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Sample records for huntingtin gene cag

  1. Correlation of CAG repeat length between the maternal and paternal allele of the Huntingtin gene: evidence for assortative mating

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    Wassink Tom

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Triplet repeats contribute to normal variation in behavioral traits and when expanded, cause brain disorders. While Huntington's Disease is known to be caused by a CAG triplet repeat in the gene Huntingtin, the effect of CAG repeats on brain function below disease threshold has not been studied. The current study shows a significant correlation between the CAG repeat length of the maternal and paternal allele in the Huntingtin gene among healthy subjects, suggesting assortative mating.

  2. HD CAGnome: a search tool for huntingtin CAG repeat length-correlated genes.

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    Ekaterina I Galkina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The length of the huntingtin (HTT CAG repeat is strongly correlated with both age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD symptoms and age at death of HD patients. Dichotomous analysis comparing HD to controls is widely used to study the effects of HTT CAG repeat expansion. However, a potentially more powerful approach is a continuous analysis strategy that takes advantage of all of the different CAG lengths, to capture effects that are expected to be critical to HD pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used continuous and dichotomous approaches to analyze microarray gene expression data from 107 human control and HD lymphoblastoid cell lines. Of all probes found to be significant in a continuous analysis by CAG length, only 21.4% were so identified by a dichotomous comparison of HD versus controls. Moreover, of probes significant by dichotomous analysis, only 33.2% were also significant in the continuous analysis. Simulations revealed that the dichotomous approach would require substantially more than 107 samples to either detect 80% of the CAG-length correlated changes revealed by continuous analysis or to reduce the rate of significant differences that are not CAG length-correlated to 20% (n = 133 or n = 206, respectively. Given the superior power of the continuous approach, we calculated the correlation structure between HTT CAG repeat lengths and gene expression levels and created a freely available searchable website, "HD CAGnome," that allows users to examine continuous relationships between HTT CAG and expression levels of ∼20,000 human genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal limitations of dichotomous approaches compared to the power of continuous analysis to study a disease where human genotype-phenotype relationships strongly support a role for a continuum of CAG length-dependent changes. The compendium of HTT CAG length-gene expression level relationships found at the HD CAGnome now provides

  3. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

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    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1.

  4. Allele-Selective Inhibition of Mutant Huntingtin Expression with Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Expanded CAG Repeat

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    Gagnon, Keith T.; Pendergraff, Hannah M.; Deleavey, Glen F.; Swayze, Eric E.; Potier, Pierre; Randolph, John; Roesch, Eric B.; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Damha, Masad J.; Bennett, C. Frank; Montaillier, Christophe; Lemaitre, Marc; Corey, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Therapeutic approaches include selectively inhibiting the expression of the mutated HTT allele while conserving function of the normal allele. We have evaluated a series of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the expanded CAG repeat within HTT mRNA for their ability to selectively inhibit expression of mutant HTT protein. Several ASOs incorporating a variety of modifications, including bridged nucleic acids and phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages, exhibited allele-selective silencing in patient-derived fibroblasts. Allele-selective ASOs did not affect the expression of other CAG repeat-containing genes and selectivity was observed in cell lines containing minimal CAG repeat lengths representative of most HD patients. Allele-selective ASOs left HTT mRNA intact and did not support ribonuclease H activity in vitro. We observed cooperative binding of multiple ASO molecules to CAG repeat-containing HTT mRNA transcripts in vitro. These results are consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition at the level of translation. ASOs targeted to the CAG repeat of HTT provide a starting point for the development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics that can inhibit gene expression with allelic discrimination in patients with HD. PMID:21028906

  5. Integrated genomics and proteomics define huntingtin CAG length-dependent networks in mice.

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    Langfelder, Peter; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Chatzopoulou, Doxa; Wang, Nan; Gao, Fuying; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Lu, Xiao-Hong; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; El-Zein, Karla; Zhao, Yining; Deverasetty, Sandeep; Tebbe, Andreas; Schaab, Christoph; Lavery, Daniel J; Howland, David; Kwak, Seung; Botas, Juan; Aaronson, Jeffrey S; Rosinski, Jim; Coppola, Giovanni; Horvath, Steve; Yang, X William

    2016-04-01

    To gain insight into how mutant huntingtin (mHtt) CAG repeat length modifies Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis, we profiled mRNA in over 600 brain and peripheral tissue samples from HD knock-in mice with increasing CAG repeat lengths. We found repeat length-dependent transcriptional signatures to be prominent in the striatum, less so in cortex, and minimal in the liver. Coexpression network analyses revealed 13 striatal and 5 cortical modules that correlated highly with CAG length and age, and that were preserved in HD models and sometimes in patients. Top striatal modules implicated mHtt CAG length and age in graded impairment in the expression of identity genes for striatal medium spiny neurons and in dysregulation of cyclic AMP signaling, cell death and protocadherin genes. We used proteomics to confirm 790 genes and 5 striatal modules with CAG length-dependent dysregulation at the protein level, and validated 22 striatal module genes as modifiers of mHtt toxicities in vivo.

  6. Targeting CAG repeat RNAs reduces Huntington’s disease phenotype independently of huntingtin levels

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    Rué, Laura; Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Creus-Muncunill, Jordi; Giralt, Albert; Alcalá-Vida, Rafael; Mentxaka, Gartze; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Aranda, Zeus; Venturi, Veronica; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a polyglutamine disorder caused by a CAG expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene exon 1. This expansion encodes a mutant protein whose abnormal function is traditionally associated with HD pathogenesis; however, recent evidence has also linked HD pathogenesis to RNA stable hairpins formed by the mutant HTT expansion. Here, we have shown that a locked nucleic acid–modified antisense oligonucleotide complementary to the CAG repeat (LNA-CTG) preferentially binds to mutant HTT without affecting HTT mRNA or protein levels. LNA-CTGs produced rapid and sustained improvement of motor deficits in an R6/2 mouse HD model that was paralleled by persistent binding of LNA-CTG to the expanded HTT exon 1 transgene. Motor improvement was accompanied by a pronounced recovery in the levels of several striatal neuronal markers severely impaired in R6/2 mice. Furthermore, in R6/2 mice, LNA-CTG blocked several pathogenic mechanisms caused by expanded CAG RNA, including small RNA toxicity and decreased Rn45s expression levels. These results suggest that LNA-CTGs promote neuroprotection by blocking the detrimental activity of CAG repeats within HTT mRNA. The present data emphasize the relevance of expanded CAG RNA to HD pathogenesis, indicate that inhibition of HTT expression is not required to reverse motor deficits, and further suggest a therapeutic potential for LNA-CTG in polyglutamine disorders. PMID:27721240

  7. Genetic background modifies nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and HD CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

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    Lloret, Alejandro; Dragileva, Ella; Teed, Allison; Espinola, Janice; Fossale, Elisa; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2006-06-15

    Genetically precise models of Huntington's disease (HD), Hdh CAG knock-in mice, are powerful systems in which phenotypes associated with expanded HD CAG repeats are studied. To dissect the genetic pathways that underlie such phenotypes, we have generated Hdh(Q111) knock-in mouse lines that are congenic for C57BL/6, FVB/N and 129Sv inbred genetic backgrounds and investigated four Hdh(Q111) phenotypes in these three genetic backgrounds: the intergenerational instability of the HD CAG repeat and the striatal-specific somatic HD CAG repeat expansion, nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and intranuclear inclusion formation. Our results reveal increased intergenerational and somatic instability of the HD CAG repeat in C57BL/6 and FVB/N backgrounds compared with the 129Sv background. The accumulation of nuclear mutant huntingtin and the formation of intranuclear inclusions were fastest in the C57BL/6 background, slowest in the 129Sv background and intermediate in the FVB/N background. Inbred strain-specific differences were independent of constitutive HD CAG repeat size and did not correlate with Hdh mRNA levels. These data provide evidence for genetic modifiers of both intergenerational HD CAG repeat instability and striatal-specific phenotypes. Different relative contributions of C57BL/6 and 129Sv genetic backgrounds to the onset of nuclear mutant huntingtin and somatic HD CAG repeat expansion predict that the initiation of each of these two phenotypes is modified by different genes. Our findings set the stage for defining disease-related genetic pathways that will ultimately provide insight into disease mechanism.

  8. Msh2 acts in medium-spiny striatal neurons as an enhancer of CAG instability and mutant huntingtin phenotypes in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

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    Kovalenko, Marina; Dragileva, Ella; St Claire, Jason; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; New, Jaclyn; Dong, Hualing; Kucherlapati, Raju; Kucherlapati, Melanie H; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2012-01-01

    The CAG trinucleotide repeat mutation in the Huntington's disease gene (HTT) exhibits age-dependent tissue-specific expansion that correlates with disease onset in patients, implicating somatic expansion as a disease modifier and potential therapeutic target. Somatic HTT CAG expansion is critically dependent on proteins in the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. To gain further insight into mechanisms of somatic expansion and the relationship of somatic expansion to the disease process in selectively vulnerable MSNs we have crossed HTT CAG knock-in mice (HdhQ111) with mice carrying a conditional (floxed) Msh2 allele and D9-Cre transgenic mice, in which Cre recombinase is expressed specifically in MSNs within the striatum. Deletion of Msh2 in MSNs eliminated Msh2 protein in those neurons. We demonstrate that MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 was sufficient to eliminate the vast majority of striatal HTT CAG expansions in HdhQ111 mice. Furthermore, MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 modified two mutant huntingtin phenotypes: the early nuclear localization of diffusely immunostaining mutant huntingtin was slowed; and the later development of intranuclear huntingtin inclusions was dramatically inhibited. Therefore, Msh2 acts within MSNs as a genetic enhancer both of somatic HTT CAG expansions and of HTT CAG-dependent phenotypes in mice. These data suggest that the selective vulnerability of MSNs may be at least in part contributed by the propensity for somatic expansion in these neurons, and imply that intervening in the expansion process is likely to have therapeutic benefit.

  9. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial DNA deletions: event or regular mechanism for mutant huntingtin protein and CAG repeats expansion?!

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    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Houshmand, Massoud; Panahi, Mehdi Shafa Shariat; Shariati, Parvin; Rostami, Maryam; Manshadi, Masoumeh Dehghan; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh

    2007-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory chain complex activities in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). Research studies were conducted to determine the possible levels of mitochondrial defect (deletion) in HD patients and consideration of interaction between the expanded Huntingtin gene as a nuclear gene and mitochondria as a cytoplasmic organelle. To determine mtDNA damage, we investigated deletions based in four areas of mitochondrial DNA, in a group of 60 Iranian patients clinically diagnosed with HD and 70 healthy controls. A total of 41 patients out of 60 had CAG expansion (group A). About 19 patients did not show expansion but had the clinical symptoms of HD (group B). MtDNA deletions were classified into four groups according to size; 9 kb, 7.5 kb, 7 kb, and 5 kb. We found one of the four-mtDNA deletions in at least 90% of samples. Multiple deletions have also been observed in 63% of HD patients. None of the normal control (group C) showed mtDNA deletions. The sizes or locations of the deletions did not show a clear correlation with expanded CAG repeat and age in our samples. The study presented evidence that HD patients had higher frequencies of mtDNA deletions in lymphocytes in comparison to the controls. It is thus proposed that CAG repeats instability and mutant Htt are causative factor in mtDNA damage.

  10. Msh2 acts in medium-spiny striatal neurons as an enhancer of CAG instability and mutant huntingtin phenotypes in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

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    Marina Kovalenko

    Full Text Available The CAG trinucleotide repeat mutation in the Huntington's disease gene (HTT exhibits age-dependent tissue-specific expansion that correlates with disease onset in patients, implicating somatic expansion as a disease modifier and potential therapeutic target. Somatic HTT CAG expansion is critically dependent on proteins in the mismatch repair (MMR pathway. To gain further insight into mechanisms of somatic expansion and the relationship of somatic expansion to the disease process in selectively vulnerable MSNs we have crossed HTT CAG knock-in mice (HdhQ111 with mice carrying a conditional (floxed Msh2 allele and D9-Cre transgenic mice, in which Cre recombinase is expressed specifically in MSNs within the striatum. Deletion of Msh2 in MSNs eliminated Msh2 protein in those neurons. We demonstrate that MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 was sufficient to eliminate the vast majority of striatal HTT CAG expansions in HdhQ111 mice. Furthermore, MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 modified two mutant huntingtin phenotypes: the early nuclear localization of diffusely immunostaining mutant huntingtin was slowed; and the later development of intranuclear huntingtin inclusions was dramatically inhibited. Therefore, Msh2 acts within MSNs as a genetic enhancer both of somatic HTT CAG expansions and of HTT CAG-dependent phenotypes in mice. These data suggest that the selective vulnerability of MSNs may be at least in part contributed by the propensity for somatic expansion in these neurons, and imply that intervening in the expansion process is likely to have therapeutic benefit.

  11. Unbiased gene expression analysis implicates the huntingtin polyglutamine tract in extra-mitochondrial energy metabolism.

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    Jong-Min Lee

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease (HD CAG repeat, encoding a polymorphic glutamine tract in huntingtin, is inversely correlated with cellular energy level, with alleles over approximately 37 repeats leading to the loss of striatal neurons. This early HD neuronal specificity can be modeled by respiratory chain inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP and, like 3-NP, mutant huntingtin has been proposed to directly influence the mitochondrion, via interaction or decreased PGC-1alpha expression. We have tested this hypothesis by comparing the gene expression changes due to mutant huntingtin accurately expressed in STHdh(Q111/Q111 cells with the changes produced by 3-NP treatment of wild-type striatal cells. In general, the HD mutation did not mimic 3-NP, although both produced a state of energy collapse that was mildly alleviated by the PGC-1alpha-coregulated nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1. Moreover, unlike 3-NP, the HD CAG repeat did not significantly alter mitochondrial pathways in STHdh(Q111/Q111 cells, despite decreased Ppargc1a expression. Instead, the HD mutation enriched for processes linked to huntingtin normal function and Nf-kappaB signaling. Thus, rather than a direct impact on the mitochondrion, the polyglutamine tract may modulate some aspect of huntingtin's activity in extra-mitochondrial energy metabolism. Elucidation of this HD CAG-dependent pathway would spur efforts to achieve energy-based therapeutics in HD.

  12. Depletion of Cognate Charged Transfer RNA Causes Translational Frameshifting within the Expanded CAG Stretch in Huntingtin

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    Hannah Girstmair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD, a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ repeat in huntingtin (Htt, displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNAGln-CUG that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNAGln-CUG. The concentration of tRNAGln-CUG also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  13. Depletion of cognate charged transfer RNA causes translational frameshifting within the expanded CAG stretch in huntingtin.

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    Girstmair, Hannah; Saffert, Paul; Rode, Sascha; Czech, Andreas; Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-01-31

    Huntington disease (HD), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in huntingtin (Htt), displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNA)(Gln-CUG) that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNA(Gln-CUG). The concentration of tRNA(Gln-CUG) also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  14. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original...

  15. Mutant huntingtin gene-dose impacts on aggregate deposition, DARPP32 expression and neuroinflammation in HdhQ150 mice.

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    Douglas Young

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant, progressive and fatal neurological disorder caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in exon-1 of the huntingtin gene. The encoded poly-glutamine stretch renders mutant huntingtin prone to aggregation. HdhQ150 mice genocopy a pathogenic repeat (∼150 CAGs in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene and model predominantly pre-manifest HD. Treating early is likely important to prevent or delay HD, and HdhQ150 mice may be useful to assess therapeutic strategies targeting pre-manifest HD. This requires appropriate markers and here we demonstrate, that pre-symptomatic HdhQ150 mice show several dramatic mutant huntingtin gene-dose dependent pathological changes including: (i an increase of neuronal intra-nuclear inclusions (NIIs in brain, (ii an increase of extra-nuclear aggregates in dentate gyrus, (iii a decrease of DARPP32 protein and (iv an increase in glial markers of neuroinflammation, which curiously did not correlate with local neuronal mutant huntingtin inclusion-burden. HdhQ150 mice developed NIIs also in all retinal neuron cell-types, demonstrating that retinal NIIs are not specific to human exon-1 R6 HD mouse models. Taken together, the striking and robust mutant huntingtin gene-dose related changes in aggregate-load, DARPP32 levels and glial activation markers should greatly facilitate future testing of therapeutic strategies in the HdhQ150 HD mouse model.

  16. Unusual structures are present in DNA fragments containing super-long Huntingtin CAG repeats.

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    Daniel Duzdevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD, expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM. As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: "Super-long" CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD.

  17. Late-onset Huntington disease with intermediate CAG repeats: true or false?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J.L.; de Bie, R.M.A.; Foncke, E.M.J.; Roos, R.A.C.; Leenders, K.L.; Tijssen, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the huntingtin gene. 'Intermediate alleles' with 27 to 35 CAG repeats generally do not cause HD but are unstable upon germ-line transmission. Insights in CAG repeat mosaicism and en

  18. Late-onset Huntington disease with intermediate CAG repeats : true or false?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Justus L.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the huntingtin gene. 'Intermediate alleles' with 27 to 35 CAG repeats generally do not cause HD but are unstable upon germ-line transmission. Insights in CAG repeat mosaicism and en

  19. Frequency of nuclear mutant huntingtin inclusion formation in neurons and glia is cell-type-specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Anne H P; van Hal, Maurik; Op den Kelder, Ilse C; Meier, Romy T; de Ruiter, Anna-Aster; Schut, Menno H; Smith, Donna L; Grit, Corien; Brouwer, Nieske; Kamphuis, Willem; Boddeke, H W G M; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; van Roon, Willeke M C; Bates, Gillian P; Hol, Elly M; Reits, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a CAG expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene, leading to HTT inclusion formation in the brain. The mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) is ubiquitously expressed and therefore nuclear inclusions cou

  20. Mutant huntingtin activates Nrf2-responsive genes and impairs dopamine synthesis in a PC12 model of Huntington's disease

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    den Dunnen Johan T

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD or Huntington's disease gene. Although micro array studies on patient and animal tissue provide valuable information, the primary effect of mutant huntingtin will inevitably be masked by secondary processes in advanced stages of the disease. Thus, cell models are instrumental to study early, direct effects of mutant huntingtin. mRNA changes were studied in an inducible PC12 model of Huntington's disease, before and after aggregates became visible, to identify groups of genes that could play a role in the early pathology of Huntington's disease. Results Before aggregation, up-regulation of gene expression predominated, while after aggregates became visible, down-regulation and up-regulation occurred to the same extent. After aggregates became visible there was a down-regulation of dopamine biosynthesis genes accompanied by down-regulation of dopamine levels in culture, indicating the utility of this model to identify functionally relevant pathways. Furthermore, genes of the anti-oxidant Nrf2-ARE pathway were up-regulated, possibly as a protective mechanism. In parallel, we discovered alterations in genes which may result in increased oxidative stress and damage. Conclusion Up-regulation of gene expression may be more important in HD pathology than previously appreciated. In addition, given the pathogenic impact of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway constitutes a new attractive therapeutic target for HD.

  1. Potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Huntington disease gene / allele-specific silencing of mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Southwell, Amber L;

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG-expansion in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in a toxic gain of function in the mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). Reducing the expression of mHTT is therefore an attractive therapy for HD. However, wild......-type HTT protein is essential for development and has critical roles in maintaining neuronal health. Therapies for HD that reduce wild-type HTT may therefore generate unintended negative consequences. We have identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets in the human HD population for the disease......-specific targeting of the HTT gene. Using primary cells from patients with HD and the transgenic YAC18 and BACHD mouse lines, we developed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) molecules that potently and selectively silence mHTT at both exonic and intronic SNP sites. Modification of these ASOs with S-constrained-ethyl (c...

  2. Huntingtin-lowering strategies in Huntington's disease: antisense oligonucleotides, small RNAs, and gene editing.

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    Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-09-15

    The idea to lower mutant huntingtin is especially appealing in Huntington's disease (HD). It is autosomal dominant, so that expression of the mutant allele causes the disease. Advances in RNA and gene regulation provide foundations for the huntingtin gene (both normal and mutant alleles) and possibly the mutant allele only. There is much preclinical animal work to support the concept of gene and RNA silencing, but, to date, no clinical studies have been attempted in HD. Preventing expression of mutant huntingtin protein is at the cusp for a human trial. Antisense oligonucleotides delivered to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been well tolerated; small RNAs administered to rodent and nonhuman primate brain knocked down huntingtin messenger RNA (mRNA); short-hairpin complementary DNA of microRNAs can be expressed in adeno-associated virus to provide long-term silencing of huntingtin mRNA and protein. We expect that these approaches will be ready for clinical studies in the near future, once safety has been validated. Our understanding of gene editing-changing the huntingtin gene itself-is rapidly progressing. Harnessing our knowledge of transcription and translation should push scientific creativity to new and exciting advances that overcome the lethality of the mutant gene in HD. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin–based polyglutamine core

    OpenAIRE

    Hoop, Cody L.; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M.; Boatz, Jennifer C.; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a devastating and incurable inherited neurodegenerative disease. Like at least eight other diseases, its primary genetic cause is the CAG repeat expansion in a specific gene. Mutant huntingtin protein undergoes misfolding and aggregation, causing degeneration of neurons through as-yet poorly understood mechanisms. Attempts to characterize the implicated protein deposits have until now had limited success. We present our structural studies of mutant huntingtin-derived p...

  4. Relationship between gastric disease and deletion of cag pathogenicity island genes of Helicobacter pylori in gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Osamu; Murakami, Masami; Araki, Osamu; Yamada, Takuro; Tomizawa, Sayaka; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Minashi, Keiko; Maeda, Masaki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Mori, Masatomo

    2003-01-01

    The cag pathogenicity island genes of Helicobacter pylori (ie, cag1, cag5, cagT, cagE, and cagA) were detected by PCR in DNA extracted from endoscopically collected gastric juice, and the relationship between these genes and gastric disease was studied in 25 patients with early gastric cancer, 9 patients with gastric ulcer, and 15 patients with chronic active gastritis. In three patients with early gastric cancer and one patient with gastric ulcer, cag pathogenicity island genes were amplified although H. pylori was not detected by conventional methods. Compared with conventional methods, the sensitivity of detection of cag genes was 92.3% (36/39) and the specificity was 60% (6/10). Among the patients with cagA amplification, only cagE was not amplified in one case each with early cancer and chronic active gastritis. In addition, none of cag1, cag5, cagT, and cagE were amplified in spite of cagA amplification in one patient with gastric ulcer. This method is a simple procedure, has a high sensitivity, and appears to be useful for accurate assessment of infection with cagA-positive strains. Because deletion of cag PAI genes was found in the patients with all three gastric diseases that we studied, it was suggested that the pathogenicity of H. pylori might not be determined by cag PAI genes in those cases.

  5. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of 2 148-bp fragment from cagA gene and detection of cagA gene, CagA protein in Helicobacter pyloriisolates and its antibody in sera of patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yan; Yuan Wang; Shi-He Shao; Ya-Fei Mao; Hua-Wen Li; Yi-Hui Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a prokaryotic expression system of a Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) cagA gene fragment and establish enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for detecting CagA and its antibody, so as to understand the manner in which the infection of CagA-expressing H pylori (CagA+ H pylori) isolates cause diseases.METHODS: H pylori strains in gastric biopsy specimens from 156 patients with positive results in rapid urease test were isolated. PCR was used to detect the frequency of cagA gene in the 109 H pylori isolates and to amplify a 2 148-bp fragment (cagA1) of cagA gene from a clinical strain Y06. A prokaryotic expression system of cagA1 gene was constructed,and the expression of the target recombinant protein (rCagA1) was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting and immunodiffusion assay were employed to determine the immunoreactivity and antigenicity of rCagA1, respectively.Two ELISAs were established to detect CagA expression in 109 H pylori isolates and the presence of CagA antibody in the corresponding patients′ sera, and the correlations between infection with CagA+ H pylori and gastritis as well as peptic ulcer were analyzed.RESULTS: Of all the clinical specimens obtained, 80.8%(126/156) were found to have H pylori isolates and 97.2%of the isolates (106/109) were positive for caaA gene. In comparison with the reported data, the cloned cagA1fragment possessed 94.83% and 93.30% homologies with the nucleotide and putative amino acid sequences,respectively. The output of rCagA1 produced by the constructed recombinant prokaryotic expression system was approximately 30% of the total bacterial protein, rCagA1was able to bind to the commercial antibody against the whole-cells of H pylori and to induce the immunized rabbits to produce antibody with an immunodiffusion titer of 1:4. A proportion as high as 92.6% of the H pylori isolates (101/109)expressed CagA and 88.1% of the patients′ serum samples (96/109) were CagA antibody-positive. The percentage of

  6. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs); however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice) to those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice) and littermate wildtype controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2(Q300) mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding, and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b, and Pfdn5 in R6/2(Q300) mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e., 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice

  7. CCG polymorphisms in the huntingtin gene have no effect on the pathogenesis of patients with Huntington's disease in mainland Chinese families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-rong; Tian, Jun; Yan, Ya-ping; Yin, Xin-zhen; Zhao, Guo-hua; Wu, Zhi-ying; Gu, Wei-hong; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-sha

    2012-01-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene (HTT). The adjacent proline-rich region, which also has a CCG polymorphism among people of different races, may also affect the pathogenesis of HD. To study the effect of this polymorphism on patients with HD in mainland China, 53 HD mutant alleles were examined. The results showed that 54.72% of the HD mutant alleles had 10-repeat alleles, and the remaining 45.28% had 7-repeat alleles. Moreover, comparison of the clinical features between the two groups revealed no significant difference. We also investigated its effect on the aggregates in vitro. No significant difference was detected when the morphology and size of the aggregates with the two polymorphisms was compared in cells. Given these findings, it was quite reasonable to suppose that the CCG polymorphism may not influence the pathogenesis of patients with HD in mainland China.

  8. Polymorphic CAG Repeat and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Bing; Tang, Qingchao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Muhammad, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-04-01

    Although somatic alterations in CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to colorectal cancer, less is known about AR in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. Because of lack of relevant analysis on CAG repeat length and AR expression in colorectal cancer, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of polymorphic CAG and protein expression of the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer. A case-control study was carried out on 550 patients with colorectal cancer and 540 healthy controls to investigate whether polymorphic CAG within the AR gene is linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer. Polymorphic CAG and AR expression were analyzed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathologic and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. The study showed that the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer had a longer CAG repeat sequence than those in the control group, as well as increased risk for colorectal cancer among females (P = 0.013), males (P = 0.002), and total colorectal cancer population (P CAG repeat sequence among males (P CAG repeat sequence and negative AR expression were associated with a short 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in colorectal cancer. Long CAG repeat sequences and the absence of AR expression were closely related to the development of colorectal cancer. Both long CAG and decreased AR expression were correlated with the poor 5-year OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  9. CAG Repeat Number in the Androgen Receptor Gene and Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjunkova, S; Eftimov, A; Georgiev, V; Petrovski, D; Dimovski, Aj; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men. The effects of androgens on prostatic tissue are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The 5' end of exon 1 of the AR gene includes a polymorphic CAG triplet repeat that numbers between 10 to 36 in the normal population. The length of the CAG repeats is inversely related to the transactivation function of the AR gene. There is controversy over association between short CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene and PC. This retrospective case-control study evaluates the possible effect of short CAG repeats on the AR gene in prostate cancer risk in Macedonian males. A total of 392 male subjects, 134 PC patients, 106 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 152 males from the general Macedonian population were enrolled in this study. The CAG repeat length was determined by fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of exon1 of the AR gene followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) on a genetic analyzer. The mean repeat length in PC patients was 21.5 ± 2.65, in controls 22.28 ± 2.86 (p = 0.009) and in BPH patients 22.1 ± 2.52 (p = 0.038). Short CAG repeats (CAG repeat (CAG repeat length. These results suggest that reduced CAG repeat length may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk in Macedonian men.

  10. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.

    2003-01-01

    or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...... of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...

  11. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.;

    2003-01-01

    of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...... or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...

  12. Design, Characterization, and Lead Selection of Therapeutic miRNAs Targeting Huntingtin for Development of Gene Therapy for Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniarikova, Jana; Zanella, Ilaria; Huseinovic, Angelina; van der Zon, Tom; Hanemaaijer, Evelyn; Martier, Raygene; Koornneef, Annemart; Southwell, Amber L; Hayden, Michael R; van Deventer, Sander J; Petry, Harald; Konstantinova, Pavlina

    2016-03-22

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by accumulation of CAG expansions in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Hence, decreasing the expression of mutated HTT (mtHTT) is the most upstream approach for treatment of HD. We have developed HTT gene-silencing approaches based on expression cassette-optimized artificial miRNAs (miHTTs). In the first approach, total silencing of wild-type and mtHTT was achieved by targeting exon 1. In the second approach, allele-specific silencing was induced by targeting the heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs362331 in exon 50 or rs362307 in exon 67 linked to mtHTT. The miHTT expression cassette was optimized by embedding anti-HTT target sequences in ten pri-miRNA scaffolds and their HTT knockdown efficacy, allele selectivity, passenger strand activity, and processing patterns were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, three scaffolds expressing miH12 targeting exon 1 were incorporated in an adeno-associated viral serotype 5 (AAV5) vector and their HTT knock-down efficiency and pre-miHTT processing were compared in the humanized transgenic Hu128/21 HD mouse model. Our data demonstrate strong allele-selective silencing of mtHTT by miSNP50 targeting rs362331 and total HTT silencing by miH12 both in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, we show that HTT knock-down efficiency and guide strand processing can be enhanced by using different cellular pri-miRNA scaffolds.

  13. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG repeat alleles in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Keagle, Pamela; Gillis, Tammy; Lowe, Patrick; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Leclerc, Ashley Lyn; Ratti, Antonia; Ticozzi, Nicola; Gellera, Cinzia; Gusella, James F; Silani, Vincenzo; Alonso, Isabel; Brown, Robert H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Landers, John E

    2012-05-01

    A higher prevalence of intermediate ataxin-2 CAG repeats in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients has raised the possibility that CAG expansions in other polyglutamine disease genes could contribute to ALS neurodegeneration. We sought to determine whether expansions of the CAG repeat of the HTT gene that causes Huntington's disease, are associated with ALS. We compared the HTT CAG repeat length on a total of 3144 chromosomes from 1572 sporadic ALS patients and 4007 control chromosomes, and also tested its possible effects on ALS-specific parameters, such as age and site of onset and survival rate. Our results show that the CAG repeat in the HTT gene is not a risk factor for ALS nor modifies its clinical presentation. These findings suggest that distinct neuronal degeneration processes are involved in these two different neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. CAG Repeat Number in the Androgen Receptor Gene and Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Madjunkova, S.; Eftimov, A.; Georgiev, V.; Petrovski, D; Dimovski, AJ; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men. The effects of androgens on prostatic tissue are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The 5′ end of exon 1 of the AR gene includes a polymorphic CAG triplet repeat that numbers between 10 to 36 in the normal population. The length of the CAG repeats is inversely related to the transactivation function of the AR gene. There is controversy over association between short CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene and PC. Th...

  15. Studies of the CAG repeat in the Machado-Joseph disease gene in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, M; Tsai, H F; Lu, T M; Yang, C Y; Wu, H M; Li, S Y

    1997-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs associated in varying degrees with a dystonic-rigid extrapyramidal syndrome or peripheral amyotrophy. Unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the MJD gene on the long arm of chromosome 14 has been identified as the pathological mutation for MJD. While investigating the distribution of CAG repeat lengths of the MJD gene in Taiwan's population, we have identified 18 MJD-affected patients and 12 at-risk individuals in seven families. In addition, we have analyzed the range of CAG repeat lengths in 96 control individuals. The CAG repeat number ranged from 13 to 44 in the controls and 72-85 in the affected and at-risk individuals. Our results indicated that the CAG repeat number was inversely correlated with the age of onset. The differences in CAG repeat length between parent and child and between siblings are greater with paternal transmission than maternal transmission. Our data show a tendency towards the phenomenon of anticipation in the MJD families but do not support unidirectional expansion of CAG repeats during transmission. We also demonstrated that PCR amplification of the CAG repeats in the MJD gene from villous DNA was possible and might prove useful as a diagnostic tool for affected families in the future.

  16. Variation in CAG and GGN repeat lengths and CAG/GGN haplotype in androgen receptor gene polymorphism and prostate carcinoma in Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, O; Gromoll, J; Simoni, M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer has become the most common cancer in Nigerian men. The growth of the prostate gland depends on circulating androgens and intracellular steroid signalling pathways. The effects of androgens are mediated through the androgen receptor (AR), a nuclear transcription factor encoded by the AR gene. The common polymorphisms, CAG and GGN repeats, in exon 1 of this gene have been implicated as possible risk factors. Thus far, existing supporting data are scanty and none are from sub-Saharan African populations. Therefore, this study investigates the possible association between AR polymorphism repeat length (CAG and GGN) and prostate cancer in Nigerians. A total of 261 subjects (70 with prostate cancer, 68 with benign prostate hyperplasia [BPH], 123 age-matched apparently normal subjects as controls) were studied. CAG and GGN repeats length were determined by fragment length analysis using GeneScan. The CAG repeat length in prostate cancer and in BPH compared to the controls was significantly different (P CAG repeats showing a significant odds ratio (OR) in both cases. However, this was not observed in GGN repeat length, which showed no significant difference between cases and controls (P > 0.05). CAG and GGN haplotype variation showed no significant difference between cases and controls (P > 0.05), except that the haplotypes CAG > or =21 and GGN CAG repeat length is a risk factor for prostate cancer, and also suggests an association with BPH.

  17. PACSIN 1 interacts with huntingtin and is absent from synaptic varicosities in presymptomatic Huntington's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modregger, Jan; DiProspero, Nicholas A; Charles, Vinod; Tagle, Danilo A; Plomann, Markus

    2002-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a pathological expansion of a CAG repeat in the first exon of the gene coding for huntingtin, resulting in an abnormally long polyglutamine stretch. Despite its widespread expression, mutant huntingtin leads to selective neuronal loss in the striatum and cortex. Here we report that the neurospecific phosphoprotein PACSIN 1, which has been implicated as playing a central role in synaptic vesicle recycling, interacts with huntingtin via its C-terminal SH3 domain. Moreover, two other isoforms, PACSIN 2 and 3, which show a wider tissue distribution including the brain, do not interact with huntingtin despite a highly conserved SH3 domain. Furthermore, this interaction is repeat-length-dependent and is enhanced with mutant huntingtin, possibly causing the sequestration of PACSIN 1. Normally, PACSIN 1 is located along neurites and within synaptic boutons, but in HD patient neurons, there is a progressive loss of PACSIN 1 immunostaining in synaptic varicosities, beginning in presymptomatic and early-stage HD. Further, PACSIN 1 immunostaining of HD patient tissue reveals a more cytoplasmic distribution of the protein, with particular concentration in the perinuclear region coincident with mutant huntingtin. Thus, the specific interaction of huntingtin with the neuronal PACSIN isoform, PACSIN 1, and its altered intracellular distribution in pathological tissue, together with the observed differences in the binding behavior, suggest a role for PACSIN 1 during early stages of the selective neuropathology of HD.

  18. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world's population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature.

  19. Genes and pathways affected by CAG-repeat RNA-based toxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Shin-Yi; Bonini, Nancy M

    2011-12-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is one of the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, which are caused by a CAG-repeat expansion within the coding region of the associated genes. The CAG repeat specifies glutamine, and the expanded polyQ domain mutation confers dominant toxicity on the protein. Traditionally, studies have focused on protein toxicity in polyQ disease mechanisms. Recent findings, however, demonstrate that the CAG-repeat RNA, which encodes the toxic polyQ protein, also contributes to the disease in Drosophila. To provide insights into the nature of the RNA toxicity, we extracted brain-enriched RNA from flies expressing a toxic CAG-repeat mRNA (CAG100) and a non-toxic interrupted CAA/G mRNA repeat (CAA/G105) for microarray analysis. This approach identified 160 genes that are differentially expressed specifically in CAG100 flies. Functional annotation clustering analysis revealed several broad ontologies enriched in the CAG100 gene list, including iron ion binding and nucleotide binding. Intriguingly, transcripts for the Hsp70 genes, a powerful suppressor of polyQ and other human neurodegenerative diseases, were also upregulated. We therefore tested and showed that upregulation of heat shock protein 70 mitigates CAG-repeat RNA toxicity. We then assessed whether other modifiers of the pathogenic, expanded Ataxin-3 polyQ protein could also modify the CAG-repeat RNA toxicity. This approach identified the co-chaperone Tpr2, the transcriptional regulator Dpld, and the RNA-binding protein Orb2 as modifiers of both polyQ protein toxicity and CAG-repeat RNA-based toxicity. These findings suggest an overlap in the mechanisms of RNA and protein-based toxicity, providing insights into the pathogenicity of the RNA in polyQ disease.

  20. Cloning and sequencing of cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori with coccoid form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Xue-Feng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and sequence the cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) with coccoid form.METHODS: H pylori strain NCTC11637 were transformed to coccoid form by exposure to antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations. The coccoid H pyloriwas collected. cagA gene of the coccoid H pylori strain was amplified by PCR.After purified, the target fragment was cloned into plasmid pMD-18T. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was transformed into E. coli JM109. Positive clones were screened and identified by PCR and digestion with restriction endonucleases. The sequence of inserted fragment was then analysed.RESULTS: cagA gene of 3 444 bp was obtained from the coccoid H pylori genome DNA. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was constructed, then it was digested by BamH Ⅰ+Sac Ⅰ, and the product of digestion was identical with the predicted one. Sequence analysis showed that the homology of coccoid and the reported original sequence H pylori was 99.7%.CONCLUSION: The recombinant plasmid containing cagA gene from coccoid H pylori has been constructed successfully.The coccoid H pylori contain completed cagA gene, which may be related to pathogenicity of them.

  1. CAG repeat length in androgen receptor gene is not associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruson, A; Sambataro, F; Querin, G; D'Ascenzo, C; Palmieri, A; Agostini, J; Gaiani, A; Angelini, C; Galbiati, M; Poletti, A; Pennuto, M; Pegoraro, E; Clementi, M; Soraru, G

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies show higher prevalence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in males than in females and more severe lesions in androgen receptor (AR)-expressing tissues. The AR gene contains a polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeat, whose expansion over a certain threshold is toxic to motor neurons, causing spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). We tested the hypothesis that the AR CAG repeat linked to SBMA is a risk factor for ALS. We analyzed AR CAG expansions in 336 patients with ALS and 100 controls. We found a negative association of AR CAG expansions with ALS susceptibility, clinical presentation, and survival. Our findings do not support a role of the AR CAG repeat length in ALS. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  2. Shorter CAG repeat in the AR gene is associated with atypical hyperplasia and breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Abreu, Francine Blumental; Pirolo, Leandro Júnior; Canevari, Renata de Azevedo

    2007-01-01

    -based GeneScan analysis was used to investigate the [CAG]n repeat length at exon 1 of the AR gene in 59 benign breast lesions (27 fibroadenomas, 18 atypical hyperplasias, and 14 hyperplasias without atypia) and 54 ductal breast carcinomas. Seventy-two cancer-free women were used as a control group....... In addition, [CAG]n repeats were evaluated for the presence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in a subset of these samples (27 fibroadenomas, 14 hyperplasias without atypia and 22 breast carcinomas). RESULTS: Shorter [CAG]n repeat lengths were strongly correlated...

  3. CAG repeat length in androgen receptor gene and male infertility in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaad, Y M; Shahin, D; Elkholy, A A-M; Mosbah, A; Badawy, W

    2012-02-01

    The CAG repeat and its association with infertility has been debatable. Therefore, this study was planned to assess the distribution of CAG repeat expansion in Egyptian patients and to investigate its association with male infertility. Forty-five infertile men were eligible for the study in addition to 20 aged-matched fertile males as control. Semen analysis, scrotal sonography, assay of serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH), and determination of the CAG repeat number within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene were carried out. Statistically significant difference was found between infertile and control groups regarding sperm count, sperm motility, serum FSH level and CAG repeats (P CAG repeats (P = 1.0) was found between oligozoospermic and asthenospermic groups; negative correlation was found between CAG repeat length and sperm count, and a positive correlation was found between CAG repeat length and serum FSH (P CAG repeat may be associated with lower AR function with derangement of sperm production, and this may contribute to male infertility in Egyptian men.

  4. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genes in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, Timothy N; Asmah, Richard H; Aidoo, Ebenezer K; Wiredu, Edwin K; Gyasi, Richard K; Adjei, David N; Beleza, Sandra; Bayliss, Christopher D; Krogfelt, Karen

    2017-06-27

    Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent in Ghana. The development of gastro-duodenal disease is dependent on virulence of the infecting strain, host susceptibility and environmental factors. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA strains induce more inflammation, ulceration and oncogenesis. Here, for the first time we present data on H. pylori cagA and vacA genes and their association with gastro-duodenal disease in Ghana. A total of 159 patients with dyspepsia at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, were investigated for H. pylori with urease-CLO, of which 113 (71.1%) were positive. Genomic DNA was extracted from antral biopsies using QIAGEN DNeasy kit. Detection of H. pylori vacA and cagA genes were determined by PCR as previously described. In total, 110 (69.2%) vacAs1, 71 (44.7%) vacAm1, 35 (22.0%) vacAm2, 77 (48.4%) cagA-(hydrophilic region) and 109 (68.6%) cagA-(internal duplication region) were detected. In multivariate analysis, duodenal ulcer was more likely than other diagnoses to have detectable cagA-(hydrophilic region) (OR 3.1 CI 1.2-7.9) or vacAs1m1 (OR 6.5 CI 1.2-34.0). Majority of biopsies were colonized with H. pylori harboring both cagA and vacA. H. pylori cagA-(internal duplication region) was more prevalent than cagA-(hydrophilic region). Duodenal ulcer was more likely than other diagnoses to have detectable cagA-(hydrophilic region) or vacAs1m1.

  5. Polymorphic CAG and GGC repeat lengths in the androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer risk: analysis of a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, Brasil; Koff, Walter J; Biolchi, Vanderlei; Brenner, Cleber; Biolo, Karlo D; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Brum, Ilma S

    2008-02-01

    Variations in transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) are related to polymorphic CAG and GGC repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene. We investigated the association between CAG and GGC repeat length and the risk of prostate cancer in a case-control study from a Brazilian population. We evaluated 49 patients and 51 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and the AR gene was analyzed by fragment analysis (GeneMapper software, Applied Biosystems, Foster City, California, USA). CAG and GGC mean lengths were not different between cases and controls. The risk for prostate cancer was higher for CAG repeats repeat lengths (CAG + GGC) repeats ( 17) were not associated with risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.13 [95% CI 0.47-2.75]). In conclusion, fewer number of CAG repeats and total repeats (CAG + GGC) in the AR gene may be associated with increased risk for prostate cancer.

  6. Genes and pathways affected by CAG-repeat RNA-based toxicity in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Shin-Yi; Bonini, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is one of the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, which are caused by a CAG-repeat expansion within the coding region of the associated genes. The CAG repeat specifies glutamine, and the expanded polyQ domain mutation confers dominant toxicity on the protein. Traditionally, studies have focused on protein toxicity in polyQ disease mechanisms. Recent findings, however, demonstrate that the CAG-repeat RNA, which encodes the toxic polyQ protein, also contributes to the ...

  7. CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene of SBMA patients and a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułek, Anna; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Krysa, Wioletta; Szirkowiec, Walentyna; Fidziańska, Elzbieta; Zaremba, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked form of motor neuron disease characterized by progressive atrophy of the muscles, dysphagia, dysarthria and mild androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a Polish control group (n = 150) and patients suspected of SBMA (n = 60). Normal and abnormal ranges of CAG repeats were established in the control group and in 21 patients whose clinical diagnosis of SBMA was molecularly confirmed. The ranges are similar to those reported for other populations.

  8. Reduced CAG repeats length in androgen receptor gene is associated with violent criminal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Pandu, Guguluth; Sharma, J D; Gandhi, K P C; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2008-09-01

    Androgens mediate their functions through androgen receptors (AR). The two triplet repeats in the AR gene (CAG and GGN) are highly polymorphic among various populations and have been extensively studied in diverse clinical conditions and antisocial personality disorders. Several studies have reported either higher levels of testosterone among rapists or the correlation of shorter CAG repeats with criminal activities. However, to date, no study has analyzed AR gene in rapists worldwide, and no study has been conducted on criminals from Indian subcontinent. Therefore, we have analyzed the AR-CAG repeat length in 645 men, of which 241 were convicted for rape, 107 for murder, 26 for both murder and rape, and 271 were control males. The aim was to explore if there was any correlation between CAG repeat length and criminal behavior. The study revealed significantly shorter CAG repeats in the rapists (mean 18.44 repeats) and murderers (mean 17.59 repeats) compared to the control men (mean 21.19 repeats). The criminals who committed murder after rape had a far shorter mean repeat length (mean 17.31 repeats) in comparison to the controls or those convicted of rape or murder alone. In short, our study suggests that the reduced CAG repeats in the AR gene are associated with criminal behavior. This, along with other studies, would help in understanding the biological factors associated with the antisocial or criminal activities.

  9. Positive Selection of a Pre-Expansion CAG Repeat of the Human SCA2 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG(8CAA(CAG(4CAA(CAG(8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  10. Positive selection of a pre-expansion CAG repeat of the human SCA2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Yu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG8CAA(CAG4CAA(CAG8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  11. Mutant huntingtin fragmentation in immune cells tracks Huntington’s disease progression

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Andreas; Träger, Ulrike; Wild, Edward J.; Grueninger, Stephan; Farmer, Ruth; Landles, Christian; Scahill, Rachael I.; Lahiri, Nayana; Haider, Salman; Macdonald, Douglas; Frost, Chris; Bates, Gillian P.; Bilbe, Graeme; Kuhn, Rainer; Andre, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding huntingtin (HTT). Therapeutic approaches to lower mutant HTT (mHTT) levels are expected to proceed to human trials, but noninvasive quantification of mHTT is not currently possible. The importance of the peripheral immune system in neurodegenerative disease is becoming increasingly recognized. Peripheral immune cells have been implicated in HD pathogenesis, but HTT ...

  12. Intergenerational and striatal CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice involve different DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragileva, Ella; Hendricks, Audrey; Teed, Allison; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith T; Friedberg, Errol C; Kucherlapati, Raju; Edelmann, Winfried; Lunetta, Kathryn L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2009-01-01

    Modifying the length of the Huntington's disease (HD) CAG repeat, the major determinant of age of disease onset, is an attractive therapeutic approach. To explore this we are investigating mechanisms of intergenerational and somatic HD CAG repeat instability. Here, we have crossed HD CAG knock-in mice onto backgrounds deficient in mismatch repair genes, Msh3 and Msh6, to discern the effects on CAG repeat size and disease pathogenesis. We find that different mechanisms predominate in inherited and somatic instability, with Msh6 protecting against intergenerational contractions and Msh3 required both for increasing CAG length and for enhancing an early disease phenotype in striatum. Therefore, attempts to decrease inherited repeat size may entail a full understanding of Msh6 complexes, while attempts to block the age-dependent increases in CAG size in striatal neurons and to slow the disease process will require a full elucidation of Msh3 complexes and their function in CAG repeat instability.

  13. Deletion of cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori by PCR products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun Zeng; Li-Hua He; Yan Yin; Mao-Jun Zhang; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cytotoxin-associated protein (antigen) A (CagA)plays an important role in Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)pathogenesis. Our aim was to obtain cagA mutant strains by a new mutation method so as to better understand the mechanism of CagA in epithelial cells. METHODS: In contrast with the traditional method using suicide plasmid, we constructed cagA- mutant strains directly with PCR products. The constructed mutant clones grew on selective media and allelic exchange was confirmed by Southern blot. Furthermore, two different transformation methods, electroporation, and natural transformation, were compared with regard to the efficiency of recombination.RESULTS: The mutation by PCR products could be completed within 3-5 d, and the recombination rate by electroporation and natural transformation was 4.02×10-8 and 1.03x 10-9 respectively. Mutation rate by electroporation (4.02× 10-8) was far higher than by natural transformation (1.03× 10-9) (P = 0.000<0.005).CONCLUSION: cagA- mutant strains have been constructed,which is important for further study on the function of CagA in epithelial cells. A mutation method by directly using PCR products has been proved successful with a much higher mutation rate, and is easier, especially when in combination with electroporation. This method could be widely used in gene deletion of H pylori.

  14. Analysis of CAG repeats in IT15 gene in Spanish population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, A.; Castellvi-Pel, S.; Mila, M. [Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Parcelons (Spain)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington`s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by involuntary movements, and cognitive and affective changes. HD has a prevalence of 1 in 10,000 individuals in most populations of European origin. The IT15 gene is responsible for HD as it contains a highly polymorphic, unstable (CAG) repeated sequence that is abnormally expanded in HD chromosomes. The IT15 (CAG)n stretch was analyzed in 100 members (50 affected individuals, 40 asymptomatic at risk for HD, and 10 unaffected members) of 50 HD families, and 50 individuals of the general Spanish population. Expansion of the CAG repeat sequence was found in 45 affected members and 14 individuals at risk, with a repeat length of 40 to 85 repeat units. The range of the polymorphic CAG repeat in normal chromosomes was between 11 and 31 repeat units. In the families with several affected members, we found increases of the repeat length in the least generation. Inverse correlation was found between the age of onset and the length of the CAG repeat; the analysis showed also parental male bias. Presymptomatic analysis of HD has been considerably enhanced with the CAG mutation study.

  15. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility.

  16. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  17. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Porta, Silvia; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Pantano, Lorena; Ferrer, Isidre; Guzmán, Manuel; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater) induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs), of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Relation of atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori-CagA+and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafaela Sierra; Francis Mégraud; Clas Une; Vanessa Ramírez; Warner Alpízar-Alpízar; María I González; José A Ramírez; Antoine de Mascarel; Patricia Cuenca; Guillermo Pérez-Pérez

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association of Helicobacter pylori (H pylon) CagA+ infection and pro-inflammatory poly-morphisms of the genes interleukin (IL)-IRN and IL-1B with the risk of gastric atrophy and peptic ulcers in a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, a country with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. METHODS: Seven biopsy specimens, a fasting blood sample and a questionnaire concerning nutritional and sociodemographic factors were obtained from 501 con-secutive patients who had undergone endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. A histopathological diagnosis was made. Pepsinogen concentrations were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Infection with H pylori CagA* was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR respectively. RESULTS: In this dyspeptic population, 86% wereHpy/ori positive and of these, 67.8% were positive forCagA. Atrophic antral gastritis (AAG) was associatedwith CagA+ status [odd ratio (OR) = 4.1; P < 0.000]and fruit consumption (OR = 0.3; P < 0.00). Atrophicbody gastritis (ABG) was associated with pepsinogenPGI/PGII < 3.4 (OR = 4.9; P < 0.04) and alcoholconsumption (OR = 7.3; P < 0.02). Duodenal ulcerwas associated with CagA+ (OR = 2.9; P < 0.04) andsmoking (OR = 2.4; P < 0.04). PGI < 60 μg/L as wellas PGI/PGII < 3.4 were associated with CagA+. CONCLUSION: In a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica,H pylori CagA+ is not associated with ABG, but it is arisk factor for AAG. The pro-inflammatory cytokine poly-morphisms IL-1B + 3945 and IL-1RN are not associatedwith the atrophic lesions of this dyspeptic population.

  19. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  20. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  1. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  2. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; CHEN, YAO; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Hongjuan DING; Xia,Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports. We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, an...

  3. Modulation of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia by CAG tracts in various genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tezenas du Montcel, S.; Durr, A.; Bauer, P.; Figueroa, K.P.; Ichikawa, Y.; Brussino, A.; Forlani, S.; Rakowicz, M.; Schols, L.; Mariotti, C.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Orsi, L.; Giunti, P.; Filla, A.; Szymanski, S.; Klockgether, T.; Berciano, J.; Pandolfo, M.; Boesch, S.; Melegh, B.; Timmann, D.; Mandich, P.; Camuzat, A.; Goto, J.; Ashizawa, T.; Cazeneuve, C.; Tsuji, S.; Pulst, S.M.; Brusco, A.; Riess, O.; Brice, A.; Stevanin, G.

    2014-01-01

    Polyglutamine-coding (CAG)n repeat expansions in seven different genes cause spinocerebellar ataxias. Although the size of the expansion is negatively correlated with age at onset, it accounts for only 50-70% of its variability. To find other factors involved in this variability, we performed a regr

  4. Longitudinal behavioral, cross-sectional transcriptional and histopathological characterization of a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease with 140 CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Aaron C; Xu, Jia; Carlson, Aaron; Napoli, Vincent V; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Mandel, Ronald J

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of the gene mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD), huntingtin, in 1993 allowed for a better understanding of the pathology of and enabled the development of animal models. HD is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine repeat region in the N-terminal of the huntingtin protein. Here we examine the behavioral, transcriptional, histopathological and anatomical characteristics of a knock-in HD mouse model with a 140 polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. This CAG 140 model contains a portion of the human exon 1 with 140 CAG repeats knocked into the mouse huntingtin gene. We have longitudinally examined the rearing behavior, accelerating rotarod, constant speed rotarod and gait for age-matched heterozygote, homozygote and non-transgenic mice and have found a significant difference in the afflicted mice. However, while there were significant differences between the non-transgenic and the knock-in mice, these behaviors were not progressive. As in HD, we show that the CAG 140 mice also have a significant decrease in striatally enriched mRNA transcripts. In addition, striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusion density increases with age. Lastly these CAG 140 mice show slight cortical thinning compared to non-transgenic mice, similarly to the cortical thinning recently reported in HD.

  5. Differential effects of the Huntington's disease CAG mutation in striatum and cerebellum are quantitative not qualitative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossale, Elisa; Seong, Ihn Sik; Coser, Kathryn R; Shioda, Toshi; Kohane, Isaac S; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2011-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) involves marked early neurodegeneration in the striatum, whereas the cerebellum is relatively spared despite the ubiquitous expression of full-length mutant huntingtin, implying that inherent tissue-specific differences determine susceptibility to the HD CAG mutation. To understand this tissue specificity, we compared early mutant huntingtin-induced gene expression changes in striatum to those in cerebellum in young Hdh CAG knock-in mice, prior to onset of evident pathological alterations. Endogenous levels of full-length mutant huntingtin caused qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different gene expression changes in the two brain regions. Importantly, the quantitatively different responses in the striatum and cerebellum in mutant mice were well accounted for by the intrinsic molecular differences in gene expression between the striatum and cerebellum in wild-type animals. Tissue-specific gene expression changes in response to the HD mutation, therefore, appear to reflect the different inherent capacities of these tissues to buffer qualitatively similar effects of mutant huntingtin. These findings highlight a role for intrinsic quantitative tissue differences in contributing to HD pathogenesis, and likely to other neurodegenerative disorders exhibiting tissue-specificity, thereby guiding the search for effective therapeutic interventions.

  6. Study on relationship between polymorphism of Har gene (CAG)n micro-satellite and prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; WANG Xiao-hui; XIA Bing; CHEN Guang-chun; LU Jian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the polymorphic (CAG)n micro-satellite of human androgen receptor (bAR) gene and prostate cancer (Pca). Methods: The number of (CAG)n repeats in 107 normal males were measured by a two-step [α-32P]-dCTP incorporated asymmetric polymeric chain reaction (PCR), and the (CAG)n repeats of both malignant and nonmalignant prostate cells in fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (PET) specimen from 36 case of Pca were determined by sequence analysis. Results: The repeats of polymorphic (CAG) n among normal men ranged from 11 to 29, and the most frequent repeat was 22(18. 69%), with 23(14. 02%), 24(10. 28%) and 21(10. 28%) being less frequent. The (CAG)n repeats of malignant prostate cells equaled to that of nonmalignant adjacent prostate tissue cells from the same PET specimen in all 36 Pca, and the (CAG)n repeats in 36 Pca which ranged from 16 to 22 were shorter than that in normal males significantly (P<0. 05), while no significant difference in (CAG)n repeats among various grade of tumor's differentiation(well-differentiated, intermediate-differentiated and poor-differentiated) was found (P> 0. 05). Conclusion: The present study suggest that short hAR gene (CAG)n micro-satellite might be associated with the occurrence of Pca, but not with the differentiation of Pca.

  7. Intergenerational Instability of the CAG Repeat of the Gene for Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD1) is Affected by the Genotype of the Normal Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    五十嵐, 修一; Igarashi, Shuichi

    1997-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the MJD1 gene at 14q32.1. To identify elements affecting the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat, we investigated whether the CGG/GGG polymorphism at the 3' end of the CAG repeat affects the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat. The [expanded (CAG) n-CGG]/[normal (CAG) n-GGG] haplotypes were found to result in significantly greater instability...

  8. Quantification assays for total and polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Macdonald

    Full Text Available The expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene, which produces huntingtin protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, is the cause of Huntington's disease (HD. Recent studies have reported that RNAi suppression of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin (mutant HTT in HD animal models can ameliorate disease phenotypes. A key requirement for such preclinical studies, as well as eventual clinical trials, aimed to reduce mutant HTT exposure is a robust method to measure HTT protein levels in select tissues. We have developed several sensitive and selective assays that measure either total human HTT or polyglutamine-expanded human HTT proteins on the electrochemiluminescence Meso Scale Discovery detection platform with an increased dynamic range over other methods. In addition, we have developed an assay to detect endogenous mouse and rat HTT proteins in pre-clinical models of HD to monitor effects on the wild type protein of both allele selective and non-selective interventions. We demonstrate the application of these assays to measure HTT protein in several HD in vitro cellular and in vivo animal model systems as well as in HD patient biosamples. Furthermore, we used purified recombinant HTT proteins as standards to quantitate the absolute amount of HTT protein in such biosamples.

  9. Modulation of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia by CAG tracts in various genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Durr, Alexandra; Bauer, Peter; Figueroa, Karla P; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Brussino, Alessandro; Forlani, Sylvie; Rakowicz, Maria; Schöls, Ludger; Mariotti, Caterina; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Orsi, Laura; Giunti, Paola; Filla, Alessandro; Szymanski, Sandra; Klockgether, Thomas; Berciano, José; Pandolfo, Massimo; Boesch, Sylvia; Melegh, Bela; Timmann, Dagmar; Mandich, Paola; Camuzat, Agnès; Goto, Jun; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Tsuji, Shoji; Pulst, Stefan-M; Brusco, Alfredo; Riess, Olaf; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Polyglutamine-coding (CAG)n repeat expansions in seven different genes cause spinocerebellar ataxias. Although the size of the expansion is negatively correlated with age at onset, it accounts for only 50-70% of its variability. To find other factors involved in this variability, we performed a regression analysis in 1255 affected individuals with identified expansions (spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7), recruited through the European Consortium on Spinocerebellar Ataxias, to determine whether age at onset is influenced by the size of the normal allele in eight causal (CAG)n-containing genes (ATXN1-3, 6-7, 17, ATN1 and HTT). We confirmed the negative effect of the expanded allele and detected threshold effects reflected by a quadratic association between age at onset and CAG size in spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 3 and 6. We also evidenced an interaction between the expanded and normal alleles in trans in individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 6 and 7. Except for individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, age at onset was also influenced by other (CAG)n-containing genes: ATXN7 in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2; ATXN2, ATN1 and HTT in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3; ATXN1 and ATXN3 in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6; and ATXN3 and TBP in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7. This suggests that there are biological relationships among these genes. The results were partially replicated in four independent populations representing 460 Caucasians and 216 Asian samples; the differences are possibly explained by ethnic or geographical differences. As the variability in age at onset is not completely explained by the effects of the causative and modifier sister genes, other genetic or environmental factors must also play a role in these diseases.

  10. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  11. The CAG repeat polymorphism of androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingliang; Dong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Xuezhi; Niu, Wenquan

    2012-03-01

    The association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in androgen receptor gene (AR) and prostate cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the results are contradictory. The purpose of our meta-analysis was to investigate whether CAG repeat related to prostate cancer risk and had genetic heterogeneity across different geographic regions and study designs. Random-effects model was performed irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. Publication bias was assessed by the fail-safe number and Egger's test. There were 16 (patients/controls: 2972/3792), 19 (3835/4908) and 12 (3372/2631) study groups for comparisons of ≥ 20, 22 and 23 repeats of CAG sequence, respectively. Compared with CAG repeat repeats had 21% (95% CI: 0.61-1.02; P = 0.076), 5% (95% CI: 0.81-1.11; P = 0.508) and 5% (95% CI: 0.76-1.20; P = 0.681) decreased risk of prostate cancer. After classifying studies by geographic areas, carriers of ≥ 20 repeats had 11% decreased risk in populations from USA, 53% from Europe, and 20% from Asia (P > 0.05), whereas comparison of ≥ 23 repeats with others generated a significant prediction in European populations (OR = 1.17; P = 0.039). Stratification by study designs revealed no material changes in risk estimation. Meta-regression analysis found no significant sources of between-study heterogeneity for age, study design and geographic region for all comparisons. There was no identified publication bias. Taken together, our results demonstrated that AR CAG repeat polymorphism with ≥ 20 repeats might confer a protective effect among the prostate cancer patients with 45 years older but not all the prostate cancer patients.

  12. Helicobacter pylori and cagA gene detected by polymerase chain reaction in gastric biopsies: correlation with histological findings, proliferation and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Ramos Moreira Leite; Elaine Darini; Flavio Canelas Canavez; Claudia Muraro de Carvalho; Cristina Aparecida Troquez da Silveira Mitteldorf; Luiz Heraldo Camara-Lopes

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The virulence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) in gastroduodenal disease is related to pathogenicity islands (cagPAI) present in some strains. Infection with cagPAI induces IL-8 secretion, increases epithelial cell proliferation and may be important in carcinogenesis. Our objective was to detect HP and the cagA gene (cagPAI marker) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to correlate these results to histological findings, epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. DESIGN A...

  13. Antibiotic resistance and cagA gene correlation: A looming crisis of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adnan Khan; Amber Farooqui; Hamid Manzoor; Syed Shakeel Akhtar; Muhammad Saeed Quraishy; Shahana Urooj Kazmi

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) in Pakistan and its correlation with host and pathogen associated factors.METHODS:A total of 178 strains of H.pylori were isolated from gastric biopsies of dyspeptic patients.Susceptibility patterns against first and second-line antibiotics were determined and trends of resistance were analyzed in relation to the sampling period,gastric conditions and cagA gene carriage.The effect of cagA gene on the acquisition of resistance was investigated by mutant selection assay.RESULTS:The observations showed that monoresistant strains were prevalent with rates of 89% for metronidazole,36% for clarithromycin,37% for amoxicillin,18.5% for ofloxacin and 12% for tetracycline.Furthermore,clarithromycin resistance was on the rise from 2005 to 2008 (32% vs 38%,P =0.004) and it is significantly observed in non ulcerative dyspeptic patients compared to gastritis,gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer cases (53% vs 20%,18% and 19%,P =0.000).On the contrary,metronidazole and ofloxacin resistance were more common in gastritis and gastric ulcer cases.Distribution analysis and frequencies of resistant mutants in vitro correlated with the absence of cagA gene with metronidazole and ofloxacin resistance.CONCLUSION:The study confirms the alarming levels of antibiotic resistance associated with the degree of gastric inflammation and cagA gene carriage in H.pylori strains.

  14. Effect of post-mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in human control and Huntington disease brain lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Menno H; Patassini, Stefano; Kim, Eric H; Bullock, Jocelyn; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Pepers, Barry A; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease is associated with elongation of a CAG repeat in the HTT gene that results in a mutant huntingtin protein. Several studies have implicated N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in Huntington disease pathogenesis. Ideally, these fragments are studied in human brain tissue. However, the use of human brain tissue comes with certain unavoidable variables such as post mortem delay, artefacts from freeze-thaw cycles and subject-to-subject variation. Knowledge on how these variables might affect N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in post mortem human brain is important for a proper interpretation of study results. The effect of post mortem delay on protein in human brain is known to vary depending on the protein of interest. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments using western blot. We mimicked post mortem delay in one individual control case and one individual Huntington disease case with low initial post mortem delay. The influence of subject-to-subject variation on N-terminal huntingtin fragments was assessed in human cortex and human striatum using two cohorts of control and Huntington disease subjects. Our results show that effects of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments are minor in our individual subjects. Additionally, one freeze-thaw cycle decreases the huntingtin western blot signal intensity in the cortex control subject, but does not introduce additional N-terminal huntingtin fragments. Our results suggest that subject-to-subject variation contributes more to variability in N-terminal huntingtin fragments than post mortem delay.

  15. Comparative semi-automated analysis of (CAG) repeats in the Huntington disease gene: use of internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L C; Hegde, M R; Herrera, G; Stapleton, P M; Love, D R

    1999-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) belongs to the group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by unstable expanded trinucleotide repeats. In the case of HD, the expansion of a CAG repeat occurs in the IT15 gene. The detection of the expanded CAG repeats has usually involved the electrophoretic separation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products using conventional agarose and acrylamide gel electrophoresis. We have undertaken the comparative analysis of sizing CAG repeats of the IT15 gene using radioactive and fluorescent PCR amplification, and the subsequent separation of these products by slab gel and capillary electrophoresis. The assays have been performed on both cloned and sequenced CAG repeats, as well as genomic DNA from HD patients with a wide range of repeat lengths. The mobility of the CAG repeat amplification products of the IT15 gene is greater using capillary electrophoresis compared to slab gel electrophoresis. The analysis of 40 DNA samples from HD patients indicates that the mobility difference increases with the length of the repeat. However, we have devised an allele ladder for sizing the CAG repeats. This ladder provides a mandatory internal calibration system for diagnostic purposes and enables the confident use of either capillary or slab gel electrophoresis for sizing HD alleles.

  16. Consensus and Variable Region PCR Analysis of Helicobacter pylori 3′ Region of cagA Gene in Isolates from Individuals with or without Peptic Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Pereira-Lima, Júlio C.; Blaya, Carolina; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2001-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori-infected patients and the relationship between cagA and peptic ulcer disease, gastric biopsy specimens from 103 Caucasian patients in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Since allelic variation in cagA exists and distinct H. pylori subgenotypes may circulate in different regions, PCR using primers for a variable 3′ region of the cagA gene according to a Japanese methodology and for a consensus cagA 3′ region used in Western methods was used for cagA detection. cagA was present in 53 (71%) of 75 H. pylori-positive cases when analyzed by the consensus region method and was associated with duodenal ulcer disease (P = 0.02), but not with gastric ulcer (P = 0.26), when compared to patients with duodenitis or gastritis. The variable region PCR method was able to detect 43 (57%) cagA-positive cases within the same group of H. pylori-positive patients and showed three subtypes of cagA (A, B/D, and C) that were not associated with clinical outcome. However, in 8 (18%) of the cases, more than one subtype was present, and an association between patients with multiple subtypes and disease outcome was observed when compared to patients with isolated subtypes (P = 0.048). cagA was a marker of H. pylori strains for duodenal ulcer disease in our population, and in spite of the differences in the 3′ region of the cagA gene, the Japanese methodology was able to detect the cagA status in most cases. The presence of multiple subgenotypes of cagA was associated with gastric ulcer. PMID:11158115

  17. Impact of CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene on male infertility - a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feifan; Lan, Aihua; Lin, Zhidi; Song, Jianfei; Zhang, Yuening; Li, Jiatong; Gu, Kailong; Lv, Baihao; Zhao, Dong; Zeng, Siping; Zhang, Ruoheng; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Zhengyan; Deng, Xiaozhen; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    CAG repeats are polymorphic nucleotide repeats present in the androgen receptor gene. Many studies have estimated the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility, but the conclusions are controversial. Previous meta-analyses have come to different conclusions; however, new studies have been published. An updated meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed, CBM, CNKI and Web of Science databases were systematically searched for studies published from 1 January 2000 to 1 October 2015. Case-control studies on the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility using appropriate methodology were included. Forty studies were selected, including 3858 cases and 3161 controls. Results showed statistically significantly longer CAG repeat length among cases compared with controls (SMD = 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-0.26). Shorter repeat length was associated with a lower risk of male infertility compared with a longer repeat length in the overall analysis (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.66-0.95). Moreover, CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Caucasian populations, but not Asian or Egyptian populations. Subgroup analysis revealed no significant difference in German populations, but CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in China and the USA. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia.

  18. Prevalence of vacA, cagA and babA2 genes in Cuban Helicobacter pylori isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lino E Torres; Karelia Melián; Arlenis Moreno; Jordis Alonso; Carlos A Sabatier; Mayrín Hernández; Ludisleydis Bermúdez; Boris L Rodríguez

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of vacuolating cytotoxin ( vacA), cytotoxin associated gene A ( cagA) and blood adhesion binding antigen ( babA2) genotypes of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) isolates from Cuban dyspeptic patients. METHODS: DNA was extracted from H pylori-positive cultures taken from 130 dyspeptic patients. Genotyping was performed by PCR, using specific primers for vacA ( s1, s2, m1, m2), cagA and babA2 genes. Endoscopic observations and histological examinations were used to determine patient pathologies. RESULTS: vacA alleles s1, s2, m1 and m2 were detected in 96 (73.8%), 34 (26.2%), 75 (57.7%) and 52 isolates (40%), respectively, while the cagA gene was detected in 95 isolates (73.2%). One hundred and seven isolates (82.3%) were babA2-positive. A significant correlation was observed between vacAs1m1 and cagA and between vacAs1m1 and babA2 genotypes ( P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) and between babA2 genotype and cagA status ( P < 0.05); but, no correlation was observed between vacAs1 and babA2 genotypes. Eighty five (65.4%) and 73 (56.2%) strains were type 1 ( vacAs1- cagA-positive) and "triplepositive" ( vacAs1- cagA- babA2-positive), respectively, and their presence was significantly associated with duodenal ulcer ( P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: The distribution of the main virulence factors in the Cuban strains in this study resembled that of the Western-type strains, and the more virulent H pylori isolates were significantly associated with duodenal ulcer, ulcer disease being the worst pathology observed in the group studied.

  19. Increased risk of breast cancer in women bearing a combination of large CAG and GGN repeats in the exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana; Javier Dorta, F; Rodriguez, Germán; Brito, Buenaventura; Rodríguez, M A Del Cristo; Cabrera, Antonio; Díaz-Chico, Juan C; Reyes, Ricardo; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Nicolás Díaz-Chico, B

    2007-11-01

    The exon 1 of the human androgen receptor gene (AR) contains both CAG (polyglutamine) and GGN (polyglycine) repeat length polymorphisms. Large CAG repeats have been related to an increased risk of breast cancer (BC), whereas the influence of the GGN repeats is still unclear. Here, we have studied how the length of CAG and GGN repeats is associated with the risk of BC in a population from Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The study was carried out on 257 woman diagnosed with BC and 393 controls, nesting in the 'CDC of the Canary Islands' cohort study. The AR CAG and GGN genotyping was performed by means of PCR amplification with specific fluorescently labelled primers followed by a capillary electrophoresis. The allelic distribution of CAG and GGN polymorphisms was similar in cases and controls. The mean of short and long CAG and GGN alleles did not show differences between cases and controls and the same was true when the average length of both CAG alleles (CAG(n)) and GGN alleles (GGN(n)) was considered. However, when CAG(n) and GGN(n) were categorised using 22 and 24 repeats as the cut-off point, respectively, significant differences between cases and controls were observed. The CAG(n)>22 repeats were more frequent in cases than in controls, being associated with an increased risk of BC (OR=1.49; CI(95%)=1.06-2.09; p=0.021). No significant differences were found for categorised GGN(n). For CAG(n)/GGN(n) combinations, the highest BC risk was found to be associated with the CAG(n)>22/GGN(n)24 combination (OR=2.47; CI(95%)=1.37-4.46; p=0.003). In conclusion, our results indicate that longer CAG(n)/GGN(n) combinations increase the risk of BC and suggest that CAG and GGN AR polymorphisms should be considered in order to assess the BC risk.

  20. CAG repeat polymorphism in androgen receptor gene is not directly associated with polycystic ovary syndrome but influences serum testosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrgatic, L; Baldani, D Pavicic; Cerne, J Z; Ferk, P; Gersak, K

    2012-02-01

    Hyperandrogenemia has been the most consistent feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Androgens exert their effects through androgen receptors (ARs). The expansion of the codon CAG trinucleotide repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene represents a type of genetic alteration associated with changes in the AR gene function. The purpose of this study was to establish a possible association of the AR gene CAG repeat length polymorphism with PCOS, and its influence on clinical and biochemical androgen traits. Two hundred and fourteen Croatian women with PCOS and 209 healthy control women of reproductive age were enrolled. Phenotypic hyperandrogenism, BMI and waist to hip ratio were recorded. Hormonal profiles, fasting insulin and glucose levels were measured on cycle days 3-5. Genotyping of the CAG repeat polymorphism in the AR gene was performed. We found no significant difference in the mean CAG repeat number between the PCOS patients and controls (22.1±3.4 vs. 21.9±3.2, P=0.286). There was a positive correlation between the CAG repeat length and total testosterone (TT) in the PCOS group (R=0.225, P=0.015). A multiple linear regression model using mean CAG repeat length, BMI, age and HOMA-IR as predictors explained 8.5% (adjusted R²) of the variability in serum TT levels. In this model the CAG repeat polymorphism was found to be a significant predictor of serum TT levels in PCOS patients (P=0.015). The logistic regression analysis revealed that the CAG repeat length is not a significant predictor of hirsutism and acne status (P=0.921 and P=0.437, respectively). The model was adjusted for serum TT, free testosterone, androstendione and DHEAS levels as independent variables, which were also not found to be significant predictors of hirsutism (P=0.687, P=0.194, P=0.675 and P=0.938, respectively) or acne status (P=0.594, P=0.095, P=0.290 and P=0.151, respectively). In conclusion, the AR CAG repeat polymorphism is not a major determinant of PCOS in the

  1. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed...... and morphology) and DNA fragmentation index (DFI) were determined. CAG and GGN repeat lengths were determined by direct sequencing of leukocyte DNA. RESULTS: A statistically significant interaction was found between the CB-153 group and CAG repeat category in relation to sperm concentration and total sperm count...

  2. The number of CAG repeats within the normal allele does not influence the age of onset in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempíř, Jiří; Zidovská, Jana; Stochl, Jan; Ing, Věra Kebrdlová; Uhrová, Tereza; Roth, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of the number of CAG repeats on the chromosome 4p16.3, which results in elongated glutamine tract of huntingtin. The purpose of this work was to examine the interaction between the normal and mutant alleles of this gene and their effect on the clinical onset of HD. We hypothesized that in patients with identical number of CAG repeats within the mutant allele, the age of onset of HD is influenced by the number of CAG repeats within the normal allele. We analyzed the relations between the number of CAG repeats within the normal and mutant alleles, the age at HD onset, and the character of initial symptoms in 468 patients with clinically expressed HD. Although the Cox regression coefficient of 0.15 was significant (P CAG repeats within normal allele. Within the groups of patients with the same number of CAG repeats of the mutant allele, number of CAG repeats of the normal allele was found uncorrelated to the age at onset. Furthermore, when analyzing subgroups of patients with the same allelic composition on both alleles, we failed to observe any correlation with the age at the onset. Our analysis gives no corroboration to the idea of a normal allele having a share in the modification of the age at HD onset. We believe that with the current state of knowledge it is not possible to devise a mathematical model for HD onset prediction because too many entirely unknown modifying factors are still involved.

  3. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin M Evers

    Full Text Available To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUGn triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG(7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well.

  4. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate.

  5. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and risk of isolated hypospadias: results from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G; Shan, W; Zeng, L; Huang, L

    2015-03-06

    Studies investigating the association between the CAG repeat polymorphism and the risk of isolated hypospadias have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to quantitatively summarize the evidence for such a relationship. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang databases. Weighted mean difference and 95% confidence intervals for the CAG repeat polymorphism and isolated hypospadias were calculated using a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed by race, study design, sample for DNA extraction, and hypospadias classifications. This meta-analysis included 6 case-control studies, including 444 isolated hypospadias cases and 727 controls. The results showed that patients with isolated hypospadias had longer CAG repeats in their androgen receptor gene sequence (weighted mean difference = 1.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.60-2.13; P = 0.0005). Similarly, stratified analyses also detected significant associations in all subgroups, excluding the group with severe hypospadias (weighted mean difference = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = -0.42-1.12; P = 0.38). This meta-analysis indicated that longer CAG repeats were associated with the risk of isolated hypospadias, and that longer CAG polymorphisms may be related to the etiology of isolated hypospadias. Future studies based on Asian and African-American patients should be performed to re-evaluate this association.

  6. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  7. Neferine attenuates the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin in PC-12 cells via induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Wu, An Guo; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-02-18

    Mutant huntingtin aggregation is highly associated with the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, an adult-onset autosomal dominant disorder, which leads to a loss of motor control and decline in cognitive function. Recent literature has revealed the protective role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases through degradation of mutant toxic proteins, including huntingtin or a-synuclein. Through the GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we have  identified  neferine,  isolated  from  the  lotus  seed  embryo  of Nelumbo nucifera, which is able to induce autophagy through an AMPK-mTOR-dependent pathway. Furthermore, by overexpressing huntingtin with 74 CAG repeats (EGFP-HTT 74) in PC-12 cells, neferine reduces both the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin through an autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent mechanism. With the variety of novel active compounds present in medicinal herbs, our current study suggests the possible protective mechanism of an autophagy inducer isolated from Chinese herbal medicine, which is crucial for its further development into a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders in the future.

  8. Neferine Attenuates the Protein Level and Toxicity of Mutant Huntingtin in PC-12 Cells via Induction of Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kam Wai Wong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutant huntingtin aggregation is highly associated with the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease, an adult-onset autosomal dominant disorder, which leads to a loss of motor control and decline in cognitive function. Recent literature has revealed the protective role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases through degradation of mutant toxic proteins, including huntingtin or a-synuclein. Through the GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we have  identified  neferine,  isolated  from  the  lotus  seed  embryo  of Nelumbo nucifera, which is able to induce autophagy through an AMPK-mTOR-dependent pathway. Furthermore, by overexpressing huntingtin with 74 CAG repeats (EGFP-HTT 74 in PC-12 cells, neferine reduces both the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin through an autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7-dependent mechanism. With the variety of novel active compounds present in medicinal herbs, our current study suggests the possible protective mechanism of an autophagy inducer isolated from Chinese herbal medicine, which is crucial for its further development into a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders in the future.

  9. NF-κB and ERK-signaling pathways contribute to the gene expression induced by cag PAI-positive- Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wataru Shibata; Yuzo Mitsuno; Naohiko Seki; Takao Kawabe; Masao Omata; Yoshihiro Hirata; Haruhiko Yoshida; Motoyuki Otsuka; Yujin Hoshida; Keiji Ogura; Shin Maeda; Tomoya Ohmae; Ayako Yanai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the sequential gene expression profile in AGS cells co-cultured with wild-type Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) as a model of H pylori-infected gastric epithelium,and to further examine the contribution of cag-pathogenicity islands (cagPAI)-coding type Ⅳ secretion system and the two pathways, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) on wild-type H pylori-induced gene expression.METHODS: Gene expression profiles induced by H pylori were evaluated in AGS gastric epithelial cells using cDNA microarray, which were present in the 4 600 independent clones picked up from the human gastric tissue. We also analyzed the contribution of NF-κB and ERK signaling on H pylori-induced gene expression by using inhibitors of specific signal pathways. The isogenic mutant with disrupted cagE (△cagE) was used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system in the gene expression profile.RESULTS: According to the expression profile, the genes were classified into four clusters. Among them, the clusters characterized by continuous upregulation were most conspicuous, and it contained many signal transducer activity-associated genes. The role of cagPAI on cultured cells was also investigated using isogenic mutant cagE,which carries non-functional cagPAI. Then the upregulation of more than 80% of the induced genes (476/566) was found to depend on cagPAI. Signal transducer pathway through NF-κB or ERK are the major pathways which are known to be activated by cagPAI-positive H pylori. The role of these pathways in the whole signal activation by cagPAIpositive H pylori was analyzed. The specific inhibitors against NF-κB or ERK pathway blocked the activation of gene expression in 65% (367/566) or 76% (429/566) of the genes whose activation appealed to depend on cagPAI.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that more than half of the genes induced by cagPAI-positive H pylori depend on NF-κB and ERK signaling activation

  10. CAG-repeat variant in the polymerase γ gene and male infertility in the Chinese population: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Jun; Peng, Hai-Ying; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shi, Lei; Chen, Jin-Bao; Lin, Ke-Qin; Yu, Liang; Shi, Li; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Hao; Chu, Jia-You

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have reported a relationship between the length of the CAG-repeat in the polymerase γ (POLG) gene and male infertility. However, other studies have not reproduced this result. In our study, the POLG-CAG-repeat length was analyzed in 535 healthy individuals from six Chinese Han populations living in different provinces. The frequencies of 10-CAG alleles and genotypes were high (97.38 and 94.13%, respectively), with no significant difference among the six Chinese Han populations. Furthermore, we determined the distribution of the POLG-CAG-repeat in 150 infertile men and 126 fertile men. Our study suggested that the distributions of POLG-CAG-repeat alleles and genotypes were not significantly different between infertile (95.67 and 92.67%, respectively) and fertile men (97.22 and 94.44%, respectively). In a subsequent meta-analysis, combining our data with data from previous studies, a comparison of the CAG-repeat alleles in fertile versus infertile men showed no obvious risk for male infertility associated with any particular allele (pooled odds ratio (OR)=0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.48). The significance level was not attained with any of the following genetic models: homozygote comparison (not 10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.34; 95% CI: 0.66-2.72), heterozygote comparison (10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.04; 95% CI: 0.78-1.38), dominant model comparison (not 10/not 10+10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.08; 95% CI: 0.79-1.47) and recessive genetic comparison (not 10/not 10 versus 10/not 10+10/10: OR=1.31; 95% CI: 0.68-2.55). In conclusion, there is no significant difference of the frequencies of POLG-CAG-repeat variants among six Chinese Han populations, and this polymorphism may not be associated with Chinese male infertility. On the basis of a meta-analysis, there is no obvious association between CAG-repeat variants of the POLG gene and male infertility.

  11. The Biology of Huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudou, Frédéric; Humbert, Sandrine

    2016-03-01

    Huntingtin (HTT) is now a famous protein because an abnormal expansion of a glutamine stretch (polyQ) in its N-terminal sequence leads to the devastating neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). The gene encoding huntingtin, HTT, and its dominantly inherited mutation were identified more than 20 years ago. Subsequently, in the hope of finding a cure for HD, there has been intense research aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of the presence of the abnormal polyQ expansion in HTT. Notwithstanding with the value of this approach, evidence has been emerging of a potential role of context and function of the HTT protein in the specificity and severity of the pathogenicity. HTT is ubiquitous both at the tissue and subcellular levels. It interacts with many partners and has long been considered having no clearly defined cellular function. Based on research over the past 20 years, specifically focused on the function of wild-type HTT, we reconsider the literature describing HTT-regulated molecular and cellular mechanisms that could be dysfunctional in HD and their possible physiological consequences for patients.

  12. A critical window of CAG repeat-length correlates with phenotype severity in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Damian M; Alaghband, Yasaman; Hickey, Miriam A; Joshi, Prasad R; Hong, S Candice; Zhu, Chunni; Ando, Timothy K; André, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Watson, Joseph B; Levine, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The R6/2 mouse is the most frequently used model for experimental and preclinical drug trials in Huntington's disease (HD). When the R6/2 mouse was first developed, it carried exon 1 of the huntingtin gene with ~150 cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats. The model presented with a rapid and aggressive phenotype that shared many features with the human condition and was particularly similar to juvenile HD. However, instability in the CAG repeat length due to different breeding practices has led to both decreases and increases in average CAG repeat lengths among colonies. Given the inverse relationship in human HD between CAG repeat length and age at onset and to a degree, the direct relationship with severity of disease, we have investigated the effect of altered CAG repeat length. Four lines, carrying ~110, ~160, ~210, and ~310 CAG repeats, were examined using a battery of tests designed to assess the basic R6/2 phenotype. These included electrophysiological properties of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons, motor activity, inclusion formation, and protein expression. The results showed an unpredicted, inverted "U-shaped" relationship between CAG repeat length and phenotype; increasing the CAG repeat length from 110 to 160 exacerbated the R6/2 phenotype, whereas further increases to 210 and 310 CAG repeats greatly ameliorated the phenotype. These findings demonstrate that the expected relationship between CAG repeat length and disease severity observed in humans is lost in the R6/2 mouse model and highlight the importance of CAG repeat-length determination in preclinical drug trials that use this model.

  13. A new subtype of 3' region of cagA gene in Helicobacter pyloristrains isolated from Zhejiang Province in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Tao; Ping-Chu Fang; Hai-Yan Liu; Yun-Shui Jiang; Jing Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To isolate the subtypes of 3' region of cagA gene in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) strains from Zhejiang Province in China and to investigate their relations to H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases.METHODS: One hundred and thirty-seven H pylori clinical strains were isolated from the gastric mucosa specimens of 74 patients with chronic gastritis, 61 with peptic ulceration,and 2 with gastric cancer. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted and 3' region of cagA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subtypes of 3' region of cagA gene were determined by the size of PCR amplified segments. The sequences of the subtypes were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing.RESULTS: Of the 137 Hpylori isolates from Zhejiang Province,132 (96.4%) yielded PCR products that could be classified into three groups of subtypes, named as subtypes Ⅰ, Ⅱ,and Ⅲ according to their sizes. The sizes of subtypes Ⅰ, Ⅱ,and Ⅲ were 648-650 bp, 705-707 bp, and 815 bp, respectively.Among the 132 cagA-positive H pyloristrains, 123 (93.2%)belonged to the group of subtype Ⅰ, 6 (4.5%) presented subtype Ⅱ, 1 (0.8%) was subtype Ⅲ, and 2 (1.5%) presented subtypes Ⅰ and Ⅲ both. The primary structure of subtype Ⅰwas composed of 3 repeats of R1, 1 repeat of R2 and 1repeat of R3. Subtype Ⅱ possessing 4 repeats of R1, 2repeats of R2 and 1 repeat of R3 was a newly found type of 3' region of cagA gene which had not been reported before. The primary structure of subtype Ⅲ consisted of 4repeats of R1, 1 repeat of R2 and 2 repeats of R3. Comparison of the sequences of subtype Ⅰ strains with the corresponding sequences deposited in GenBank, showed a similarity of95.0% (94.0-96.1%) for nucleotide sequences and 95.9%(94.9-97.4%) for deduced amino acid sequences.Comparison of the sequences of subtype Ⅲ strains with the corresponding sequences deposited in GenBank,showed a similarity of 93.9% (90.8-96.9%) for nucleotide sequences and 93.2% (90.2-96.2%) for deduced amino acid

  14. 男乳癌与 AR 基因 CAG 重复多态性的相关性研究%Related research of male breast cancer and CAG repeat polymorphism of AR gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔佳琳; 黄睿; 姜永冬; 韩继广; 牛明; 魏巍; 郑伟; 宋燕妮

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨雄激素受体( AR)基因外显子CAG重复频数多态性与男性乳腺癌(男乳癌)发病风险的关系。方法研究对象为40例男性乳腺癌患者和40例男性健康者,从外周血提取DNA,对AR基因外显子CAG编码序列进行PCR扩增、测序和计算CAG重复频数,用χ2检验和Logistic回归分析AR基因CAG重复频数长度对男乳癌发病风险的影响。结果男性乳腺癌病例组和对照组CAG重复频数长度存在差异,其差异具有统计学意义,CAG重复频数长度超过22男性乳腺癌发病风险是重复频数长度少于21的3.52倍(OR=3.52,P=0.036)。结论 AR基因CAG重复频数长度是预测男性乳腺癌发病风险的指标,较长(超过22)的CAG重复序列可增加男乳癌的发病风险。%Objectiv e To investigate the correlation between ( CAG) n repeat polymorphism of androgen receptor(AR)geneandmalebreastcancer.Methods 40casesofmalebreastcancerand40controlswerecol-lected.DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the AR gene CAG coding exon sequences for PCR amplifica -tion,sequencing and calculated the number of CAG repeats frquency .χ2 test and Logistic regression analysis were used assess the AR gene CAG repeat length frequency affect the number of male breast cancer risk .Results There was statistically significant difference in male breast cancer cases and controls the number of CAG repeat length frequency.Man for whom the(CAG)n≥22 repeat sequence had 3.52 times risk of male breast compared (CAG)n≤22(OR=3.52,P=0.036).Conclusion AR gene CAG repeat length is a predictor of the frequency of male breast cancer risk .Longer CAG repeats can increase the risk of male breast cancer .

  15. Huntington CAG repeat size does not modify onset age in familial Parkinson’s disease: The GenePD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicoll, Christopher F.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Frederick; Watts, Ray L.; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Ahmed, Anwar; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    The ATP/ADP ratio reflects mitochondrial function and has been reported to be influenced by the size of the Huntington disease gene (HD) repeat. Impaired mitochondrial function has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and therefore, we evaluated the relationship of the HD CAG repeat size to PD onset age in a large sample of familial PD cases. PD affected siblings (n=495) with known onset ages from 248 families, were genotyped for the HD CAG repeat. Genotyping failed in 11 cases leaving 484 for analysis, including 35 LRRK2 carriers. All cases had HD CAG repeats (range 15 to 34) below the clinical range for HD, although 5.2 percent of the sample (n=25) had repeats in the intermediate range (the intermediate range lower limit=27; upper limit=35 repeats), suggesting that the prevalence of intermediate allele carriers in the general population is significant. No relation between the HD CAG repeat size and the age at onset for PD was found in this sample of familial PD. PMID:18649400

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of infertile Chinese men: karyotypic abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T T; Ran, J; Ding, X P; Li, L J; Zhang, L Y; Zhang, Y P; Nie, S S; Chen, L

    2013-07-08

    Chromosome abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in infertile Chinese men featuring severe oligospermia and azoospermia were analyzed. Ninety-six fertile men and 189 non-obstructive infertile men, including 125 patients with azoospermia and 64 with severe oligozoospermia, were studied. Seventeen infertile men (9.0%) carried a chromosome abnormality. Twenty (10.6%) carried a Y-chromosome microdeletion. In the remainder of the patients and controls, GGN and CAG repeats were sequenced. Short GGN repeats (n repeats strongly correlated with sperm counts. No significant difference in CAG repeats was found between patients and controls, nor were CAG repeats correlated with sperm counts. However, for CAG repeats ranging between 24 and 25, there was a >2.5-fold risk (OR = 2.539, 95%CI = 1.206-5.344, P repeats in Chinese male infertility.

  17. Expression of the CagA gene of H. pylori and application of its product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Chan Han; Xiao Jun Yan; Cheng Zhi Su

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori (Hp) plays an important role in the upper digestive tract diseases. It can be divided into two main groups (toxic and non-toxic Hp )according to the production of vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA). The toxic bacteria also produce cytotoxin associated protein A (CagA) which might have something to do with the transcription, folding,transportation or the function of VacA. Studies showed that CagA positive Hp ( CagA+ Hp )accounted for more than 50% of all kinds of Hp,and peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were closely related to their infection[1-7].

  18. Effects on murine behavior and lifespan of selectively decreasing expression of mutant huntingtin allele by supt4h knockdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Production of protein containing lengthy stretches of polyglutamine encoded by multiple repeats of the trinucleotide CAG is a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD and of a variety of other inherited degenerative neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Earlier work has shown that interference with production of the transcription elongation protein SUPT4H results in decreased cellular capacity to transcribe mutant huntingtin gene (Htt alleles containing long CAG expansions, but has little effect on expression of genes containing short CAG stretches. zQ175 and R6/2 are genetically engineered mouse strains whose genomes contain human HTT alleles that include greatly expanded CAG repeats and which are used as animal models for HD. Here we show that reduction of SUPT4H expression in brains of zQ175 mice by intracerebroventricular bolus injection of antisense 2'-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides (ASOs directed against Supt4h, or in R6/2 mice by deletion of one copy of the Supt4h gene, results in a decrease in mRNA and protein encoded specifically by mutant Htt alleles. We further show that reduction of SUPT4H in mouse brains is associated with decreased HTT protein aggregation, and in R6/2 mice, also with prolonged lifespan and delay of the motor impairment that normally develops in these animals. Our findings support the view that targeting of SUPT4H function may be useful as a therapeutic countermeasure against HD.

  19. Distribution of cagG gene in Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients with different gastroduodenal diseases and its clinical and pathological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yan-Fang Gong; Xiao-Hua Man

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the distribution of cagG gene of Helicobacter pylori(Hpylori) isolates cultured from patients with various digestive diseases and its relationship with gastroduodenal diseases.METHODS: cagG was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in 145 H pylori isolates cultured from patients with chronic gastritis (n=72), duodenal ulcer (n=48), gastric ulcer (n=17), or gastric and duodenal ulcer (n=8), and the relationship between cagGstatus and the grade of gastric mucosal inflammation was determined.RESULTS: cagG was present in 91.7% of the 145 H pylori isolates, with the rates were 90.3%, 93.8%, 88.2% and 100.0%, respectively, in those from patients with chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric and duodenal ulcer. There was no significant difference among the four groups (P>0.05). The average grade of gastric mucosal inflammation in the antrum and corpus was 1.819±0.325and 1.768±0.312, respectively in cagG positive patients,whereas the average inflammation grade was 1.649±0.297,1.598±0.278 respectively in cagG negative cases (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: cagG gene of H pylori was quite conservative,and most H pylori strains in Chinese patients were cagG positive.cagG status was not related to clinical outcome or the degree of gastric mucosal inflammation. Therefore, cagG can notbe used as a single marker for discrimination of H pylori strains with respect to a specific digestive disease.

  20. Effects of CAG repeat length, HTT protein length and protein context on cerebral metabolism measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy in transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bruce G; Andreassen, Ole A; Dedeoglu, Alpaslan; Leavitt, Blair; Hayden, Michael; Borchelt, David; Ross, Christopher A; Ferrante, Robert J; Beal, M Flint

    2005-10-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative illness caused by expansion of CAG repeats at the N-terminal end of the protein huntingtin. We examined longitudinal changes in brain metabolite levels using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five different mouse models. There was a large (>50%) exponential decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) with time in both striatum and cortex in mice with 150 CAG repeats (R6/2 strain). There was a linear decrease restricted to striatum in N171-82Q mice with 82 CAG repeats. Both the exponential and linear decreases of NAA were paralleled in time by decreases in neuronal area measured histologically. Yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice with 72 CAG repeats, but low expression levels, had less striatal NAA loss than the N171-82Q mice (15% vs. 43%). We evaluated the effect of gene context in mice with an approximate 146 CAG repeat on the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (HPRT). HPRT mice developed an obese phenotype in contrast to weight loss in the R6/2 and N171-82Q mice. These mice showed a small striatal NAA loss (21%), and a possible increase in brain lipids detectable by magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and decreased brain water T1. Our results indicate profound metabolic defects that are strongly affected by CAG repeat length, as well as gene expression levels and protein context.

  1. Androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in Chilean men with primary severe spermatogenic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Bacallao, Ketty; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Lardone, María C; López, Patricia V; Madariaga, Marcia; Valdevenito, Raúl; Piottante, Antonio; Ebensperger, Mauricio; Castro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    There is ample documentation supporting the fact that androgens are required for normal spermatogenesis. A minority of infertile men have abnormal testosterone blood levels or mild androgen receptor mutations. We investigated the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths in Chilean men with spermatogenic impairment. We studied 117 secretory azoospermic/oligozoospermic men (93 idiopathic and 24 excryptorchidic), without Y-chromosome microdeletions, and 121 controls with normal spermatogenesis (42 obstructive and 79 normozoospermic men). Peripheral blood was drawn to obtain genomic DNA for polymerase chain reaction and automated sequencing of CAG and GGN repeats. Testicular characterization included hormonal studies, physical evaluation, and seminal and biopsy analysis. The CAG and GGN polymorphism distributions were similar among idiopathic men, excryptorchidic men, and controls and among the different types of spermatogenic impairment. However, the proportion of the CAG 21 allele was significantly increased in idiopathic cases compared to controls (P = .012 by Bonferroni test, odds ratio = 2.99, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-7.0) and the CAG 32 allele only was observed in excryptorchidic patients (P CAG 21 allele (P = .024, χ(2) test). On the other hand, in idiopathic cases and controls the most common GGN allele was 23, followed by 24, but an inverse relation was found among excryptorchidic cases. The joint distribution of CAG and GGN in control, idiopathic, and excryptorchidic groups did not show an association between the 2 allele repeat polymorphisms (P > 0.05, χ(2) test). Our results suggest that the CAG 21 allele seems to increase the risk of idiopathic Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Moreover, the GGN 24 allele could be contributing to deranged androgen receptor function, associated with cryptorchidism and spermatogenic failure.

  2. Pathogenicty and immune prophylaxis of cag pathogenicity island gene knockout homogenic mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Jian Lin; Jing Xue; Yang Bai; Ji-De Wang; Ya-Li Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the role of cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI)of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in the pathogenicity and immune prophylaxis of H pyloriinfection.METHODS: Three pairs of H pylori including 3 strains of cagPAI positive wildtype bacteria and their cagPAI knockout homogenic mutants were utilized. H pylori binding to the gastric epithelial cells was analyzed by flow cytometry assays.Apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H pylori was determined by ELISA assay. Prophylaxis effect of the wildtype and mutant strains was compared by immunization with the sonicate of the bacteria into mice model.RESULTS: No difference was found in the apoptasis between cagPAI positive and knockout H pylori strains in respective of the ability in the binding to gastric epithelial cells as well as the induction of apoptosis. Both types of the bacteria were able to protect the mice from the infection of H pylori after immunization, with no difference between them regarding to the protection rate as well as the stimulation of the proliferation of splenocytes of the mice.CONCLUSION: The role of cagPAI in the pathogenicity and prophylaxis of H pylori infection remains to be cleared.

  3. Factors influencing the clinical expression of intermediate CAG repeat length mutations of the Huntington's disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Shu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Huei-Yang; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    Our aim is to elucidate the clinical variables associated with the development of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat lengths. 2,167 participants were seen throughout 44 research sites in the United States, Canada or Australia over a five-year natural history observational study (2006-2011) (Trial # NCT00313495). The Chi-square test and a generalised linear model were used to examine the differences in demographics and cognitive tests among three groups of CAG repeat length. The mixed model was then used to examine the time effect on cognitive assessments by CAG groups. No patient with CAG repeat length 27-35 developed manifest HD, whereas three patients with 36-39 did. Total motor score, maximal chorea score and maximal dystonia score were significantly different at baseline (p CAG 36-39; those with an associated university degree or higher education were less frequently diagnosed as manifest HD (OR 0.10, 95 % CI 0.02-0.54, p = 0.007). Age, smoking and lower education achievement were found to be significantly associated with higher odds of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat length mutations.

  4. Dominant effects of the Huntington's disease HTT CAG repeat length are captured in gene-expression data sets by a continuous analysis mathematical modeling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Galkina, Ekaterina I; Levantovsky, Rachel M; Fossale, Elisa; Anne Anderson, Mary; Gillis, Tammy; Srinidhi Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Coser, Kathryn R; Shioda, Toshi; Zhang, Bin; Furia, Matthew D; Derry, Jonathan; Kohane, Isaac S; Seong, Ihn Sik; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E

    2013-08-15

    In Huntington's disease (HD), the size of the expanded HTT CAG repeat mutation is the primary driver of the processes that determine age at onset of motor symptoms. However, correlation of cellular biochemical parameters also extends across the normal repeat range, supporting the view that the CAG repeat represents a functional polymorphism with dominant effects determined by the longer allele. A central challenge to defining the functional consequences of this single polymorphism is the difficulty of distinguishing its subtle effects from the multitude of other sources of biological variation. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based upon continuous correlation with CAG size was able to capture the modest (∼21%) contribution of the repeat to the variation in genome-wide gene expression in 107 lymphoblastoid cell lines, with alleles ranging from 15 to 92 CAGs. Furthermore, a mathematical model from an iterative strategy yielded predicted CAG repeat lengths that were significantly positively correlated with true CAG allele size and negatively correlated with age at onset of motor symptoms. Genes negatively correlated with repeat size were also enriched in a set of genes whose expression were CAG-correlated in human HD cerebellum. These findings both reveal the relatively small, but detectable impact of variation in the CAG allele in global data in these peripheral cells and provide a strategy for building multi-dimensional data-driven models of the biological network that drives the HD disease process by continuous analysis across allelic panels of neuronal cells vulnerable to the dominant effects of the HTT CAG repeat.

  5. Relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in premanifest and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Susie M D; Wild, Edward J; Hobbs, Nicola Z; Scahill, Rachael I; Ridgway, Gerard R; Macmanus, David G; Barker, Roger A; Fox, Nick C; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2009-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat on the gene encoding for the protein huntingtin. There are conflicting findings about the extent to which repeat length predicts signs of the disease or severity of disease progression in adults. This study examined the relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in a large cohort of pre- and post-motor onset HD gene carriers, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), an approach which allowed us to investigate the whole brain without defining a priori regions of interest. We also used VBM to examine group differences between 20 controls, 21 premanifest, and 40 early HD subjects. In the 61 mutation-positive subjects higher CAG repeat length was significantly associated with reduced volume of the body of the caudate nucleus bilaterally, left putamen, right insula, right parahippocampal gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and right occipital lobe, after correcting for age. The group contrasts showed significant reduction in grey matter volume in the early HD group relative to controls in widespread cortical as well as subcortical areas but there was no evidence of difference between controls and premanifest subjects. Overall we have demonstrated that increased CAG repeat length is associated with atrophy in extra-striatal as well as striatal regions, which has implications for the monitoring of disease-modifying therapies in the condition.

  6. The mTOR kinase inhibitor Everolimus decreases S6 kinase phosphorylation but fails to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in brain and is not neuroprotective in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frentzel Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin protein misfolds and accumulates within neurons where it mediates its toxic effects. Promoting mutant huntingtin clearance by activating macroautophagy is one approach for treating Huntington's disease (HD. In this study, we evaluated the mTOR kinase inhibitor and macroautophagy promoting drug everolimus in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Results Everolimus decreased phosphorylation of the mTOR target protein S6 kinase indicating brain penetration. However, everolimus did not activate brain macroautophagy as measured by LC3B Western blot analysis. Everolimus protected against early declines in motor performance; however, we found no evidence for neuroprotection as determined by brain pathology. In muscle but not brain, everolimus significantly decreased soluble mutant huntingtin levels. Conclusions Our data suggests that beneficial behavioral effects of everolimus in R6/2 mice result primarily from effects on muscle. Even though everolimus significantly modulated its target brain S6 kinase, this did not decrease mutant huntingtin levels or provide neuroprotection.

  7. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Ling; Du, Yan

    2017-02-28

    Ovarian cancer is one of the common gynecological malignancies worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at a later stage, thus missing the best opportunity for treatment. Despite the advancement of ovarian cancer treatment, the prognosis is still poor. Androgen receptor (AR) may play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. Previous studies regarding the association between AR CAG repeat length and ovarian cancer risk reported inconsistent results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between AR CAG repeat length and ovarian cancer risk following the MOOSE guidelines. PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and other databases were searched up to September 15(th) 2016. Case control studies with clear definition of CAG repeat length and detailed genotype information were included. Two authors independently reviewed and extracted data. Pooled analysis and subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity were performed for different genetic models. Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test were performed for publication bias estimation. Overall, there was no association between the AR CAG repeat polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk. However, short CAG repeat polymorphism was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk in African Americans and Chinese under the dominant model, whereas a reverse association was observed in Caucasians and Italians under the other three models. Our study results should be interpreted with caution. Further well-designed epidemiological and functional studies are needed to elucidate the role of AR in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  8. Direct and accurate measurement of CAG repeat configuration in the ataxin-1 (ATXN-1) gene by "dual-fluorescence labeled PCR-restriction fragment length analysis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang X; Ishikawa, Kinya; Sakamoto, Masaki; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ishiguro, Taro; Amino, Takeshi; Toru, Shuta; Kondo, Ikuko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2008-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1; OMIM: #164400) is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia caused by an expansion of CAG repeat, which encodes polyglutamine, in the ataxin-1 (ATXN1) gene. Length of polyglutamine in the ATXN1 protein is the critical determinant of pathogenesis of this disease. Molecular diagnosis of SCA1 is usually undertaken by assessing the length of CAG repeat configuration using primers spanning this configuration. However, this conventional method may potentially lead to misdiagnosis in assessing polyglutamine-encoding CAG repeat length, since CAT interruptions may be present within the CAG repeat configuration, not only in normal controls but also in neurologically symptomatic subjects. We developed a new method for assessing actual CAG repeat numbers not interrupted by CAT sequences. Polymerase chain reaction using a primer pair labeled with two different fluorescences followed by restriction enzyme digestion with SfaNI which recognizes the sequence "GCATC(N)(5)", lengths of actual CAG repeats that encode polyglutamine were directly detected. We named this method "dual fluorescence labeled PCR-restriction fragment length analysis". We found that numbers of actual CAG repeat encoding polyglutamine do not overlap between our cohorts of normal chromosomes (n=385) and SCA1 chromosomes (n=5). We conclude that the present method is a useful way for molecular diagnosis of SCA1.

  9. In vivo proof-of-concept of removal of the huntingtin caspase cleavage motif-encoding exon 12 approach in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaca-Carreira, João; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Evers, Melvin M; Jahanshahi, Ali; van-Roon-Mom, Willeke M C; Temel, Yasin

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, resulting in an expanded polyglutamine stretch at the N-terminal of the huntingtin protein. An important event in HD pathogenesis appears to be the proteolysis of the mutant protein, which forms N-terminal huntingtin fragments. These fragments form insoluble aggregates and are found in nuclei and cytoplasm of affected neurons where they interfere with normal cell functioning. Important cleavage sites are encoded by exon 12 of HTT. A novel approach is Htt protein modification through exon skipping, which has recently been proven effective both in vitro and in vivo. Here we report proof-of-concept of AON 12.1 in vivo using the YAC128 mouse model of HD. Our results support and encourage future longitudinal studies exploring the therapeutic effects of sustained infusions in the YAC128 mouse model.

  10. Clinical features of Chinese patients with Huntington's disease carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 within HTT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z-J; Sun, Y-M; Ni, W; Dong, Y; Shi, S-S; Wu, Z-Y

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 are less frequently seen and clinical features of them have been rarely reported. We identified four unrelated patients carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 (84.0 ± 13.76, ranging from 74 to 104) from 119 Chinese HD patients via direct sequencing. These four were all early onset with a mean age at presenting symptom of 9.8 ± 1.71 years. Paternal transmission was found in three of them and the fourth was apparently sporadic. In addition, they had atypical onset symptoms including epilepsy, intellectual decline, tics and walking instability, which might lead the clinicians to make the wrong diagnosis in the early stage of disease. Our work explores clinical features of Chinese HD patients with an expanded CAG repeat over 60 and may help the clinicians make a correct diagnosis in the early stage of disease.

  11. Analysis of the trinucleotide CAG repeat from the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene in healthy and diseased individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio, A; Tiranti, V; Bednarz, A L; Suomalainen, A; Spelbrink, J N; Lecrenier, N; Melberg, A; Zeviani, M; Poulton, J; Foury, F; Jacobs, H T

    1999-01-01

    The human nuclear gene (POLG) for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma) contains a trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeat within the coding sequence. We have investigated the frequency of different repeat-length alleles in populations of diseased and healthy individuals. The predominant allele of 10 CAG repeats was found at a very similar frequency (approximately 88%) in both Finnish and ethnically mixed population samples, with homozygosity close to the equilibrium prediction. Other alleles of between 5 and 13 repeat units were detected, but no larger, expanded alleles were found. A series of 51 British myotonic dystrophy patients showed no significant variation from controls, indicating an absence of generalised CAG repeat instability. Patients with a variety of molecular lesions in mtDNA, including sporadic, clonal deletions, maternally inherited point mutations, autosomally transmitted mtDNA depletion and autosomal dominant multiple deletions showed no differences in POLG trinucleotide repeat-length distribution from controls. These findings rule out POLG repeat expansion as a common pathogenic mechanism in disorders characterised by mitochondrial genome instability.

  12. CagI is an essential component of the Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system and forms a complex with CagL.

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    Kieu Thuy Pham

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of type B gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma, uses the Cag type IV secretion system to induce a strong proinflammatory response in the gastric mucosa and to inject its effector protein CagA into gastric cells. CagA translocation results in altered host cell gene expression profiles and cytoskeletal rearrangements, and it is considered as a major bacterial virulence trait. Recently, it has been shown that binding of the type IV secretion apparatus to integrin receptors on target cells is a crucial step in the translocation process. Several bacterial proteins, including the Cag-specific components CagL and CagI, have been involved in this interaction. Here, we have examined the localization and interactions of CagI in the bacterial cell. Since the cagI gene overlaps and is co-transcribed with the cagL gene, the role of CagI for type IV secretion system function has been difficult to assess, and conflicting results have been reported regarding its involvement in the proinflammatory response. Using a marker-free gene deletion approach and genetic complementation, we show now that CagI is an essential component of the Cag type IV secretion apparatus for both CagA translocation and interleukin-8 induction. CagI is distributed over soluble and membrane-associated pools and seems to be partly surface-exposed. Deletion of several genes encoding essential Cag components has an impact on protein levels of CagI and CagL, suggesting that both proteins require partial assembly of the secretion apparatus. Finally, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that CagI and CagL interact with each other. Taken together, our results indicate that CagI and CagL form a functional complex which is formed at a late stage of secretion apparatus assembly.

  13. Characterization of virulence genes cagA and vacA in Helicobacter Pylori and their prevalence in gastrointestinal disorders

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    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Neves, Daniel Locatelli; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori infection was determined using cultures of gastric biopsy samples of patients attended at the academic hospital of the Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Molecular methods were used to characterize the cagA and vacA genes from bacterial isolates associated with different diseases presented by patients. Out of a total of 81, forty-two gastric biopsy samples tested were positive for H. pylori, with a prevalence of 51.9%. No significant difference was found with regard to the gender (p=0.793) and age (p=0.183) of the patients. Genotype s1m1 vacA gene was found in 67% of the cases of peptic ulcer investigated (p=1.0), despite the limited number of patients with this disease (n=3). A correlation between the presence of less virulent strains (s2m2) and reflux esophagitis was found in the majority of the cases (45%), but without statistical significance. An association between the prevalence of cagA gene, found in 92% of isolates, and peptic ulcer was not observed (p=1.0), suggesting that this gene cannot be considered a specific marker of severity in our environment. The results reinforce the importance of conducting regional studies and the need to characterize H. pylori virulence genes associated with different diseases. PMID:24031754

  14. Structural Mechanisms of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Suppression by the Synthetic Chaperonin-like CCT5 Complex Explained by Cryoelectron Tomography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Michele C.; Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Isas, Jose M.; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G.; King, Jonathan A.; Langen, Ralf; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by functional deficits and loss of striatal neurons, is linked to an expanded and unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT). This DNA sequence translates to a polyglutamine repeat in the protein product, leading to mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein aggregation. The aggregation of mHTT is inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin. Recently, a novel complex comprised of a single type of TRiC subunit has been reported to inhibit mHTT aggregation. Specifically, the purified CCT5 homo-oligomer complex, when compared with TRiC, has a similar structure, ATP use, and substrate refolding activity, and, importantly, it also inhibits mHTT aggregation. Using an aggregation suppression assay and cryoelectron tomography coupled with a novel computational classification method, we uncover the interactions between the synthetic CCT5 complex (∼1 MDa) and aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing 46 glutamines (mHTTQ46-Ex1). We find that, in a similar fashion to TRiC, synthetic CCT5 complex caps mHTT fibrils at their tips and encapsulates mHTT oligomers, providing a structural description of the inhibition of mHTTQ46-Ex1 by CCT5 complex and a shared mechanism of mHTT inhibition between TRiC chaperonin and the CCT5 complex: cap and contain. PMID:25995452

  15. Structural Mechanisms of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Suppression by the Synthetic Chaperonin-like CCT5 Complex Explained by Cryoelectron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Michele C; Sergeeva, Oksana A; Isas, Jose M; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; King, Jonathan A; Langen, Ralf; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2015-07-10

    Huntington disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by functional deficits and loss of striatal neurons, is linked to an expanded and unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT). This DNA sequence translates to a polyglutamine repeat in the protein product, leading to mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein aggregation. The aggregation of mHTT is inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin. Recently, a novel complex comprised of a single type of TRiC subunit has been reported to inhibit mHTT aggregation. Specifically, the purified CCT5 homo-oligomer complex, when compared with TRiC, has a similar structure, ATP use, and substrate refolding activity, and, importantly, it also inhibits mHTT aggregation. Using an aggregation suppression assay and cryoelectron tomography coupled with a novel computational classification method, we uncover the interactions between the synthetic CCT5 complex (∼ 1 MDa) and aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing 46 glutamines (mHTTQ46-Ex1). We find that, in a similar fashion to TRiC, synthetic CCT5 complex caps mHTT fibrils at their tips and encapsulates mHTT oligomers, providing a structural description of the inhibition of mHTTQ46-Ex1 by CCT5 complex and a shared mechanism of mHTT inhibition between TRiC chaperonin and the CCT5 complex: cap and contain.

  16. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

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    Niels H Skotte

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs. We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  17. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

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    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H. [H.A. Chapman Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  18. [Tissue variability of androgen receptor gene in bulbospinal muscular atrophy--comparison of the number of CAG repeats between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H; Kimura, F; Shinoda, K; Ohsawa, N; Nakagawa, T; Shimizu, A

    1993-10-01

    We investigated an expansion of CAG repeats in exon 1 of androgen receptor gene in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from the patients with various neuro-muscular disorders (5 BSMA, 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 3 patients with spinal progressive muscular atrophy and 2 patients with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy), by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification according to LaSpadas' description. These muscle tissues had been stored at -70 degrees C freezer during 7 years. We also studied the tissue variation of CAG repeats size between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes in 4 patients with BSMA. And we confirmed the increased number of CAG repeats in all 5 BSMA except for other patients with neurogenic muscular atrophy. In the 4 BSMA patients, we subcloned the PCR products from muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes, and we determined the number of CAG repeats by sequencing. The repeats of them were 43-51, and all BSMA patients showed the same number of CAG repeats in muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes. The CAG repeats fragment of BSMA may be stable region in frozen storage state for 7 years, and we didn't recognized the somatic variation at least between muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes.

  19. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrak, Sami; Ayyasamy, Vanniarajan; Zirpoli, Gary; Ambrosone, Christine; Bandera, Elisa V; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Pawlish, Karen S; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav

    2012-01-01

    The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA) women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls) who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21). Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  20. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

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    Sami Azrak

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21. Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  1. Intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene is a unique genetic risk factor for ALS--a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

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    Ming-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rare degenerative condition of the motor neurons. Over 10% of ALS cases are linked to monogenic mutations, with the remainder thought to be due to other risk factors, including environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms, and possibly gene-environmental interactions. We examined the association between ALS and an intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene using a meta-analytic approach. Observational studies were searched with relevant disease and gene terms from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from January 2010 through to January 2014. All identified articles were screened using disease terms, gene terms, population information, and CAG repeat information according to PRISMA guidelines. The final list of 17 articles was further evaluated based on the study location, time period, and authors to exclude multiple usage of the same study populations: 13 relevant articles were retained for this study. The range 30-33 CAG repeats in the ATXN2 gene was most strongly associated with ALS. The meta-analysis revealed that the presence of an intermediate CAG repeat (30-33 in the ATXN2 gene was associated with an increased risk of ALS [odds ratio (OR = 4.44, 95%CI: 2.91-6.76] in Caucasian ALS patients. There was no significant difference in the association of this CAG intermediate repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene between familial ALS cases (OR = 3.59, 1.58-8.17 and sporadic ALS cases (OR = 3.16, 1.88-5.32. These results indicate that the presence of intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene is a specific genetic risk factor for ALS, unlike monogenic mutations with an autosomal dominant transmission mode, which cause a more severe phenotype of ALS, with a higher prevalence in familial ALS.

  2. Intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene is a unique genetic risk factor for ALS--a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Dong; Gomes, James; Cashman, Neil R; Little, Julian; Krewski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare degenerative condition of the motor neurons. Over 10% of ALS cases are linked to monogenic mutations, with the remainder thought to be due to other risk factors, including environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms, and possibly gene-environmental interactions. We examined the association between ALS and an intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene using a meta-analytic approach. Observational studies were searched with relevant disease and gene terms from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from January 2010 through to January 2014. All identified articles were screened using disease terms, gene terms, population information, and CAG repeat information according to PRISMA guidelines. The final list of 17 articles was further evaluated based on the study location, time period, and authors to exclude multiple usage of the same study populations: 13 relevant articles were retained for this study. The range 30-33 CAG repeats in the ATXN2 gene was most strongly associated with ALS. The meta-analysis revealed that the presence of an intermediate CAG repeat (30-33) in the ATXN2 gene was associated with an increased risk of ALS [odds ratio (OR) = 4.44, 95%CI: 2.91-6.76)] in Caucasian ALS patients. There was no significant difference in the association of this CAG intermediate repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene between familial ALS cases (OR = 3.59, 1.58-8.17) and sporadic ALS cases (OR = 3.16, 1.88-5.32). These results indicate that the presence of intermediate CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene is a specific genetic risk factor for ALS, unlike monogenic mutations with an autosomal dominant transmission mode, which cause a more severe phenotype of ALS, with a higher prevalence in familial ALS.

  3. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  4. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

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    James R C Miller

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  5. Association of smoking, alcohol and NSAIDs use with expression of cag A and cag T genes of Helicobacter pylori in salivary samples of asymptomatic subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinaki Ghosh; Subhash Laxmanrao Bodhankar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To determine the association of smoking, alcohol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use with presence and virulence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in a representative sample of a random adult population of asymptomatic subjects. Methods:Non virulent 16S rRNA and virulent cag A and T genes from salivary samples of 854 asymptomatic subjects were determined using polymerase chain reaction. The presence and absence of virulent and non virulent infection was statistically compared with consumption of smoking, alcohol and NSAIDs. Results:The prevalence of infection in male and female subjects was found to be 69.25%and 66.90%, respectively. The prevalence of infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to consumption of alcohol was as follows:current (31.22%), former (52.20%) and never (43.58%). The prevalence of infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to smoking of cigarettes was as follows:current (88.80%), former (57.14%) and never (33.33%). The prevalence of infection in the subject population consuming NSAIDs and not consuming NSAIDs frequently was found to be 82.75%and 21.16%, respectively. Virulence in male and female subjects was found to be 60.00%and 50.00%, respectively. The presence of virulent infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to consumption of alcohol was as follows:current (28.57%), former (40.15%) and never (50.00%). The prevalence of virulent infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to smoking of cigarettes was as follows:current (79.32%), former (75.00%) and never (50.00%). The prevalence of virulent infection in the subject population consuming NSAIDs and not consuming NSAIDs frequently was found to be 88.23%and 66.66%, respectively. Conclusions:It can be concluded that smoking and NSAIDs consumption are aggravating factors for virulence of H. pylori and alcohol can inhibit H. pylori infection in asymptomatic

  6. UreA and cagA genes of Helicobacter pylori in Egyptian patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and benign laryngeal polyps: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ghada; Nabiel, Yasmin; Ali, Omima; El-Nady, Ghada; Musaad, Ahmed; El-Sharkawy, Asser

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to estimate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori ureA gene and evaluate cagA gene-positive strains in both patients of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and those with benign laryngeal polyps. This study included 49 patients confirmed pathologically to have LSCC and 15 patients with benign laryngeal polyps over a period from June 2013 to March 2015. Samples of laryngeal tissue were collected during direct laryngoscope under general anesthesia to be pathologically evaluated followed by analysis for H. pylori detection. Each laryngeal tissue sample was divided into three parts; one for bacteriological examination, the second for pathological examination and the third for PCR to detect both ureA and cagA genes. Out of 49 LSCC samples, 31 (64.6 %) was positive for ureA by PCR. Out of them, 29 samples (93.5 %) were cagA positive. Only three cases (20 %) of the benign laryngeal polyp were ureA positive by PCR and one of them was cagA positive by PCR. By the bacteriological culture, only eight samples (25.8 %) gave growth. All of them were ureA positive and only seven of them were cagA positive. There was a significant association between presence of H. pylori and LSCC as compared to benign laryngeal polyp which may contribute in the pathogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma. These results should be confirmed by further studies over larger number of cases.

  7. Androgen receptor gene methylation and exon one CAG repeat length in ovarian cancer: differences from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Samar; Zoheiry, Nivan M; Hamed, Wael M; Going, James J; Craft, John A

    2004-07-01

    More than one neoplastic founder clone can exist in benign epithelial tumours. Although theories of clonal selection make pluriclonality appear unlikely in carcinomas, published data do not exclude this possibility. This study looked for evidence of multiclonal X inactivation in ovarian carcinoma using AR methylation as a marker. Fifteen unifocal ovarian carcinomas and 14 multifocal carcinomas all in Scottish patients were studied. One representative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour block was chosen for each of the former and two for the latter. From each of these 43 tumour blocks three samples each of approximately 10(4) carcinoma cells were obtained by microdissection (129 in all). DNA released by proteinase K digestion was subjected to PCR amplification of the androgen receptor gene AR exon I CAG repeat polymorphism with and without prior digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes HpaII and HhaI. Complex amplification patterns were consistent with mosaic X inactivation in some ovarian carcinomas but acquired anomalies of AR methylation cannot be excluded. Parallel analysis of other X-linked polymorphic loci would strengthen the inference of clonality status from DNA methylation data in tumour X studies. Strikingly, the number of CAG repeats in the 29 ovarian tumour patients (median 16, range 11 - 20) was substantially fewer than in 34 previously studied breast cancer patients from the same scottish population (median 21, range 14 - 26; P CAG repeat were over-represented in the ovarian cancer patients but not in the breast cancer series. These findings reinforce recent suggestions that AR may have a role in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  8. Striatal infusion of glial conditioned medium diminishes huntingtin pathology in r6/1 mice.

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    Juan Perucho

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene which produces widespread neuronal and glial pathology. We here investigated the possible therapeutic role of glia or glial products in Huntington's disease using striatal glial conditioned medium (GCM from fetus mice (E16 continuously infused for 15 and 30 days with osmotic minipumps into the left striatum of R6/1 mice. Animals infused with GCM had significantly less huntingtin inclusions in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex and in the ipsilateral and contralateral striata than mice infused with cerebrospinal fluid. The numbers of DARPP-32 and TH positive neurons were also greater in the ipsilateral but not contralateral striata and substantia nigra, respectively, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of GCM on efferent striatal and nigro-striatal dopamine neurons. GCM increases activity of the autophagic pathway, as shown by the reduction of autophagic substrate, p-62, and the augmentation of LC3 II, Beclin-1 and LAMP-2 protein levels, direct markers of autophagy, in GCM infused mice. GCM also increases BDNF levels. These results suggest that CGM should be further explored as a putative neuroprotective agent in Huntington's disease.

  9. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  10. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Szkaradkiewicz

    Full Text Available In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4 and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains, multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2 and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3. Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1 high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains. In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes.

  11. Negative association between androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Goodarzi, Mark O; Xiong, Ting; Wang, Di; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Hanwang

    2012-10-01

    A number of studies focusing on the association between the exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have revealed conflicting results. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the strength of the association and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity that may have influenced the results. Studies matched to search terms from PubMed, EMBASE and HuGE Navigator published through to 31 January 2012 were retrieved. Data extraction from the included studies was carried out by two authors independently. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) of biallelic mean and odds ratios (ORs) of alleles and genotypes were pooled for meta-analysis. Sixteen articles reporting on 17 studies were included. In continuous data analysis, the summary WMD was -0.06 (95% confidence interval -0.29 to 0.16). In dichotomous data analysis, we divided the alleles into short and long alleles and calculated the summary ORs. No statistically significant results were identified by different comparison models or different cut-off point definitions. No publication bias was observed in continuous and dichotomous data analysis. In summary, the current systematic review and meta-analysis found that the AR CAG microsatellite repeat polymorphism is unlikely to be a major determining factor in the development of PCOS.

  12. Normal CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease genes of Parkinson`s disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Barton, D.E. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    The clinical features of Parkinson`s disease, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia and occasionally tremor, are seen in juvenile-onset Huntington`s disease. Therefore, the CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene were investigated in 45 Parkinson`s disease patients and compared to 40 control individuals. All of the Parkinson`s disease chromosomes fell within the normal size ranges. In addition, the distributions of the two repeats in the Parkinson`s disease patients did not differ significantly from those of the control population. Therefore, abnormalities of these trinucleotide repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene are not likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson`s disease. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  13. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  14. The (CAG)n tract of Machado–Joseph Disease gene (ATXN3): a comparison between DNA and mRNA in patients and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Santos, Cristina; Montiel, Rafael; Kay, Teresa; Vasconcelos, João; Maciel, Patrícia; Lima, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset (occurring at a mean age of 40.2 years). The clinical manifestation of MJD is dependent on the presence of an expansion of the (CAG)n motif within exon 10 of the ATXN3 gene, located at 14q32.1. The variance in onset of MJD is only partially correlated (∼50–80%) with the extension of the CAG tract in genomic DNA (gDNA). The main aim of this work was to determine whether there are discrepancies in the size of the (CAG)n tract between gDNA and mRNA, and to establish whether there is a better association between age at onset and repeat size at the mRNA level. We typed gDNA and cDNA samples for the (CAG)n tract totalizing 108 wild-type and 52 expanded ATXN3 alleles. In wild-type alleles no differences were found between gDNA and cDNA. In expanded alleles, the CAG repeat size in gDNA was not always directly transcribed into the mRNA; on average there were differences of +1 repeat at the cDNA level. The slight discrepancies obtained were insufficient to cause significant differences in the distribution of the expanded alleles, and therefore no improvement in onset variance explanation was obtained with mRNA. PMID:19935829

  15. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence...... of the common 10-CAG-long POLG allele with testicular cancer as well as previously reported in some European populations' association with male subfertility, which is a condition carrying an increased risk of TGCT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The number of CAG repeats in both POLG alleles was established in 243.......001). The vast majority of the homozygous patients had a seminoma (11 of 12; 97%), despite that only about half (55%) of the studied patients had this tumour type. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the POLG polymorphism may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of TGCT particularly in seminoma...

  16. How strong is the association between CAG and GGN repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Nieder, A.M.; Ostrer, H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although narrative reviews have suggested an association between (CAG)n and (GGN)n polymorphisms in the AR gene and prostate cancer, it has never been quantified systematically. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to provide relative and absolute quantitative summary estimates with suff

  17. Analysis of the CAG repeat number in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene in Slovene men with idiopathic azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Borut Peterlin; Branko Zorn; Natasa Teran; Tanja Kunej

    2007-01-01

    @@ Dear Sir, I am Borut Peterlin, from Division of Medical Genetics,Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Medical Center, Ljubljana, Slovenia. We write to you to discuss if the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is associated with male infertility in a group of 190 Slovene infertile men compared to 137 men with proven fertility.

  18. Correlation study between the polymorphism of repetitive sequence in gene CAG of androgen receptor and the occurrence and progression of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lei Zhai; Xiao-Wei Qu; Liang Guo; Qian-He Ha

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relation between the polymorphism of repetitive sequence in gene CAG of androgen receptor (AR) and the susceptibility and clinical stages as well as pathological grading of prostate cancer among Han population. Method: Sixty-eight cases with prostate cancer hospitalized in Urinary Surgery Department from Feb. 2010 to Feb. 2012 and 60 healthy cases were chosen as research subjects. Methods of PCR and direct sequencing were adopted to detect DNA sequence of AR gene and the length of repetitive sequence in CAG. Results: The lengths of repetitive sequence in CAG of patients with prostate cancer and healthy people were (22.3±4.6) and (23.0±4.9), respectively showing no statistical significance. Comparing length (repetitive sequence of CAG)>22, those with that ﹤ 22 suffer a remarkably higher risk of prostate cancer (P﹤0.05). The number of repetitive sequence in CAG of patients at clinical stage C-D was less than that of patients at stage B, and the number of repetitive sequence in CAG of patients with poorly differentiated prostate cancer was also less than that of patients with moderately and highly differentiated prostate cancer. But there was no statistical significance int the difference (P>0.05); the proportion of patients with length ﹤22 at clinical stage C-D was much larger than that of patients at clinical stage B (P﹤0.05), and as the aggravation of pathological grading, the proportion of patients with the length ﹤22 was also remarkably increased and there was significant difference between patients with highly differentiated prostate cancer and those with poorly differentiated prostate cancer (P﹤0.05). Conclusions: There is correlation between the occurrence and development of prostate cancer in Han population and the polymorphism of repetitive sequence in gene CAG of androgen receptor. The less the number of repetitive sequence in CAG is, the higher the risk of prostate cancer will be and the more severe the clinical

  19. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar E Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92-7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation.

  20. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenielson Vilar e Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92–7.46, and P=0.002. A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation.

  1. 家族性亨廷顿病临床和(CAG)n多态性分析%The polymorphism analysis of (CAG)n gene in Huntington's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初海鹰; 王剑锋; 杨佩满; 黄尚志

    2003-01-01

    @@ 亨廷顿病(Huntington's disease, HD)是一种常染色体显性遗传的基底节和大脑皮层变性疾病,临床特征为慢性进行性的舞蹈样动作和痴呆.1993年,分离获得HD相关基因IT15,并确定其开放阅读框架5'端多态性CAG三核苷酸重复序列的过度扩展为致病的突变[1],正常人群(CAG)n拷贝数为11-34个.通过检测CAG拷贝数,可从基因水平确诊HD.基于此,我们对一个家族性HD家系两个病例进行了基因分析.

  2. Comparison of three PCR methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA and detection of cagA gene in gastric biopsy specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Smith; AO Coker; KS Oyedeji; AO Arigbabu; F Cantet; F Megraud; OO Ojo; AO Uwaifo; JA Otegbayo; SO Ola

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To comparatively evaluate PCR and other diagnostic methods (the rapid urease test and / or culture) in order to determine which of the three PCR methods (ureA, glmM and 26-kDa, SSA gene) was most appropriate in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection and also to evaluate the detection of a putative virulence marker of H pylori, the cagA gene, by PCR in biopsy specimens.METHODS: One hundred and eighty-nine biopsy specimens were collected from 63 patients (three biopsies each)undergoing upper gastroduodenal endoscopy for various dyspeptic symptoms. The PCR methods used to detect H pylori DNA directly from biopsies were the glmM, 26-kDa,ureA and then cagA was used to compare the culture technique and CLO for urease with the culture technique being used as the gold standard.RESULTS: Thirty-five percent of the biopsies were positive for Hpylori DNA using the 3 PCR methods, while 68% of these were positive for the cagA gene. Twenty-four percent of the biopsies were negative for H pylori DNA in all PCR methods screened. The remaining 41% were either positive for ureA gene only, glmMonly, 26-kDa only, or ureA + glmM,ureA + 26-kDa, glmM + 26-kDa. Out of the 35% positive biopsies, 41% and 82% were positive by culture and CLO respectively, while all negative biopsies were also negative by culture and cagA. Cag A+ infection was also predominantly found in Hpylori DNA of the biopsies irrespective of the clinical diagnosis.CONCLUSION: This method is useful for correctly identifying infections caused by H pylori and can be easily applied in our laboratory for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Tandem CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer risk in black and white men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panz, V R; Joffe, B I; Spitz, I; Lindenberg, T; Farkas, A; Haffejee, M

    2001-07-01

    The most common malignancy in men worldwide is cancer of the prostate. Androgens play a direct role in normal and malignant growth of prostate cells via the androgen receptor (AR). This study analyzed the polymorphic CAG repeat sequence in exon 1 of the AR gene to determine if the number of repeats might be an indicator of prostate cancer risk or aggressive disease. DNA was extracted from blood samples of 20 black and 20 white men with well-documented prostate cancer and 40 healthy controls (20 blacks and 20 whites). PCR amplification was followed by gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. This region normally contains between 9 and 29 repeats. Patients and controls both had minor variations in the number of repeats, which ranged from 13 to 27 with 21 being the most frequent allele. Black controls and patients both had a mean of 20 +/- 3 repeats; in whites the mean was significantly lower in patients than controls (21 +/- 2 versus 23 +/- 2; p = 0.004). Combined black and white patients also had a lower number than the combined group of controls (20 +/- 3 versus 22 +/- 3; p = 0.02). Similarly, black and white patients with aggressive disease had a lower number than patients whose disease was more slowly progressive (19 +/- 2 versus 22 +/- 3; p = 0.02). We conclude that the small differences in the number of CAG repeats in both black and white patients do not appear to be a strong indicator of risk or aggressive disease but that this size polymorphism may be one of many genetic and environmental risk factors involved in prostate cancer.

  4. Stoichiometry of base excision repair proteins correlates with increased somatic CAG instability in striatum over cerebellum in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vassiliki; Berquist, Brian R; Wilson, David M; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Trottier, Yvon; Merienne, Karine

    2009-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of an unstable CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Instability affects both germline and somatic cells. Somatic instability increases with age and is tissue-specific. In particular, the CAG repeat sequence in the striatum, the brain region that preferentially degenerates in HD, is highly unstable, whereas it is rather stable in the disease-spared cerebellum. The mechanisms underlying the age-dependence and tissue-specificity of somatic CAG instability remain obscure. Recent studies have suggested that DNA oxidation and OGG1, a glycosylase involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine lesions, contribute to this process. We show that in HD mice oxidative DNA damage abnormally accumulates at CAG repeats in a length-dependent, but age- and tissue-independent manner, indicating that oxidative DNA damage alone is not sufficient to trigger somatic instability. Protein levels and activities of major base excision repair (BER) enzymes were compared between striatum and cerebellum of HD mice. Strikingly, 5'-flap endonuclease activity was much lower in the striatum than in the cerebellum of HD mice. Accordingly, Flap Endonuclease-1 (FEN1), the main enzyme responsible for 5'-flap endonuclease activity, and the BER cofactor HMGB1, both of which participate in long-patch BER (LP-BER), were also significantly lower in the striatum compared to the cerebellum. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that POLbeta was specifically enriched at CAG expansions in the striatum, but not in the cerebellum of HD mice. These in vivo data fit a model in which POLbeta strand displacement activity during LP-BER promotes the formation of stable 5'-flap structures at CAG repeats representing pre-expanded intermediate structures, which are not efficiently removed when FEN1 activity is constitutively low. We propose that the stoichiometry of BER enzymes is one critical

  5. Stoichiometry of base excision repair proteins correlates with increased somatic CAG instability in striatum over cerebellum in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vassiliki Goula

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of an unstable CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Instability affects both germline and somatic cells. Somatic instability increases with age and is tissue-specific. In particular, the CAG repeat sequence in the striatum, the brain region that preferentially degenerates in HD, is highly unstable, whereas it is rather stable in the disease-spared cerebellum. The mechanisms underlying the age-dependence and tissue-specificity of somatic CAG instability remain obscure. Recent studies have suggested that DNA oxidation and OGG1, a glycosylase involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine lesions, contribute to this process. We show that in HD mice oxidative DNA damage abnormally accumulates at CAG repeats in a length-dependent, but age- and tissue-independent manner, indicating that oxidative DNA damage alone is not sufficient to trigger somatic instability. Protein levels and activities of major base excision repair (BER enzymes were compared between striatum and cerebellum of HD mice. Strikingly, 5'-flap endonuclease activity was much lower in the striatum than in the cerebellum of HD mice. Accordingly, Flap Endonuclease-1 (FEN1, the main enzyme responsible for 5'-flap endonuclease activity, and the BER cofactor HMGB1, both of which participate in long-patch BER (LP-BER, were also significantly lower in the striatum compared to the cerebellum. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that POLbeta was specifically enriched at CAG expansions in the striatum, but not in the cerebellum of HD mice. These in vivo data fit a model in which POLbeta strand displacement activity during LP-BER promotes the formation of stable 5'-flap structures at CAG repeats representing pre-expanded intermediate structures, which are not efficiently removed when FEN1 activity is constitutively low. We propose that the stoichiometry of BER enzymes

  6. Prevalence of cagA and vacA genes in isolates from patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito Carlos AA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographical differences in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori genes and their association with disease severity have been identified. This study analyzes the prevalences of the cagA gene and alleles of the vacA gene in H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in isolates from Recife, PE, Brazil. Gastric biopsy of 61 H. pylori-positive patients were submitted to DNA extraction and gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Among the 61 patients, 21 suffered from duodenal ulcer (DU and 40 from gastritis (GT. The prevalence of H. pylori strains harbouring the cagA gene was higher in the DU group (90.5% than in the GT group (60% (p = 0.02. The vacA gene was amplified in 56 out of 61 biopsies, of which 43 (76.8% contained bacteria carrying the s1 allele and 13 (23.2% the s2. However, the prevalence of the vacA s1 genotying was the same in either DU or GT group. The majority of the s1-typed strains, 39 (90.7% out of 43, were subtype s1b. In resume there was a strong association between the H. pylori cagA+ gene and DU. However, there were no differences between the DU and GT groups in relation to the vacA s1 and s2 alleles distribution, albeit the subtype s1b was predominat.

  7. Heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori cag genotypes in experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, M; Crosatti, M; Kim, S K; Romero, J; Blaser, M J

    2001-09-11

    Our aim was to assess whether the Helicobacter pylori population recovered from experimentally infected mice show heterogeneity in cag genotypes. Wild-type FVB/N mice were challenged with strain Hp1 and sacrificed 8 weeks later. Direct PCR on gastric tissue was performed using primers for glmM and cagA, and for these two genes and for cagE and virB11 using DNA from the infecting and the emerging strains. The gastric tissues of two of five mice were PCR+ for glmM but not cagA. For the infecting strain, the PCRs for all four genes studied were strongly positive, but the sweeps from the emerging strains from both mice gave weaker signals for cagA and cagE. Examination of single colonies showed reduced or absent signals for cagA and cagE in relation to glmM and virB11. Serial dilution PCR of sweep isolates from the mice showed a 10- to 100-fold decrease in cagA signal compared to the infecting strain. The decrease of cagA and cagE, but not virB11, amplification and lack of cagA hybridization in Southern blots indicates a selective loss of the right half of the cag island during murine infection. This phenomenon is consistent with host-induced adaptive changes of cag genotype in the population of colonizing H. pylori cells.

  8. Expression of nuclear factor-kappa B and target genes in gastric precancerous lesions and adenocarcinoma:Association with Helicobactor pylori cagA (+) infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Fang Yang; Chang-Sheng Deng; Yong-Yan Xiong; Ling-Ling Gong; Bi-Cheng Wang; Jun Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and its target genes in intestinal metaplasia (IN),dysplasia (DYS) and gastric carcinoma (GC) infected with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) and to investigate the mechanism underlying H pylori cytotoxin associated gene A (cag A) infection leading to gastric adenocarcinoma.METHODS: Expressions of NF-κB/p65 and its target genes:c-myc, cyclinD1 and bcl-xl were immunohistochemically examined in 289 cases of gastric biopsy and resection specimens from patients with IM, DYS and GC infected with H pylori. H pylori in the above mentioned tissues was detected by Warthin-Starry stain and rapid urease tests.IgG antibody to cagA in sera of the patients was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: The positive rates of NF-κB/p65 were significantly higher in groups with cagA of IMI-Ⅱ(28/33), IM Ⅲ(48/52),DYSI(27/31), DYS Ⅱ-Ⅲ(28/32), GC(35/40) than in groups without cagA of IMI-Ⅱ(4/17), IMIII(3/20), DYSI(3/20),DYSII-Ⅲ(6/21), GC(10/23). The expressions of c-myc,cyclinD1, and bcl-xl were significantly higher in groups with cagA of IM Ⅲ(47/52, 49/52, 46/52), DYSII-Ⅲ(29/32, 26/32,25/32) than in groups without cagA of IM Ⅲ(8/20, 7/20,5/20), DYSII-Ⅲ(10/21, 8/21,3/21), which were in conformity with the expression of NF-κB in IM Ⅲ, and DYSII-Ⅲ. A significantly higher expression level of NF-κB/p65, c-myc,cyclinD1 and bcl-xl was detected in intestinal type GC(27/28,18/28, 22/28, 24/28) than in diffuse type GC(8/12, 3/12,3/12, 6/12), respectively.CONCLUSION: There may be two different molecular mechanisms in the occurrence of intestinal and diffuse type gastric carcinomas. Intestinal type gastric carcinoma is strongly associated with high expression of c-myc, cyclinD1 and bcl-xl through NF-κB/p65 activated by H pylori cagA.Inhibiting the activity of NF-κB is an effective and promising way to prevent intestinal type gastric carcinoma.

  9. Association of H pylori cagA and vacA genotypes and IL-8 gene polymorphisms with clinical outcome of infection in Iranian patients with gastrointestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eskandar Kamali-Sarvestani; Abdulah Bazargani; Malihe Masoudian; Kamran Lankarani; Ali-Reza Taghavi; Mehdi Saberifiroozi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find out if a functional promoter polymorphism in the IL-8 gene along with cagA status and polymorphisms in vac4 gene influence the type of diseases in Iranian patients infected by H pylori.METHODS: IL-8 -251 A/T polymorphism was genotypedby oligonucleotide allele specific PCR (ASO-PCR) in a sample of 233 patients with H pylori infection undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence of cagA gene and polymorphisms in vacA gene was also determined by PCR. Association of these genetic polymorphisms with the development of gastritis, peptic ulcers as well as gastric cancer was tested. RESULTS: When the patients with different clinical manifestations were compared according to the presence of cagA gene or various vacA genotypes, only the vacA genotypes were significantly different among gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer patients (x2= 17.8; P =0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the frequency of IL-8 -251 A/T genotypes between patients with gastric cancer and benign diseases (x2=10.47; P = 0.005).CONCLUSION: The IL-8 -251 A/T polymorphism and the polymorphisms in H pylori vacA gene are involved in limiting the infection outcome to gastritis and peptic ulcer or in favoring cancer onset in Iranian patients.

  10. Analysis of the CAG repeat region of the androgen receptor gene in a kindred with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, D D; Yee, W C; Greenberg, C R; Wrogemann, K

    1992-10-01

    Herein we describe a family with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease), an adult onset neuromuscular disease characterized by slow progression, predominant proximal and bulbar muscle weakness. One frequent association is the appearance of gynecomastia. This disorder was previously shown to be linked to the locus DXYS1 on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Recently, a report implicated a mutation at the N-terminus of the androgen receptor gene involving amplification of CAG repeats as the cause of X-linked SBMA. We studied this region of the androgen receptor in a kindred clinically suspected but not confirmed of having X-linked SBMA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by Southern analysis and DNA sequencing. The mutated allele was found to have an increased number of 51 CAG repeats confirming the clinical diagnosis of SBMA. Normal individuals revealed 23 repeat numbers within the normal range, while another unrelated X-linked SBMA patient had an enlarged CAG repeat region. The carrier or disease status could be established or confirmed in 12 individuals of this family on the basis of detecting normal and disease alleles reflected by the number of CAG repeats.

  11. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the ...... muscle size increased exponentially with decreasing androgen levels and was tripled at total testosterone levels...... the CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20...... continuous outcomes (thigh and axial muscle area, lower extremity, upper extremity, and trunk lean body mass, and total body fat mass) and five binary outcomes of low muscle size defined as men with muscle size below the lower 10 percentile of each continuous outcome of muscle size. Results: The CAG...

  12. No evidence that 2D:4D is related to the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eHönekopp

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The length ratio of the second to the fourth digit (2D:4D is a putative marker of prenatal testosterone (T effects. The number of CAG repeats (CAGn in the AR gene is negatively correlated with T sensitivity in vitro. Results regarding the relationship between 2D:4D and CAGn are mixed but have featured prominently in arguments for and against the validity of 2D:4D. Here, I present random-effects meta-analyses on 14 relevant samples with altogether 1,904 subjects. Results were homogeneous across studies. Even liberal estimates (upper limit of the 95% CI were close to zero and therefore suggested no substantial relationship of CAGn with either right-hand 2D:4D, left-hand 2D:4D, or the difference between the two. However, closer analysis of the effects of CAGn on T dependent gene activation in vitro and of relationships between CAGn and T dependent phenotypic characteristics suggest that normal variability of CAGn has mostly no, very small, or inconsistent effects. Therefore, the lack of a clear association between CAGn and 2D:4D has no negative implications for the latter’s validity as a marker of prenatal T effects.

  13. Relationship between New Allelic Types of Helicobacter pylori vacA Gene and cagA Status and Risk of GU or DU in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bakhti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Several studies have described VacA and CagA as the two important virulence determinants of Helicobacter pylori, which are associated with gastric ulcer (GU and duodenal ulcer (DU. The aim of present study was to determine the associations of the i and d regions genotypes of H. pylori vacA gene and cagA status with GU and DU risk. Methods: A total of 177 isolates were cultured from the biopsies of Iranian patients with different geographic origins and genotyped. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: Frequency of the vacA i1, i2, i1i2, d1, and d2 alleles and cagA in all patients was 42.9%, 55.4%, 1.7%, 41.8%, 58.2% and 68.4%, respectively. There was a significant difference between the frequencies of vacA i1 in isolates from GU than those from non-atrophic gastritis (p<0.05. When the GU was considered as a dependant factor by the multiple logistic regression analysis, the vacA i1 genotype was significantly associated with the age- and sex-adjusted risk for GU (p=0.006, odds ratio [OR]=3.56 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.45–8.75. Statistical analysis showed no significant association between vacA d genotype and digestive diseases. After controlling for age and sex variables, the cagA genotype remained in the final model when the DU was considered as a dependant factor by the the multiple logistic regression analysis (p=0.021, OR=3.77 95% CI=1.22-11.60. Conclusion: We have proposed that the H. pylori vacA i1 and cagA genotypes could be considered as benefit biomarkers for prediction of risk of GU and DU in Iran, respectively.

  14. Bifunctional anti-huntingtin proteasome-directed intrabodies mediate efficient degradation of mutant huntingtin exon 1 protein fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Butler

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide (CAG(n repeat expansion in the coding sequence of the huntingtin gene, and an expanded polyglutamine (>37Q tract in the protein. This results in misfolding and accumulation of huntingtin protein (htt, formation of neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions, and neuronal dysfunction/degeneration. Single-chain Fv antibodies (scFvs, expressed as intrabodies that bind htt and prevent aggregation, show promise as immunotherapeutics for HD. Intrastriatal delivery of anti-N-terminal htt scFv-C4 using an adeno-associated virus vector (AAV2/1 significantly reduces the size and number of aggregates in HDR6/1 transgenic mice; however, this protective effect diminishes with age and time after injection. We therefore explored enhancing intrabody efficacy via fusions to heterologous functional domains. Proteins containing a PEST motif are often targeted for proteasomal degradation and generally have a short half life. In ST14A cells, fusion of the C-terminal PEST region of mouse ornithine decarboxylase (mODC to scFv-C4 reduces htt exon 1 protein fragments with 72 glutamine repeats (httex1-72Q by ~80-90% when compared to scFv-C4 alone. Proteasomal targeting was verified by either scrambling the mODC-PEST motif, or via proteasomal inhibition with epoxomicin. For these constructs, the proteasomal degradation of the scFv intrabody proteins themselves was reduced<25% by the addition of the mODC-PEST motif, with or without antigens. The remaining intrabody levels were amply sufficient to target N-terminal httex1-72Q protein fragment turnover. Critically, scFv-C4-PEST prevents aggregation and toxicity of httex1-72Q fragments at significantly lower doses than scFv-C4. Fusion of the mODC-PEST motif to intrabodies is a valuable general approach to specifically target toxic antigens to the proteasome for degradation.

  15. Identification of binding sites in Huntingtin for the Huntingtin Interacting Proteins HIP14 and HIP14L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun S Sanders

    Full Text Available Huntington disease is an adult onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric dysfunction, caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Huntingtin Interacting Protein 14 (HIP14 and Huntingtin Interacting Protein 14-like (HIP14L are palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs, enzymes that mediate the post-translational addition of long chain fatty acids to proteins in a process called palmitoylation. HIP14 and HIP14L interact with and palmitoylate HTT and are unique among PATs as they are the only two that have an ankyrin repeat domain, which mediates the interaction between HIP14 and HTT. These enzymes show reduced interaction with and palmitoylation of mutant HTT, leading to increased mutant HTT inclusion formation and toxicity. The interaction between HIP14 and HTT goes beyond that of only an enzyme-substrate interaction as HTT is essential for the full enzymatic activity of HIP14. It is important to further understand and characterize the interactions of HTT with HIP14 and HIP14L to guide future efforts to target and enhance this interaction and increase enzyme activity to remediate palmitoylation of HTT and their substrates, as well as to understand the relationship between the three proteins. HIP14 and HIP14L have been previously shown to interact with HTT amino acids 1-548. Here the interaction of HIP14 and HIP14L with N- and C-terminal HTT 1-548 deletion mutations was assessed. We show that HTT amino acids 1-548 were sufficient for full interaction of HTT with HIP14 and HIP14L, but partial interaction was also possible with HTT 1-427 and HTT 224-548. To further characterize the binding domain we assessed the interaction of HIP14-GFP and HIP14L-GFP with 15Q HTT 1-548Δ257-315. Both enzymes showed reduced but not abolished interaction with 15Q HTT 1-548Δ257-315. This suggests that two potential binding domains exist, one around residues 224 and the other around 427, for the PAT enzymes HIP14 and HIP14L.

  16. Shorter CAG repeat length in the AR gene is associated with poor outcome in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, Fabíola Encinas; dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos; Poli-Frederico, Regina Célia

    2007-01-01

    of the AR [CAG](n) repeat length. Sixty-nine individuals without cancer were used as a control group for both procedures. The Log-rank test was used to compare overall survival and disease-free survival curves. The Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to determine the [CAG](n) repeats...... as an independent prognostic factor. RESULTS: Patients with alleles survival (P=0.0325) and with recurrence or metastasis (RR 2.52, CI 95%). In the female group, the allele 2 (longer allele) showed a significant lower mean of [CAG](n) repeat when...... compared to the control group. Microsatellite instability was detected in nine cases in both procedures. In six out of these nine cases, we observed a reduction of the AR [CAG](n) repeat length. LOH was detected in one out of 17 women informative for oral cancer in both procedures. CONCLUSION...

  17. A series of N-terminal epitope tagged Hdh knock-in alleles expressing normal and mutant huntingtin: their application to understanding the effect of increasing the length of normal huntingtin’s polyglutamine stretch on CAG140 mouse model pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Shuqiu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ stretch within Huntingtin (htt, the protein product of the HD gene. Although studies in vitro have suggested that the mutant htt can act in a potentially dominant negative fashion by sequestering wild-type htt into insoluble protein aggregates, the role of the length of the normal htt polyQ stretch, and the adjacent proline-rich region (PRR in modulating HD mouse model pathogenesis is currently unknown. Results We describe the generation and characterization of a series of knock-in HD mouse models that express versions of the mouse HD gene (Hdh encoding N-terminal hemaglutinin (HA or 3xFlag epitope tagged full-length htt with different polyQ lengths (HA7Q-, 3xFlag7Q-, 3xFlag20Q-, and 3xFlag140Q-htt and substitution of the adjacent mouse PRR with the human PRR (3xFlag20Q- and 3xFlag140Q-htt. Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry analyses, we detect no significant interaction between soluble full-length normal 7Q- htt and mutant (140Q htt, but we do observe N-terminal fragments of epitope-tagged normal htt in mutant htt aggregates. When the sequences encoding normal mouse htt’s polyQ stretch and PRR are replaced with non-pathogenic human sequence in mice also expressing 140Q-htt, aggregation foci within the striatum, and the mean size of htt inclusions are increased, along with an increase in striatal lipofuscin and gliosis. Conclusion In mice, soluble full-length normal and mutant htt are predominantly monomeric. In heterozygous knock-in HD mouse models, substituting the normal mouse polyQ and PRR with normal human sequence can exacerbate some neuropathological phenotypes.

  18. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene (AR) and its relationship to head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, M L; Sibov, T T; Nishimoto, I N; Kowalski, L P; Miracca, E C; Nagai, M A

    2004-02-01

    Sex hormones may play an important role in the tumorigenic process of the head and neck. The aim of our work was to investigate whether the androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism is associated with an increased relative risk for head and neck cancer. Genomic DNA from 103 male patients with head and neck carcinomas and 100 male controls were analyzed for the AR CAG polymorphism by PCR amplification and direct sequencing or denaturing polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between CAG repeat length and risk of head and neck cancer in individuals with more than 20 CAG repeats [OR=2.54 (95% CI, 1.3-4.8)]. For the group of individuals with oral and laryngeal cancer the estimated relative risk was increased to 2.79 (95% CI, 1.2-6.3) and 3.06 (95% CI, 1.0-9.6), respectively, in men with CAG repeat length >20. These results suggest, for the first time, that shorter AR CAG repeat alleles have a protective effect for head and neck cancer development.

  19. Expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease gene increases neuronal differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Matthew T; Zawistowski, Virginia A

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an uncommon autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats. Increased neurogenesis was demonstrated recently in Huntington's disease post-mortem samples. In this manuscript, neuronally differentiated embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease homologue and neural progenitors isolated from the subventricular zone of an accurate mouse Huntington's disease were examined for increased neurogenesis. Embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease homologue were demonstrated to undergo facilitated differentiation first into neural progenitors, then into more mature neurons. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of a Huntington's disease knock-in animal displayed increased production of neural progenitors and increased neurogenesis. These findings suggested that neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats is a reasonable system to identify factors responsible for increased neurogenesis in Huntington's disease. Expression profiling analysis comparing neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats to neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells without expanded CAG repeats identified transcripts involved in development and transcriptional regulation as factors possibly mediating increased neurogenesis in response to expanded CAG repeats.

  20. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty; Dumoulin, Christine; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria; Biunno, Ida; Bauer, Peter; Kline, Margaret; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original results from 121 laboratories across 15 countries. We report on 1326 duplicate results; a discrepancy in reporting the upper allele occurred in 51% of cases, this reduced to 13.3% and 9.7% when we applied acceptable measurement errors proposed by the American College of Medical Genetics and the Draft European Best Practice Guidelines, respectively. Duplicate results were available for 1250 lower alleles; discrepancies occurred in 40% of cases. Clinically significant discrepancies occurred in 4.0% of cases with a potential unexplained misdiagnosis rate of 0.3%. There was considerable variation in the discrepancy rate among 10 of the countries participating in this study. Out of 1326 samples, 348 were re-analysed by an accredited diagnostic laboratory, based in Germany, with concordance rates of 93% and 94% for the upper and lower alleles, respectively. This became 100% if the acceptable measurement errors were applied. The central laboratory correctly reported allele sizes for six standard reference samples, blind to the known result. Our study differs from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes in that these are duplicate results obtained from a large sample of patients across the whole diagnostic range. We strongly recommend that laboratories state an error rate for their measurement on the report, participate in EQA schemes and use reference materials regularly to adjust their own internal standards.

  1. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  2. A study of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism in Turner syndrome females: a novel primer pair for the (CAG)n repeat within the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, J; Hanson, C

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures developed for the determining of diparental/uniparental origin of X chromosomes in mosaic Turner females (karyotype 45,X/46,XX), and accounts for results of the analysis of chromosomal material from 20 girls with Turner syndrome. An (CAG)n repeat within the androgen receptor (AR) gene was selected as a genetic marker. A novel primer pair for amplification of the (CAG)12-30 repeat was designed. These primers gave an amplification product of 338 bp in length and were following (5'-->3'): agttagggctgggaagggtc and cggctgtgaaggttgctgt. Nineteen of the subjects were heterozygous for the selected marker. In 4 cases there were distinct signals from three alleles. The only Turner female in the study who had been previously ascribed a non-mosaic 45,X karyotype by using cytogenetic techniques, proved to be a cryptic mosaic, displaying two alleles of the genetic marker in the more sensitive molecular assay. These results suggest that in most cases 45,X/46,XX mosaicism in Turner females arises through loss of one of the X chromosomes in some cell lines in originally 46,XX conceptuses, rather than through mitotic non-disjunction during early embryogenesis in originally 45,X conceptuses. A high sensitivity of the modified assay based on PCR-amplification of the (CAG)n repeat within AR gene proves its usefulness as a tool for studying mosaicism in Turner syndrome.

  3. Expression of expanded CAG transcripts triggers nucleolar stress in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Ho; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2013-06-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, including several types of spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease (HD), are dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders caused by the expansion of the glutamine-coding CAG repeat in the open reading frame of the disease gene. Apart from being translated to produce toxic elongated polyQ domain-containing disease proteins, transcribed expanded CAG RNAs per se also exert toxicity in polyQ degeneration. In the R6/2 HD transgenic mouse model, expanded mutant Huntingtin (Htt) transcripts were found to physically interact with nucleolin (NCL), a nucleolar protein that plays a crucial role in ribosome biogenesis. We further demonstrated that mutant Htt transcripts deprived NCL from binding onto the Upstream Control Element (UCE) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) promoter. This resulted in UCE hypermethylation which abolished the binding of the transcription factor Upstream Binding Factor to UCE and subsequently led to down-regulation of pre-45s rRNA transcription. We also found that the p53/mitochondria-dependent nucleolar stress cell death pathway was activated in polyQ diseases. Ribosomal RNA transcription dysfunction has been reported in other types of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease; it is anticipated that nucleolar stress is one common pathogenic signaling mechanism shared by different forms of neurodegeneration.

  4. Lack of correlation of vacA genotype, cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori and their expresson products with various gastroduodenal diseases%幽门螺杆菌vacA基因型、cagA基因及其表达产物与不同类型胃十二指肠疾病的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尤历; 刘厚钰; 周康

    2001-01-01

    Abstract:Objective To investigate the correlation among vacA genotypes, cagA gene, VacA, serum CagA antibodies of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and gastroduodenal diseases. Methods vacA genotypes and cagA gene of 62 H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were tested by polymerase chain reaction, and Hela cell assay for VacA activity in vitro. Serum CagA antibodies were measured by EIA method in the same patients.Results All 62 H. pylori strains possessed the vacA gene and vacA genotypes of all strains were type s1a/m2. Total positive rate of cagA gene was 56.45%; the positive rates of cagA gene of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were 55.56%, 54.17% and 63.64%, respectively (P>0.05). The total positive rate of VacA was 37.10%; the positive rates of VacA produced by H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were 33.33%, 29.17% and 63.64%, respectively (P>0.05). The positive rates of CagA antibodies in patients with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were 70.37%, 79.17% and 40.00%, respectively (P>0.05). The total positive rate of CagA antibodies was 68.85%.Conclusion There was no correlation among cagA gene and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, VacA, serum CagA antibodies and various gastroduodenal diseases.%目的研究幽门螺杆菌vacA基因型、cagA基因,空泡形成细胞毒素和血清CagA抗体与胃十二指肠疾病的关系.方法应用多聚酶链反应方法对62例慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡和胃癌患者分离获得幽门螺杆菌菌株的vacA基因型和cagA基因进行测定;应用Hela细胞方法测定体外空泡形成细胞毒素活性;应用酶免疫测定方法检测同一患者的血清CagA抗体.结果 62株幽门螺杆菌菌株均具有vacA基因,所有菌株的vacA基因型均为sla/m2型.cagA基因的总阳性率为56.45%;慢性胃炎、消化

  5. A huntingtin peptide inhibits polyQ-huntingtin associated defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Arribat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Huntington's disease (HD is caused by the abnormal expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the human Huntingtin protein (polyQ-hHtt. Although this mutation behaves dominantly, huntingtin loss of function also contributes to HD pathogenesis. Indeed, wild-type Huntingtin plays a protective role with respect to polyQ-hHtt induced defects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The question that we addressed here is what part of the wild-type Huntingtin is responsible for these protective properties. We first screened peptides from the Huntingtin protein in HeLa cells and identified a 23 aa peptide (P42 that inhibits polyQ-hHtt aggregation. P42 is part of the endogenous Huntingtin protein and lies within a region rich in proteolytic sites that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis process. Using a Drosophila model of HD, we tested the protective properties of this peptide on aggregation, as well as on different polyQ-hHtt induced neuronal phenotypes: eye degeneration (an indicator of cell death, impairment of vesicular axonal trafficking, and physiological behaviors such as larval locomotion and adult survival. Together, our results demonstrate high protective properties for P42 in vivo, in whole animals. These data also demonstrate a specific role of P42 on Huntington's disease model, since it has no effect on other models of polyQ-induced diseases, such as spinocerebellar ataxias. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether our data show that P42, a 23 aa-long hHtt peptide, plays a protective role with respect to polyQ-hHtt aggregation as well as cellular and behavioral dysfunctions induced by polyQ-hHtt in vivo. Our study also confirms the correlation between polyQ-hHtt aggregation and neuronal defects. Finally, these results strongly suggest a therapeutic potential for P42, specific of Huntington's disease.

  6. Association between gastroduodenal diseases and cagA, vacA gene expressions of Helicobacter pylori%具有cagA、vacA基因的幽门螺杆菌及其表达产物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈肖肖; 尚世强; 来庆和; 欧弼悠; 陈黎勤; 吴秀英; 章许平

    2003-01-01

    @@ 2000年4月~2001年5月,我们检测了浙江地区小儿感染的Hp菌株的cagA、vacA基因及其CagA、VacA蛋白的抗体阳性率,以研究Hp菌株的基因型与消化性溃疡(Peptic ulcer disease,PUD)和慢性胃炎(Chronic gastritis,CG)的相关性.

  7. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  8. Expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington’s disease gene increases neuronal differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lorincz, Matthew T.; Zawistowski, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an uncommon autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats. Increased neurogenesis was demonstrated recently in Huntington’s disease postmortem samples. In this manuscript, neuronally differentiated embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington’s disease homologue and neural progenitors isolated from the subventricular zone of an accurate mouse Huntington’s disease were examined for increased neurogenesi...

  9. CAG-repeat variant in the polymerase γ gene and male infertility in the Chinese population: a meta-analysis%DNA聚合酶γ基CAG-三核苷酸多态性与中国人群男性不育的相关性研究及元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yuan Liu; Xiao-Qin Huang; Hao Sun; Jia-You Chu; Chang-Jun Zhang; Hai-Ying Peng; Yu-Feng Yao; Lei Shi; Jin-Bao Chen; Ke-Qin Lin; Liang Yu; Li Shi

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported a relationship between the length of the CAG-repeat in the polymerase γ(POLG)gene and male infertility.However,other studies have not reproduced this result.In our study,the POLG-CAG-repeat length was analyzed in 535 healthy individuals from six Chinese Han populations living in different provinces.The frequencies of 10-CAG alleles and genotypes were high(97.38 and 94.13%,respectively),with no significant difference among the six Chinese Han populations.Furthermore,we determined the distribution of the POLG-CAG-repeat in 150 infertile men and 126 fertile men.Our study suggested that the distributions of POLG-CAG-repeat alleles and genotypes were not significantly different between infertile(95.67 and 92.67%,respectively)and fertile men(97.22 and 94.44%,respectively).In a subsequent meta-analysis,combining our data with data from previous studies,a comparison of the CAG-repeat alleles in fertile versus infertile men showed no obvious risk for male infertility associated with any particular allele(pooled odds ratio(OR)=0.94; 95% confidence interval(CI):0.60-1.48).The significance level was not attained with any of the following genetic models: homozygote comparison(not 10/not 10 versus 10/10:OR=1.34; 95% CI:0.66-2.72),heterozygote comparison(10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.04; 95% CI:0.78-1.38),dominant model comparison(not 10/not 10+10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.08; 95% CI: 0.79-1.47)and recessive genetic comparison(not 10/not 10 versus 10/not 10+10/10:OR=1.31; 95% CI:0.68-2.55).In conclusion,there is no significant difference of the frequencies of POLG-CAG.repeat variants among six Chinese Han populations,and this polymorphism may not be associated with Chinese male infertility.On the basis of a meta-analysis,there is no obvious association between CAG-repeat variants of the POLG gene and male infertility.

  10. PCR Method for Measuring vacA Genotype and cagA Gene of Helicobacter Pylori%PCR方法测定幽门螺杆菌vacA基因型和cagA基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢啸东; 张尤历

    2001-01-01

    目的:建立幽门螺杆菌vacA基因型和cagA基因的PCR测定方法.方法:应用多聚酶链反应方法对62例慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡和胃癌患者分离获得幽门螺杆菌菌株的vacA基因型和cagA基因进行测定.结果:62株幽门螺杆菌菌株均具有vacA基因,所有菌株的vacA基因型均为sla/m2型.cagA基因的总阳性率为56.45%;慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡和胃癌患者分离获得幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因阳性率分别为55.56%、54.17%和63.64%(P>0.05).结论:本研究建立的PCR测定幽门螺杆菌vacA基因型和cagA基因方法敏感性高、特异性强.

  11. Genetic susceptibility on CagA-interacting molecules and gene-environment interaction with phytoestrogens: a putative risk factor for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Jeong Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether genes that encode CagA-interacting molecules (SRC, PTPN11, CRK, CRKL, CSK, c-MET and GRB2 are associated with gastric cancer risk and whether an interaction between these genes and phytoestrogens modify gastric cancer risk. METHODS: In the discovery phase, 137 candidate SNPs in seven genes were analyzed in 76 incident gastric cancer cases and 322 matched controls from the Korean Multi-Center Cancer Cohort. Five significant SNPs in three genes (SRC, c-MET and CRK were re-evaluated in 386 cases and 348 controls in the extension phase. Odds ratios (ORs for gastric cancer risk were estimated adjusted for age, smoking, H. pylori seropositivity and CagA strain positivity. Summarized ORs in the total study population (462 cases and 670 controls were presented using pooled- and meta-analysis. Plasma concentrations of phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, equol and enterolactone were measured using the time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. RESULTS: SRC rs6122566, rs6124914, c-MET rs41739, and CRK rs7208768 showed significant genetic effects for gastric cancer in both the pooled and meta-analysis without heterogeneity (pooled OR = 3.96 [95% CI 2.05-7.65], 1.24 [95% CI = 1.01-1.53], 1.19 [95% CI = 1.01-1.41], and 1.37 [95% CI = 1.15-1.62], respectively; meta OR = 4.59 [95% CI 2.74-7.70], 1.36 [95% CI = 1.09-1.70], 1.20 [95% CI = 1.00-1.44], and 1.32 [95% CI = 1.10-1.57], respectively. Risk allele of CRK rs7208768 had a significantly increased risk for gastric cancer at low phytoestrogen levels (p interaction<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that SRC, c-MET and CRK play a key role in gastric carcinogenesis by modulating CagA signal transductions and interaction between CRK gene and phytoestrogens modify gastric cancer risk.

  12. Study on detecting of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA gene and typing of vacA genotypes%幽门螺杆菌vacA基因分型和cagA基因检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学文; 王礼文; 陈云峰; 缪界平; 陈亚军

    2000-01-01

    [目的]建立检测幽门螺杆菌(Hp)的cagA、vacA基因及其基因型的方法,观察vacA基因型与cagA状态的相关性.[方法]应用聚合酶链反应(PCR)对172份Hp阳性标本进行Hp cagA和vacA基因检测及其基因型分析.[结果]172份Hp阳性标本中,vacA阳性数172(100%),cagA阳性数93(54.07%);49例萎缩性胃炎患者中,cagA阳性菌株感染47例(95.92%),64例浅表性胃炎患者中,vacA阳性菌株感染28例(43.75%),两者有显著差异(p<0.05);vacA中间区域型m1和m2分别为80和92例,两者无明显差异(p>0.05),信号序列型sla、slb、s2分别为82、68、22例,sla与slb无明显差异(P>0.05),sla、slb、sl(sla+slb)均显著多于s2型(p<0.05).检出所有的6种信号序列/中间区域组合型,slb/ml和sla/m2分别为48和52例,明显多于其它基因型(p<0.05),s2/ml仅为2列,明显少于其它基因型(p<0.01).对Hp vacA基因型与cagA状态相关性分析,s1/m1、s1/m2、s2/m1、s2/m2型的cagA阳性数为分别为45、48、0、0,93份cagA阳性标本均为s1(s1/m1+s1/m2).[结论]vacA基因存在于所有Hp中,而cagA基因仅存在于50%~60%的Hp中,vacA s1型与cagA密切相关,cagA阳性菌株感染与萎缩性胃炎十分相关.因此,对Hp cagA基因和vacA基因型的检测,有助于加深对Hp致病机理的认识,为Hp的分型和Hp感染患者的治疗提供有力的帮助.

  13. cagA, vacA and iceA virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori isolates of children in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhukorpi, J; Yan, Y; Kolho, K L; Rautelin, H; Lahti, M; Sirviö, A; Riipinen, K; Lindahl, H; Verkasalo, M; Fagerholm, R; Karttunen, R

    2000-10-01

    cagA, vacA s and m genotypes and iceA alleles were analyzed from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from 17 Finnish children and 32 children of non-Finnish origin living in Finland. Twelve children in the latter group were eastern European and 15 were of African origin. Only three children of non-Finnish origin were born in Finland. The vacA sla subtype was more prevalent in the isolates from Finnish children than African children (76% vs. 7%, Pchildren originating from different geographic regions, but the geographic variation of s1 subtypes resembled that described in other reports.

  14. Heterogeneity of cag genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in the esophageal mucosa of dyspeptic patients and its relation to histopathological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Contreras

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: H. pylori may coexist in similar proportions without dominance of one cag genotype, suggesting a heterogeneous distribution in the esophagus. The cagE and virB11 genes can be used as markers of cag-PAI in the esophagus. The single cag-PAI genotype in both mucosae confers an increased risk of developing histological damage.

  15. Anti-CagA IgG Antibody is Independent from Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori strains have two classical virulence genes, the cytotoxinassociated A (cagA gene and the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA gene, which are located in thecag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies to H. pylori,especially, the CagA antigen may be a reliable marker for selection of dyspeptic patients for upperendoscopy.Methods: Serum sample of 129 dyspeptic patients with positive H. pylori, were tested for serumIgG Anti-CagA antibody by ELISA. The presence of the cagA and vacA genotypes weredetermined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR on biopsy samples taken via endoscopy.Results: Positive serum IgG anti-CagA antibodies in patients with cagA+/vacA+ and cagA+/vacA- genotypes were 22/23 (95.6% and 18/19 (94.7%, respectively. In addition, serum IgG anti-CagAantibodies in patients with cagA-/vacA+ and cagA-/vacA- genotypes were 22/47 (46.8% and 33/40(82.5%, respectively.Conclusions: It can be concluded that the serum IgG anti-CagA antibody alone could selectpatients with dyspepsia following upper endoscopy. The assessment of vacuolating cytotoxinactivity of H. Pylori is, therefore, not required, even when vacA gene is positive. This hypothesisneeds to be studied in a large number of patients with dyspepsia.

  16. The HTT CAG-Expansion Mutation Determines Age at Death but Not Disease Duration in Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Jae Whan; Shin, Aram; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Lucente, Diane; Hadzi, Tiffany; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Kwak, Seung; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-02-04

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded HTT CAG repeat that leads in a length-dependent, completely dominant manner to onset of a characteristic movement disorder. HD also displays early mortality, so we tested whether the expanded CAG repeat exerts a dominant influence on age at death and on the duration of clinical disease. We found that, as with clinical onset, HD age at death is determined by expanded CAG-repeat length and has no contribution from the normal CAG allele. Surprisingly, disease duration is independent of the mutation's length. It is also unaffected by a strong genetic modifier of HD motor onset. These findings suggest two parsimonious alternatives. (1) HD pathogenesis is driven by mutant huntingtin, but before or near motor onset, sufficient CAG-driven damage occurs to permit CAG-independent processes and then lead to eventual death. In this scenario, some pathological changes and their clinical correlates could still worsen in a CAG-driven manner after disease onset, but these CAG-related progressive changes do not themselves determine duration. Alternatively, (2) HD pathogenesis is driven by mutant huntingtin acting in a CAG-dependent manner with different time courses in multiple cell types, and the cellular targets that lead to motor onset and death are different and independent. In this scenario, processes driven by HTT CAG length lead directly to death but not via the striatal pathology associated with motor manifestations. Each scenario has important ramifications for the design and testing of potential therapeutics, especially those aimed at preventing or delaying characteristic motor manifestations.

  17. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    not correlate with any circulating androgen. Conclusions: The CAG repeat polymorphism affects body composition in young men: absolute musclethigh and absolute musclelower trunk increase as CAGn decreases. Expressed relatively, muscle areas and LBM increase, while SAT and FM decrease as CAGn decreases......Background: The number of CAG repeats (CAGn) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor. Objective: To examine the impact of CAGn on muscle, fat distribution, and circulating androgen levels. Design, settings...... and participants: Population-based, cross-sectional study of 783 Danish men aged 20–29 years. Methods: Genotyping was performed in 767 men. Areas of thigh and lower trunk muscle (musclethigh and musclelower trunk), subcutaneous adipose tissues (SATthigh and SATlower trunk), and deep adipose tissues (i...

  18. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin-based polyglutamine core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Cody L; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M; Boatz, Jennifer C; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-02-09

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington's disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin-containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand-based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of "intrinsic" polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms.

  19. Polyglutamine- and temperature-dependent conformational rigidity in mutant huntingtin revealed by immunoassays and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Fodale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Huntington's disease, expansion of a CAG triplet repeat occurs in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT, resulting in a protein bearing>35 polyglutamine residues whose N-terminal fragments display a high propensity to misfold and aggregate. Recent data demonstrate that polyglutamine expansion results in conformational changes in the huntingtin protein (HTT, which likely influence its biological and biophysical properties. Developing assays to characterize and measure these conformational changes in isolated proteins and biological samples would advance the testing of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at correcting mutant HTT misfolding. Time-resolved Förster energy transfer (TR-FRET-based assays represent high-throughput, homogeneous, sensitive immunoassays widely employed for the quantification of proteins of interest. TR-FRET is extremely sensitive to small distances and can therefore provide conformational information based on detection of exposure and relative position of epitopes present on the target protein as recognized by selective antibodies. We have previously reported TR-FRET assays to quantify HTT proteins based on the use of antibodies specific for different amino-terminal HTT epitopes. Here, we investigate the possibility of interrogating HTT protein conformation using these assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By performing TR-FRET measurements on the same samples (purified recombinant proteins or lysates from cells expressing HTT fragments or full length protein at different temperatures, we have discovered a temperature-dependent, reversible, polyglutamine-dependent conformational change of wild type and expanded mutant HTT proteins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirms the temperature and polyglutamine-dependent change in HTT structure, revealing an effect of polyglutamine length and of temperature on the alpha-helical content of the protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The temperature- and polyglutamine

  20. Polyglutamine- and Temperature-Dependent Conformational Rigidity in Mutant Huntingtin Revealed by Immunoassays and Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodale, Valentina; Kegulian, Natalie C.; Verani, Margherita; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Petricca, Lara; Daldin, Manuel; Boggio, Roberto; Padova, Alessandro; Kuhn, Rainer; Pacifici, Robert; Macdonald, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Ryan C.; Park, Hyunsun; Isas, J. Mario; Langen, Ralf; Weiss, Andreas; Caricasole, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Huntington's disease, expansion of a CAG triplet repeat occurs in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT), resulting in a protein bearing>35 polyglutamine residues whose N-terminal fragments display a high propensity to misfold and aggregate. Recent data demonstrate that polyglutamine expansion results in conformational changes in the huntingtin protein (HTT), which likely influence its biological and biophysical properties. Developing assays to characterize and measure these conformational changes in isolated proteins and biological samples would advance the testing of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at correcting mutant HTT misfolding. Time-resolved Förster energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based assays represent high-throughput, homogeneous, sensitive immunoassays widely employed for the quantification of proteins of interest. TR-FRET is extremely sensitive to small distances and can therefore provide conformational information based on detection of exposure and relative position of epitopes present on the target protein as recognized by selective antibodies. We have previously reported TR-FRET assays to quantify HTT proteins based on the use of antibodies specific for different amino-terminal HTT epitopes. Here, we investigate the possibility of interrogating HTT protein conformation using these assays. Methodology/Principal Findings By performing TR-FRET measurements on the same samples (purified recombinant proteins or lysates from cells expressing HTT fragments or full length protein) at different temperatures, we have discovered a temperature-dependent, reversible, polyglutamine-dependent conformational change of wild type and expanded mutant HTT proteins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirms the temperature and polyglutamine-dependent change in HTT structure, revealing an effect of polyglutamine length and of temperature on the alpha-helical content of the protein. Conclusions/Significance The temperature- and polyglutamine-dependent effects

  1. Huntington's disease as caused by 34 CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, Jürgen; Arning, Larissa; Wieczorek, Stefan; Kraus, Peter H; Gold, Ralf; Saft, Carsten

    2008-04-30

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of a polymorphic stretch of CAG repeats in the coding 5' part of the HD gene on chromosome 4p. Expansions of CAG blocks beyond 35 repeats are associated with the clinical presentation of HD. There is an intermediate range of rare alleles between 27 and 35 CAG repeats with a higher risk for further expansion in subsequent generations. Here, we report a 75-year-old male with clinical features of HD and 34 CAG repeat units.

  2. Investigating Mutations to Reduce Huntingtin Aggregation by Increasing Htt-N-Terminal Stability and Weakening Interactions with PolyQ Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza-Anthony, Cody; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal autosomal genetic disorder characterized by an expanded glutamine-coding CAG repeat sequence in the huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 gene. The Htt protein associated with the disease misfolds into toxic oligomers and aggregate fibril structures. Competing models for the misfolding and aggregation phenomena have suggested the role of the Htt-N-terminal region and the CAG trinucleotide repeats (polyQ domain) in affecting aggregation propensities and misfolding. In particular, one model suggests a correlation between structural stability and the emergence of toxic oligomers, whereas a second model proposes that molecular interactions with the extended polyQ domain increase aggregation propensity. In this paper, we computationally explore the potential to reduce Htt aggregation by addressing the aggregation causes outlined in both models. We investigate the mutation landscape of the Htt-N-terminal region and explore amino acid residue mutations that affect its structural stability and hydrophobic interactions with the polyQ domain. Out of the millions of 3-point mutation combinations that we explored, the (L4K E12K K15E) was the most promising mutation combination that addressed aggregation causes in both models. The mutant structure exhibited extreme alpha-helical stability, low amyloidogenicity potential, a hydrophobic residue replacement, and removal of a solvent-inaccessible intermolecular side chain that assists oligomerization. PMID:28096892

  3. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for somatic TNR expansion in HD.

  4. Huntingtin processing in pathogenesis of Huntington disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenghong QIN; Zhenlun GU

    2004-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the protein named huntingtin.The expansion of polyglutamine tract induces selective degeneration of striatal projection neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons. The bio-hallmark of HD is the formation of intranuclear inclusions and cytoplasmic aggregates in association with other cellular proteins in vulnerable neurons. Accumulation of N-terminal mutant huntingtin in HD brains is prominent. These pathological features are related to protein misfolding and impairments in protein processing and degradation in neurons. This review focused on the role of proteases in huntingtin cleavage and degradation and the contribution of altered processing of mutant huntingtin to HD pathogenesis.

  5. Quantification of age-dependent somatic CAG repeat instability in Hdh CAG knock-in mice reveals different expansion dynamics in striatum and liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD is largely determined by the CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the HTT gene. Importantly, the CAG repeat undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, prevalent in brain regions that are disease targets, suggesting a potential role for somatic CAG repeat instability in modifying HD pathogenesis. Thus, understanding underlying mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability may lead to discoveries of novel therapeutics for HD. Investigation of the dynamics of the CAG repeat size changes over time may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying CAG repeat instability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand how the HTT CAG repeat length changes over time, we quantified somatic instability of the CAG repeat in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice from 2-16 months of age in liver, striatum, spleen and tail. The HTT CAG repeat in spleen and tail was very stable, but that in liver and striatum expanded over time at an average rate of one CAG per month. Interestingly, the patterns of repeat instability were different between liver and striatum. Unstable CAG repeats in liver repeatedly gained similar sizes of additional CAG repeats (approximately two CAGs per month, maintaining a distinct population of unstable repeats. In contrast, unstable CAG repeats in striatum gained additional repeats with different sizes resulting in broadly distributed unstable CAG repeats. Expanded CAG repeats in the liver were highly enriched in polyploid hepatocytes, suggesting that the pattern of liver instability may reflect the restriction of the unstable repeats to a unique cell type. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with repeat expansion occurring as a consequence of recurrent small repeat insertions that differ in different tissues. Investigation of the specific mechanisms that underlie liver and striatal instability will contribute to our understanding of the relationship between

  6. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the Y chromosome: absence of a significant relationship between CAG repeat length in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene and infertility in Indian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Varinderpal S; Husain, Syed A

    2003-10-01

    The genetic basis of male infertility remains unclear in the majority of cases. Recent studies have indicated an association between microdeletions of the azoospermia factor a (AZFa)-AZFc regions of Yq and severe oligospermia or azoospermia. Increased (CAG)n repeat lengths in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have also been reported in infertile men. Therefore, in order to assess the prevalence of these genetic defects to male infertility, 183 men with non-obstructive azoospermia (n = 70), obstructive azoospermia (n = 33), severe oligospermia (n = 80) and 59 fertile men were examined cytogenetically and at molecular level for Yq deletions, microdeletions, and AR-CAG repeat lengths along with hormonal profiles [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T)]. We used high resolution cytogenetics to detect chromosome deletions and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) involving 27 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers on Yq to determine the rate and extent of Yq microdeletions. PCR amplification with primers flanking exon 1 of AR gene was used to determine the AR-(CAG)n repeat lengths. Hormonal profiles (LH, FSH and T levels) were also analysed in infertile and fertile men. Testicular biopsies showed Sertoli cell only (SCO) morphology, maturation arrests (MA) and hypospermatogenesis. No chromosome aberrations were found in infertile men but there was a significant increase (p CAG repeats in AR gene was observed between infertile and fertile men (22.2 +/- 1.5 and 21.5 +/- 1.4 respectively). No significant increase or decrease in levels of LH, FSH and T was observed in infertile and fertile men. In some infertile men, significantly elevated levels of FSH alone or in combination with LH were found to be indicative of failure of spermatogenesis and/or suggestive of testicular failure. Y-chromosome microdeletions contribute to infertility in some patients but no relationship could be established with the (CAG)n repeat lengths in exon 1 of

  7. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  8. Huntingtin interacting proteins 14 and 14-like are required for chorioallantoic fusion during early placental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shaun S; Hou, Juan; Sutton, Liza M; Garside, Victoria C; Mui, Katherine K N; Singaraja, Roshni R; Hayden, Michael R; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2015-01-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that is caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Palmitoylation is the addition of saturated fatty acids to proteins by DHHC palmitoylacyl transferases. HTT is palmitoylated by huntingtin interacting proteins 14 and 14-like (HIP14 and HIP14L or ZDHHC17 and 13 respectively). Mutant HTT is less palmitoylated and this reduction of palmitoylation accelerates its aggregation and increases cellular toxicity. Mouse models deficient in either Hip14 (Hip14(-/-)) or Hip14l (Hip14l(-/-)) develop HD-like phenotypes. The biological function of HTT palmitoylation and the role that loss of HTT palmitoylation plays in the pathogenesis of HD are unknown. To address these questions mice deficient for both genes were created. Loss of Hip14 and Hip14l leads to early embryonic lethality at day embryonic day 10-11 due to failed chorioallantoic fusion. The chorion is thickened and disorganized and the allantois does not fuse correctly with the chorion and forms a balloon-like shape compared to Hip14l(-/-); Hip14(+/+) littermate control embryos. Interestingly, the Hip14(-/-) ; Hip14(-/-) embryos share many features with the Htt(-/-) embryos, including folding of the yolk sac, a bulb shaped allantois, and a thickened and disorganized chorion. This may be due to a decrease in HTT palmitoylation. In Hip14(-/-); Hip14l(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a 25% decrease in HTT palmitoylation compared to wild type cells. This is the first description of a double PAT deficient mouse model where loss of a PAT or multiple PATs results in embryonic lethality in mammals. These results reinforce the physiological importance of palmitoylation during embryogenesis.

  9. Scalable production in human cells and biochemical characterization of full-length normal and mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Huntingtin (Htt is a 350 kD intracellular protein, ubiquitously expressed and mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a CAG triplet amplification in exon 1 of the corresponding gene resulting in a polyglutamine (polyQ expansion at the N-terminus of Htt. Production of full-length Htt has been difficult in the past and so far a scalable system or process has not been established for recombinant production of Htt in human cells. The ability to produce Htt in milligram quantities would be a prerequisite for many biochemical and biophysical studies aiming in a better understanding of Htt function under physiological conditions and in case of mutation and disease. For scalable production of full-length normal (17Q and mutant (46Q and 128Q Htt we have established two different systems, the first based on doxycycline-inducible Htt expression in stable cell lines, the second on "gutless" adenovirus mediated gene transfer. Purified material has then been used for biochemical characterization of full-length Htt. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs were determined and several new phosphorylation sites were identified. Nearly all PTMs in full-length Htt localized to areas outside of predicted alpha-solenoid protein regions. In all detected N-terminal peptides methionine as the first amino acid was missing and the second, alanine, was found to be acetylated. Differences in secondary structure between normal and mutant Htt, a helix-rich protein, were not observed in our study. Purified Htt tends to form dimers and higher order oligomers, thus resembling the situation observed with N-terminal fragments, although the mechanism of oligomer formation may be different.

  10. Cloning and expression of the rat homologue of the Huntington disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, I.; Epplen, J.T.; Riess, O. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington`s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder which is manifested usually in adult life. The age of onset is variable and leads to progressive symptoms including involuntary choreatic movements and various cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Recently, a gene (IT15) was cloned containing a (CAG){sub n} repeat which is elongated and unstable in HD patients. IT15 is widely expressed in human tissues but unrelated to any known deduced protein sequence. To further investigate the HD gene, 15 rat cDNA libraries were screened. 24 clones have been identified covering the Huntingtin gene. Comparison of the Huntingtin gene between human and rat revealed homologies between 80% and 87% at the DNA level and about 90% at the protein level. These analyses will help to define biologically important sequence regions, e.g., via evolutionary conservation. One clone contains the (CAG){sub n} repeat which consists of eight triplets compared to seven triplets in the mouse and a median of 17 in human. As in humans there are two transcripts arising from differential 3{prime}-polyadenylation. In the 3{prime}UTR a stretch of about 280 bp is exchanged for a 250 bp fragment with no homology in rodents and man. The cDNA clones are currently used to study Huntingtin gene expression during development in rodent tissues. RNA in situ hybridization of embryonic sections shows predominant signals in all neuronal tissues. In contrast to previously published data Huntingtin mRNA expression in testis is increased in spermatocytes vs. spermatogonia.

  11. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMurray Cynthia T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD.

  12. Regulation of mRNA translation by MID1: a common mechanism of expanded CAG repeat RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Griesche

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of CAG repeats, which code for the disease-causing polyglutamine protein, is a common feature in polyglutamine diseases. RNA-mediated mechanisms that contribute to neuropathology in polyglutamine diseases are important. RNA-toxicity describes a phenomenon by which the mutant CAG repeat RNA recruits RNA-binding proteins, thereby leading to aberrant function. For example the MID1 protein binds to mutant huntingtin (HTT RNA, which is linked to Huntington’s disease (HD, at its CAG repeat region and induces protein synthesis of mutant protein. But is this mechanism specific to HD or is it a common mechanism in CAG repeat expansion disorders? To answer this question, we have analysed the interaction between MID1 and three other CAG repeat mRNAs, Ataxin2 (ATXN2, Ataxin3 (ATXN3, and Ataxin7 (ATXN7, that all differ in the sequence flanking the CAG repeat. We show that ATXN2, ATXN3 and ATXN7 bind to MID1 in a CAG repeat length-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that functionally, in line with what we have previously observed for HTT, the binding of MID1 to ATXN2, ATXN3 and ATXN7 mRNA induces protein synthesis in a repeat length-dependent manner. Our data suggest that regulation of protein translation by the MID1 complex is a common mechanism for CAG repeat containing mRNAs.

  13. Huntingtin-deficient zebrafish exhibit defects in iron utilization and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Amanda L; Henshall, Tanya L; Dayan, Sonia; Lardelli, Michael T; Richards, Robert I

    2007-08-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is one of nine neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats encoding polyglutamine in their respective, otherwise apparently unrelated proteins. Despite these proteins having widespread and overlapping expression patterns in the brain, a specific and unique subset of neurons exhibits particular vulnerability in each disease. It has been hypothesized that perturbation of normal protein function contributes to the specificity of neuronal vulnerability; however, the normal biological functions of many of these proteins including the HD gene product, Huntingtin (Htt), are unclear. To explore the roles of Htt, we have used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to observe the effects of Htt deficiency in early zebrafish development. Knockdown of Htt expression resulted in a variety of developmental defects. Most notably, Htt-deficient zebrafish had hypochromic blood due to decreased hemoglobin production, despite the presence of iron within blood cells. Furthermore, transferrin receptor 1 transcripts were increased, suggesting cellular iron starvation. Provision of iron to the cytoplasm in a bio-available form restored hemoglobin production in Htt-deficient embryos. Since erythroid cells acquire iron via receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin, these results suggest a role for Htt in making endocytosed iron accessible for cellular utilization. Iron is required for oxidative energy production, and defects in iron homeostasis and energy metabolism are features of HD pathogenesis that are most pronounced in the major region of neurodegeneration. It is therefore plausible that perturbation of Htt's normal role in the iron pathway (by polyglutamine tract expansion) contributes to HD pathology, and particularly to its neuronal specificity.

  14. Structure and function of Helicobacter pylori CagA, the first-identified bacterial protein involved in human cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HATAKEYAMA, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    .... The cagA gene-encoded CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via bacterial type IV secretion, where it undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs...

  15. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

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    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  16. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölter, Sabine M; Stromberg, Mary; Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  17. Androgen receptor CAG polymorphism and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Biolchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a very frequent age-related proliferative abnormality in men. Polymorphic CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR can alter transactivation of androgen-responsive genes and potentially influence BPH risk. We investigated the association between CAG repeat length and risk of BPH in a case-control study of a Brazilian population. We evaluated 214 patients; 126 with BPH and 88 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes and the AR gene was analyzed using fragment analysis. Hazard ratio (HR and 95% confidence interval were estimated using logistic regression models. Mean CAG length was not different between patients with BPH and controls. The CAG repeat length was examined as a categorical variable (CAG 21 and CAG 22 and did not differ between the control vs. the BPH group. We found no evidence for an association between AR CAG repeat length in BPH risk in a population-based sample of Brazilians.

  18. Polymorphisms in the CAG repeat--a source of error in Huntington disease DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S; Fimmel, A; Fung, D; Trent, R J

    2000-12-01

    Five of 400 patients (1.3%), referred for Huntington disease DNA testing, demonstrated a single allele on CAG alone, but two alleles when the CAG + CCG repeats were measured. The PCR assay failed to detect one allele in the CAG alone assay because of single-base silent polymorphisms in the penultimate or the last CAG repeat. The region around and within the CAG repeat sequence in the Huntington disease gene is a hot-spot for DNA polymorphisms, which can occur in up to 1% of subjects tested for Huntington disease. These polymorphisms may interfere with amplification by PCR, and so have the potential to produce a diagnostic error.

  19. Effects of deletion of mutant huntingtin in steroidogenic factor 1 neurons on the psychiatric and metabolic phenotype in the BACHD mouse model of Huntington disease.

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    Barbara Baldo

    Full Text Available Psychiatric and metabolic features appear several years before motor disturbances in the neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD, caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene. Although the mechanisms leading to these aspects are unknown, dysfunction in the hypothalamus, a brain region controlling emotion and metabolism, has been suggested. A direct link between the expression of the disease causing protein, huntingtin (HTT, in the hypothalamus and the development of metabolic and psychiatric-like features have been shown in the BACHD mouse model of HD. However, precisely which circuitry in the hypothalamus is critical for these features is not known. We hypothesized that expression of mutant HTT in the ventromedial hypothalamus, an area involved in the regulation of metabolism and emotion would be important for the development of these non-motor aspects. Therefore, we inactivated mutant HTT in a specific neuronal population of the ventromedial hypothalamus expressing the transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a Cre-loxP system. Effects on anxiety-like behavior were assessed using the elevated plus maze and novelty-induced suppressed feeding test. Depressive-like behavior was assessed using the Porsolt forced swim test. Effects on the metabolic phenotype were analyzed using measurements of body weight and body fat, as well as serum insulin and leptin levels. Interestingly, the inactivation of mutant HTT in SF1-expressing neurons exerted a partial positive effect on the depressive-like behavior in female BACHD mice at 4 months of age. In this cohort of mice, no anxiety-like behavior was detected. The deletion of mutant HTT in SF1 neurons did not have any effect on the development of metabolic features in BACHD mice. Taken together, our results indicate that mutant HTT regulates metabolic networks by affecting hypothalamic circuitries that do not involve the SF1 neurons

  20. Helicobacter pylori CagA causes mitotic impairment and induces chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Mayumi; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Saito, Yasuhiro; Ohba, Yusuke; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2009-08-14

    Infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric carcinoma. The cagA gene product CagA, which is delivered into gastric epithelial cells, specifically binds to and aberrantly activates SHP-2 oncoprotein. CagA also interacts with and inhibits partitioning-defective 1 (PAR1)/MARK kinase, which phosphorylates microtubule-associated proteins to destabilize microtubules and thereby causes epithelial polarity defects. In light of the notion that microtubules are not only required for polarity regulation but also essential for the formation of mitotic spindles, we hypothesized that CagA-mediated PAR1 inhibition also influences mitosis. Here, we investigated the effect of CagA on the progression of mitosis. In the presence of CagA, cells displayed a delay in the transition from prophase to metaphase. Furthermore, a fraction of the CagA-expressing cells showed spindle misorientation at the onset of anaphase, followed by chromosomal segregation with abnormal division axis. The effect of CagA on mitosis was abolished by elevated PAR1 expression. Conversely, inhibition of PAR1 kinase elicited mitotic delay similar to that induced by CagA. Thus, CagA-mediated inhibition of PAR1, which perturbs microtubule stability and thereby causes microtubule-based spindle dysfunction, is involved in the prophase/metaphase delay and subsequent spindle misorientation. Consequently, chronic exposure of cells to CagA induces chromosomal instability. Our findings reveal a bifunctional role of CagA as an oncoprotein: CagA elicits uncontrolled cell proliferation by aberrantly activating SHP-2 and at the same time induces chromosomal instability by perturbing the microtubule-based mitotic spindle. The dual function of CagA may cooperatively contribute to the progression of multistep gastric carcinogenesis.

  1. Biological activity of the virulence factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永良; 郑树; 钱可大; 方平楚

    2004-01-01

    Background China is one of the countries with the highest incidence of H. Pylori and more than 9090 isolates possessed the cagA gene. This study was to evaluate the biological activity of the H.pylori virulence factor cagA isolated from Chinese patients. Methods cagA DNA fragments were amplified from the genomic DNA and subsequently cloned into the mammalian expression vector for cell transfection and DNA sequencing. cagA protein, phosphorylated-tyrosine cagA and the complex of cagA precipitated with SHP-2 were identified respectively by western blot in the crude cell lysate from conditionally immortalized gastric epithelial cells at 48 hours after transfection with cagA DNA. In addition, the ability of induction of scattering phenotype was examined after transient expression of cagA in AGS cells. Results The C-terminal half of cagA contained only one repeated sequence and three tandem five-amino-acid motifs glutamic acid-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of D2 region in repeated sequence was aspartic acid-phenylanaline-aspartic acid (D-F-D) which was significantly distinguished from the three repeated sequences and aspartic acid-aspartic adid-leucine (D-D-L) in the western standard strain NCTC11637. Western blot revealed that cagA became phosphorylated in tyrosine site and bound with SHP-2 after transient expression of cagA DNA in gastric epithelial cells. Transient expression of cagA in AGS cells showed that cagA was able to induce the elongation phenotype although to a lesser extent than western strains. Conclusions cagA perturbs cell signaling pathways by binding with SHP-2. However, significant difference exists in amino acid sequence and biological function of cagA in Chinese compared with those of western countries.

  2. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin–based polyglutamine core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Cody L.; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M.; Boatz, Jennifer C.; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington’s disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin–containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand–based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of “intrinsic” polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms. PMID:26831073

  3. Mixed infection with cagA positive and cagA negative strains of Helicobacter pylori lowers disease burden in The Gambia.

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    Ousman Secka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori including strains with putatively virulent genotypes is high, whereas the H. pylori-associated disease burden is low, in Africa compared to developed countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of virulence-related H. pylori genotypes and their association with gastroduodenal diseases in The Gambia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: DNA extracted from biopsies and H. pylori cultures from 169 subjects with abdominal pain, dyspepsia or other gastroduodenal diseases were tested by PCR for H. pylori. The H. pylori positive samples were further tested for the cagA oncogene and vacA toxin gene. One hundred and twenty one subjects (71.6% were H. pylori positive. The cagA gene and more toxigenic s1 and m1 alleles of the vacA gene were found in 61.2%, 76.9% and 45.5% respectively of Gambian patients harbouring H. pylori. There was a high prevalence of cagA positive strains in patients with overt gastric diseases than those with non-ulcerative dyspepsia (NUD (p = 0.05; however, mixed infection by cagA positive and cagA negative strains was more common in patients with NUD compared to patients with gastric disease (24.5% versus 0%; p = 0.002. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the prevalence of H. pylori is high in dyspeptic patients in The Gambia and that many strains are of the putatively more virulent cagA+, vacAs1 and vacAm1 genotypes. This study has also shown significantly lower disease burden in Gambians infected with a mixture of cag-positive and cag-negative strains, relative to those containing only cag-positive or only cag-negative strains, which suggests that harbouring both cag-positive and cag-negative strains is protective.

  4. Mixed Infection with cagA Positive and cagA Negative Strains of Helicobacter pylori Lowers Disease Burden in The Gambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secka, Ousman; Antonio, Martin; Berg, Douglas E.; Tapgun, Mary; Bottomley, Christian; Thomas, Vivat; Walton, Robert; Corrah, Tumani; Thomas, Julian E.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori including strains with putatively virulent genotypes is high, whereas the H. pylori-associated disease burden is low, in Africa compared to developed countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of virulence-related H. pylori genotypes and their association with gastroduodenal diseases in The Gambia. Methods and Findings DNA extracted from biopsies and H. pylori cultures from 169 subjects with abdominal pain, dyspepsia or other gastroduodenal diseases were tested by PCR for H. pylori. The H. pylori positive samples were further tested for the cagA oncogene and vacA toxin gene. One hundred and twenty one subjects (71.6%) were H. pylori positive. The cagA gene and more toxigenic s1 and m1 alleles of the vacA gene were found in 61.2%, 76.9% and 45.5% respectively of Gambian patients harbouring H. pylori. There was a high prevalence of cagA positive strains in patients with overt gastric diseases than those with non-ulcerative dyspepsia (NUD) (p = 0.05); however, mixed infection by cagA positive and cagA negative strains was more common in patients with NUD compared to patients with gastric disease (24.5% versus 0%; p = 0.002). Conclusion This study shows that the prevalence of H. pylori is high in dyspeptic patients in The Gambia and that many strains are of the putatively more virulent cagA+, vacAs1 and vacAm1 genotypes. This study has also shown significantly lower disease burden in Gambians infected with a mixture of cag-positive and cag-negative strains, relative to those containing only cag-positive or only cag-negative strains, which suggests that harbouring both cag-positive and cag-negative strains is protective. PMID:22140492

  5. Co-localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and wild-type huntingtin in normal and quinolinic acid-lesioned rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Francesca R; Zuccato, Chiara; Tartari, Marzia; Martorana, Alessandro; De March, Zena; Giampà, Carmela; Cattaneo, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Loss of huntingtin-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene transcription has been described in Huntington's disease (HD) [Zuccato et al. (2001) Science, 293, 493-498]. It has been shown that BDNF is synthesized in the pyramidal layer of cerebral cortex and released in the striatum [Altar et al. (1997) Nature, 389, 856-860; Conner et al. (1997) J. Neurosci., 17, 2295-2313]. Here we show the cellular localization of BDNF in huntingtin-containing neurons in normal rat brain; our double-label immunofluorescence study shows that huntingtin and BDNF are co-contained in approximately 99% of pyramidal neurons of motor cortex. In the striatum, huntingtin is expressed in 75% of neurons containing BDNF. In normal striatum we also show that BDNF is contained in cholinergic and in NOS-containing interneurons, which are relatively resistant to HD degeneration. Furthermore, we show a reduction in huntingtin and in BDNF immunoreactivity in cortical neurons after striatal excitotoxic lesion. Our data are confirmed by an ELISA study of BDNF and by a Western blot analysis of huntingtin in cortex of quinolic acid (QUIN)-lesioned hemispheres. In the lesioned striatum we describe that the striatal subpopulation of cholinergic neurons, surviving degeneration, contain BDNF. The finding that BDNF is contained in nearly all neurons that contain huntingtin in the normal cortex, along with the reduced expression of BDNF after QUIN injection of the striatum, shows that huntingtin may be required for BDNF production in cortex.

  6. Helicobacter pylori CagA protein polymorphisms and their lack of association with pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicole; Acosta; Andrés; Quiroga; Pilar; Delgado; María; Mercedes; Bravo; Carlos; Jaramillo

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA diversity and to evaluate the association between protein polymorphisms and the occurrence of gastric pathologies. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two clinical isolates of H. pylori cultured from gastric biopsies obtained from Colombian patients with dyspepsia were included as study material. DNA extracted from isolates was used to determine cagA status, amplifying the C-terminal cagA gene region by polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and six strai...

  7. CAG microsatellite polymorphisms of androgen receptor gene and the stage and grade of prostate cancer%雄激素受体基因微卫星CAG多态性与前列腺癌的分期分级

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长岭; 吕宁; 董金堂; 关维民; 万仪增

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the CAG mirosatellite in androgen receptor(AR)gene and the stage and grade of prostate cancer(PC).Methods The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was measured in 37 PC tissues by PCR-SSCP analysis, and its association with stages and grades of PC determined.Results The average number of CAG repeats of AR gene differed significantly between PC in stage B (25.04±1.88) and in stage C~D (24.14±2.64)(P=0.002). The frequency of short CAG(<22) was 13.0%(3/23) in stage B and 28.6%(4/14) in stage C~D, while that of long CAG(≥22) was 87.0%(20/23) and 71.4%(10/14) (P=0.029 ), respectively. The average number of CAG repeats increased with the decrease in tumor cell differentiation. The frequency of short CAG repeats dropped with the increase in tumor cell differentiation while the opposite was true for that of long CAG repeats.Conclusion The number of CAG repeats in AR gene may be one of the factors determining the biologic characteratics PC. Short CAG repeats may signify aggressiveness of PC.%目的研究雄激素受体(AR)基因三核苷酸CAG微卫星多态性与前列腺癌(PC)分期和分级的关系,探讨其与肿瘤生物学特性的相关性。方法运用聚合酶链反应-单链构象多态性分析法(PCR-SSCP),对37例PC标本的AR基因CAG微卫星数量进行测定,并进行不同病变期别、分化级别间的比较及统计学分析。结果 AR基因CAG微卫星数量在病变B期与C~D期分别为25.04±1.88和22.14±2.64(P=0.002);其短的AR基因CAG(数量<22)的分布为:B期13.0%(3/23),C~D期28.6%(4/14);其长的AR基因CAG(数量≥22)的分布为:B期87.0%(20/23),C~D期71.4%(10/14),差异有显著性(P=0.029)。AR基因CAG微卫星数量随PC病变分化程度的增高而增加,低分化为23.64±2.56,中分化为24.29±3.45,高分化为25.6±1.67,在高分化与低分化间差异有显著性(P=0.047)。短

  8. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington’s disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results. PMID:27110099

  9. Expression of mutant huntingtin in leptin receptor-expressing neurons does not control the metabolic and psychiatric phenotype of the BACHD mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Hult Lundh

    Full Text Available Metabolic and psychiatric disturbances occur early on in the clinical manifestation of Huntington's disease (HD, a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene. Hypothalamus has emerged as an important site of pathology and alterations in this area and its neuroendocrine circuits may play a role in causing early non-motor symptoms and signs in HD. Leptin is a hormone that controls energy homeostasis by signaling through leptin receptors in the hypothalamus. Disturbed leptin action is implicated in both obesity and depression and altered circulating levels of leptin have been reported in both clinical HD and rodent models of the disease. Pathological leptin signaling may therefore be involved in causing the metabolic and psychiatric disturbances of HD. Here we tested the hypothesis that expression of mutant HTT in leptin receptor carrying neurons plays a role in the development of the non-motor phenotype in the BACHD mouse model. Our results show that inactivation of mutant HTT in leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a cre-loxP system did not have an effect on the metabolic phenotype or anxiety-like behavior. The data suggest that mutant HTT disrupts critical hypothalamic pathways by other mechanisms than interfering with intracellular leptin signaling.

  10. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington's disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington's disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington's disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington's disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results.

  11. Dysregulation of system xc(-) expression induced by mutant huntingtin in a striatal neuronal cell line and in R6/2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Natalie M; Bertho, Julie; Patel, Kishan K; Petr, Geraldine T; Bakradze, Ekaterina; Smith, Sylvia B; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD), however, the origin of the oxidative stress is unknown. System xc(-) plays a role in the import of cystine to synthesize the antioxidant glutathione. We found in the STHdh(Q7/Q7) and STHdh(Q111/Q111) striatal cell lines, derived from neuronal precursor cells isolated from knock-in mice containing 7 or 111 CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene, that there is a decrease in system xc(-) function. System xc(-) is composed of two proteins, the substrate specific transporter, xCT, and an anchoring protein, CD98. The decrease in function in system xc(-) that we observed is caused by a decrease in xCT mRNA and protein expression in the STHdh(Q111/Q111) cells. In addition, we found a decrease in protein and mRNA expression in the transgenic R6/2 HD mouse model at 6weeks of age. STHdh(Q111/Q111) cells have lower basal levels of GSH and higher basal levels of ROS. Acute inhibition of system xc(-) causes greater increase in oxidative stress in the STHdh(Q111/Q111) cells than in the STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells. These results suggest that a defect in the regulation of xCT may be involved in the pathogenesis of HD by compromising xCT expression and increasing susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  12. Huntingtin Regulates Mammary Stem Cell Division and Differentiation

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    Salah Elias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington’s disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties.

  13. In Vitro Expansion of CAG, CAA, and Mixed CAG/CAA Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Figura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington’s disease and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias, are caused by expanded CAG repeats that are located in translated sequences of individual, functionally-unrelated genes. Only mutant proteins containing polyglutamine expansions have long been thought to be pathogenic, but recent evidence has implicated mutant transcripts containing long CAG repeats in pathogenic processes. The presence of two pathogenic factors prompted us to attempt to distinguish the effects triggered by mutant protein from those caused by mutant RNA in cellular models of polyglutamine diseases. We used the SLIP (Synthesis of Long Iterative Polynucleotide method to generate plasmids expressing long CAG repeats (forming a hairpin structure, CAA-interrupted CAG repeats (forming multiple unstable hairpins or pure CAA repeats (not forming any secondary structure. We successfully modified the original SLIP protocol to generate repeats of desired length starting from constructs containing short repeat tracts. We demonstrated that the SLIP method is a time- and cost-effective approach to manipulate the lengths of expanded repeat sequences.

  14. Long CAG repeat sequence and protein expression of androgen receptor considered as prognostic indicators in male breast carcinoma.

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    Yan-Ni Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The androgen receptor (AR expression and the CAG repeat length within the AR gene appear to be involved in the carcinogenesis of male breast carcinoma (MBC. Although phenotypic differences have been observed between MBC and normal control group in AR gene, there is lack of correlation analysis between AR expression and CAG repeat length in MBC. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prognostic value of CAG repeat lengths and AR protein expression. METHODS: 81 tumor tissues were used for immunostaining for AR expression and CAG repeat length determination and 80 normal controls were analyzed with CAG repeat length in AR gene. The CAG repeat length and AR expression were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological factors and prognostic indicators. RESULTS: AR gene in many MBCs has long CAG repeat sequence compared with that in control group (P = 0.001 and controls are more likely to exhibit short CAG repeat sequence than MBCs. There was statistically significant difference in long CAG repeat sequence between AR status for MBC patients (P = 0.004. The presence of long CAG repeat sequence and AR-positive expression were associated with shorter survival of MBC patients (CAG repeat: P = 0.050 for 5y-OS; P = 0.035 for 5y-DFS AR status: P = 0.048 for 5y-OS; P = 0.029 for 5y-DFS, respectively. CONCLUSION: The CAG repeat length within the AR gene might be one useful molecular biomarker to identify males at increased risk of breast cancer development. The presence of long CAG repeat sequence and AR protein expression were in relation to survival of MBC patients. The CAG repeat length and AR expression were two independent prognostic indicators in MBC patients.

  15. Severe and rapidly progressing cognitive phenotype in a SCA17-family with only marginally expanded CAG/CAA repeats in the TATA-box binding protein gene: A case report

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    Nielsen Troels

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs confine a group of rare and heterogeneous disorders, which present with progressive ataxia and numerous other features e.g. peripheral neuropathy, macular degeneration and cognitive impairment, and a subset of these disorders is caused by CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes. The diagnosing of the SCAs is often difficult due to the phenotypic overlap among several of the subtypes and with other neurodegenerative disorders e.g. Huntington’s disease. Case presentation We report a family in which the proband had rapidly progressing cognitive decline and only subtle cerebellar symptoms from age 42. Sequencing of the TATA-box binding protein gene revealed a modest elongation of the CAG/CAA-repeat of only two repeats above the non-pathogenic threshold of 41, confirming a diagnosis of SCA17. Normally, repeats within this range show reduced penetrance and result in a milder disease course with slower progression and later age of onset. Thus, this case presented with an unusual phenotype. Conclusions The current case highlights the diagnostic challenge of neurodegenerative disorders and the need for a thorough clinical and paraclinical examination of patients presenting with rapid cognitive decline to make a precise diagnosis on which further genetic counseling and initiation of treatment modalities can be based.

  16. Androgen receptor CAG polymorphism and sporadic and early-onset prostate cancer among Mexican men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Rocío; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Camacho-Mejorado, Rafael; Burguete-García, Ana I; Vázquez-Salas, Ruth Argelia; Martínez-Nava, Gabriela A; Santana, Carla; Noris, Gino

    2016-09-01

    A short CAG repeat length in the gene encoding for the androgen receptor (AR) has been associated with prostate cancer (PC) risk and aggressiveness. In Latino men, information on this association is scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate this association in Mexican males. Using fragment analysis by capillary electrophoresis, we determined the number of CAG repeats-(CAG)n-in AR gene from 158 incident PC cases and 326 age-matched healthy controls (±5 years), residing in Mexico City, Mexico. According to Gleason scale and age at diagnosis, cases were classified as high (⩾7) and low grade (CAG repeat length than controls (18.6±2.2 vs 19.5±2.5; P=0.02). Lower number of CAG repeats (CAG)⩽19 were associated with a greater risk for early-onset PC (odds ratio: 2.31; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-4.69). CAG repeat length could increase the risk for sporadic and early-onset PC. The best cutoff point for identifying at-risk subjects was (CAG)19. However, further studies are necessary to replicate our findings in subjects with a family history of PC and also to evaluate the association between CAG repeats length and disease progression.

  17. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychiatric symptoms and CAG expansion in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.W.; Schmid, W.; Spiegel, R. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-16

    The mutation responsible for Huntington`s disease (HD) is an elongated CAG repeat in the coding region of the IT15 gene. A PCR-based test with high sensitivity and accuracy is now available to identify asymptomatic gene carriers and patients. An inverse correlation between CAG copy number and age at disease onset has been found in a large number of affected individuals. The influence of the CAG repeat expansion on other phenotypic manifestations, especially specific psychiatric symptoms has not been studied intensively. In order to elucidate this situation we investigated the relation between CAG copy number and distinct psychiatric phenotypes found in 79 HD-patients. None of the four differentiated categories (personality change, psychosis, depression, and nonspecific alterations) showed significant differences in respect to size of the CAG expansion. In addition, no influence of individual sex on psychiatric presentation could be found. On the other hand in patients with personality changes maternal transmission was significantly more frequent compared with all other groups. Therefore we suggest that clinical severity of psychiatric features in HD is not directly dependent on the size of the dynamic mutation involved. The complex pathogenetic mechanisms leading to psychiatric alterations are still unknown and thus genotyping does not provide information about expected psychiatric symptoms in HD gene carriers. 40 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B.A.; Eberwine, J.; Spencer, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington`s disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to >37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and LJV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  20. ss-siRNAs allele selectively inhibit ataxin-3 expression: multiple mechanisms for an alternative gene silencing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Yu, Dongbo; Aiba, Yuichiro; Pendergraff, Hannah; Swayze, Eric E; Lima, Walt F; Hu, Jiaxin; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2013-11-01

    Single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) provide an alternative approach to gene silencing. ss-siRNAs combine the simplicity and favorable biodistribution of antisense oligonucleotides with robust silencing through RNA interference (RNAi). Previous studies reported potent and allele-selective inhibition of human huntingtin expression by ss-siRNAs that target the expanded CAG repeats within the mutant allele. Mutant ataxin-3, the genetic cause of Machado-Joseph Disease, also contains an expanded CAG repeat. We demonstrate here that ss-siRNAs are allele-selective inhibitors of ataxin-3 expression and then redesign ss-siRNAs to optimize their selectivity. We find that both RNAi-related and non-RNAi-related mechanisms affect gene expression by either blocking translation or affecting alternative splicing. These results have four broad implications: (i) ss-siRNAs will not always behave similarly to analogous RNA duplexes; (ii) the sequences surrounding CAG repeats affect allele-selectivity of anti-CAG oligonucleotides; (iii) ss-siRNAs can function through multiple mechanisms and; and (iv) it is possible to use chemical modification to optimize ss-siRNA properties and improve their potential for drug discovery.

  1. Long CAG Repeat Sequence and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Considered as Prognostic Indicators in Male Breast Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Ni Song; Jing-Shu Geng; Tong Liu; Zhen-Bin Zhong; Yang Liu; Bing-Shu Xia; Hong-Fei Ji; Xiao-Mei Li; Guo-Qiang Zhang; Yan-Lv Ren; Zhi-Gao Li; Da Pang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The androgen receptor (AR) expression and the CAG repeat length within the AR gene appear to be involved in the carcinogenesis of male breast carcinoma (MBC). Although phenotypic differences have been observed between MBC and normal control group in AR gene, there is lack of correlation analysis between AR expression and CAG repeat length in MBC. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prognostic value of CAG repeat lengths and AR protein expression. METHODS: 81 tumor tiss...

  2. H.pylori Cag A gene and its pathogenesis mechanism in digestive diseases%幽门螺杆菌CagA及其致病机理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐顺福; 施瑞华; 苗毅

    2007-01-01

    1984年Warren和Marshall从人胃黏膜中分离培养出幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter Pylori,H.pylori)后,经过20多年的研究表明H.pylori感染为慢性活动性胃炎的主要致病菌是消化性溃疡的重要致病因素,是胃癌重要的危险因素,世界卫生组织将其列为一类致癌物,Warren和Marshall并为此荣获2005年诺贝尔生理医学奖。在且pylori致病机理中,其分泌的毒力因子毒素相关基因(cytotoxin associated geneA,

  3. Onset Time and Durability of Huntingtin Suppression in Rhesus Putamen After Direct Infusion of Antihuntingtin siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Richard; Ge, Pei; Chen, Qingmin; Sutherland, Jessica E; Zhang, Zhiming; Gash, Don M; Stiles, David K; Stewart, Gregory R; Sah, Dinah W Y; Kaemmerer, William F

    2015-06-30

    One possible treatment for Huntington's disease involves direct infusion of a small, interfering RNA (siRNA) designed to reduce huntingtin expression into brain tissue from a chronically implanted programmable pump. Here, we studied the suppression of huntingtin mRNA achievable with short infusion times, and investigated how long suppression may persist after infusion ceases. Rhesus monkeys received 3 days of infusion of Magnevist into the putamen to confirm catheter patency and fluid distribution. After a 1-week washout period, monkeys received radiolabeled siRNA targeting huntingtin. After 1 or 3 days of siRNA delivery, monkeys were either terminated, or their pumps were shut off and they were terminated 10 or 24 days later. Results indicate that the onset of huntingtin mRNA suppression in the rhesus putamen occurs rapidly, achieving a plateau throughout the putamen within 4 days. Conversely, loss of huntingtin suppression progresses slowly, persisting an estimated 27-39 days in the putamen and surrounding white matter. These findings indicate the rapid onset and durability of siRNA-mediated target gene suppression observed in other organs also occurs in the brain, and support the use of episodic delivery of siRNA into the brain for treatment of Huntington's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Onset Time and Durability of Huntingtin Suppression in Rhesus Putamen After Direct Infusion of Antihuntingtin siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Grondin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One possible treatment for Huntington's disease involves direct infusion of a small, interfering RNA (siRNA designed to reduce huntingtin expression into brain tissue from a chronically implanted programmable pump. Here, we studied the suppression of huntingtin mRNA achievable with short infusion times, and investigated how long suppression may persist after infusion ceases. Rhesus monkeys received 3 days of infusion of Magnevist into the putamen to confirm catheter patency and fluid distribution. After a 1-week washout period, monkeys received radiolabeled siRNA targeting huntingtin. After 1 or 3 days of siRNA delivery, monkeys were either terminated, or their pumps were shut off and they were terminated 10 or 24 days later. Results indicate that the onset of huntingtin mRNA suppression in the rhesus putamen occurs rapidly, achieving a plateau throughout the putamen within 4 days. Conversely, loss of huntingtin suppression progresses slowly, persisting an estimated 27–39 days in the putamen and surrounding white matter. These findings indicate the rapid onset and durability of siRNA-mediated target gene suppression observed in other organs also occurs in the brain, and support the use of episodic delivery of siRNA into the brain for treatment of Huntington's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. [Production of a recombinant CagA protein for the detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgüç, Miray; Karatayli, Ersin; Çelik, Esra; Koyuncu, Duygu; Çelik, İnci; Karatayli, Senem Ceren; Özden, Ali; Bozdayi, A Mithat

    2014-07-01

    At present, Helicobacter pylori infections affect approximately 50% of the world population. It is known that H.pylori is related with several gastric diseases including chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic and gastric ulcers as well as gastric carcinomas. CagA (Cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein which is one of the most important virulence factors of H.pylori, is thought to be responsible for the development of gastric cancer. CagA is a 128 kDa hydrophilic protein which binds to the epitelial stomach cells and is known to be phosphorylated on its EPIYA regions. The EPIYA regions are highly variable and carry a higher risk of developing gastric cancer than CagA negative strains. The aim of this study was to construct a prokaryotic expression system expressing a recombinant CagA protein, which can be used for the detection of anti-CagA antibodies. For the isolation of H.pylori genomic DNA, a total of 112 gastric biopsy samples obtained from patients who were previously found positive for rapid urease (CLO) test, were used. H.pylori DNAs were amplified from 57 of those samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of them 35 were found positive in terms of cagA gene. Different EPIYA motifs were detected in 25 out of 35 cagA positive samples, and one of those samples that contained the highest number of EPIYA motif, was chosen for the cloning procedure. Molecular cloning and expression of the recombinant fragment were performed with Champion Pet151/D expression vector (Invitrogen, USA), the expression of which was induced by the addition of IPTG (Isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) into the E.coli culture medium. Expression was observed with anti-histidin HRP (Horse Radish Peroxidase) antibodies by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot (WB) analysis. In our study, two clones possessing different fragments from the same H.pylori strain with three different EPIYA motifs were succesfully expressed. Since CagA antigen plays a signicant role in the pathogenesis of H

  6. Association between CAG repeat polymorphisms and the risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis by race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ah

    2013-11-01

    Although a number of studies have been conducted on the association between prostate cancer and CAG repeat polymorphisms of the androgen receptor gene, this association remains elusive and controversial. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the effects of (CAG)n repeat genetic polymorphisms on the incidence of prostate cancer, particularly as regards race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeats. To collect articles published on the association between CAG repeats and prostate cancer, publications were identified from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database of epidemiological studies published up to October 2011; our identification of publications was not limited by a language barrier. The following search keywords were used: prostate cancer risk, CAG repeat polymorphism, androgen receptor gene and human. Stata version 10 was used for the meta-analysis and the publication bias was measured through the Begg's test and Egger's test. This meta-analysis included 47 studies with 13,346 cases and 15,172 control or non-cases and consisted of 31 reports based on Caucasians, ten on Asians, one on Hispanics and four on combined ethnic groups. The carriers of a shorter CAG repeat sequence had an increased risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for all subjects; OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for prospective studies; OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.51 for retrospective studies) regardless of the exact length of the CAG repeat, compared with carriers of a longer repeat sequence. In terms of race, the risk of carrying a shorter CAG repeat sequence was 1.10- and 1.83-fold higher than that of a longer repeat sequence in Caucasians and Asians, respectively. For the specific number of CAG repeat polymorphisms, carriers of repeats were observed to have a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.29) compared with carriers with ≥ 22 CAG repeat polymorphisms, particularly for Asians (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.24). This meta

  7. Cloning and Characterization of Expanded CAG-Repeat Containing Sequence(s): Identification of Candidate Breast Cancer Predisposition (Gene(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    polymerase chain reaction . Am J Hum Genet 1989;44(3):388-396. 2. Lander ES, Linton LM, Birren B, Nusbaum C, Zody MC, Baldwin J, Devon K, Dewar K, Doyle M...these TRE loci have been associated with inherited forms of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, including Huntington disease , Fragile X syndrome...42 code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 I. INTRODUCTION: Expression of an inherited disease gene does not always follow

  8. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  9. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG) Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD) and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawani, Arpita; Kumar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein) to expanded r(CAG) repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG) also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG) motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD) simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG) motif.

  10. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs.

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    Arpita Tawani

    Full Text Available In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein to expanded r(CAG repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG motif.

  11. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

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    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases including Huntington's disease (HD, mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms.

  12. 青少年痤疮患者雄激素受体水平、雄激素受体基因 CAG 多态性的研究%Research on adolescent androgen receptor level in patients with acne,androgen receptor gene CAG polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴波; 邵晓珊; 吴文锦

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨青少年痤疮患者雄激素受体(A R )水平的变化情况以及患者雄激素受体基因CAG多态性的分布情况。方法选择100例(其中男性50例、女性50例)面部明显痤疮在校高中生作为观察组,再按照1∶1匹配原则选择100例面部无痤疮的在校高中生作为对照组,检查患者外周血雄激素水平、白细胞雄激素受体(AR)以及雄激素受体基因CAG多态性。结果男性和女性痤疮患者其血浆睾酮水平、AR水平比正常对照组均升高,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);随着男性痤疮患者其痤疮越严重,其血浆睾酮有所升高,但是差异不具有统计学意义(P>0.05),而不同程度女性痤疮患者其血浆睾酮水平具有统计学意义(P<0.05);随着痤疮患者其痤疮越严重,AR水平有所升高,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);痤疮患者携带CAG短片段的比例显著高于对照组携带比例(P<0.05)。结论痤疮发生与发展过程中,雄激素以及雄激素受体增高起着重要的作用,特别对于女性痤疮患者而言,其影响更为显著;携带雄激素受体基因CAG短片段的人群,其患痤疮的危险性更大。%Objective To investigate the adolescent patients with acne androgen receptor (AR) levels and the distribution of androgen receptor gene CAG polymorphism .Methods 100 cases (inclu-ding 50 male and 50 female) the obvious facial acne high school student as the observation group ,1∶1 according to the matching principle to select 100 cases of facial acne free high school students as the control group .Patients were examined for peripheral androgen levels ,androgen receptor (AR) and androgen receptor gene CAG polymorphism .Results The male and female patients with acne and the plasma levels of testosterone ,AR levels were higher than the normal control group ,there were statis-tically significant differences (P0 .05) ,and in pa

  13. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng YX

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yixuan Zeng,1,2,* Wenyuan Guo,1,* Guangqing Xu,3 Qinmei Wang,4 Luyang Feng,1,2 Simei Long,1 Fengyin Liang,1 Yi Huang,1 Xilin Lu,1 Shichang Li,5 Jiebin Zhou,5 Jean-Marc Burgunder,6 Jiyan Pang,5 Zhong Pei1,2 1Department of Neurology, National Key Clinical Department and Key Discipline of Neurology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Major Neurological Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Guangzhou Center, Chinese Huntington’s Disease Network, 3Department of Rehabilitation, The First Affiliated Hospital, 4Key laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine of the First Affiliated Hospital, 5School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 6Swiss Huntington’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt. Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a

  14. Crystal structure of the type IV secretion system component CagX from Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fei; Zhao, Yanhe; Sun, Lifang; Liu, Yadan; Wu, Yunkun

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen prevalent in the human population, is the causative agent of severe gastric diseases. An H. pylori type IV secretion (T4S) system encoded by the cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is responsible for communication with host cells. As a component of the cagPAI T4S system core complex, CagX plays an important role in virulence-protein translocation into the host cells. In this work, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of CagX (CagXct), which is a homologue of the VirB9 protein from the VirB/D4 T4S system, is presented. CagXct is only the second three-dimensional structure to be elucidated of a VirB9-like protein. Another homologue, TraO, which is encoded on the Escherichia coli conjugative plasmid pKM101, shares only 19% sequence identity with CagXct; however, there is a remarkable similarity in tertiary structure between these two β-sandwich protein domains. Most of the residues that are conserved between CagXct and TraO are located within the protein core and appear to be responsible for the preservation of this domain fold. The studies presented here will contribute to our understanding of different bacterial T4S systems. PMID:28291753

  15. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA genotype among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sueptrakool Wisessombat; Chatruthai Meethai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in dyspepsia patients and its relation to virulence factor cagA gene. Methods: In total, 110 gastric biopsies from dyspeptic patients were comparatively studied using rapid urease test and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Multiplex PCR detected three genes of 16S rRNA, cagA, and ureC. H. pylori was detected in 14 gastric biopsies (13%). Significantly higher numbers of female were infected. Furthermore,cag A gene was found in all H. pylori-positive specimens. In addition, the result indicated that the multiplex PCR with annealing temperature at 57 oC was able to effectively amplify specific products. Conclusions:The results confirmed high prevalence of cagA gene in H. pylori among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand.

  17. A Familial Factor Independent of CAG Repeat Length Influences Age at Onset of Machado-Joseph Disease

    OpenAIRE

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Maciel, Patricia; Gaspar, Claudia; Radvany, Joao; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Corwin, Lee; Coutinho, Paula; MacLeod, Patrick; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    1996-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a late-onset, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide (CAG) repeat sequence in a novel gene (MJD1) on chromosome 14. Previous studies showed that age at onset is negatively correlated with the number of CAG repeat units, but only part of the variation in onset age is explained by CAG repeat length. Ages at onset and CAG repeat lengths of 136 MJD patients from 23 kindreds of Portuguese descent were analyzed, t...

  18. CagY Is an Immune-Sensitive Regulator of the Helicobacter pylori Type IV Secretion System.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrozo, RM; Hansen, LM; Lam, AM; Skoog, EC; Martin, ME; Cai, LP; Lin, Y; Latoscha, A; Suerbaum, S; Canfield, DR; Solnick, JV

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer are caused most often by Helicobacter pylori strains that harbor the cag pathogenicity island, which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host cells. cagY is an essential gene in the T4SS and has an unusual DNA repeat structure that predicts in-frame insertions and deletions. These cagY recombination events typically lead to a reduction in T4SS function in mouse and primate models. We examined the role of the ...

  19. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Tiwari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The population of India harbors one of the world's most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs, in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0 software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5 software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs.

  20. Pathogenicity island cag, vacA and IS605 genotypes in Mexican strains of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabche-Barrera María L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the pathogenicity island cag (cag PAI and the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA. Virtually all strains have a copy of vacA, but its genotype varies. The cag PAI is a region of 32 genes in which the insertion of IS605 elements in its middle region has been associated with partial or total deletions of it that have generated strains with varying virulence. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the cag PAI integrity, vacA genotype and IS605 status in groups of isolates from Mexican patients with non-peptic ulcers (NPU, non-bleeding peptic ulcers (NBPU, and bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU. Methods The cag PAI integrity was performed by detection of eleven targeted genes along this locus using dot blot hybridization and PCR assays. The vacA allelic, cag PAI genotype 1 and IS605 status were determined by PCR analysis. Results Groups of 16-17 isolates (n = 50 from two patients with NPU, NBPU, and BPU, respectively, were studied. 90% (45/50 of the isolates harbored a complete cag PAI. Three BPU isolates lacked the cag PAI, and two of the NBPU had an incomplete cag PAI: the first isolate was negative for three of its genes, including deletion of the cagA gene, whereas the second did not have the cagM gene. Most of the strains (76% had the vacA s1b/m1 genotype; meanwhile the IS605 was not present within the cag PAI of any strain but was detected elsewhere in the genome of 8% (4/50. Conclusion The patients had highly virulent strains since the most of them possessed a complete cag PAI and had a vacA s1b/m1 genotype. All the isolates presented the cag PAI without any IS605 insertion (genotype 1. Combined vacA genotypes showed that 1 NPU, 2 NBPU, and 1 BPU patients (66.6% had a mixed infection; coexistence of H. pylori strains with different cag PAI status was observed in 1 NBPU

  1. Novel CagA ELISA exhibits enhanced sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Kido, Yasutoshi; Akada, Junko; Shiota, Seiji; Binh, Tran Thanh; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Dung, Ho D Q; Tung, Pham Huu; Tri, Tran Dinh; Thuan, Ngo P Minh; Tam, Le Quang; Nam, Bui Chi; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    AIM To develop a novel Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suitable for detecting serum anti-CagA antibodies with high sensitivity. METHODS Recombinant East Asian-type CagA protein was purified and immobilized for ELISA. Serum samples from 217 Vietnamese individuals (110 H. pylori-infected and 107 uninfected individuals) were applied. Conventional ELISA from Western-type CagA and our East Asian-type CagA ELISA were evaluated by comparing 38 subjects with the Western-type genotype and 72 subjects with the East Asian-type cagA genotype. Histological scores of the gastric mucosa were determined using the updated Sydney System to examine the relationship with anti-CagA antibody titers. RESULTS Recombinant 70-100 kDa fragments were immobilized on the ELISA plate. In ROC analysis, the area under the curve of our East Asian-type CagA ELISA was comparable to that of conventional CagA ELISA. The sensitivity of the two ELISAs differed depending on the cagA genotype. The sensitivity of East Asian-type CagA ELISA was higher for subjects infected with East Asian-type cagA H. pylori (P < 0.001), and the sensitivity of the conventional CagA ELISA tended to be higher for subjects infected with Western cagA H. pylori (P = 0.056). The titer of anti-CagA antibody tended to correlate with monocyte infiltration scores (r = 0.25, P = 0.058) and was inversely correlated with H. pylori density (r = -0.26, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION The novel ELISA is useful to detect anti-CagA antibodies in East Asian countries, and the titer may be a marker for predicting chronic gastritis. PMID:28104980

  2. Full-length huntingtin levels modulate body weight by influencing insulin-like growth factor 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Xie, Yuanyun; Skotte, Niels Henning

    2010-01-01

    body weight by modulating the IGF-1 pathway. Plasma IGF-1 levels correlate with body weight and htt levels in the transgenic YAC mice expressing human htt. The effect of htt on IGF-1 expression is independent of CAG size. No effect on body weight is observed in transgenic YAC mice expressing...... and decreases the body weight of YAC128 animals to WT levels. Furthermore, given the ubiquitous expression of IGF-1 within the central nervous system, we also examined the impact of FL htt levels on IGF-1 expression in different regions of the brain, including the striatum, cerebellum of YAC18, YAC128......Levels of full-length huntingtin (FL htt) influence organ and body weight, independent of polyglutamine length. The growth hormone-insulin like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis is well established as a regulator of organ growth and body weight. In this study, we investigate the involvement...

  3. Evolution of cagA oncogene of Helicobacter pylori through recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half the human population and causes gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. The cagA gene product is a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. It is injected into epithelial cells, undergoes phosphorylation by host cell kinases, and perturbs host signaling pathways. CagA is known for its geographical, structural, and functional diversity in the C-terminal half, where an EPIYA host-interacting motif is repeated. The Western version of CagA carries the EPIYA segment types A, B, and C, while the East Asian CagA carries types A, B, and D and shows higher virulence. Many structural variants such as duplications and deletions are reported. In this study, we gained insight into the relationships of CagA variants through various modes of recombination, by analyzing all known cagA variants at the DNA sequence level with the single nucleotide resolution. Processes that occurred were: (i homologous recombination between DNA sequences for CagA multimerization (CM sequence; (ii recombination between DNA sequences for the EPIYA motif; and (iii recombination between short similar DNA sequences. The left half of the EPIYA-D segment characteristic of East Asian CagA was derived from Western type EPIYA, with Amerind type EPIYA as the intermediate, through rearrangements of specific sequences within the gene. Adaptive amino acid changes were detected in the variable region as well as in the conserved region at sites to which no specific function has yet been assigned. Each showed a unique evolutionary distribution. These results clarify recombination-mediated routes of cagA evolution and provide a solid basis for a deeper understanding of its function in pathogenesis.

  4. Androgen receptor (CAG)n polymorphisms and breast cancer risk in a Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, J; Peng, L; Zhong, H J; Huo, Z H

    2015-08-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the differentiation and growth of breast cancer. Genetic markers in the AR gene have a plausible role in modulating the risk of breast cancer. In this study, we studied the association of breast cancer and the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism (CAG)n in exon 1 of the AR gene in 202 patients with breast cancer and 183 healthy controls from our hospital (Yinchuan, China). Repeat lengths were determined by fluorescent DNA fragment analysis using the ABI GeneScan software and DNA sequencing. We detected 17 short tandem repeat alleles in exon 1 in the Han population of Ningxia Province, China. The CAG repeat number ranged from 14 to 31 and the frequency ranged from 0.339 to 24.460%. Generally, (CAG)n repeat lengths 22 were classified as long (L). No association was found between breast cancer and the S/L (CAG) variants. However, the frequency of the (CAG)25 repeats in the breast cancer group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P = 0.033, odds ratio = 1.790, 95% confidence interval = 1.044-3.069). These findings indicate a role for AR gene (CAG)n variations in breast cancer and might be informative for future genetic or biological studies on breast cancer, although these findings need replication in other populations.

  5. ATXN2 CAG repeat expansions increase the risk for Chinese patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolu; Lu, Ming; Tang, Lu; Zhang, Nan; Chui, Dehua; Fan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder with unclear etiology. Recently, intermediate CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2, the gene responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), have been identified as a possible genetic risk factor for ALS. In this study, we analyzed the ATXN2 CAG repeat length in Chinese patients with ALS to evaluate the relationship between the genotype and phenotype. We studied 1,067 patients with ALS and 506 controls from mainland China (excluding Tibet). We collected clinical data and analyzed fluorescent PCR products to assess ATXN2 CAG repeat length in all of the samples. We observed that intermediate CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 (CAG repeat length >30) were associated with ALS (p = 0.004). There was no significant difference in clinical characteristics between the groups with and without intermediate CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2. Our data indicate that, for ALS patients from mainland China, intermediate CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 increase the risk of ALS but have no effect on disease phenotype.

  6. Characterization of CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Liang Zhu; Shu Zheng; Qin Du; Ke-Da Qian; Ping-Chu Fang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients.METHODS: DNA fragments in CagA variable region were amplified and sequenced respectively from genomic DNA of 19 isolates from patients with gastric cancer and 20isolates from patients with chronic gastritis. The tendency of phosphorylation in tyrosine(s) of CagA proteins was evaluated subsequently by phosphorylation assay in vivo and in vitro respectively.RESULTS: About 97.44% (38/39) H pylori isolates possessed CagA gene. CagA+ strains contained 2-4tandem five-amino-acid motifs EPIYA but only one EPIYA had repeated sequence in CagA variable region in different isolates. There was no significant difference between the number of EPIYA motifs in H pylori from patients with different diseases. However, only tyrosine site in EPIYA within repeated sequence could be phosphorylated by AGS cells in vivo although all tyrosine sites in EPIYA could be phosphorylated in vitro.CONCLUSION: CagA in Chinese has no functional difference in perturbing cellular signal pathway among different H pylori isolates.

  7. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori CagA-Induced Pathogenesis by Methylantcinate B from Antrodia camphorata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the leading risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Hp virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA interacted with cholesterol-enriched microdomains and leads to induction of inflammation in gastric epithelial cells (AGS. In this study, we identified a triterpenoid methylantcinate B (MAB from the medicinal mushroom Antrodia camphoratawhich inhibited the translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and caused a reduction in hummingbird phenotype in HP-infected AGS cells. Additionally, MAB suppressed the Hp-induced inflammatory response by attenuation of NF-κB activation, translocation of p65 NF-κB, and phosphorylation of IκB-α, indicating that MAB modulates CagA-mediated signaling pathway. Additionally, MAB also suppressed the IL-8 luciferase activity and its secretion in HP-infected AGS cells. On the other hand, molecular structure simulations revealed that MAB interacts with CagA similarly to that of cholesterol. Moreover, binding of cholesterol to the immobilized CagA was inhibited by increased levels of MAB. Our results demonstrate that MAB is the first natural triterpenoid which competes with cholesterol bound to CagA leading to attenuation of Hp-induced pathogenesis of epithelial cells. Thus, this study indicates that MAB may have a scope to develop as a therapeutic candidate against Hp CagA-induced inflammation.

  8. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Might Induce TGF-β1-Mediated EMT by Means of cagE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Park, Seon Mee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which polarized epithelial cells have mesenchymal cell phenotypes, is thought to be a key process of invasion and metastasis of cancer. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) is known to be carcinogenic and Helicobacter pylori is a predominant carcinogen of gastric cancer. Our study aimed to determine whether TGF-β1 or H. pylori infection enhances EMT process and cytotoxin-associated gene E (CagE) is associated with EMT. Human gastric cancer cell AGS and MKN45 were treated with recombinant TGF-β1 or H. pylori including cagE-negative (ΔcagE) mutant. Besides the assessment of EMT-related markers expression levels by means of RT-qPCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assay, the induction of in vitro EMT on gastric cancer cells (AGS and MKN cell lines) was confirmed by wound-healing assay and invasion assay. When gastric cancer cells were treated with TGF-β1 or various strains of cagE-positive H. pylori, EMT-related marker altered significantly. However, the ΔcagE mutant did not. Wound-healing assay and invasion assay showed enhanced migration ability of the cells treated with cagE-positive H. pylori but not in ΔcagE mutant. EMT induction in gastric cancer cells by TGF-β1 was confirmed. Only infection with cagE-positive H. pylori upregulated the TGF-β1-mediated EMT pathway and consequently promotes EMT. Therefore, H. pylori might induce TGF-β1-mediated EMT associated with the cagE. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Investigation into the Distribution of vacA and cagA Genes of Helicobacter Pylori in Miners of Huainan City%淮南地区矿工幽门螺杆菌vacA、cagA基因分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪雪峰; 崔玉宝; 王钧; 王克霞; 陈琳; 吴静; 胡友莹

    2006-01-01

    [目的]研究淮南地区煤矿工人幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,H.pylori)vacA、cagA基因分布特征.[方法]选择经胃镜及病理组织检查诊断证实有相关胃、十二指肠疾病的349名矿工为研究对象,取其胃窦部活检黏膜作H.pylori的分离培养,利用聚合酶链反应技术(PCR)测定分离培养出H.pylori菌株的vacA、cagA基因,并进行分型.[结果]349份样本中共分离培养出244株H.pylori菌株,其中慢性胃炎、萎缩性胃炎、胃溃疡及十二指肠溃疡幽门螺杆菌培养阳性率分别为61.61%(69/112)、61.54%(48/78)、75%(72/96)及87.30%(55/63);基因测定结果显示,244株H.pylori菌株临床分离株中,84.84%(207/244)含vacA基因,73.36%(179/244)含cagA基因;其中慢性胃炎、萎缩性胃炎、胃溃疡及十二指肠溃疡cagA、vacA基因检出率分别为66.67%(46/69)、50.72%(35/69)、85.42%(41/48)和70.83%(34/48)与93.06%(67/72)、84.72%(61/72)、96.36%(53/55)和89.09%(49/55),4种疾病间差异均具显著性(P<0.01).进一步分型发现,慢性胃炎、萎缩性胃炎,胃溃疡及十二指肠溃疡患者中vacA+、cagA+分别为44.93%(31/69)、66.67%(32/48)、79.17%(57/72)、87.27%(48/55),差异具显著性(χ2=30.80,P<0.01).vacA+、cagA+菌株主要多见于损害较严重的胃黏膜表面,如萎缩性炎症、炎性坏死等,23例腺体不典型增生的胃黏膜表面均为vacA+、cagA+菌株.[结论]淮南地区矿工H.pylori感染多为vacA+、cagA+菌株,vacA+、cagA+H.pylori菌株为高毒力菌株,且与较严重的胃黏膜病理改变有关,可能是导致矿工慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡的重要因素,临床应充分重视H.pylori菌株毒力因子的监测.

  11. Efficacy Improvement of PCR Amplification of CAG Trinucleotide Repeats in the Coding Sequence of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type II Gene%提高SCA2编码区CAG三核苷酸重复的PCR扩增效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 夏家辉

    2000-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of PCR amplification of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the coding sequence of spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene(69.2% G+C), hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR, and the addition of enhancers(1%~12.5% DMSO , 1%~25% glycerol ,1%~12.5% formamide) were performed and compared with normal PCR . The results showed that hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR and the addition of enhancers(1%~10% DMSO , 5%~20% glycerol , 1%~10% formamide) improved the amplification efficacy of the GC rich region. Gene diagnosis in 70 SCA pedgrees and 60 spontaneous SCA patients were also conducted.%以遗传性脊髓小脑共济失调II型基因(spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene SCA2)编码区内的CAG三核苷酸重复为研究对象(G+C含量为69.2%),比较了热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR、添加增效剂(1%~12.5%二甲亚砜、1%~25%甘油、1%~12.5%甲酰胺)与常规PCR的扩增效率,发现热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR及添加增效剂(1%~10%二甲亚砜、5%~20%甘油、1%~10%甲酰胺)能提高该GC富集区的扩增效率,并对70个SCA家系及60个散发SCA患者进行了SCA2的基因诊断。

  12. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Stéphanie; Manley, Kevin; Simard, Jodie P; Clark, Greg W; Slean, Meghan M; Swami, Meera; Shelbourne, Peggy F; Tillier, Elisabeth R M; Monckton, Darren G; Messer, Anne; Pearson, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD) (CAG)∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6) background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy) background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with polymorphisms of

  13. 直接检测IT15基因(CAG)n重复对亨廷顿氏病进行基因诊断%Direct Detection of the Expanded CAG Repeat in IT15 Gene for Molecular Diagnosis of Huntington's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛跃华; 周刚; 陈美珏; 任兆瑞; 曾溢滔; 王秀英; 许志大

    1995-01-01

    应用巢式PCR和变性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳放射自显影鉴定IT15基因(CAG)n串联重复序列拷贝数的技术,对40名正常中国人以及徐州和浙江两大亨廷顿氏病(HD病)家系46名家庭成员进行了分析.结果表明,正常中国人IT15基因(CAG)n拷贝数为16左右,而HD患者的突变基因(CAG)n拷贝数均大于40,两者之间不重叠.对38名HD病高风险者进行症状前分子诊断,揭示11名家庭成员为HD基因的携带者,与家系调查和临床分析的结果相吻合.本文结果不仅证明IT15基因的动态突变也是导致中国人HD病的遗传学基础,而且为HD病的基因诊断、遗传咨询和遗传保健提供了科学资料.

  14. Normal aging modulates the neurotoxicity of mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Diguet

    Full Text Available Aging likely plays a role in neurodegenerative disorders. In Huntington's disease (HD, a disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the protein huntingtin (Htt, the role of aging is unclear. For a given tract length, the probability of disease onset increases with age. There are mainly two hypotheses that could explain adult onset in HD: Either mutant Htt progressively produces cumulative defects over time or "normal" aging renders neurons more vulnerable to mutant Htt toxicity. In the present study, we directly explored whether aging affected the toxicity of mutant Htt in vivo. We studied the impact of aging on the effects produced by overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of mutant Htt, of wild-type Htt or of a beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal reporter gene in the rat striatum. Stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors were performed simultaneously in young (3 week and old (15 month rats. Histological evaluation at different time points after infection demonstrated that the expression of mutant Htt led to pathological changes that were more severe in old rats, including an increase in the number of small Htt-containing aggregates in the neuropil, a greater loss of DARPP-32 immunoreactivity and striatal neurons as assessed by unbiased stereological counts.The present results support the hypothesis that "normal" aging is involved in HD pathogenesis, and suggest that age-related cellular defects might constitute potential therapeutic targets for HD.

  15. Huntingtin interactions with membrane phospholipids: strategic targets for therapeutic intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel-Gleason, Kimberly B

    2013-01-01

    The Huntington's disease gene encodes the protein huntingtin (Htt), a soluble protein that largely distributes to the cytoplasm where about half the protein is found in association with membranes. Early studies on Huntington's disease patients suggested changes in membrane phospholipids. Furthermore, changes in phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes have been found in HD cell models using genetic methods. Recent investigations prove that Htt associates with membranes by direct interactions with phospholipids in membranes. Htt contains at least two membrane binding domains, which may work in concert with each other, to target to the appropriate intracellular membranes for diverse functions. Htt has a particular affinity for a specific class of phospholipids called phosphatidylinositol phosphates; individual species of these phospholipids propagate signals promoting cell survival and regulating changes in morphology. Mutant Htt fragments can disrupt synthetic phospholipid bilayers and full-length mutant Htt shows increased binding to numerous phospholipids, supporting the idea that mutant Htt can introduce pathology at the level of phospholipid interactions. There is a great potential to develop therapeutic agents since numerous enzymes regulate the both the biosynthesis/metabolism of lipids and the post-translational modifications of Htt that direct membrane interactions. Understanding the relationship of Htt with membrane phospholipids, and the impact of mutant Htt on membrane-related functions and lipid metabolism, may help identify new modes of therapeutic intervention for Huntington's disease.

  16. Selective expression of mutant huntingtin during development recapitulates characteristic features of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Aldrin E; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Chen, Christopher H; Gulinello, Maria; Winchester, Michael L; Pichamoorthy, Nandini; Gokhan, Solen; Khodakhah, Kamran; Mehler, Mark F

    2016-05-17

    Recent studies have identified impairments in neural induction and in striatal and cortical neurogenesis in Huntington's disease (HD) knock-in mouse models and associated embryonic stem cell lines. However, the potential role of these developmental alterations for HD pathogenesis and progression is currently unknown. To address this issue, we used BACHD:CAG-Cre(ERT2) mice, which carry mutant huntingtin (mHtt) modified to harbor a floxed exon 1 containing the pathogenic polyglutamine expansion (Q97). Upon tamoxifen administration at postnatal day 21, the floxed mHtt-exon1 was removed and mHtt expression was terminated (Q97(CRE)). These conditional mice displayed similar profiles of impairments to those mice expressing mHtt throughout life: (i) striatal neurodegeneration, (ii) early vulnerability to NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity, (iii) impairments in motor coordination, (iv) temporally distinct abnormalities in striatal electrophysiological activity, and (v) altered corticostriatal functional connectivity and plasticity. These findings strongly suggest that developmental aberrations may play important roles in HD pathogenesis and progression.

  17. Association between cag-pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori isolates from peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and nonulcer dyspepsia subjects with histological changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahaboob Ali; Aleem A Khan; Santosh K Tiwari; Niyaz Ahmed; L Venkateswar Rao; CM Habibullah

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of the cay-pathogenicity island and the associated histological damage caused by strains with complete cay-PAI and with partial deletions in correlation to the disease status.METHODS: We analyzed the complete cag-PAI of 174representative Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) clinical isolates obtained from patients with duodenal ulcer,gastric ulcer, gastric cancer, and non-ulcer dyspepsia using eight different oligonucleotide primers viz cagA1,cagA2, cagAP1, cagAP2, cagE, cagT, LEC-1, LEC-2spanning five different loci of the whole cag-PAI by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).RESULTS: The complete screening of the genes comprising the cag-PAI showed that larger proportions of subjects with gastric ulcer (97.8%) inhabited strains with complete cag-PAI, followed by gastric cancer (85.7%),non-ulcer dyspepsia (7.1%), and duodenal ulcer (6.9%),significant differences were found in the percentagedistribution of the genes in all the clinical groups studied.It was found that strains with complete cag-PAI were able to cause severe histological damage than with the partially deleted ones.CONCLUSION: The cay-PAI is a strong virulent marker in the disease pathogenesis as it is shown that a large number of those infected with strain with complete cag-PAI had one or the other of the irreversible gastric pathologies and interestingly 18.5% of them developed gastric carcinoma. The presence of an intact cayPAI correlates with the development of more severe pathology, and such strains were found more frequently in patients with severe gastroduodenal disease. Partial deletions of the cag-PAI appear to be sufficient to render the organism less pathogenic.

  18. Sustained therapeutic reversal of Huntington’s disease by transient repression of huntingtin synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasiewicz, Holly B.; Stanek, Lisa M.; Wancewicz, Edward V.; Mazur, Curt; McAlonis, Melissa M.; Pytel, Kimberly A.; Artates, Jonathan W.; Weiss, Andreas; Cheng, Seng H.; Shihabuddin, Lamya S.; Hung, Gene; Bennett, C. Frank; Cleveland, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The primary cause of Huntington’s disease (HD) is expression of huntingtin with a polyglutamine expansion. Despite an absence of consensus on the mechanism(s) of toxicity, diminishing the synthesis of mutant huntingtin will abate toxicity if delivered to the key affected cells. With antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that catalyze RNase H-mediated degradation of huntingtin mRNA, we demonstrate that transient infusion into the cerebral spinal fluid of symptomatic HD mouse models not only delays disease progression, but mediates a sustained reversal of disease phenotype that persists longer than the huntingtin knockdown. Reduction of wild type huntingtin, along with mutant huntingtin, produces the same sustained disease reversal. Similar ASO infusion into non-human primates is shown to effectively lower huntingtin in many brain regions targeted by HD pathology. Rather than requiring continuous treatment, our findings establish a therapeutic strategy for sustained HD disease reversal produced by transient ASO-mediated diminution of huntingtin synthesis. PMID:22726834

  19. 布鲁氏菌和幽门螺杆菌等6种病原菌16S rRNA和cagA等基因的克隆与鉴定%Cloning and identification of 16S rRNA and cagA genes from six pathogenic bacteria including Brucella and Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高正琴; 岳秉飞; 贺争鸣

    2010-01-01

    目的 克隆并鉴定布鲁氏菌的16S rRNA、支原体的16S rRNA、泰泽氏菌的16S rRNA、空肠弯曲菌的flaA、肝螺杆菌的flaB和幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因,为建立实时荧光定量PCR检测方法作准备.方法 设计、合成布鲁氏菌的16S rRNA、支原体的16S rRNA、泰泽氏菌的16S rRNA、空肠弯曲菌flaA、肝螺杆菌flaB和幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因的特异性引物;PCR扩增、克隆16S rRNA、flaA、flaB和cagA基因;对重组质粒进行酶切鉴定、PCR鉴定和测序分析.结果 布鲁氏菌的16S rRNA、支原体的16S rRNA、泰泽氏菌的16S rRNA、空肠弯曲杆菌的flaA、肝螺杆菌的flaB和幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因PCR扩增产物分别在612 bp、600 bp、922 bp、637 bp、1 545 bp和1 168 bp处出现特异性目的 条带,结果均与预期扩增的目的 片段大小一致.将PCR产物分别与pMD18-T载体连接并转化感受态细菌大肠埃希菌JM109.对重组质粒pT-BC16S rRNA、pT-MP16S rRNA、pT-CP16S rRNA、pT-CJflaA、pT-HHflaB和pT-HPcagA分别进行酶切鉴定及PCR鉴定,结果均可见特异性目的 条带.测序结果显示,布鲁氏菌的16S rRNA、支原体的16S rRNA、泰泽氏菌的16S rRNA、空肠弯曲菌的flaA、肝螺杆菌的flaB和幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因序列与GenBank中细菌相应序列同源性高达100 %,说明上述6种致病菌的16S rRNA、flaA、flaB和cagA基因已成功克隆.结论 成功克隆了布鲁氏菌16S rRNA、支原体的16S rRNA、泰泽氏菌的16S rRNA、空肠弯曲菌的flaA、肝螺杆菌的flaB和幽门螺杆菌的cagA基因,为建立实时荧光定量PCR检测方法奠定了基础.

  20. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chi Chang

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis.

  1. Diversity in the androgen receptor CAG repeat has been shaped by a multistep mutational mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Diana; Pimenta, João; Wong, Virginia C N; Amorim, António; Martins, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene encodes a type of nuclear receptor that functions as a steroid-hormone activated transcription factor. In its coding region, AR includes a CAG repeat, which has been intensely studied due to the inverse correlation between repeat size and AR transcriptional activity. Several studies have reported different (CAG)n sizes associated with the risk of androgen-linked diseases. We aimed at clarifying the mechanisms on the origin of newly CAG sized alleles through a strategy involving the analysis of the associated haplotype diversity. We genotyped 374 control individuals of European and Asian ancestry, and reconstructed the haplotypes associated with the CAG repeat, defined by 10 SNPs and 6 flanking STRs. The most powerful SNPs to tag AR lineages are rs7061037-rs12012620 and rs34191540-rs6625187-rs2768578 in Europeans and Asians, respectively. In the most frequent AR lineage, (CAG)18 alleles seem to have been generated by a multistep mutation mechanism, most probably from longer alleles. We further noticed that the DXS1194-DXS1111 haplotype, in linkage disequilibrium with AR-(CAG)n expanded alleles responsible for spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), is rare among our controls; however, the haplotype strategy here described may be used to clarify the origin of expansions in other populations, as in future association studies.

  2. Risk assessment of gastric cancer caused by Helicobacter pylori using CagA sequence markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a marker of Helicobacter pylori, Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA has been revealed to be the major virulence factor causing gastroduodenal diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of different gastroduodenal diseases caused by cagA-positive H. pylori infection remain unknown. Current studies are limited to the evaluation of the correlation between diseases and the number of Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA motifs in the CagA strain. To further understand the relationship between CagA sequence and its virulence to gastric cancer, we proposed a systematic entropy-based approach to identify the cancer-related residues in the intervening regions of CagA and employed a supervised machine learning method for cancer and non-cancer cases classification. METHODOLOGY: An entropy-based calculation was used to detect key residues of CagA intervening sequences as the gastric cancer biomarker. For each residue, both combinatorial entropy and background entropy were calculated, and the entropy difference was used as the criterion for feature residue selection. The feature values were then fed into Support Vector Machines (SVM with the Radial Basis Function (RBF kernel, and two parameters were tuned to obtain the optimal F value by using grid search. Two other popular sequence classification methods, the BLAST and HMMER, were also applied to the same data for comparison. CONCLUSION: Our method achieved 76% and 71% classification accuracy for Western and East Asian subtypes, respectively, which performed significantly better than BLAST and HMMER. This research indicates that small variations of amino acids in those important residues might lead to the virulence variance of CagA strains resulting in different gastroduodenal diseases. This study provides not only a useful tool to predict the correlation between the novel CagA strain and diseases, but also a general new framework for detecting biological sequence

  3. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  5. Helicobacter pylori modulates host cell responses by CagT4SS-dependent translocation of an intermediate metabolite of LPS inner core heptose biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Eugenia; Bats, Simon H.; Murillo, Tatiana; Speidel, Yvonne; Coombs, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Highly virulent Helicobacter pylori cause proinflammatory signaling inducing the transcriptional activation and secretion of cytokines such as IL-8 in epithelial cells. Responsible in part for this signaling is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) that codetermines the risk for pathological sequelae of an H. pylori infection such as gastric cancer. The Cag type IV secretion system (CagT4SS), encoded on the cagPAI, can translocate various molecules into cells, the effector protein CagA, peptidoglycan metabolites and DNA. Although these transported molecules are known to contribute to cellular responses to some extent, a major part of the cagPAI-induced signaling leading to IL-8 secretion remains unexplained. We report here that biosynthesis of heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP), an important intermediate metabolite of LPS inner heptose core, contributes in a major way to the H. pylori cagPAI-dependent induction of proinflammatory signaling and IL-8 secretion in human epithelial cells. Mutants defective in the genes required for synthesis of HBP exhibited a more than 95% reduction of IL-8 induction and impaired CagT4SS-dependent cellular signaling. The loss of HBP biosynthesis did not abolish the ability to translocate CagA. The human cellular adaptor TIFA, which was described before to mediate HBP-dependent activity in other Gram-negative bacteria, was crucial in the cagPAI- and HBP pathway-induced responses by H. pylori in different cell types. The active metabolite was present in H. pylori lysates but not enriched in bacterial supernatants. These novel results advance our mechanistic understanding of H. pylori cagPAI-dependent signaling mediated by intracellular pattern recognition receptors. They will also allow to better dissect immunomodulatory activities by H. pylori and to improve the possibilities of intervention in cagPAI- and inflammation-driven cancerogenesis. PMID:28715499

  6. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    Full Text Available Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD (CAG∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6 background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with

  7. Equally high prevalences of infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori in Chinese patients with peptic ulcer disease and those with chronic gastritis-associated dyspepsia.

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Z J; Hulst, R.W. van der; Feller, M.; Xiao, S D; Tytgat, G N; Dankert, J.; Ende, A. van der

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 60% of Helicobacter pylori isolates in the Western world possess the cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). cagA-positive H. pylori is found to be associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastric adenocarcinoma. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori isolates from Chinese patients with PUD and chronic gastritis (CG), H. pylori populations from 83 patients, 48 with PUD and 35 with CG, were assessed by two different cagA-specific PCRs, Southern blotting, and colony hybridi...

  8. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection by PCR: comparison with other invasive techniques and detection of cagA gene in gastric biopsy specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    A.P. Lage; Godfroid, E; Fauconnier, A.; Burette, A.; Butzler, J P; Bollen, A; Glupczynski, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A PCR assay for the detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsy specimens with specific primers for ureC gene amplification (herein referred to as ureC PCR) was compared with other routine invasive methods (culture, the rapid-urease test, and Giemsa staining of histological sections) with samples from a group of 104 consecutive dyspeptic patients. Bacteria were found in 40 (38.5%), 38 (36.5%), 36 (34.6%), and 35 (33.7%) of the patients by ureC PCR, culture, the rapid-urease test, and G...

  9. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Chen, B K; Qiu, Y; Sonobe, H; Ohtsuki, Y

    1997-12-19

    A novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats, designated B120, was cloned by PCR amplification. An approximately 300-bp 3' untranslated region in this cDNA was followed by a 3426-bp coding region containing the CAG repeats. A computer search failed to find any significant homology between this cDNA and previously reported genes. The number of CAG trinucleotide repeats appeared to vary from seven to 12 in analyses of genomic DNA from healthy volunteers. An approximately 8-kb band was detected in brain, skeletal muscle and thymus by Northern blot analysis. The deduced amino-acid sequence had a polyglutamine chain encoded by CAG repeats as well as glutamine- and tyrosine-rich repeats, which has also been reported for several RNA binding proteins. We immunized mice with recombinant gene product and established a monoclonal antibody to it. On Western immunoblotting, this antibody detected an approximately 120-kDa protein in human brain tissue. In addition, immunohistochemical staining showed that the cytoplasm of neural cells was stained with this antibody. These findings indicated that B120 is a novel cDNA with a CAG repeat length polymorphism and that its gene product is a cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa.

  11. Light and electron microscopic characterization of the evolution of cellular pathology in the Hdh(CAG)150 Huntington's disease knock-in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Torres, Eduardo M; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disease in which a single mutation in the gene responsible for the protein huntingtin leads to a primarily striatal and cortical neuronal loss, resulting progressive motor, cognitive and psychiatric disability and ultimately death. The mutation induces an abnormal protein accumulation within cells, although the precise role of this accumulation in the disease process is unknown. Several animal models have been created to model the disease. In the present study, the pathology of the Hdh(CAG(150)) mouse model was analyzed longitudinally over 24 months. At 5 months of age, the mutant N-terminal antibody S830 found dense nuclear staining and nuclear inclusions in the olfactory tubercle and striatum of the Hdh(Q150/Q150) mice. Nuclear inclusions increased in number and size with age and disease progression, and spread in ventral to dorsal, and anterior to posterior pattern. Electron microscopy observations at 14 months of age revealed that the neurons showed a normal nucleus having a circular shape and regular membranes in a densely packed cytoplasm, whereas by 21 months the cytoplasm was vacuolated and contained swollen mitochondria with many degenerated cytoplasmic organelles. Immunogold labelling of the S830 antibody was found to be specifically localised to the inner area of the neuronal intra-nuclear inclusions. Our data demonstrate a marked and progressive cellular phenotype that begins at 5 months of age and progresses with time. The pathology the Hdh(Q150/Q150) line was focused on the striatum and cortex until the late stage of the disease, consistent with the human condition.

  12. Coupling of D2R Short but not D2R Long receptor isoform to the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway renders striatal neurons vulnerable to mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Rodriguez, Beatriz; Martin, Elodie; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Déglon, Nicole; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, results from abnormal polyglutamine extension in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin protein. This mutation causes preferential degeneration of striatal projection neurons. We previously demonstrated, in vitro, that dopaminergic D2 receptor stimulation acted in synergy with expanded huntingtin to increase aggregates formation and striatal death through activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway. In vivo, in a lentiviral-mediated model of expanded huntingtin expression in the rat striatum, we found that the D2 antagonist haloperidol protects striatal neurons against expanded huntingtin-mediated toxicity. Two variant transcripts are generated by alternative splicing of the of D2 receptor gene, the D2R-Long and the D2R-Short, which are thought to play different functional roles. We show herein that overexpression of D2R-Short, but not D2R-Long in cell lines is associated with activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. In striatal neurons in culture, the selective D2 agonist Quinpirole triggers phosphorylation of cofilin, a downstream effector of ROCK, which is abrogated by siRNAs that knockdown both D2R-Long and D2R-Short, but not by siRNAs targeting D2R-Long alone. Aggregate formation and neuronal death induced by expanded huntingtin, were potentiated by Quinpirole. This D2 agonist-mediated effect was selectively inhibited by the siRNA targeting both D2R-Long and D2R-Short but not D2R-Long alone. Our data provide evidence for a specific coupling of D2R-Short to the RhoA/ROCK/cofilin pathway, and its involvement in striatal vulnerability to expanded huntingtin. A new route for targeting Rho-ROCK signaling in Huntington's disease is unraveled with our findings.

  13. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genotypes in Cuban and Venezuelan populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ortiz-Princz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA/vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA among patients with chronic gastritis in Cuba and Venezuela. Gastric antrum biopsies were taken for culture, DNA extraction and PCR analysis. Amplification of vacA and cagA segments was performed using two regions of cagA: 349 bp were amplified with the F1/B1 primers and the remaining 335 bp were amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers. The VA1-F/VA1-R set of primers was used to amplify the 259-bp (s1 or 286-bp (s2 product and the VAG-R/VAG-F set of primers was used to amplify the 567-bp (m1 or 642-bp (m2 regions of vacA. cagA was detected in 87% of the antral samples from Cuban patients and 80.3% of those from Venezuelan patients. All possible combinations of vacA regions were found, with the exception of s2/m1. The predominant combination found in both countries was s1/m1. The percentage of cagA+ strains was increased by the use of a second set of primers and a greater number of strains was amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers in the Cuban patients (p = 0.0001. There was no significant difference between the presence of the allelic variants of vacA and cagA in both populations. The predominant genotype was cagA+/s1m1 in both countries. The results support the necessary investigation of isolates circulating among the human population in each region.

  14. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A transgenic Drosophila model demonstrates that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein functions as a eukaryotic Gab adaptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Botham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with a spectrum of diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA protein of H. pylori, which is translocated into host cells via a type IV secretion system, is a major risk factor for disease development. Experiments in gastric tissue culture cells have shown that once translocated, CagA activates the phosphatase SHP-2, which is a component of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK pathways whose over-activation is associated with cancer formation. Based on CagA's ability to activate SHP-2, it has been proposed that CagA functions as a prokaryotic mimic of the eukaryotic Grb2-associated binder (Gab adaptor protein, which normally activates SHP-2. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila model to test this hypothesis by investigating whether CagA can function in a well-characterized Gab-dependent process: the specification of photoreceptors cells in the Drosophila eye. We demonstrate that CagA expression is sufficient to rescue photoreceptor development in the absence of the Drosophila Gab homologue, Daughter of Sevenless (DOS. Furthermore, CagA's ability to promote photoreceptor development requires the SHP-2 phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW. These results provide the first demonstration that CagA functions as a Gab protein within the tissue of an organism and provide insight into CagA's oncogenic potential. Since many translocated bacterial proteins target highly conserved eukaryotic cellular processes, such as the RTK signaling pathway, the transgenic Drosophila model should be of general use for testing the in vivo function of bacterial effector proteins and for identifying the host genes through which they function.

  16. Sequencing analysis of the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy CAG expansion reveals absence of repeat interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratta, Pietro; Collins, Toby; Pemble, Sally; Nethisinghe, Suran; Devoy, Anny; Giunti, Paola; Sweeney, Mary G; Hanna, Michael G; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-02-01

    Trinucleotide repeat disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the expansion, beyond a pathogenic threshold, of unstable DNA tracts in different genes. Sequence interruptions in the repeats have been described in the majority of these disorders and may influence disease phenotype and heritability. Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Diagnostic testing and previous research have relied on fragment analysis polymerase chain reaction to determine the AR CAG repeat size, and have therefore not been able to assess the presence of interruptions. We here report a sequencing study of the AR CAG repeat in a cohort of SBMA patients and control subjects in the United Kingdom. We found no repeat interruptions to be present, and we describe differences between sequencing and traditional sizing methods.

  17. Null alleles at the Huntington disease locus: implications for diagnostics and CAG repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L C; Hegde, M R; Nagappan, R; Faull, R L; Giles, J; Winship, I; Snow, K; Love, D R

    2000-01-01

    PCR amplification of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the IT15 gene is routinely undertaken to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Huntington disease (HD) and to provide predictive testing for at-risk relatives of affected individuals. Our studies have detected null alleles on the chromosome carrying the expanded repeat in three of 91 apparently unrelated HD families. Sequence analysis of these alleles has revealed the same mutation event, leading to the juxtaposition of uninterrupted CAG and CCG repeats. These data suggest that a mutation-prone region exists in the IT15 gene bounded by the CAG and CCG repeats and that caution should be exercised in designing primers that anneal to the region bounded by these repeats. Two of the HD families segregated null alleles with expanded uninterrupted CAG repeats at the lower end of the zone of reduced penetrance. The expanded repeats are meiotically unstable in these families, although this instability is within a small range of repeat lengths. The haplotypes of the disease-causing chromosomes in these two families differ, only one of which is similar to that reported previously as being specific for new HD mutations. Finally, no apparent mitotic instability of the uninterrupted CAG repeat was observed in the brain of one of the HD individuals.

  18. ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori cagA infection: evidence of an association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection appear to be dependent on a host of genetic traits and virulence factors possessed by this microorganism. This paper aimed to investigate the association between the ABO histo-blood groups and H. pylori cagA infections. Genomic DNA samples (n = 110 of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcers (n = 25 and chronic active gastritis (n = 85 were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the cagA gene. Of the samples, 66.4% (n = 73 tested positive and 33.6% (n = 37 negative for the gene. The cagA strain was predominant in peptic ulcers (n = 21; 84.0% compared with chronic active gastritis (n = 52; 61.2% (p = 0.05; OR 3.332; 95% CI: 1.050-10.576. Additionally, the cagA strain was prevalent in the type O blood (48/63; 76.2% compared with other ABO phenotypes (25/47; 53.2% (p = 0.01; OR 2.816; 95% CI: 1.246-6.364. These results suggest that H. pylori cagA infection is associated with the O blood group in Brazilian patients suffering from chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcers.

  19. Heterogenous effect of androgen receptor CAG tract length on testicular germ cell tumor risk: shorter repeats associated with seminoma but not other histologic types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Dao, Carol A; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Vandenberg, David J; Skinner, Eila C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Thomas, Duncan C; Pike, Malcolm C; Cortessis, Victoria K

    2011-08-01

    Increasing rates of testicular germ cells tumors (TGCTs) overtime suggest that environmental factors are involved in disease etiology, but familial risk and genome-wide association studies implicate genetic factors as well. We investigated whether variation in the functional CAG(n) polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is associated with TGCT risk, using data from a population-based family study. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of CAG repeat length and TGCT risk using matched pairs logistic regression. Analyses of 273 TGCT case-mother pairs revealed no association between AR CAG repeat length and overall TGCT risk. However, risk of seminoma was significantly associated with shorter CAG repeat length [CAG 20-21 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.82 (95% CI: 0.43-1.58), CAG 22-23 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.19-0.83) and CAG ≥ 24 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20-0.86)], with a highly significant trend over these four categories of decreasing CAG repeat length (P(trend) = 0.0030). This is the first report of a statistically significant association between AR CAG repeat length and seminoma risk, suggesting that increased AR transactivation may be involved in development of seminoma and/or progression of carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified to seminoma. This result provides a rationale whereby androgenic environmental compounds could contribute to increases in TGCT incidence, and identifies for the first time a potential biological pathway influencing whether TGCTs achieve seminomatous versus nonseminomatous histology, a clinically and biologically important distinction.

  20. Early onset and novel features in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patient with a 68 CAG repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunseich, Christopher; Kats, Ilona R; Bott, Laura C; Rinaldi, Carlo; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick; Chen, Ke-Lian; Schindler, Alice B; Mankodi, Ami K; Shrader, Joseph A; Schwartz, Daniel P; Lehky, Tanya J; Liu, Chia-Ying; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2014-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Patients with SBMA have weakness, atrophy, and fasciculations in the bulbar and extremity muscles. Individuals with CAG repeat lengths greater than 62 have not previously been reported. We evaluated a 29year old SBMA patient with 68 CAGs who had unusually early onset and findings not seen in others with the disease. Analysis of the androgen receptor gene confirmed the repeat length of 68 CAGs in both peripheral blood and fibroblasts. Evaluation of muscle and sensory function showed deficits typical of SBMA, and in addition the patient had manifestations of autonomic dysfunction and abnormal sexual development. These findings extend the known phenotype associated with SBMA and shed new insight into the effects of the mutated androgen receptor.

  1. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  2. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotype is a predominant determinant of immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti-H. pylori, anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates (cagA, EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1, 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2. Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive (vacA s1m1) or negative (vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA+ strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  3. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Shi-Rui; Ni, Wang; Dong, Yi; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs), intermediate alleles (AIs) and expanded alleles (AEs). It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs) is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  4. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Rui Gan

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs, intermediate alleles (AIs and expanded alleles (AEs. It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  5. Improvement of neuropathology and transcriptional deficits in CAG 140 knock-in mice supports a beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickey Miriam A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound No disease modifying treatment currently exists for Huntington's disease (HD, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the formation of amyloid-like aggregates of the mutated huntingtin protein. Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with Congo red-like amyloid binding properties and the ability to cross the blood brain barrier. CAG140 mice, a knock-in (KI mouse model of HD, display abnormal aggregates of mutant huntingtin and striatal transcriptional deficits, as well as early motor, cognitive and affective abnormalities, many months prior to exhibiting spontaneous gait deficits, decreased striatal volume, and neuronal loss. We have examined the ability of life-long dietary curcumin to improve the early pathological phenotype of CAG140 mice. Results KI mice fed a curcumin-containing diet since conception showed decreased huntingtin aggregates and increased striatal DARPP-32 and D1 receptor mRNAs, as well as an amelioration of rearing deficits. However, similar to other antioxidants, curcumin impaired rotarod behavior in both WT and KI mice and climbing in WT mice. These behavioral effects were also noted in WT C57Bl/6 J mice exposed to the same curcumin regime as adults. However, neither locomotor function, behavioral despair, muscle strength or food utilization were affected by curcumin in this latter study. The clinical significance of curcumin's impairment of motor performance in mice remains unclear because curcumin has an excellent blood chemistry and adverse event safety profile, even in the elderly and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusion Together with this clinical experience, the improvement in several transgene-dependent parameters by curcumin in our study supports a net beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in HD.

  6. Haplotype analysis in Huntington desease provides insights into mechanisms of CAG repeat expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, S.E.; Goldberg, Y.P.; Squitieri, F. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is one of 7 disorders now known to be caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The HD mutation is a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat in the 5{prime} region of a novel gene that expands beyond the normal range of 10-35 repeats in persons destined to develop the disease. Haplotype analysis of other dynamic mutation disorders such as myotonic dystrophy and Fragil X have suggested that a rare ancestral expansion event on a normal chromosome is followed by subsequent expansion events, resulting in a pool of chromosomes in the premutation range, which is inherently unstable and prone to further multiple expansion events leading to disease range chromosomes. Haplotype analysis of 67 HD and 84 control chromosomes using 5 polymorphic markers, both intragenic and 5{prime} to the disease mutation, demonstrate that multiple haplotypes underlie HD. However, 94% of the chromosomes can be grouped under two major haplotypes. These two haplotypes are also present in the normal population. A third major haplotype is seen on 38% of normal chromosomes but rarely on HD chromosomes (6%). CAG lengths on the normal chromosomes with the two haplotypes seen in the HD population are higher than those seen on the normal chromosomes with the haplotype rarely seen on HD chromosomes. Furthermore, in populations with a diminished frequency of HD, CAG length on normal chromosomes is significantly less than other populations with higher prevalence rates for HD. These data suggest that CAG length on normal chromosomes may be a significant factor contributing to repeat instability that eventually leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat lengths in the HD range. Haplotypes on the HD chromosomes are identical to those normal chromosomes which have CAG lengths in the high range of normal, suggesting that further expansions of this pool of chromosomes leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat sizes within the disease range, consistent with a multistep model.

  7. Cells exposed to a huntingtin fragment containing an expanded polyglutamine tract show no sign of ion channel formation: results arguing against the ion channel hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremølle, Anne; Grunnet, Morten; Hasholt, Lis

    2003-01-01

    tract to form ion channels in two cell types. Whole cell current from Xenopus oocytes was recorded using two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, and whole cell current from CHO-K1 cells was recorded by patch-clamp technique. The fragment with an expanded polyglutamine sequence induced no change......Ion channels formed by expanded polyglutamine tracts have been proposed to play an important role in the pathological processes leading to neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease and other CAG repeat diseases. We tested the capacity of a huntingtin fragment containing an expanded polyglutamine...... in the currents recorded in any of the two expression systems, indicating no changes in ion channel activity. The results therefore argue against the proposed hypothesis of expanded polyglutamines forming ion channels....

  8. Structure of the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein bound to the human tumor suppressor ASPP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nešić, Dragana; Buti, Ludovico; Lu, Xin; Stebbins, C Erec

    2014-01-28

    The Cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) protein of Helicobacter pylori is associated with increased virulence and risk of cancer. Recent proteomic studies have demonstrated an association of CagA with the human tumor suppressor Apoptosis-stimulating Protein of p53-2 (ASPP2). We present here a genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of CagA with ASPP2. Domain delineation of the 120-kDa CagA protein revealed a stable N-terminal subdomain that was used in a yeast two-hybrid screen that identified the proline-rich domain of ASPP2 as a host cellular target. Biochemical experiments confirm this interaction. The cocrystal structure to 2.0-Å resolution of this N-terminal subdomain of CagA with a 7-kDa proline-rich sequence of ASPP2 reveals that this domain of CagA forms a highly specialized three-helix bundle, with large insertions in the loops connecting the helices. These insertions come together to form a deep binding cleft for a highly conserved 20-aa peptide of ASPP2. ASPP2 forms an extended helix in this groove of CagA, burying more than 1,000 Å(2) of surface area. This interaction is disrupted in vitro and in vivo by structure-based, loss-of-contact point mutations of key residues in either CagA or ASPP2. Disruption of CagA and ASPP2 binding alters the function of ASPP2 and leads to the decreased survival of H. pylori-infected cells.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human cerebellum cDNAs containing polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, S.; Onodera, O.; Tanaka, H. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been discovered that neurologic diseases such as X linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Huntington`s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) are caused by unstable expansions of CAG repeats, which shed a light on a new mechanism of human hereditary diseases. The genetic anticipation, a common genetic feature in these diseases, can be explained by the trinucleotide repeat expansions, and an inverse correlation between the ages of onset and the numbers of trinucleotide repeats is demonstrated in these diseases. Furthermore, there have been diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and Machado-Joseph disease showing similar genetic anticipation, which suggests that their causative mutations are unstable expansions of trinucleotide repeats. To identify candidate genes for neurodegenerative diseases which are expressed in human cerebellum and contain CAG repeats, we screened a human cerebellum cDNA library with an oligonucleotide (CAG){sub 10}, labelled with [{gamma}{sup 32}P]ATP. Out of 78 clones we have isolated, 43 clones were partially sequenced and 31 clones were shown to contain CAG or CTG tinucleotide repeats. From homology searches, 12 of the 59 clones were identified to contain known sequences including human MAR/SAR DNA binding protein, human glial fibrillary acidic protein, human myelin transcription factor 1, human neuronal growth protein 43 and human myocyte-specific enhancer 2. From 6 clones out of the 43 novel genes, we were able to develop primer pairs flanking CAG repeats and determined chromosomal localizations with human and rodent hybrid mapping panels. These CAG repeats were shown to be polymorphic and mapped to 1, 15, 17 and 18. These novel cDNAs will be useful as candidate genes for hereditary neurologic diseases showing genetic anticipation.

  10. New primer for specific amplification of the CAG repeat in Huntington disease alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, C.E.; Hodes, M.E. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat near the 5{prime} end of the gene for Huntington disease (IT15). The CAG repeat is flanked by a variable-length CCG repeat that is included in the amplification product obtained with most currently used primer sets and PCR protocols. Inclusion of this adjacent CCG repeat complicates the accurate assessment of CAG repeat length and interferes with the genotype determination of those individuals carrying alleles in the intermediate range between normal and expanded sized. Due to the GC-rich nature of this region, attempts at designing a protocol for amplification of only the CAG repeat have proved unreliable and difficult to execute. We report here the development of a compatible primer set and PCR protocol that yields consistent amplification of the CAG-repeat region. PCR products can be visualized in ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels for rapid screening or in 6% polyacrylamide gels for determination of exact repeat length. This assay produces bands that can be sized accurately, while eliminating most nonspecific products. Fifty-five specimens examined showed consistency with another well-known method, but one that amplifies the CCG repeats as well. The results we obtained also matched the known carrier status of the donors.

  11. 不同群体中ATXN2基因编码区CAG重复的变异研究%Variation of CAG repeats in coding region of ATXN2 gene in different ethnic groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓晨; 杨昭庆; 褚嘉祐; 孙浩; 米冬青; 黄小琴; 林克勤; 易文; 于亮; 史磊; 史荔

    2011-01-01

    在中国6个生活环境差异较大的少数民族群体中进行ATXN2基因编码区CAG重复的变异研究,以衡量其是否受到正选择的作用以及寻找推动选择作用的因素.采集6个民族群体共291个健康无关个体,对其进行STR分型,直接计数其等位基因及等位基因型频率,计算其线性Fst值,构建针对该基因的系统进化树,并对各群体进行MDS分析.线性Fst值结果显示:回族和彝族群体间ATXN2基因STR位点进化的差异具有显著性,其他4个群体相互间无显著性差异.结合已报道的其他群体进一步分析,回族、哈尼族、云南蒙古族以及内蒙古自治区蒙古族每个人群都与日本人群有显著性差异;回族、内蒙古自治区蒙古族与汉族具有显著性差异.6个群体中ATXN2基因STR的等位基因频率有各自的分布特点,稀有等位基因频率变化产生的原因可能是选择作用的结果.%Toinvestigate CAG repeats variation of ATXN2 gene coding region in six ethnic groups that live in comparatively different environments, to evaluate whether these variations are under positive selection, and to find factors driving selection effects, 291 unrelated healthy individuals were collected from six ethnic groups and their STR geneotyping was performed.The frequencies of alleles and genotypes were counted and thereby Slatkin's linearized Fst values were calculated.The UPGMA tree against this gene was constructed.The MDS analysis among these groups was carried out as well.The results from the linearized Fst values indicated that there were significant evolutionary differences of the STR in A TXN2 gene between Hui and Yi groups, but not among the other 4 groups.Further analysis was performed by combining our data with published data obtained from other groups.These results indicated that there were significant differences between Japanese and other groups including Hui, Hani, Yunnan Mongolian, and Inner Mongolian.Both Hui and Mongolian from

  12. CagA对幽门螺杆菌与宿主细胞相互作用影响的研究进展%Advance of CagA's Influences on the Interaction of Helicobacter Pylori and Host Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬晓云; 张建中

    2007-01-01

    在体外实验中,幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,H.pylori)和宿主细胞相互作用后发生很多变化,而H.pylori细胞毒素相关蛋白(cytotoxin associated gene A,CagA)是H.pylori重要的毒力因子之一,在H.pylori与宿主细胞相互作用中起着非常重要的作用,包括CagA转运进入细胞、CagA磷酸化和断裂,以及引起胞内信号转导通路的改变.本文就CagA对H.pylori与宿主细胞的相互作用影响进行综述.

  13. Genetic analysis of polymorphisms in the kalirin gene for association with age-at-onset in European Huntington disease patients

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    Tsai Yu-Chun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington disease (HD is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HD gene. Although the length of the CAG repeat strongly correlates with the age-at-onset (AAO, AAO in HD individuals may differ dramatically in spite of similar expanded CAG repeat lengths. Additional genetic or environmental factors are thought to influence the disease onset. Several modifier genes have been discovered so far but they do not fully explain the variability of AAO in HD. To potentially identify a novel genetic modifier, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the kalirin (KALRN gene. Kalirin is a protein crucially involved in spine plasticity and its interaction with huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP-1 and a potential protein dysfunction might contribute to spine pathogenesis in HD. Methods The selected SNPs were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and association of SNPs with AAO was investigated with the framework of linear models in an analysis of variance and covariance. Results Eleven SNPs in the kalirin gene were examined in an association study in European HD patients. The ten coding SNPs under investigation were monomorphic, whereas SNP rs10934657 in the promoter region showed a minor allele frequency >1%. An analysis of covariance together with the influence of the expanded HD allele was applied in 680 HD patients. SNP rs10934657 did not affect the AAO of the examined HD population. Conclusions The results did not reveal an association between the analyzed kalirin polymorphisms and the AAO in HD. However, it does not exclude other SNPs of the kalirin gene as susceptible genetic modifiers.

  14. The repetitive sequence genotype research of Helicobacter pylori with VacA+ or CagA+%VacA+和CagA+的幽门螺杆菌重复序列基因分型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓华; 黄赞松; 黄衍强; 周喜汉; 韦鹏涯; 岑朝; 黄小凤

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori ( Hp ) with VacA + or CagA + and repetitive sequence genotype. Methods The amplification of VacA and CagA gene fragments were conducted with PCR. Strains were genotyped with REP - PCR and further clustered with NTsys_2 software. Results The 26 VacA and CagA gene positive strains were divided into six genotype groups according to homology, both with 3,3,8,4,6,2 strains in each Hp group, respectively. Conclusion The VacA and CagA positive strains could be divided into six genotype groups, and the repetitive sequence genotype is not associated with VacA and CagA gene.%目的 探索VacA+和CagA+与幽门螺杆菌(Hp)重复序列基因分型的关系.方法 采用PCR方法确定VacA+或CagA+ Hp菌株,重复序列基因分型方法分别对26株VacA+和CagA+的菌株进行基因分型,并运用NTsys_2软件,根据相似性78%进行聚类分型.结果 VacA+和CagA+的26株Hp均被分为6个基因型,分别是Group Ⅰ、Group Ⅱ、Group Ⅲ、Group Ⅳ、Group Ⅴ和Group Ⅵ,且每类聚集的菌株数相同,分别是3、3、8、4、6、2株.结论 VacA+和CagA+的Hp可以分成6大类基因型,VacA+和CagA+与Hp重复序列基因分型无密切关系.

  15. Characterization of the Cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori from naturally infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Emma C; Deck, Samuel L; Entwistle, Hasan D; Hansen, Lori M; Solnick, Jay V

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly infects the epithelial layer of the human stomach and in some individuals causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse species, and the most important bacterial virulence factor that increases the risk of developing disease, versus asymptomatic colonization, is the cytotoxin associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Socially housed rhesus macaques are often naturally infected with H. pylori similar to that which colonizes humans, but little is known about the cagPAI. Here we show that H. pylori strains isolated from naturally infected rhesus macaques have a cagPAI very similar to that found in human clinical isolates, and like human isolates, it encodes a functional type IV secretion system. These results provide further support for the relevance of rhesus macaques as a valid experimental model for H. pylori infection in humans.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Huntington's disease show CAG-repeat-expansion-associated phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded stretch of CAG trinucleotide repeats that results in neuronal dysfunction and death. Here, The HD Consortium reports the generation and characterization of 14 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from HD patients and controls. Microarray profiling revealed CAG-repeat-expansion-associated gene expression patterns that distinguish patient lines from controls, and early onset versus late onset HD. Differentiated HD neural cells showed disease-associated changes in electrophysiology, metabolism, cell adhesion, and ultimately cell death for lines with both medium and longer CAG repeat expansions. The longer repeat lines were however the most vulnerable to cellular stressors and BDNF withdrawal, as assessed using a range of assays across consortium laboratories. The HD iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in HD and provides a human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics.

  17. CagA and VacA Helicobacter Pylori Antibodies in Gastric Cancer

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    Renzo Suriani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with different genotypes of virulent Helicobacter pylori strains (cytotoxin-associated gene A [CagA]-and/or vacuolating cytotoxin A [VacA]-positive can play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU and gastric cancer (GC.

  18. Length of CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene is associated with the development of acne%雄激素受体基因第一外显子CAG重复序列长度多态性与痤疮的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞莹; 姜弈; 魏华臣; 陈洪铎; 何春涤; 刘勇; 朱红; 魏彬; 王凯波; 赵宁; 王雅坤; 肖汀

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨人雄激素受体基因第一外显子CAG重复序列长度多态性与痤疮发生之间的关系.方法 研究对象为中国东北地区238例痤疮患者和207例健康对照,抽取外周血后分离纯化出基因组DNA,采用微卫星扫描(STRs)方法分析CAG重复序列的多态性.结果 男性病例组和对照组的CAG重复均数分别为22.70±3.09和23.48±2.83,两组之间差异有统计学意义(P=0.046);将对照组中CAG重复次数的中位数23作为分割点分组比较,长/短CAG片段在男性病例和对照中的分布差异有统计学意义,携带有CAG短片段的男性较携带CAG长片段的男性患痤疮的风险性明显增加(OR值2.07;95%可信限为1.21~3.54).女性病例组和对照组的CAG重复均数分别为23.41±2.87和23.85±0.21,两组之间差异无统计学意义(P=0.115);按中位数分组比较长/短CAG片段在女性病例和对照中的分布差异有统计学意义,携带有CAG短片段的女性患痤疮的风险性明显增加(P=0.013,OR值2.05;95%可信限为1.18~3.56).结论 雄激素受体基因第一外显子CAG的重复次数与中国东北地区痤疮的发生有关,CAG重复次数少的男性个体患痤疮的风险性增加,雄激素受体基因第一外显子CAG的重复次数可作为痤疮的遗传易感标志之一.%Objective To investigate the relationship of CAG repeat length polymorphism in the androgen receptor(AR)gene to the development of acne.Methods A total of 238 patients with ache vulgaris and 207 healthy human controls in Northeast China were included in this study.Genomic DNA was isolated and purified from the blood of these subjects.The CAG repeat lengths in the AR gene were analyzed by somatic microsatellites (STRs).Results A significant difference was found in the CAG repeat number between the male acne Patients(22.70±3.09)and male controls(23.48±2.83,P=0.046),but not between the female cases and controls(23.41±2.87 versus 23.85±0.21.P=0.12).In order to assess the

  19. Heterogenous effect of androgen receptor CAG tract length on testicular germ cell tumor risk: shorter repeats associated with seminoma but not other histologic types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Dao, Carol A.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Vandenberg, David J.; Skinner, Eila C.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Cortessis, Victoria K.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing rates of testicular germ cells tumors (TGCTs) overtime suggest that environmental factors are involved in disease etiology, but familial risk and genome-wide association studies implicate genetic factors as well. We investigated whether variation in the functional CAGn polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is associated with TGCT risk, using data from a population-based family study. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of CAG repeat length and TGCT risk using matched pairs logistic regression. Analyses of 273 TGCT case–mother pairs revealed no association between AR CAG repeat length and overall TGCT risk. However, risk of seminoma was significantly associated with shorter CAG repeat length [CAG 20–21 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.82 (95% CI: 0.43–1.58), CAG 22–23 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.19–0.83) and CAG ≥ 24 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20–0.86)], with a highly significant trend over these four categories of decreasing CAG repeat length (Ptrend = 0.0030). This is the first report of a statistically significant association between AR CAG repeat length and seminoma risk, suggesting that increased AR transactivation may be involved in development of seminoma and/or progression of carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified to seminoma. This result provides a rationale whereby androgenic environmental compounds could contribute to increases in TGCT incidence, and identifies for the first time a potential biological pathway influencing whether TGCTs achieve seminomatous versus nonseminomatous histology, a clinically and biologically important distinction. PMID:21642359

  20. Polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin increases its insertion into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Schewkunow, Vitali; Sapp, Ellen; Masso, Nicholas; Wanker, Erich E; DiFiglia, Marian; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2009-09-25

    An expanded polyglutamine (Q) tract (>37Q) in huntingtin (htt) causes Huntington disease. Htt associates with membranes and polyglutamine expansion in htt may alter membrane function in Huntington disease through a mechanism that is not known. Here we used differential scanning calorimetry to examine the effects of polyQ expansion in htt on its insertion into lipid bilayers. We prepared synthetic lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and tested interactions of htt amino acids 1-89 with 20Q, 32Q or 53Q with the vesicles. GST-htt1-89 with 53Q inserted into synthetic lipid vesicles significantly more than GST-htt1-89 with 20Q or 32Q. We speculate that by inserting more into cell membranes, mutant huntingtin could increase disorder within the lipid bilayer and thereby disturb cellular membrane function.

  1. Huntingtin interacting proteins are genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Kaltenbach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea, we identified a comprehensive set of Htt interactors using two complementary approaches: high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening and affinity pull down followed by mass spectrometry. This effort led to the identification of 234 high-confidence Htt-associated proteins, 104 of which were found with the yeast method and 130 with the pull downs. We then tested an arbitrary set of 60 genes encoding interacting proteins for their ability to behave as genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of HD. This high-content validation assay showed that 27 of 60 orthologs tested were high-confidence genetic modifiers, as modification was observed with more than one allele. The 45% hit rate for genetic modifiers seen among the interactors is an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-4% typically observed in unbiased genetic screens. Genetic modifiers were similarly represented among proteins discovered using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down/mass spectrometry methods, supporting the notion that these complementary technologies are equally useful in identifying biologically relevant proteins. Interacting proteins confirmed as modifiers of the neurodegeneration phenotype represent a diverse array of biological functions, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal organization, signal transduction, and transcription. Among the modifiers were 17 loss-of-function suppressors of neurodegeneration, which can be considered potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we show that seven interacting proteins from among 11 tested were able to

  2. TRiC’s tricks inhibit huntingtin aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradian, Sarah H; Galaz-Montoya, Jesus G; Schmid, Michael F; Cong, Yao; Ma, Boxue; Spiess, Christoph; Frydman, Judith; Ludtke, Steven J; Chiu, Wah

    2013-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, a mutated version of the huntingtin protein leads to cell death. Mutant huntingtin is known to aggregate, a process that can be inhibited by the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (TCP1-ring complex) in vitro and in vivo. A structural understanding of the genesis of aggregates and their modulation by cellular chaperones could facilitate the development of therapies but has been hindered by the heterogeneity of amyloid aggregates. Using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and single particle cryo-electron tomography (SPT) we characterize the growth of fibrillar aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing an expanded polyglutamine tract with 51 residues (mhttQ51), and resolve 3-D structures of the chaperonin TRiC interacting with mhttQ51. We find that TRiC caps mhttQ51 fibril tips via the apical domains of its subunits, and also encapsulates smaller mhtt oligomers within its chamber. These two complementary mechanisms provide a structural description for TRiC’s inhibition of mhttQ51 aggregation in vitro. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00710.001 PMID:23853712

  3. Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI involved in bacterial internalization and IL-8 induced responses via NOD1- and MyD88-dependent mechanisms in human biliary epithelial cells.

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    Wongwarut Boonyanugomol

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection has been proposed to be associated with various diseases of the hepatobiliary tract, including cancer of the bile duct epithelial cells (cholangiocarcinoma, CCA. The ability of H. pylori bacteria to cause pathogenic effects in these cells has, however, yet to be investigated. Given that the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI is required for H. pylori pathogenesis in gastric epithelial cells, we investigated wild-type and cag mutant strains for their ability to adhere, be internalized and induce pro-inflammatory responses in two bile duct epithelial cell lines derived from cases of CCA. The findings from these experiments were compared to results obtained with the well-characterized AGS gastric cancer cell line. We showed that the cagPAI encodes factors involved in H. pylori internalization in CCA cells, but not for adhesion to these cells. Consistent with previous studies in hepatocytes, actin polymerization and α5β1 integrin may be involved in H. pylori internalization in CCA cells. As for AGS cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in CCA cells stimulated with either cagA, cagL or cagPAI bacteria, when compared with wild-type bacteria. Importantly, these IL-8 responses could be inhibited via either pre-treatment of cells with antibodies to α5β1 integrins, or via siRNA-mediated knockdown of the innate immune signaling molecules, nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 and myeloid differentiation response gene 88 (MyD88. Taken together, the data demonstrate that the cagPAI is critical for H. pylori pathogenesis in bile duct cells, thus providing a potential causal link for H. pylori in biliary tract disease.

  4. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

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    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  5. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qixing; Qiu, Mantang; Dong, Gaochao; Xia, Wenjie; Zhang, Shuai; Xu, Youtao; Wang, Jie; Rong, Yin; Xu, Lin; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg's test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855-1.245). However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089-1.992). Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014-1.707). These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results.

  6. Hydrophobically Modified siRNAs Silence Huntingtin mRNA in Primary Neurons and Mouse Brain

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    Julia F Alterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of RNA interference for neuroscience research have been limited by a lack of simple and efficient methods to deliver oligonucleotides to primary neurons in culture and to the brain. Here, we show that primary neurons rapidly internalize hydrophobically modified siRNAs (hsiRNAs added directly to the culture medium without lipid formulation. We identify functional hsiRNAs targeting the mRNA of huntingtin, the mutation of which is responsible for Huntington's disease, and show that direct uptake in neurons induces potent and specific silencing in vitro. Moreover, a single injection of unformulated hsiRNA into mouse brain silences Htt mRNA with minimal neuronal toxicity. Thus, hsiRNAs embody a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that enable simple and straightforward functional studies of genes involved in neuronal biology and neurodegenerative disorders in a native biological context.

  7. Gene diagnosis and CAG repeat analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia cases of Guangxi region%广西地区脊髓小脑性共济失调病人的基因诊断和CAG重复扩增

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建强; 袁志刚; 汪萍; 胡启平; 李松峰; 舒伟; 马军; 方玲; 华荣; 丁晔

    2009-01-01

    为探讨广西地区脊髓小脑性共济失调(Spinocerebellar ataxia,SCA)患者各种亚型类型特点及分布状况,应用聚合酶链反应(Polymerase chain reaction,PCR),毛细管电泳(Capillary electrophoresis,CE)片段分析等技术检测分析遗传性共济失调患者的SCA1、SCA2、SCA3/MJD、SCA6、SCA7和SCA12(CAG)n突变.在6个SCA家系共检出21例患者和19例症状前患者均为SCA3/MJD突变,CAG重复数分别为59~70次和60~73次.未检测到SCA1、SCA2、SCA6、SCA7和SCA12(CAG)n突变.研究表明,广西地区的SCA病人主要为SCA3/MJD型,患者的CAG重复数低于过去的报道.

  8. CAG repeat size correlates to electrophysiological motor and sensory phenotypes in SBMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yu; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Mizuki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Yamashita, Fumitada; Hori, Norio; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hirayama, Masaaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2008-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset, lower motor neuron disease caused by an aberrant elongation of a CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The main symptoms are weakness and atrophy of bulbar, facial and limb muscles, but sensory disturbances are frequently found in SBMA patients. Motor symptoms have been attributed to the accumulation of mutant AR in the nucleus of lower motor neurons, which is more profound in patients with a longer CAG repeat. We examined nerve conduction properties including F-waves in a total of 106 patients with genetically confirmed SBMA (mean age at data collection = 53.8 years; range = 31-75 years) and 85 control subjects. Motor conduction velocities (MCV), compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), sensory conduction velocities (SCV) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) were significantly decreased in all nerves examined in the SBMA patients compared with that in the normal controls, indicating that axonal degeneration is the primary process in both motor and sensory nerves. More profound abnormalities were observed in the nerves of the upper limbs than in those of the lower limbs. F-waves in the median nerve were absent in 30 of 106 cases (28.3%), but no cases of absent F-waves were observed in the tibial nerve. From an analysis of the relationship between CMAPs and SNAPs, patients were identified with different electrophysiological phenotypes: motor-dominant, sensory-dominant and non-dominant phenotypes. The CAG repeat size and the age at onset were significantly different among the patients with motor- and sensory-dominant phenotypes, indicating that a longer CAG repeat is more closely linked to the motor-dominant phenotype and a shorter CAG repeat is more closely linked to the sensory-dominant phenotype. Furthermore, when we classified the patients by CAG repeat size, CMAP values showed a tendency to be decreased in patients with a longer CAG repeat (> or =47), while SNAPs were significantly

  9. Dynamic mutation of huntingtin gene and detection of mtDNA D-loop hypervariable region in two huntington disease pedigrees%2个亨廷顿舞蹈病家系动态突变及mtDNA D环高变区的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新伟; 刘建新; 黄月丽; 陈晓蕾; 陈辉; 李晓文

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop mutation and Huntington disease(HD). Methods (CAG)n repeat size and mtDNA D-loop fragment deletion or insertion were detected by PCR-DNA sequencing in two HD pedigree. Results Normal individuals (CAG)n≤18 times, patient's abnormal n≥40 times. There were no fragment deletion and insertion in the mitochondrial control region. Conclusion Big fragment's recombination in mtDNA control region maybe isn't the important factor in HD pathogenic mechanism.%目的 探讨mtDNA D环高变区突变与亨廷顿舞蹈病(HD)的关系.方法 PCR-DNA测序法检测2个HD家系(CAG)n重复序列、mtDNA D环高变区大片段缺失或插入突变.结果 两家系正常人(CAG)n≤18次,患者n≥40次,mtDNA D环未见大片段缺失和插入.结论 检测亨廷顿(IT15)基因(CAG)n可准确、快速诊断HD;mtDNA调控区大片段重组可能不是HD发病机制中的重要因素.

  10. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

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    Ouyang Xiaosen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease activities may contribute to toxicity whereas others are consistent with protection. These discrepancies may be due to a number of mechanisms including distinct effects of the specific intermediate digestion products of mutant huntingtin generated by different proteases. These observations suggested a critical need to investigate the consequence of upregulation of individual lysosomal enzyme in mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity. Results In this study, we used molecular approaches to enhance lysosomal protease activities and examined their effects on mutant huntingtin level and toxicity. We found that enhanced expression of lysosomal cathepsins D and B resulted in their increased enzymatic activities and reduced both full-length and fragmented huntingtin in transfected HEK cells. Furthermore, enhanced expression of cathepsin D or B protected against mutant huntingtin toxicity in primary neurons, and their neuroprotection is dependent on macroautophagy. Conclusions These observations demonstrate a neuroprotective effect of enhancing lysosomal cathepsins in reducing mutant huntingtin level and toxicity in transfected cells. They highlight the potential importance of neuroprotection mediated by cathepsin D or B through macroautophagy.

  11. Helicobacter pylori VacA, acting through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α, is crucial for CagA phosphorylation in human duodenum carcinoma cell line AZ-521

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Yamasaki, Eiki; Kurazono, Hisao; Akada, Junko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Niidome, Takuro; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Taro; Moss, Joel; Isomoto, Hajime; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which seem to be involved in virulence. VacA exhibits pleiotropic actions in gastroduodenal disorders via its specific receptors. Recently, we found that VacA induced the phosphorylation of cellular Src kinase (Src) at Tyr418 in AZ-521 cells. Silencing of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)α, a VacA receptor, reduced VacA-induced Src phosphorylation. Src is responsible for tyrosine phosphorylation of CagA at its Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) variant C (EPIYA-C) motif in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, resulting in binding of CagA to SHP-2 phosphatase. Challenging AZ-521 cells with wild-type H. pylori induced phosphorylation of CagA, but this did not occur when challenged with a vacA gene-disrupted mutant strain. CagA phosphorylation was observed in cells infected with a vacA gene-disrupted mutant strain after addition of purified VacA, suggesting that VacA is required for H. pylori-induced CagA phosphorylation. Following siRNA-mediated RPTPα knockdown in AZ-521 cells, infection with wild-type H. pylori and treatment with VacA did not induce CagA phosphorylation. Taken together, these results support our conclusion that VacA mediates CagA phosphorylation through RPTPα in AZ-521 cells. These data indicate the possibility that Src phosphorylation induced by VacA is mediated through RPTPα, resulting in activation of Src, leading to CagA phosphorylation at Tyr972 in AZ-521 cells. PMID:27935824

  12. Functions of huntingtin in germ layer specification and organogenesis.

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    Giang D Nguyen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormal polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (Htt. Although both Htt and the HD pathogenic mutation (mHtt are implicated in early developmental events, their individual involvement has not been adequately explored. In order to better define the developmental functions and pathological consequences of the normal and mutant proteins, respectively, we employed embryonic stem cell (ESC expansion, differentiation and induction experiments using huntingtin knock-out (KO and mutant huntingtin knock-in (Q111 mouse ESC lines. In KO ESCs, we observed impairments in the spontaneous specification and survival of ectodermal and mesodermal lineages during embryoid body formation and under inductive conditions using retinoic acid and Wnt3A, respectively. Ablation of BAX improves cell survival, but failed to correct defects in germ layer specification. In addition, we observed ensuing impairments in the specification and maturation of neural, hepatic, pancreatic and cardiomyocyte lineages. These developmental deficits occurred in concert with alterations in Notch, Hes1 and STAT3 signaling pathways. Moreover, in Q111 ESCs, we observed differential developmental stage-specific alterations in lineage specification and maturation. We also observed changes in Notch/STAT3 expression and activation. Our observations underscore essential roles of Htt in the specification of ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, in the specification of neural and non-neural organ-specific lineages, as well as cell survival during early embryogenesis. Remarkably, these developmental events are differentially deregulated by mHtt, raising the possibility that HD-associated early developmental impairments may contribute not only to region-specific neurodegeneration, but also to non-neural co-morbidities.

  13. Functions of huntingtin in germ layer specification and organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D; Molero, Aldrin E; Gokhan, Solen; Mehler, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormal polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (Htt). Although both Htt and the HD pathogenic mutation (mHtt) are implicated in early developmental events, their individual involvement has not been adequately explored. In order to better define the developmental functions and pathological consequences of the normal and mutant proteins, respectively, we employed embryonic stem cell (ESC) expansion, differentiation and induction experiments using huntingtin knock-out (KO) and mutant huntingtin knock-in (Q111) mouse ESC lines. In KO ESCs, we observed impairments in the spontaneous specification and survival of ectodermal and mesodermal lineages during embryoid body formation and under inductive conditions using retinoic acid and Wnt3A, respectively. Ablation of BAX improves cell survival, but failed to correct defects in germ layer specification. In addition, we observed ensuing impairments in the specification and maturation of neural, hepatic, pancreatic and cardiomyocyte lineages. These developmental deficits occurred in concert with alterations in Notch, Hes1 and STAT3 signaling pathways. Moreover, in Q111 ESCs, we observed differential developmental stage-specific alterations in lineage specification and maturation. We also observed changes in Notch/STAT3 expression and activation. Our observations underscore essential roles of Htt in the specification of ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, in the specification of neural and non-neural organ-specific lineages, as well as cell survival during early embryogenesis. Remarkably, these developmental events are differentially deregulated by mHtt, raising the possibility that HD-associated early developmental impairments may contribute not only to region-specific neurodegeneration, but also to non-neural co-morbidities.

  14. DNA-labelled cytidine assay for the quantification of CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bello, Dannelys; Xu, Z H; Higginson-Clarke, David; Rojas, Ana María Riverón; Le, Weidong; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine

    2008-03-30

    The sequencing procedure has been used to determine the size of the CAG repeat expansion for the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Likewise, standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis techniques are applied for screening large number of patients. The trinucleotide repeats (TNR) region amplification by means of the PCR procedure was initially performed using 32-P end-labelled primers and currently carried out with fluorescently end-labelled primers. The goal to obtain reliable TNR quantification assays, at low cost and short assay times, represents a challenge for the molecular diagnosis aimed at massive screening of affected populations. In the current work, we obtained preliminary results of a new methodology for the detection and size estimation of CAG expanded alleles. The assay was based on an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantifying the amount of labelled cytidines in DNA molecules. The label, 6-(p-bromobenzamido)caproyl radical, was introduced by the transamination and acylation reactions. A group of model sequences containing different numbers of CAG repeats, as well as the ATXN3 (ataxin 3) gene (from subjects suffering type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia SCA3) were used for assay standardization. The assay is simple, inexpensive, and easy to perform and differentiates distinct degrees of CAG expansions.

  15. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington’s Disease Knock-In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R.; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. PMID:27913616

  16. cag Pathogenicity island-dependent upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 in infected patients with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghiani, Marzieh; Bagheri, Nader; Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Rashidi, Reza; Mahsa, Majid; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Salimi, Elaheh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2017-07-12

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been involved in the pathogenesis of most important gastroduodenal diseases. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a large family of zincendopeptidases which play important roles in degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we examined MMP-7 mRNA levels in the gastric mucosa of patients with H. pylori infection and evaluated the effects of virulence factors, such as vacA (vacuolating cytotoxin A) and cagA (cytotoxin-associated gene), in H. pylori-infected patients upon the MMP-7 mRNA mucosal levels. We also determined the correlation between mucosal MMP-7 mRNA levels and the types of disease. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 50 H. pylori-infected patients and 50 uninfected individuals. Mucosal MMP-7 mRNA expression level in H. pylori-infected and non-infected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presences of cagA and vacA virulence factors was evaluated using PCR. MMP-7 expression was significantly higher in biopsies of patients infected with H .pylori compared to uninfected individuals. In addition, mucosal MMP-7 mRNA expression in H. pylori-infected patients significantly associated with the cagA status and the types of disease. Our results suggest that MMP-7 might be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori. Peptic ulcer was associated with cag pathogenicity island-dependent MMP-7 upregulation.

  17. CagA(+)幽门螺杆菌感染与心血管疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗悦晨; 李玉明; 周欣

    2010-01-01

    @@ 幽门螺旋杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,HP)不仅与多种胃部疾病有着密切的关系,在其它疾病中也发挥重要的作用.其中细胞毒素相关基因(cytotoxin associated gene,CagA)阳性的HP对心血管疾病的影响是目前研究的热点之一.CagA是HP最重要的毒力标志物,其表达水平与心血管疾病的发生、发展及疾病严重程度密切相关.CagA(+)HP感染是心血管疾病的独立危险因素之一[1].本文就CagA(+)HP的检测技术及与心血管疾病的关系研究进展做一简要综述.

  18. Progress in studies of gene therapy for Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Fan-ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a kind of inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by movement problems, cognitive decline and psychiatry disturbance. HD is caused by mutation in gene IT -15 involving the expansion of a trinucleotide (CAG repeat encoding glutamine, which leads to abnormal conformation of huntingtin (Htt protein and finally emerge cytotoxic functions. Currently, HD remains a fatal untreatable disease. Gene therapy for HD discussed in this review is under preclinical studies. Silencing of mutant IT-15 via RNA interference (RNAi or antisense oligonucleotide (ASO has shown some effectiveness in mouse model studies. Increasing the clearance of mutant Htt protein could be achieved by viral-mediated delivery of anti-Htt intrabodies (iAbs or induction of autophagy, and beneficial results have been observed. Ectopic expression of neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, mediated either by viral vectors or transplantation of genetically modified cells, has also been proved to be effective. Other gene-modifying methods aiming at correction of transcriptional dysregulation by histone modification, activation of endogenous neural stem cells, and normalization of calcium signaling and mitochondrial function, are also under intensive research. Gene therapy for Huntington's disease is promising, yet a long way remains from preclinical studies to clinical trials.

  19. Androgen receptor CAG repeat length and TMPRSS2:ETS prostate cancer risk: results From the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, William D; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J; Cho, Yonggon; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Reichardt, Juergen K V; Tangen, Catherine M; Leach, Robin J; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Thompson, Ian M; Lucia, M Scott

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the association between the length of the polymorphic trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene and the risk of prostate cancer containing TMPRSS2:ETS fusion genes. This nested case-control study came from subjects enrolled in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial and included 195 biopsy-proven prostate cancer cases with a known TMPRSS2:ETS status and 1344 matched controls. There was no association between the CAG repeat length and the risk of TMPRSS2:ETS-positive (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.04) or TMPRSS2:ETS-negative prostate cancer (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.11) and in patients with low- or high-grade disease. Our findings suggested that AR CAG repeats are not associated with TMPRSS2:ETS formation in prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  1. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Labadorf

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480 of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05 and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes, that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD.

  2. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Laureen; Neueder, Andreas; Földes, Gabor; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Hobbs, Carl; Jolinon, Nelly; Mioulane, Maxime; Sakai, Takao; Harding, Sian E; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ) motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  3. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  4. 幽门螺杆菌CagA抗体与胃黏膜异型增生关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 钱可大; 朱永良; 唐训球; 杜勤

    2000-01-01

    @@ 我们对403例慢性胃病患者进行了血清幽门螺杆菌(Hp)CagA(cytotoxin associated gene A)抗体检测,评价及分析了血清Hp CagA抗体与胃黏膜异型增生的关系,现将研究结果报告如下.

  5. The Aggregation of Huntingtin and α-Synuclein

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    María Elena Chánez-Cárdenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases are neurodegenerative disorders associated with unusual protein interactions. Although the origin and evolution of these diseases are completely different, characteristic deposits of protein aggregates (huntingtin and α-synuclein resp., are a common feature in both diseases. After these observations, many studies are performed with both proteins. Some of them try to understand the nature and driving forces of the aggregation process; others try to find a correlation between the genetic and failure in protein function. Finally with the combination of both approaches, it was proposed that possible strategies deal with pathologic aggregation. Unfortunately, if protein aggregation is a cause or a consequence of the neurodegeneration observed in these pathologies, it is still debatable. This paper describes the process of aggregation of two proteins: huntingtin and α synuclein. The characteristics of the aggregation reaction of these proteins have been followed with novel methods both in vivo and in vitro; these studies include both the combination with other proteins and the presence of various chemical compounds. The ultimate goal of this study was to summarize recent findings on protein aggregation and its possible role as a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases and their role in biomaterial science.

  6. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  7. 2003 CAG Educational Needs Assessment Report

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    Desmond Leddin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual survey of Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG members’ educational needs was conducted online this past April. One hundred eightyseven individuals (one fifth of the membership completed the needs assessment. The topic most in demand for future educational events was inflammatory bowel disease, both from the clinical and basic science perspectives. Other highly rated topics were endoscopy, pharmacological therapeutics, celiac disease and pancreatitis/pancreatic disease. Educational materials were judged to be the most valuable component of exhibit areas. Results of the needs assessment were used to shape the 2004 Canadian Digestive Diseases Week (CDDW program.

  8. Summary of the 2002 CAG Strategic Planning Survey

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    Philip M Sherman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this Journal, we have recently highlighted the progress of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG in meeting the goals and objectives outlined in the first Strategic Plan developed in 1993 (1. In September 2002, a Strategic Planning survey was mailed to all members of the CAG (a copy of the cover letter and survey are present for viewing on the CAG Web site www.cag-acg.org/whatsnew/strat_plann_surv.htm. The results of the responses to this survey were collated and presented to the Past Presidents of the CAG at a retreat held during the summer of 2003. These findings were then employed to develop a Strategic Plan for the CAG to guide its progress and development over the next five to ten years. A subsequent issue of this Journal will include a presentation of the CAG 2004 Strategic Plan, which was finalized and approved by the CAG Governing Board during the annual fall meeting in October 2003.

  9. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  10. No CAG repeat expansion of polymerase gamma is associated with male infertility in Tamil Nadu, South India

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    J Poongothai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contains a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma (POLG mapped to long arm of chromosome 15 (15q25, responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Exon 1 of the human POLG contains CAG trinucleotide repeat, which codes for polyglutamate. Ten copies of CAG repeat were found to be uniformly high (0.88 in different ethnic groups and considered as the common allele, whereas the mutant alleles (not -10/not -10 CAG repeats were found to be associated with oligospermia/oligoasthenospermia in male infertility. Recent data suggested the implication of POLG CAG repeat expansion in infertility, but are debated. The aim of our study was to explore whether the not -10/not -10 variant is associated with spermato g enic failure. As few study on Indian population have been conducted so far to support this view, we investigated the distribution of the POLG CAG repeats in 61 infertile men and 60 normozoospermic control Indian men of Tamil Nadu, from the same ethnic background. This analysis interestingly revealed that the homozygous wild type genotype (10/-10 was common in infertile men (77% - 47/61 and in normozoospermic control men (71.7% - 43/60. Our study failed to confirm any influence of the POLG gene polymorphism on the efficiency of the spermatogenesis.

  11. No CAG repeat expansion of polymerase gamma is associated with male infertility in Tamil Nadu, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poongothai, J

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondria contains a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase, polymerase gamma (POLG) mapped to long arm of chromosome 15 (15q25), responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Exon 1 of the human POLG contains CAG trinucleotide repeat, which codes for polyglutamate. Ten copies of CAG repeat were found to be uniformly high (0.88) in different ethnic groups and considered as the common allele, whereas the mutant alleles (not -10/not -10 CAG repeats) were found to be associated with oligospermia/oligoasthenospermia in male infertility. Recent data suggested the implication of POLG CAG repeat expansion in infertility, but are debated. The aim of our study was to explore whether the not -10/not -10 variant is associated with spermatogenic failure. As few study on Indian population have been conducted so far to support this view, we investigated the distribution of the POLG CAG repeats in 61 infertile men and 60 normozoospermic control Indian men of Tamil Nadu, from the same ethnic background. This analysis interestingly revealed that the homozygous wild type genotype (10/-10) was common in infertile men (77% - 47/61) and in normozoospermic control men (71.7% - 43/60). Our study failed to confirm any influence of the POLG gene polymorphism on the efficiency of the spermatogenesis.

  12. Helicobacter pylori vesicles carrying CagA localize in the vicinity of cell-cell contacts and induce histone H1 binding to ATP in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkina, Maria V; Olofsson, Annelie; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Arnqvist, Anna; Vikström, Elena

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces outer membrane vesicles (OMV), delivering bacterial substances including the oncogenic cytotoxin-associated CagA protein to their surroundings. We investigated the effects of H. pylori OMV carrying CagA (OMV-CagA) on cell junctions and ATP-binding proteome of epithelial monolayers, using proteomics, mass spectrometry and imaging. OMV-CagA localized in close vicinity of ZO-1 tight junction protein and induced histone H1 binding to ATP. We suggest the expression of novel events in the interactions between H. pylori OMV and epithelia, which may have an influence on host gene transcription and lead to different outcomes of an infection and development of cancer. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders.

  15. Autophagy in Huntington disease and huntingtin in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dale D O; Ladha, Safia; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important biological process that is essential for the removal of damaged organelles and toxic or aggregated proteins by delivering them to the lysosome for degradation. Consequently, autophagy has become a primary target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that involve aggregating proteins. In Huntington disease (HD), an expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the N-terminus of the huntingtin (HTT) protein leads to protein aggregation. However, HD is unique among the neurodegenerative proteinopathies in that autophagy is not only dysfunctional but wild type (wt) HTT also appears to play several roles in regulating the dynamics of autophagy. Herein, we attempt to integrate the recently described novel roles of wtHTT and altered autophagy in HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent Trends in Detection of Huntingtin and Preclinical Models of Huntington’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a genetically inherited neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by neuronal cell death in the brain. Molecular biology techniques to detect and quantify huntingtin protein in biological samples involve fluorescence imaging, western blotting, and PCR. Modified cell lines are widely used as models for Huntington’s disease for preclinical screening of drugs to study their ability to suppress the expression of huntingtin. Although worm and fly species have been exp...

  17. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang Xiaosen; Liang Qiuli; Schneider Lonnie; Zhang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease a...

  18. Progress study on the mechanism of CAG repeats dynamic mutation in polyQ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine (polyQ disease is a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormal expansion of CAG repeats within coding regions of certain causative genes, which are translated into a series of abnormally expanded polyQ tracts causing cytotoxicity. So far, nine diseases caused by expanded polyQ tracts have been demonstrated including Huntington's disease (HD, spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and several spinocerebellar ataxias subtypes (SCA. In human, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, named as dynamic mutation, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. The review presents some novel mechanisms based on dynamic mutation.

  19. The CAG repeat polymorphism of mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG) is associated with male infertility in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti-Gargouri, S; Ghorbel, M; Chakroun, N; Sellami, A; Fakhfakh, F; Ammar-Keskes, L

    2012-05-01

    Male fertility largely depends on sperm quality, which may be affected by environmental and genetic factors. Recent data emphasised the implication of the polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) CAG repeats in male infertility. In this report, we explored a possible role of the (POLG) gene polymorphism in male infertility in Tunisian men. The polymorphic CAG repeat in the nuclear POLG gene was studied in 339 male subjects (216 patients with infertility (69 azoospermic, 115 oligoasthenoteratospermic and 32 normospermic) and 123 fertile) after DNA amplification by PCR, followed by genotyping using an automatic sequencer. The heterozygous and the homozygous mutant genotypes (10/ ≠ 10 and ≠ 10/ ≠ 10) were significantly more frequent among infertile patients than among fertile controls (11.2% versus 1.6%, P = 1.3 × 10(-3) and 4.6% versus 0.8%, P = 4.2 × 10(-7) respectively). We also found a significant difference between the frequencies of 10/ ≠ 10 genotype in azoospermic (4.4%) and in oligoasthenoteratospermic (15.6%) infertile patients (P = 2.6 × 10(-2) ). However, the homozygous mutant genotype (≠ 10/ ≠ 10) was seen at similar frequencies in azoospermic, normospermic and oligoasthenospermic men (4.4%, 3.1% and 5.2% respectively). Under our conditions, the findings showed an association between POLG CAG repeat polymorphism and male infertility in Tunisian population.

  20. Analysis of SCA1, DRPLA, MJD, SCA2, and SCA6 CAG repeats in 48 Portuguese ataxia families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, I; Coutinho, P; Maciel, P; Gaspar, C; Hayes, S; Dias, A; Guimarães, J; Loureiro, L; Sequeiros, J; Rouleau, G A

    1998-03-28

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are clinically and genetically a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, eight different loci causing SCA have been identified: SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD)/SCA3, SCA4, SCA5, SCA6, SCA7, and dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Expansion of a CAG repeat in the disease genes has been found in five of these disorders. To estimate the relative frequencies of the SCA1, DRPLA, MJD, SCA2, and SCA6 mutations among Portuguese ataxia patients, we collected DNA samples from 48 ataxia families and performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the CAG repeat mutations on chromosomes 6p, 12p, 14q, 12q, and 19p, respectively. Fifty-five individuals belonging to 34 dominant families (74%) had an expanded CAG repeat at the MJD gene. In five individuals from two kindreds with a dominant pattern of inheritance (4%), an expanded CAG repeat at the SCA2 gene was found. In MJD patients, the normal allele size ranged from 13 to 41, whereas the mutant alleles contained 65 to 80 repeats. For the SCA2 patients, normal alleles had 22 or 23, while expanded alleles had between 36 and 47 CAG units. We did not find the SCA1, DRPLA, or SCA6 mutations in our group of families. The MJD mutation remains the most common cause of SCA in Portugal, while a small number of cases are caused by mutations at the SCA2 gene, and 22% are due to still unidentified genes.

  1. Transcription elongation and tissue-specific somatic CAG instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vasiliki Goula

    Full Text Available The expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is responsible for many diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD and myotonic dystrophy 1. CAG/CTG expansions are unstable in selective somatic tissues, which accelerates disease progression. The mechanisms underlying repeat instability are complex, and it remains unclear whether chromatin structure and/or transcription contribute to somatic CAG/CTG instability in vivo. To address these issues, we investigated the relationship between CAG instability, chromatin structure, and transcription at the HD locus using the R6/1 and R6/2 HD transgenic mouse lines. These mice express a similar transgene, albeit integrated at a different site, and recapitulate HD tissue-specific instability. We show that instability rates are increased in R6/2 tissues as compared to R6/1 matched-samples. High transgene expression levels and chromatin accessibility correlated with the increased CAG instability of R6/2 mice. Transgene mRNA and H3K4 trimethylation at the HD locus were increased, whereas H3K9 dimethylation was reduced in R6/2 tissues relative to R6/1 matched-tissues. However, the levels of transgene expression and these specific histone marks were similar in the striatum and cerebellum, two tissues showing very different CAG instability levels, irrespective of mouse line. Interestingly, the levels of elongating RNA Pol II at the HD locus, but not the initiating form of RNA Pol II, were tissue-specific and correlated with CAG instability levels. Similarly, H3K36 trimethylation, a mark associated with transcription elongation, was specifically increased at the HD locus in the striatum and not in the cerebellum. Together, our data support the view that transcription modulates somatic CAG instability in vivo. More specifically, our results suggest for the first time that transcription elongation is regulated in a tissue-dependent manner, contributing to tissue-selective CAG instability.

  2. Androgen receptor gene polymorphisms lean mass and performance in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Rodríguez-González, F Germán; Dorado, Cecilia; Olmedillas, Hugo; Fuentes, Teresa; Pérez-Gómez, Jorge; Delgado-Guerra, Safira; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán; Ara, Ignacio; Guerra, Borja; Arteaga-Ortiz, Rafael; Calbet, José A L; Díaz-Chico, B Nicolás

    2011-02-01

    The exon-1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene contains two repeat length polymorphisms which modify either the amount of AR protein inside the cell (GGN(n), polyglycine) or its transcriptional activity (CAG(n), polyglutamine). Shorter CAG and/or GGN repeats provide stronger androgen signalling and vice versa. To test the hypothesis that CAG and GGN repeat AR polymorphisms affect muscle mass and various variables of muscular strength phenotype traits, the length of CAG and GGN repeats was determined by PCR and fragment analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing of selected samples in 282 men (28.6 ± 7.6 years). Individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG(S)) if harbouring repeat lengths of ≤ 21 and CAG long (CAG(L)) if CAG >21. GGN was considered short (GGN(S)) or long (GGN(L)) if GGN ≤ 23 or >23, respectively. No significant differences in lean body mass or fitness were observed between the CAG(S) and CAG(L) groups, or between GGN(S) and GGN(L) groups, but a trend for a correlation was found for the GGN repeat and lean mass of the extremities (r=-0.11, p=0.06). In summary, the lengths of CAG and GGN repeat of the AR gene do not appear to influence lean mass or fitness in young men.

  3. Proteomic characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA antigen recognized by child serum antibodies and its epitope mapping by peptide array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Akada

    Full Text Available Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children.

  4. Lower Circulating Levels of Chemokine CXCL10 In Helicobacter Pylori-Infected Patients with Peptic Ulcer: Influence of the Bacterial Virulence Factor CagA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Alterations in CXCL10 (a Th1 chemokine expression have been associated with various diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum CXCL10 levels in H. pylori-infected patients with peptic ulcer (PU and to determine its association with bacterial virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA. Materials and Methods: Serum samples from 90 H. pylori infected patients (70 were anti-CagA+, 20 were anti-CagA-, 65 asymptomatic (AS carriers (40 were anti-CagA+, 25 were anti-CagA- and 30 healthy H. pylori-negative subjects (as a control were tested for the concentrations of CXCL10 by using ELISA method. Results: The mean serum levels of CXCL10 in PU patients (96.64 ± 20.85 Pg/mL was significantly lower than those observed in AS subjects (162.16 ± 53.31 Pg/mL, P < 0.01 and control group (193.93 ± 42.14 Pg/mL, P < 0.02. In the PU group, the levels of CXCL10 in anti-CagA+ subjects was significantly higher in comparison to anti-CagA- patients (P<0.04. Conclusion: These results showed that the mean concentrations of CXCL10 in H. pylori-infected-PU patients was lower than AS carriers and control group. In the PU group, the serum levels of CXCL10 were affected by bacterial factor CagA.

  5. 幽门螺旋杆菌细胞毒素相关蛋白A真核表达载体的构建与表达%The Construction of the Helicobacter pylori Cytotoxin-Associated Protein A ( CagA ) Gene Eukaryotic Expression Vector and the Coding Protein Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万小勇; 杨登元

    2013-01-01

    目的 构建幽门螺旋杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,Hp)细胞毒素相关蛋白A(cytotoxin-associated protein,CagA)基因表达载体并表达其编码蛋白.方法 从胃黏膜活检标本中分离Hp,提取核酸,采用RT-PCR技术扩增CagA基因,将其克隆至pEGFP真核表达载体中,构建Hp CagA基因真核表达载体并转染293-T细胞表达其编码蛋白.结果 通过PCR、双酶切、测序鉴定证实CagA基因的真核表达载体构建成功,免疫印迹法证实CagA蛋白的表达.结论 成功构建了Hp CagA基因真核表达载体并表达其编码蛋白,为后期功能研究提供了材料和基础.

  6. Continuous and periodic expansion of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease R6/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllersen, Linda; Rowe, Alexander D; Larsen, Elisabeth; Rognes, Torbjørn; Klungland, Arne

    2010-12-09

    Huntington's disease (HD) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR) and base excision repair (BER) proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail), which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic--and apparently irreversible--periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues.

  7. Early cognitive dysfunction in the HD 51 CAG transgenic rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Kyle D; Rossignol, Julien; Crane, Andrew T; Davis, Kendra K; Bavar, Angela M; Dekorver, Nicholas W; Lowrance, Steven A; Reilly, Mark P; Sandstrom, Michael I; von Hörsten, Stephan; Lescaudron, Laurent; Dunbar, Gary L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in humans caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat that produces choreic movements, which are preceded by cognitive deficits. The HD transgenic rat (tgHD), which contains the human HD mutation with a 51 CAG repeat allele, exhibits motor deficits that begin when these rats are 12 months of age. However, there are no reports of cognitive dysfunction occurring prior to this. To assess whether cognitive dysfunction might precede motor deficits in tgHD rats, one group of 9-month-old male rats with homozygotic mutated genes and one group of wild-type (WT) rats underwent three testing phases in a unique Spatial Operant Reversal Test (SORT) paradigm, as well as assessment of spontaneous motor activity. After testing, morphological and histological examination of the brains were made. Results indicated that tgHD rats acquired the cued-response (Phase 1) portion of the SORT, but made significantly more errors during the reversal (Phase 2) and during the pseudorandomized reversals (Phase 3) portion of the study, when compared to WT rats. Analysis of the data using mathematical principles of reinforcement revealed no memory, motor, or motivational deficits. These results indicate that early cognitive dysfunction, as measured by the SORT, occur prior to motor deficits, gross anatomical changes, or cell loss in the tgHD rat with 51 CAG repeats, and suggest that this protocol could provide a useful screen for therapeutic studies.

  8. Continuous and periodic expansion of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease R6/1 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Møllersen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR and base excision repair (BER proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail, which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic--and apparently irreversible--periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues.

  9. Prevalence of cagA and vacA among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soroush, Setareh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Bogdanović, Lidija; Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-07-30

    The varieties of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori may be due to differences in bacterial genotypes and virulence factors as well as environmental and host-related factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients in Iran and analyze their relevance to the disease status between two clinical groups via a meta-analysis method. Different databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, SID, Magiran, Science Direct, and Medlib were investigated, and 23 relevant articles from the period between 2001 and 2012 were finally analyzed. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random-effects model. Data were analyzed using R software and STATA. The prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients was 70% (95% CI, 64-75) and 41% (95% CI, 24.3-57.7), respectively. The prevalence of duodenal ulcers, peptic ulcers, and gastritis among cagA+ individuals was 53% (95% CI, 20-86), 65% (95% CI, 34-97), and 71% (95% CI, 59-84), respectively. Odds ratio (OR) between cagA-positive compared with cagA-negative patients showed a 1.89 (95% CI, 1.38-2.57) risk of ulcers. In conclusion, the frequency of cagA gene among H. pylori strains is elevated in Iran and it seems to be more frequently associated with gastritis. Therefore, any information about cagA and vacA prevalence among different H. pylori-infected clinical groups in the country can help public health authorities to plan preventive policies to reduce the prevalence of diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  10. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium.

  11. Neuropathological diagnosis and CAG repeat expansion in Huntington's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Xuereb, J H; MacMillan, J C; Snell, R; Davies, P.; Harper, P S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To correlate the degree of CAG repeat expansion with neuropathological findings in Huntington's disease. METHODS--The CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a large series of brain samples from 268 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease in which full neuropathological data was available. RESULTS--Analysis by polymerase chain reaction was successful in 63% of samples (169 of 268). Repeat expansions were detected in 152 of 153 (99%) samples with a neuropathologic...

  12. Mutant Huntingtin and Elusive Defects in Oxidative Metabolism and Mitochondrial Calcium Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2016-07-01

    Elongation of a polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch in huntingtin protein (Htt) is linked to Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. The mutation in Htt correlates with neuronal dysfunction in the striatum and cerebral cortex and eventually leads to neuronal cell death. The exact mechanisms of the injurious effect of mutant Htt (mHtt) on neurons are not completely understood but might include aberrant gene transcription, defective autophagy, abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis, anomalous mitochondrial dynamics, and trafficking. In addition, deficiency in oxidative metabolism and defects in mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling are considered essential contributing factors to neuronal dysfunction in HD and, consequently, in HD pathogenesis. Since the discovery of the mutation in Htt, the questions whether mHtt affects oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling and, if it does, what mechanisms could be involved were in focus of numerous investigations. However, despite significant research efforts, the detrimental effect of mHtt and the mechanisms by which mHtt might impair oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling remain elusive. In this paper, I will briefly review studies aimed at clarifying the consequences of mHtt interaction with mitochondria and discuss experimental results supporting or arguing against the mHtt effects on oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling.

  13. An evolutionary recent neuroepithelial cell adhesion function of huntingtin implicates ADAM10-Ncadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sardo, Valentina; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Vitali, Barbara; Ramos, Catarina; Tartari, Marzia; Myre, Michael A; Walker, James A; Pistocchi, Anna; Conti, Luciano; Valenza, Marta; Drung, Binia; Schmidt, Boris; Gusella, James; Zeitlin, Scott; Cotelli, Franco; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-05-01

    The Huntington's disease gene product, huntingtin, is indispensable for neural tube formation, but its role is obscure. We studied neurulation in htt-null embryonic stem cells and htt-morpholino zebrafish embryos and found a previously unknown, evolutionarily recent function for this ancient protein. We found that htt was essential for homotypic interactions between neuroepithelial cells; it permitted neurulation and rosette formation by regulating metalloprotease ADAM10 activity and Ncadherin cleavage. This function was embedded in the N terminus of htt and was phenocopied by treatment of htt knockdown zebrafish with an ADAM10 inhibitor. Notably, in htt-null cells, reversion of the rosetteless phenotype occurred only with expression of evolutionarily recent htt heterologues from deuterostome organisms. Conversely, all of the heterologues that we tested, including htt from Drosophila melanogaster and Dictyostelium discoideum, exhibited anti-apoptotic activity. Thus, anti-apoptosis may have been one of htt’s ancestral function(s), but, in deuterostomes, htt evolved to acquire a unique regulatory activity for controlling neural adhesion via ADAM10-Ncadherin, with implications for brain evolution and development.

  14. Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island genotype diversity within the gastric niche of a single host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, Mario José; Granados, Gabriela; Pérez, Cecilia Valeria; Olmos, Martín; Sanchez, Cristian; Catalano, Mariana

    2007-05-01

    cag pathogenicity island (PAI) integrity was investigated in isolates from multiple biopsies recovered from 40 patients in an attempt to determine the co-existence of a varying cagPAI-positive to cagPAI-negative ratio in a single host. Six biopsies were obtained from each patient during the same endoscopic session. cagPAI analysis included amplification of seven loci (cagA, cagE, cagG, cagM, cagT, HP0527 and HP0524) and the left end of cagII (LEC). Absence of the island was confirmed by empty-site PCR. lspA-glmM RFLP and random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR were used for strain delineation. The number of biopsies with Helicobacter pylori-positive culture ranged from three to six per patient and a total of 218 isolates were recovered. Mixed infection was only found in two patients. Nearly one-third of the 40 patients harboured isolates with an intact cagPAI in all niches, another third of the isolates were empty-site-positive in all niches, whilst the remaining third of the isolates had a disrupted cagPAI in all or at least one of the niches. Co-existence of variants of the same strain with different cagPAI genotypes was observed in one-quarter of patients. The variations in cagPAI genotype included co-existence of: diverse cagPAI deletions in different niches, variants with intact and with partially deleted islands, variants with empty-site-positive and with partially deleted cagPAIs, and variants with an intact cagPAI and with empty-site-positive. Half of the patients with different cagPAI genotypes harboured an intact cagPAI in at least one niche. Co-existence of diverse genotypes of putative virulence factors in a single host must be considered when drawing a correlation with clinical presentation.

  15. Effect of 2'-O-methyl/thiophosphonoacetate-modified antisense oligonucleotides on huntingtin expression in patient-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Masayuki; Threlfall, Richard N; Caruthers, Marvin H; Corey, David R

    2014-12-15

    Optimizing oligonucleotides as therapeutics will require exploring how chemistry can be used to enhance their effects inside cells. To achieve this goal it will be necessary to fully explore chemical space around the native DNA/RNA framework to define the potential of diverse chemical modifications. In this report we examine the potential of thiophosphonoacetate (thioPACE)-modified 2'-O-methyl oligoribonucleotides as inhibitors of human huntingtin (HTT) expression. Inhibition occurred, but was less than with analogous locked nucleic acid (LNA)-substituted oligomers lacking the thioPACE modification. These data suggest that thioPACE oligonucleotides have the potential to control gene expression inside cells. However, advantages relative to other modifications were not demonstrated. Additional modifications are likely to be necessary to fully explore any potential advantages of thioPACE substitutions.

  16. Infection with cagA-positive and cagA-negative types of Helicobacter pylori among children and adolescents with gastrointestinal symptoms in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugule, I; Rumba, I; Engstrand, L; Ejderhamn, J

    2003-10-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of concomitant cagA-positive and cagA-negative Helicobacter pylori genotypes in individual subjects, a group of 56 symptomatic patients (aged 8-18 years) was studied. Among 31 patients culture-positive for Helicobacter pylori, only cagA-positive colonies were isolated from 18 patients, both cagA-positive and cagA-negative genotypes were isolated from 4 patients, and in 9 patients all of the individual colonies isolated were cagA-negative, but in seven of them a pool of colonies was positive for cagA. Thus, the presence of both cagA-positive and cagA-negative genotypes in the same individual was identified in 11 of the 31 culture-positive patients tested, and most of the patients predominantly colonized by cagA-negative strains also harbored a small amount of cagA-positive strains. Previous or current infection with cagA-positive strains of Helicobacter pylori was observed in 50 of the 56 patients studied.

  17. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-07

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  19. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

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    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  20. Longitudinal analysis of the behavioural phenotype in Hdh(CAG)150 Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Simon; Higgs, Gemma; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2012-06-01

    In people with Huntington's disease, an expanded CAG repeat sequence on the HTT gene confers a toxic gain function resulting in a progressive and fatal neurodegeneration. The Hdh((CAG)Q150) Huntington's disease mouse line is a knock-in model of the disease that carries ∼150 CAG repeats on the normal mouse Htt locus. To determine that these mice are a useful model of the disease, they were assessed longitudinally for motor and cognitive deficits relevant to the human disease state. Each test was conducted bi-monthly across the lifespan of the animal. The results indicate that the Hdh(Q150/Q150) mice were impaired on each of the measures used, with deficits appearing on a 3-stage water maze test at 4 months of age and on prepulse inhibition at 6 months of age, both of which were prior to the manifestation of motor abnormalities. Grip strength, as measured by the inverted cage lid test, was reduced in the Hdh(Q150/Q150) mice from 10 months of age, when the male mice also exhibited weight loss relative to their wildtype littermates. On the accelerating rotarod, deficits in the carrier mice did not appear until they were 21 months old. Our results demonstrate that the Hdh((CAG)150) is a valid model of HD that displays early and progressive cognitive deficits that precede the onset of motor abnormalities.

  1. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes and cagA status and their relationship to associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Hou; Zhen Xing Tu; Guo Ming Xu; Yan Fang Gong; Xu Hui Ji; Zhao Shen Li

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) is a major causativebacterium of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans, and associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer[1 -8]. An important virulant factor of H. pylori is the vacuolating cytotoxin ( VacA ) encoded by vacA that induces cytoplasmic vacuolation in target cells both in vitro and in vivo[9-11]. VacA is produced as a 140 kDa precursor which contains an N-terminal signal peptide and an approximately 33 kDa C-terminal outer membrance exporter. The precursor is cleaved at both N-terminal and C-terminal and secreted into the extracellular milieu as a 95 kDa mature protein. The mature protein futher undergoes specific cleavage to yield 37 kDa and 58 kDa subunits[12-14] Although vacA is present in all H. pylori strains, only about 50% to 60% of strains can induce vacuolation of epithelial cells as assessed by the HeLa cell assay. vacA shows considerable genetic variation in H. pylori isolated from all over the world and contains at least two variable regions. The s region exists as sl or s2 allelic types. Among type sl strains, subtypes sla and slb have been identified. The m region occurs as ml or m2 allelic types. Specific vacA genotype of H. pylori strains are associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, epithelial damage in vivo, and clinical consequences[15-27]. The other virulant factor is the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA) encoded by the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA). The cagA gene is present in about 60% to 70% of strains and all of these strains express the cagA. The presence of cagA is also associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, and clinical outcome[24-30]. The aim of this study was (i) to identify vacA genotypes and cagA status of H. pylori isolated from Chinese patients; (ii) to evaluation the relatioship beween vacA genotypes, cagA status and related gastroenterological disorders.

  2. High Frequency of cagA and vacA s1a/m2 Genotype among Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Biopsies of Pakistani Children

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    Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin associated gene product CagA, encoded by vacA and cagA are major virulence determinants associated with pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. The presence and prevalence of two major H. pylori virulence associated genes among gastric biopsies of Pakistani children were investigated in the current study. Fifty one gastric biopsy specimens of children were analysed for 16S rRNA, vacA and cagA genes using PCR. The results showed that 21 (41.2% biopsies were positive for H. pylori as determined by 16S rRNA PCR. In the 21 H. pylori positive gastric biopsies, 19 (90.5% showed vacA s1a, 1 (4.75% was vacA s1b and 1 (4.75% was vacA s2 whereas, 5 (23.8% were vacA m1 and 16 (76.2% were vacA m2. None of the H. pylori positive biopsies carried vacA s1c subtype. The cagA gene was found in 13 (61.9% of H. pylori infected biopsies and different vacA combinations were found with or without cagA gene. H. pylori was detected with high frequency of cagA while vacA s1a and vacA m2 regions with vacA s1a/m2 genotype were predominant in H. pylori infected gastric biopsies of children.

  3. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidal, Yolanda; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Barreto-Zúñiga, Rafael; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008), and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003). A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036). A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003). Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. Conclusion/Significance High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work. PMID:19050763

  4. High diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer.

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    Yolanda López-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008, and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003. A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036. A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003. Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work.

  5. Clinical and pathological importance of vacA allele heterogeneity and cagA status in peptic ulcer disease in patients from North Brazil

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    Luisa Caricio Martins

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the prevalence of gene cagA and vacA alleles in 129 patients, 69 with gastritis and 60 with peptic ulcer diseases from North Brazil and their relation with histopathological data. vacA and cagA genotype were determined by polymerase chain reaction. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used for histological diagnosis. 96.6% of the patients were colonized by Helicobacter pylori strains harboring single vacA genotype (nont-mixed infection. Among them, 11.8% had subtype s1a, 67.8% had subtype s1b, and 17% subtype s2. In regard to the middle region analysis, m1 alleles were found in 75.4% and m2 in 21.2% of patients. The cagA gene was detected in 78% patients infected with H. pylori and was associated with the s1-m1 vacA genotype. The H. pylori strains, vacA s1b m1/cagA-positive, were associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer disease and higher amounts of lymphocytic and neutrophilic infiltrates and the presence of intestinal metaplasia. These findings show that cagA and vacA genotyping may have clinical relevance in Brazil.

  6. Central body fat changes in men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism undergoing testosterone replacement therapy are modulated by androgen receptor CAG polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, G; delli Muti, N; Buldreghini, E; Lenzi, A; Balercia, G

    2014-08-01

    Little is known about the effect of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism in conditioning body composition changes after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In this study, we aimed to clarify this aspect by focussing our attention on male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition often associated with partial or total hypopituitarism. Fourteen men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and undergoing several replacement hormone therapies were evaluated before and after TRT. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)-derived body composition measurements, pituitary-dependent hormones and AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism were considered. While testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels increased after TRT, cortisol concentration decreased. No anthropometric or body composition parameters varied significantly, except for abdominal fat decrease. The number of CAG triplets was positively and significantly correlated with this abdominal fat decrease, while the opposite occurred between the latter and Δ-testosterone. No correlation of IGF-1 or cortisol variation (Δ-) with Δ-abdominal fat was found. At multiple linear regression, after correction for Δ-testosterone, the positive association between CAG triplet number and abdominal fat change was confirmed. In male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter length of AR CAG repeat tract is independently associated with a more marked decrease of abdominal fat after TRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent Trends in Detection of Huntingtin and Preclinical Models of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Neelima; Das, Nandita G; Das, Sudip K

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a genetically inherited neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by neuronal cell death in the brain. Molecular biology techniques to detect and quantify huntingtin protein in biological samples involve fluorescence imaging, western blotting, and PCR. Modified cell lines are widely used as models for Huntington's disease for preclinical screening of drugs to study their ability to suppress the expression of huntingtin. Although worm and fly species have been experimented on as models for Huntington's disease, the most successful animal models have been reported to be primates. This review critically analyses the molecular biology techniques for detection and quantitation of huntingtin and evaluates the various animal species for use as models for Huntington's disease.

  8. Age, CAG repeat length, and clinical progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam; Kumar, Brahma V; Mo, Alisa; Welsh, Claire S; Margolis, Russell L; Ross, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore the effect of CAG repeat length on the rate of clinical progression in patients with Huntington's disease. The dataset included records for 569 subjects followed prospectively at the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center. Participants were seen for a mean of 7.1 visits, with a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Quantified Neurologic Examination and its Motor Impairment subscale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Huntington's disease Activities of Daily Living Scale. By itself, CAG repeat length showed a statistically significant but small effect on the progression of all clinical measures. Contrary to our previous expectations, controlling for age of onset increased the correlation between CAG repeat length and progression of all variables by 69% to 159%. Graphical models further supported the idea that individuals with smaller triplet expansions experience a more gradual decline. CAG repeat length becomes an important determinant of clinical prognosis when accounting for age of onset. This suggests that the aging process itself influences clinical outcomes in Huntington's disease. Inconsistent results in prior studies examining CAG repeat length and progression may indeed reflect a lack of age adjustment.

  9. Bone mass and the CAG and GGN androgen receptor polymorphisms in young men.

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    Amelia Guadalupe-Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine whether androgen receptor (AR CAG (polyglutamine and GGN (polyglycine polymorphisms influence bone mineral density (BMD, osteocalcin and free serum testosterone concentration in young men. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole body, lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral content (BMC and BMD, Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA, AR repeat polymorphisms (PCR, osteocalcin and free testosterone (ELISA were determined in 282 healthy men (28.6+/-7.6 years. Individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG(S if harboring repeat lengths of 21, and GGN was considered short (GGN(S or long (GGN(L if GGN 23. There was an inverse association between logarithm of CAG and GGN length and Ward's Triangle BMC (r = -0.15 and -0.15, P<0.05, age and height adjusted. No associations between CAG or GGN repeat length and regional BMC or BMD were observed after adjusting for age. Whole body and regional BMC and BMD values were similar in men harboring CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S or GGN(L AR repeat polymorphisms. Men harboring the combination CAG(L+GGN(L had 6.3 and 4.4% higher lumbar spine BMC and BMD than men with the haplotype CAG(S+GGN(S (both P<0.05. Femoral neck BMD was 4.8% higher in the CAG(S+GGN(S compared with the CAG(L+GGN(S men (P<0.05. CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S, GGN(L men had similar osteocalcin concentration as well as the four CAG-GGN haplotypes studied. CONCLUSION: AR polymorphisms have an influence on BMC and BMD in healthy adult humans, which cannot be explained through effects in osteoblastic activity.

  10. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

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    Faisal Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n=169, chronic gastritis (GIs, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84% cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93% compared with GIs (72% and GU (84%. The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40% and GU (36%, vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%, vacAs1bm1 (14% and vacAs1bm2 (8% in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%, while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2% and GU (3% and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%, as compared to GIs (41% and GU (20%. The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23% than in GU (22% and GIs (145 patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China.

  11. The role of chaperone-mediated autophagy in huntingtin degradation.

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    Lin Qi

    Full Text Available Huntington Disease (HD is caused by an abnormal expansion of polyQ tract in the protein named huntingtin (Htt. HD pathology is featured by accumulation and aggregation of mutant Htt in striatal and cortical neurons. Aberrant Htt degradation is implicated in HD pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA components, heat shock protein cognate 70 (Hsc70 and lysosome-associated protein 2A (LAMP-2A in degradation of Htt fragment 1-552aa (Htt-552. A cell model of HD was produced by overexpression of Htt-552 with adenovirus. The involvement of CMA components in degradation of Htt-552 was determined with over-expression or silencing of Hsc70 and LAMP-2A. The results confirmed previous reports that both macroautophagy and CMA were involved in degradation of Htt-552. Changing the levels of CMA-related proteins affected the accumulation of Htt-552. The lysosomal binding and luminal transport of Htt-552 was demonstrated by incubation of Htt-552 with isolated lysosomes. Expansion of the polyQ tract in Htt-552 impaired its uptake and degradation by lysosomes. Mutation of putative KFERQ motif in wild-type Htt-552 interfered with interactions between Htt-552 and Hsc70. Endogenous Hsc70 and LAMP-2A interacted with exogenously expressed Htt-552. Modulating the levels of CMA related proteins degraded endogenous full-length Htt. These studies suggest that Hsc70 and LAMP-2A through CMA play a role in the clearance of Htt and suggest a novel strategy to target the degradation of mutant Htt.

  12. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies

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    Mao Q

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Qixing Mao,1–3,* Mantang Qiu,1–3,* Gaochao Dong,3 Wenjie Xia,1–3 Shuai Zhang,1,3 Youtao Xu,1,3 Jie Wang,3 Yin Rong,1,3 Lin Xu,1,3 Feng Jiang1,3 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, 2Fourth Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, 3Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg’s test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855–1.245. However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089–1.992. Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014–1.707. These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results. Keywords: androgen, CAG repeat polymorphism, women

  13. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  14. Rebamipide attenuates Helicobacter pylori CagA-induced self-renewal capacity via modulation of β-catenin signaling axis in gastric cancer-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Woo; Noh, Yu Na; Hwang, Won Chan; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2016-08-01

    Rebamipide, a mucosal-protective agent, is used clinically for treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcers induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) which is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Although rebamipide is known to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells, the action mechanisms of rebamipide in gastric carcinogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that rebamipide suppresses H. pylori CagA-induced β-catenin and its target cancer-initiating cells (C-IC) marker gene expression via upregulation of miRNA-320a and -4496. Rebamipide attenuated in vitro self-renewal capacity of H. pylori CagA-infected gastric C-IC via modulation of miRNA-320a/-4496-β-catenin signaling axis. Moreover, rebamipide enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in CagA-expressed gastric C-IC. Furthermore, rebamipide suppressed tumor-initiating capacity of gastric C-IC, probably via suppression of CagA-induced C-IC properties. These data provide novel insights for the efficacy of rebamipide as a chemoprotective drug against H. pylori CagA-induced carcinogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple aspects of gene dysregulation in Huntington’s Disease.

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    Lara eMoumne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s Disease (HD is a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the gene encoding Huntingtin (Htt. It is characterized by chorea, cognitive and psychiatric disorders. The most affected brain region is the striatum, and the clinical symptoms are directly correlated to the rate of striatal degeneration. The wild-type Htt is a ubiquitous protein and its deletion is lethal. Mutated (expanded Htt produces excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunctions, axonal transport deficit, altered proteasome activity, and gene dysregulation. Transcriptional dysregulation occurs at early neuropathological stages in HD patients. Multiple genes are dysregulated, with overlaps of altered transcripts between mouse models of HD and patient brains. Nuclear localization of Exp-Htt interferes with transcription factors, co-activators and proteins of the transcriptional machinery. Another key mechanism described so far, is an alteration of cytoplasmic retention of the transcriptional repressor REST, which is normally associated with wild-type Htt. As such, Exp-Htt causes alteration of transcription of multiple genes involved in neuronal survival, plasticity, signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Besides these transcriptional dysregulations, Exp-Htt affects the chromatin structure through altered post-translational modifications (PTM of histones and methylation of DNA. Multiple alterations of histone PTM are described, including acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, polyamination and phosphorylation. Exp-Htt also affects the expression and regulation of non-coding microRNAs. First multiple neural microRNAs are controlled by REST, and dysregulated in HD, with concomitant de-repression of downstream mRNA targets. Second, Exp-Htt protein or RNA may also play a major role in the processing of miRNAs and hence pathogenesis. These pleiotropic effects of Exp-Htt on gene expression may represent seminal deleterious effects on the

  16. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

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    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  17. Strategy To Characterize the Number and Type of Repeating EPIYA Phosphorylation Motifs in the Carboxyl Terminus of CagA Protein in Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G.; Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Papadakos, Konstantinos; Kalliaropoulos, Antonios; Papatheodoridis, George; Mentis, Andreas F; Archimandritis, Athanasios J

    2006-01-01

    Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) diversity with regard to EPIYA-A, -B, -C, or -D phosphorylation motifs may play an important role in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, and therefore determination of these motifs in H. pylori clinical isolates can become a useful prognostic tool. We propose a strategy for the accurate determination of CagA EPIYA motifs in clinical strains, based upon one-step PCR amplification using primers that flank the EPIYA coding region. We thus analyzed 135 H. pylori i...

  18. Accelerating the clearance of mutant huntingtin protein aggregates through autophagy induction by europium hydroxide nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Yi; Man, Na; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Xu, Jing; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Wen, Long-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the well-known pathways to accelerate the clearance of protein aggregates, which contributes to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Although there are numerous reports that demonstrate the induction of autophagy with small molecules including rapamycin, trehalose and lithium, however, there are few reports mentioning the clearance of aggregate-prone proteins through autophagy induction by nanoparticles. In the present article, we have demonstrated that europium hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can reduce huntingtin protein aggregation (EGFP-tagged huntingtin protein with 74 polyQ repeats), responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. Again, we have found that these nanorods induce authentic autophagy flux in different cell lines (Neuro 2a, PC12 and HeLa cells) through the expression of higher levels of characteristic autophagy marker protein LC3-II and degradation of selective autophagy substrate/cargo receptor p62/SQSTM1. Furthermore, depression of protein aggregation clearance through the autophagy blockade has also been observed by using specific inhibitors (wortmannin and chloroquine), indicating that autophagy is involved in the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation. Since [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can enhance the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation via autophagy induction, we strongly believe that these nanorods would be useful for the development of therapeutic treatment strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases in near future using nanomedicine approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. HDAC4 reduction: a novel therapeutic strategy to target cytoplasmic huntingtin and ameliorate neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mielcarek

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC 4 is a transcriptional repressor that contains a glutamine-rich domain. We hypothesised that it may be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD, a protein-folding neurodegenerative disorder caused by an aggregation-prone polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. We found that HDAC4 associates with huntingtin in a polyglutamine-length-dependent manner and co-localises with cytoplasmic inclusions. We show that HDAC4 reduction delayed cytoplasmic aggregate formation, restored Bdnf transcript levels, and rescued neuronal and cortico-striatal synaptic function in HD mouse models. This was accompanied by an improvement in motor coordination, neurological phenotypes, and increased lifespan. Surprisingly, HDAC4 reduction had no effect on global transcriptional dysfunction and did not modulate nuclear huntingtin aggregation. Our results define a crucial role for the cytoplasmic aggregation process in the molecular pathology of HD. HDAC4 reduction presents a novel strategy for targeting huntingtin aggregation, which may be amenable to small-molecule therapeutics.

  20. Study on Vac A and Cag A of Helicobacter pylori associated with gastric cancinogenesis%幽门螺杆菌Vac A与Cag A在胃癌形成过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丽婷; 郁丽; 夏时海

    2007-01-01

    幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,Hp)是一种微需氧的、螺旋状的革兰氏阴性杆菌。大量研究证实Hp与胃的癌前疾病、癌前病变及胃癌的发生发展密切相关,近年来研究的热点是Hp菌株的2个重要基因:空泡毒素基因(vacuolating toxin gene A,vac A)和细胞毒素相关基因(cytotoxin associated gene A,cag A)及其相应表达产物空泡毒素(Vacuolating toxin,Vac A)和细胞毒素相关蛋白(Cytotoxin associated protein,Cag A)。本文现就cag A与vac A基因及其相应蛋白在胃癌形成过程中的作用的研究进展综述如下。

  1. Genomes of Helicobacter pylori from native Peruvians suggest admixture of ancestral and modern lineages and reveal a western type cag-pathogenicity island

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    Rahman Syed

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is presumed to be co-evolved with its human host and is a highly diverse gastric pathogen at genetic levels. Ancient origins of H. pylori in the New World are still debatable. It is not clear how different waves of human migrations in South America contributed to the evolution of strain diversity of H. pylori. The objective of our 'phylogeographic' study was to gain fresh insights into these issues through mapping genetic origins of H. pylori of native Peruvians (of Amerindian ancestry and their genomic comparison with isolates from Spain, and Japan. Results For this purpose, we attempted to dissect genetic identity of strains by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST of the 7 housekeeping genes (atpA, efp, ureI, ppa, mutY, trpC, yphC and the sequence analyses of the babB adhesin and oipA genes. The whole cag pathogenicity-island (cagPAI from these strains was analyzed using PCR and the geographic type of cagA phosphorylation motif EPIYA was determined by gene sequencing. We observed that while European genotype (hp-Europe predominates in native Peruvian strains, approximately 20% of these strains represent a sub-population with an Amerindian ancestry (hsp-Amerind. All of these strains however, irrespective of their ancestral affiliation harbored a complete, 'western' type cagPAI and the motifs surrounding it. This indicates a possible acquisition of cagPAI by the hsp-Amerind strains from the European strains, during decades of co-colonization. Conclusion Our observations suggest presence of ancestral H. pylori (hsp-Amerind in Peruvian Amerindians which possibly managed to survive and compete against the Spanish strains that arrived to the New World about 500 years ago. We suggest that this might have happened after native Peruvian H. pylori strains acquired cagPAI sequences, either by new acquisition in cag-negative strains or by recombination

  2. Association of CagPAI integrity with severeness of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Ghalehnoei, H; Farzi, N; Yadegar, A; Alebouyeh, M; Aghdaei, H A; Molaei, M; Zali, M R; Pour Hossein Gholi, M A

    2015-12-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is involved in delivery of CagA effector protein and peptidoglycan into host cells and also in IL-8 induction in the human gastric tissue. Diversity of cagPAI may affect disease status and clinical outcome of the infected patients. Our study was aimed to investigate diversity of this island and its intactness in Iranian patients to investigate possible associations between cagPAI integrity and pathological changes of the infected tissue. Out of the 75 patients, H. pylori strains were obtained from 30 patients with severe active gastritis (SAG) (n=11), moderate chronic gastritis (CG) (n=14) and intestinal metaplasia/dysplasia (IM) (n=5). Intactness of the cagPAI was determined using 12 sets of primer pairs specific for functionally important loci of cagPAI by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cagPAI positive strains were significantly observed in patients with SAG (52.4%) in comparison to those presenting CG (33.3%) and IM (14.3%). In addition, the presence of intact cagPAI was 87.5% in H. pylori strains isolated from patients with SAG, which was higher than those obtained from patients with CG (12.5%) or IM (0%). A significant increase in the frequency of cagα-cagY and cagW-cagT segments, as exterior proteins of the CagPAI, was illustrated in strains from SAG patients compared with those from patients with CG. Overall, these results strongly proposed an association between the severity of histopathological changes and intactness of cagPAI in the gastric tissue of patients infected with H. pylori. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.M.; Pepers, B.A.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Mulders, S.A.M.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Ommen, G.J.B. van; Roon-Mom, W.M. van

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion i

  4. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.M.; Pepers, B.A.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Mulders, S.A.M.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Ommen, G.J.B. van; Roon-Mom, W.M. van

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion i

  5. Seroprevalence of anti-Helicobacter pylori and anti-CagA antibodies in peptic ulcer and healthy subjects in the city of Rafsanjan

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    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is thought to play an etiologic role in several gastroduodenal diseases including gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric MALT lymphoma, and distal gastric cancer. Several studies have suggested that H. pylori which express cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA may be more virulent than those that do not, but limited populations have been studied to date. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG, IgA and anti-CagA antibodies in peptic ulcer (PU patients and healthy individuals in the city of Rafsanjan. METHODS: A total of 60 PU patients (30 males and 30 females, aged 17 to 60 years and 138 age-matched healthy individuals (65 males, 73 females were enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of PU disease was established on the basis of findings by gastrointestinal endoscopy. The control group was recruited from among healthy blood donors referred to Blood Transfusion Center of Rafsanjan. A blood sample was collected from each participant and the sera were tested for the presence of anti- H. pylori IgG and IgA antibodies and antibody to bacterial virulence factor (CagA by use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The serum concentrations of anti-H. pylori IgA and anti-CagA antibody were expressed as mean ± SD in each group. RESULTS: In PU patients the overall seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG (95.8%, IgA (96.6% and anti-CagA (91.6% were higher than those observed in the control group (73.2%, P<0.003; 79%, P<0.002; 47.82%, P<0.0000001; respectively. In the control group the prevalence of serum anti-CagA IgG antibodies was significantly higher in males compared to females (58.46% vs. 38.35%; P<0.01. Moreover, the mean titer of anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies was significantly higher in anti-CagA+ subjects compared to anti-CagA- subjects (47.5 Uarb/ml ± 35 vs. 27 Uarb/ml ± 18; P<0.01. Furthermore, an inverse association was found between levels and the

  6. An East-Asian-type cagA Helicobacter pylori Infected Patient with Clinical Manifestation Gastric Ulcer

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    Yudith Annisa Ayu Rezkitha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We reported a male, 72 yo, Chinese ethnic with chief complaint black mushy defecation. Physical examination revealed pale on conjunctival palpebra which confirmed as anemia on complete blood count. Gastroduodenoscopy revealed a 3 mm ulcer at the antrum (Forrest stage III. H. pylori infection was positive based on five different test methods (urinary antibody tests, rapid urease test, culture, histology ad immunohistochemistry. Used polymerase chain reaction-based sequencing, we found the patient infected by CagA producing, East-Asian-type cagA and vacA s1m1-strain. Further analysis using 7 housekeeping genes confirmed that the strain categorized in to hspEAsia group. The patient was given continuous intravenous infusions of proton pump inhibitor and standard triple therapy regimens eradication of H. pylori.

  7. Molecular phylogeny analysis of full-length vacA and cagA genesfrom Helicobacter pylori%幽门螺杆菌vacA 和cagA 基因全长分子系统发育分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨泽民; 陈蔚文

    2012-01-01

    All amino acid full-length sequences of VacA and CagA proteins from Helicobacter pylori strains including vacA and cagA genes were downloaded from GenBank. Molecular phylogenic trees of VacA and CagA were constructed by ClastalX 2.0 and MEGA 5.05 software to understand phylogenetic relationships of vacA and cagA genes, clinical infection effects, and genotype characteristics of different clustering groups. The results showed that the phylogenetic trees of VacA and CagA recapitulated the same three-clustering groups, i.e., East Asia group 1 and 2 and Western group, and all H. pylori strains had similar distribution. The strains of East Asia group 1 were significantly higher in patients with atrophic gastritis. Genotype vacA contained mainly s1c/m1b ands1a/m1b, while genotype cagA was mostly EPIYA-ABD. The strains of East Asia group 2 were higher in patients with duodenal ulcer. Genotype vacA was mainly slc/m2 and sla/m2, while genotype cagA was mostly EPIYA-AB'C. The strains of Western group were higher in patients with duodenal ulcer and chronic gastritis than with atrophic gastritis. Genotype vacA was mainly s1a/m1a and s1b/m1a, while genotype cagA was mostly EPIYA-AB/B'CC. All of these results illustrated that there might be inheritant relationship of coevolution between vacA and cagA genes; East Asia group 1 and 2 and Western group had different vacA and cagA sub-genotypes, which had close relationship to its clinical infection effects. It might be necessary to deeply analyze vacA and cagA sub-genotypes in the research of H. pylori-related diseases.%文章从GenBank 中下载所有含有vacA 和cagA 基因的H.pylori 菌株的VacA 和CagA全长氨基酸序列,利用ClastalX 2.0 和MEGA 5.05 软件构建VacA 和CagA 分子系统发育树,探讨两基因之间的分子系统发育关系和不同聚类群的临床感染结果与基因型特征.结果显示,VacA 和CagA 具有高度相似的分子系统发育树,并且所有H.pylori 菌株在系统发育树中具

  8. RAI1 point mutations, CAG repeat variation, and SNP analysis in non-deletion Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Saifi, G Mustafa; Girirajan, Santhosh; Shi, Xin; Szomju, Barbara; Firth, Helen; Magenis, R Ellen; Potocki, Lorraine; Elsea, Sarah H; Lupski, James R

    2006-11-15

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation disorder characterized by distinct craniofacial features and neurobehavioral abnormalities usually associated with an interstitial deletion in 17p11.2. Heterozygous point mutations in the retinoic acid induced 1 gene (RAI1) have been reported in nine SMS patients without a deletion detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), implicating RAI1 haploinsufficiency as the cause of the major clinical features in SMS. All of the reported point mutations are unique and de novo. RAI1 contains a polymorphic CAG repeat and encodes a plant homeo domain (PHD) zinc finger-containing transcriptional regulator. We report a novel RAI1 frameshift mutation, c.3103delC, in a non-deletion patient with many SMS features. The deletion of a single cytosine occurs in a heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC), the longest mononucleotide repeat in the RAI1 coding region. Interestingly, we had previously reported a frameshift mutation, c.3103insC, in the same mononucleotide repeat. Furthermore, all five single base frameshift mutations preferentially occurred in polyC but not polyG tracts. We also investigated the distribution of the polymorphic CAG repeats in both the normal population and the SMS patients as one potential molecular mechanism for variability of clinical expression. In this limited data set, there was no significant association between the length of CAG repeats and the SMS phenotype. However, we identified a 5-year-old girl with an apparent SMS phenotype who was a compound heterozygote for an RAI1 missense mutation inherited from her father and a polyglutamine repeat of 18 copies, representing the largest known CAG repeat in this gene, inherited from her mother.

  9. Long tract of untranslated CAG repeats is deleterious in transgenic mice.

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    Ren-Jun Hsu

    Full Text Available The most frequent trinucleotide repeat found in human disorders is the CAG sequence. Expansion of CAG repeats is mostly found in coding regions and is thought to cause diseases through a protein mechanism. Recently, expanded CAG repeats were shown to induce toxicity at the RNA level in Drosophila and C. elegans. These findings raise the possibility that CAG repeats may trigger RNA-mediated pathogenesis in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing EGFP transcripts with long CAG repeats in the 3' untranslated region develop pathogenic features. Expression of the transgene was directed to the muscle in order to compare the resulting phenotype to that caused by the CUG expansion, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Transgenic mice expressing 200, but not those expressing 0 or 23 CAG repeats, showed alterations in muscle morphology, histochemistry and electrophysiology, as well as abnormal behavioral phenotypes. Expression of the expanded CAG repeats in testes resulted in reduced fertility due to defective sperm motility. The production of EGFP protein was significantly reduced by the 200 CAG repeats, and no polyglutamine-containing product was detected, which argues against a protein mechanism. Moreover, nuclear RNA foci were detected for the long CAG repeats. These data support the notion that expanded CAG repeat RNA can cause deleterious effects in mammals. They also suggest the possible involvement of an RNA mechanism in human diseases with long CAG repeats.

  10. Morphological and pathologic changes of experimental chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and the regulating mechanism of protein expression in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-jing; CHEN Shu-jie; CHEN Zhe; CAI Jian-ting; SI Jian-min

    2006-01-01

    the nucleus of epithelial cells. The former was higher positively expressed in atrophic gland, while the later was higher positively stained in normal gastric tissue. bcl-2 protein was positively stained in the cytoplasma in atrophic gastric gland,while very weakly stained in normal gastric tissue. Conclusion: The pathological findings in gastric gland accorded with the Houston diagnostic criteria of antrum-predominant CAG. CAG in rats was related with the damage of barrier in gastric mucosa and the misbalance of cell proliferation and apoptosis. There was high protein expression of oncogene, while inhibitor of suppressor gene in CAG rats indicated high trend of carcinogenesis.

  11. cagA and vacA genotype of Helicobacter pylori associated with gastric diseases in Xi'an area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Qiao; Jia-Lu Hu; Bing Xiao; Kai-Chun Wu; Dao-Rong Peng; John C Atherton; Hui Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish stock of clinical Helicobacter pylori (H.pylon) isolates, to perform cagA and vacA typing of these isolates, to evaluate the relationship between genotypes of cagA and vacA and upper gastrointestinal diseases and to assess the association of vacA genotypes with presence of the pathogenicity marker-cagA.METHODS: Clinical H.pylori strains were isolated from the antrum of 259 patients in Clumbia agar. The isolated H.pylori strains were identified by histology, and16SrRNA PCR.CagA genotypes were detected by colony hybridization, the probe was derived from the cloned plasmid PcagA, and digested by EcoRI-HindⅢ and the isolated PcagA DNA fragment was radioactively labelled by the random priming method. vacA genes types (s,m)and subtypes (s1a, s1b,s2) were typed by PCR. Vacuolating toxin was detected with neutral red absorb test. The results were treated statistically by χ2test, ttest, and rank sum test.RESULTS: A total of 192 clinical H. pylori strains were isolated and the stock of Helicobacter pylori was established. The total positive rate of cagA was 87 % in all gastric diseases,and 95 % in gastric cancer group. There was a difference between gastric cancer group and the other groups (P<0.05)except duodenal ulcer group. The expression of type s1 of vacA was more than type s2 (P<0.05), and, the expression of type m1 was equal to type m2. In gastric cancer group,there was a difference between s1a and s1b (P<0.05), and s1a was more than s1b. Vacuolating toxins were more in Xi′an area isolates.CONCLUSION: The cagA+ vacA type s1 clinical isolates are more in Xi′an area, but this can not serve as an index to predict gastric cancer.

  12. Analysis and application of SCA1 and SCA3/MJD gene CAG repeats in Han population in Northeastern China%东北地区正常汉族人群 SCA1及 SCA3/MJD基因内CAG重复变异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜淼; 金春莲; 林长坤; 邱广荣; 柳宗兰; 王朝祥; 孙开来

    2004-01-01

    目的对东北地区110名汉族正常人 SCA1及 SCA3/MJD基因(CAG)n拷贝进行检测,探讨其正常变异范围,并对临床诊断为遗传型脊髓小脑共济失调的8个家系的25例患者和6个散发病例进行基因分型评价和症状前及产前诊断.方法应用荧光-PCR方法测定不同基因型片段长度,并进行DNA序列分析.结果 SCA3/MJD基因(CAG)n正常变异范围为14~38个拷贝,集中于14个拷贝,其等位基因频率为39.55%,杂合频率为78.18%,共13种等位基因.检出一个家系先证者携带有(CAG)68的SCA3/MJD基因,并对该家系成员进行了症状前诊断,没有发现(CAG)n拷贝异常突变; SCA1基因内(CAG)n正常变异范围20~39拷贝,集中于26及27次,等位基因频率分别为34.09%和20.91%,杂合频率为84.55%,共13种等位基因;散发病例未检出CAG扩展性突变.结论 SCA1及 SCA3/MJD基因中(CAG)n 正常变异范围存在地区和种族差异,SCAs基因分型是该病症状前及产前诊断的首选策略.

  13. Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and beta-cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Størling, Zenia Marian; Ortis, Fernanda; Lage, Kasper; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus; Bergholdt, Regine; Hald, Jacob; Brorsson, Caroline Anna; Eizirik, Decio Laks; Pociot, Flemming; Brunak, Søren; Størling, Joachim

    2011-09-13

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing genes in T1D, we performed an in silico "phenome-interactome analysis" on a genome-wide linkage scan dataset. This method prioritizes candidates according to their physical interactions at the protein level with other proteins involved in diabetes. A total of 11 genes were predicted to be likely disease genes in T1D, including the INS gene. An unexpected top-scoring candidate gene was huntingtin-interacting protein (HIP)-14/ZDHHC17. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections demonstrated that HIP14 is almost exclusively expressed in insulin-positive cells in islets of Langerhans. RNAi knockdown experiments established that HIP14 is an antiapoptotic protein required for β-cell survival and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) that mediate β-cell dysfunction in T1D down-regulated HIP14 expression in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells and in isolated rat and human islets. Overexpression of HIP14 was associated with a decrease in IL-1β-induced NF-κB activity and protection against IL-1β-mediated apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that the current network biology approach is a valid method to identify genes of importance for T1D and may therefore embody the basis for more rational and targeted therapeutic approaches.

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia 3 by (CAG)(n) repeat detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüsedau, M; Dreesen, J C F M; De Die-Smulders, C; Hardy, K; Bras, M; Dumoulin, J C M; Evers, J L H; Smeets, H J M; Geraedts, J P M; Herbergs, J

    2004-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by variable expression and a variable age of onset. SCA3/MJD (Machado-Joseph disease) is caused by an expansion of a (CAG)(n) repeat in the MJD1 gene on chromosome 14q32.1. A single cell PCR protocol has been developed for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of SCA3 to select unaffected embryos on the basis of the CAG genotype. Single leukocytes and blastomeres served as a single cell amplification test system to determine the percentage of allelic drop-out (ADO) and PCR efficiency. Out of 105 tested heterozygous single leukocytes, 103 (98.1%) showed a positive amplification signal, while five cells (4.9%) showed ADO. Amplification in single blastomeres was obtained in 13 out of a total of 14, and ADO was observed in two out of the 13 single blastomeres. PGD of SCA3 was performed in a couple with paternal transmission of the SCA3 allele. Seven embryos were available for biopsy, all biopsied blastomeres showed amplification and no ADO occurred. One embryo was diagnosed as affected whereas six embryos were diagnosed as unaffected. Two unaffected embryos were transferred and resulted in a singleton pregnancy and the birth of a healthy girl.

  15. Research advance in CagA of H. pylori and its pathogenesis%幽门螺杆菌CagA及其致病机理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐顺福; 施瑞华; 苗毅

    2006-01-01

    1984年Warren和Marshall从人胃黏膜中分离培养出幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter Pylori,H.pylori)后,经过20多年的研究表明H.pylori感染为慢性活动性胃炎的主要致病菌,消化性溃疡的重要致病因素,是胃癌重要的危险因素,世界卫生组织将其列为一类致癌物,Warren和Marshall并为此荣获2005年诺贝尔生理医学奖。在H.pylori致病机理中,其分泌的毒力因子毒素相关基因(cytotoxin associated gene A,cagA)表达的蛋白CagA是H.pylori最重要的毒力因子之一,一直是该领域研究的热点,现将近年来CagA研究进展综述如下。

  16. 癌蛋白CagA、ERK信号通路与胃癌关系的研究进展%Association between CagA/ERK signaling pathway and gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢军明; 黄志刚

    2013-01-01

    细胞毒素相关基因A蛋白(cytotoxin-associated gene A,CagA)是幽门螺杆菌重要毒力因子之一,亦被称为细菌癌蛋白,可通过Ⅳ型分泌系统易位进入胃上皮细胞,干扰多条信号转导通路.细胞外信号调节激酶(extracellular signalregulated kinase,ERK)通路在细胞信号传导中处于枢纽地位,癌蛋白CagA可通过激活ERK 信号通路对细胞的增殖、凋亡、分散和转移等生物学行为产生影响,与胃癌的发生、发展有关.本文对CagA、ERK信号通路与胃癌的研究进展做一综述.

  17. Role of androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and X-inactivation in the manifestation of recurrent spontaneous abortions in Indian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Aruna

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of CAG repeat polymorphism and X-chromosome Inactivation (XCI pattern in Recurrent Spontaneous Abortions among Indian women which has not been hitherto explored. 117 RSA cases and 224 Controls were included in the study. Cases were recruited from two different hospitals--Lakshmi Fertility Clinic, Nellore and Fernandez Maternity Hospital, Hyderabad. Controls were roughly matched for age, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. The CAG repeats of the Androgen Receptor gene were genotyped using a PCR-based assay and were analysed using the GeneMapper software to determine the CAG repeat length. XCI analysis was also carried out to assess the inactivation percentages. RSA cases had a significantly greater frequency of allele sizes in the polymorphic range above 19 repeats (p = 0.006, which is the median value of the controls, and in the biallelic mean range above 21 repeats (p = 0.002. We found no evidence of abnormal incidence of skewed X-inactivation. We conclude that longer CAG repeat lengths are associated with increased odds for RSA with statistical power estimated to be ∼90%.

  18. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and Machado-Joseph disease: Incidence of CAG expansions among adult-onset ataxia patients from 311 families with dominant, recessive, or sporadic ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranum, L.P.W.; Gomez, C.; Orr, H.T. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The ataxias are a complex group of diseases with both environmental and genetic causes. Among the autosomal dominant forms of ataxia the genes for two, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), have been isolated. In both of these disorders the molecular basis of disease is the expansion of an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat. To assess the frequency of the SCA1 and MJD trinucleotide repeat expansions among individuals diagnosed with ataxia, we have collected DNA from individuals representing 311 families with adult-onset ataxia of unknown etiology and screened these samples for trinucleotide repeat expansions within the SCA1 and MJD genes. Within this group there are 149 families with dominantly inherited ataxia. Of these, 3% have SCA1 trinucleotide repeat expansions, whereas 21% were positive for the MJD trinucleotide expansion. Thus, together SCA1 and MJD represent 24% of the autosomal dominant ataxias in our group, and the frequency of MJD is substantially greater than that of SCA1. For the 57 patients with MJD trinucleotide repeat expansions, a strong inverse correlation between CAG repeat size and age at onset was observed (r = -.838). Among the MJD patients, the normal and affected ranges of CAG repeat size are 14-40 and 68-82 repeats, respectively. For SCA1 the normal and affected ranges are much closer, containing 19-38 and 40-81 CAG repeats, respectively. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. β-Defensin genomic copy number does not influence the age of onset in Huntington's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vittori, Angelica; Orth, Michael; Roos, Raymund A C; Outeiro, Tiago F; Giorgini, Flaviano; Hollox, Edward J; Kremer, Berry

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the abnormal expansion of a CAG triplet repeat tract in the huntingtin gene. While the length of this CAG expansion is the major determinant of the age of onset (AO), other genetic factors have also b

  20. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  1. Helicobacter pylori CagA disrupts epithelial patterning by activating myosin light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Muyskens

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is a leading cause of ulcers and gastric cancer. We show that expression of the H. pylori virulence factor CagA in a model Drosophila melanogaster epithelium induces morphological disruptions including ectopic furrowing. We find that CagA alters the distribution and increases the levels of activated myosin regulatory light chain (MLC, a key regulator of epithelial integrity. Reducing MLC activity suppresses CagA-induced disruptions. A CagA mutant lacking EPIYA motifs (CagA(EPISA induces less epithelial disruption and is not targeted to apical foci like wild-type CagA. In a cell culture model in which CagA(EPISA and CagA have equivalent subcellular localization, CagA(EPISA is equally potent in activating MLC. Therefore, in our transgenic system, CagA is targeted by EPIYA motifs to a specific apical region of the epithelium where it efficiently activates MLC to disrupt epithelial integrity.

  2. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia

    2014-01-01

    a role in the peripheral phenotypes, such as muscle wasting observed in HD. We assessed skeletal muscle tissue from HD patients and well-characterized mouse models of HD. Cleavage of the caspase-6 specific substrate lamin A is significantly increased in skeletal muscle obtained from HD patients as well...... as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse......-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6...

  3. Non-cell autonomous cell death caused by transmission of Huntingtin aggregates in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Daniel T; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that protein aggregates can spread between neurons in several neurodegenerative diseases but much remains unknown regarding the underlying mechanisms responsible for this spreading and its role in disease progression. We recently demonstrated that mutant Huntingtin aggregates spread between cells within the Drosophila brain resulting in non-cell autonomous loss of a pair of large neurons in the posterior protocerebrum. However, the full extent of neuronal loss throughout the brain was not determined. Here we examine the effects of driving expression of mutant Huntingtin in Olfactory Receptor Neurons (ORNs) by using a marker for cleaved caspase activity to monitor neuronal apoptosis as a function of age. We find widespread caspase activity in various brain regions over time, demonstrating that non-cell autonomous damage is widespread. Improved understanding of which neurons are most vulnerable and why should be useful in developing treatment strategies for neurodegenerative diseases that involve transcellular spreading of aggregates.

  4. Linking SNPs to CAG repeat length in Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanzhao; Kennington, Lori A; Rosas, H Diana; Hersch, Steven; Cha, Jang-Ho; Zamore, Phillip D; Aronin, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing using small interfering RNAs targeting heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a promising therapy for human trinucleotide repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Linking SNP identities to the two HTT alleles, normal and disease-causing, is a prerequisite for allele-specific RNA interference. Here we describe a method, SNP linkage by circularization (SLiC), to identify linkage between CAG repeat length and nucleotide identity of heterozygous SNPs using Huntington's disease patient peripheral blood samples.

  5. Designing siRNA that distinguish between genes that differ by a single nucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Dianne S; Ding, Hongliu; Kennington, Lori; Moore, Jessica T; Schelter, Janell; Burchard, Julja; Linsley, Peter S; Aronin, Neil; Xu, Zuoshang; Zamore, Phillip D

    2006-09-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the guides that direct RNA interference (RNAi), provide a powerful tool to reduce the expression of a single gene in human cells. Ideally, dominant, gain-of-function human diseases could be treated using siRNAs that specifically silence the mutant disease allele, while leaving expression of the wild-type allele unperturbed. Previous reports suggest that siRNAs can be designed with single nucleotide specificity, but no rational basis for the design of siRNAs with single nucleotide discrimination has been proposed. We systematically identified siRNAs that discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of two disease genes: the human Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene, which contributes to the progression of hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through the gain of a toxic property, and the huntingtin (HTT) gene, which causes Huntington disease when its CAG-repeat region expands beyond approximately 35 repeats. Using cell-free RNAi reactions in Drosophila embryo lysate and reporter assays and microarray analysis of off-target effects in cultured human cells, we identified positions within an siRNA that are most sensitive to mismatches. We also show that purine:purine mismatches imbue an siRNA with greater discriminatory power than other types of base mismatches. siRNAs in which either a G:U wobble or a mismatch is located in the "seed" sequence, the specialized siRNA guide region responsible for target binding, displayed lower levels of selectivity than those in which the mismatch was located 3' to the seed; this region of an siRNA is critical for target cleavage but not siRNA binding. Our data suggest that siRNAs can be designed to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of many genes that differ by just a single nucleotide.

  6. Designing siRNA that distinguish between genes that differ by a single nucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne S Schwarz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, the guides that direct RNA interference (RNAi, provide a powerful tool to reduce the expression of a single gene in human cells. Ideally, dominant, gain-of-function human diseases could be treated using siRNAs that specifically silence the mutant disease allele, while leaving expression of the wild-type allele unperturbed. Previous reports suggest that siRNAs can be designed with single nucleotide specificity, but no rational basis for the design of siRNAs with single nucleotide discrimination has been proposed. We systematically identified siRNAs that discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of two disease genes: the human Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene, which contributes to the progression of hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through the gain of a toxic property, and the huntingtin (HTT gene, which causes Huntington disease when its CAG-repeat region expands beyond approximately 35 repeats. Using cell-free RNAi reactions in Drosophila embryo lysate and reporter assays and microarray analysis of off-target effects in cultured human cells, we identified positions within an siRNA that are most sensitive to mismatches. We also show that purine:purine mismatches imbue an siRNA with greater discriminatory power than other types of base mismatches. siRNAs in which either a G:U wobble or a mismatch is located in the "seed" sequence, the specialized siRNA guide region responsible for target binding, displayed lower levels of selectivity than those in which the mismatch was located 3' to the seed; this region of an siRNA is critical for target cleavage but not siRNA binding. Our data suggest that siRNAs can be designed to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of many genes that differ by just a single nucleotide.

  7. Outcomes of CAG Regimen for Refractory Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng He; Xiang Zhang; De-pei Wu; Ai-ning Sun; Zheng-ming Jin; Hui-ying Qiu; Miao Miao; Xiao-wen Tang; Zheng-zheng Fu; Yue Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the efficiency of low-dose cytosine arabinoside plus aclarubicin with concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(CAG)regimen for refractory biphenotypic acute leukemia(BAL).Methods We treated 5 refractory BAL patients by CAG regimen(10 mg·m 2 cytosine arabinoside subcutaneously administrated every 12 hours,day 1-14;5-7 mg·m2 aclarubicin intravenously administrated daily,day 1-8;and concurrently used 200 μg.m-2·d-1 granulocyte colony-stimulating factor subcutaneously)from November 2002 to April 2007.The efficacy of the regimen was evaluated by response rate,and the side effects were also measured.Results The complete remission rate was 80% ,median duration of absolute neutrophil count<5.0×108/L and platelet count<2.0×1010/L was day 13 and day 1,respectively;and the infection rate was low(Ⅲ-Ⅳ infection rate,20.00% ).Conclusion CAG regimen as remission induction chemotherapy for BAL patients is effective with a high remission rate and low toxicity.

  8. The characteristics of CAG repeat in the CACNA1A gene in the Chinese Han population and its application in molecular diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6%中国汉族人群CACNA1A基因CAG重复数目分布特点及其在脊髓小脑性共济失调6型基因诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁声通; 甘世锐; 吴志英; 邬剑军; 王柠; 慕容慎行; 吕传真

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨我国汉族人群CACNA1A基因CAG重复数目分布特点及其在脊髓小脑性共济失调6型(spinocerebellar ataxias type 6,SCA6)基因诊断中的应用.方法 应用"两步PCR法"、变性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(DPAGE)和测序等方法对300名健康对照及109例无血缘关系的SCA患者进行CACNA1A基因CAG三核苷酸重复数目分析.结果 300名健康对照的CAG重复次数范围为3~18次,以13次最常见.在109例SCA患者中,发现1例SCA6患者,其CAG异常重复次数为24次,该患者的母亲和哥哥亦为SCA6患者,临床上均表现为缓慢进展的小脑性共济失调、构音障碍、眼震、轻度的振动及本体觉减退,遗传早现现象较明显.结论 SCA6病例在我国较少见,进行CACNA1A基因突变分析有助于临床诊断."两步PCR法"可提高CACNA1A基因突变分析的效率.%Objective To investigate distribution of CAG repeat in the CACNA1A gene in theChinese Han population and its application in molecular diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6(SCA6).Methods The trinucleotide repeats of CAG were detected by two-step polymerase chain reaction(PCR).denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(DPAGE)and DNA sequencing in 300 normal individuals and 109 unrelated SCA patients.Results In normal individuals.the number of CAG repeats ranged from 3 to 18 with 13 being the most frequent repeats.In 109 SCA patients,one patient was identified of 24 repeats and was diagnosed with SCA6.This patient's mother and elder brother were also SCA6 patients.They all showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia,dysarthria,nystagmus,minor impairment in vibration sensation and proprioeeptive sensation in clinical manifestation with obvious anticipation.Conclusions SCA6 is rare in the Chinese Population.Mutation analysis of the CACNA1A gene is helpful for clinical diagnosis of SCA6.Two-step PCR increases the efficieney of molecular diagnosis in SCA6.

  9. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective ...... of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 October 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.231....

  10. Molecular characterization and polyclonal antibody generation against core component CagX protein of Helicobacter pylori type IV secretion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Gopal Jee; Kumar, Awanish; Pal, Jagannath; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori cause gastric ulcer, duodenal cancer, and found in almost half of the world’s residents. The protein responsible for this disease is secreted through type IV secretion system (TFSS) of H. pylori. TFSS is encoded by 40-kb region of chromosomal DNA known as cag-pathogenicity island (PAI). TFSS comprises of three major components: cytoplasmic/inner membrane ATPase, transmembrane core-complex and outer membranous pilli, and associated subunits. Core complex consists of CagX, CagT, CagM, and Cag3(δ) proteins as per existing knowledge. In this study, we have characterized one of the important component of core-complex forming sub-unit protein, i.e., CagX. Complete ORF of CagX except signal peptide coding region was cloned and expressed in pET28a vector. Purification of CagX protein was performed, and polyclonal anti-sera against full-length recombinant CagX were raised in rabbit model. We obtained a very specific and high titer, CagX anti-sera that were utilized to characterize endogenous CagX. Surface localization of CagX was also seen by immunofluorescence microscopy. In short for the first time a full-length CagX was characterized, and we showed that CagX is the part of high molecular weight core complex, which is important for assembly and function of H. pylori TFSS. PMID:24637488

  11. Assessment of cagE and babA mRNA expression during morphological conversion of Helicobacter pylori from spiral to coccoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursina, Farkhondeh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Nasr-Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2013-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is an actively dividing spiral bacterium that changes to coccoid morphology under stressful environments. The infectivity of the coccoids is still controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the viability and expression of two important virulence genes (babA and cagE), in antibiotic-induced coccoid forms. Three strains of H. pylori, the standard 26695 and two clinical isolates (p1, p2) were converted to coccoid form by amoxicillin. Coccoids were identified according to Gram-staining and microscopic morphology. The viability of the cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cagE and babA in coccoid forms were evaluated and compared to the spirals by quantitative PCR assay. The coccoid forms were developed after 72 h exposure of H. pylori to ½ MIC of amoxicillin, and the conversion form was completed (100 %) at 144 h in all of three isolates. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the majority of the induced coccoids (90-99.9 %) were viable. Expression of cagE and babA was seen in coccoids; however, in lower rate (cagE, ~3-fold and babA, ~10-fold) than these in spiral forms. Coccoid forms of two clinical isolates significantly expressed higher rate of cagE and babA than standard 26695 strain (P = 0.01). These results suggest that the induced coccoid form of H. pylori is not a passive entity but can actively infect the human by expression of the virulence genes for long time in stomach and probably play a role in chronic and severe disease.

  12. A general method for the detection of large CAG repeat expansions by fluorescent PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, J P; Barron, L H; Goudie, D; Kelly, K; Dow, D.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Brock, D J

    1996-01-01

    The expansion of a tandemly repeated trinucleotide sequence, CAG, is the mutational mechanism for several human genetic diseases. We present a generally applicable PCR amplification method using a fluorescently labelled locus specific primer flanking the CAG repeat together with paired primers amplifying from multiple priming sites within the CAG repeat. Triplet repeat primed PCR (TP PCR) gives a characteristic ladder on the fluorescence trace enabling the rapid identification of large pathog...

  13. The relationship between anogenital distance and the androgen receptor CAG repeat length

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Michael L.; Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Pastuszak, Alexander W; McIntyre, Matthew G.; Walters, Rustin C; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-01-01

    Anogenital distance (AGD) is used to define degree of virilization of genital development, with shorter length being associated with feminization and male infertility. The first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) consists of a polymorphic sequence of cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG) repeats, with longer CAG repeat lengths being associated with decreased receptor function. We sought to determine if there is an association between AGD and AR CAG repeat length. A cross-sectional, prospective cohor...

  14. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noorain; Kolimi, Narendar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2015-04-01

    Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  15. The relationship between CAG repeat length and age of onset differs for Huntington's disease patients with juvenile onset or adult onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, J Michael; Gayán, Javier; Djoussé, Luc; Roberts, Simone; Brocklebank, Denise; Cherny, Stacey S; Cardon, Lon R; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Myers, Richard H; Housman, David E; Wexler, Nancy S

    2007-05-01

    Age of onset for Huntington's disease (HD) varies inversely with the length of the disease-causing CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. A simple exponential regression model yielded adjusted R-squared values of 0.728 in a large set of Venezuelan kindreds and 0.642 in a North American, European, and Australian sample (the HD MAPS cohort). We present evidence that a two-segment exponential regression curve provides a significantly better fit than the simple exponential regression. A plot of natural log-transformed age of onset against CAG repeat length reveals this segmental relationship. This two-segment exponential regression on age of onset data increases the adjusted R-squared values by 0.012 in the Venezuelan kindreds and by 0.035 in the HD MAPS cohort. Although the amount of additional variance explained by the segmental regression approach is modest, the two slopes of the two-segment regression are significantly different from each other in both the Venezuelan kindreds [F(2, 439) = 11.13, P= 2 x 10(-5)] and in the HD MAPS cohort [F(2, 688) = 38.27, P= 2 x 10(-16)]. In both populations, the influence of each CAG repeat on age of onset appears to be stronger in the adult-onset range of CAG repeats than in the juvenile-onset range.

  16. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  17. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-03

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest.

  18. Helicobacter pylori CagA inhibits PAR1-MARK family kinases by mimicking host substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesić, Dragana; Miller, Marshall C; Quinkert, Zachary T; Stein, Markus; Chait, Brian T; Stebbins, C Erec

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  19. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1/MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neišić, Dragana; Miller, Marshall C.; Quinkert, Zachary T.; Stein, Markus; Chait, Brian T.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors, and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the co-crystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2. PMID:19966800

  20. A positive assay for identification of cagA negative strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicinschi, Liviu A; Correa, Pelayo; Bravo, Luis E; Schneider, Barbara G

    2003-12-01

    A new PCR protocol was developed for the positive identification of cagA negative Helicobacter pylori strains. Amplification of a portion of the genome across the insertion point of the cag pathogenicity island (the ES-"empty site") generated a 106-bp fragment, which produces a positive signal for cagA negative strains. Combined with the results of the cagA assay, the signals for ES allowed the complete characterization of the patients' cagA status. DNA sequencing analysis confirmed the identity of the ES fragment. The new protocol and cagA assay were applied to 22 DNA preparations isolated from stools from H. pylori infected adult patients and to 21 DNA preparations isolated from stools from H. pylori infected children. The same analysis was also performed on nine colonies of H. pylori derived from gastric biopsies of nine of the adult patients. The total number of cagA positive cases from adult patients was 14 or 63.6% (11 mono- and 3 mixed) and of the cagA negative cases (or ES positive) was 9 or 40.9% (6 mono- and 3 mixed). Of the 21 stool DNA samples from children, 6 (28.6%) were cagA positive, 12 (57.1%) were cagA negative and 3 (14.3%) were positive for cagA and for the ES simultaneously. The proportions of mixed cagA positive and cagA negative H. pylori infections were almost equal in adults and children (13.6% and 14.3%, respectively). No reaction products of the proper fragment sizes for cagA or the empty site (ES) were obtained from any of the stool DNA samples of 10 H. pylori uninfected subjects (100% specificity). This noninvasive assay discriminates consistently cagA negative cases from cagA positive strains and from amplification failures. It can be a useful tool for clinical and epidemiological studies of H. pylori infection.

  1. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  2. Association of CagA and VacA presence with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kantarceken Bulent; Hilmioglu Fatih; Aladag Murat; Atik Esin; Koksal Fatih; Harputluoglu MMMurat; Harputluoglu Hakan; Karincaoglu Melih; Ates Mehmet; Yildirim Bulent

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The mostly known genotypic virulence features, of H. pyloriare cytotoxin associated gene A (ragA) and Vacuolating cytotoxin gene A (VacA). We investigated the association of these major virulence factors with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in our region.METHODS: One hundred and forty two dyspeptic patients were studied (average age 44.8±15.9 years, range 15-87years, 64 males and 78 females). Antral and corpus biopsies were taken for detecting and genotyping of H. pylori. 107patients who were H. pylori positive by histological assessment were divided into three groups according to endoscopic findings: Duodenal ulcer (DU), gastric ulcer (GU)and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect CagA and VacA genes of H.pylori using specific primers.RESULTS: H.pyloriwas isolated from 75.4 % (107/142) of the patients. Of the 107 patients, 66 (61.7 %) were cagApositive and 82 (76.6 %) were Vacl-positive. CagA gene was positively associated with DU and GU (P<0.01, P<0.02),but not with NUD (P>0.05). Although VacA positivity in ulcer patients was higher than that in NUD group, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: There is a significantly positive association between CagA genes and DU and GU. The presence of VacA is not a predictive marker for DU, GU, and NUD in our patients.

  3. Huntingtin-interacting Proteins, HIP14 and HIP14L, Mediate Dual Functions, Palmitoyl Acyltransferase and Mg2+ Transport*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goytain, Angela; Hines, Rochelle M.; Quamme, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansions of huntingtin protein are responsible for the Huntington neurological disorder. HIP14 protein has been shown to interact with huntingtin. HIP14 and a HIP14-like protein, HIP14L, with a 69% similarity reside in the Golgi and possess palmitoyl acyltransferase activity through innate cysteine-rich domains, DHHC. Here, we used microarray analysis to show that reduced extracellular magnesium concentration increases HIP14L mRNA suggesting a role in cellular magnesium metabolism. Because HIP14 was not on the microarray platform, we used real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR to show that HIP14 and HIP14L transcripts were up-regulated 3-fold with low magnesium. Western analysis with a specific HIP14 antibody also showed that endogenous HIP14 protein increased with diminished magnesium. Furthermore, we demonstrate that when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, HIP14 and HIP14L mediate Mg2+ uptake that is electrogenic, voltage-dependent, and saturable with Michaelis constants of 0.87 ± 0.02 and 0.74 ± 0.07 mm, respectively. Diminished magnesium leads to an apparent increase in HIP14-green fluorescent protein and HIP14L-green fluorescent fusion proteins in the Golgi complex and subplasma membrane post-Golgi vesicles of transfected epithelial cells. We also show that inhibition of palmitoylation with 2-bromopalmitate, or deletion of the DHHC motif HIP14ΔDHHC, diminishes HIP14-mediated Mg2+ transport by about 50%. Coexpression of an independent protein acyltransferase, GODZ, with the deleted HIP14ΔDHHC mutant restored Mg2+ transport to values observed with wild-type HIP14. Although we did not directly measure palmitoylation of HIP14 in these studies, the data are consistent with a regulatory role of autopalmitoylation in HIP14-mediated Mg2+ transport. We conclude that the huntingtin interacting protein genes, HIP14 and HIP14L, encode Mg2+ transport proteins that are regulated by their innate palmitoyl acyltransferases thus fulfilling the characteristics of

  4. The relationship between anogenital distance and the androgen receptor CAG repeat length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael L Eisenberg; Tung-Chin Hsieh; Alexander W Pastuszak; Matthew G McIntyre; Rustin C Walters; Dolores J Lamb; Larry I Lipshultz

    2013-01-01

    Anogenital distance (AGD) is used to define degree of virilization of genital development,with shorter length being associated with feminization and male infertility.The first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) consists of a polymorphic sequence of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats,with longer CAG repeat lengths being associated with decreased receptor function.We sought to determine if there is an association between AGD and AR CAG repeat length.A cross-sectional,prospective cohort of men evaluated at a urology clinic at a single institution was recruited.AGD (the distance from the posterior scrotum to the anal verge) and penile length (PL) were measured.Sanger DNA sequence analysis was used to define CAG repeat length.AGD and CAG repeat lengths in 195 men were determined.On unadjusted analysis,there was no linear relationship between CAG repeat length and PL (P=0.17) or AGD (P=0.31).However,on sub-population analyses,those men with longer CAG repeat lengths (>26) had significantly shorter AGDs compared to men with shorter CAG repeat lengths.For example,the mean AGD was 41.9 vs.32.4 mm with a CAG repeat length ≤ 26 vs.>26 (P=0.01).In addition,when stratifying the cohort based on AGD,those with AGD less than the median (i.e.40 mm) had a longer CAG repeat length compared to men with an AGD >40 mm (P=0.02).In summary,no linear relationship was found between AGD and AR CAG repeat length overall.

  5. The relationship between anogenital distance and the androgen receptor CAG repeat length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael L; Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Pastuszak, Alexander W; McIntyre, Matthew G; Walters, Rustin C; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-03-01

    Anogenital distance (AGD) is used to define degree of virilization of genital development, with shorter length being associated with feminization and male infertility. The first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) consists of a polymorphic sequence of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats, with longer CAG repeat lengths being associated with decreased receptor function. We sought to determine if there is an association between AGD and AR CAG repeat length. A cross-sectional, prospective cohort of men evaluated at a urology clinic at a single institution was recruited. AGD (the distance from the posterior scrotum to the anal verge) and penile length (PL) were measured. Sanger DNA sequence analysis was used to define CAG repeat length. AGD and CAG repeat lengths in 195 men were determined. On unadjusted analysis, there was no linear relationship between CAG repeat length and PL (P=0.17) or AGD (P=0.31). However, on sub-population analyses, those men with longer CAG repeat lengths (>26) had significantly shorter AGDs compared to men with shorter CAG repeat lengths. For example, the mean AGD was 41.9 vs. 32.4 mm with a CAG repeat length ≤26 vs. >26 (P=0.01). In addition, when stratifying the cohort based on AGD, those with AGD less than the median (i.e. 40 mm) had a longer CAG repeat length compared to men with an AGD >40 mm (P=0.02). In summary, no linear relationship was found between AGD and AR CAG repeat length overall.

  6. Microsatellite polymorphism of (CAG) n in the promoter of androgen receptor gene in Yunnan Han female acne patients%云南汉族女性痤疮与雄激素受体基因多态性的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何黎; 杨智; 张恒

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨人雄激素受体(AR)基因第一外显子CAG串联短重复序列(STR)多态性与汉族女性痤疮发生之间的关系.方法 选取了86名女性患者作为研究对象,68名正常女性作为对照组,将研究对象血样提取基因组DNA,采用PCR-genescan技术研究CAG STR的n值.结果 痤疮组及对照组的CAG STR n值范围分别为12~30和12~28,经t检验分析AR基因CAG重复片段数在对照组与各痤疮组之间分布没有差异.结论 AR基因与云南汉族女性痤疮发病无明显相关性.

  7. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  8. Instability of human TATA-binding protein CAG triplet repeats during amplification by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, F C; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1994-09-13

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a TATA-binding protein cDNA that contains CAG triplet repeats results in heterogeneous products. This is caused by a variable loss in the number of CAG triplets. Sequence analysis of PCR products suggests that instability increases with repeat length.

  9. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    ) had lower levels of SHBG (88 vs 125 nmol/L) (P skinfold thickness (41 vs 31 mm) (P = .06) compared with boys with an average number of CAG repeats (CAG 21-23). In contrast, the inverse association was observed at puberty (at 12 years of age...

  10. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuleta, Amparo [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vidal, Rene L. [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile); Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Hetz, Claudio, E-mail: chetz@med.uchile.cl [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Av., Boston, MA 02446 (United States); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  11. Clues to γ-secretase, huntingtin and Hirano body normal function using the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myre Michael A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many neurodegenerative disorders, although related by their destruction of brain function, display remarkable cellular and/or regional pathogenic specificity likely due to a deregulated functionality of the mutant protein. However, neurodegenerative disease genes, for example huntingtin (HTT, the ataxins, the presenilins (PSEN1/PSEN2 are not simply localized to neurons but are ubiquitously expressed throughout peripheral tissues; it is therefore paramount to properly understand the earliest precipitating events leading to neuronal pathogenesis to develop effective long-term therapies. This means, in no unequivocal terms, it is crucial to understand the gene's normal function. Unfortunately, many genes are often essential for embryogenesis which precludes their study in whole organisms. This is true for HTT, the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilins, responsible for early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD. To better understand neurological disease in humans, many lower and higher eukaryotic models have been established. So the question arises: how reasonable is the use of organisms to study neurological disorders when the model of choice does not contain neurons? Here we will review the surprising, and novel emerging use of the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, a species of soil-living amoeba, as a valuable biomedical tool to study the normal function of neurodegenerative genes. Historically, the evidence on the usefulness of simple organisms to understand the etiology of cellular pathology cannot be denied. But using an organism without a central nervous system to understand diseases of the brain? We will first introduce the life cycle of Dictyostelium, the presence of many disease genes in the genome and how it has provided unique opportunities to identify mechanisms of disease involving actin pathologies, mitochondrial disease, human lysosomal and trafficking disorders and host-pathogen interactions. Secondly, I will

  12. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betschart Claudia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation in Huntington's disease is a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. Huntingtin expressed in immortalized neurons is cleaved near the N-terminus to form N-terminal polypeptides known as cleavage products A and B (cpA and cpB. CpA and cpB with polyglutamine expansion form inclusions in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. The formation of cpA and cpB in primary neurons has not been established and the proteases involved in the formation of these fragments are unknown. Results Delivery of htt cDNA into the mouse striatum using adeno-associated virus or into primary cortical neurons using lentivirus generated cpA and cpB, indicating that neurons in brain and in vitro can form these fragments. A screen of small molecule protease inhibitors introduced to clonal striatal X57 cells and HeLa cells identified compounds that reduced levels of cpA and are inhibitors of the aspartyl proteases cathepsin D and cathepsin E. The most effective compound, P1-N031, is a transition state mimetic for aspartyl proteases. By western blot analysis, cathepsin D was easily detected in clonal striatal X57 cells, mouse brain and primary neurons, whereas cathepsin E was only detectible in clonal striatal X57 cells. In primary neurons, levels of cleavage product A were not changed by the same compounds that were effective in clonal striatal cells or by mRNA silencing to partially reduce levels of cathepsin D. Instead, treating primary neurons with compounds that are known to inhibit gamma secretase activity either indirectly (Imatinib mesylate, Gleevec or selectively (LY-411,575 or DAPT reduced levels of cpA. LY-411,575 or DAPT also increased survival of primary neurons expressing endogenous full-length mutant huntingtin. Conclusion We show that cpA and cpB are produced from a larger huntingtin fragment in vivo in mouse brain and in primary neuron cultures. The aspartyl protease involved in forming cpA has cathepsin

  13. A general method for the detection of large CAG repeat expansions by fluorescent PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J P; Barron, L H; Goudie, D; Kelly, K; Dow, D; Fitzpatrick, D R; Brock, D J

    1996-12-01

    The expansion of a tandemly repeated trinucleotide sequence, CAG, is the mutational mechanism for several human genetic diseases. We present a generally applicable PCR amplification method using a fluorescently labelled locus specific primer flanking the CAG repeat together with paired primers amplifying from multiple priming sites within the CAG repeat. Triplet repeat primed PCR (TP PCR) gives a characteristic ladder on the fluorescence trace enabling the rapid identification of large pathogenetic CAG repeats that cannot be amplified using flanking primers. We used our method to test a cohort of 183 people from myotonic dystrophy families including unaffected subjects and spouses. Eighty five clinically affected subjects with expanded alleles on Southern blot analysis were all correctly identified by TP PCR. This method is applicable for any human diseases involving CAG repeat expansions.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and CagA under conditions of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and compelling evidence has demonstrated that this condition heightens the risk of gastric cancer. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Recent work has demonstrated that, under conditions of iron deficiency, H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is augmented through increased formation of the strain-specific cag type IV secretion system and enhanced delivery of the bacterial oncoprotein CagA into host cells. Although CagA is a potent virulence factor that promotes oncogenic responses, additional studies have now demonstrated that CagA modulates host cell iron homeostasis in vitro and fundamental metabolic functions of the bacterial cell in vivo. Here we discuss these findings and describe working models by which CagA exerts its effects on gastric epithelial cells, with particular emphasis on its potential role in modulation of host iron homeostasis.

  15. MicroRNAs located in the Hox gene clusters are implicated in huntington's disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hoss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional dysregulation has long been recognized as central to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs represent a major system of post-transcriptional regulation, by either preventing translational initiation or by targeting transcripts for storage or for degradation. Using next-generation miRNA sequencing in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 9 of twelve HD and nine controls, we identified five miRNAs (miR-10b-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p, miR-615-3p and miR-1247-5p up-regulated in HD at genome-wide significance (FDR q-value<0.05. Three of these, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p and miR-615-3p, were expressed at near zero levels in control brains. Expression was verified for all five miRNAs using reverse transcription quantitative PCR and all but miR-1247-5p were replicated in an independent sample (8HD/8C. Ectopic miR-10b-5p expression in PC12 HTT-Q73 cells increased survival by MTT assay and cell viability staining suggesting increased expression may be a protective response. All of the miRNAs but miR-1247-5p are located in intergenic regions of Hox clusters. Total mRNA sequencing in the same samples identified fifteen of 55 genes within the Hox cluster gene regions as differentially expressed in HD, and the Hox genes immediately adjacent to the four Hox cluster miRNAs as up-regulated. Pathway analysis of mRNA targets of these miRNAs implicated functions for neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, cell death and survival. In regression models among the HD brains, huntingtin CAG repeat size, onset age and age at death were independently found to be inversely related to miR-10b-5p levels. CAG repeat size and onset age were independently inversely related to miR-196a-5p, onset age was inversely related to miR-196b-5p and age at death was inversely related to miR-615-3p expression. These results suggest these Hox-related miRNAs may be involved in neuroprotective response in HD. Recently, miRNAs have shown promise as

  16. 幽门螺杆菌cagA基因和血清CagA抗体与VacA表达关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尤历; 刘厚钰; 等

    1999-01-01

    目的;探讨幽门螺杆菌cagA基因和血清CagA抗体与VacA表达的关系。方法:用聚合酶链反应法(PCR)测定由62例慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡和胃癌患者胃罕粘膜分离获得Hp菌株:用酶免疫技术测定患者血清HpCagA抗体;用Hela细胞培养法测定Hp菌株VacA活性。结果:cagA基因阳性和阴性Hp菌株表达VacA阳必班组分别为40.00%和33.33%(P>0.05);血清CagA抗体阳性和阴性患者感染Hp菌株体外产生VacA阳性率分别为33.33%和42.11%(P>0.05)。结论:HpcagA基因和血清CagA抗体与VacA表达之间无相互依赖关系,vacA基因是一个独立的标志物。

  17. Relation of CagA+ helicobacter pylori with gastroduodenal disorders%CagA+幽门螺杆菌与上消化道疾病的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾凯; 王世鑫

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨细胞毒素相关蛋白(Cytotoxin Associated Protein , CagA)阳性株幽门螺杆菌感染在胃、十二指肠疾病的发生中的意义.方法:分别观察34例慢性胃炎患者、28例消化性溃疡患者幽门螺杆菌的感染情况及CagA基因的阳性率,并与30例正常人群做了对比研究.结果:28例消化性溃疡患者Hp感染率为92.9%,CagA基因的阳性率为96.2%;34例慢性胃炎患者Hp感染率为91.2%,CagA基因的阳性率为51.6%;30例正常人群Hp感染率为53.3%,CagA基因的阳性率为6.25%;3组数据比较有明显差异(P<0.05).结论:CagA+幽门螺杆菌在胃、十二指肠炎症及溃疡发病中起重要作用,应采用必要的治疗措施.

  18. Serum oxidative stress status in CagA positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Çizmeci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that CagA positive Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection may cause the various oxidative damages. The objective of this study was to investigate serum oxidative status in infectetion with CagA positive H.pylori strains.Materials and methods: Forty-two H.pylori CagA positive subjects and 39 H.pylori CagA negative subjects were enrolled. H.pylori infection was diagnosed by the histopathological assessment of gastric mucosa. CagA status was detected by enzyme immuno assay in a micro ELISA machine. Total antioxidant status (TAS and total oxidant status (TOS were measured autoanalyzer using commercially available kits. Serum oxidative stress index (OSI was calculated using TAS and TOS measurements.Results: The levels TAS and TOS of CagA positive subjects were found to be 1.48 ± 0.18 mmol/L, 36.88 ± 19.84 mmol/L. Those of CagA negative group were measured to be 1.43 ± 0.19 mmol/L and 38.44 ± 14.72 mmol/L respectively. The values of serum OSI were similar (25.28 ± 15.85 and 26.48 ± 10.02 in CagA positive and negative groups.Conclusions: The measurements of serum oxidative status did not show any sigficant difference between the patients infected with CagA positive and CagA negative H.pilori strains. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:202-6

  19. Haplotype analysis of the CAG and CCG repeats in 21 Brazilian families with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Luciana de A; Rocha, Catielly F; Medina-Acosta, Enrique; Barboza, Hazel N; da Silva, Antônio F Alves; Pereira, Simão P F; da Silva, Iane Dos Santos; Paradela, Eduardo R; Figueiredo, André L dos S; Nogueira, Eduardo de M; Alvarenga, Regina M P; Hernan Cabello, Pedro; dos Santos, Suely R; Paiva, Carmen L A

    2012-12-01

    We studied the allelic profile of CAG and CCG repeats in 61 Brazilian individuals in 21 independent families affected by Huntington's disease (HD). Thirteen individuals had two normal alleles for HD, two had one mutable normal allele and no HD phenotype, and forty-six patients carried at least one expanded CAG repeat allele. Forty-five of these individuals had one expanded allele and one individual had one mutable normal allele (27 CAG repeats) and one expanded allele (48 CAG repeats). Eleven of these forty-five subjects had a mutant allele with reduced penetrance, and thirty-four patients had a mutant allele with complete penetrance. Inter- and intragenerational investigations of CAG repeats were also performed. We found a negative correlation between the number of CAG repeats and the age of disease onset (r=-0.84; Pdisease onset (r=0.06). We found 40 different haplotypes and the analysis showed that (CCG)(10) was linked to a CAG normal allele in 19 haplotypes and to expanded alleles in two haplotypes. We found that (CCG)(7) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in 40 haplotypes (95.24%) and (CCG)(10) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in only two haplotypes (4.76%). Therefore, (CCG)(7) was the most common allele in HD chromosomes in this Brazilian sample. It was also observed that there was a significant association of (CCG)(7) with the expanded CAG alleles (χ(2)=6.97, P=0.0084). Worldwide, the most common CCG alleles have 7 or 10 repeats. In Western Europe, (CCG)(7) is the most frequent allele, similarly to our findings.

  20. Frequency of virulence genes in mixed infections with Helicobacter pylori strains from a Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González-Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The Fisher's exact test did not support a significant association between clinical outcome and genotype. The main circulating genotypes in the Mexican population studied were: cagA+, vacAs1, and vacAm1. Multiplex PCR can be used as a screening test for H. pylori strains. Furthermore, the cagE gene is a good marker for identifying cag-PAI positive strains.

  1. Natural osmolytes remodel the aggregation pathway of mutant huntingtin exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borwankar, Tejas; Röthlein, Christoph; Zhang, Gong; Techen, Anne; Dosche, Carsten; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-03-29

    In response to stress small organic compounds termed osmolytes are ubiquitously accumulated in all cell types to regulate the intracellular solvent quality and to counteract the deleterious effect on the stability and function of cellular proteins. Given the evidence that destabilization of the native state of a protein either by mutation or by environmental changes triggers the aggregation in the neurodegenerative pathologies, the modulation of the intracellular solute composition with osmolytes is an attractive strategy to stabilize an aggregating protein. Here we report the effect of three natural osmolytes on the in vivo and in vitro aggregation landscape of huntingtin exon 1 implicated in the Huntington's disease. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and proline redirect amyloid fibrillogenesis of the pathological huntingtin exon 1 to nonamyloidogenic amorphous assemblies via two dissimilar molecular mechanisms. TMAO causes a rapid formation of bulky amorphous aggregates with minimally exposed surface area, whereas proline solubilizes the monomer and suppresses the accumulation of early transient aggregates. Conversely, glycine-betaine enhances fibrillization in a fashion reminiscent of the genesis of functional amyloids. Strikingly, none of the natural osmolytes can completely abrogate the aggregate formation; however, they redirect the amyloidogenesis into alternative, nontoxic aggregate species. Our study reveals new insights into the complex interactions of osmoprotectants with polyQ aggregates.

  2. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Jeremy D., E-mail: jwilbur@msg.ucsf.edu [Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hwang, Peter K. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Brodsky, Frances M. [The G. W. Hooper Foundation, Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Fletterick, Robert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  3. Cytodifferentiation of the postnatal mouse stomach in normal and Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Theresa M.

    2010-01-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (Hip1r) is highly expressed in gastric parietal cells, where it participates in vesicular trafficking associated with acid secretion. Hip1r-deficient mice have a progressive remodeling of the mucosa, including apoptotic loss of parietal cells, glandular hypertrophy, mucous cell metaplasia, and reduced numbers of zymogenic cells. In this study, we characterized gastric gland development in wild-type and Hip1r-deficient mice to define normal development, as well as the timing and sequence of the cellular transformation events in the mutant stomach. Postnatal (newborn to 8-wk-old) stomachs were examined by histological and gene expression analysis. At birth, gastric glands in wild-type and mutant mice were rudimentary and mature gastric epithelial cells were not apparent, although marker expression was detected for most cell lineages. Interestingly, newborns exhibited unusual cell types, including a novel surface cell filled with lipid and cells that coexpressed markers of mature mucous neck and zymogenic cells. Glandular morphogenesis proceeded rapidly in both genotypes, with gastric glands formed by weaning at 3 wk of age. In the Hip1r-deficient stomach, epithelial cell remodeling developed in a progressive manner. Initially, in the perinatal stomach, cellular changes were limited to parietal cell apoptosis. Other epithelial cell changes, including apoptotic loss of zymogenic cells and expansion of metaplastic mucous cells, emerged several weeks later when the glands were morphologically mature. Thus, parietal cell loss appeared to be the initiating event in Hip1r-deficient mice, with secondary