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Sample records for hunter syndrome type-ii

  1. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE II MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS (HUNTER SYNDROME

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    N. D. Vashakmadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 17 children received cardiorespiratory monitoring in order to evaluate spread and dynamics of changes in the primary obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS parameters at type II mucopolysaccharidosis. Mild OSAS [apnea/hypopnea index (AHI – 1.5-5] was diagnosed in 4 patients (23.5%, moderate OSAS (AHI – 5-10 – in 4 patients (23.5%, severe OSAS (AHI>10 – in 2 patients (11.8%. Average AHI at Hunter syndrome was 5.3±6.9/hour. Mild OSAS (AHI – 0.8±0.3/hour was prevalent in the group of younger children (1-3 years of age; severe OSAS was prevalent in the group of adolescents (AHI – 10.9±9.4/hour; average blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 was 87.5±10.6%, desaturation index – 10.4±13.3/hour. In total, OSAS was observed in 58.8% of children and aggravated in direct proportion to aggravation of the disease course. Thus, cardiorespiratory monitoring is necessary to reveal children with moderate and severe OSAS course with subsequent prevention of life-threatening conditions, which may appear at this syndrome.

  2. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with muco­polysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

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    Bianca Link

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS. The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years. Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required.

  3. Atypical clinical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome: a case report

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    Sharma Subodh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a very rare case of mucopolysaccharidosis with atypical presentation such as mild mental retardation, an acrocephalic head and no corneal clouding. The purpose of presenting this case is to highlight the distinctive manifestation of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome. Case presentation A 10-year-old East Asian boy presented with abdominal distension of five years' duration and complained of shortness of breath on and off for the same period. On examination his head was large and his head circumference was 54.5 cm. His neck was short, he had coarse facial features, a depressed nasal bridge and small stubby fingers with flexion of distal interphalangeal joints, and a low arched palate was observed. There was mild mental retardation. Conclusion Based on clinical findings and radiological features it is possible to diagnose a case of mucopolysaccharidosis. Careful and systemic approach is needed to accurately diagnose the exact type as enzymatic studies are not available in most centers.

  4. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    the two enzymes required to break down the sugar chains into proteins and ... Clinical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's syndrome). He was born of ... He is the only child in a separated family and is currently staying with ...

  5. Gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (hunter syndrome)

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    Motas Mallol, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    La Mucopolisacaridosis tipus II (MPSII), o síndrome de Hunter, és una malaltia d'acumulació lisosòmica d'herència recessiva lligada al cromosoma X i està causada per la deficiència de l'Iduronat-2-sulfatasa (IDS), enzim que actua en la via de degradació dels glicosaminoglicans (GAGs) heparan sulfat (HS) i dermatan sulfat (DS). Aquests GAGs no degradats s'acumulen als lisosomes de manera patològica, causant disfunció cel·lular. La forma més severa i també més prevalent de la MPSII es caracteri...

  6. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe cardiovascular complications exemplifies the challenges faced in resource-limited countries towards making diagnosis and treatment of rare conditions. Elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans levels or a ...

  7. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    disorder due to deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase with patients rarely living till adulthood. Failure to identify ... case report. CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe .... mitral valve prolapse with severe regurgitation, moderate ...

  8. Clinical Presentation of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (Hunter's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    problems such as airway obstruction, respiratory failure, and obstructive sleep apnea. These could be explained by the deposition of GAGs in soft tissues.[4] Our patient complained of occasional stridor. Ophthalmological findings are common in patients with. Hunter's disease, though corneal clouding is absent; retinitis.

  9. Hunter syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dermatan et sulfate d'heparin. L'accumulation de l'intra et extracellulaire de ce matieres provoquent un organe multisystémique anormal. Nous présentons un patient atteint du syndrome de chasseur impliquant 1a peau systeme cardiovasculaire, des yeux et systeme musculosquelettique. Nous avons aussi écrit le compte ...

  10. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II.

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    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Kanitkar, S; John, Robby; Gireesh, G; Bhate, Amit; Mithun, M

    2012-10-01

    Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (OFD-II) is characterized by frenulated tongue, midline cleft lip, high arched or cleft palate, micrognathia, syndactyly and polydactyly, bilateral reduplicated hallux, conductive hearing loss, choroidal coloboma and normal intelligence. There are nine forms of oro-facial-digital syndromes with different modes of inheritance. A young female with features of oro-facio-digital syndrome type-II is being reported.

  11. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

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    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, W J; Gorin, M B; Weston, M D; Furman, J M; Pikus, A; Möller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis indicated non-linkage of this family to these markers. The A test analysis for heterogeneity with this family and 32 other Usher type II families was statistically significant at p < 0.05. Further clinical evaluation of this family was done in light of the linkage results to determine if any phenotypic characteristics would allow for clinical identification of the unlinked type. No clear phenotypic differences were observed; however, this unlinked family may represent a previously unreported subtype of Usher type II characterised by a milder form of retinitis pigmentosa and mild vestibular abnormalities. Heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II complicates efforts to isolate and clone Usher syndrome genes using linkage analysis and limits the use of DNA markers in early detection of Usher type II. Images PMID:7901420

  12. [Mania associated with Usher syndrome type II].

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    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Acharya, Mahima; Sarvanan, Arul; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, P S V N

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome (or Hallgren syndrome) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular deficit; Usher syndrome type II is the most common form. Various neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported to occur in those with Usher syndrome, including schizophrenia-like disorder, atypical psychosis, recurrent depressive illness, neurotic disorder, and mental retardation; however, bipolar disorder is not common in those with Usher syndrome. Herein we describe a 30-year-old male with Usher syndrome type II that developed features indicative of a probable manic episode. The patient had complete remission of symptoms in response to treatment with olanzapine 20 mg d-1. In persons with dual sensory impairment there are inherent problems with assessment and diagnosis is difficult due to their limited communication abilities. The diagnosis of Usher syndrome depends heavily on behavioral observation and disturbances in vegetative functions.

  13. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

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    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  14. Current Understanding of Usher Syndrome Type II

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    Yang, Jun; Wang, Le; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common deafness-blindness caused by genetic mutations. To date, three genes have been identified underlying the most prevalent form of Usher syndrome, the type II form (USH2). The proteins encoded by these genes are demonstrated to form a complex in vivo. This complex is localized mainly at the periciliary membrane complex in photoreceptors and the ankle-link of the stereocilia in hair cells. Many proteins have been found to interact with USH2 proteins in vitro, suggesting that they are potential additional components of this USH2 complex and that the genes encoding these proteins may be the candidate USH2 genes. However, further investigations are critical to establish their existence in the USH2 complex in vivo. Based on the predicted functional domains in USH2 proteins, their cellular localizations in photoreceptors and hair cells, the observed phenotypes in USH2 mutant mice, and the known knowledge about diseases similar to USH2, putative biological functions of the USH2 complex have been proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches for this group of diseases are now being actively explored. PMID:22201796

  15. Management of the behavioural manifestations of Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jane; Stewart, Catherine; Kearney, Shauna

    This article reviews the behavioural manifestations of, and the strategies for managing, Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type II), a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulphatase. Hunter syndrome is generally considered to have two manifestations: an attenuated form and a severe form; in the latter, the person has pronounced cognitive decline. Infants with either phenotype usually appear normal at birth, but may show some somatic signs. Children with the severe phenotype show developmental delay and changes in behaviour patterns at about 18 months to 4 years of age. To varying degrees, patients with the severe form manifest behavioural disorders such as hyperactivity, aggression, impulsivity, anxiety and sleep disturbances. Medications, such as antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and anticonvulsants, have been tried with varying degrees of success. Behavioural management strategies may be a worthwhile approach, although published data are lacking. For sleep disturbances, behavioural modification plus melatonin or benzodiazepine may be effective treatments.

  16. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

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    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  17. Hunters syndrom og hørenedsaettelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiaer, Eva Kirkegaard; Møller, Troels Reinholdt; Wetke, Randi

    2010-01-01

    A 30 month-old boy with delayed language development was referred to the Department of Audiology in Aarhus. At the time of referral he had had 19 cases of acute otitis media and had been tubulated four times. Furthermore, the boy had not developed according to age in several respects: his motor...... functions and language were delayed, and he made audible respiratory sounds and was obviously nasally congested. The boy was referred for further investigations at the Department of Paediatrics. The tests showed that the boy suffered from Hunter Syndrome (MPSII) and he underwent relevant treatment....

  18. Successful Pregnancy Outcome In Maternal Crigler Najjar Syndrome Type II

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    Shakuntala PN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimated incidence of Crigler-Najjar syndrome(CNS is 1 case per 1,000,000 births(1 million. The overall prevalence of CN syndrome is unknown, with only several hundred people reported to have this disease. It is interestingly very rare to encounter a pregnant adult women with congenital jaundice. Pregnancy in CN type II patients is a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge because of the high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy with serious neurological damage as life-threatening complications for the fetus. To date 8 pregnancy outcome have been reported from 5 women and we report the6 woman with a successful 9 th pregnancy outcome. We have discussed detail history, presentation and management during pregnancy and care of the new born.

  19. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Type II Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome

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    Mark Ram Borgaonkar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old female was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in 1976 and Addison’s disease in 1979. At that time, her antimitochondrial antibody (AMA level was elevated at 1:32. She subsequently developed premature ovarian failure and type I diabetes mellitus. In 1996, she became jaundiced with a cholestatic enzyme pattern. AMA was positive at a titre of 1:256. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. She underwent a liver transplantation in January 1998. This is the first report of PBC in association with type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. The association of PBC with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases supports an immune-mediated pathogenesis and may have implications in further studies of PBC.

  20. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

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    Bloemker, B.K. [Boys Town National Research hospital, Omaha, NE (United States); Swaroop, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kimberling, W.J. [Yale medical School, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  1. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type II: Transitional type between Mohr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2013-04-16

    consanguineous parents, with several typical features of oral-facial-digital syndrome type II (OFDS II) including cleft lip, high arched palate, retromicrognathia, preaxial polysyndactyly of hands and feet, duplication of thumb and hallux.

  2. Multiple long bone cysts revealed by MRI in trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II predisposing to pathological fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konala, Praveen; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Kiely, Nigel [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Noakes, Charlotte [Oxford University Hospital, The Oxford Genetics Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blair, Edward [Oxford University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II is a rare genetic disorder with the few published case reports mainly reporting the radiographic skeletal manifestations. There are no published imaging reports of long bone cysts involving multiple bones in this condition. We report a unique case of bone cysts involving multiple long bones detected with MRI in a patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II complicated by a subsequent pathological fracture. It is possible that the bone cysts are a previously undescribed feature of this syndrome; however, the evidence is insufficient to establish a definite association. Chromosomal abnormality identified in this patient is consistent with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II with no unusual features. Although the nature of these bone cysts is unclear, they are one of the causes of the known increased fracture risk observed in this syndrome. (orig.)

  3. [Acute coronary syndrome after hornet bite, type II Kounis syndrome - a case report].

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    Alihodzić, Hajriz; Ilić, Boris; Mladina, Nada; Mrsić, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is an accidental occurrence of acute coronary syndrome associated with anaphylaxis, where acute inflammatory mediators cause the spasm of coronary arteries with the erosion and rupture of atheromatous plaque. We present a 53-year-old male who during the treatment of anaphylaxis after a hornet bite developed acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction. The diagnosis of type II Kounis syndrome was proven by electrocardiographic abnormalities and biochemical markers with clinical manifestation of acute coronary syndrome, and was associated with anaphylaxis which demanded prehospital treatment of the patient after the hornet bite. Anaphylaxis after a hornet bite requires consideration of acute coronary syndrome if patients have chest pain and hemodynamic impairment, as these conditions occur infrequently but demand additional diagnostics and adequate treatment.

  4. People with Usher Syndrome, Type II: Issues and Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, I. D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the experiences of individuals with Usher Syndrome, discusses the lack of appropriate services and the failure of professionals to provide sufficient information on the condition, and stresses the importance of access to information and the acquisition of new skills before the visual impairment becomes severe. (Author/CR)

  5. Physical and Psychological Health in Persons with Deafblindness that Is due to Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Moa; Moller, Claes; Moller, Kerstin; Danermark, Berth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the study reported here were to describe the physical and psychological health of persons with Usher syndrome Type II (USH2) and to explore any differences in terms of gender. Methods: The participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. In the first step, 122 persons received the questionnaire by mail,…

  6. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II in Hospital Universitario del Caribe, Cartagena Colombia.

    OpenAIRE

    Fortich-Revollo Álvaro José; Mora-García Gustavo; Fortich-Salvador Adriana; Malambo-García Dacia; Ramos-Clason Enrique Carlos; Franco-García Samir

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a polyendocrinopathy characterized by failureof some endocrine glands as well as nonendocrine organs, caused by actions of theimmune system on endocrine tissues. It has been described two groups and at leasttwo or three variants of them. Autoimmune polyglandular autoimmune syndrome typeII is the most common autoimmune endocrinopathy that is characterized mainly bypresence of Addison’s disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease or typeI diabetes...

  7. Effect of type II diabetes mellitus on outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Abhishek; Turner, Paul; Pendurthi, Madhu Kalyan; Agrawal, Vrinda; Modrykamien, Ariel

    2014-02-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition, whereas the presence of diabetes has been shown to be protective in its development. We undertook this study to assess the association of type II diabetes mellitus with clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive series of patients with ARDS requiring mechanical ventilation from January 2008 to March 2011. Patients with type I diabetes were excluded from the study. Clinical outcomes such as ventilator-free days, mortality, length of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit (ICU), and reintubations were compared based on the presence of diabetes. Multivariate regression model was used to find if the presence of type II diabetes mellitus predicts ventilator-free days at day 28. Two hundred forty-nine patients with ARDS were admitted to the ICU during the study period. Fifty (20%) subjects had type II diabetes mellitus. Differences in ventilator-free days, in-hospital mortality, reintubation rate, and length of stay in the hospital or ICU were not statistically significant between diabetic and nondiabetic patients with ARDS. Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II, ICU specialty, use of vasopressors, and the need for reintubation were predictors of ventilator-free days at day 28. The presence of type II diabetes mellitus and its adjustment by body mass index did not show association with ventilator-free days at day 28. The presence of type II diabetes mellitus is not associated with clinical outcomes in ARDS, even when its presence is adjusted by body mass index. © 2013.

  8. Dental implants as Treatment Option in Patients With Osteopenic Syndrome and Type II Diabetes

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    M.V. Kozlova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the important problems in modern dentistry is the study of jaw bone changes associated with type II diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of osteopenic syndrome on osseointegration when using dental implants in patients with type II diabetes. 40 patients with type II diabetes have been evaluated and assigned to two different groups based on the duration of the disease. Including criteria in patients with compensated diabetes were fasting glucose test results <6 mM/l and glycohemoglobin concentration ≤6%. All patients have been evaluated by means of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry on Discovery W densitometer by HOLOGIC. Laboratory blood markers have been used to assess the rate of metabolic processes. 43 implants have been fixed in both groups and maxillary sinus lifting has been applied in 4 cases. No immediate or late post -operative complications have been registered. In cases of disease duration over 5 years and presence of osteopenia the period of surgical wound healing has been prolongated.

  9. Development of a mnemonic screening tool for identifying subjects with Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Gabriel M; Morin, Isabelle; Whiteman, David A H

    2013-07-01

    The Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS), an international, long-term observational registry of patients with Hunter syndrome, was used to develop a simple mnemonic screening tool (HUNTER) to aid in the diagnosis of Hunter syndrome. Data regarding the prediagnosis prevalence of ten specific signs and symptoms present in individual patients enrolled in the HOS were used to develop the HUNTER mnemonic screening tool. A total score of 6 or greater using a weighting scheme in which certain manifestations were assigned a weight of 2 (facial dysmorphism, nasal obstruction or rhinorrhea, enlarged tongue, enlarged liver, enlarged spleen, joint stiffness) and others assigned a weight of 1 (hernia, hearing impairment, enlarged tonsils, airway obstruction or sleep apnea) correctly identified 95 % of patients who had no family history of Hunter syndrome or who were not diagnosed prenatally. No association between age at diagnosis and HUNTER score was found. The HUNTER mnemonic appears to be a useful screening tool. Further validation in the clinical setting will be necessary to confirm its utility.

  10. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (i.e., in association with Hirschsprung disease [HD]) and heterozygous mutations in isolated HD. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of six heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5%-6% of WS2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Myopathic EMG findings and type II muscle fiber atrophy in patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Christiansen, Ingelise; Vissing, John

    2013-01-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare condition, which may mimic myopathy. A few reports have described that EMG in LEMS may show changes compatible with myopathy, and muscle biopsies have been described with type II as well as type I atrophy. The EMG results were, however, based...

  12. Anterior Hypopituitarism and Treatment Response in Hunter Syndrome: A Comparison of Two Patients

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    Munier A. Nour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism is a clinically important diagnosis and has not previously been reported in Hunter syndrome. We contrast two cases with anatomic pituitary anomalies: one with anterior panhypopituitarism and the other with intact pituitary function. Patient 1, a 10-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for poor growth and an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Endocrine testing revealed growth hormone (GH deficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency, and tertiary hypothyroidism. An improvement in growth velocity with hormone replacement (GH, thyroxine, and corticosteroid was seen; however, final adult height remained compromised. Patient 2, a 13-year-old male with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for growth failure. He had a large empty sella turcica with posteriorly displaced pituitary. Functional endocrine testing was normal and a trial of GH-treatment yielded no significant effect. Panhypopituitarism associated with pituitary anomalies has not been previously reported in Hunter syndrome and was an incidental finding of significant clinical importance. In the setting of documented anterior hypopituitarism, while hormone replacement improved growth velocity, final height remained impaired. In patient 2 with equivocal GH-testing results, treatment had no effect on linear growth. These cases highlight the importance of careful clinical assessment in Hunter syndrome and that judicious hormone replacement may be indicated in individual cases.

  13. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

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    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  14. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Yang

    Full Text Available The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2 play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL. We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064 induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  15. HLA class II haplotypes differentiate between the adult autoimmune polyglandular syndrome types II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, B K; Matheis, N; Alt, T; Weinstock, C; Bux, J; Kahaly, G J

    2014-01-01

    Genetics of the adult autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the genetics of the adult APS types. SITE: The study was conducted at a university referral center. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were determined in a large cohort of patients with APS, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and type 1 diabetes and in healthy controls by the consistent application of high-resolution typing at a four-digit level. Comparison of the allele and haplotype frequencies significantly discriminated patients with APS vs AITD and controls. The HLA class II alleles DRB1*03:01 *04:01, DQA1*03:01, *05:01, DQB1*02:01, and *03:02 were observed more frequently (Pdisease (APS type II) and those without Addison's disease but including type 1 diabetes and AITD (APS type III) demonstrated DR3-DQ2/DRB1*04:01-DQ8 as a susceptibility genotype in APS III (Pctype II (Pctypes II and III. Susceptible haplotypes favor the development of polyglandular autoimmunity in patients with AITD.

  16. Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2009-09-01

    A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II.

  17. Candidate regions for Waardenburg syndrome type II: Search for a second WS locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nance, W.E.; Pandya, A.; Blanton, S.H. [VA Commonwealth Univ, Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness and pigmentary abnormalities such as heterochromia of irides, hypopigmented skin patches, white forlock and premature graying. Clinically the syndrome has been classified into three types. Type II differs from type I in that dystopia canthorum is generally absent, and type III has associated limb anomalies. Recently linkage analysis localized the gene for WSI to chromosome 2q. PAX-3, which is a human analogue of the murine pax-3 locus, maps to this region and mutations in this gene have been found to segregate with WSI. However genetic heterogeneity clearly exists: most if not all WSII families are unlinked to PAX-3 while most if not all WSI cases are linked. We ascertained a four-year-old female child with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 who had features of WS including bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pale blue irides and pinched nostrils as well as hypertelorism microcephaly, bilateral eyelid ptosis, digitalization of thumbs and fifth finger clinodactyly. High resolution chromosomal analysis revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of 13q22-33.2. There was no family history of WS or retardation. A similar deletion in the region of 13q21-32 has been described in a 13-year-old boy with features of WSII. These two cases strongly suggested that this chromosomal region may include a second locus for WS. We have identified eight families with clinical features of WS type I which have been excluded from linkage to the PAX-3 locus. We have typed these families for microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 13. Linkage between WSII and the chromosome 13 markers was excluded in these families. Hirschsprung disease has been associated with WS and it has recently been mapped to chromosome 10q11.2-q21.1. We are currently typing the 8 families for microsatellites in this region.

  18. IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and allergic reactions to idursulfase in patients with Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Park, M R; Kim, D S; Lee, J O; Maeng, S H; Cho, S Y; Han, Y; Ahn, K; Jin, D K

    2013-06-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human idursulfase is effective for the treatment of Hunter syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type II. However, various adverse events can occur by the infusion of idursulfase. The purpose was to evaluate the occurrence of infusion-related allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, to idursulfase in patients with MPS II receiving ERT and to elucidate its possible mechanism. A total of 34 patients with MPS II were enrolled to receive ERT with Elaprase(®) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg intravenously once a week. Information regarding the symptoms, frequency, and timing of anaphylaxis during treatment was analyzed. Presence of anti-idursulfase IgE antibody was assessed by skin prick test (SPT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blotting was performed to confirm the reaction between idursulfase and specific IgE. Three patients (8.8%) showed anaphylaxis by infusion of idursulfase. No deaths occurred during the study. Anti-idursulfase IgE antibody was detected by SPT and ELISA. Immunoblotting with patients' sera and Elaprase(®) showed a single band of specific IgE binding to the protein around 70 kD, and idursulfase did not display amino acid sequence homology to known allergens. SPT with idursulfase demonstrated positive results in all patients with anaphylaxis. However, we failed to reveal any risk factors for the development of infusion-related immediate-type allergic reactions. Anaphylaxis related to infusion of idursulfase is mediated by anti-idursulfase IgE antibody, which might be produced by de novo synthesis. SPT is useful in predicting the occurrence of anti-idursulfase IgE-mediated anaphylaxis during infusion. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type II: A hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlotogora, J. [Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1995-11-20

    Margolis reported on a large pedigree with a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} X-linked syndrome of profound deafness and albinism (MIM 300700, albinism-deafness syndrome). The affected males presented with profound deafness and severe pigmentary abnormalities of the skin. At birth the skin appeared as almost albinotic except for areas of light pigmentation over the gluteal and scrotal areas, and thereafter pigmentation gradually increased over the body. Skin changes ultimately included areas of hypopigmentation and spots of hyperpigmentation. Some of the affected males also had blue irides, heterochromia, or segmental color iris changes. In carrier females, variable hearing impairment was documented without any pigmentary changes. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  20. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  1. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical response to long term enzyme replacement treatment in children, adolescent and adult patients with Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau Serra, Jaime; Vitoria Miñana, Isidro; Calderón Fernández, Rafael; Cortell Aznar, Isidoro

    2015-11-06

    Since enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) with idursulfase is available for Hunter syndrome (HS; mucopolysaccharidosis type II), for the first time, disease progression can be limited and organ damage reduced or prevented. We described retrospectively the clinical evolution of eight HS males, treated with ERT and followed in routine clinical practice in Hospital Infantil La Fe (Valencia, Spain). We studied three children, three adolescents and two adults. Time from diagnosis to ERT ranged from 13.7 to 0.2 years, and duration of ERT ranged from 24 to 77.1 months. From the start of ERT, weight and height increased in children and adolescents and remained stable in adults. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) decreased in all patients; in patient 5 (aged 23 years), we observed the highest reduction (86%) with recovery of carpal tunnel syndrome, splenomegaly and a decrease in nocturnal oxygen dependence. Our results show that ERT improve respiratory impairment and organomegalies and decrease GAGs levels in all patients including children, adolescent and adults. While cardiac manifestations and facial features stabilized, responses in other parameters were heterogeneous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Genotype of UGT1A1 and phenotype correlation between Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II and Gilbert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yoshihiro; Nakahara, Sayuri; Yanagi, Takahide; Nomura, Akitaka; Mimura, Yu; Matsui, Katsuyuki; Sato, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemias, Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (CN-2), and Gilbert syndrome (GS) all result from mutations of the bilirubin uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase gene (UGT1A1). Often, to distinguish between CN-2 and GS is difficult because the borderline of the two syndromes is unclear. We analyzed the genotypes and phenotypes of 163 Japanese patients with CN-2 or GS. Japanese patients (99 males and 64 females) with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia were analyzed. Their serum bilirubin concentrations varied from 1.2 to 22.2 mg/dL (20 to 379 μM). Genetic analysis of UGT1A1 was performed by PCR-amplified direct sequencing. Association between serum bilirubin concentrations and genotypes group (typical CN-2, intermediate group, and typical GS) was studied. Most patients had biallelic mutations of UGT1A1. Moreover, many of them (78.5%) had multiple mutations. The mutation in typical CN-2 was a homozygous double missense mutation of p.[G71R:Y486D]. In typical GS group, four prevalent genotypes were detected: homozygous UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6/UGT1A1*28, and homozygous UGT1A1*6, and UGT1A1*27/UGT1A1*28. In the intermediate group, three genotypes, p.[G71R:Y486D]/UGT1A1*7, p.[G71R:Y486D]/UGT1A1*6, and homozygous UGT1A1*7, were detected. Serum bilirubin concentrations of typical CN-2, intermediate group, and typical GS are respectively 12.9 ± 5.1, 5.2 ± 2.2, and 2.8 ± 1.1 mg/dL. Serum bilirubin concentration among the three groups is statistically different (P syndromes. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish clearly between the two syndromes. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. FISH approach to determine cat eye syndrome chromosome breakpoints of a patient with cat eye syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M; De Sanctis, S; Cariola, F; Spezzi, T; Di Carlo, A; Tontoli, F; Lista, F; Buonadonna, A L

    2005-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old man with craniofacial dysmorphic features, anorectal malformations, eye colobomas, orthopaedic anomalies, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. Cat eye syndrome (CES) was suspected, and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis which showed the presence of a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome, identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as invdup(22). The marker was further analyzed with six BAC clones located at the 22q11.1 and 22q11.2 regions; this analysis allowed correct assignment at low copy repeat 4 on chromosome 22 (LCR22-4) of the two breakpoints, confirming the presence of a CES chromosome type II. The patient's phenotype is considered in the light of the cytogenetic, and FISH investigations results and other patients reported in literature. Molecular definition of the breakpoints at the LCR22-4 copy confirms the role of different chromosome 22-specific LCRs in CES chromosomes generation, as well as in other chromosome 22 germ line rearrangements. Our report confirms that, unlike other conditions, i.e. the invdup(15) bisatellited dicentric marker, the CES phenotype does not appear to correlate with the size of the marker chromosome. Additional cases are necessary to be able to draw more specific genotype-phenotype correlations and to determine the outcome of patients with CES, especially when this rare condition is diagnosed in prenatal age.

  5. Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of Hunter Syndrome for clinicians in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide clinicians in Latin America with the most current information on the clinical aspects, diagnosis, and management of Hunter syndrome, a serious and progressive disease for which specific treatment is available. Hunter syndrome is a genetic disorder where iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S, an enzyme that degrades glycosaminoglycans, is absent or deficient. Clinical manifestations vary widely in severity and involve multiple organs and tissues. An attenuated and a severe phenotype are recognized depending on the degree of cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis is vital for disease management. Clinical signs common to children with Hunter syndrome include inguinal hernia, frequent ear and respiratory infections, facial dysmorphisms, macrocephaly, bone dysplasia, short stature, sleep apnea, and behavior problems. Diagnosis is based on screening urinary glycosaminoglycans and confirmation by measuring I2S activity and analyzing I2S gene mutations. Idursulfase (recombinant I2S (Elaprase®, Shire enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, designed to address the underlying enzyme deficiency, is approved treatment and improves walking capacity and respiratory function, and reduces spleen and liver size and urinary glycosaminoglycan levels. Additional measures, responding to the multi-organ manifestations, such as abdominal/inguinal hernia repair, carpal tunnel surgery, and cardiac valve replacement, should also be considered. Investigational treatment options such as intrathecal ERT are active areas of research, and bone marrow transplantation is in clinical practice. Communication among care providers, social workers, patients and families is essential to inform and guide their decisions, establish realistic expectations, and assess patients' responses.

  6. Impaired renal NaCl absorption in mice lacking the ROMK potassium channel, a model for type II Bartter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, John N; Baird, Nancy R; Judd, Louise M; Noonan, William T; Andringa, Anastasia; Doetschman, Thomas; Manning, Patrice A; Liu, Lynne H; Miller, Marian L; Shull, Gary E

    2002-10-04

    ROMK is an apical K(+) channel expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) and throughout the distal nephron of the kidney. Null mutations in the ROMK gene cause type II Bartter's syndrome, in which abnormalities of electrolyte, acid-base, and fluid-volume homeostasis occur because of defective NaCl reabsorption in the TALH. To understand better the pathogenesis of type II Bartter's syndrome, we developed a mouse lacking ROMK and examined its phenotype. Young null mutants had hydronephrosis, were severely dehydrated, and approximately 95% died before 3 weeks of age. ROMK-deficient mice that survived beyond weaning grew to adulthood; however, they had metabolic acidosis, elevated blood concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-), reduced blood pressure, polydipsia, polyuria, and poor urinary concentrating ability. Whole kidney glomerular filtration rate was sharply reduced, apparently as a result of hydronephrosis, and fractional excretion of electrolytes was elevated. Micropuncture analysis revealed that the single nephron glomerular filtration rate was relatively normal, absorption of NaCl in the TALH was reduced but not eliminated, and tubuloglomerular feedback was severely impaired. These data show that the loss of ROMK in the mouse causes perturbations of electrolyte, acid-base, and fluid-volume homeostasis, reduced absorption of NaCl in the TALH, and impaired tubuloglomerular feedback.

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS Type II After Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tunç

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic syndrome characterised with dystrophic changes and neurovascular disordes of bone and skin of extremities. The most common etiological factors are trauma, ischemic heart disease, cerebral lesions, servical region disorders, infections, and surgical treatments. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compressive neuropaty of the upper extremity. There are various surgical and conservative alternatives in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Complex regional pain syndrome has been reported as a complication of surgical carpal tunnel release in 2-5% of patients. In this case report clinical characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes of a patient with complex regional pain syndrome after carpal tunnel release surgery is presented. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2010;16:41-3

  8. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the USH2A Gene in a Korean Patient with Usher Syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Sung Hyun; Song, Min-Jung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Hosuk; Ko, Moon-Hee; Chung, Won-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown that mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for USH2. The authors herein describe a 34-year-old Korean woman with the typical clinical manifestation of USH2; she had bilateral hearing disturbance and progressive visual deterioration, without vestibular dysfunction. Molecular genetic study of the USH2A gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.2310delA; Glu771LysfsX17). She was heterozygous for this mutation, and no other mutation was found in USH2A, suggesting the possibility of an intronic or large genomic rearrangement mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of USH2 in Korea. More investigations are needed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlations and ethnicity-specific genetic background of Usher syndrome.

  9. Meglumine exerts protective effects against features of metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Bravo-Nuevo

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes complications pose a growing medical challenge worldwide, accentuating the need of safe and effective strategies for their clinical management. Here we present preclinical evidence that the sorbitol derivative meglumine (N-methyl-D-glucamine can safely protect against several features of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, as well as elicit enhancement in muscle stamina. Meglumine is a compound routinely used as an approved excipient to improve drug absorption that has not been ascribed any direct biological effects in vivo. Normal mice (SV129 administered 18 mM meglumine orally for six weeks did not display any gastrointestinal or other observable adverse effects, but had a marked effect on enhancing muscle stamina and at longer times in limiting weight gain. In the established KK.Cg-Ay/J model of non-insulin dependent diabetes, oral administration of meglumine significantly improved glycemic control and significantly lowered levels of plasma and liver triglycerides. Compared to untreated control animals, meglumine reduced apparent diabetic nephropathy. Sorbitol can improve blood glucose uptake by liver and muscle in a manner associated with upregulation of the AMPK-related enzyme SNARK, but with undesirable gastrointestinal side effects not seen with meglumine. In murine myoblasts, we found that meglumine increased steady-state SNARK levels in a dose-dependent manner more potently than sorbitol. Taken together, these findings provide support for the clinical evaluation of meglumine as a low-cost, safe supplement offering the potential to improve muscle function, limit metabolic syndrome and reduce diabetic complications.

  10. THE PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valluri Satya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a combination of factors that multiply person's risk for diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. In the present study which included 100 newly diagnosed patients of diabetes mellitus of less than 6 months in duration selected from out - patient department, GGH, K AKINADA, EGdt, INDIA, out of which 46 were males and 54 females. Based on the following methods we studied and compared with other studies with significant results. a. Current NCEP ATP III criteria : b. International Diabetes Federation Criteria . c. WHO Criteria 1999. Among 100 newly detected type 2 DM patients, the mean age of presentation with new onset diabetes in males is 42.02 Yrs ±8.14 and in females it is 44.96 Yrs ±8.57. Prevalence of Mets was found in 69.56% of male s and 88.88% of females . Preval ence of MetS was 66.67%, 71.85%, 82.92%, 85% in the age groups of 20 - 29, 30 - 39, 40 - 49, 50 - 59 yrs of age group respectively, and all 4 cases above 60 yrs had MetS.

  11. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    MPS is a group of metabolic disorders caused by absence or malfunctioning of the lysosomal enzymes needed to break down molecules called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs).[1]. Children with MPs either do not produce enough of one of the two enzymes required to break down the sugar chains into proteins and simpler ...

  12. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a defective chromosome is inherited from the child's mother. Because of that defective chromosome, an enzyme that's ... brain and nervous system. Respiratory complications An enlarged tongue, thickened gums, and thickening of the nasal passages ...

  13. Mutations in the VLGR1 Gene Implicate G-Protein Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michael D.; Luijendijk, Mirjam W. J.; Humphrey, Kurt D.; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C locus was considered a likely candidate on the basis of its protein motif structure and expressed-sequence-tag representation from both cochlear and retinal subtracted libraries. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing of polymerase-chain-reaction products amplified from 10 genetically independent patients with USH2C and 156 other patients with USH2 identified four isoform-specific VLGR1 mutations (Q2301X, I2906FS, M2931FS, and T6244X) from three families with USH2C, as well as two sporadic cases. All patients with VLGR1 mutations are female, a significant deviation from random expectations. The ligand(s) for the VLGR1 protein is unknown, but on the basis of its potential extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interaction domains and its wide mRNA expression profile, it is probable that VLGR1 serves diverse cellular and signaling processes. VLGR1 mutations have been previously identified in both humans and mice and are associated with a reflex-seizure phenotype in both species. The identification of additional VLGR1 mutations to test whether a phenotype/genotype correlation exists, akin to that shown for other Usher syndrome disease genes, is warranted. PMID:14740321

  14. Compound heterozygous NEK1 variants in two siblings with oral-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monroe, Glen R; Kappen, Isabelle Fpm; Stokman, Marijn F; Terhal, Paulien A; van den Boogaard, Marie-José H; Savelberg, Sanne Mc; van der Veken, Lars T; van Es, Robert J J; Lens, Susanne M; Hengeveld, Rutger C; Creton, Marijn A; Janssen, Nard G; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B; Ebbeling, Michelle B; Giles, Rachel H; Knoers, Nine V; van Haaften, Gijs

    2016-01-01

    The oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndromes comprise a group of related disorders with a combination of oral, facial and digital anomalies. Variants in several ciliary genes have been associated with subtypes of OFD syndrome, yet in most OFD patients the underlying cause remains unknown. We investigated

  15. The significance of electron microscopic examination of gingiva in cases of Hunter syndrome and hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Michal; Danisovic, Lubos; Bzduch, Vladimir; Polak, Stefan; Varga, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy has been for decades a basic morphological method still used in diagnostic protocols of some pathological conditions affecting the ultrastructure of cells and extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was an ultrastructural description of gingiva of patients with Hunter syndrome and hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Gingival biopsies were obtained during surgical periodontal treatment from a 9-year-old boy with Hunter disease (with enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human idursulphase) and a 15-year-old girl with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Gingival samples obtained from the upper anterior region were processed and examined with transmission electron microscope. In the case of Hunter syndrome due to the genetic lack of one lysosomal enzyme, an intercellular accumulation of glycosaminoglycans occurs. Within the gingiva of a patient with Hunter syndrome we observed membrane-bound storage vesicles in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts, endothelial cells of capillaries, surface epithelial cells, mast cells, and macrophages. Despite a long-term enzyme replacement therapy which improves clinical manifestations of Hunter syndrome, on the cellular level we still found marked accumulations of glycosaminoglycans in the cytoplasm of different cells as well as in the extracellular matrix. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a benign, slowly progressive and non-inflammatory gingival enlargement with a predominance of randomly oriented collagen fibrils in the gingival lamina propria. Some of these fibrils exhibited loops. Another unusual ultrastructural finding is the presence of empty perinuclear space in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells. The origin and significance of these non-membrane bound spaces are unknown. In both genetically determined diseases, the electron microscopic examination may be useful, and physicians get relevant information about the progress of illness.

  16. Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I and type II: clinical findings and novel mutations in two Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzavara-Pinton Pier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder showing the involvement of cutaneous, cardiovascular, craniofacial, and skeletal systems. In particular, LDS patients show arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysm and dissection, and have a high risk of aortic dissection or rupture at an early age and at aortic diameters that ordinarily are not predictive of these events. Recently, LDS has been subdivided in LDS type I (LDSI and type II (LDSII on the basis of the presence or the absence of cranio-facial involvement, respectively. Furthermore, LDSII patients display at least two of the major signs of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. LDS is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor (TGF beta-receptor I (TGFBR1 and II (TGFBR2 genes. The aim of this study was the clinical and molecular characterization of two LDS patients. Methods The exons and intronic flanking regions of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes were amplified and sequence analysis was performed. Results Patient 1 was a boy showing dysmorphic signs, blue sclerae, high-arched palate, bifid uvula; skeletal system involvement, joint hypermobility, velvety and translucent skin, aortic root dilatation, tortuosity and elongation of the carotid arteries. These signs are consistent with an LDSI phenotype. The sequencing analysis disclosed the novel TGFBR1 p.Asp351Gly de novo mutation falling in the kinase domain of the receptor. Patient 2 was an adult woman showing ascending aorta aneurysm, with vascular complications following surgery intervention. Velvety and translucent skin, venous varicosities and wrist dislocation were present. These signs are consistent with an LDSII phenotype. In this patient and in her daughter, TGFBR2 genotyping disclosed in the kinase domain of the protein the novel p.Ile510Ser missense mutation. Conclusion We report two novel mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes in two patients affected with LDS and showing marked

  17. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. Interestingly, we encountered variable minor malformations in his parents, confirming the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. There were no microdeletions or microduplications after performing array-CGH-analysis. We report what might be a constellation of unreported skeletal abnormalities in a child with OFD type II (Mohr syndrome). PMID:26566416

  18. Classification of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes according to the FAB co-operative group's proposals. Proposals for a redefinition of blast cell type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, B; Thiede, T; Sundström, C; Hagberg, H

    1984-05-01

    53 patients with the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) were classified according to the proposals of the FAB cooperative group 1982. 29 patients had refractory anaemia (RA), 10 refractory anaemia with excess of blasts ( RAEB ), 5 RAEB in transformation, 7 RA with ringed sideroblasts and 2 chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia ( CMML ). Counting blast cells type I and II involved no difficulties. 4 of 15 patients who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) according to the FAB classification of 1976 did not fulfill the new 1982 criteria for AML. A redefinition of the blast cell type II to include a more granulated blast cells, without the characteristics of promyelocytes, would solve this problem. We conclude that a redefinition of the blast cell type II might turn out to be useful.

  19. An interstitial deletion at 8q23.1-q24.12 associated with Langer-Giedion syndrome/ Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) type II and Cornelia de Lange syndrome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenti, Nikoletta; Tzetis, Maria; Braoudaki, Maria; Gianikou, Krinio; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Fryssira, Helen

    2015-01-01

    There are three distinct subtypes of Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS); TRPS type I, TRPS type II and TRPS type III. Features common to all three subtypes include sparse, slowly growing scalp hair, laterally sparse eyebrows, a bulbous tip of the nose (pear-shaped), and protruding ears. Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) or TRPS type II is a contiguous gene syndrome on 8q24.1, involving loss of functional copies of the TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report a male patient that was referred to the Department of Medical Genetics due to hypotonia and dysmorphic facial features. Cytogenetic and array- Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) analysis revealed that the patient was a carrier of an interstitial deletion at 8q23.1-q24.12 of 12,5 Mb. Parental karyotype indicated that the father carried an apparently balanced insertion: 46, ΧΥ, der(10)ins(10;8)(q22;q23q24). This is the first report of an apparently balanced insertion including chromosomes 8 and 10 contributing to the etiology of LGS/ TRPS type II. Τimely diagnosis of parental balanced chromosomal rearrangements can reduce the risk of subsequent miscarriages as well as abnormal offspring.

  20. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  1. Differences in UGT1A1 gene mutations and pathological liver changes between Chinese patients with Gilbert syndrome and Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Li, Man; Zhang, Liang; Teng, Xiaoying; Chen, Xiangmei; Zhou, Xingang; Ma, Zhiyuan; Qi, Liming; Wang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (CNS-II) and Gilbert syndrome (GS) based on the serum bilirubin concentration is difficult, because this parameter can fluctuate under certain conditions. The aim of this study was to explore differences in UGT1A1 gene mutations, which cause both CNS and GS, and pathological changes between CNS-II and GS.Ninety-five Chinese patients with hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in this study. Peripheral blood samples obtained from patients were used to evaluate bilirubin levels and for UGT1A1 gene testing. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the liver and staining of tissue samples with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, reticulin, and Perl Prussian blue were performed for 59 patients. The Ishak scoring system was used to assess inflammatory activity and the extent of fibrosis.One hundred ninety-two UGT1A1 mutations at 6 sites were detected in the 95 patients; the most common mutation in GS was c.-3279T>G in the phenobarbital response enhancing motif of the UGT1A1 promoter, whereas the most common mutation in CNS-II was p.G71R. The frequency of heterozygous p.G71R mutations in CNS-II was significantly higher than that in GS (P = .001); however, the frequency of homozygous c.-3279T>G mutations in CNS-II was markedly lower than that in GS (P = .032). Among all patients with multiple mutations, the frequency of p.Y486D was significantly higher in CNS-II than in GS (P = .007). The frequency of compound c.-3279T>G, A(TA)7TAA, and p.G71R mutations in CNS-II was significantly higher than that in GS (P = .001). Among the 59 patients who underwent percutaneous needle biopsy, 20 had iron deposition in the liver. The frequency of hepatic iron deposition in CNS-II was significantly higher than that in GS (P = .002).The linked polymorphic mutations, A(TA)7TAA and c.-3279T>G in UGT1A1, were most strongly associated with GS, whereas mutations in the coding region, especially p.G71R and p.Y486D, were

  2. Short rib-polydactyly syndrome type II (Majewski: Prenatal diagnosis, perinatal imaging findings and molecular analysis of the NEK1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Tibial aplasia, choroid plexus cysts and polycystic kidneys can be prominent prenatal ultrasound findings of type II SRPS. The present case provides evidence for a correlation of NEK1 mutation with type II SRPS.

  3. Molecular analysis of iduronate -2- sulfatase gene in Tunisian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II

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    Chkioua Latifa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome is X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the defective activity of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS. Hunter disease can vary from mild to severe, depending on the level of enzyme deficiency. We report the IDS mutation and polymorphisms causing the Hunter syndrome in patients from one family in Tunisia Patients and methods A preliminary diagnosis was made by qualitative detection of urinary glycosaminoglycans of the suspected MPS II probands. The IDS mutation and polymorphisms were determined on these probands and their family members by amplifying and sequencing each of the exons and intron-exon junctions of IDS gene. Results The studied probands were homoallelic for p.R88P mutation. In addition, three known polymorphisms/sequence variants: IVS3-16 (c.419-16 delT, T214M (c.641C > T, T146T (c.438 C > T, IVS5-87(c.709-87G > A and one previously unknown: IVS7+38(c.1006+38T > C were identified in the MPS II patients. These are the first Tunisian MPS II patients to be genotyped. Conclusion The identification of these mutation and polymorphisms and their genotype-phenotype correlation should facilitate prenatal diagnosis and counseling for MPS II in Tunisia, where a very high rate of consanguinity exists.

  4. Two families with quadrupedalism, mental retardation, no speech, and infantile hypotonia (Uner Tan Syndrome Type-II; a novel theory for the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uner eTan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two consanguineous families with Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS were analyzed in relation to self-organizing processes in complex systems, and the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism. The cases had the key symptoms of previously reported cases of UTS, such as quadrupedalism, mental retardation, and dysarthric or no speech, but the new cases also exhibited infantile hypotonia and are designated UTS Type-II. There were 10 siblings in Branch I and 12 siblings in Branch II. Of these, there were seven cases exhibiting habitual quadrupedal locomotion (QL: four deceased and three living. The infantile hypotonia in the surviving cases gradually disappeared over a period of years, so that they could sit by about 10 years, crawl on hands and knees by about 12 years. They began walking on all fours around 14 years, habitually using QL. Neurological examinations showed normal tonus in their arms and legs, no Babinski sign, brisk tendon reflexes especially in the legs, and mild tremor. The patients could not walk in a straight line, but (except in one case could stand up and maintain upright posture with truncal ataxia. Cerebello-vermial hypoplasia and mild gyral simplification were noted in their MRIs. The results of the genetic analysis were inconclusive: no genetic code could be identified as the triggering factor for the syndrome in these families. Instead, the extremely low socio-economic status of the patients was thought to play a role in the emergence of UTS, possibly by epigenetically changing the brain structure and function, with a consequent selection of ancestral neural networks for QL during locomotor development. It was suggested that UTS may be regarded as one of the unpredictable outcomes of self-organization within a complex system. It was also noted that the prominent feature of this syndrome, the diagonal-sequence habitual QL, generated an interference between ipsilateral hands and feet, as in non-human primates. It was suggested that this

  5. Two families with quadrupedalism, mental retardation, no speech, and infantile hypotonia (Uner Tan Syndrome Type-II); a novel theory for the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Uner

    2014-01-01

    Two consanguineous families with Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS) were analyzed in relation to self-organizing processes in complex systems, and the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism. The cases had the key symptoms of previously reported cases of UTS, such as quadrupedalism, mental retardation, and dysarthric or no speech, but the new cases also exhibited infantile hypotonia and are designated UTS Type-II. There were 10 siblings in Branch I and 12 siblings in Branch II. Of these, there were seven cases exhibiting habitual quadrupedal locomotion (QL): four deceased and three living. The infantile hypotonia in the surviving cases gradually disappeared over a period of years, so that they could sit by about 10 years, crawl on hands and knees by about 12 years. They began walking on all fours around 14 years, habitually using QL. Neurological examinations showed normal tonus in their arms and legs, no Babinski sign, brisk tendon reflexes especially in the legs, and mild tremor. The patients could not walk in a straight line, but (except in one case) could stand up and maintain upright posture with truncal ataxia. Cerebello-vermial hypoplasia and mild gyral simplification were noted in their MRIs. The results of the genetic analysis were inconclusive: no genetic code could be identified as the triggering factor for the syndrome in these families. Instead, the extremely low socio-economic status of the patients was thought to play a role in the emergence of UTS, possibly by epigenetically changing the brain structure and function, with a consequent selection of ancestral neural networks for QL during locomotor development. It was suggested that UTS may be regarded as one of the unpredictable outcomes of self-organization within a complex system. It was also noted that the prominent feature of this syndrome, the diagonal-sequence habitual QL, generated an interference between ipsilateral hands and feet, as in non-human primates. It was suggested that this may have been

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II in the Practice of the Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Y. Vatanskaya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to one of the hereditary disea­ses — mucopolysaccharidosis type II, which is caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzymes, which leads to the catabolism disorder of the basic substance of the connective tissue mucopolysaccharide molecules — carbohydrate portion (glycosaminoglycans. The tissues (mainly the fibroblasts and mesenchymal cells accumulate chondroitin sulphate and/or geparanmonosulfat that leads to defective structure of connective tissue, causing gross cellular changes and the development of typical clinical picture. The peculiarities of their clinical manifestations involve manifold of clinical signs, involvement of many organs and systems in the pathological process, different age of onset of the disease that complicate the diagnosis of these diseases. If there is any marked clinical polymorphism (infantile, juvenile, adult forms all lysosomal diseases are characterized by progressive course, and most of them lead to early disability and premature death. The mucopolysaccharidosis II type as Hunter syndrome is widely spread in the world. The authors present their own clinical observation and indicate the characteristics of the course of respiratory disease in this group of adult patients.

  7. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wei; Jin, Xin; Gong, Yan; Qu, Ling-Hui; Zhao, Chen; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls. We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  8. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2.METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger sequencing.RESULTS:The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL and retinitis pigmentosa (RP without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.CONCLUSION:We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  9. Ventricular noncompaction and absent thumbs in a newborn with tetrasomy 5q35.2-5q35.3: an association with Hunter-McAlpine syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, Elizabeth A; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Smolarek, Teresa; Hopkin, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    We report on an infant with tetrasomy of 5q35.2-5q35.3, an interstitial triplication on one chromosome and normal complement on the other. The patient has some features of Hunter-McAlpine syndrome including intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), almond-shaped eyes, epicanthal folds, and downturned mouth with thin vermillion of the upper lip. In addition, left ventricular noncompaction and absent thumbs were identified, which have never been described in Hunter-McAlpine syndrome. This chromosome abnormality is distinct from those previously reported. Within this region of tetrasomy is MSX2, a highly conserved homeobox containing gene. Increased copies of MSX2 have been previously associated with craniosynostosis. Our patient's only skeletal defect is absent thumbs, also potentially related to increased dosage of MSX2 which is important for limb formation. In addition, MSX2 is expressed in the developing heart and overexpression of this gene may disrupt the co-regulation of other cardiac genes in this region, namely CSX1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Avaliação genética e oftalmológica de pacientes com síndrome de Stickler tipo II Genetic and ophthalmological assessment of patients with type II Stickler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderson Glerian Dias

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Diagnosticar, avaliar e descrever os achados clínico-genéticos e oftalmológicos de pacientes com síndrome de Stickler tipo II de uma mesma família. MÉTODOS: Todos os pacientes com alterações oftalmológicas foram submetidos à radiografia de mãos e punhos para idade óssea e posteriormente analisados pelo exame clínico-genético. O diagnóstico de síndrome de Stickler foi dado mediante análise clínica e correlação com o perfil metacarpofalangeano visualizado na radiografia. RESULTADOS: Síndrome de Stickler tipo II foi comprovada em 11 pacientes. Os achados oculares mais importantes foram: alta miopia (80%, subluxação do cristalino (70%, exotropia (50% e anomalias vítreo-retinianas (80% incluindo vazio vítreo (50%. O exame clínico-genético revelou que 30% dos pacientes apresentavam micrognatia, 50% hipoacusia, 40% depressão nasal e 60% palato alto. Hipermotilidade articular e dedos longos foram demonstrados em 7 casos (70% e artropatia esteve presente em 3 pacientes (30% dos casos. CONCLUSÕES: O diagnóstico da síndrome de Stickler é difícil devido à variabilidade fenotípica e a existência de outras síndromes genéticas com características semelhantes. As radiografias de mão e punho são de particular importância no diagnóstico desta síndrome.PURPOSE: To diagnose, evaluate and describe the clinical, genetic and ophthalmic characteristics of a family with type II Stickler syndrome. METHODS: X-rays for bone age, clinical and genetic evaluation were performed in all patients with ocular alterations. The Stickler syndrome diagnosis was established after correlating these examinations. RESULTS: Type II Stickler syndrome was found in 11 patients. The most important ocular findings were: high myopia (80%, lens subluxation (70%, exotropia (50% and vitreoretinal abnormalities (80% including vitreous cavity (50%. The clinical genetic examination disclosed that 30% of the patients had micrognathia, 50% hearing

  11. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  12. Hunters' motivations and values:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radder, Laetitia; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the values and motivations of South African biltong hunters. A hierarchical value map of associations between attributes, consequences and values resulted from laddering interviews with 34 hunters. The Means-End Chain approach proved useful in identifying: (a) personal value...... the predominant wildlife value orientations. Motivations included male identity, escape, appreciation of nature, and bonding with family and friends. The study refuted perceptions that biltong hunters primarily hunt for the meat or for the sake of killing an animal....

  13. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  14. Mapping of the choroideremia-like (CHML) gene at 1q42-qter and mutation analysis in patients with Usher syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhoven, H.V.; Genderen, C.V.; Molloy, C.M.; Pol, D.J.R.V.D.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Aarem, A.V.; Kessel, H.M.G.

    1994-01-15

    The human choroideremia-like (CHML) gene and a locus for Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2) were recently mapped to the 1q31-qter region employing physical mapping and genetic linkage studies, respectively. Using a human-rodent hybrid cell line, the authors could refine the assignment of CHML in this study to 1q42-qter. USH2 was shown to map to the same chromosomal segment as evidence by the fact that D1S58, a polymorphic marker previously shown to be located proximal to the USH2 locus, was also assigned in the 1q42-qter segment. To investigate a possible role of the CHML gene in the pathogenesis of USH2, they investigated 10 Dutch and 9 Danish USH2 patients for point mutations in the open reading frame of the CHML gene. Employing polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing, they found no disease-specific mutations. These results suggest that CHML is not involved in the pathogenesis of USH2. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  16. Identification of 51 novel exons of the Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) gene that encode multiple conserved functional domains and that are mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E. van; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Claassen, A.M.W.; Yntema, H.G.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The USH2A gene is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type IIa, which is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome and is characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutation analysis by DNA sequencing of exons 1-21 revealed only ~63% of the expected USH2A mutations, we

  17. Genetics of type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, M A; Chiu, K; Ferrer, J; Glaser, B; Inoue, H; Nestorowicz, A; Stanley, C A; Tanizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    Defining the genetic basis of Type II or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) will accelerate our progress toward understanding its etiology and will provide new therapeutic targets for treatment of this common disease. Here we present a brief overview of the history of the search for diabetes genes and report current strategies employed by our laboratory and by others in this effort. Isolation and subsequent mapping of candidate genes involved in insulin production and action has been a major effort in this field. Our lab has focused on pancreatic islet beta-cell genes, since the insulin lack of NIDDM is often the result of resistance to the action of insulin that is superimposed on a limited ability to produce insulin. A number of islet genes have been evaluated, including those involved in glucose metabolism, islet K+ channel genes, and transcription factors. For each gene, human cDNAs and genomic clones have been isolated and simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRPs) identified. The SSRPs were used to map the genes by linkage in CEPH pedigrees, or sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were used to map the genes to radiation hybrids (RH) or to YAC clones containing SSRPs. The SSRPs have then been used as markers for linkage analyses in families with NIDDM. Mutation screening by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and by sequencing has revealed variants that have been tested in association studies. A strategy was devised to generate novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from human pancreatic islet genes by differential display of islet mRNA. In the first phase of this project we identified 42 cDNAs that were preferentially expressed in pancreatic islets relative to exocrine tissue. When compared to sequences in GenBank, novel genes were represented by 69%. Enhanced islet expression was confirmed by Northern analysis of RNA. Sequence-tagged sites were synthesized for a number of islet ESTs and used to map these genes to human chromosomes. This

  18. The Higgs hunter's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gunion, John F; Haber, Howard E; Kane, Gordon L

    1989-01-01

    The Higgs Hunter's Guide is a definitive and comprehensive guide to the physics of Higgs bosons. In particular, it discusses the extended Higgs sectors required by those recent theoretical approaches that go beyond the Standard Model, including supersymmetry and superstring-inspired models.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glutaric acidemia type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood and tissues to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). Glutaric acidemia type II usually appears in infancy ... sudden episode called a metabolic crisis, in which acidosis and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) cause weakness, behavior ...

  20. COL5A1: Genetic mapping and exclusion as candidate gene in families with nail-patella syndrome, tuberous sclerosis 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Northrup, H.; Au, K.S. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, has been considered a candidate gene for certain diseases based on chromosomal location and/or disease phenotype. We have employed 3{prime}-untranslated region RFLPs to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis 1, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type H, and nail-patella syndrome. In addition, we describe a polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) within a COL5A1 intron. This SSR is used to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease) and to add COL5A1 to the existing map of {open_quotes}index{close_quotes} markers of chromosome 9 by evaluation of the COL5A1 locus on the CEPH 40-family reference pedigree set. This genetic mapping places COL5A1 between markers D9S66 and D9S67. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Scalar dark matter with type II seesaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Dasgupta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the possibility of generating tiny neutrino mass through a combination of type I and type II seesaw mechanism within the framework of an abelian extension of standard model. The model also provides a naturally stable dark matter candidate in terms of the lightest neutral component of a scalar doublet. We compute the relic abundance of such a dark matter candidate and also point out how the strength of type II seesaw term can affect the relic abundance of dark matter. Such a model which connects neutrino mass and dark matter abundance has the potential of being verified or ruled out in the ongoing neutrino, dark matter, as well as accelerator experiments.

  2. Corneal Lesion as the Initial Manifestation of Tyrosinemia Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Pin Tsai

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease with deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase and subsequently increasing level of serum tyrosine. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl who was referred due to bilateral corneal lesions. Slit-lamp examination showed small granular white deposits arranged in a dendritic pattern in the superficial central cornea of both eyes. Physical examination revealed painful, non-pruritic, hyperkeratotic plaques on the soles, palms and fingertips. Mental evaluation demonstrated developmental delay for her age. Blood examination revealed serum tyrosine level to be 1,868 μM (normal range, 30-110 μM, which decreased to 838 μM with 2-month diet on tyrosine and phenylalanine restriction. The corneal and skin lesions resolved completely. However, the corneal deposits recurred a month later as her mother failed to strictly control the diet because the little girl was losing weight and activity. With specific formula and adjusted diet regimen, the corneal lesions decreased again. Corneal pseudodendritic deposits may be the initial manifestation in patients with tyrosinemia type II. Early diagnosis and intervention with diet control are crucial for preventing permanent visual and developmental deficits. Corneal deposits can be one of the parameters in monitoring the efficacy of diet control.

  3. Tyrosinemia type II: nine cases of ocular signs and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macsai, M S; Schwartz, T L; Hinkle, D; Hummel, M B; Mulhern, M G; Rootman, D

    2001-10-01

    To report nine cases of tyrosinemia type II, with ocular signs and symptoms. Participants included nine patients (18 eyes) who were followed for a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years (range, 2 to 8 years). Intervention included dietary restriction of tyrosine and phenylalanine, which led to resolution of ocular and cutaneous lesions, improved behavior in one patient, and may have prevented developmental delay in others. The main outcome measures were visual acuity and serum tyrosine levels to determine the response to dietary therapy. Intelligence testing and developmental screening were performed when appropriate. All patients presented with ocular signs and symptoms as the primary manifestation of disease and serve to illustrate the typical ocular findings of this syndrome. Three patients presented with cutaneous manifestations, and one patient had mild mental impairment at the time of diagnosis. Recalcitrant pseudodendritic keratitis may be the presenting sign in tyrosinemia type II. Awareness of the presenting signs and symptoms may accelerate the diagnosis and dietary intervention. Initiation of a tyrosine-restricted and phenylalanine-restricted diet in infancy is most effective in preventing cognitive impairment.

  4. NNMSM type-II and -III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We suggest two types of extension of the standard model, which are the so-called next to new minimal standard model type-II and -III. They can achieve gauge coupling unification as well as suitable dark matter abundance, small neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, inflation, and dark energy. The gauge coupling unification can be realized by introducing two or three extra new fields, and they could explain charge quantization. We also show that there are regions in which the vacuum stability, coupling perturbativity, and correct dark matter abundance can be realized with current experimental data at the same time. (orig.)

  5. Vitiligo following type II lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavithran, K

    1989-01-01

    A middle-aged male with lepromatous leprosy developed bouts of skin lesions of depigmented macules and patches of vitiligo, just following attacks of type II lepra reaction each time. In view of the present concept of autoimmunity playing a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo as well as lepra reaction, their association in our patient appears to be more than fortuious. The depigmented macules persisted even after regression of skin lesions of leprosy following chemotherapy. The vitiligo macules responded partially to topical and systemic psoralen therapy.

  6. Acrodermatitis Enteropathica Type-II in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Ibraham EI-Sherif

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6 mouth old Libyan girl was seen with well - defined erythematous scaly, exudative and crusted lesions around the mouth, neck, back perineum, thighs and legs suggestive of acrodermatitis enteropathica. Two of the 3 other siblings had also suffered from similar lesions for a month or so at the age of 5-7 months. All of them were on breast feeding and improved on weaning. This is believed to be type II acrodermatitis enteropathica caused by deficient secretion of zinc in the mother′s milk.

  7. Antigen-specific immune responsiveness and lymphocyte recruitment in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T. W.; Etzioni, A.; Pollack, S.; Pals, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type II (LAD-II) is caused by a general defect in fucose metabolism, which leads to the absence of fucosylated sugar determinants such as the selectin ligand SLe(x). In view of the important role of selectins in lymphocyte migration and homing, we have

  8. Fetuin-A and type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Ismail Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion We concluded that fetuin-A may play a role in the pathogenesis of type II DM, and high serum fetuin-A has a strong association with IR and glycemic control in type II diabetic patients. Future studies are recommended to establish the possibility of using fetuin-A as a predictor of insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients.

  9. Duplication 5q and deletion 9p due to a t(5;9)(q34;p23) in 2 cousins with features of Hunter-McAlpine syndrome and hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Velásquez, A I; García-Castillo, H A; González-Mercado, M G; Dávalos, I P; Raca, G; Xu, X; Dwyer, E; Rivera, H

    2011-01-01

    We report on 2 similarly affected cousins with a compound imbalance resulting from a familial t(5;9)(q34;p23) and entailing both an ∼17-Mb 5q terminal duplication and an ∼12-Mb 9p terminal deletion as determined by G-banding, subtelomere FISH, and aCGH. The proband's karyotype was 46,XX,der(9)t(5;9)(q34;p23)mat.ish der(9)t(5;9)(q34;p23)(9pter-,5qter+).arr 5q34q35(163,328,000-180,629,000)×3, 9p24p23(194,000-12,664,000)×1. Her cousin had the same unbalanced karyotype inherited from his father. The clinical phenotype mainly consists of a distinct craniofacial dysmorphism featuring microcephaly, flat facies, down slanting palpebral fissures, small flat nose, long philtrum, and small mouth with thin upper lip. Additional remarkable findings were craniosynostosis of several sutures, craniolacunia and preaxial polydactyly in the proband and hypothyroidism in both subjects. The observed clinical constellation generally fits the phenotypic spectrum of the 5q distal duplication syndrome (known also as Hunter-McAlpine syndrome), except for the thyroid insufficiency which can likely be ascribed to the concurrent 9p deletion, as at least 4 other 9pter monosomic patients without chromosome 5 involvement had this hormonal disorder. The present observation further confirms the etiology of the HMS phenotype from gain of the 5q35→qter region, expands the clinical pictures of partial trisomy 5q and monosomy 9p, and provides a comprehensive list of 160 patients with 5q distal duplication. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. HISTORICAL NOTE JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON) John Hunter FRS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smellie's work was particularly high for that locality and time; the prevalence of preeclampsia, a common condition affecting ten percent of all pregnancies and one easily treated today but for which there was no treatment in Hunter's time, would more than suffice to explain a mortality rate that seems suspiciously high to 21st ...

  11. Photoelectrolysis Using Type-II Semiconductor Heterojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S; Hayne, M

    2017-09-14

    The solar-powered production of hydrogen for use as a renewable fuel is highly desirable for the world's future energy infrastructure. However, difficulties in achieving reasonable efficiencies, and thus cost-effectiveness, have hampered significant research progress. Here we propose the use of semiconductor nanostructures to create a type-II heterojunction at the semiconductor-water interface in a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) and theoretically investigate it as a method of increasing the maximum photovoltage such a cell can generate under illumination, with the aim of increasing the overall cell efficiency. A model for the semiconductor electrode in a PEC is created, which solves the Schrödinger, Poisson and drift-diffusion equations self-consistently. From this, it is determined that ZnO quantum dots on bulk n-InGaN with low In content x is the most desirable system, having electron-accepting and -donating states straddling the oxygen- and hydrogen-production potentials for x < 0.26, though large variance in literature values for certain material parameters means large uncertainties in the model output. Accordingly, results presented here should form the basis for further experimental work, which will in turn provide input to refine and develop the model.

  12. Type-II superlattice hole effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2017-08-01

    A long wavelength infrared (LWIR) type-II superlattice (T2SL) is typically characterized by a very large valence-band-edge curvature effective mass, which is often assumed to lead to poor hole mobility. A detailed examination of the LWIR T2SL heavy-hole 1 (hh1) band structure reveals that a hole with non-zero in-plane momentum (k‖ ≠ 0) can move with a much larger group velocity component along the growth direction than one at the band edge (k‖ = 0), and that the hh1 miniband width can exhibit a very strong dependence on the in-plane wavevector k‖ . To distill the band structure effects relevant to hole transport into a simple quantity, we describe a formulation for computing the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass. We show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective masses along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge curvature effective masses. We compare the conductivities effective masses of InAs/GaSb T2SL and InAs/InAsSb T2SL grown pseudomorphically on GaSb substrate, as well as the metamorphic bulk InAsSb and InAs/InAsSb T2SL.

  13. Project Lifescape-11 Hunter Plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. Project Lifescape - 11 Hunter Plants. Dipanjan Ghosh. Classroom Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 64-70. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/03/0064-0070. Keywords.

  14. Project Lifescape-:-11 Hunter Plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hunter plants are among the curiosities of nature, being very different from normal plants in their mode of nutrition. They, however, never prey upon humans or large animals as often dep- icted in fiction or fables. They are specialised in trapping insects and are popularly known as insectivorous plants. Way back in. 1875 ...

  15. Type-II Symmetry-Protected Topological Dirac Semimetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tay-Rong; Xu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, Daniel S; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Chang, Guoqing; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Bian, Guang; Belopolski, Ilya; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Shengyuan A; Neupert, Titus; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2017-07-14

    The recent proposal of the type-II Weyl semimetal state has attracted significant interest. In this Letter, we propose the concept of the three-dimensional type-II Dirac fermion and theoretically identify this new symmetry-protected topological state in the large family of transition-metal icosagenides, MA_{3} (M=V, Nb, Ta; A=Al, Ga, In). We show that the VAl_{3} family features a pair of strongly Lorentz-violating type-II Dirac nodes and that each Dirac node can be split into four type-II Weyl nodes with chiral charge ±1 via symmetry breaking. Furthermore, we predict that the Landau level spectrum arising from the type-II Dirac fermions in VAl_{3} is distinct from that of known Dirac or Weyl semimetals. We also demonstrate a topological phase transition from a type-II Dirac semimetal to a quadratic Weyl semimetal or a topological crystalline insulator via crystalline distortions.

  16. Type-II Superlattice Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun

    Type-II superlattice avalanche photodiodes have shown advantages compared to conventional mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes for infrared wavelength detection. However, surface or interface leakage current has been a major issue for superlattice avalanche photodiodes, especially in infrared wavelength region. First, passivation of the superlattice device with ammonium sulfide and thioacetamide was carried out, and its surface quality was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The study showed that both ammonium sulfide and thiacetamide passivation can actively remove the native oxide at the surface. Thiacetamide passivation combine more sulfur bonds with III-V elements than that of ammonium sulfide. Another X-ray photoelectron spectra of thiacetamide-treated atomic layer deposited zinc sulfide capped InAs/GaSb superlattice was performed to investigate the interface sulfur bond conditions. Sb--S and As--S bonds disappear while In-S bond gets enhanced, indicating that Indium Sulfide should be the major components at the interface after ZnS deposition. Second, the simulation of electrical characteristics for zinc sulfide, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide passivated superlattice devices was performed by SILVACO software to fit the experimental results and to discover the surface current mechanism. Different surface current mechanism strengths were found. Third, several novel dual-carrier avalanche photodiode structures were designed and simulated. The structures had alternate carrier multiplication regions, placed next to a wider electron multiplication region, creating dual-carrier multiplication feedback systems. Gain and excess noise factor of these structures were simulated and compared based on the dead space multiplication theory under uniform electric field. From the simulation, the applied bias can be greatly lowered or the thickness can be shrunk to achieve the same gain from the conventional device. The width of the thin region was the most

  17. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  18. Type-II myocardial infarction--patient characteristics, management and outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Y Stein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type-II MI is defined as myocardial infarction (MI secondary to ischemia due to either increased oxygen demand or decreased supply. This categorization has been used for the last five years, yet, little is known about patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. In the current work we assessed the epidemiology, causes, management and outcomes of type II MI patients. METHODS: A comparative analysis was performed between patients with type-I and type-II MI who participated in two prospective national Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Surveys (ACSIS performed in 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: The surveys included 2818 patients with acute MI of whom 127 (4.5% had type-II MI. The main causes of type-II MI were anemia (31%, sepsis (24%, and arrhythmia (17%. Patients with type-II MI tended to be older (75.6±12 vs. 63.8±13, p<0.0001, female majority (43.3% vs. 22.3%, p<0.0001, had more frequently impaired functional level (45.7% vs. 17%, p<0.0001 and a higher GRACE risk score (150±32 vs. 110±35, p<0.0001. Patients with type-II MI were significantly less often referred for coronary interventions (36% vs. 89%, p<0.0001 and less frequently prescribed guideline-directed medical therapy. Mortality rates were substantially higher among patients with type-II MI both at thirty-day (13.6% vs. 4.9%, p<0.0001 and at one-year (23.9% vs. 8.6%, p<0.0001 follow-ups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type-II compared to type-I MI have distinct demographics, increased prevalence of multiple comorbidities, a high-risk cardiovascular profile and an overall worse outcome. The complex medical condition of this cohort imposes a great therapeutic challenge and specific guidelines with recommended medical treatment and invasive strategies are warranted.

  19. Learning Objects, Type II Applications, and Embedded Pedagogical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George; Schindler, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the extent to which learning objects that focus on higher level thinking might be seen as Type II applications, as defined by Maddux, Johnson, and Willis (2001). We conclude that learning objects are at best hybrid applications, with some Type I and some Type II characteristics. We also consider whether the educational…

  20. The prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional community-based study was carried out to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting, and to study the association between various risk factors and the presence of microalbuminuria. All patients with type II diabetes mellitus who ...

  1. Type II lepra reaction--an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Avas Chandra; Sen, Sumit; Banerjee, Sabyasachi; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2012-06-01

    Type II lepra reaction usually present with skin lesions. We report a 23 years old male patient presented with fever for two weeks with no visible skin lesion suggestive of leprosy and with no history of either completion or concurrent anti leprosy drug treatment was eventually turned out to be a case of Hansen's presenting with type II lepra reaction.

  2. Method for generating exact Bianchi type II cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajj-Boutros, J.

    1986-06-01

    A method for generating exact Bianchi type II cosmological models with a perfect fluid distribution of matter is presented. Two new classes of Bianchi type II solutions have been generated from Lorenz's solution (D. Lorenz, Phys. Lett. A 79, 19 (1980)). A detailed study of physical and kinematic properties of one of them has been carried out.

  3. Travels with the Fossil Hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Peter J.

    2000-04-01

    Whether dodging bullets in West Africa, or rabid dogs in Pakistan, surviving yak-butter tea in Tibet, or eating raw fish in China, the life of a globe-trotting fossil hunter is often hazardous and always filled with surprises. Travels with the Fossil Hunters lets readers share the wonder, joys of discovery, and excitement of these intrepid scientists. Packed with more than 100 beautiful, full-color photographs, the volume takes readers on twelve expeditions to remote parts of the world in search of diverse fossil remains, from those of dinosaurs to human ancestors. Each expedition by paleontologists from London's Natural History Museum reveals the problems and challenges of working in extreme conditions, from the deserts of the Sahara and Yemen to the frozen wastes of Antarctica, from the mountains of India to the forests of Latvia. Along the way they also describe the paleontology and geology of the countries they visit and the scientific reasons for their expeditions. With a foreword from Sir David Attenborough and an introduction from Richard Fortey, this fascinating book will appeal to amateur and professional fossil hunters alike and to readers interested in accounts of exotic locales. Peter Whybrow is a research scientist at the Natural History Museum, London. His research interests include Arabian Miocene vertebrates, paleoclimates, paleogeography, and biotic diversity. He is senior editor with A. Hill of Fossil Vertebrates of Arabia (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1999).

  4. Chains of N=2, D=4 heterotic type II duals

    CERN Document Server

    Aldazabal, G; Font, A; Quevedo, Fernando

    1996-01-01

    We report on a search for N=2 heterotic strings that are dual candidates of type II compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds described as K3 fibrations. We find many new heterotic duals by using standard orbifold techniques. The associated type II compactifications fall into chains in which the proposed duals are heterotic compactifications related one another by a sequential Higgs mechanism. This breaking in the heterotic side typically involves the sequence SU(4)\\rightarrow SU(3)\\rightarrow SU(2)\\rightarrow 0, while in the type II side the weights of the complex hypersurfaces and the structure of the K3 quotient singularities also follow specific patterns.

  5. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Karoline Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP....... To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation....

  6. Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome (COFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene and are more appropriately diagnosed as having Cockayne Syndrome Type II. Other individuals with COFS may have ... gene and are more appropriately diagnosed as having Cockayne Syndrome Type II. Other individuals with COFS may have ...

  7. AHP 47: A HUNTER'S DESTINY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rnam rgyal རྣམ་རྒྱལ།

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A hunter with a quiver full of arrows at the right side of his waist and a rainbow-like bow on his back was on his way to a deep, narrow valley that slowly opened to a jungle in which only a bold man would dare set foot. Big trees held their numerous arms around each other so tightly that only tiny rays of light could pass through the leaves to the rich ground. Wild animals enjoyed this jungle as their home and peacefully lived there. ...

  8. Plasmonic Enhanced Type-II Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  9. Heterotic-type II duality in twistor space

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Heterotic string theory compactified on a K3 surface times T^2 is believed to be equivalent to type II string theory on a suitable Calabi-Yau threefold. In particular, it must share the same hypermultiplet moduli space. Building on the known twistorial description on the type II side, and on recent progress on the map between type II and heterotic moduli in the `double scaling' limit (where both the type II and heterotic strings become classical), we provide a new twistorial construction of the hypermultiplet moduli space in this limit which is adapted to the symmetries of the heterotic string. We also take steps towards understanding the twistorial description for heterotic worldsheet instanton corrections away from the double scaling limit. As a spin-off, we obtain a twistorial description of a class of automorphic forms of SO(4,n,Z) obtained by Borcherds' lift.

  10. PKMiner: a database for exploring type II polyketide synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jinki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial aromatic polyketides are a pharmacologically important group of natural products synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (type II PKSs in actinobacteria. Isolation of novel aromatic polyketides from microbial sources is currently impeded because of the lack of knowledge about prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis and the difficulties in finding and optimizing target microorganisms. Comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and the prediction of possible polyketide chemotypes in various actinobacterial genomes will thus enable the discovery or synthesis of novel polyketides in the most plausible microorganisms. Description We performed a comprehensive computational analysis of type II PKSs and their gene clusters in actinobacterial genomes. By identifying type II PKS subclasses from the sequence analysis of 280 known type II PKSs, we developed highly accurate domain classifiers for these subclasses and derived prediction rules for aromatic polyketide chemotypes generated by different combinations of type II PKS domains. Using 319 available actinobacterial genomes, we predicted 231 type II PKSs from 40 PKS gene clusters in 25 actinobacterial genomes, and polyketide chemotypes corresponding to 22 novel PKS gene clusters in 16 genomes. These results showed that the microorganisms capable of producing aromatic polyketides are specifically distributed within a certain suborder of Actinomycetales such as Catenulisporineae, Frankineae, Micrococcineae, Micromonosporineae, Pseudonocardineae, Streptomycineae, and Streptosporangineae. Conclusions We could identify the novel candidates of type II PKS gene clusters and their polyketide chemotypes in actinobacterial genomes by comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and prediction of aromatic polyketides. The genome analysis results indicated that the specific suborders in actinomycetes could be used as prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis. The chemotype-prediction rules with

  11. PKMiner: a database for exploring type II polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinki; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2012-08-08

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides are a pharmacologically important group of natural products synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (type II PKSs) in actinobacteria. Isolation of novel aromatic polyketides from microbial sources is currently impeded because of the lack of knowledge about prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis and the difficulties in finding and optimizing target microorganisms. Comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and the prediction of possible polyketide chemotypes in various actinobacterial genomes will thus enable the discovery or synthesis of novel polyketides in the most plausible microorganisms. We performed a comprehensive computational analysis of type II PKSs and their gene clusters in actinobacterial genomes. By identifying type II PKS subclasses from the sequence analysis of 280 known type II PKSs, we developed highly accurate domain classifiers for these subclasses and derived prediction rules for aromatic polyketide chemotypes generated by different combinations of type II PKS domains. Using 319 available actinobacterial genomes, we predicted 231 type II PKSs from 40 PKS gene clusters in 25 actinobacterial genomes, and polyketide chemotypes corresponding to 22 novel PKS gene clusters in 16 genomes. These results showed that the microorganisms capable of producing aromatic polyketides are specifically distributed within a certain suborder of Actinomycetales such as Catenulisporineae, Frankineae, Micrococcineae, Micromonosporineae, Pseudonocardineae, Streptomycineae, and Streptosporangineae. We could identify the novel candidates of type II PKS gene clusters and their polyketide chemotypes in actinobacterial genomes by comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and prediction of aromatic polyketides. The genome analysis results indicated that the specific suborders in actinomycetes could be used as prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis. The chemotype-prediction rules with the suggested type II PKS modules derived using this resource

  12. Transient neonatal hyperparathyroidism: a presenting feature of sialidosis type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoglu, Tuba Fatma; Ozkan, Mehpare; Igdoura, Suleiman; Dursun, Arzu; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül

    2013-01-01

    Sialidosis is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of α-N-acetyl neuraminidase-1. Sialidosis is classified into two main clinical variants: type I, the milder form of the disease, and type II, which can in turn be subdivided into three forms: congenital, infantile, and juvenile. We report a female patient with sialidosis type II, presenting with the congenital form of the disease with thrombocytopenia, pulmonary interstitial thickening, and transient secondary neonatal hyperparathyroidism.

  13. Generating controllable type-II Weyl points via periodic driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-12-01

    Type-II Weyl semimetals are a novel gapless topological phase of matter discovered recently in 2015. Similar to normal (type-I) Weyl semimetals, type-II Weyl semimetals consist of isolated band touching points. However, unlike type-I Weyl semimetals which have a linear energy dispersion around the band touching points forming a three-dimensional (3D) Dirac cone, type-II Weyl semimetals have a tilted conelike structure around the band touching points. This leads to various novel physical properties that are different from type-I Weyl semimetals. In order to study further the properties of type-II Weyl semimetals and perhaps realize them for future applications, generating controllable type-II Weyl semimetals is desirable. In this paper, we propose a way to generate a type-II Weyl semimetal via a generalized Harper model interacting with a harmonic driving field. When the field is treated classically, we find that only type-I Weyl points emerge. However, by treating the field quantum mechanically, some of these type-I Weyl points may turn into type-II Weyl points. Moreover, by tuning the coupling strength, it is possible to control the tilt of the Weyl points and the energy difference between two Weyl points, which makes it possible to generate a pair of mixed Weyl points of type-I and type-II. We also discuss how to physically distinguish these two types of Weyl points in the framework of our model via the Landau level structures in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. The results are of general interest to quantum optics as well as ongoing studies of Floquet topological phases.

  14. Type-II Dirac surface states in topological crystalline insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Chan, Y.-H.; Li, Xiao; Nohara, Y.; Schnyder, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been realized that topological Weyl semimetals come in two different varieties: (i) with standard Weyl cones with pointlike Fermi surfaces (type I) and (ii) with tilted Weyl cones that appear at the contact of electron and hole pockets (type II). These two types of Weyl semimetals have very different physical properties, in particular, in their thermodynamics and magnetotransport. Here, we show that Dirac cone surface states of topological crystalline insulators can be distinguished in a similar way. We demonstrate this in terms of a general surface theory and then apply this knowledge to a family of antiperovskites of the form A3E O , where A denotes an alkaline earth metal, while E stands for Pb or Sn. Using ab initio DFT calculations, we investigate the bulk and surface topology of these antiperovskites and show that they exhibit type-I as well as type-II Dirac surface states protected by reflection symmetry. We find that the type-II Dirac states, as opposed to the type-I Dirac states, exhibit characteristic van Hove singularities in their dispersion, which lead to different thermodynamic properties, and which can serve as an experimental fingerprint of type-II surface states. The different magnetotransport characteristics between type-I and type-II surface states are discussed. In addition, we show that both type-I and type-II surface states exhibit an unusual helical spin polarization, which could lead to topological surface superconductivity.

  15. Enhanced Materials Based on Submonolayer Type-II Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamargo, Maria C [City College of New York, NY (United States); Kuskovsky, Igor L. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States) Queens College; Meriles, Carlos [City College of New York, NY (United States); Noyan, Ismail C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We have investigated a nanostructured material known as sub-monolayer type-II QDs, made from wide bandgap II-VI semiconductors. Our goal is to understand and exploit their tunable optical and electrical properties by taking advantage of the type-II band alignment and quantum confinement effects. Type-II ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) in a ZnSe host are particularly interesting because of their relatively large valence band and conduction band offsets. In the current award we have developed new materials based on sub-monolayer type-II QDs that may be advantageous for photovoltaic and spintronics applications. We have also expanded the structural characterization of these materials by refining the X-ray diffraction methodologies needed to investigate them. In particular, we have 1) demonstrated ZnCdTe/ZnCdSe type-II QDs materials that have ideal properties for the development of novel high efficiency “intermediate band solar cells”, 2) we developed a comprehensive approach to describe and model the growth of these ultra-small type-II QDs, 3) analysis of the evolution of the photoluminescence (PL) emission, combined with other characterization probes allowed us to predict the size and density of the QDs as a function of the growth conditions, 4) we developed and implemented novel sophisticated X-ray diffraction techniques from which accurate size and shape of the buried type-II QDs could be extracted, 5) a correlation of the shape anisotropy with polarization dependent PL was observed, confirming the QDs detailed shape and providing insight about the effects of this shape anisotropy on the physical properties of the type-II QD systems, and 6) a detailed “time-resolved Kerr rotation” investigation has led to the demonstration of enhanced electron spin lifetimes for the samples with large densities of type-II QDs and an understanding of the interplay between the QDs and Te-isoelectroic centers, a defect that forms in the spacer layers that separate the QDs.

  16. Type II DNA: When the interfacial energy becomes negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Poulomi; Maji, Jaya; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2011-08-01

    An important step in transcription of a DNA base sequence to a protein is the initiation from the exact starting point, called promoter region. We propose a physical mechanism for identification of the promoter region, which relies on a new classification of DNAs into two types, Type I and Type II, like superconductors, depending on the sign of the energy of the interface separating the zipped and the unzipped phases. This is determined by the energies of helical ordering and stretching over two independent length scales. The negative interfacial energy in Type II DNA leads to domains of helically ordered state separated by defect regions, or blobs, enclosed by the interfaces. The defect blobs, pinned by non-coding promoter regions, would be physically distinct from all other types of bubbles. We also show that the order of the melting transition under a force is different for Type I and Type II.

  17. The Boston keratoprosthesis type II: the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Siddharth; Siddique, Sana S; Dohlman, Claes H; Chodosh, James

    2011-12-01

    To report the long-term outcomes of Boston keratoprosthesis type II implantation in the management of severe ocular surface disease and corneal blindness through a retrospective interventional case series. This retrospective review included medical records of patients who underwent Boston keratoprosthesis type II implantation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2009. The main outcome measures analyzed were visual acuity, keratoprosthesis retention, and postoperative complications. A total of 29 eyes of 26 patients received a Boston keratoprosthesis type II during the study period. Patients undergoing operation had corneal blindness because of mucous membrane pemphigoid (51.7%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (41.4%), or other ocular surface disease (6.9%). Visual acuity after surgery improved to 20/200 or better in 23 eyes (79.3%) and to 20/30 or better in 10 eyes (34.5%). In patients with at least 1 year of follow-up (n = 21), visual acuity of 20/200 or better was maintained in 12 eyes (57.1%). Of 13 eyes followed-up for more than 5 years, 6 eyes (46.2%) had visual acuity of 20/200 or better at the last follow-up examination. Eyes that did not improve to 20/200 or lost vision during the follow-up had end-stage glaucoma, previous retinal detachment, or age-related macular degeneration. Of the total of 29 eyes, 17 devices (58.6%) were retained without extrusion or replacement during a total follow-up time of 107.9 person-years. The Boston keratoprosthesis type II is a viable option for corneal blindness from severe autoimmune ocular surface diseases.

  18. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies

  20. Type II Endometrial Cancer Overexpresses NILCO: A Preliminary Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Brown, Danielle; Oprea-Iles, Gabriela; Vann, Kiara T; Lanier, Viola; Lee, Regina; Candelaria, Pierre V; Quarshie, Alexander; Pattillo, Roland; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben Rene

    2017-01-01

    The expression of NILCO molecules (Notch, IL-1, and leptin crosstalk outcome) and the association with obesity were investigated in types I and II endometrial cancer (EmCa). Additionally, the involvement of NILCO in leptin-induced invasiveness of EmCa cells was investigated. The expression of NILCO mRNAs and proteins were analyzed in EmCa from African-American (n = 29) and Chinese patients (tissue array, n = 120 cases). The role of NILCO in leptin-induced invasion of Ishikawa and An3ca EmCa cells was investigated using Notch, IL-1, and leptin signaling inhibitors. NILCO molecules were expressed higher in type II EmCa, regardless of ethnic background or obesity status of patients. NILCO proteins were mainly localized in the cellular membrane and cytoplasm of type II EmCa. Additionally, EmCa from obese African-American patients showed higher levels of NILCO molecules than EmCa from lean patients. Notably, leptin-induced EmCa cell invasion was abrogated by NILCO inhibitors. Type II EmCa expressed higher NILCO molecules, which may suggest it is involved in the progression of the more aggressive EmCa phenotype. Obesity was associated with higher expression of NILCO molecules in EmCa. Leptin-induced cell invasion was dependent on NILCO. Hence, NILCO might be involved in tumor progression and could represent a new target/biomarker for type II EmCa.

  1. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banerjee et al [16] studied exponential inflation and power function inflation in general scalar tensor theory where the coupling parameter ω is a function of the scalar field. Shri Ram and Singh [17] studied the inflationary solutions in totally anisotropic Bianchi Type-II space–time in the presence of massless scalar field with.

  2. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke. Utku Murat Kalafat, Canan Akman, Turker Karaboga, Tarik Ocak. Abstract. Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic ...

  3. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafat, Utku Murat; Akman, Canan; Karaboga, Turker; Ocak, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic stroke. In this study, we present a rare case of multicentric ischemic stroke induced by Mobitz type II atrioventricular block. PMID:28154620

  4. Evidence for topological type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2017-12-11

    Recently, a type-II Weyl fermion was theoretically predicted to appear at the contact of electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. A distinguishing feature of the surfaces of type-II Weyl semimetals is the existence of topological surface states, so-called Fermi arcs. Although WTe2 was the first material suggested as a type-II Weyl semimetal, the direct observation of its tilting Weyl cone and Fermi arc has not yet been successful. Here, we show strong evidence that WTe2 is a type-II Weyl semimetal by observing two unique transport properties simultaneously in one WTe2 nanoribbon. The negative magnetoresistance induced by a chiral anomaly is quite anisotropic in WTe2 nanoribbons, which is present in b-axis ribbon, but is absent in a-axis ribbon. An extra-quantum oscillation, arising from a Weyl orbit formed by the Fermi arc and bulk Landau levels, displays a two dimensional feature and decays as the thickness increases in WTe2 nanoribbon.

  5. Islet Specific Wnt Activation in Human Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hee Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt pathway effector gene TCF7L2 has been linked to type II diabetes, making it important to study the role of Wnt signaling in diabetes pathogenesis. We examined the expression of multiple Wnt pathway components in pancreases from normal individuals and type II diabetic individuals. Multiple members of the Wnt signaling pathway, including TCF7L2, Wnt2b, β-catenin, pGSK3β, TCF3, cyclinD1, and c-myc, were undetectable or expressed at low levels in islets from nondiabetic individuals, but were also upregulated specifically in islets of type II diabetic patients. Culture of pancreatic tissue and islet isolation led to Wnt activation that was reversed by the Wnt antagonist sFRP, demonstrating that Wnt activation in that setting was due to soluble Wnt factors. These data support a model in which the Wnt pathway plays a dynamic role in the pathogenesis of type II diabetes and suggest manipulation of Wnt signaling as a new approach to β-cell-directed diabetes therapy.

  6. Knowledge Is Power: Teaching Children about Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feild-Berner, Natalie; Balgopal, Meena

    2011-01-01

    World Diabetes Day (November 14) offers a wonderful opportunity to educate elementary children about the power they have to control their health. First lady Michelle Obama has urged Americans to educate themselves about childhood obesity, which is often associated with the onset of type II diabetes (Rabin 2010). The authors developed activities to…

  7. Type II Endometrial Cancer Overexpresses NILCO: A Preliminary Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Daley-Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The expression of NILCO molecules (Notch, IL-1, and leptin crosstalk outcome and the association with obesity were investigated in types I and II endometrial cancer (EmCa. Additionally, the involvement of NILCO in leptin-induced invasiveness of EmCa cells was investigated. Methods. The expression of NILCO mRNAs and proteins were analyzed in EmCa from African-American n=29 and Chinese patients (tissue array, n=120 cases. The role of NILCO in leptin-induced invasion of Ishikawa and An3ca EmCa cells was investigated using Notch, IL-1, and leptin signaling inhibitors. Results. NILCO molecules were expressed higher in type II EmCa, regardless of ethnic background or obesity status of patients. NILCO proteins were mainly localized in the cellular membrane and cytoplasm of type II EmCa. Additionally, EmCa from obese African-American patients showed higher levels of NILCO molecules than EmCa from lean patients. Notably, leptin-induced EmCa cell invasion was abrogated by NILCO inhibitors. Conclusion. Type II EmCa expressed higher NILCO molecules, which may suggest it is involved in the progression of the more aggressive EmCa phenotype. Obesity was associated with higher expression of NILCO molecules in EmCa. Leptin-induced cell invasion was dependent on NILCO. Hence, NILCO might be involved in tumor progression and could represent a new target/biomarker for type II EmCa.

  8. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report | Ayadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy ...

  9. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of median nerve conduction in Type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-12-29

    Dec 29, 2015 ... Electrodiagnostic evaluation of median nerve conduction in. Type II diabetes mellitus patients that were asymptomatic for peripheral neuropathy: a case control study. Owolabi LF 1*, Adebisi S2, Danborno B2, Buraimoh AA3. 1Department of Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, ...

  10. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion, where the majority of the sample is ...

  11. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  12. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  13. Left Ventricular Geometry In Nigerians With Type II Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy is independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular and all cause mortality. In a relatively healthy hypertensive adult population, type II diabetes is associated with higher left ventricular mass, concentric left ventricular geometry and lower ...

  14. [Metabolic surgery in treatment of diabetes mellitus of type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, V M; Fishman, M B

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, according to data of WHO, the diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in more than 280 million people. The diabetes mellitus type II had 90% patients. The applied methods of conservative therapy seldom lead to euglycemia condition of patients. Last years the treatment of diabetes mellitus was carried out by the method of different bariatic interventions. Good results was obtained, they should be analyzed and investigate. The results of treatment of 142 patients from 628 patients (with type II) were estimated. The patients were undergone by different bariatic interventions. Modern laparoscopic operations were performed on all the patients. Controlled bandage of stomach had 81 of patients. Gastric resection was performed in 28. Gastric bypass surgery was carried out in 22 of patients and biliopancreatic diversion - in 11. The improvement of control of leukemia level was obtained. Diabetes type II could be treated by surgical methods. The best results were obtained after combined operations, which potentially could present an alternative method of treatment of type II diabetes.

  15. Hypertension In Type II Diabetes Mellitus In Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with hypertension in diabetes. Conclusion: Hypertension is commoner in diabetes in sub-saharan Africa that it was previously believed. The finding of hypertension should arouse the possibility of the presence of microangiopathic complications in type II diabetes. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol.1(2) 2002: 22-24 ...

  16. The hunter a scientific novel

    CERN Document Server

    Genta, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th century: humankind has become a spacefaring civilization, colonizing the solar system and beyond. While no alien forms of life have yet been encountered in this expansion into space, colonists suddenly encounter machines of alien origin - huge robots able to reproduce themselves.  Called replicators by the colonists, they seem to have but a single goal: to destroy all organic life they come in contact with. Since the colonial governments have no means to fight this menace directly, they instead promise huge rewards to whoever destroys a replicator. As a result, the frontier attracts a new kind of adventurers, the Hunters, who work to find and destroy the replicators. Mike Edwards, a skilled young maintenance technician and robotics expert at a faraway outpost, will not only become one of them - but be the very first one to unlock the secret behind the replicators’ origin and mission.   The scientific and technical aspects underlying the plot - in particular space travel, robotics and self-replica...

  17. Síndrome de Hunter-Hurler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Lefèvre

    1954-03-01

    Full Text Available Les deux cas de gargoylisme présentés ont appelé l'attention des auteurs et ont mérité leur publication vue la rareté de la maladie en question. Le diagnostic repose en un certain nombre de signes cliniques, lesquels, cependant, n'ont pas besoin d'être au complet pour que l'on puisse affermir le diagnostic du syndrome de Hunter-Hurler. C'est ce qui arrive, d'ailleurs, avec la majorité des maladies de caractère génétique, dans les-quelles il est possible de verifier la transmission de quelques traits seule-ment de Pensemble clinique, insuffisants pour caractériser la maladie sous tous ses aspects, mais suffisants pour permettre un diagnostic très sûr. Cas nº 1: les auteurs font ressortir la face caractéristique de la maladie, la petite taille, les doigts en griffe, les alterations très caractéristiques de forme des vertèbres lombaires et le retard psycho-moteur considérable; comme antécédents familiaux, il a été constaté qu'une cousine-germaine du côté paternel de la malade est morte à 1'âge de 12 ans d'une maladie semblable. Cas nº 2: ici ressortent la face caractéristique, la petite taille, le développement retardé, les altérations des vertèbres lombaires et, à l'examen oculaire, un aspect suggestif de l'opacité cornéenne considérée comme pathognomonique du gargoylisme. Aucun traitement a été tenté dans les deux cas.

  18. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  19. Luminescence dynamics in type-II GaAs/AlAs superlattices near the type-I to type-II crossover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Kalt, H.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1996-01-01

    We report on a study of the time-resolved luminescence of type-II GaAs/AlAs superlattices near the type-I to type-II crossover. In spite of the slight type-II band alignment, the luminescence is dominated by the type-I transition. This is due to the inhomogeneous broadening of the type-I transiti...

  20. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  1. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 60, La Serena (Chile); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); McCarthy, Patrick [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: lgalbany@das.uchile.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP, CONICET) (Argentina); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  2. Homozygous antithrombin deficiency type II causing neonatal thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Vanessa; Zervan, Katharina; Thom, Katharina; Mannhalter, Christine; Quehenberger, Peter; Pabinger, Ingrid; Male, Christoph

    2017-09-04

    We report four children from different families with homozygous antithrombin (AT) deficiency type II affecting the heparin binding site (p.Leu131Phe mutation). All children had severe spontaneous venous and/or arterial thromboembolic events shortly after birth. This report intends to raise awareness among clinicians about this rare but severe condition. When thrombosis occurs in an otherwise healthy newborn, a severe congenital thrombophilic disorder should be considered. In homozygous AT deficiency type II, AT activity is typically reduced but may also be in the normal range, posing a diagnostic challenge. Rapid diagnosis is important to initiate appropriate therapy. Standard anticoagulation with heparin may prove ineffective in severe AT deficiency, requiring substitution of AT concentrate and early switch to alternative anticoagulants such as vitamin K antagonists. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Instability in the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Isaías G. de, E-mail: isaias@ufrrj.br

    2015-07-17

    Under the view of the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau theory we have investigated the penetration of the magnetic field in the type II superconductors. We show that the single vortices, situated along the borderline, between the normal region channel and the superconducting region, can escape to regions still empty of vortices. We show that the origin of this process is the repulsive nature of vortex–vortex interaction, in addition to the non-homogeneous distribution of the vortices along the normal region channel. Using London theory we explain the extra gain of kinetic energy by the vortices situated along this borderline. - Highlights: • TDGL is used to study the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors. • Instability process is found during the magnetic field penetration. • Vortices along the front of the normal region escape to superconducting region. • We explain the extra-gain of kinetic energy by vortices along the borderline.

  4. On the covariant quantization of type-II superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenberg, Sebastian [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: basti@hep.itp.tuwien.ac.at; Knapp, Johanna; Kreuzer, Maximilian [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    In a series of papers Grassi, Policastro, Porrati and van Nieuwenhuizen have introduced a new method to covariantly quantize the GS-superstring by constructing a resolution of the pure spinor constraint of Berkovits' approach. Their latest version is based on a gauged WZNW model and a definition of physical states in terms of relative cohomology groups. We first put the off-shell formulation of the type-II version of their ideas into a chirally split form and directly construct the free action of the gauged WZNW model, thus circumventing some complications of the super group manifold approach to type-II. Then we discuss the BRST charges that define the relative cohomology and the N=2 superconformal algebra. A surprising result is that nil potency of the BRST charge requires the introduction of another quartet of ghosts. (author)

  5. Gain spectroscopy of a type-II VECSEL chip

    CERN Document Server

    Lammers, Christian; Berger, Christian; Möller, Christoph; Fuchs, Christian; Perez, Antje Ruiz; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Hader, Jörg; Moloney, Jerome; Stolz, Wolfgang; Koch, Stephan W; Koch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Using optical pump-white light probe spectroscopy the gain dynamics is investigated for a VECSEL chip which is based on a type-II heterostructure. The active region the chip consists of a GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs multiple quantum well. For this structure, a fully microscopic theory predicts a modal room temperature gain at a wavelength of 1170 nm, which is confirmed by experimental spectra. The results show a gain buildup on the type-II chip which is delayed relative to that of a type-I chip. This slower gain dynamics is attributed to a diminished cooling rate arising from reduced electron-hole scattering.

  6. Auroral kilometric radiation triggered by type II solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    The previously-reported triggering of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) during type III solar radio bursts was attributed to the incoming radio waves rather than other aspects of the burst's causative solar flare. This conclusion has now been confirmed by ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations showing AKR which seems to have been triggered also by a subsequent type II solar radio burst, up to eleven hours after the flare.

  7. Progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2018-01-01

    The progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are believed to be red supergiant (RSG) stars, but there is much disparity in the literature concerning their mass at core collapse and therefore on the main sequence. Here, we model the SN radiation arising from the low-energy explosion of RSG stars of 12, 25 and 27 M⊙ on the main sequence and formed through single star evolution. Despite the narrow range in ejecta kinetic energy (2.5-4.2 × 1050 erg) in our model set, the SN observables from our three models are significantly distinct, reflecting the differences in progenitor structure (e.g. surface radius, H-rich envelope mass and He-core mass). Our higher mass RSG stars give rise to Type II SNe that tend to have bluer colours at early times, a shorter photospheric phase, and a faster declining V-band light curve (LC) more typical of Type II-linear SNe, in conflict with the LC plateau observed for low-luminosity SNe II. The complete fallback of the CO core in the low-energy explosions of our high-mass RSG stars prevents the ejection of any 56Ni (nor any core O or Si), in contrast to low-luminosity SNe II-P, which eject at least 0.001 M⊙ of 56Ni. In contrast to observations, Type II SN models from higher mass RSGs tend to show an H α absorption that remains broad at late times (due to a larger velocity at the base of the H-rich envelope). In agreement with the analyses of pre-explosion photometry, we conclude that low-luminosity SNe II-P likely arise from low-mass rather than high-mass RSG stars.

  8. Type II restriction endonucleases—a historical perspective and more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss ‘Type II’ REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. PMID:24878924

  9. Retinopathy and microalbuminuria in type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoja Mohammad R

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of retinopathy and microalbuminuria and their correlation in type II diabetic patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study 590 patients suffering from diabetis type II were examined. Fundoscopy was performed by practising ophthalmologist. The ratio of urinary albumin to creatinine was assessed by clinitek 100 (Bayer corporation–USA. HbA1C, height and weight also were measured. Results The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3% (232 patients, 5.4% of which showed to be prolifrative diabetic retinopathy (PDR. The diabetic retinopathy had significant inverse correlation with body mass index (BMI (P = 0.02. HbA1C was higher in patients with PDR (mean = 10.5% than in patients with no signs of retinopathy (mean = 9.5% and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 25.9% while 14.5% of the patients revealed to have macroalbuminuria. As expected, diabetic retinopathy and renal involvement were highly positively correlated. (P = 0.001. Conclusion Microalbuminuria is associated with diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients and is a reliable marker of retinopathy.

  10. Retinopathy and microalbuminuria in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaviat, Masoud R; Afkhami, Mohammad; Shoja, Mohammad R

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of retinopathy and microalbuminuria and their correlation in type II diabetic patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study 590 patients suffering from diabetis type II were examined. Fundoscopy was performed by practising ophthalmologist. The ratio of urinary albumin to creatinine was assessed by clinitek 100 (Bayer corporation–USA). HbA1C, height and weight also were measured. Results The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3% (232 patients), 5.4% of which showed to be prolifrative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The diabetic retinopathy had significant inverse correlation with body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.02). HbA1C was higher in patients with PDR (mean = 10.5%) than in patients with no signs of retinopathy (mean = 9.5%) and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 25.9% while 14.5% of the patients revealed to have macroalbuminuria. As expected, diabetic retinopathy and renal involvement were highly positively correlated. (P = 0.001). Conclusion Microalbuminuria is associated with diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients and is a reliable marker of retinopathy. PMID:15228626

  11. Coronas Mass Ejections, Shocks, and Type II Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomena in the interplanetary medium. Type II radio bursts are the earliest indicators of particle acceleration by CME-driven shocks. There is one-to-one correspondence between large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and long wavelength type II bursts because the same CME-driven shock is supposed to accelerate electrons and ions. However, there are some significant deviations: some CMEs lacking type II bursts (radio-quiet or RQ CMEs) are associated with small SEP events while some radioloud (RL) CMEs are not associated with SEP events, suggesting subtle differences in the acceleration of electrons and protons. Not all CME-driven shocks are radio loud: more than one third of the interplanetary shocks during solar cycle 23 were radio quiet. Some RQ shocks were associated with energetic storm particle (ESP) events, which are detected when the shocks arrive at the observing spacecraft. This paper attempts to explain these contradictory results in terms of the properties of CMEs, shocks, and the ambient medium.

  12. [A pancreas suture-less type II binding pancreaticogastrostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-you; Hong, De-fei; Liu, Ying-bin; Li, Jiang-tao; Tao, Feng; Tan, Zhi-jian

    2009-12-01

    To explore the feasibility and safety of type II binding pancreaticogastrostomy (BPG) in pancreaticoduodenectomy and mid-segmentectomy of pancreas. From November 2008 to May 2009, 26 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and mid-segmentectomy of pancreas with type II BPG reconstruction, including 13 cases of pancreatic head cancer, 3 cases of duodenal adenocarcinoma, 2 cases of ampullary carcinoma, 4 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 1 case of bile duct cell severe atypical hyperplasia, and 1 case of stomach cancer. The process of type II BPG was described as the following: after pancreas remnant was mobilized for 2-3 cm, a piece of sero-muscular layer at the posterior gastric wall was excised and then a sero-muscular depth purse-suturing with 3-0 prolene was pre-placed (outer purse-string). Incising anterior gastric wall or opening part of the closed distal gastric stump, the mucosa layer at the sero-muscular defect was incised and then purse-suture at the mucosal tube was pre-placed (inner purse-string). Through the two pre-placed purse-strings, the pancreas remnant was pulled into the gastric lumen and then posterior gastric wall was pushed backward to keep it closely in contact with the retro-peritoneal wall. Thereafter, the outer purse-string was tied (outer binding) and then the inner purse-string was tied (inner binding). All cases underwent BPG of type II. The operative time ranged from 3 to 5.5 hours. The postoperative hospital stay ranged from 6 to 48 days. Postoperative complications included 1 case of ascites, 2 cases of delayed gastric emptying and 1 case of intra-abdominal bleeding. All cases with complications were cured after nonsurgical treatment. No mortality or pancreatic leakage occurred. Pancreaticogastrostomy is good for accommodating a large pancreas stump. Binding technique is very helpful in minimizing the leak rate of pancreaticogastrostomy. While type I BPG is safe and easy to perform, type II is even safer and easier to be done.

  13. Hunter-McAlpine craniosynostosis phenotype associated with skeletal anomalies and interstitial deletion of chromosome 17q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.A.; Manchester, D.K.; Prescott, K.E.; Milner, R.; McGavran, L.; Cohen, M.M. Jr. [Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-24

    Hunter-McAlpine syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder consisting of variable manifestations including craniosynostosis, almond-shaped palpebral fissures, small mouth, mild acral-skeletal anomalies, short stature, and mental deficiency. We report on a 9-year-old boy with this phenotype with more severe skeletal abnormalities than previously described. Chromosomes showed del(17)(q23.1{r_arrow}q24.2); the more severe phenotype may be explained by the deletion. The deletion also suggests the possibility that the gene for Hunter-McAlpine syndrome might map to that region. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Motivations of female Black Hills deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Covelli Metcalf, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    State fish and wildlife agencies are particularly interested in attracting female participation because of the potential to offset declining participation in hunting. Understanding female hunters’ motivations will be critical for designing effective recruitment and retention programs for women hunters. Although female participation in hunting is increasing, males still outnumber females by about tenfold. Gender differences in deer hunters were explored by comparing ratings of eight motivations (social, nature, excitement, meat, challenge, trophy, extra hunting opportunity, and solitude). Hunter types were defined by hunters’ selection of the most important motivation for why they like Black Hills deer hunting. Overall, females and males were relatively similar in their ratings of the eight motivations, and we found 85% gender similarity in the selection of the most important motivation. Women were slightly more motivated by the food aspect of the hunt while men placed slightly more value on the hunt as a sporting activity.

  15. On Improving the Conceptualization and Implementation of the Hunter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidman, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Selected results of an examination of the Hunter model are presented as two conceptual limitations of the Hunter model are discussed: "Curriculum and Instruction," and "Supervision vs Evaluation." (JD)

  16. Type II diabetes mellitus and menopause: a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, A; Blümel, J E; Portela-Buelvas, K; Mezones-Holguín, E; Barón, G; Bencosme, A; Benítez, Z; Bravo, L M; Calle, A; Chedraui, P; Flores, D; Espinoza, M T; Gómez, G; Hernández-Bueno, J A; Laribezcoa, F; Lima, S; Martino, M; Mostajo, D; Ojeda, E; Onatra, W; Sánchez, H; Navarro, D; Tserotas, K; Vallejo, M S; Witis, S; Zuñiga, M C

    2013-12-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus causes metabolic changes that may lead to early menopause and worsen climacteric symptoms. To determine the risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus and assess the impact of this disease on the age of menopause and on climacteric symptoms. A total of 6079 women aged between 40 and 59 years from 11 Latin American countries were requested to answer the Menopause Rating Scale and Goldberg Anxiety-Depression Scale. The prevalence of diabetes was 6.7%. Diabetes mellitus was associated with arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 4.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.47-5.31), the use of psychotropic drugs (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.22-1.94), hormonal therapy (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.11-1.92), ≥ 50 years of age (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.86), overweight or obese (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.15-1.89), and waist circumference ≥ 88 cm (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.06-1.65). Factors associated with lower risk of diabetes were the use of hormonal contraceptives (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87), alcohol (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98) and living in cities > 2500 meters above sea level (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.91) or with high temperatures (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). In turn, diabetes tripled the risk of menopause in women under 45 years of age. Diabetes did not increase the risk of deterioration of quality of life due to climacteric symptoms. Menopause does not increase the risk of type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is associated with early menopause in women under 45 years of age.

  17. Dentin dysplasia, type II: a rare autosomal dominant disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, M; Eastman, J R; Goldblatt, L I; Michaud, M; Bixler, D

    1977-10-01

    Dentin dysplasia, Type II, is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. The primary teeth are amber and translucent and the pulp chambers are obliterated. The permanent teeth have a normal to brown-gray coloration and a thistle-tube pulp configuration with multiple true denticles. To date, only five families with this disorder have been reported. This article presents two additional families. Light and scanning electron microscopy of an affected primary incisor showed the dentin, including the mantle layer, to be highly disorganized throughout. Possible pathogenic events associated with the phenotype are discussed.

  18. Predicted continuum spectra of type II supernovae - LTE results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaviv, G.; Wehrse, R.; Wagoner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The continuum spectral energy distribution of the flux emerging from type II supernovae is calculated from quasi-static radiative transfer through a power-law density gradient, assuming radiative equilibrium and LTE. It is found that the Balmer jump disappears at high effective temperatures and low densities, while the spectrum resembles that of a dilute blackbody but is flatter with a sharper cutoff at the short-wavelength end. A significant UV excess is found in all models calculated. The calculation should be considered exploratory because of significant effects which are anticipated to arise from departure from LTE.

  19. Antimonide type-II superlattice barrier infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Höglund, Linda; Keo, Sam A.; Rafol, B., , Sir; Hill, Cory J.; Fisher, Anita M.; Luong, Edward M.; Nguyen, Jean; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Pepper, Brian J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2017-02-01

    We provide a brief overview of recent progress in III-V semiconductor infrared photodetectors resulting from advances in infrared detector materials, including type-II superlattices (T2SL) and InAsSb alloy, and the unipolar detector architecture. We summarize T2SL unipolar barrier infrared detector and focal plane array development at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in support of the Vital Infrared Sensor Technology Acceleration (VISTA) Program. We also comment on the connection of T2SL barrier infrared detector to MCT infrared detectors.

  20. Type II p-branes the brane-scan revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael J

    1993-01-01

    We re-examine the classification of supersymmetric extended objects in the light of the recently discovered Type II p-branes, previously thought not to exist for p> 1. We find new points on the brane-scan only in D = 10 and then only for p = 3(Type IIB), p = 4 (Type IIA), p = 5 (Type IIA and IIB) and p = 6 (Type IIA). The case D = 10, p = 2 (Type IIA) also exists but is equivalent to the previously classified D = 11 supermembrane.

  1. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure.

  2. The quiescent progenitors of four Type II supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Samson A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Adams, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope difference imaging data for the final years of four Type II supernovae progenitors. For all four, we find no significant evidence for stochastic or steady variability in the U, B, V, or R-bands. Our limits constrain variability to no more than roughly 5-10% of the expected R-band luminosities of the progenitors. These limits are comparable to the observed variability of red supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds. Based on these four events, the probability o...

  3. Predictive data modeling of human type II diabetes related statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Kristina L.; Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Albritton, Nathaniel G.

    2009-04-01

    During the course of routine Type II treatment of one of the authors, it was decided to derive predictive analytical Data Models of the daily sampled vital statistics: namely weight, blood pressure, and blood sugar, to determine if the covariance among the observed variables could yield a descriptive equation based model, or better still, a predictive analytical model that could forecast the expected future trend of the variables and possibly eliminate the number of finger stickings required to montior blood sugar levels. The personal history and analysis with resulting models are presented.

  4. Promoting Interest in Plant Biology with Biographies of Plant Hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisey, Peggy

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of biographical stories to promote student interest in plant biology. Discusses plant hunters of various time periods, including ancient, middle ages, renaissance, colonial Americas, and 18th and 19th centuries; women plant hunters of the 1800s and early 1900s; and modern plant hunters. Discusses classroom strategies for the…

  5. Unleaded shooting: hunters like copper bullets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-03-01

    Mar 1, 2007 ... Ammunition, Bismuth Cartridge Co. and Barnes Bullets to let hunters see if they worked. They did. Shot groups fired with the Barnes copper hollow point. Triple Shock X-Bullet were generally tighter than with conventional softpoint bullets. A test firing of the two types of bullets into plastic bins filled with wet.

  6. Hunter-Gatherers and Human Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitton, Thad

    1980-01-01

    Presents an approach to the study of humans in an ecosystem, where several hunter-gatherer societies presently in equilibrium with their environment are studied. The ethnographies of the Netsilik Eskimos of Arctic Canada and the Kunt Bushmen of Southwest Africa are described. (CS)

  7. The white band disease type II pathogen in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L Gil-Agudelo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The white band disease type I (WBD-I epizootic event of the early 1980’s resulted in significant changes in the structure and composition of coral communities throughout the wider Caribbean. The disease decimated populations of acroporid corals throughout their geographic distribution and it is still affecting the surviving and recovering populations of these corals in a number of localities in the wider Caribbean. The putative pathogen for this syndrome (WBD-I was never identified. A second pattern of white band was described later as white band type II (WBD-II. A potential pathogen named Vibrio charchariae was identified but Koch’s postulates were never fulfilled. In this work, we present results of a preliminary approach to confirm the identity of the pathogen of WBD-II. During the fall months of 2004, samples of Acropora cervicornis with signs of WBD-II were collected from a small population in Mario reef, an isolated patch reef off La Parguera, southwest coast of Puerto Rico. Bacteria extracted from these samples were isolated in TCBS agar, grown in Glycerol Seawater agar, and then used to inoculate separated, healthy-looking colonies of the same population in the same reef. Isolation, culture, and inoculations of bacteria were conducted under controlled conditions within hours of collection, and no microorganisms that were not already in the reef community were introduced with these experiments. Some of the newly inoculated colonies developed the disease signs within 24 hr. These were subsequently sampled and bacterial re-isolated to be identified, thus complying with the first steps to fulfill Koch ’s postulates for this disease. Rates of advance of the disease signs varied between 0.5 and 2 cm/day. Preliminary analyses indicated that the potential cause of WBD-II is a Vibrio species very close to Vibrio harveyi, a synonymy of V. charchariae. All inoculated coral colonies that developed the signs of WBD-II, behaved as the naturally

  8. Zeta functional equation on Jordan algebras of type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayoya, J. B.

    2005-02-01

    Using the Jordan algebras methods, specially the properties of Peirce decomposition and the Frobenius transformation, we compute the coefficients of the zeta functional equation, in the case of Jordan algebras of type II. As particular cases of our result, we can cite the case of studied by Gelbart [Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 108 (1971)] and Godement and Jacquet [Zeta functions of simple algebras, Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 260, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1972], and the case of studied by Muro [Adv. Stud. Pure Math. 15 (1989) 429]. Let us also mention, that recently, Bopp and Rubenthaler have obtained a more general result on the zeta functional equation by using methods based on the algebraic properties of regular graded algebras which are in one-to-one correspondence with simple Jordan algebras [Local Zeta Functions Attached to the Minimal Spherical Series for a Class of Symmetric Spaces, IRMA, Strasbourg, 2003]. The method used in this paper is a direct application of specific properties of Jordan algebras of type II.

  9. Gravitational Field Shielding by Scalar Field and Type II Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational field shielding by scalar field and type II superconductors are theoret- ically investigated. In accord with the well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field, which unifies the Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory, the scalar field cannot only polarize the space as shown previously, but also flatten the space as indicated recently. The polariza- tion of space decreases the electromagnetic field by increasing the equivalent vacuum permittivity constant, while the flattening of space decreases the gravitational field by decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. In other words, the scalar field can be also employed to shield the gravitational field. A strong scalar field significantly shield the gravitational field by largely decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. According to the theory of gravitational field shielding by scalar field, the weight loss experimentally detected for a sample near a rotating ceramic disk at very low tempera- ture can be explained as the shielding of the Earth gravitational field by the Ginzburg- Landau scalar field, which is produced by the type II superconductors. The significant shielding of gravitational field by scalar field produced by superconductors may lead to a new spaceflight technology in future.

  10. Characterization of hearing loss in aged type II diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss – is the number one communicative disorder and a significant chronic medical condition of the aged. Little is known about how type II diabetes, another prevalent age-related medical condition, and presbycusis interact. The present investigation aimed to comprehensively characterize the nature of hearing impairment in aged type II diabetics. Hearing tests measuring both peripheral (cochlea) and central (brainstem and cortex) auditory processing were utilized. The majority of differences between the hearing abilities of the aged diabetics and their age-matched controls were found in measures of inner ear function. For example, large differences were found in pure-tone audiograms, wideband noise and speech reception thresholds, and otoacoustic emissions. The greatest deficits tended to be at low frequencies. In addition, there was a strong tendency for diabetes to affect the right ear more than the left. One possible interpretation is that as one develops presbycusis, the right ear advantage is lost, and this decline is accelerated by diabetes. In contrast, auditory processing tests that measure both peripheral and central processing showed fewer declines between the elderly diabetics and the control group. Consequences of elevated blood sugar levels as possible underlying physiological mechanisms for the hearing loss are discussed. PMID:16309862

  11. Synthesis, characterization and photovoltaic integration of type II nanorod heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Hunter Y.

    Motivated by a desire to control the actions of charges within materials in new and productive ways, researchers have increasingly focused their efforts on engineering materials on the nanometer scale where the laws of quantum mechanics rule supreme. Novel properties emerge when a semiconductor crystal is prepared at sizes below the hydrogenic ground state of the material, also known as the exciton Bohr radius. In addition to effects of quantum confinement, the large fraction of surface atoms can play a significant role in determining nanocrystal properties and applications. By combining two or more nanometer scale semiconductor crystals together to form a nanocrystal heterostructure, new avenues for materials engineering are opened up as nascent properties emerge. The high fraction of surface atoms means that much larger degrees of strain are possible than in the bulk. The large fraction of interface atoms means that the heterojunction properties can dominate the properties of the entire structure. Along with engineering these novel multi component properties comes new unexplored areas of science to be investigated and understood. New techniques are needed for studying these materials that require resolution of features much smaller than the wavelength of (visible) light. Along with this research comes a responsibility to share findings with the scientific community and to pursue directions that can positively impact humanity. At the same time, we should take a long term view when judging the applications of this or any new technology as we are only beginning to understand what is possible. After an introduction to the field in chapter one where we motivate our focus on anisotropic nanocrystal heterostructures, we discuss the formation of Fe3O4/CdS structures from spherical seeds in chapter two. In chapter three we turn our focus to type II CdSe/CdTe nanorod heterostructures where the anisotropy is inherent. The type II system is of particular interest because

  12. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  13. A Quantitative Study of Hunter-Schreger Brands in the Tooth Enamel of Camelus Dromedarius

    OpenAIRE

    Radhi, Ameera

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hunter-Schreger Bands (HSBs) are an optical phenomenon seen in mammalian tooth enamel related to orientation changes in the enamel prisms. HSBs are considered a factor in the development and progress of certain clinical conditions, including tooth wear, the resistance of enamel to fracture, cracked tooth syndrome, enamel bonding, abfraction, and vital tooth bleaching. They can also be used for personal identification in automated systems. No previous investigations have descr...

  14. D-effects in Toroidally Compactified Type II String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, B

    1999-01-01

    We review exact results obtained for R^4 couplings in maximally supersymmetric type II string theories. These couplings offer a privileged scene to understand the rules of semiclassical calculus in string theory. Upon expansion in weak string coupling, they reveal an infinite sum of non-perturbative e^{-1/g} effects that can be imputed to euclidean D-branes wrapped on cycles of the compactification manifolds. They also shed light on the relation between Dp-branes and D-(p-2)branes, D-strings and (p,q) strings, instanton sums and soliton loops. The latter interpretation takes over in D<=6 in order to account for the e^{-1/g^2} effects, still mysterious from the point of view of instanton calculus. [To appear in the proceedings of the conference "Quantum Aspects of Gauge Theories, Supersymmetry and Unification" held at Neuchatel University, Switzerland, 18-23 September 1997.

  15. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Riccioni, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond-Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana-Weyl spinor of O (D , D). Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor-spinor of O (D , D) is determined. This tensor-spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-)duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O (D , D) to GL (D), one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  16. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( Pplatelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  17. Vacuum stability and naturalness in type-II seesaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki [Shimane University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Matsue (Japan); Okada, Nobuchika [University of Alabama, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Yamaguchi, Yuya [Shimane University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Matsue (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We study the vacuum stability and perturbativity conditions in the minimal type-II seesaw model. These conditions give characteristic constraints to the model parameters. In the model, there is a SU(2){sub L} triplet scalar field, which could cause a large Higgs mass correction. From the naturalness point of view, heavy Higgs masses should be lower than 350 GeV, which may be testable by the LHC Run-II results. Due to the effects of the triplet scalar field, the branching ratios of the Higgs decay (h → γγ, Zγ) deviate from the standard model, and a large parameter region is excluded by the recent ATLAS and CMS combined analysis of h → γγ. Our result of the signal strength for h → γγ is R{sub γγ}

  18. Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Arabic-Speaking Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemic of diabetes has not spared the Arabic-speaking countries, which have some of the highest prevalence of type II diabetes. This is particularly true of the Arab Gulf, a conglomerate of high income, oil-producing countries where prevalence rates are the highest. The prevalence rates among adults of the Arabic speaking countries as a whole range between 4%–21%, with the lowest being in Somalia and the highest in Kuwait. As economic growth has accelerated, so has the movement of the populations to urban centers where people are more likely to adopt lifestyles that embrace increased high-calorie food consumption and sedentary lifestyles. These factors likely contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the Arabic speaking countries. PMID:22851968

  19. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Bergshoeff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond–Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana–Weyl spinor of O(D,D. Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor–spinor of O(D,D is determined. This tensor–spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O(D,D to GL(D, one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  20. On N=1 Mirror Symmetry for Open Type II Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Lerche, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    We study the open string extension of the mirror map for N=1 supersymmetric type II vacua with D-branes on non-compact Calabi-Yau manifolds. Its definition is given in terms of a system of differential equations that annihilate certain period and chain integrals. The solutions describe the flat coordinates on the N=1 parameter space, and the exact disc instanton corrected superpotential on the D-brane world-volume. A gauged linear sigma model for the combined open-closed string system is also given. It allows to use methods of toric geometry to describe D-brane phase transitions and the N=1 K\\"ahler cone. Applications to a variety of D-brane geometries are described in some detail.

  1. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among topoisomerases in its ability to introduce negative supercoils into closed-circular DNA. We have demonstrated that deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the A subunit of gyrase gives rise to an enzyme that cannot supercoil DNA but relaxes DNA in an ATP......-dependent manner. Novobiocin, a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding by gyrase, inhibits this reaction. The truncated enzyme, unlike gyrase, does not introduce a right-handed wrap when bound to DNA and stabilizes DNA crossovers; characteristics reminiscent of conventional type II topoisomerases. This new enzyme...... form can decatenate DNA circles with increased efficiency compared with intact gyrase and, as a result, can complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a parCts mutant. Thus these results suggest that the unique properties of DNA gyrase are attributable to the wrapping of DNA around the C...

  2. Functional assessment of feet of patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Saura Cardoso

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the incidence of functional changes and risk of developing ulcers in type II diabetic patients seen in Primary Healthcare Units (Unidades Básicas de Saúde- UBS. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative and descriptive study comprising 80patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM aged between 41 to 85 years and attended inthe UBS in the city of Parnaíba-PI. Volunteers responded to the identification form and theMichigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI, followed by an evaluation of the lowerlimbs, as follows: achilles and patellar reflex, palpation of arterial pulses (dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial, tactile sensitivity (Monofilament 10g and vibration sensitivity (128Hz tuning fork; identification of the presence of changes such as ingrown toenails, calluses,claw toes and hair loss. Finally, using the information acquired from the assessment, subjects were classified according to the risk of developing wounds. Results: The sample consisted of 76 diabetic patients, with average age of 63.8 ± 10.4 years, 63 (82.8% were female, mean diagnostic time 8.8 ± 7.2 years, average body mass index (BMI 28.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2, with 15.7% of the sample being smokers. The myotatic reflexes and arterial pulses were reduced. Tactile sensitivity was identified in 81.5% and 13.1% did not feel the vibration of the tuning fork. The most dominant changes identified were calluses, 76.3% (n = 58. Risk level 2 of developing ulcers stood out, 52.6% (n = 40. Conclusion: Functional changes were detected in the sample and a classification of risk 2 for developing wounds was found in more than 50% of the assessed patients. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p563

  3. A Sample of Light Curves of Type II-n and other Unclassified Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Justin; Martin, J. C.; Hambsch, F.; Strickland, W.; Cason, A.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a connection between supernova impostors and Type II-n supernovae. The modern Type II-n spectroscopic classification overlaps a great deal with Zwicky’s “Type V” supernovae, which includes several impostors. In late 2012, SN 2009ip, a known impostor, may have exploded as a Type II-n supernova. The decline from that event exhibited unusual fluctuations in brightness that are not evident in other Type II-n light curves. We present the light curves of several more recent Type II-n supernova and compare them with other published samples.

  4. Hunter-Gatherer Energetics and Human Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A.; Wood, Brian M.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Racette, Susan B.; Marlowe, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day) in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg−1 m−1) and resting (kcal kg−1 s−1) were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences. PMID:22848382

  5. Long-term Visual Outcomes and Complications of Boston Keratoprosthesis Type II Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ramon; Khoueir, Ziad; Tsikata, Edem; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H; Chen, Teresa C

    2017-01-01

    To report the long-term visual outcomes and complications after Boston keratoprosthesis type II implantation in the largest single-center case series with the longest average follow-up. Retrospective review of consecutive clinical case series. Between January 1992 and April 2015 at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 48 eyes of 44 patients had keratoprosthesis type II implanted by 2 surgeons (C.H.D. and J.C.). For each eye, data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative characteristics, intraoperative procedures, and postoperative course. Visual acuity outcomes, postoperative complications, and device retention. The most common indications for surgery were Stevens-Johnson syndrome in 41.7% (20 of 48 eyes) and mucous membrane pemphigoid in 41.7% (20 of 48 eyes). Mean follow-up duration was 70.2 months (standard deviation, 61.8 months; median, 52 months; range, 6 months to 19.8 years). Almost all patients (95.8%, 46 of 48 eyes) had a preoperative visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Postoperative visual acuity improved to 20/200 or better in 37.5% (18 of 48 eyes) and to 20/100 or better in 33.3% (16 of 48 eyes) at the last follow-up visit. The most common postoperative complication was retroprosthetic membrane formation in over half (60.4%, 29 of 48 eyes). The most pressing postoperative complication was glaucoma onset or progression in about a third. Preexisting glaucoma was present in 72.9% (35 of 48 eyes). Glaucoma progressed in 27.1% (13 of 48 eyes) and was newly diagnosed in 8.3% (4 of 48 eyes) after surgery. Other postoperative complications were tarsorrhaphy revision in 52.1% (25 of 48 eyes), retinal detachment in 18.8% (9 of 48 eyes), infectious endophthalmitis in 6.3% (3 of 48 eyes), and choroidal detachment or hemorrhage in 8.3% (4 of 48 eyes). Half of eyes retained their initial keratoprosthesis at the last follow-up (50.0%, 24 of 48 eyes). The Boston keratoprosthesis type II is a viable option to salvage vision in patients with poor prognosis for

  6. MAJEWSKI OSTEODYSPLASTIC PRIMORDIAL DWARFISM TYPE II: CLINICAL FINDINGS AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF A CHILD PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Terlemez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular primary molar teeth. Clinical examination revealed that most of the primary teeth had been decayed and all primary teeth were hypoplastic. Patient’s history revealed delayed development in the primary dentition and radiographic examination showed rootless primary molar teeth and short-rooted incisors. The treatment was not possible due to the lack of root of the left mandibular primary molars; so the teeth were extracted. Thorough and timely dental evaluation is crucial for the prevention of dental problems and the maintenance of oral health in patients with MOPD II syndrome is of utmost importance.

  7. Quantum Spin Hall Effect in Inverted Type II Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chaoxing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hughes, Taylor L.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wang, Kang; /UCLA; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically non-trivial state of quantum matter which preserves time-reversal symmetry; it has an energy gap in the bulk, but topologically robust gapless states at the edge. Recently, this novel effect has been predicted and observed in HgTe quantum wells. In this work we predict a similar effect arising in Type-II semiconductor quantum wells made from InAs/GaSb/AlSb. Because of a rare band alignment the quantum well band structure exhibits an 'inverted' phase similar to CdTe/HgTe quantum wells, which is a QSH state when the Fermi level lies inside the gap. Due to the asymmetric structure of this quantum well, the effects of inversion symmetry breaking and inter-layer charge transfer are essential. By standard self-consistent calculations, we show that the QSH state persists when these corrections are included, and a quantum phase transition between the normal insulator and the QSH phase can be electrically tuned by the gate voltage.

  8. Impact of Type II Spicules into the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Pereira, Tiago M. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the lower solar atmosphere, the chromosphere is permeated by jets, in which plasma is propelled at speeds of 50-150 km/s into the Sun’s atmosphere or corona. Although these spicules may play a role in heating the million-degree corona and are associated with Alfvén waves that help drive the solar wind, their generation remains mysterious. We implemented in the radiative MHD Bifrost code the effects of partial ionization using the generalized Ohm’s law. This code also solves the full MHD equations with non-grey and non-LTE radiative transfer and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The ion-neutral collision frequency is computed using recent studies that improved the estimation of the cross sections under chromospheric conditions (Vranjes & Krstic 2013). Self-consistently driven jets (spicules type II) in magnetohydrodynamic simulations occur ubiquitously when magnetic tension is confined and transported upwards through interactions between ions and neutrals, and impulsively released to drive flows, heat plasma, generate Alfvén waves, and may play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans. This mechanism explains how spicular plasma can be heated to millions of degrees and how Alfvén waves are generated in the chromosphere.

  9. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: approach for dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Mantuaneli Scarel-Caminaga

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI is a hereditary dentin development disorder that affects both primary and permanent dentitions. The DI characteristics are discolored and translucent teeth ranging from gray to brownish-blue or amber. The enamel may split readily from the dentin when subjected to occlusal stress. Radiographically there are evident of cervical constrictions, short root and pulp chambers, and the root canals are smaller than normal or completely obliterated. The dental treatment choice can be decided on a case-by case‑basis, considering the degree of dental tissue loss, and child age and cooperation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this case report was to describe the early dental treatment performed in a child affected by DI type II. CASE REPORT: The treatment involved basic preventive procedures. Primary molars were worn to such an extent that the remained tooth structure was covered with composite resin to protect the exposed dentin. Resin-based sealant was applied in all first permanent molars. Posterior cross bite was treated with the expansion of the upper arch. CONCLUSION: The early treatment restored the patient´s vertical dimension resulting in acceptable esthetics and function for the permanent teeth to complete their eruption.

  10. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  11. Frequency dependent conductivity of vortex cores in type II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Theodore C.

    1993-08-01

    Recent experiments by Karraï et al. probed vortices in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 at frequencies near the “minigap” between discrete core states, Δ 2/ EF. EF is the Fermi energy and Δ is the bulk energy gap. Here we calculate the conductivity, σ(ω), of vortices using a novel, microscopic description of single vortex dynamics based on the Bogoliubov-deGennes equations and self-consistency through the gap equation. It is applicable to the low temperature, clean, type II limit. An equation of motion for vortex cores valid at non-zero frequencies, including Magnus, drag, and pinning forces, is derived. The cyclotron resonance as well as structure at the minigap appear in σ(ω). The expected dipole transition between localized states is hidden because the vortex is a self-consistent potential. Unless translation invariance is broken, single particle properties are invisible to a long wavelength probe. Upon adding drag and pinning, dissipation near h̵hω≈Δ 2/ EF appears.

  12. Obstetric ultrasonographic findings of Chiari type II: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alptekin Tosun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiari malformations divided into 3 groups. Chiari type I malformation is caudal protrusion of cerebellar tonsils. Type II malformation is the most common and associate with meningomyelocele. Type III is a high cervical men-ingoencephalocele and uncommon.Spina bifida, has classified into open and closed forms as skin covered spine lesions. Cranial signs are not ac-companiment on closed type. Open type usually diag-nosed on prenatal period. Typical findings are ventricu-lomegaly, lemon sign (bifrontal indentation, banana sign (Chiari II malformation, obliteration of cisterna magna and small BPD and body measurements according to gestation age. Occipital horns are higher than 10 mm in ventriculomegaly. Choroid plexus are small and looking like tear. Limon sign defines biconcave frontal bones as looking like a lemon. Banana sign and obliteration of cis-terna magna resulted cause of hypoplasia of posterior fossa. Compression of cerebellum causing abnormal lo-calization, although cerebellar tonsils and vermis herni-ated to foramen magnum. Hemispheres are wrapping brain stem and looking like ‘‘C’’ (banana sign. Spinal longitudinal sonogram reveals open spine and skin de-fect, although dilatation on spine canal and increased in-terpedincular distance.

  13. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  14. Exercise behavior and knowledge among the DM type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadchavalpanichaya, Navaporn; Intaratep, Nualpis

    2010-05-01

    To study the exercise behavior and knowledge about physical exercise among diabetic patients. The authors explored the correlation between the exercise behavior and knowledge of physical exercise. DM type II patients aged more than 18 years, who attended the DM clinic, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok between April and August 2007 were randomly interviewed by using questionnaires while they were waiting to see their doctors. One hundred and ninety six patients were interviewed. They were 62 males and 134 females with an average age of 60.5 years. Most of them exercised regularly at least three times a week (65.8%). Most of them exercised by walking (67%). They liked to exercise in their houses (48.7%), and in the morning (41.8%). Health care providers provided knowledge about exercise (58.2%). The benefit of exercise known the least was that it could increase endorphin release (61.2%). The aerobic exercise principle known the least was the proper frequency of exercise (50.5%). In addition, the exercise principle in DM known the least was that the DM patients should consult their doctors before starting to exercise (49%). Most of the DM patients exercised regularly, but some had insufficient knowledge. The researchers will take the results to provide the adequate knowledge to the DM patients in the future.

  15. Glenohumeral arthrodesis for recurrent types II and III shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J Ian L; Lambert, Simon M

    2017-04-01

    This study reports the clinical outcome after glenohumeral arthrodesis for recurrent type II (atraumatic structural) and type III (muscle patterning nonstructural disorder) shoulder instability. A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Eight consecutive patients (7 women and 1 man) with recurrent shoulder instability underwent arthrodesis and were monitored for a mean of 57 months (range, 24-123 months). Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 21-73 years). Bony union was achieved in all patients at a mean time to fusion of 3 months (range, 1-11 months). No complications, such as routine removal of the metalwork or loosening, were noted. No residual perceived glenohumeral instability was reported, and no patient developed scapulothoracic instability or painful scapular dyskinesis. The mean Oxford Shoulder Instability Score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 0-19) to 32 postoperatively (range, 16-41; P = .001). This was accompanied by an increase in the mean subjective shoulder value, which improved from 22 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 73 (range, 50-100) postoperatively (P = .004). In our series, glenohumeral arthrodesis was associated with no complications and was able to reduce pain, eliminate instability, and improve functional outcome. It should therefore be considered in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 75 FR 32877 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ..., Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety) financial... Hunter Education and Safety program; and (d) receive financial assistance from the Sport Fish Restoration... wildlife agencies to: (a) Restore or manage wildlife and sport fish; (b) provide hunter- education, hunter...

  17. Elevated levels of shed type II IL-1 receptor in sepsis. Potential role for type II receptor in regulation of IL-1 responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giri, JG; Wells, J; Dower, SK; McCall, CE; Guzman, RN; Slack, J; Bird, TA; Shanebeck, K; Grabstein, KH; Sims, JE

    1994-01-01

    .... Neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis have greatly enhanced expression of type II IL-1R mRNA and cell surface receptors and are therefore a likely source for the shed receptors in serum...

  18. Bolometric Light Curves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the bolometric light curves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, and 2009E), which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors like that of SN 1987A, using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe light curves using three different common techniques common from the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the light curves calculated by SuperBoL, along with previously published light curves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction light curves largely agree with previously published light curves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2≲ δ {L}{bol}/{L}{bol}≲ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ˜5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric light curves from observed sets of broadband light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  19. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitan, Santiago; Galbany, Lluis; Dessart, Luc; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Folatelli, Gastón

    2017-11-01

    We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion, where the majority of the sample is likely to be under similar physical conditions. Several correlation matrices are produced to search for interesting trends between more than 30 distinct light-curve and spectral properties that characterize the diversity of SNe II. Overall, SNe with higher expansion velocities are brighter, have more rapidly declining light curves, shorter plateau durations, and higher 56Ni masses. Using a larger sample than previous studies, we argue that “Pd”—the plateau duration from the transition of the initial to “plateau” decline rates to the end of the “plateau”—is a better indicator of the hydrogen envelope mass than the traditionally used optically thick phase duration (OPTd: explosion epoch to end of plateau). This argument is supported by the fact that Pd also correlates with s 3, the light-curve decline rate at late times: lower Pd values correlate with larger s 3 decline rates. Large s 3 decline rates are likely related to lower envelope masses, which enables gamma-ray escape. We also find a significant anticorrelation between Pd and s 2 (the plateau decline rate), confirming the long standing hypothesis that faster declining SNe II (SNe IIL) are the result of explosions with lower hydrogen envelope masses and therefore have shorter Pd values. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS- 2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programs 076.A-0156, 078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  20. Hip pathology in Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ali F; Bober, Michael B; Rogers, Kenneth; Duker, Angela L; Ditro, Colleen P; Mackenzie, William G

    2014-09-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth failure with microcephaly, characteristic skeletal dysplasia, an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease, and insulin resistance. MOPDII is caused by mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene and is inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner. This study aimed to determine the incidence of hip pathology in patients with molecularly confirmed MOPDII and to describe the functional outcomes of surgical treatment. Thirty-three enrolled patients had a clinical diagnosis of MOPDII. Biallelic PCNT mutations or absent pericentrin protein was confirmed in 25 of these patients. Twelve patients (7 female) had appropriate clinical and radiographic records at this institution and were included in this study. The data collected included age at presentation, age at surgery, sex, body weight and height, weight-bearing status at diagnosis, and the clinical examination. Four patients (31%) had coxa vara: 3 unilateral and 1 bilateral. Three unilateral patients had in situ pinning at a mean age 4 years. The patient with bilateral coxa vara had valgus osteotomy at the age of 5 years. Two children had bilateral hip dysplasia and subluxation with no surgery. One patient had bilateral developmental hip dislocations. The patient was treated by open reduction-spica cast and 2 years after surgery, coxa valga was noted. Another patient was diagnosed at an age of 12 years with bilateral avascular necrosis of the hips. Four patients did not have hip pathology. Hip pathology is common among children with MOPDII; coxa vara is the most frequent diagnosis. Routine clinical and radiographic hip evaluation is important. The capital femoral epiphysis appears to slip down along the shaft, giving the appearance of a proximal femoral epiphysiolysis. A hip diagnosed with slipped capital femoral epiphysis in early life may progress to severe coxa vara. Level IV.

  1. ANALYTIC APPROXIMATION OF CARBON CONDENSATION ISSUES IN TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Donald D., E-mail: claydonald@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2013-01-01

    I present analytic approximations for some issues related to condensation of graphite, TiC, and silicon carbide in oxygen-rich cores of supernovae of Type II. Increased understanding, which mathematical analysis can support, renders researchers more receptive to condensation in O-rich supernova gases. Taking SN 1987A as typical, my first analysis shows why the abundance of CO molecules reaches an early maximum in which free carbon remains more abundant than CO. This analysis clarifies why O-rich gas cannot oxidize C if {sup 56}Co radioactivity is as strong as in SN 1987A. My next analysis shows that the CO abundance could be regarded as being in chemical equilibrium if the CO molecule is given an effective binding energy rather than its laboratory dissociation energy. The effective binding energy makes the thermal dissociation rate of CO equal to its radioactive dissociation rate. This preserves possible relevance for the concept of chemical equilibrium. My next analysis shows that the observed abundances of CO and SiO molecules in SN 1987A rule out frequent suggestions that equilibrium condensation of SUNOCONs has occurred following atomic mixing of the He-burning shell with more central zones in such a way as to reproduce roughly the observed spectrum of isotopes in SUNOCONs while preserving C/O > 1. He atoms admixed along with the excess carbon would destroy CO and SiO molecules, leaving their observed abundances unexplained. The final analysis argues that a chemical quasiequilibrium among grains (but not gas) may exist approximately during condensation, so that its computational use is partially justified as a guide to which mineral phases would be stable against reactions with gas. I illustrate this point with quasiequilibrium calculations by Ebel and Grossman that have shown that graphite is stable even when O/C >1 if prominent molecules are justifiably excluded from the calculation of chemical equilibrium.

  2. METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dikanović, Marinko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders that include hyperlipidemia, inadequate insulin resistance, hypertension, and abdominal type obesity. Patients who suffer from this syndrome have an increased risk for heart disease and blood vessel disease, stroke and type II diabetes. The world's leading healthcare institutions also disagree on the exact definition of this organization poremećaja. NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program) defines metabolic syndrome as a situation in which the...

  3. Play as a Foundation for Hunter-Gatherer Social Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author offers the thesis that hunter-gatherers promoted, through cultural means, the playful side of their human nature and this made possible their egalitarian, nonautocratic, intensely cooperative ways of living. Hunter-gatherer bands, with their fluid membership, are likened to social-play groups, which people could freely join or leave.…

  4. Ehlers- Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta Basak

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A female patient had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II since infancy, manifesting with hyperextensible skin and ciagarette paper scars at the sites of trauma. Treatment with vitamin C 1 gm a day seemed to be useful.

  5. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII ...

  6. KRAS and MAPK1 Gene Amplification in Type II Ovarian Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Ishikawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the clinical significance of KRAS and MAPK1 amplification and assessed whether these amplified genes were potential therapeutic targets in type II ovarian carcinoma. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and retrospectively collected clinical data, KRAS and MAPK1 amplifications were identified in 9 (13.2% and 5 (7.4% of 68 type II ovarian carcinoma tissue samples, respectively. Interestingly, co-amplification of KRAS and MAPK1 seemed to be absent in the type II ovarian carcinomas tested, except one case. Active phospho-ERK1/2 was identified in 26 (38.2% out of 68 type II ovarian carcinomas and did not correlate with KRAS or MAPK1 amplification. There was no significant relationship between KRAS amplification and overall or progression-free survival in patients with type II ovarian carcinoma. However, patients with MAPK1 amplification had significantly poorer progression-free survival than patients without MAPK1 amplification. Moreover, type II ovarian carcinoma cells with concomitant KRAS amplification and mutation exhibited dramatic growth reduction following treatment with the MEK inhibitor PD0325901. These findings indicate that KRAS/MAPK1 amplification is critical for the growth of a subset of type II ovarian carcinomas. Additionally, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway-targeted therapy may benefit selected patients with type II ovarian carcinoma harboring KRAS/MAPK1 amplifications.

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saidul Abrar

    Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A>G ... Article history: Received 6 October 2016. Accepted 8 December 2016. Available online 18 January 2017. Keywords: Type II diabetes. Mitochondrial DNA. PCR ... Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under.

  8. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  9. Type II Estrogen Receptor in the Development and Progression of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biswas, Subhasis

    1996-01-01

    .... The antibody was able to detect the type II EBS in Western Blot. In order to identify the gene encoding the type II EBS, a cDNA library was created in lambdagt11 using cDNA prepared from pregnant rat uterine tissue...

  10. Novel Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDespite the huge advances made in the understanding of type II diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD), these diseases still constitute a major health problem. Since the 1950s, epidemiologists focused on chronic disorders, including type II diabetes and CHD. Major aims of their

  11. Long-term use of metformin and colorectal cancer risk in type II diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardel, Majken; Jensen, S. M.; Pottegård, Anton

    2014-01-01

    In vitro and animal studies indicate that metformin prevents colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological studies, however, have been equivocal. We undertook this study to assess whether metformin prevents CRC in individuals with type II diabetes. We performed a nested case-control study restricted...... to Danish citizens with type II diabetes. Data were collected from four Danish nationwide registries. Cases were type II diabetics with a primary CRC between 2000 and 2009, and controls were sampled among subjects with type II diabetes. Longterm exposure to metformin was defined by the redeeming.......99 for men). There was a significant dose-response association of metformin use > 250 defined daily dose (DDD) and for the duration of metformin use > 1 year. We found an indication of a protective effect of long-term metformin use against CRC in type II diabetics, although this effect was only seen in women....

  12. Rabbit hunter uveitis: case report of tularemia uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrada, Céline; Azza, Said; Bodaghi, Bahram; Le Hoang, Phuc; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Literature reports on ophthalmological manifestations related to tularemia, a zoonose caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, largely refer to Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, which consists of the association of conjunctivitis with preauricular lymphadenitis. In this paper, we report a case of intraocular inflammation during tularemia infection. A 52-year-old Caucasian man was diagnosed with unilateral uveitis. The uveitis was posterior, with a 2+ vitritis and a large yellowish lesion involving the macula with an overlying sub-retinal detachment, extending inferiorly, and subretinal hemorrhages. Fluorescein angiography showed a late hyperfluorescence with focal vascular leakage. Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed the presence of a 3.8 mm parietal granuloma with a few calcifications in the left eye. While extensive work-up eliminated any other infectious and non-infectious etiology, tularemia was diagnosed by advanced serology consisting of two-dimensional Western-immunoblotting. The patient, a hunter, recalled having killed rabbits in the days before the symptoms appeared. Uveitis was rapidly controlled following treatment with doxycycline, yet three years after initiation of the treatment, the patient still complained of loss of vision in the left eye with a central scotoma. Posterior uveitis may be an infrequent manifestation of tularemia infection, and therefore this infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraocular inflammation in areas where F. tularensis is endemic.

  13. Discrete choice modeling of season choice for Minnesota turkey hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Cornicelli, Louis; Merchant, Steven S.

    2018-01-01

    Recreational turkey hunting exemplifies the interdisciplinary nature of modern wildlife management. Turkey populations in Minnesota have reached social or biological carrying capacities in many areas, and changes to turkey hunting regulations have been proposed by stakeholders and wildlife managers. This study employed discrete stated choice modeling to enhance understanding of turkey hunter preferences about regulatory alternatives. We distributed mail surveys to 2,500 resident turkey hunters. Results suggest that, compared to season structure and lotteries, additional permits and level of potential interference from other hunters most influenced hunter preferences for regulatory alternatives. Low hunter interference was preferred to moderate or high interference. A second permit issued only to unsuccessful hunters was preferred to no second permit or permits for all hunters. Results suggest that utility is not strictly defined by harvest or an individual's material gain but can involve preference for other outcomes that on the surface do not materially benefit an individual. Discrete stated choice modeling offers wildlife managers an effective way to assess constituent preferences related to new regulations before implementing them. 

  14. Mapping the brain in type II diabetes: Voxel-based morphometry using DARTEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhiye [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Lin [Department of Geriatric Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Sun, Jie [Department of Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Ma, Lin, E-mail: cjr.malin@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of brain volume changes of the brain in patients with type II diabetes mellitus using voxel-based morphometry. Material and methods: Institutional ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. VBM based on the high resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo MRI images was obtained from 16 type II diabetes patients (mean age 61.2 years) and 16 normal controls (mean age 59.6 years). All images were spatially preprocessed using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm, and the DARTEL templates were made from 100 normal subjects. Statistical parametric mapping was generated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: An atrophy pattern of gray matter was seen in type II diabetes patients compared with controls that involved the right superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, right precentral gyrus, and left rolandic operculum region. The loss of white matter volume in type II diabetes mellitus was observed in right temporal lobe and left inferior frontal triangle region. ROI analysis revealed that the gray and white matter volume of right temporal lobe were significant lower in type II diabetes mellitus than that in controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This work demonstrated that type II diabetes mellitus patients mainly exhibited gray and white matter atrophy in right temporal lobe, and this finding supported that type II diabetes mellitus could lead to subtle diabetic brain structural changes in patients without dementia or macrovascular complications.

  15. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Type II Odontoid Fracture with Atlantoaxial Dislocation Presenting as Symptomatic Seizures: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Guoyun; Shuang, Feng; Liu, Gang; Wu, Ye; Hou, Shuxun; Ren, Dongfeng

    2016-12-01

    To report symptomatic seizures of a patient with an old type II odontoid fracture with atlantoaxial dislocation. The type II odontoid fracture is a dangerous disease and presents as neurological deficits. Because of the compression of upper cervical cord, without timely diagnosis and treatment, a type II odontoid fracture may result in sudden death. Although it has been shown that epileptic seizures may lead to type II odontoid fracture, there is no report of symptomatic seizures in patients with odontoid fracture. A 16-year-old adolescent boy with neurological deficits, especially grand mal seizures for duration of 5 years, was diagnosed as an old type II odontoid fracture with atlantoaxial dislocation and treated in our hospital. A 1-year follow-up was performed. Systematic analyses of the clinical history, manifestations, physical examination, and radiologic results of the patient revealed an old type II odontoid fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord compression and degeneration. The patient received posterior atlantoaxial fixation and fusion procedure following successful closed reduction. The frequency of seizures was reduced to once a month and there was a thorough recovery in other neurological functions 1 year after the operation. Old type II odontoid fracture might present as symptomatic seizures in addition to other neurological deficits. Posterior atlantoaxial screw-plate fixation and fusion is an effective treatment for old type II odontoid fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Streptococcus sanguis modulates type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalonga, Massimo; Hodges, James S; Herzberg, Mark C

    2002-08-15

    Native type II collagen is tolerogenic when given orally or i.p. to DBA/1J mice and induces autoimmune arthritis when given s.c. in CFA. The tolerogenic epitope is contained in cyanogen bromide fragment 11 (CB11) and is structurally mimicked by PGEQGPK within the platelet aggregation-associated protein (PAAP) on Streptococcus sanguis. To learn whether S. sanguis modulates transmucosally the Ag-specific development of autoimmune arthritis, DBA/1J pups were given live S. sanguis, CB11, or type II collagen intragastrically. Feeding S. sanguis at 6 days postpartum delayed the onset of arthritis, and reduced the rate, final severity, and percentage of affected limbs. Next, PAAP(+) S. sanguis and type II collagen were tested for T cell cross-reactivity. T cells primed with the tolerogenic epitope of type II collagen proliferated more when incubated with PAAP(+) S. sanguis than with PAAP(-) Streptococcus gordonii or type II collagen, suggesting an Ag-specific transmucosal tolerogenic effect. In neonatal mice, therefore, bacterial surface Ags that mimic self can transmucosally stimulate Ag-specific inhibitory T cells. In adult mice immunized with type II collagen, these Ag-specific inhibitory T cells manifest later as attenuated arthritis. The PAAP(+) S. sanguis appear to activate adult memory, rather than naive, type II collagen-specific T cells, suggesting that systemic challenge with commensal self-mimicking microorganisms may perpetuate existing autoimmunity, but not initiate autorecognition.

  18. Stimulated rabbit alveolar macrophages secrete a growth factor for type II pneumocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, M E; Finkelstein, J N

    1989-08-01

    The type II pneumocyte plays a principle role in the maintenance and repair of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium by increasing its rate of proliferation under conditions of epithelial damage. This investigation examined the role of the alveolar macrophage in the control of type II cell division through its ability to produce specific growth factors when activated in vitro. Type II cells were isolated from adult male rabbits and cultured in the presence of media and matrix that support cell proliferation. Proliferation was assessed by cell counting and pulsing with [3H]thymidine, followed by measurements of labeling index and TCA-insoluble radioactivity. Alveolar macrophages were cultured in serum-free media in the presence of a particulate stimulus. Conditioned media was diluted and added to type II cell cultures. Conditioned media from stimulated macrophage cultures was found to double basal type II cell proliferation, whereas media from unstimulated macrophage cultures had no effect. Macrophage production of type II cell growth-promoting activity was dependent on the concentration of the stimulus and the length of the incubation. Investigation into the identity of the growth-regulating protein established that it is heat labile, insensitive to reduction and acidic conditions, and sensitive to trypsin digestion. Its molecular weight appears to be greater than or equal to 25 kD. Addition of several characterized growth factors to type II cell cultures demonstrated that other known growth-promoting products of macrophages do not act as type II cell growth factors. The evidence presented suggests that in vitro activated alveolar macrophages produce a type II cell growth factor that may play a critical role in mediating repair of the alveolar epithelium.

  19. Prevention of type II endoleak by laparoscopic inferior mesenteric artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Robert A; Panait, Lucian; Abbas, Hussain M A; Tapias, Leonidas; Tripodi, Giuseppe; Ajemian, Michael S; Macaron, Shady H

    2013-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair by endovascular techniques have gained wide acceptance as a treatment option. A potential well-known complication of endovascular repair includes endoleak. Specifically, type II endoleak, which is described as retrograde flow into the aneurysm sac through collateral vessels, can occur in up to 30% of patients. Certain preoperative factors can predict which patients may develop type II endoleak. This article describes laparoscopic inferior mesenteric artery ligation prior to endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as a viable treatment option in the prevention of type II endoleak.

  20. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety; Final Rule #0;#0... Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety... Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety program; and (d) receive financial assistance from the Sport Fish...

  1. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic exogenous surfactant therapy is a promising way to attenuate the ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury associated with lung transplantation and thereby to decrease the clinical occurrence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, there is little information on the mode by which exogenous surfactant attenuates I/R injury of the lung. We hypothesized that exogenous surfactant may act by limiting pulmonary edema formation and by enhancing alveolar type II cell and lamellar body preservation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exogenous surfactant therapy on the formation of pulmonary edema in different lung compartments and on the ultrastructure of the surfactant producing alveolar epithelial type II cells. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to a control, Celsior (CE or Celsior + surfactant (CE+S group (n = 5 each. In both Celsior groups, the lungs were flush-perfused with Celsior and subsequently exposed to 4 h of extracorporeal ischemia at 4°C and 50 min of reperfusion at 37°C. The CE+S group received an intratracheal bolus of a modified natural bovine surfactant at a dosage of 50 mg/kg body weight before flush perfusion. After reperfusion (Celsior groups or immediately after sacrifice (Control, the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion and processed for light and electron microscopy. Stereology was used to quantify edematous changes as well as alterations of the alveolar epithelial type II cells. Results Surfactant treatment decreased the intraalveolar edema formation (mean (coefficient of variation: CE: 160 mm3 (0.61 vs. CE+S: 4 mm3 (0.75; p 3 (0.90 vs. CE+S: 0 mm3; p 3 (0.39 vs. CE+S: 268 mm3 (0.43; p 3(0.10 and CE+S (481 μm3(0.10 compared with controls (323 μm3(0.07; p Conclusion Intratracheal surfactant application before I/R significantly reduces the intraalveolar edema formation and development of atelectases but leads to an increased development of

  2. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... needed. (b) Decals are to be issued to all military and civilian employees of Hunter Army Airfield... viewing of the decal. (3) Installation decals will be placed directly beneath and centered on the DOD...

  3. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  4. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  5. The Hunter Drain Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Fallon, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines water quality concerns related to the operation of the Hunter Drain located in the vicinity of the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  6. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  7. Will hunters steward wolves? A comment on Treves and Martin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskotter, Jeremy T.; Fulton, David C.

    2012-01-01

    As wolf conservation transitions away from federally sponsored protection and recovery toward sustainable management under state fish and game agencies, researchers and policymakers are interested to know what role hunters will play. Based upon hunters' responses to three recent surveys in Wisconsin and the northern Rockies, Treves and Martin question the assumption that hunters will steward wolves, noting that the majority of hunters that responded were unsupportive of wolf conservation. However, this conclusion largely depends upon what is meant by stewardship and what actions are required for wolves to be conserved. This article discusses the meaning of three concepts either explicitly or implicitly discussed by Treves and Martin—tolerance, acceptance, and stewardship—and offers a conceptual model of wildlife conservation behavior that clarifies the relationship among these concepts.

  8. Gradients of occlusal wear in hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deter, Christina A

    2009-03-01

    Occlusal wear was recorded in maxillary teeth from three North American late Archaic (3385 +/- 365 cal BC) hunter-gatherer sites (n = 306) and late Anasazi-early Zuni agricultural sites ( approximately 1300 AD) (n = 87). Comparisons were undertaken using descriptive and inferential statistics to determine differences between these groups, and along the maxillary tooth row. The hunter-gatherers had a significantly greater percentage of occlusal wear than the agriculturalists. For both hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists, occlusal wear was greatest on the central incisors and first molars. The third molars had the least amount of wear. It was inferred from these results that the hunter-gatherers had a more abrasive diet, and different daily task activities compared to the agriculturalists. One further finding was that wear patterns on anterior and posterior teeth are influenced by the order that teeth erupt into the jaw, as well as diet and behavior. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Hunter-gatherers and the behavioural ecology of human occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark J; Aoyama, Mami

    2009-02-01

    Despite growing interest in indigenous peoples within occupational therapy in Canada and elsewhere, there has been little consideration of hunter-gathering-an occupation that retains great material and symbolic significance for many indigenous groups. A preliminary analysis of occupational behaviour amongst hunter-gatherers was conducted to aid understanding of the nature and evolution of human occupations and inform policy in indigenous occupational therapy. Human behavioural ecology was used to analyze four aspects of hunter-gatherer occupations: occupational diversification, the sexual "division of labour," the long dependence of juveniles on adult provisioning, and active foraging by postmenopausal women. It was concluded that many occupational adaptations of human foragers can be related to life-history traits, namely slow maturation, long lifespans, weaning before independent feeding, and postmenopausal longevity. Further research will help understand how our hunter-gatherer heritage has affected the evolution of occupational behaviour and to develop program designs using foraging occupations.

  10. Crosslinked type II collagen matrices: preparation, characterization, and potential for cartilage engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, J.S.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Kamp, J.; Buma, P.; Susante, J.L.C. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The limited intrinsic repair capacity of articular cartilage has stimulated continuing efforts to develop tissue engineered analogues. Matrices composed of type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS), the major constituents of hyaline cartilage, may create an appropriate environment for the

  11. High-Detectivity Type-II Superlattice Detectors for 6-14 um Infrared Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  12. High Quantum Efficiency Type II SLS FPAs for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high quantum efficiency (QE) and low dark current infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS)...

  13. Large Format LW Type-II SLS FPAs for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high performance (low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and low NEdT) infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained...

  14. High Quantum Efficiency Type II SLS FPAs for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposes to develop high quantum efficiency (QE) and low dark current infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained Layer Superlattice...

  15. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation for the Treatment of Glaucoma in Boston Keratoprosthesis Type II Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Linda Yi-Chieh; Chodosh, James; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Dohlman, Claes H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the surgical technique of endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation in a Boston keratoprosthesis type II patient. This patient with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid had pars plana endoscopic cyclophotocoagula through wounds created in the eyelids. PMID:28079656

  16. Throughput of Type II HARQ-OFDM/TDM Using MMSE-FDE in a Multipath Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Gacanin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In type II hybrid ARQ (HARQ schemes, the uncoded information bits are transmitted first, while the error correction parity bits are sent upon request. Consequently, frequency diversity cannot be exploited during the first transmission. In this paper, we present the use of OFDM/TDM with MMSE-FDE and type II HARQ to increase throughput of OFDM due to frequency diversity gain.

  17. Parameter estimation for multiple weibull populations under joint type-II censoring

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Ashour; Osama Eraki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the maximum likelihood estimation for k Weibull populations under joint type II censored scheme and different special cases have been obtained.  The asymptotic variance covariance matrix and approximate confidence region based on the asymptotic normality of the maximum likelihood estimators have been obtained. A numerical example is considered to illustrate the proposed estimators. Keywords: Approximate Inference; Coverage Probabilities; Joint Type II Censored Sche...

  18. Type-II Quantum Dot Nanowire Structures with Large Oscillator Strengths for Optical Quantum Gating Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taherkhani, Masoomeh; Gregersen, Niels; Willatzen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The exciton oscillator strength (OS) in type-II quantum dot (QD) nanowires is calculated by using a fast and efficient method. We propose a new structure in Double-Well QD (DWQD) nanowire that considerably increases OS of type-II QDs which is a key parameter in optical quantum gating in the stimu...... in the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) process [1] for implementing quantum gates....

  19. Aloe Vera Juice Decrease the Amount of Blood Glucose Level in Patient with Diabetic Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Kusnanto Kusnanto; Sriyono Sriyono; Dian Eko Puji Astuti

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Aloe vera is a tropical plant that known can decrease the amount of blood glucose level in patient with diabetic type II. Diabetes mellitus is a disease cause by an increasing amount of blood glucose level that is reduce by conditions of the insulin. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of Aloe vera administering on decreasing blood glucose level for Diabetes mellitus type II patient. Method: A quasy experimental non randomized control group pre post test design was...

  20. Lorentz-violating type-II Dirac fermions in transition metal dichalcogenide PtTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingzhe; Huang, Huaqing; Zhang, Kenan; Wang, Eryin; Yao, Wei; Deng, Ke; Wan, Guoliang; Zhang, Hongyun; Arita, Masashi; Yang, Haitao; Sun, Zhe; Yao, Hong; Wu, Yang; Fan, Shoushan; Duan, Wenhui; Zhou, Shuyun

    2017-08-15

    Topological semimetals have recently attracted extensive research interests as host materials to condensed matter physics counterparts of Dirac and Weyl fermions originally proposed in high energy physics. Although Lorentz invariance is required in high energy physics, it is not necessarily obeyed in condensed matter physics, and thus Lorentz-violating type-II Weyl/Dirac fermions could be realized in topological semimetals. The recent realization of type-II Weyl fermions raises the question whether their spin-degenerate counterpart-type-II Dirac fermions-can be experimentally realized too. Here, we report the experimental evidence of type-II Dirac fermions in bulk stoichiometric PtTe2 single crystal. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements and first-principles calculations reveal a pair of strongly tilted Dirac cones along the Γ-A direction, confirming PtTe2 as a type-II Dirac semimetal. Our results provide opportunities for investigating novel quantum phenomena (e.g., anisotropic magneto-transport) and topological phase transition.Whether the spin-degenerate counterpart of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermions, the Dirac fermions, can be realized remains as an open question. Here, Yan et al. report experimental evidence of such type-II Dirac fermions in bulk PtTe2 single crystal with a pair of strongly tilted Dirac cones.

  1. Alveolar type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor I; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. Alveolar Type II cells were obtained from healthy animals and transplanted 14 days after bleomycin was administered. Furthermore, one group transplanted with alveolar macrophages and another group treated with surfactant were established to evaluate the specificity of the alveolar Type II cell transplantation. The animals were euthanized at 21 days after bleomycin instillation. Lung fibrosis was confirmed by a histologic study and an evaluation of the hydroxyproline content. Changes in surfactant proteins were evaluated by mRNA expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. The group with alveolar Type II cell transplantation was the only one to show a reduction in the degree of lung fibrosis and a complete recovery to normal levels of surfactant proteins. One of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial effect of alveolar Type II cell transplantation is restoration of lung surfactant protein levels, which is required for proper respiratory function. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Creation of a type IIS restriction endonuclease with a long recognition sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippow, Shaun M; Aha, Patti M; Parker, Matthew H; Blake, William J; Baynes, Brian M; Lipovsek, Dasa

    2009-05-01

    Type IIS restriction endonucleases cleave DNA outside their recognition sequences, and are therefore particularly useful in the assembly of DNA from smaller fragments. A limitation of type IIS restriction endonucleases in assembly of long DNA sequences is the relative abundance of their target sites. To facilitate ligation-based assembly of extremely long pieces of DNA, we have engineered a new type IIS restriction endonuclease that combines the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-SceI with the type IIS cleavage pattern of FokI. We linked a non-cleaving mutant of I-SceI, which conveys to the chimeric enzyme its specificity for an 18-bp DNA sequence, to the catalytic domain of FokI, which cuts DNA at a defined site outside the target site. Whereas previously described chimeric endonucleases do not produce type IIS-like precise DNA overhangs suitable for ligation, our chimeric endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA exactly 2 and 6 nt from the target site to generate homogeneous, 5', four-base overhangs, which can be ligated with 90% fidelity. We anticipate that these enzymes will be particularly useful in manipulation of DNA fragments larger than a thousand bases, which are very likely to contain target sites for all natural type IIS restriction endonucleases.

  3. Properties of the complex type II burst with rich herringbone structure within 3-33 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. M.; Konovalenko, O. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Poedts, S.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of the type II burst with "herringbone" structure observed on 7 June 2011 within 3-33 MHz are considered. The burst was recorded both by the two ground-based radiotelescopes (UTR-2, URAN-2) and the spaceborne STEREO radio receivers. For the first time, a detailed statistical analysis of main parameters of the herringbone sub- bursts of type II (duration and frequency drift rate) was performed at decameter wavelengths separately for those positively and negatively drifting ones. Another new result within these frequencies is the measured degree of circular polarization of fine structure type II bursts. A fine frequency, structure of the sub-bursts herringbone was found to be, similar to the so-called "fringes" in the solar S-bursts. From the characteristic wave-like oscillations of the type II back-bone the parameters of coronal streamers intersected by the shock wave were derived. Using the observational data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, the speed and direction of the associated CME propagation were detected. From the ground-based radio observations the radial speed of type II burst source was found. As a result, possible location of the type II burst source was determined. In addition, the geoeffectiveness of the discussed solar event was estimated.

  4. Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbesque, J Colette; Marlowe, Frank W; Shaw, Peter; Thompson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The idea that hunter-gatherer societies experience more frequent famine than societies with other modes of subsistence is pervasive in the literature on human evolution. This idea underpins, for example, the 'thrifty genotype hypothesis'. This hypothesis proposes that our hunter-gatherer ancestors were adapted to frequent famines, and that these once adaptive 'thrifty genotypes' are now responsible for the current obesity epidemic. The suggestion that hunter-gatherers are more prone to famine also underlies the widespread assumption that these societies live in marginal habitats. Despite the ubiquity of references to 'feast and famine' in the literature describing our hunter-gatherer ancestors, it has rarely been tested whether hunter-gatherers suffer from more famine than other societies. Here, we analyse famine frequency and severity in a large cross-cultural database, in order to explore relationships between subsistence and famine risk. This is the first study to report that, if we control for habitat quality, hunter-gatherers actually had significantly less--not more--famine than other subsistence modes. This finding challenges some of the assumptions underlying for models of the evolution of the human diet, as well as our understanding of the recent epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Improvements to the Hunter Dose tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-01

    Since 1965, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted deer hunts which are open to the general public. SRS performs field monitoring for cesium-137 (Cs-137) of each harvested animal to determine whether the animal may be released to the hunter. A new field system for measuring Cs-137 in the harvested animals has been developed. The system incorporates numerous enhancements compared to the original system. The original system was composed of two Ludlum Measurements scalar-driven 2 inch x 2 inch sodium iodide counters, while the new system is based on a single Ametek Ortec Digibase-driven 2 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch sodium iodide gamma spectrometer. The new system includes a series of easy-to-assemble stainless steel encapsulated lead shields. The combination of the larger detector size and lead shielding improved the detection limit of the new system by a factor of approximately three compared to the original system. This lower detection limit allows for a larger number of measurements to be directly compared to the laboratory results, in cases where animal portions have been sampled. The results from developing and using this system are presented as well as recommendations on improvements to the overall field monitoring of the SRS hunts.

  6. Preventive Effect of Boiogito on Metabolic Disorders in the TSOD Mouse, a Model of Spontaneous Obese Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Shimada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available “Boiogito” is a Kampo preparation which has been used since ancient times in patients with obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type, so-called “watery obesity”, and its effect has been recognized clinically. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Boiogito in the TSOD (Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes mouse, a model of spontaneous obese type II diabetes mellitus. Boiogito showed a significant anti-obesity effect in TSOD mice by suppressing body weight gain in a dosage-dependent manner. In addition, Boiogito showed significant ameliorative effects on features of metabolic syndrome such as hyperinsulinemia, fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal lipid metabolism. Regarding lipid accumulation in TSOD mice, Boiogito showed a significant suppressive effect on accumulation of subcutaneous fat, but the effect on the visceral fat accumulation that constitutes the basis of metabolic syndrome was weak, and the suppressive effect on insulin resistance was also weak. Furthermore, Boiogito did not alleviate the abnormal glucose tolerance, the hypertension or the peripheral neuropathy characteristically developed in the TSOD mice. In contrast, in the TSNO (Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obesity mice used as controls, Boiogito suppressed body weight gain and accumulation of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The above results suggested that Boiogito is effective as an anti-obesity drug against obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type in which subcutaneous fat accumulates, but cannot be expected to exert a preventive effect against various symptoms of metabolic syndrome that are based on visceral fat accumulation.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have difficulty riding a bicycle and playing certain sports. Usher syndrome type II is characterized by hearing ... 19-27. Review. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Rare Disease Day 2018 Darwin ...

  8. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  9. Management of type II superior labrum anterior posterior lesions: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinning Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Superior labrum anterior and posterior lesions were first described in 1985 by Andrews et al. and later classified into four types by Synder et al. The most prevalent is type II which is fraying of the superior glenoid labrum with detachment of the biceps anchor. Superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP lesions can also be associated with other shoulder pathology. Both MRI and MRA can be utilized in making the diagnosis with the coronal images being the most sensitive. The mechanism of injury can be either repetitive stress or acute trauma with the superior labrum most vulnerable to injury during the late cocking phase of throwing. A combination of the modified dynamic labral shear and O’Brien test can be used clinically in making the diagnosis of SLAP lesion. However, the most sensitive and specific test used to diagnosis specifically a type II SLAP lesion is the Biceps Load Test II. The management of type II SLAP lesions is controversial and dependent on patient characteristics. In the young high demanding overhead athlete, repair of the type II lesion is recommended to prevent glenohumeral instability. In middle-aged patients (age 25-45, repair of the type II SLAP lesion with concomitant treatment of other shoulder pathology resulted in better functional outcomes and patient satisfaction. Furthermore, patients who had a distinct traumatic event resulting in the type II SLAP tear did better functionally than patients who did not have the traumatic event when the lesion was repaired. In the older patient population (age over 45 years, minimum intervention (debridement, biceps tenodesis/tenotomy to the type II SLAP lesion results in excellent patient satisfaction and outcomes.

  10. Heights of Coronal Mass Ejections and Shocks Inferred from Metric and DH Type II Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Bendict Lawrance, M.; Moon, Y. J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Suresh, K.

    2017-09-01

    A set of 27 continuous events that showed extension of metric Type-II radio bursts (m-Type IIs) into the deca-hectometric (DH) domain is considered. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with this type of continuous event supply more energy to produce space-weather effects than the CMEs that produce Type-II bursts in any one region. Since the heights of shock formation at the start of m-Type IIs were not available from observations, they were estimated using kinematic modeling in previous studies. In the present study, the heights of shock formation during metric and DH Type-II bursts are determined using two methods: i) the CME leading-edge method and ii) a method employing known electron-density models and start/end frequencies. In the first method, assuming that the shocks are generated by the associated CMEs at the leading edge, the height of the CME leading edge (LE) is calculated at the onset and end of m-Type IIs using the kinematic equation with constant acceleration or constant speed. The LE heights of CMEs that are assumed to be the heights of shock formation/end of nearly 79% of m-Type IIs are found to be within the acceptable range of 1 - 3 R_{⊙}. For other events, the heights are beyond this range, for which the shocks might either have been generated at the CME flanks/flare-blast waves, or the initial CME height might have been different. The CME/shock height at the onset and end of 17 DH Type IIs are found to be in the range of 2 - 6 R_{⊙} and within 30 R_{⊙}, respectively. In addition, the CME LE heights from observations at the onset and end of metric/DH Type IIs are compared with the heights corresponding to the observed frequency that is determined using the known electron-density models, and they are in agreement with the model results. The heights are also estimated using the space speed available for 15 halo CMEs, and it is found that the difference is smaller at the m-Type II start/end (0.02 to 0.66 R_{⊙}) and slightly greater

  11. Origin of Radio Enhancements in Type II Bursts in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadani, Firas; Pohjolainen, Silja; Valtonen, Eino

    2017-09-01

    We study interplanetary (IP) solar radio type II bursts from 2011 - 2014 in order to determine the cause of the intense enhancements in their radio emission. Type II bursts are known to be due to propagating shocks that are often associated with fast halo-type coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We analysed the radio spectral data and the white-light coronagraph data from 16 selected events to obtain directions and heights for the propagating CMEs and the type II bursts. CMEs preceding the selected events were included in the analysis to verify whether CME interaction was possible. As a result, we were able to classify the events into five different groups. 1) Events where the heights of the CMEs and type II bursts are consistent, indicating that the shock is located at the leading front of the CME. The radio enhancements are superposed on the type II lanes, and they are probably formed when the shock meets remnant material from earlier CMEs, but the shock continues to propagate at the same speed. 2) Events where the type II heights agree with the CME leading front and an earlier CME is located at a height that suggests interaction. The radio enhancements and frequency jumps could be due to the merging process of the CMEs. 3) Events where the type II heights are significantly lower than the CME heights almost from the start. Interaction with close-by streamers is probably the cause for the enhanced radio emission, which is located at the CME flank region. 4) Events where the radio enhancements are located within wide-band type II bursts and the causes for the radio enhancements are not clear. 5) Events where the radio enhancements are associated with later-accelerated particles (electron beams, observed as type III bursts) that stop at the type II burst emission lane, and no other obvious reason for the enhancement can be identified. Most of the events (38%) were due to shock-streamer interaction, while one quarter of the events was due to possible CME-CME interaction

  12. Effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on the increase in type II collagen accumulation in cartilage-like MSC sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keigo; Mera, Hisashi; Wakitani, Shigeyuki; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2017-06-01

    With the aim to increase type II collagen content in the scaffold-free cartilage-like cell sheet using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, we examined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) addition to the chondrogenic medium for the cell sheet culture. The addition of EGCG (10 μM) increased the content of type II collagen 2-fold, while the addition did not markedly change the expression level of the genes encoding type II collagen and Sox 9. The reactive oxygen species level in the cells in cell sheets was thought to be too low to suppress the accumulation of type II collagen. On the other hand, the addition of EGCG markedly decreased both the matrix metalloproteinase-13 concentration in the supernatant of cell sheet culture and the type II collagen degradation activity in that supernatant. Taken together, EGCG may enhance the accumulation of type II collagen by suppressing type II collagen degradation.

  13. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Crosslinked type II collagen matrices: preparation, characterization, and potential for cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, J S; van der Kraan, P M; Hafmans, T; Kamp, J; Buma, P; van Susante, J L C; van den Berg, W B; Veerkamp, J H; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2002-08-01

    The limited intrinsic repair capacity of articular cartilage has stimulated continuing efforts to develop tissue engineered analogues. Matrices composed of type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS), the major constituents of hyaline cartilage, may create an appropriate environment for the generation of cartilage-like tissue. In this study, we prepared, characterized, and evaluated type 11 collagen matrices with and without CS. Type II collagen matrices were prepared using purified, pepsin-treated, type II collagen. Techniques applied to prepare type I collagen matrices were found unsuitable for type II collagen. Crosslinking of collagen and covalent attachment of CS was performed using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)carbodiimide. Porous matrices were prepared by freezing and lyophilization, and their physico-chemical characteristics (degree of crosslinking, denaturing temperature, collagenase-resistance, amount of CS incorporated) established. Matrices were evaluated for their capacity to sustain chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in vitro. After 7 d of culture, chondrocytes were mainly located at the periphery of the matrices. In contrast to type I collagen, type II collagen supported the distribution of cells throughout the matrix. After 14 d of culture, matrices were surfaced with a cartilagenous-like layer, and occasionally clusters of chondrocytes were present inside the matrix. Chondrocytes proliferated and differentiated as indicated by biochemical analyses, ultrastructural observations, and reverse transcriptase PCR for collagen types I, II and X. No major differences were observed with respect to the presence or absence of CS in the matrices.

  15. A novel DSPP mutation is associated with type II dentinogenesis Imperfecta in a chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chengqi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary defects of tooth dentin are classified into two main groups: dentin dysplasia (DD (types I and II and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI (types I, II, and III. Type II DGI is one of the most common tooth defects with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. One disease-causing gene, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene, has been reported for type II DGI. Methods In this study, we characterized a four-generation Chinese family with type II DGI that consists of 18 living family members, including 8 affected individuals. Linkage analysis with polymorphic markers D4S1534 and D4S414 that span the DSPP gene showed that the family is linked to DSPP. All five exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP were sequenced in members of type II DGI family. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel mutation (c.49C→T, p.Pro17Ser in exon 1 of the DSPP gene. The mutation spot, the Pro17 residue, is the second amino acid of the mature DSP protein, and highly conserved during evolution. The mutation was identified in all affected individuals, but not in normal family members and 100 controls. Conclusion These results suggest that mutation p.Pro17Ser causes type II DGI in the Chinese family. This study identifies a novel mutation in the DSPP gene, and expands the spectrum of mutations that cause DGI.

  16. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deemter, Mariëlle; Kuijer, Roel; Harm Pas, Hendri; Jacoba van der Worp, Roelofje; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used for detecting and locating trypsin isoforms in the vitreous and retina of human donor eyes. The capability of the retina to produce these trypsins was analyzed with polymerase chain reaction. Whether the different trypsins degraded type II collagen was tested in vitro. The sizes of the in vitro induced type II collagen degradation products were compared to those present in the vitreous of human eyes of different ages. Results Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 were detected in the vitreous. In the retina, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for trypsin-2, -3, and -4 was present. Using immunohistochemistry, trypsin-2 was detected in microglial cells located in the vitreous and the retina. All trypsin isoforms degraded type II collagen and produced degradation products of similar sizes as those present in the vitreous. Conclusions Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 appear to have a function in the degradation of vitreous type II collagen. They could therefore have a role in the development of vitreous liquefaction. PMID:23882137

  17. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (IIT)

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  18. Semiclassical theory of anomalous transport in type-II topological Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Timothy M.; McKay, Robert C.; Trivedi, Nandini

    2017-12-01

    Weyl semimetals possess low-energy excitations which act as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space. These emergent monopoles are at the heart of the many novel transport properties that Weyl semimetals exhibit. The singular nature of the Berry curvature around the nodal points in Weyl semimetals allows for the possibility of large anomalous transport coefficients in zero applied magnetic field. Recently, a new class, termed type-II Weyl semimetals, has been demonstrated in a variety of materials, where the Weyl nodes are tilted. We present here a theoretical study of anomalous transport in this new class of Weyl semimetals. We find that the parameter governing the tilt of these type-II Weyl points is intimately related to the zero-field transverse transport properties. We also find that the temperature dependence of the chemical potential plays an important role in determining how the transport coefficients can effectively probe the Berry curvature of the type-II Weyl points. In particular, we find that the transverse thermoelectric transport coefficient Lxy E T is strongly enhanced with the tilt of the type-II Weyl nodes and with increasing temperature. We also discuss the experimental implications of our work for time-reversal breaking type-II Weyl semimetals.

  19. Erythrocyte Membrane Antigen Frequencies in Patients with Type II Congenital Smell Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stateman, William A.; Henkin, Robert I.; Knöppel, Alexandra; Flegel, Willy A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine whether there are genetic factors associated with Type II congenital smell loss. STUDY DESIGN The expression frequencies of 16 erythrocyte antigens among patients with Type II congenital smell loss were determined and compared to those of a large control group. METHODS Blood samples were obtained from 99 patients with Type II congenital smell loss. Presence of the erythrocyte surface antigens A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, Fyb, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, and Jkb was analyzed by blood group serology. Comparisons of expression frequencies of these antigens were made between the patients and a large control group. RESULTS Patients tested for the Duffy b antigen (Fyb haplotype) exhibited a statistically significant 11% decrease in expression frequency compared to the controls. There were no significant differences between patients and controls in the expression frequencies for all other erythrocyte antigens (A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, or Jkb). CONCLUSIONS These findings describe the presence of a previously unrevealed genetic tendency among patients with Type II congenital smell loss related to erythrocyte surface antigen expression. The deviation in expression rate of Duffy b suggests a target gene and chromosome region in which future research into this form of congenital smell loss may reveal a more specific genetic basis for Type II congenital smell loss. PMID:25456515

  20. T-dualization of type II superstring theory in double space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, B.; Sazdovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-03-15

    In this article we offer a new interpretation of the T-dualization procedure of type II superstring theory in the double space framework. We use the ghost free action of type II superstring in pure spinor formulation in approximation of constant background fields up to the quadratic terms. T-dualization along any subset of the initial coordinates, x{sup a}, is equivalent to the permutation of this subset with subset of the corresponding T-dual coordinates, y{sub a}, in double space coordinate Z{sup M} = (x{sup μ}, y{sub μ}). Requiring that the T-dual transformation law after the exchange x{sup a} <-> y{sub a} has the same form as the initial one, we obtain the T-dual NS-NS and NS-R background fields. The T-dual R-R field strength is determined up to one arbitrary constant under some assumptions. The compatibility between supersymmetry and T-duality produces a change of bar spinors and R-R field strength. If we dualize an odd number of dimensions x{sup a}, such a change flips type IIA/B to type II B/A. If we T-dualize the time-like direction, one imaginary unit i maps type II superstring theories to type II{sup *} ones. (orig.)

  1. Intrathoracic drainage of a perforated prepyloric gastric ulcer with a type II paraoesophageal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonneveld Bas JGL

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an incidence of less than 5%, type II paraesophageal hernias are one of the less common types of hiatal hernias. We report a case of a perforated prepyloric gastric ulcer which, due to a type II hiatus hernia, drained into the mediastinum. Case presentation A 61-year old Caucasian man presented with acute abdominal pain. On a conventional x-ray of the chest a large mediastinal air-fluid collection and free intra-abdominal air was seen. Additional computed tomography revealed a large intra-thoracic air-fluid collection with a type II paraesophageal hernia. An emergency upper midline laparotomy was performed and a perforated pre-pyloric gastric ulcer was treated with an omental patch repair. The patient fully recovered after 10 days and continues to do well. Conclusion Type II paraesophageal hernia is an uncommon diagnosis. The main risk is gastric volvulus and possible gastric torsion. Intrathoracic perforation of gastric ulcers due to a type II hiatus hernia is extremely rare and can be a diagnostic and treatment challenge.

  2. Natural transformation of an engineered Helicobacter pylori strain deficient in type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems are important for bacteria to limit foreign DNA invasion. The naturally competent bacterium Helicobacter pylori has highly diverse strain-specific type II systems. To evaluate the roles of strain-specific restriction in H. pylori natural transformation, a markerless type II restriction endonuclease-deficient (REd) mutant was constructed. We deleted the genes encoding all four active type II restriction endonucleases in H. pylori strain 26695 using sacB-mediated counterselection. Transformation by donor DNA with exogenous cassettes methylated by Escherichia coli was substantially (1.7 and 2.0 log(10) for cat and aphA, respectively) increased in the REd strain. There also was significantly increased transformation of the REd strain by donor DNA from other H. pylori strains, to an extent corresponding to their shared type II R-M system strain specificity with 26695. Comparison of the REd and wild-type strains indicates that restriction did not affect the length of DNA fragment integration during natural transformation. There also were no differentials in cell growth or susceptibility to DNA damage. In total, the data indicate that the type II REd mutant has enhanced competence with no loss of growth or repair facility compared to the wild type, facilitating H. pylori mutant construction and other genetic engineering.

  3. Experimental Realization of Type-II Dirac Fermions in a PdTe_{2} Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Han-Jin; Jeong, Jinwon; Cho, En-Jin; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B I; Park, Byeong-Gyu

    2017-07-07

    A Dirac fermion in a topological Dirac semimetal is a quadruple-degenerate quasiparticle state with a relativistic linear dispersion. Breaking either time-reversal or inversion symmetry turns this system into a Weyl semimetal that hosts double-degenerate Weyl fermion states with opposite chiralities. These two kinds of quasiparticles, although described by a relativistic Dirac equation, do not necessarily obey Lorentz invariance, allowing the existence of so-called type-II fermions. The recent theoretical discovery of type-II Weyl fermions evokes the prediction of type-II Dirac fermions in PtSe_{2}-type transition metal dichalcogenides, expecting experimental confirmation. Here, we report an experimental realization of type-II Dirac fermions in PdTe_{2} by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with ab initio band calculations. Our experimental finding shows the first example that has both superconductivity and type-II Dirac fermions, which turns the topological material research into a new phase.

  4. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type II: Transitional type between Mohr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interestingly, the patient also had mesoaxial polydactyly of the left hand with extra metacarpal bones characteristic of OFDS. VI, however mentality and MRI brain were normal. This unusual association may suggest an additional subgroup of OFDSs or a variant of OFDS II due to variable gene expression or a transitional type ...

  5. The effects of psyllium on lipoproteins in type II diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore, G; Reitano, R; Barison, A; Magnanini, P; Cosma, C; Burlina, S; Manzato, E; Fedele, D; Lapolla, A

    2009-10-01

    We examined the effects of 2 months of psyllium treatment in optimizing metabolic control and lipoprotein profile, and its postprandial effects on lipids in type II diabetes. We recruited 40 type II diabetic patients who were on sulfonylureas and a controlled diet, sequentially assigning them to psyllium treatment (G1) or to a control group (G2) treated with dietary measures alone. After 2 months of treatment, body mass index, waist circumference, HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c) and fasting plasma glucose levels had significantly decreased in both groups. There were no postprandial differences in the lipoprotein profile between the two groups. Triglycerides were significantly lower in G1, but not in G2. Our study contributes toward elucidating the effects of psyllium on serum lipids, and suggests that psyllium treatment may help in reducing triglycerides (a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease) in type II diabetic patients.

  6. [Multifactor analysis on proliferative retinopathy in elderly patients with type II diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P L; Yao, Y; Yang, Z

    1997-10-01

    To evaluate the importance of different risk factors and their mutual interactions in the occurrence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in the elderly patients with type II diabetes, an investigation was carried out on the relationship between PDR and various risk factors in 98 elderly cases of type II diabetes by way of stepwise regression analysis method. Results showed: (1) the average course of PDR was longer than that of diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (P 2) multifactor analysis showed that BUN was one of the most important variables positively correlated with PDR, second to it in orders were the course of diabetes militus, GHbA1c, hypertention, proteinuria and urine microalbumin and TC. To prevent the occurrence and progress of PDR in the elderly patients with type II diabetes, it is important not only to control blood sugar, but to control blood pressure and relieve renal damage.

  7. Emergence of Type-II Dirac Points in Graphynelike Photonic Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrialakos, Georgios G; Nye, Nicholas S; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2017-09-15

    We theoretically demonstrate that a type-II class of tilted Dirac cones can emerge in generalized two-dimensional anisotropic lattice arrangements. This is achieved by introducing a special set of graphynelike exchange bonds by means of which the complete spectrum of the underlying Weyl Hamiltonian can be realized. Our ab initio calculations demonstrate a unique class of eigensolutions corresponding to a type-II class of Dirac fermionic excitations. Based on our approach, one can systematically synthesize a wide range of strongly anisotropic band diagrams having tilted Dirac cones with variable location and orientation. Moreover, we show that asymmetric conical diffraction, as well as edge states, can arise in these configurations. Our results can provide a versatile platform to observe, for the first time, optical transport around type-II Dirac points in two-dimensional optical settings under linear, nonlinear, and non-Hermitian conditions.

  8. BKM superalgebras from counting dyons in N=4 supersymmetric type II compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, Suresh, E-mail: suresh@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Jatkar, Dileep P., E-mail: dileep@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Gopala Krishna, K., E-mail: krishna@mpim-bonn.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mathematik, Vivatsgasse 7, 53111 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-06-11

    We study the degeneracy of quarter BPS dyons in N=4 type II compactifications of string theory. We find that the genus-two Siegel modular forms generating the degeneracies of the quarter BPS dyons in the type II theories can be expressed in terms of the genus-two Siegel modular forms generating the degeneracies of quarter BPS dyons in the CHL theories and the heterotic string. This helps us in understanding the algebra structure underlying the degeneracy of the quarter BPS states. The Conway group, Co{sub 0}, plays a role similar to Mathieu group, M{sub 24}, in the CHL models with eta quotients appearing in the place of eta products. We construct BKM Lie superalgebra structures for the Z{sub N} (for N=2,3,4) orbifolds of the type II string compactified on a six-torus.

  9. Evidence of in-situ Type II radio bursts in interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castillo, S. M.; Oliveros, J. C. Martínez; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2017-10-01

    We present a database of 11 interplanetary shocks associated to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO and Wind missions between 2006 and 2011 that show evidence of Type II radio burst. For all events, we calculated the principal characteristics of the shock driver, the intensity and geometrical configuration of the in-situ shock and checked for the existence of in-situ type II radio burst. We made a comparative analysis of two CME events (on 18 August 2010 and 4 June 2011), which are apparently associated to two or more magnetic structures which interact in space (i.e. CMEs, SIRs, CIRs). These events show varied shock configurations and intensities. We found evidence of in-situ type II radio bursts in one of the events studied, suggesting that the geometry of the shock (quasi-perpendicularity) is also critical for the generation and/or detection of radio emission in-situ.

  10. Emergence of Type-II Dirac Points in Graphynelike Photonic Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrialakos, Georgios G.; Nye, Nicholas S.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that a type-II class of tilted Dirac cones can emerge in generalized two-dimensional anisotropic lattice arrangements. This is achieved by introducing a special set of graphynelike exchange bonds by means of which the complete spectrum of the underlying Weyl Hamiltonian can be realized. Our ab initio calculations demonstrate a unique class of eigensolutions corresponding to a type-II class of Dirac fermionic excitations. Based on our approach, one can systematically synthesize a wide range of strongly anisotropic band diagrams having tilted Dirac cones with variable location and orientation. Moreover, we show that asymmetric conical diffraction, as well as edge states, can arise in these configurations. Our results can provide a versatile platform to observe, for the first time, optical transport around type-II Dirac points in two-dimensional optical settings under linear, nonlinear, and non-Hermitian conditions.

  11. Adipokines: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Vascular Dysfunction in Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Wanees Ahmed El husseny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines are bioactive molecules that regulate several physiological functions such as energy balance, insulin sensitization, appetite regulation, inflammatory response, and vascular homeostasis. They include proinflammatory cytokines such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as adiponectin, as well as vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules. In obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (DM, insulin resistance causes impairment of the endocrine function of the perivascular adipose tissue, an imbalance in the secretion of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator molecules, and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have shown that targeting plasma levels of adipokines or the expression of their receptors can increase insulin sensitivity, improve vascular function, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several reviews have discussed the potential of adipokines as therapeutic targets for type II DM and obesity; however, this review is the first to focus on their therapeutic potential for vascular dysfunction in type II DM and obesity.

  12. Corneal endothelial morphology and central thickness in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Singh, Amardeep; Jeppesen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in type II diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to relate potential differences to the glycaemic status. METHODS: A prospective clinical study including 107 patients with type II diabetes and 128 non-diabetic patients. Sample...... blood tests. The endothelial cell density, the variation in endothelial cell size (CV), the percentage of hexagonal cells, and the central corneal thickness (CCT) were recorded. RESULTS: Type II diabetic subjects did not differ from the non-diabetic control subjects with regards to endothelial cell...... density, hexagonality or variation in CV, but showed a significant increase in CCT (538 versus 546 μm, p diabetic group, lower cell counts were associated with higher HbA1c values (p II diabetes has no impact...

  13. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P Ethanol ingestion decreased (P glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  14. A Search for Type II Cepheids: Stars From the ROTSE Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Langan, S.; Rogalla, D.; Thacker-Lynn, L.

    2005-12-01

    There is good reason to believe that only a small fraction of type II Cepheids in the Galaxy have been discovered. Given their relevance to a number of interesting astrophysical problems, we have undertaken a program to expand the number of these stars known. As a first step, we selected 205 Cepheid candidates from the list of periodic variable stars discovered in the ROTSE Demonstration Project (Akerlof et al. 2000). Given the galactic latitudes and apparent magnitudes of these stars, any which are Cepheids are very likely to be type II Cepheids. However, the amplitudes are surprisingly small; 80% are less than 0.4 magnitudes in contrast to known type II Cepheids of which only a few percent have such small amplitudes. In order to obtain color information and accurate light curves, we have conducted RV photometry of the Cepheid candidates using the Behlen Observatory 0.76-m telescope and the CCD photometer. Based on a preliminary analysis of a portion of the data, about 55% of the candidates have colors and light curves appropriate to type II Cepheids. Since the ROTSE demonstration project included only 5.6% of the fields in the survey, this suggests that the entire ROTSE-I database could yield nearly 2000 new type II Cepheids. However, spectroscopy will be needed to confirm the identification of individual stars as type II Cepheids, particularly those with small amplitudes. This work makes use of the data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey created jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and University of Michigan. The NSVS was funded by the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST 00-97353. Akerlof, C. et al. 2000, AJ 119, 1901.

  15. Novel Type II and Monomeric NAD+ Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Phylogenetic Affinity, Enzymatic Characterization, and Evolutionary Implication

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Lv, Changqi; Zhu, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ use is an ancestral trait of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), and the NADP+ phenotype arose through evolution as an ancient adaptation event. However, no NAD+-specific IDHs have been found among type II IDHs and monomeric IDHs. In this study, novel type II homodimeric NAD-IDHs from Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 IDH (OlIDH) and Micromonas sp. RCC299 (MiIDH), and novel monomeric NAD-IDHs from Campylobacter sp. FOBRC14 IDH (CaIDH) and Campylobacter curvus (CcIDH) were reported for the fir...

  16. Lifshitz Transitions, Type-II Dirac and Weyl Fermions, Event Horizon and All That

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovik, G. E.; Zhang, K.

    2017-12-01

    The type-II Weyl and type-II Dirac points emerge in semimetals and also in relativistic systems. In particular, the type-II Weyl fermions may emerge behind the event horizon of black holes. In this case the horizon with Painlevé-Gullstrand metric serves as the surface of the Lifshitz transition. This relativistic analogy allows us to simulate the black hole horizon and Hawking radiation using the fermionic superfluid with supercritical velocity, and the Dirac and Weyl semimetals with the interface separating the type-I and type-II states. The difference between such type of the artificial event horizon and that which arises in acoustic metric is discussed. At the Lifshitz transition between type-I and type-II fermions the Dirac lines may also emerge, which are supported by the combined action of topology and symmetry. The type-II Weyl and Dirac points also emerge as the intermediate states of the topological Lifshitz transitions. Different configurations of the Fermi surfaces, involved in such Lifshitz transition, are discussed. In one case the type-II Weyl point connects the Fermi pockets and the Lifshitz transition corresponds to the transfer of the Berry flux between the Fermi pockets. In the other case the type-II Weyl point connects the outer and inner Fermi surfaces. At the Lifshitz transition the Weyl point is released from both Fermi surfaces. They loose their Berry flux, which guarantees the global stability, and without the topological support the inner surface disappears after shrinking to a point at the second Lifshitz transition. These examples reveal the complexity and universality of topological Lifshitz transitions, which originate from the ubiquitous interplay of a variety of topological characters of the momentum-space manifolds. For the interacting electrons, the Lifshitz transitions may lead to the formation of the dispersionless (flat) band with zero energy and singular density of states, which opens the route to room

  17. Two Ramond-Ramond corrections to type II supergravity via field-theory amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Hamid R.

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the standard form of the string-theory amplitude, we calculate the field-theory amplitude to complete the higher-derivative terms in type II supergravity theories in their conventional form. We derive explicitly the O(α '^3) interactions for the RR (Ramond-Ramond) fields with graviton, B-field and dilaton in the low-energy effective action of type II superstrings. We check our results by comparison with previous work that has been done by the other methods, and we find exact agreement.

  18. Ground-based and spaceborn observations of the type II burst with developed fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of two huge ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) operated in decameter wavelengths with three spatially separated spacecrafts (SOHO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B) equipped with white light coronagraphs, UV telescopes and decameter-hectometer band radio telescopes created a unique opportunity to investigate the high energy solar transients, such as CMEs and their manifestations in radio bands - type II bursts. In this paper we made detailed analysis of the powerful and complex event occurred on 7 June 2011 consisted of Halo-CME and type II burst with rich fine structure.

  19. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  20. Social learning among Congo Basin hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Barry S; Fouts, Hillary N; Boyette, Adam H; Hewlett, Bonnie L

    2011-04-12

    This paper explores childhood social learning among Aka and Bofi hunter-gatherers in Central Africa. Existing literature suggests that hunter-gatherer social learning is primarily vertical (parent-to-child) and that teaching is rare. We use behavioural observations, open-ended and semi-structured interviews, and informal and anecdotal observations to examine the modes (e.g. vertical versus horizontal/oblique) and processes (e.g. teaching versus observation and imitation) of cultural transmission. Cultural and demographic contexts of social learning associated with the modes and processes of cultural transmission are described. Hunter-gatherer social learning occurred early, was relatively rapid, primarily vertical under age 5 and oblique and horizontal between the ages of 6 and 12. Pedagogy and other forms of teaching existed as early as 12 months of age, but were relatively infrequent by comparison to other processes of social learning such as observation and imitation.

  1. Wealth transmission and inequality among hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric Alden; Hill, Kim; Marlowe, Frank; Nolin, David; Wiessner, Polly; Gurven, Michael; Bowles, Samuel; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hertz, Tom; Bell, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    We report quantitative estimates of intergenerational transmission and population-wide inequality for wealth measures in a set of hunter-gatherer populations. Wealth is defined broadly as factors that contribute to individual or household well-being, ranging from embodied forms such as weight and hunting success to material forms such household goods, as well as relational wealth in exchange partners. Intergenerational wealth transmission is low to moderate in these populations, but is still expected to have measurable influence on an individual's life chances. Wealth inequality (measured with Gini coefficients) is moderate for most wealth types, matching what qualitative ethnographic research has generally indicated (if not the stereotype of hunter-gatherers as extreme egalitarians). We discuss some plausible mechanisms for these patterns, and suggest ways in which future research could resolve questions about the role of wealth in hunter-gatherer social and economic life.

  2. Roentgenographic diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis with particular reference to Morquio syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    umesh chandra parashari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS comprises a group of conditions associated with an abnormality in glycoprotein or mucopolysaccharides metabolism. Types of MPS identified are MPS I-H (Hurler's syndrome, gargoylism, MPS II (Hunter's syndrome, MPS III (Sanfilippo's syndrome, MPS IV (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome, MPS I-S (Scheie's syndrome and MPS VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome. The Hunter type is inherited as an X-linked recessive; the others are autosomal recessive. Patients with MPS IV can usually be clinically distinguished from patients with other forms of MPS; their intelligence is unimpaired, in contrast with other forms of MPS. Husler coined the term dysostosis multiplex to describe the skeletal findings.

  3. Information Technology, Type II Classroom Integration, and the Limited Infrastructure in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Cleborne D.; Johnson D. Lamont

    2006-01-01

    In this second special issue on Type II applications of information technology in education, the focus is on classroom integration. This editorial explores some possible explanations for the fact that information technology in schools has not fulfilled its considerable potential. One reason may be that individualized instruction is not part of the…

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II: European recommendations for the diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of a rare disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpa, Maurizio; Almássy, Zsuzsanna; Beck, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a rare, life-limiting, X-linked recessive disease characterised by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Consequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leads to pathological changes in multiple body systems. Age at onset, signs...

  5. Pool sizes of precursors for phosphatidylcholine formation in adult rat lung type II cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posta, M.; Batenburg, J.J.; Smith, B.T.; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The pool sizes of the choline intermediates and cofactors involved in the CDPcholine pathway were studied in alveolar type II cells from adult rat lung. 2. 2. The choline phosphate pool was much larger than both the choline and CDPcholine pools. 3. 3. Kinetic analysis of the pool sizes

  6. Exercise And Other Lifestyle Habits Of Patients With Type Ii Diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    1. EXERCISE AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE II. DIABETES MELLITUS IN JOS, NIGERIA. Authors. Edah JO, Odoh G, Kumtap CY, Onwukeme OC, Ojo SO, Okpara UC, MwarakDB, Puepet FH. Endocrinology and Metabolism unit, Department of internal medicine, Jos University Teaching.

  7. Mutation detection in glycogen storage disease type II by RT-PCR and automated sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.P. Hermans (Monique); D. van Leenen (Dik); M.A. Kroos (Marian); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA new method is described for detection of mutations in the lysosomal a-glucosidase gene (GAA) leading to Glycogen Storage Disease type II (GSDII). A key feature of the method is isolation and reverse transcription of mRNA followed by PCR amplification of lysosomal a-glucosidase cDNA

  8. The Type II supernovae 2006V and 2006au: two SN 1987A-like events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Sollerman, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Supernova 1987A revealed that a blue supergiant (BSG) star can end its life as a core-collapse supernova (SN). SN 1987A and other similar objects exhibit properties that distinguish them from ordinary Type II Plateau (IIP) SNe, whose progenitors are believed to be red supergiants (RSGs...

  9. Interleukin-8, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors in type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Shousha, Seham; Abd El-Megeed, Mona H; Sultan, Hala K

    2006-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common form of diabetes that constitutes the majority of cases worldwide including Egypt. Chronic elevated glucose level in DM increases monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelial cells (ECs) which is mediated primarily through induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8). This study aimed to investigate the possible role of IL-8 as a potent chemoattractant, pro-inflammatory cytokine in the immuno-inflammatory response of type II diabetic patients in correlation to ferritin and sTFR as markers of glucose homeostasis that characterizes the disease. The current work was conducted on 20 diabetic females and 10 healthy age and sex matching subjects as a group of control. Serum levels of IL-8, ferritin and sTFR were measured in all study subjects under investigation. Results revealed that both serum levels of IL-8 and ferritin were significantly elevated in type II diabetic patients (P = 0.0029 and 0.03 respectively) compared with those of control group while no significant difference was detected between sTFR levels in diabetic patient and control groups. In addition, a significant positive correlation was detected (P = 0.032) between serum levels of IL-8 and sTFR of the studied diabetic patient group. In conclusion, quantitative determination of IL-8, ferritin and sTFR could help in predicting type II diabetes-associated immuno-inflammatory manifestations characterize the micro-and macrovascular disease complications, particularly for high risk populations.

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Type II diabetes is the most often considered as maternally inherited disease and A>G transition at position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA (m.3243A>G) in the encoding tRNALeu(UUR) gene is thought to be strongly responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease in number of cases. Aim: Current study was ...

  11. Plants used to manage type II diabetes mellitus in selected districts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such information can lay a firm and clear foundation for scientific investigation of the purported therapeutic benefits of the said plants. The objective of this study was to collect names of medicinal plants used to manage diabetes mellitus type II in selected districts of central Uganda. Methods: In this ethnobotanical survey, ...

  12. Non-lethal infection parameters in mice separate sheep Type II Toxoplasma gondii isolates by virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Jensen, L; Rask, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The zoonotic protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect all warm-blooded animals, but virulence of isolates has previously been characterised mainly by the ability to kill mice after experimental infections. In the present study, 15 Type II strains of T. gondii, isolated from five adult sheep...

  13. String cosmology in LRS Bianchi type-II dusty Universe with time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A model of a cloud formed by massive strings is used as a source of LRS Bianchi type-II with time-decaying vacuum energy density . To construct string cosmological models, we have used the energy–momentum tensor for such strings as formulated by Letelier (1983). The high nonlinear field equations have been solved ...

  14. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis.

  15. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Kuijer, Roel; Pas, Hendri Harm; van der Worp, Roelofje Jacoba; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods:

  16. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease in a Nigerian population with type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Worldwide, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become an important cause of chronic liver disease and cardiovascular morbidity, even more so in subjects with Type II Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of NAFLD in an African population ...

  17. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients...

  18. Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on rats with Type II diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To examine metabolic changes in a rat model of type II diabetes and explore mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in this model. 120 rats were divided into four groups, including a control group, a high-fat diet group (high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection), a TCM ...

  19. Comparison of Diabetes Type II Patients Life Style Effective Factors With That of Healthy People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Mostafaei

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Diabetes is a significant and expensive health problem which had influenced all the ages in almost all the countries. Increasing prevalence of this disease has been caused by continued changes in lifestyle such as unsuitable nutrition, lack of physical activities and fatness which is often related to modern city life, mechanization and industrialization. It is an expensive disease, both for patients and the health and hygienic care systems. This research tried to examine the relationship between lifestyle risk factors and type II diabetes. Methods: This research was a case-control type by random sampling and studying140 diabetes type II patients as case group and 140 healthy people accompanying some other patients as the control group at Tonekabon Shahid Rajaei hospital. People were of both sexes, between 30 and 64 years of age and Tonekabon residents. The questionnaire used included demographic, nutritional, physical activities, stress tolerance and smoking status information. The SPSS 11.5 and excel software were used for statistic calculation and for analysis of data, T and Chi-Square tests were applied. Results: By analyzing the data collected, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between physical activities, stress residence, nutrition, smoking and the diabetes type II disease (P-value0.05. Conclusion: Results imply that some risk factors important in diabetes type II include unsuitable nutrition such as having too much of sweets and sugar,lack of fruits, vegetables, fish, proteins and also lack of physical activities, stress tolerance and control.

  20. A case of osteogenesis imperfecta type II, a diagnosis made almost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of type I collagen (COL I), characterised by excessive bone fragility with low bone mineral density (BMD). Type II is associated with extreme bone fragility leading to intrauterine or early infant death. Objective: To highlight a case of OI type II ...

  1. Discriminating neutrino mass models using Type-II see-saw formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt has been made to discriminate theoretically the three possible patterns of neutrino mass models,viz., degenerate, inverted hierarchical and normal hierachical models, within the framework of Type-II see-saw formula. From detailed numerical analysis we are able to arrive at a conclusion that the inverted ...

  2. 77 FR 60124 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... ``Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II API DMFs Under GDUFA.'' Under the Generic Drug User Fee... ingredient (API) drug master files (DMFs) that are referenced in generic drug applications, or in amendments... Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD...

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saidul Abrar

    Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation in a Pakistani family. Saidul Abrar a, Khushi Muhammad b, Hasnain Zaman c, Suleman Khan b, Faisal Nouroz a,d, Nousheen Bibi a,* a Department of Bioinformatics, Hazara University Mansehra, Pakistan b Department of ...

  4. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. I. Observations, Sample Characterization, and Spectral Line Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post-explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spect...

  5. Integrated Spreadsheets as a Paradigm of Type II Technology Applications in Mathematics Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovich, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the use of spreadsheets integrated with digital tools capable of symbolic computations and graphic constructions in a master's level capstone course for secondary mathematics teachers. Such use of spreadsheets is congruent with the Type II technology applications framework aimed at the development of conceptual knowledge in the…

  6. Can optical afterglows be used to discriminate between Type I and Type II GRBs?

    OpenAIRE

    Kann, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    The precise localization of short/hard (Type I) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in recent years has answered many questions but raised even more. I present some results of a systematic study of the optical afterglows of long/soft (Type II) and short/hard (Type I) GRBs, focusing on the optical luminosity as another puzzle piece in the classification of GRBs.

  7. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  8. Contrast enhancement of fingerprint images using intuitionistic type II fuzzy set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devarasan Ezhilmaran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel contrast image enhancement of fingerprint images using intuitionistic type II fuzzy set theory is recommended in this work. The method of Hamacher T co-norm(S norm which generates a new membership function with the help of upper and lower membership function of type II fuzzy set. The finger print identification is one of the very few techniques employed in forensic science to aid criminal investigations in daily life, providing access control in financial security;-, visa related services, as well as others. Mostly fingerprint images are poorly illuminated and hardly visible, so it is necessary to enhance the input images. The enhancement is useful for authentication and matching. The fingerprint enhancement is vital for identifying and authenticating people by matching their fingerprints with the stored one in the database. The proposed enhancement of the intuitionistic type II fuzzy set theory results showed that it is more effective, especially, very useful for forensic science operations. The experimental results were compared with non-fuzzy, fuzzy, intuitionistic fuzzy and type II fuzzy methods in which the proposed method offered better results with good quality, less noise and low blur features.

  9. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. ... and, therefore, emphasis should be on the education of the local population of New Karachi Township on how to attain euglycemic state with regular medication, diet and exercise to avoid development and progress of DR.

  10. Group B streptococcal type II and III conjugate vaccines: physicochemical properties that influence immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michon, Francis; Uitz, Catherine; Sarkar, Arun; D'Ambra, Anello J; Laude-Sharp, Maryline; Moore, Samuel; Fusco, Peter C

    2006-08-01

    Recent efforts toward developing vaccines against group B streptococci (GBS) have focused on increasing the immunogenicity of GBS polysaccharides by conjugation to carrier proteins. However, partial depolymerization of GBS polysaccharides for the production of vaccines is a difficult task because of their acid-labile, antigenically critical sialic acids. Here we report a method for the partial depolymerization of type II and III polysaccharides by mild deaminative cleavage to antigenic fragments with reducing-terminal 2,5-anhydro-d-mannose residues. Through the free aldehydes of their newly formed end groups, the fragments were conjugated to tetanus toxoid by reductive amination. The resulting conjugates stimulated the production in animals of high-titer type II- and III-specific antibodies which induced opsonophagocytic killing of type II and III strains of group B streptococci. For the type II conjugates, immunogenicity increased as oligosaccharide size decreased, whereas for type III conjugates, the size of the oligosaccharides did not significantly influence immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides of defined size were conjugated through sialic acid residues, the resulting cross-linkages were shown to affect immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides were conjugated through terminal aldehyde groups generated by deamination, modification of the exocyclic chain of sialic acid did not influence immunogenicity.

  11. Priapism in type II Diabetes Mellitus: A case report | Muthuuri | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Priapism in type II diabetes mellitus is an uncommon event. A case of this condition in an adult male is presented. More common precipitating factors such as use of medications like sildenafil or use of an intracarvenosal vasodilator was absent, although diagnostic investigations postulated the cause as thrombotic factors in ...

  12. Structural studies on a non toxic homologue of type II RIPs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Each domain carries a carbohydrate binding site in type II RIPS of known structure. BGSL has a sugar binding site only on one domain, thus impairing its interaction at the cell surface. The adenine binding site in the catalytic chain is defective. Thus, defects in sugar binding as well as adenine binding appear to contribute to ...

  13. p53 suppresses type II endometrial carcinomas in mice and governs endometrial tumour aggressiveness in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Peter J; Ikenberg, Kristian; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Georgiev, Strahil; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Noske, Aurelia; Roessle, Matthias; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Krek, Wilhelm; Frew, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are a highly aggressive group of tumour subtypes that are frequently associated with inactivation of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. We show that mice with endometrium-specific deletion of Trp53 initially exhibited histological changes that are identical to known precursor lesions of type II endometrial carcinomas in humans and later developed carcinomas representing all type II subtypes. The mTORC1 signalling pathway was frequently activated in these precursor lesions and tumours, suggesting a genetic cooperation between this pathway and Trp53 deficiency in tumour initiation. Consistent with this idea, analyses of 521 human endometrial carcinomas identified frequent mTORC1 pathway activation in type I as well as type II endometrial carcinoma subtypes. mTORC1 pathway activation and p53 expression or mutation status each independently predicted poor patient survival. We suggest that molecular alterations in p53 and the mTORC1 pathway play different roles in the initiation of the different endometrial cancer subtypes, but that combined p53 inactivation and mTORC1 pathway activation are unifying pathogenic features among histologically diverse subtypes of late stage aggressive endometrial tumours. PMID:22678923

  14. Behavior Change; Weight Loss, and Physiological Improvements in Type II Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated whether behavior modification would improve short- and long-term results of weight control programs for obese patients (N=53) with Type II diabetes. The behavior modification group lost more weight than the nutrition education or standard-care condition during the 16-week treatment, but at 16-month follow-up, weight loss differences…

  15. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitude...

  16. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in known diabetic patients attending the diabetes outpatient department ... regular medication, diet and exercise to avoid development and progress of DR. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus ... Type II Diabetes Mellitus (DM II) is a chronic progressive condition which is ...

  17. Bulk superconductivity in Type II superconductors near the second critical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Helffer, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We consider superconductors of Type II near the transition from the ‘bulk superconducting’ to the ‘surface superconducting’ state. We prove a new L∞ estimate on the order parameter in the bulk, i.e. away from the boundary. This solves an open problem posed by Aftalion and Serfaty [AS]....

  18. Comment on the two ''new'' classes of Bianchi type II solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz-Petzold, D.

    1987-06-01

    Hajj-Boutros's claim (J. Math. Phys. 27, 1592 (1986)) that two new classes of Bianchi type II solutions can be generated from Lorenz's solution (Phys. Lett. A 79, 19 (1980)) is shown to be wrong.

  19. Hip joint torques in type II diabetes with and without neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Abadi, MS (PT

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy demonstrate significantly reduced peak torques at the peripheral joints. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess isometric and concentric peak torques of the hip joint in people with type II diabetes with and without peripheral neuropathy in comparison with healthy participants. Methods: 27 patients with type II diabetes including 15 patients without peripheral neuropathy, 12 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy and 15 healthy people participated. Isometric and concentric peak torques of hip flexion, extension, adduction and abduction of the non-dominant leg were measured by motorized dynamometer. Results: Peak and average peak concentric torques of the hip extension and abduction in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were lower than those patients with diabetes and control group. Angle of extension peak torque was significantly greater in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy compared with other groups. Angle of flexion peak torque was lower in the patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions: Torque related parameters in patients with type II diabetes with or without peripheral neuropathy, are different from healthy subjects. As a result, patients with diabetes especially with peripheral neuropathy are more susceptible of injury and disability in lower limbs. Keywords: type II diabetes, hip, joint, torques, peripheral neuropathy

  20. A new modification of rotationplasty in a patient with proximal femoral focal deficiency Pappas type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, J; Winkelmann, W; Becker, W

    1999-07-01

    The application of rotationplasty type B III (Winkelmann) for a patient with proximal femoral focal deficiency (PFFD) Pappas type II in a 5-year-old patient is described. The advantages for prosthetic management are discussed in comparison with other surgical options.

  1. Factors affecting fatigue in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong-Mi; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Hahm, Jong-Ryeal; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Won-Hee

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize and identify the factors affecting fatigue in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in Korea. A total of 180 patients with type II diabetes mellitus were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital. For data collection, a questionnaire survey of diabetes history, hypoglycemia symptoms, and fatigue was conducted between January and February 2011. Data were analyzed using t test, analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression. The mean fatigue and hypoglycemia symptom scores of patients with type II diabetes mellitus were 2.88 ± 0.61 and 6.18 ± 12.60, respectively. Hypoglycemia symptoms (p = .004), disease duration (p II diabetes mellitus after adjustment for influences of demographic and clinical characteristic variables. Hypoglycemia symptoms were confirmed to be a predictor of fatigue. Consequently, it is essential to consider age, and disease duration as well as hypoglycemia symptoms to intervene fatigue effectively among patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSITION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSTION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE. MJ DeVito', JJ Diliberto', DG Ross', C Emond2, VM Richardson', and LS Birnbaum', 'ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, USA, 2National Research Council.One possible explanation fo...

  3. Interaction between Sex and Social Support in the Control of Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzmann, Carma A.; Kaplan, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the role of social support in the control of Type II diabetes mellitus. Participants (N=37) in a behavioral program in diabetes care completed questionnaires and provided blood samples. For women, satisfaction with supportive relationships was associated with control of diabetes. The opposite was true for men. (BH)

  4. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human anti-mullerian hormone type II receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Visser (Jenny); A. McLuskey; T. van Beers (T.); D.O. Weghuis (D. Olde); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractUsing the rat anti-müllerian hormone type II receptor (AMHRII) cDNA as a probe, two overlapping lambda phage clones containing the AMHRII gene were isolated from a human genomic library. Sequence analysis of the exons was performed and the exon/intron boundaries were determined. The

  5. The long-term functional outcome of type II odontoid fractures managed non-operatively.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Butler, J S

    2010-10-01

    Odontoid fractures currently account for 9-15% of all adult cervical spine fractures, with type II fractures accounting for the majority of these injuries. Despite recent advances in internal fixation techniques, the management of type II fractures still remains controversial with advocates still supporting non-rigid immobilization as the definitive treatment of these injuries. At the NSIU, over an 11-year period between 1 July 1996 and 30 June 2006, 66 patients (n = 66) were treated by external immobilization for type II odontoid fractures. The medical records, radiographs and CT scans of all patients identified were reviewed. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed using the Cervical Spine Outcomes Questionnaire (CSOQ). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term functional outcome of patients suffering isolated type II odontoid fractures managed non-operatively and to correlate patient age and device type with clinical and functional outcome. Of the 66 patients, there were 42 males and 24 females (M:F = 1.75:1) managed non-operatively for type II odontoid fractures. The mean follow-up time was 66 months. Advancing age was highly correlated with poorer long-term functional outcomes when assessing neck pain (r = 0.19, P = 0.1219), shoulder and arm pain (r = 0.41, P = 0.0007), physical symptoms (r = 0.25, P = 0.472), functional disability (r = 0.24, P = 0.0476) and psychological distress (r = 0.41, P = 0.0007). Patients >65 years displayed a higher rate of pseudoarthrosis (21.43 vs. 1.92%) and established non-union (7.14 vs. 0%) than patients <65 years. The non-operative management of type II odontoid fractures is an effective and satisfactory method of treating type II odontoid fractures, particularly those of a stable nature. However, patients of advancing age have been demonstrated to have significantly poorer functional outcomes in the long term. This may be linked to higher rates of non-union.

  6. Investigation of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions in type II non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaremko, Matt J.

    2017-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are responsible for the biosynthesis of many pharmaceutically relavant compounds. Type II NRPSs are an emerging subfamily of NRPSs that form hybrid pathways with type I fatty acid synthases (FAS), polyketide synthases (PKS), type I NRPSs, or others. The type II NRPSs commonly contain tailoring enzymes that generate unique substrate modifications, such as dehydrogenations and halogenation. Unlike type I NRPSs, the type II systems consists of standalone...

  7. Coronal mass ejections, type II radio bursts, and solar energetic particle events in the SOHO era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gopalswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the extensive and uniform data on coronal mass ejections (CMEs, solar energetic particle (SEP events, and type II radio bursts during the SOHO era, we discuss how the CME properties such as speed, width and solar-source longitude decide whether CMEs are associated with type II radio bursts and SEP events. We discuss why some radio-quiet CMEs are associated with small SEP events while some radio-loud CMEs are not associated with SEP events. We conclude that either some fast and wide CMEs do not drive shocks or they drive weak shocks that do not produce significant levels of particle acceleration. We also infer that the Alfvén speed in the corona and near-Sun interplanetary medium ranges from <200 km/s to ~1600 km/s. Radio-quiet fast and wide CMEs are also poor SEP producers and the association rate of type II bursts and SEP events steadily increases with CME speed and width (i.e. energy. If we consider western hemispheric CMEs, the SEP association rate increases linearly from ~30% for 800 km/s CMEs to 100% for ≥1800 km/s. Essentially all type II bursts in the decametre-hectometric (DH wavelength range are associated with SEP events once the source location on the Sun is taken into account. This is a significant result for space weather applications, because if a CME originating from the western hemisphere is accompanied by a DH type II burst, there is a high probability that it will produce an SEP event.

  8. Human type II pneumocyte chemotactic responses to CXCR3 activation are mediated by splice variant A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rong; Lee, Clement M; Gonzales, Linda W; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae; Hurford, Matthew T; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    Chemokine receptors control several fundamental cellular processes in both hematopoietic and structural cells, including directed cell movement, i.e., chemotaxis, cell differentiation, and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that CXCR3, the chemokine receptor expressed by Th1/Tc1 inflammatory cells present in the lung, is also expressed by human airway epithelial cells. In airway epithelial cells, activation of CXCR3 induces airway epithelial cell movement and proliferation, processes that underlie lung repair. The present study examined the expression and function of CXCR3 in human alveolar type II pneumocytes, whose destruction causes emphysema. CXCR3 was present in human fetal and adult type II pneumocytes as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. CXCR3-A and -B splice variant mRNA was present constitutively in cultured type II cells, but levels of CXCR3-B greatly exceeded CXCR3-A mRNA. In cultured type II cells, I-TAC, IP-10, and Mig induced chemotaxis. Overexpression of CXCR3-A in the A549 pneumocyte cell line produced robust chemotactic responses to I-TAC and IP-10. In contrast, I-TAC did not induce chemotactic responses in CXCR3-B and mock-transfected cells. Finally, I-TAC increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B kinases only in CXCR3-A-transfected cells. These data indicate that the CXCR3 receptor is expressed by human type II pneumocytes, and the CXCR3-A splice variant mediates chemotactic responses possibly through Ca(2+) activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Expression of CXCR3 in alveolar epithelial cells may be important in pneumocyte repair from injury.

  9. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  10. Chronic shin splints. Classification and management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmer, D E

    1986-01-01

    A clinical classification and treatment programme has been developed for chronic medial tibial stress syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome has been reported to be either tibial stress fracture or microfracture, tibial periostitis, or distal deep posterior chronic compartment syndrome. Three chronic types exist and may coexist: Type I (tibial microfracture, bone stress reaction or cortical fracture); type II (periostalgia from chronic avulsion of the periosteum at the periosteal-fascial junction); and type III (chronic compartment syndrome syndrome). Type I disease is treated nonoperatively. Operations for resistant types II and III medial tibial stress syndrome were performed in 41 patients. Bilaterality was common (type II, 50% type III, 88%). Seven had coexistent type II/III; one had type I/II. Preoperative symptoms averaged 24 months in type II, 6 months in type III, and 33 months in types II/III. Mean age was 22 years (15 to 51). Resting compartment pressures were normal in type II (mean 12 mm Hg) and elevated in type III and type II/III (mean 23 mm Hg). Type II and type II/III patients received fasciotomy plus periosteal cauterisation. Type III patients had fasciotomy only. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis using local anaesthesia. Follow up was complete and averaged 6 months (2 to 14 months). Improved performance was as follows: type II, 93%, type III, 100%; type II/III, 86%. Complete cures were as follows: type II, 78%; type III, 75%; and type II/III, 57%. This experience suggests that with precise diagnosis and treatment involving minimal risk and cost the athlete has a reasonable chance of return to full activity.

  11. Evidence for effects on thermoregulation after acute oral exposure to type I and type II pyrethroids in infant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardullas, Ulises; Sosa-Holt, Carla Solange; Pato, Alejandro Martín; Nemirovsky, Sergio Iván; Wolansky, Marcelo Javier

    2015-01-01

    Most pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides may be classified either as type-I compounds, which produce whole body tremors and hyperthermia, or type-II compounds, which produce salivation, choreoathetosis, and hypothermia (i.e., producing T and CS neurobehavioral syndromes, respectively). This classification is based on clinical observations in adult rats and mice after intracerebroventricular or intravascular administration of highly effective acute (bolus) doses. PYR neurotoxicity in infant animals is not characterized as much as in adult animals. Endpoints informing on vital determinants of mammal's maturation, such as body temperature may help recognizing age-related differences in susceptibility to PYRs. In this work, body temperature (Tb) was monitored at 30-min intervals after acute oral exposure to T-syndrome PYR bifenthrin (BIF), CS-syndrome PYR cypermethrin (CYPM), and a BIF–CYPM mixture in weanling rats by using a subcutaneous temperature monitoring system. In both single-compound assays, a time- and dose-related decline of Tb was the most evident impact on thermoregulation observed starting at ~2–3 h after dosing.Moreover, 15–18 mg/kg BIF induced a mild increase in Tb before the hypothermic action was apparent. The lowest effective dose for temperature perturbation was 15mg/kg for BIF and 10mg/kg for CYPM, and moderate neurobehavioral alterations were evident at 12 and 10mg/kg, respectively. When low effective doses of BIF and CYPM were co-administered mild behavioral effects and a transient increase in Tb (p=0.02) were observed at 1–2 h, and no Tb decline was apparent afterwards compared to control animals. Noteworthy, the hypothermic action of BIF in infant rats was quite different from the hyperthermia consistently reported in studies using mature animals. Our results suggest that body temperature monitoring may be useful as a complementary assessment to reveal qualitative age-specific pesticide effects in rats.

  12. Swedish hunters' safety behaviour and experience of firearm incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junuzovic, Mensura; Midlöv, Patrik; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Eriksson, Anders

    2013-11-01

    Since any firearm injury is potentially lethal, it is of great interest to prevent firearm incidents. This study investigated such incidents during hunting and Swedish hunters' safety behaviour. A 48-item questionnaire was posted to a random sample of 1000 members of the Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management. The questions considered demographics, hunting experience/hunting habits/safety behaviour/attitudes and experience of careless weapon handling, hunters' weapons and safety behaviour relating to weapons, health status, firearm incidents and their preventability, and personal comments on the questionnaire. The response rate was almost 50%. The mean age of the responders was 54 years; 5% were females. Almost none (1%) reported hunting under the influence of alcohol. Young age and male sex were positively associated with risk behaviour, although the presence of multiple risk behaviours in the same responder was not common. A very high degree of compliance with Swedish laws regarding weapon storage was reported. One-quarter of the responders had witnessed a firearm incident caused by another hunter, which in most situations did not result in human injury or death. An unsafetied weapon was the most common reported "cause" of these incidents. Experience of a firearm incident was not uncommon and the majority of the responders considered the incident in question to be preventable. This study provides a picture of the possible risk behaviour among hunters and the results suggest that future prevention work should target safer weapon handling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Camp stability predicts patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Dyble, Mark; Thompson, James; Major, Katie; Page, Abigail E; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Mace, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Humans regularly cooperate with non-kin, which has been theorized to require reciprocity between repeatedly interacting and trusting individuals. However, the role of repeated interactions has not previously been demonstrated in explaining real-world patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation. Here we explore cooperation among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using data from both actual resource transfers and two experimental games across multiple camps. Patterns of cooperation vary greatly between camps and depend on socio-ecological context. Stable camps (with fewer changes in membership over time) were associated with greater reciprocal sharing, indicating that an increased likelihood of future interactions facilitates reciprocity. This is the first study reporting an association between reciprocal cooperation and hunter-gatherer band stability. Under conditions of low camp stability individuals still acquire resources from others, but do so via demand sharing (taking from others), rather than based on reciprocal considerations. Hunter-gatherer cooperation may either be characterized as reciprocity or demand sharing depending on socio-ecological conditions.

  14. Perceptions of Hunting and Hunters by U.S. Respondents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Byrd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Public acceptance of hunting and hunting practices is an important human dimension of wildlife management in the United States. Researchers surveyed 825 U.S. residents in an online questionnaire about their views of hunting, hunters, and hunting practices. Eighty-seven percent of respondents from the national survey agreed that it was acceptable to hunt for food whereas 37% agreed that it was acceptable to hunt for a trophy. Over one-quarter of respondents did not know enough about hunting over bait, trapping, and captive hunts to form an opinion about whether the practice reduced animal welfare. Chi-square tests were used to explore relationships between perceptions of hunters and hunting practices and demographics. Those who knew hunters, participated in hunting-related activities, visited fairs or livestock operations, or were males who had more favorable opinions on hunting. A logistic regression model showed that not knowing a hunter was a statistically significant negative predictor of finding it acceptable to hunt; owning a pet was statistically significant and negative for approving of hunting for a trophy.

  15. Paleolithic hunter-gatherers' dietary patterns: Implications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonetheless, information about the Paleolithic diet have been drawn from studies of surviving hunter-gatherer populations, archeological records, and analysis of wild plants and animals plus other methods. Recommendations of the Paleolithic nutrition are not based on interventional studies, thus the adoption of which ...

  16. Perceptions and adaptations of beekeepers and honey hunters to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of climate change are a major threat to the environment and sustainable development of most sub-Saharan African countries. The perceptions and adaptation strategies of beekeepers and other operators in the honey sector (i.e. honey hunters) to climate change are, however, not adequately explored.

  17. perceptions and adaptations of beekeepers and honey hunters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    The effects of climate change are a major threat to the environment and sustainable development of most sub-. Saharan African countries. The perceptions and adaptation strategies of beekeepers and other operators in the honey sector (i.e. honey hunters) to climate change are, however, not adequately explored.

  18. Intraspecific prey choice of bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigated intraspecific prey choice of illegal bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. During the study 151 animals belonging to 12 species were reported killed. The majority, 76%, of prey species were migratory herbivores. Night hunting with dogs was the most common hunting ...

  19. Hunter-gatherer plant use in southwest Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otaegui, Amaia Arranz; Ibañez, Juan José; Zapata, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on plant use by the last hunter-gatherers in the Levant, from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the first experiments with plant cultivation at the beginning of the Holocene. This review of Epipaleolithic and Early Neolithic plant use summarises available archaeobotanical...

  20. Librarians as Hunter-Gatherers: Lessons Learned from an Excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by the pressing need for electronic resource usage statistics, librarians are finding themselves being thrust into the role of hunter-gatherer. This article discusses the work done at University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to provide usage statistics for all its paid subscriptions for a 3-year period. The…

  1. Uvulectomy - the making of a ritual | Hunter | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 85, No 9 (1995) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Uvulectomy - the making of a ritual. Linda Hunter. Abstract.

  2. Modelling mechanisms of social network maintenance in hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned

    2014-10-01

    Due to decreasing resource densities, higher latitude hunter-gatherers need to maintain their social networks over greater geographic distances than their equatorial counterparts. This suggests that as latitude increases, the frequency of face-to-face interaction decreases for 'weak tie' relationships in the outer mating pool (~500-strong) and tribal (~1500-strong) layers of a hunter-gatherer social network. A key question, then, is how a hunter-gatherer tribe sustains coherence as a single identifiable unit given that members are distributed across a large geographic area. The first step in answering this question is to establish whether the expectation that network maintenance raises a challenge for hunter-gatherers is correct, or whether sustaining inter-group contact is in fact trivial. Here I present a null model that represents mobile groups as randomly and independently moving gas particles. The aim of this model is to examine whether face-to-face contact can be maintained with every member of an individual's tribe at all latitudes even under the baseline assumption of random movement. Contrary to baseline expectations, the number of encounters between groups predicted by the gas model cannot support tribal cohesion and is significantly negatively associated with absolute latitude. In addition, above ~40 degrees latitude random mobility no longer produces a sufficient number of encounters between groups to maintain contact across the 500-strong mating pool. These model predictions suggest that the outermost layers of hunter-gatherers' social networks may require additional mechanisms of support in the form of strategies that either enhance encounter rates, such as coordinated mobility patterns, or lessen the need for face-to-face interaction, such as the use of symbolic artefacts to represent social affiliations. Given the predicted decline in encounters away from the equator, such additional supports might be most strongly expressed at high latitudes.

  3. Outcomes of revision arthroscopic type II superior labral anterior posterior repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SangDo; Glousman, Ronald E

    2011-06-01

    Outcomes of arthroscopic type II superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repairs have been reported with success. However, published data regarding outcomes of revision arthroscopic type II SLAP repairs are lacking. Outcomes of revision arthroscopic type II SLAP repairs are inferior to those of primary repairs. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients who had undergone revision arthroscopic type II SLAP repairs at our institution. Patients who underwent concomitant rotator cuff repairs or labral repairs for instability were excluded. Twelve patients were contacted, and the following outcome data were prospectively gathered: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, patient satisfaction level, return to work, return to sports, and physical examination. Demographics and intraoperative report data were also collected from the charts. The mean age at the time of revision arthroscopic type II SLAP repairs was 32.6 years (range, 19-67 years) with a mean follow-up of 50.5 months (range, 8-81 months). There were 5 workers' compensation patients and 6 overhead athletes. Pain was the chief complaint at the time of initial and revision SLAP repairs. The mean ASES score was 72.5, patient satisfaction level was 6.4 (scale of 0-10), mean return to work was at 57.8% of the previous level, and mean return to sports was at 42.2% of the previous level. In overhead athletes, mean return to sports was at 41.3% of the previous level, and none of the 4 baseball players returned to preinjury level. The mean values for all outcome data and range of motion values were lower in workers' compensation patients. There were no reported complications, but 2 patients required additional arthroscopic surgeries. Arthroscopic revision type II SLAP repairs yield worse results than primary repairs as reported in the literature, with workers' compensation patients and overhead athletes doing especially worse. A larger prospective

  4. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  5. Charge density wave instabilities of type-II Weyl semimetals in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trescher, Maximilian; Bergholtz, Emil J.; Udagawa, Masafumi; Knolle, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of Weyl semimetals, properties related to the topology of their bulk band structure have been observed, e.g., signatures of the chiral anomaly and Fermi arc surface states. These essentially single particle phenomena are well understood, but whether interesting many-body effects due to interactions arise in Weyl systems remains much less explored. Here, we investigate the effect of interactions in a microscopic model of a type-II Weyl semimetal in a strong magnetic field. We identify a charge density wave (CDW) instability even for weak interactions stemming from the emergent nesting properties of the type-II Weyl Landau level dispersion. We map out the dependence of this CDW on magnetic field strength. Remarkably, as a function of decreasing temperature, a cascade of CDW transitions emerges and we predict characteristic signatures for experiments.

  6. Effect of metformin on insulin receptor binding and glycaemic control in type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, J M; White, S I; Bailey, C J; Atkins, T W; Fletcher, R F; Taylor, K G

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the effect of metformin on insulin receptor binding and diabetic control, eight obese type II diabetic patients were studied before treatment, after one and four weeks of taking metformin (500 mg thrice daily), and four weeks after withdrawal of the drug. After one and four weeks of treatment the number of erythrocyte insulin receptors had increased by 116% and 184% respectively. This was due almost entirely to an increase in the number of low affinity binding sites. The number of receptors was still raised four weeks after metformin had been withdrawn. Diabetic control as assessed by urinary glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1), and glucose tolerance values was significantly improved during metformin treatment, while plasma insulin concentrations were not altered. These results indicate that metformin produces a rapid and protracted increase in low affinity insulin receptors in type II diabetes, associated with greater insulin sensitivity and improved diabetic control. PMID:6403102

  7. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K.; Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huyet, G.; Huffaker, D. L.; Houlihan, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  9. Properties of Anomalous and Type II Cepheids in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkovic Monika I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC give us the possibility to study individual variable star types in a new way. Literature data provide us with photometric information about objects from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Here we would like to show the results of our study of 335 Anomalous and Type II Cepheids in the SMC and LMC detected by OGLE. Using the code More of DUSTY (MoD, a modified version of the DUSTY radiative transfer code, and the assumption that our objects are at a known distance, luminosity and effective temperature were determined. From these data the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of these objects was compared with the theoretical models. The radius and masses of the examined stars was estimated, too. In the end, we have given the period-luminosity relations for the Anomalous and Type II Cepheids.

  10. Phenotypical enrichment strategies for microarray data analysis applied in a type II diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Keith; Kriete, Andres; Nagatomi, Sheila; Kelder, Bruce; Coschigano, Karen; Kopchick, John J

    2005-01-01

    Combining results from gene microarrays, clinical chemistry, and quantitative tissue histomorphology in an integrated bioinformatics setting enables prioritization of gene families as well as individual genes in a type II diabetes animal study. This new methodology takes advantage of a time-controlled mouse study as the animals progress from a normal phenotype to that of type II diabetes. Profiles from different levels of the biological hierarchy of unpooled entities provide an encompassing, system-wide view of biological changes. Here, phenotypic changes on the tissue-structural and physiological level are used as statistical covariants to enrich the gene expression analysis, suggesting correlative processes between gene expression and phenotype unlocked by multi-sample comparisons. We apply correlative and gene set enrichment procedures and compare the results to differential analysis to identify molecular markers. Evaluation based on ontological classifications proves changes in prioritization of disease-related genes that would have been overlooked by conventional gene expression analyses strategies.

  11. Photometry of Type II Cepheid Candidates from the Northern Part of the All Sky Automated Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Hemen, Brian; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren

    2009-06-01

    We have obtained VR photometry of 282 Cepheid variable star candidates from the northern part of the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). These together with data from the ASAS and the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) were used to redetermine the periods of the stars. We divided the stars into four groups based on location in a plot of mean color, langV-Rrang, versus period. Two of the groups fell within the region of the diagram containing known type II Cepheids and yielded 14 new highly probable type II Cepheids. The properties of the remaining stars in these two groups are discussed but their nature remains uncertain. Unexplained differences exist between the sample of stars studied here and a previous sample drawn from the NSVS by Akerlof et al. This suggests serious biases in the identification of variables in different surveys.

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Process Analysis, Cork Institute of Technology, Cork (Ireland); Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Huyet, G. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Process Analysis, Cork Institute of Technology, Cork (Ireland); Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Houlihan, J. [School of Science, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford (Ireland)

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  13. Type II dens evaginatus of maxillary central incisor: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Alrejaie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens evaginatus is the developmental anomaly of tooth that exhibits protrusion of a tubercle from occlusal surfaces of premolar, and lingual surfaces of maxillary central incisor and lateral incisors. Dens evaginatus is common in Caucasian population. Saudi Arabia is also well evidenced of such cases. These tubercles have an enamel layer covering dentin core containing a thin extension of pulp. These cusp-like protrusions are susceptible to pulp exposure from wear or fracture because of malocclusion. Type II dens evaginatus involves normal pulp with immature root apex. Materials to enhance the pulpal recession or pulpotomy procedures indicated in such cases require long time and efforts to ensure pulpal recession or root maturity, respectively. Also prolonged treatment has risk of fracture of the cusp and reinfection and requires patient commitment for the follow-up procedures. Present case describes the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA in type II dens evaginatus of maxillary central incisor.

  14. Hidden type-II Weyl points in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Chun; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai

    2017-10-01

    A Weyl semimetal discovered recently, NbP, exhibits two groups of Weyl points with one group lying inside the kz=0 plane and the other group staying away from this plane. All Weyl points have been assumed to be type I, in which the Fermi surface (Fs) shrinks into a point as the Fermi energy crosses the Weyl point. In this paper, we have revealed that the second group of Weyl points are actually type II, which are found to be touching points between the electron and hole pockets in the FS. Corresponding Weyl cones are strongly tilted along a line approximately 17∘ off the kz axis in the kx-kz (or ky-kz ) plane, violating the Lorentz symmetry but still giving rise to Fermi arcs on the surface. Therefore, NbP exhibits both type-I (kz=0 plane) and type-II (kz≠0 plane) Weyl points.

  15. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  16. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  17. Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting in CdSe/CdTe invert type-II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the atomistic tight-binding (TB) theory and configuration interaction (CI) description, it is showed that the Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting (FSS) in semiconductor core/shell nanocrystals are predominantly affected by the shell thickness and band profiles. CdSe/CdTe invert type-II and CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell ...

  18. ON THE GAUSS MAP OF RULED SURFACES OF TYPE II IN 3-DIMENSIONAL PSEUDO-GALILEAN SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Osman Öğrenmis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space are given. By studying its Gauss map and Laplacian operator, we obtain a classification of ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space.

  19. On the gauss map of ruled surfaces of type ii in 3-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Osman Öğrenmiş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space are given. By studying its Gauss map and Laplacian operator, we obtain a classification of ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space.

  20. Influence of collagen type II and nucleus pulposus cells on aggregation and differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.F.; Zandieh Doulabi, B.; Wuisman, P.I.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in guiding local stem cell differentiation. Within the intervertebral disc, collagen type II and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells are two major components. This study aimed to investigate how collagen type II and NP cells affect adipose tissue-derived stem

  1. Defective amplification of the late phase insulin response to glucose by GIP in obese Type II diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Krarup, T; Madsbad, S

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is strongly insulinotropic in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, whereas glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is less effective. Our investigation evaluated "early" (protocol 1) - and "late phase" (protocol 2) insulin and C......-peptide responses to GLP-1 and GIP stimulation in patients with Type II diabetes....

  2. Osteomyelitis and Discitis Following Translumbar Repair of a Type II Endoleak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sella, David M., E-mail: Sella.david@mayo.edu; Frey, Gregory T., E-mail: Frey.gregory@mayo.edu; Giesbrandt, Kirk, E-mail: giesbrandt.kirk@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Here we present the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a type II endoleak following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Initial attempts at treating the endoleak via a transarterial approach were unsuccessful; therefore the patient underwent percutaneous translumbar endoleak embolization. Approximately 1 month following the translumbar procedure, he developed back pain, with subsequent workup revealing osteomyelitis and discitis as a complication following repair via the translumbar approach.

  3. Global stability and persistence in LG–Holling type II diseased predator ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwardi, Sahabuddin; Haque, Mainul; Venturino, Ezio

    2010-01-01

    A Leslie–Gower–Holling type II model is modified to introduce a contagious disease in the predator population, assuming that disease cannot propagate to the prey. All the system’s equilibria are determined and the behaviour of the system near them is investigated. The main mathematical issues are global stability and bifurcations for some of the equilibria, together with sufficient conditions for persistence of the ecosystem. Counterintuitive results on the role played by intraspecific compet...

  4. Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Opposition Transfer for Augmenting Function in Types II and IIIA Thumb Hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillermin, Carley; Butler, Lesley; Lake, Amy; Ezaki, Marybeth; Oishi, Scott

    2016-02-01

    To report the functional outcomes associated with the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) opposition transfer for types II and IIIA thumb hypoplasia and determine if there is any noteworthy difference in the outcome dependent on the pulley used. We included patients who underwent a ring FDS opposition transfer and had at least 2 years follow-up. The study group consisted of 36 patients with 40 treated thumbs. All patients underwent follow-up examination and standardized testing. Outcome functional measures were recorded using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI). There were 9 type II and 31 type IIIA hypoplastic thumbs. All patients underwent a ring FDS opposition transfer and a 4-flap z-plasty for first web space deepening. The pulley for opposition was flexor carpi ulnaris in 19 and the transverse carpal ligament in 21. Thirty-six thumbs had ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions, with 5 of the 36 undergoing combined ulnar collateral ligament/radial collateral ligament stabilizations. Average follow-up was 7.6 years (range, 2-16 years). Average postoperative Kapandji score was 8 (range, 4-10). Grip, lateral pinch, and tripod pinch strengths averaged 46%, 49%, and 48% of age- and sex-matched normal controls, respectively. There was no significant difference between surgical pulleys used. The Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument global was 91 (range, 53-100), and PODCI happiness was 87 (range, 15-100). We found the ring FDS opposition transfer to be an effective method for providing opposition for both type II and IIIA thumb hypoplasia. At follow-up, excellent opposition function and PODCI scores were noted, with no difference related to the type of pulley used. Type II thumbs had significantly greater grip and pinch strengths when compared with type IIIA thumbs. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnes, Cyril; Sm, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications.

  6. A Switching Type-II Hybrid ARQ Scheme with RCPT Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ju-Ya

    A switching type-II hybrid ARQ scheme with rate compatible punctured turbo (RCPT) codes is proposed in this letter. The proposed scheme combines three retransmission schemes by minimizing a cost function that yields a compromise between throughput and delay time. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by computer simulations. Compared with conventional hybrid ARQ algorithms, the proposed algorithm can offer almost the same throughput performance with smaller time delay.

  7. Detecting change in advance tree regeneration using forest inventory data: the implications of type II error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, James A; McWilliams, William H

    2012-09-01

    Achieving adequate and desirable forest regeneration is necessary for maintaining native tree species and forest composition. Advance tree seedling and sapling regeneration is the basis of the next stand and serves as an indicator of future composition. The Pennsylvania Regeneration Study was implemented statewide to monitor regeneration on a subset of Forest Inventory and Analysis plots measured by the U.S. Forest Service. As management techniques are implemented to improve advance regeneration, assessments of the change in the forest resource are needed. When the primary focus is on detecting change, hypothesis tests should have small type II (β) error rates. However, most analyses are based on minimizing type I (α) error rates and type II error rates can be quite large. When type II error rates are high, actual improvements in regeneration can remain undetected and the methods that brought these improvements may be deemed ineffective. The difficulty in detecting significant change in advance regeneration when small type I error rates are given priority is illustrated. For statewide assessments, power (1-β) to detect changes in proportion of area having adequate advance regeneration is relatively weak (≤0.5) when the change is smaller than 0.05. For evaluations conducted at smaller spatial scales, such as wildlife management units, the reduced sample size results in only marginal power even when relatively large changes (≥0.20) in area proportion occur. For fixed sample sizes, analysts can consider accepting larger type I error rates to increase the probability of detecting change (smaller type II error rates) when it occurs, such that management methods that positively affect regeneration can be identified.

  8. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN Versus Dynamic Hip Screw(DHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Jonnes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN, in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification. This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures.   Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml, longer duration of surgery (105min, and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml, shorter duration of surgery (91min, and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II inter-trochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications.

  9. Niacin supplementation induces type II to type I muscle fiber transition in skeletal muscle of sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It was recently shown that niacin supplementation counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber transition from oxidative type I to glycolytic type II and increases the number of type I fibers in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. These effects were likely mediated by the induction of key regulators of fiber transition, PPARδ (encoded by PPARD), PGC-1α (encoded by PPARGC1A) and PGC-1β (encoded by PPARGC1B), leading to type II to type I fiber transition and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether niacin administration also influences fiber distribution and the metabolic phenotype of different muscles [M. longissimus dorsi (LD), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. semitendinosus (ST)] in sheep as a model for ruminants. For this purpose, 16 male, 11 wk old Rhoen sheep were randomly allocated to two groups of 8 sheep each administered either no (control group) or 1 g niacin per day (niacin group) for 4 wk. Results After 4 wk, the percentage number of type I fibers in LD, SM and ST muscles was greater in the niacin group, whereas the percentage number of type II fibers was less in niacin group than in the control group (P niacin group than in the control group. Conclusions The study shows that niacin supplementation induces muscle fiber transition from type II to type I, and thereby an oxidative metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle in sheep as a model for ruminants. The enhanced capacity of skeletal muscle to utilize fatty acids in ruminants might be particularly useful during metabolic states in which fatty acids are excessively mobilized from adipose tissue, such as during the early lactating period in high producing cows. PMID:24267720

  10. Design and Fabrication of High-Performance LWIR Photodetectors Based on Type-II Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    of band- structure engineering opens the horizon for exploring novel device architectures that are unthinkable using simple binary or ternary compound... architecture have demonstrated the advantages of the material system over alternatives, and proven it as a viable candidate for the next generation infrared...Illustration of the overlap of electron and hole wave function in InAs/GaSb superlattice and direct bandgap nature of the Type-II structure

  11. Spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-17je (=AT 2017ffq) as a Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Osmar; Prieto, J. L.

    2017-07-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (450-760nm) of ASASSN-17je/AT2017ffq (ATel #10571) on 2017 July 15.19 UT with GMOS, mounted on Gemini-South. Using the SNID code (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) we find a good match with a Type II supernova at z=0.014, consistent with the redshift of its host galaxy 2MASX J17401447-5825586.

  12. Induction of arthritis in monkeys by immunization with type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of two cynomolugus and three rhesus monkeys with purified type II collagen resulted in the development of polyarthritis. Arthritis first became clinically apparent 7 wk after primary immunization and persisted for 16 mo. Radiologic examination of the limbs demonstrated soft tissue swelling with severe joint destruction including loss of cartilage and bone. Involved joints eventually became ankylosed with permanent loss of some motion. All of the monkeys developed a response to th...

  13. Osteomyelitis and Discitis Following Translumbar Repair of a Type II Endoleak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, David M; Frey, Gregory T; Giesbrandt, Kirk

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a type II endoleak following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Initial attempts at treating the endoleak via a transarterial approach were unsuccessful; therefore the patient underwent percutaneous translumbar endoleak embolization. Approximately 1 month following the translumbar procedure, he developed back pain, with subsequent workup revealing osteomyelitis and discitis as a complication following repair via the translumbar approach.

  14. Front-Side Type II Radio Bursts Without Shocks Near Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    2011-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are due to shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), so the shocks are expected to arrive at Earth in 2-3 days if the source is on the front-side of the Sun. However, a significant fraction of front-side CMEs producing type II bursts did not result in shocks at 1 AU. On can think of several possibilities for the lack of shocks: (1) CMEs originating at large central meridian distances may be driving a shock, but the shock may not be extended sufficiently to reach to the Sun-Earth line. (2) CME cannibalism results in the merger of shocks so that one observes a single shock at Earth even though there are two type II bursts near the Sun. (3) CME-driven shocks may become weak and dissipate before reaching 1 AU. We examined a set of 30 type II bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES experiment that had the solar sources very close to the disk center (within a CMD of 15 degrees), but did not have shock at Earth. We find that the near-Sun speeds of the associated CMEs average to approx.600 km/s, only slightly higher than the average speed of CM Es associated with radio-quiet shocks. However, the fraction of halo CMEs is only -28%, compared to 40% for radio-quiet shocks and 72% for all radio-loud shocks. We conclude that the disk-center radio loud CMEs with no shocks at 1 AU are generally of lower energy and they drive shocks only close to the Sun.

  15. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kesavan, R; Preetha E Chaly; V Chandrasekhara Reddy; A Vinita Mary

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending ...

  16. Noncollinear parametric amplification in the near-infrared based on type-II phase matching

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Christian; Bühler, Johannes; Heinrich, Alexander-Cornelius; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Brida, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Noncollinear parametric amplification based on type-II phase matching for the generation of ultrabroadband and tunable spectra in the near infrared is investigated. In a noncollinear geometry the group velocity matching condition between signal and idler can be obtained in frequently used crystals such as β-barium borate (BBO) even for wavelengths fully located in the anomalous dispersion region. The extremely broadband operation, peculiar tuning possibilities and straightforward experimental...

  17. Functional and quality-of-life outcomes in geriatric patients with type-II dens fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kepler, Christopher K; Kopjar, Branko; Chapman, Jens; Shaffrey, Christopher; Arnold, Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya; Brodke, Darrel; France, John; Dekutoski, Mark; Sasso, Rick; Yoon, S Tim; Bono, Christopher; Harrop, James; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-04-17

    Dens fractures are relatively common in the elderly. The treatment of Type-II dens fractures remains controversial. The aim of this multicenter prospective cohort study was to compare outcomes (assessed with use of validated clinical measures) and complications of nonsurgical and surgical treatment of Type-II dens fractures in patients sixty-five years of age or older. One hundred and fifty-nine patients with a Type-II dens fracture were enrolled in a multicenter prospective study. Subjects were treated either surgically (n = 101) or nonsurgically (n = 58) as determined by the treatment preferences of the treating physicians and the patients. The subjects were followed at six and twelve months with validated outcome measures, including the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short Form-36v2 (SF-36v2). Treatment complications were prospectively recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to compare outcome measures before and after adjustment for confounding variables. The two groups were similar with regard to baseline characteristics. The most common surgical treatment was posterior C1-C2 arthrodesis (eighty of 101, or 79%) while the most common nonsurgical treatment was immobilization with use of a hard collar (forty-seven of fifty-eight, or 81%). The overall mortality rate was 18% over the twelve-month follow-up period. At twelve months, the NDI had increased (worsened) by 14.7 points in the nonsurgical cohort (p patients with a Type-II dens fracture who are healthy enough for general anesthesia be considered for surgical stabilization to improve functional outcome as well as the union and fusion rates.

  18. Serotyping of Toxoplasma gondii in Cats (Felis domesticus) Reveals Predominance of Type II Infections in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Pavlo; Zerweck, Johannes; Dubey, Jitender P.; Pantchev, Nikola; Frey, Caroline F.; Maksimov, Aline; Reimer, Ulf; Schutkowski, Mike; Hosseininejad, Morteza; Ziller, Mario; Conraths, Franz J.; Schares, Gereon

    2013-01-01

    Background Cats are definitive hosts of Toxoplasma gondii and play an essential role in the epidemiology of this parasite. The study aims at clarifying whether cats are able to develop specific antibodies against different clonal types of T. gondii and to determine by serotyping the T. gondii clonal types prevailing in cats as intermediate hosts in Germany. Methodology To establish a peptide-microarray serotyping test, we identified 24 suitable peptides using serological T. gondii positive (n=21) and negative cat sera (n=52). To determine the clonal type-specific antibody response of cats in Germany, 86 field sera from T. gondii seropositive naturally infected cats were tested. In addition, we analyzed the antibody response in cats experimentally infected with non-canonical T. gondii types (n=7). Findings Positive cat reference sera reacted predominantly with peptides harbouring amino acid sequences specific for the clonal T. gondii type the cats were infected with. When the array was applied to field sera from Germany, 98.8% (85/86) of naturally-infected cats recognized similar peptide patterns as T. gondii type II reference sera and showed the strongest reaction intensities with clonal type II-specific peptides. In addition, naturally infected cats recognized type II-specific peptides significantly more frequently than peptides of other type-specificities. Cats infected with non-canonical types showed the strongest reactivity with peptides presenting amino-acid sequences specific for both, type I and type III. Conclusions Cats are able to mount a clonal type-specific antibody response against T. gondii. Serotyping revealed for most seropositive field sera patterns resembling those observed after clonal type II-T. gondii infection. This finding is in accord with our previous results on the occurrence of T. gondii clonal types in oocysts shed by cats in Germany. PMID:24244652

  19. Approximate Bayes Estimators of the Logistic Distribution Parameters Based on Progressive Type-II Censoring Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmoud Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop approximate Bayes estimators of the parameters,reliability, and hazard rate functions of the Logistic distribution by using Lindley’sapproximation, based on progressively type-II censoring samples. Noninformativeprior distributions are used for the parameters. Quadratic, linexand general Entropy loss functions are used. The statistical performances of theBayes estimates relative to quadratic, linex and general entropy loss functionsare compared to those of the maximum likelihood based on simulation study.

  20. Coronary plaque quantification and composition in asymptomatic patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrini, Olivia; Russo, Vincenzo; Ciavarella, Adolfo; Ceroni, Luana; Montalti, Maurizio; Fattori, Rossella

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the extent and morphology of coronary lesions in asymptomatic patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We enrolled 102 asymptomatic patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 97 patients without diabetes as controls. All individuals had no history of ischemic heart disease. They underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Plaque density and plaque volume were calculated using specific software on axial images. Arterial remodeling was evaluated with semiquantitative assessment on image reconstructions. MDCT angiography revealed the presence of 124 coronary plaques in 46 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 59 plaques in 21 controls (PDiabetic patients had a significantly higher proportion of lesions with impaired adaptive remodeling (56.5 versus 35.6%, Pdiabetic patients and 0.08 cm (0.01-0.33) in controls (P=0.14). The calcium volume was 0.082 cm (0-0.558) in diabetic patients and 0.12 cm (0-0.669) in controls (P=0.21). Plaques with fibrofatty components had a significantly higher density in the diabetic cohort (58.76  ±  9.55  Hounsfield Units), as compared with the control group (47.31  ±  5.42 Hounsfield Units, PII diabetes mellitus (r=0.37, P=0.044), but was independent of age, sex, hypertension and metabolic profile. In the control group, plaque density was independent of any covariate. Coronary plaques in type II diabetes mellitus show a tendency to develop impaired adaptive remodeling and to have a higher tissue density.

  1. Non-Surgical Endodontic Management of Type II Dens Invaginatus with Closed and Open Apex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia, Hugo; Díaz, Mariana; Moldauer, Bertram Ivan; Uribe, Mario; Skidmore, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a developmental anomaly that poses a significant challenge to the clinician if endodontic treatment is required. The type II (as per Oehlers) form exhibits complex internal anatomy and is frequently associated with incomplete root and apex formation. The purpose of this study is to present two cases of type II DI in the maxillary lateral incisors. In the first case, non-surgical endodontic therapy was performed utilizing calcium hydroxide as an intracanal dressing, showing significant periapical healing of the apical radiolucent area at the six month follow-up. In the second case, the development of the root and apex were affected by pulp necrosis, and the revascularization procedure was performed. Complete resolution of the pre-existing apical radiolucency, apical closure, thickening of the root canal walls, and increase in root length, after 32 months was observed. Early detection of teeth with DI type II and proper exploration of their internal anatomy are key factors for their successful management. As demonstrated in this report, conservative non-surgical endodontic treatment should be the first line of treatment for these cases. The use of revascularization protocols in teeth that develop pulp necrosis and exhibit early stage of root development could be a better alternative than traditional apexification techniques. PMID:29225655

  2. Type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Insabato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Silent Corticotroph Adenoma (SCA is a pituitary adenoma variant characterized by the immunoreactivity for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and related peptides, without the clinical signs of Cushing's disease. SCA has been postulated to either secrete structurally abnormal ACTH that is inactive but detectable by immunohistochemistry or radioimmunoassay, or to secrete ACTH intermittently or at low levels continuously. Excess of ACTH has been associated to type II muscle atrophy. We describe a case of type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog. The dog showed moderate to severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness with normal levels of muscle-associated enzymes. In the limb muscle biopsies, type II fibers were uniformly smaller than type I fibers. In temporalis muscles, there were few atrophic fibers, and several irregular areas of loss of enzymatic activity observed in NADH, SDH and COX stains. The tumour showed a trabecular growth pattern and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for ACTH. The muscle atrophy was considered to be related to an excess of inactive ACTH. Studying spontaneous occurring rare diseases in animals could help to understand the mechanism of similar diseases in human has well.

  3. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-10-01

    An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as "fuzzy," so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better.

  4. Amylin uncovered: a review on the polypeptide responsible for type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Amylin is primarily responsible for classifying type II diabetes as an amyloid (protein misfolding) disease as it has great potential to aggregate into toxic nanoparticles, thereby resulting in loss of pancreatic β-cells. Although type II diabetes is on the increase each year, possibly due to bad eating habits of modern society, research on the culprit for this disease is still in its early days. In addition, unlike the culprit for Alzheimer's disease, amyloid β-peptide, amylin has failed to receive attention worthy of being featured in an abundance of review articles. Thus, the aim of this paper is to shine the spotlight on amylin in an attempt to put it onto the top of researchers' to-do list since the secondary complications of type II diabetes have far-reaching and severe consequences on public health both in developing and fully developed countries alike. This paper will cover characteristics of the amylin aggregates, mechanisms of toxicity, and a particular focus on inhibitors of toxicity and techniques used to assess these inhibitors.

  5. Amylin Uncovered: A Review on the Polypeptide Responsible for Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Pillay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amylin is primarily responsible for classifying type II diabetes as an amyloid (protein misfolding disease as it has great potential to aggregate into toxic nanoparticles, thereby resulting in loss of pancreatic -cells. Although type II diabetes is on the increase each year, possibly due to bad eating habits of modern society, research on the culprit for this disease is still in its early days. In addition, unlike the culprit for Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid -peptide, amylin has failed to receive attention worthy of being featured in an abundance of review articles. Thus, the aim of this paper is to shine the spotlight on amylin in an attempt to put it onto the top of researchers’ to-do list since the secondary complications of type II diabetes have far-reaching and severe consequences on public health both in developing and fully developed countries alike. This paper will cover characteristics of the amylin aggregates, mechanisms of toxicity, and a particular focus on inhibitors of toxicity and techniques used to assess these inhibitors.

  6. Impact of hospital type II violent events: use of psychotropic drugs and mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John M; Lipscomb, Hester J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Pompeii, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    While violence can adversely affect mental health of victims, repercussions of violence against workers is not as well characterized. We explored relationships between workplace violent events perpetrated by patients or visitors (Type II) against hospital employees and the employee use of psychotropic medications or mental health services using a data system that linked violent events with health claims. Significant associations were observed between reported Type II workplace violent events and employee prescription claims for anti-depressants and anxiolytics combined (RR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.01-2.33) and anti-depressants alone (RR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10-2.48). No significant association between reported violent events and health claims for treatment of depression or anxiety was observed. Type II violence experienced by hospital workers may lead to increased use of psychotropic drugs, particularly anti-depressants but also anxiolytics. Our results suggest an important role of employee assistance programs in mitigating the psychological consequences of workplace violent events. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quasiparticle interference of surface states in the type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhan; Wu, Quansheng; Zhang, Lunyong; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Soluyanov, Alexey A.; Wu, Weida

    2017-10-01

    A topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) is a metal where low-energy excitations behave like Weyl fermions of high-energy physics. Recently, it was shown that, due to the lower symmetry of condensed-matter systems, they can realize two distinct types of Weyl fermions. The type-I Weyl fermion in a metal is formed by a linear crossing of two bands at a point in the crystalline momentum space—Brillouin zone. The second type of TWSs host type-II Weyl points appearing at the touching points of electron and hole pockets, which is a result of tilted linear dispersion. The type-II TWS was predicted to exist in several compounds, including WTe2. Several angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of WTe2 were reported so far, having contradictory conclusions on the topological nature of observed Fermi arcs. In this paper, we report the results of spectroscopic imaging with a scanning tunneling microscope and first-principles calculations, establishing clear quasiparticle interference features of the surface states of WTe2. Our paper provides strong evidence for surface-state scattering. Although the surface Fermi arcs clearly are observed, it is still difficult to prove the existence of predicted type-II Weyl points in the bulk.

  8. An unobscured type II quasar candidate: SDSS J012032.19-005501.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Yuan, W.; Komossa, S. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, H. Y.; Liu, W. J. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ai, Y. L. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Boisvert, J. H., E-mail: liye@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report the finding of an unobscured type II active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidate, SDSS J012032.19-005501.9, at a relatively high redshift of 0.601, which shows a number of unusual properties. It varies significantly on timescales of years, typical of type I AGNs, and marginally on timescales of weeks. The color–magnitude relation and the structure function are also consistent with that of type I AGNs, which implies that its variability likely originates from the black hole accretion system. However, no broad emission line (BEL) is detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, and the upper limit of the equivalent width of the Hβ BEL is much less than that of type I AGNs. These properties suggest that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be an unobscured quasar without intrinsically broad emission lines, namely, an unobscured type II AGN or “true” type II AGN. Furthermore, its continuum luminosity is at least one order of magnitude fainter than the average value over the past century from the [O iii] emission line. This indicates that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be switching off. Additional possible scenarios to explain this intriguing source are also discussed. Future deep observations at multiwavelengths are needed to reveal the nature of this peculiar and intriguing AGN.

  9. Glycosaminoglycans from bovine eye vitreous humour and interaction with collagen type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanfei; Yu, Yanlei; Lin, Lei; Liu, Xinyue; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Peipei; Hoffman, Pauline; Kim, So Young; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2018-01-05

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in stabilizing the gel state of eye vitreous humour. In this study, the composition of GAGs present in bovine eye vitreous was characterized through disaccharide analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The interaction of GAGs with collagen type II was assessed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The percentage of hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS), of total GAG, were 96.2%, 3.5% and 0.3%, respectively. The disaccharide composition of CS consisted of 4S (49%), 0S (38%) 6S (12%), 2S6S (1.5%) and 2S4S (0.3%). The disaccharide composition of HS consisted of 0S (80%), NS2S (7%), NS (7%), 6S (4%), NS6S (2%), and TriS, 2S and 4S6S (each at 0.1%). The average molecular weights of CS and HS were 148 kDa and 204 kDa, respectively. SPR reveals that collagen type II binds to heparin (primarily composed of TriS) with a binding affinity (K D) of 755 nM and interacts with other GAGs, including CSB and CSE. Both bovine vitreous CS and HS interact with collagen type II, with vitreous HS showing a higher binding affinity.

  10. The OGLE Collection of Variable Stars. Classical, Type II, and Anomalous Cepheids toward the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, D. M.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Rybicki, K.; Jacyszyn-Dobrzeniecka, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a collection of classical, typeII, and anomalous Cepheids detected in the OGLE fields toward the Galactic center. The sample contains 87 classical Cepheids pulsating in one, two or three radial modes, 924 type II Cepheids divided into BL Her, W Vir, peculiar W Vir, and RV Tau stars, and 20 anomalous Cepheids - first such objects found in the Galactic bulge. Additionally, we upgrade the OGLE Collection of RR Lyr stars in the Galactic bulge by adding 828 newly identified variables. For all Cepheids and RRLyr stars, we publish time-series VI photometry obtained during the OGLE-IV project, from 2010 through 2017. We discuss basic properties of our classical pulsators: their spatial distribution, light curve morphology, period-luminosity relations, and position in the Petersen diagram. We present the most interesting individual objects in our collection: a typeII Cepheid with additional eclipsing modulation, WVir stars with the period doubling effect and the RVb phenomenon, a mode-switching RR Lyr star, and a triple-mode anomalous RRd star.

  11. Hydroxychloroquine induces inhibition of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroxychloroquine on the level of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes of knee osteoarthritis. The rate of growth in cartilage cells was analyzed using MTT assay whereas the Col-2 and COMP expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. For the determination of MMP-13 expression, ELISA test was used. The results revealed no significant change in the rate of cartilage cell proliferation in hydroxychloroquine-treated compared to untreated cells. Hydroxychloro-quine treatment exhibited concentration- and time-dependent effect on the inhibition of collagen type II and COMP expression in chondrocytes. However, its treatment caused a significant enhancement in the expression levels of MMP-13 compared to the untreated cells. Therefore, hydroxychloro-quine promotes expression of MMP-13 and reduces collagen type II and COMP expression levels in chondrocytes without any significant change in the growth of cells.

  12. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Sergio I; Hleap, Jose S; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS.

  13. The burden of suicidal ideation among persons with type II diabetes: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, Karen M; Perez-Flores, Nancy; Wang, Yang; Huang, Hsiang

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes is a major global health concern. People with diabetes have worse mental health outcomes than those without diabetes. Researchers have recently sought to examine the relationship between diabetes and suicidal ideation. The aim of this study is to determine the burden of suicidal ideation among adults with type II diabetes from existing literature. We conducted a scoping review of published literature in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Google Scholar published before March 2017. To identify relevant literature, search terms included suicidal ideation and type II diabetes. The search was limited to English language peer-reviewed journal articles. The main outcome of interest was suicidal ideation captured on a validated scale in a population with type II diabetes. This review resulted in 10 relevant studies, which reported the prevalence of suicidal ideation ranging from 2.5-51.4% with a median prevalence of 18.6% among adults with diabetes. Across the five studies reporting the associated risks, all but one study found a significant risk for persons with diabetes to endorse suicidal ideation and only three studies adjusted for depression. This review demonstrates the need for future studies to investigate potential mechanistic pathways of suicidality among persons with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conserved DNA motifs in the type II-A CRISPR leader region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Mason J; Klein, Peter; Babu, Kesavan; Najar, Fares Z; Rajan, Rakhi

    2017-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems consist of RNA-protein complexes that provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific immunity against bacteriophages, plasmids, and other mobile genetic elements. Bacteria and archaea become immune to phage or plasmid infections by inserting short pieces of the intruder DNA (spacer) site-specifically into the leader-repeat junction in a process called adaptation. Previous studies have shown that parts of the leader region, especially the 3' end of the leader, are indispensable for adaptation. However, a comprehensive analysis of leader ends remains absent. Here, we have analyzed the leader, repeat, and Cas proteins from 167 type II-A CRISPR loci. Our results indicate two distinct conserved DNA motifs at the 3' leader end: ATTTGAG (noted previously in the CRISPR1 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710) and a newly defined CTRCGAG, associated with the CRISPR3 locus of S. thermophilus DGCC7710. A third group with a very short CG DNA conservation at the 3' leader end is observed mostly in lactobacilli. Analysis of the repeats and Cas proteins revealed clustering of these CRISPR components that mirrors the leader motif clustering, in agreement with the coevolution of CRISPR-Cas components. Based on our analysis of the type II-A CRISPR loci, we implicate leader end sequences that could confer site-specificity for the adaptation-machinery in the different subsets of type II-A CRISPR loci.

  15. Electrophysiological Study of Nerves in Type-II Reaction in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Mukhija, R D; Thacker, A K

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system, skin and reticuloendothelial system. Cutaneous nerves are severely affected in lepra reaction and this leads to morbidity. To study electrophysiological pattern of different nerves involved in Type-II reactions in leprosy. The present study was undertaken in 21 leprosy patients with Type-II reactions attending in and out-patient department of Dermatology & Venereology, B.R.D. Medical College, Gorakhpur from July 2005 to October 2006. This was a prospective case control study in which 20 healthy, age and sex matched people with no evidence of any disease (particularly nerve involvement) were included. Lesser number of cases were studied. The proximal motor conduction latency was significantly prolonged in both ulnar and common peroneal nerve and proximal motor conduction velocity was also significantly reduced. On examining the values beyond 2S.D. of the control value, distal latency was not affected and only proximal conduction was affected in ulnar nerve. In Type II lepra reaction the motor conduction abnormalities are not prominent. Abnormalities are relatively more marked in the proximal segment.

  16. Deep lateral wall orbital decompression following strabismus surgery in patients with Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael P; Broxterman, Emily C; Hromas, Alan R; Whittaker, Thomas J; Sokol, Jason A

    2018-01-10

    Surgical management of ophthalmic Graves' disease traditionally involves, in order, orbital decompression, followed by strabismus surgery and eyelid surgery. Nunery et al. previously described two distinct sub-types of patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease; Type I patients exhibit no restrictive myopathy (no diplopia) as opposed to Type II patients who do exhibit restrictive myopathy (diplopia) and are far more likely to develop new-onset worsening diplopia following medial wall and floor decompression. Strabismus surgery involving extra-ocular muscle recession has, in turn, been shown to potentially worsen proptosis. Our experience with Type II patients who have already undergone medial wall and floor decompression and strabismus surgery found, when additional decompression is necessary, deep lateral wall decompression (DLWD) appears to have a low rate of post-operative primary-gaze diplopia. A case series of four Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease patients, all of whom had already undergone decompression and strabismus surgery, and went on to develop worsening proptosis or optic nerve compression necessitating further decompression thereafter. In all cases, patients were treated with DLWD. Institutional Review Board approval was granted by the University of Kansas. None of the four patients treated with this approach developed recurrent primary-gaze diplopia or required strabismus surgery following DLWD. While we still prefer to perform medial wall and floor decompression as the initial treatment for ophthalmic Graves' disease, for proptosis following consecutive strabismus surgery, DLWD appears to be effective with a low rate of recurrent primary-gaze diplopia.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment reduced the lung injury of type II decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ming; Zhou, Luting; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, Peifeng

    2015-01-01

    To detect the ultrastructural changes in rabbits with type II decompression sickness (DCS), and study the therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). Twenty-seven male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided equally into the DCS group, HBO treatment group and control group. Experimental models of each group were prepared. Lung apex tissues were harvested to prepare paraffin- and EPON812-embedded tissues. In the DCS group, macroscopic and histological examination revealed severe and rapid damage to lung tissue. Ultrastructural examination revealed exudation of red blood cells in the alveolar space. Type I alveolar epithelial cells exhibited retracted cell processes and swollen mitochondria, and type II cells showed highly swollen mitochondria and decrease in cytoplasmic lamellar bodies. Dilatation and congestion of capillary vessels were accompanied by swelling of endothelial cells and incomplete basement membrane. In the HBO treatment group, the findings were somewhat similar to those in the DCS group, but the extent of damage was lesser. Only a small amount of tiny bubbles could be seen in the blood vessels. Type I alveolar epithelia cells and endothelial cells of the capillaries illustrated slight shortening of cells, swollen cytoplasm and decreased cell processes. Type II alveolar epithelial cells showed slight swelling of the mitochondria, decreased vacuolar degeneration of lamellar bodies, and increase in the number of free ribosomes. Our microscopic and ultrastructural findings confirm that the lung is an important organ affected by DCS. We also confirmed that HBO can alleviate DCS-induced pulmonary damage.

  18. Fine and Superfine Structure of the Decameter-Hectometer Type II Burst on 7 June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Poedts, S.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of a type II burst with a herringbone structure observed both with ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) and space-borne spectrometers (STEREO-A and B) are discussed. The burst was recorded on 7 June 2011 in the frequency band 3 - 33 MHz. It was characterized by extremely rich fine structure. Statistical analysis of more than 300 herringbone sub-bursts constituting the burst was performed separately for the positively (reverse) and negatively (forward) drifting sub-bursts. The sense and the degree of circular polarization of the herringbone sub-bursts were measured in a wide frequency band (16 - 32 MHz). A second-order fine frequency structure of the herringbone sub-bursts was observed and studied for the first time. Using STEREO/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 images, we determined the direction and radial speed of the coronal mass ejection responsible for the studied type II burst. The possible location of the type II burst source on the flank of the shock was found.

  19. Assessment of type II diabetes mellitus using irregularly sampled measurements with missing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazandegan, Melissa; Ekram, Fatemeh; Kwok, Ezra; Gopaluni, Bhushan; Tulsyan, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading diseases in the developed world. In order to better regulate blood glucose in a diabetic patient, improved modelling of insulin-glucose dynamics is a key factor in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the current work, the insulin-glucose dynamics in type II diabetes mellitus can be modelled by using a stochastic nonlinear state-space model. Estimating the parameters of such a model is difficult as only a few blood glucose and insulin measurements per day are available in a non-clinical setting. Therefore, developing a predictive model of the blood glucose of a person with type II diabetes mellitus is important when the glucose and insulin concentrations are only available at irregular intervals. To overcome these difficulties, we resort to online sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) estimation of states and parameters of the state-space model for type II diabetic patients under various levels of randomly missing clinical data. Our results show that this method is efficient in monitoring and estimating the dynamics of the peripheral glucose, insulin and incretins concentration when 10, 25 and 50% of the simulated clinical data were randomly removed.

  20. Mutation of human molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene is responsible for classical xanthinuria type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, K; Matsumura, T; Sakuma, R; Hosoya, T; Nishino, T

    2001-04-20

    Drosophila ma-l gene was suggested to encode an enzyme for sulfuration of the desulfo molybdenum cofactor for xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). The human molybdenum cofactor sulfurase (HMCS) gene, the human ma-l homologue, is therefore a candidate gene responsible for classical xanthinuria type II, which involves both XDH and AO deficiencies. However, HMCS has not been identified as yet. In this study, we cloned the HMCS gene from a cDNA library prepared from liver. In two independent patients with classical xanthinuria type II, we identified a C to T base substitution at nucleotide 1255 in the HMCS gene that should cause a CGA (Arg) to TGA (Ter) nonsense substitution at codon 419. A classical xanthinuria type I patient and healthy volunteers lacked this mutation. These results indicate that a functional defect of the HMCS gene is responsible for classical xanthinuria type II, and that HMCS protein functions to provide a sulfur atom for the molybdenum cofactor of XDH and AO. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  2. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  3. A solar type II radio burst from CME-coronal ray interaction: simultaneous radio and EUV imaging

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    Chen, Yao; Feng, Li; Feng, Shiwei; Kong, Xiangliang; Guo, Fan; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the 3-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two STEREO spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio imaging data to infer the 3-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the CME EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  4. Sacrificing Steve: How I Killed the Crocodile Hunter

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    Luke Carman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Bob Hodge and Vijay Mishra argue that the complex issues of illegitimacy at the core of Australian identity are repressed through a continual process of cyclical silencing, where traces of a shameful past are exorcised by a focus on images of a mythologised ‘legend’, embodied in characters such as 'The Man from Snowy River'. This article explores such a 'schizophrenic' cycle in relation to the life, death and resurrection of Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin.

  5. Sacrificing Steve : how I killed the Crocodile Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carman, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bob Hodge and Vijay Mishra argue that the complex issues of illegitimacy at the core of Australian identity are repressed through a continual process of cyclical silencing, where traces of a shameful past are exorcised by a focus on images of a mythologised ‘legend’, embodied in characters such as 'The Man from Snowy River'. This article explores such a 'schizophrenic' cycle in relation to the life, death and resurrection of Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin.

  6. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion.

  7. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cooperation and the evolution of hunter-gatherer storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Schlaepfer, Philip; Major, Katie; Dyble, Mark; Page, Abigail E; Thompson, James; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Mace, Ruth; Astete, Leonora; Ngales, Marilyn; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2017-12-05

    Storytelling is a human universal. From gathering around the camp-fire telling tales of ancestors to watching the latest television box-set, humans are inveterate producers and consumers of stories. Despite its ubiquity, little attention has been given to understanding the function and evolution of storytelling. Here we explore the impact of storytelling on hunter-gatherer cooperative behaviour and the individual-level fitness benefits to being a skilled storyteller. Stories told by the Agta, a Filipino hunter-gatherer population, convey messages relevant to coordinating behaviour in a foraging ecology, such as cooperation, sex equality and egalitarianism. These themes are present in narratives from other foraging societies. We also show that the presence of good storytellers is associated with increased cooperation. In return, skilled storytellers are preferred social partners and have greater reproductive success, providing a pathway by which group-beneficial behaviours, such as storytelling, can evolve via individual-level selection. We conclude that one of the adaptive functions of storytelling among hunter gatherers may be to organise cooperation.

  9. Evolutionary history of hunter-gatherer marriage practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The universality of marriage in human societies around the world suggests a deep evolutionary history of institutionalized pair-bonding that stems back at least to early modern humans. However, marriage practices vary considerably from culture to culture, ranging from strict prescriptions and arranged marriages in some societies to mostly unregulated courtship in others, presence to absence of brideservice and brideprice, and polyandrous to polygynous unions. The ancestral state of early human marriage is not well known given the lack of conclusive archaeological evidence. METHODOLOGY: Comparative phylogenetic analyses using data from contemporary hunter-gatherers around the world may allow for the reconstruction of ancestral human cultural traits. We attempt to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gatherer phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. RESULTS: Arranged marriages are inferred to go back at least to first modern human migrations out of Africa. Reconstructions are equivocal on whether or not earlier human marriages were arranged because several African hunter-gatherers have courtship marriages. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that marriages in early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny (low reproductive skew and reciprocal exchanges between the families of marital partners (i.e., brideservice or brideprice. DISCUSSION: Phylogenetic results suggest a deep history of regulated exchange of mates and resources among lineages that enhanced the complexity of human meta-group social structure with coalitions and alliances spanning across multiple residential communities.

  10. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  11. Does lateral transmission obscure inheritance in hunter-gatherer languages?

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    Claire Bowern

    Full Text Available In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56, despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of

  12. The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita

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    Justine Shu- Ting Kao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Nabokov’s Lolita, Humbert Humbert’s The Enchanted Hunters, as a quest for love, aims to reconstruct a felicitous world or integrate various fragmentary details into an organic unity that revives a lost love, experiencing it on the basis of irony, and revealing a simulation of the desire, violence, and despondency which have been expressed in myths of nymphs and Persephone. The protagonist never reaches this unity, but his narrative of erotic and romantic love reveals him as a pathetic addict engaged in mechanical reproduction related to the phenomena of desire, seduction, violence, and sex. His The Enchanted Hunters does not simulate what he expects of his childhood love with Annabel; rather, it simulates the erotic imagination suggested in Mary D. Sheriff’s term “nymphomania,” in which artists fall degenerately to a model of tragedy. Keywords: simulation, nymph, nymphomania, The Enchanted Hunters The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita refers to the name of a hotel and the title of a play. This seeming coincidence is actually not coincidental: Nabokov weaves a story concerning a pedophile’s seduction of a prepubescent child into a “story within a story,” in which the girl is imagined as a seducer who bewitches a number of hunters. Just as the girl in the play is a figment of a poet’s imagination, so Lolita in the novel Lolita is an imaginary production of a middle-aged pedophile. Yet Lolita is not so much a novel revealing guilt and mental disorder, but a mélange of art and reality, or more specifically, it is about a coinage in which the author fabricates art and myth in real life. Parallel to the protagonist who simulates what he expects of his childhood love, Annabel, in the form of the nymphet, Lolita, Nabokov replicates the beauty of butterflies in the pursuit of beauty and immortality, and develops the world of art with a pathetic tone whereby we gradually perceive a simulation of the desire, violence, and

  13. Does lateral transmission obscure inheritance in hunter-gatherer languages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowern, Claire; Epps, Patience; Gray, Russell; Hill, Jane; Hunley, Keith; McConvell, Patrick; Zentz, Jason

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance) status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56), despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of borrowing were

  14. Fenestrated and branched endovascular aneurysm repair outcomes for type II and III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Matthew J; Follansbee, Matthew; Wolski, Katherine; Mastracci, Tara; Kuramochi, Yuki

    2016-04-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains a challenging clinical pathology. Endovascular technology, in particular the evolution of fenestrated and branched (F/B) endografts used in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided a less invasive method of treating these complex aneurysms. This study evaluated the technical and clinical outcomes of F/B-EVAR for extensive type II and III TAAA. Data from 354 high-risk patients enrolled in a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption trial (2004-2013) undergoing F/B-EVAR for type II and III TAAA were evaluated. Technical success, perioperative clinical outcomes, and midterm outcomes (36 months) for branch patency, reintervention, aneurysm-related death, and all-cause mortality were analyzed. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and were assessed using Kaplan-Meier, univariate, and multivariate analysis. F/B-EVARs incorporating 1305 fenestration/branches were implanted with 96% of target vessels successfully stented. Completion aortography showed 2.8% patients had a type I or III endoleak. Procedure duration (6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.5 ± 1.6 hours; P < .01) and hospital stay (13.1 ± 10.1 vs 10.2 ± 7.4 days; P < .01) were longer for type II TAAA. Perioperative mortality was greater in type II repairs (7.0% vs 3.5%; P < .001). Permanent spinal cord ischemia occurred in 4% and renal failure requiring hemodialysis occurred in 2.8% of patients. Twenty-seven branches (7.6%) required reintervention for stenosis or occlusion; and celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and renal artery secondary patency at 36 months was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), 98% (95% CI, 0.97-1.0), and 98% (95% CI, 0.96-1.0), respectively. Eighty endoleak repairs were performed in 67 patients, including 55 branch-related endoleaks, 4 type Ia, 5 type Ib, and 15 type II endoleaks. At 36 months, freedom from aneurysm-related death was 91% (95% CI, 0.88-0.95), and freedom from all

  15. Conserved DNA motifs in the type II-A CRISPR leader region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Kesavan; Najar, Fares Z.

    2017-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems consist of RNA-protein complexes that provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific immunity against bacteriophages, plasmids, and other mobile genetic elements. Bacteria and archaea become immune to phage or plasmid infections by inserting short pieces of the intruder DNA (spacer) site-specifically into the leader-repeat junction in a process called adaptation. Previous studies have shown that parts of the leader region, especially the 3′ end of the leader, are indispensable for adaptation. However, a comprehensive analysis of leader ends remains absent. Here, we have analyzed the leader, repeat, and Cas proteins from 167 type II-A CRISPR loci. Our results indicate two distinct conserved DNA motifs at the 3′ leader end: ATTTGAG (noted previously in the CRISPR1 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710) and a newly defined CTRCGAG, associated with the CRISPR3 locus of S. thermophilus DGCC7710. A third group with a very short CG DNA conservation at the 3′ leader end is observed mostly in lactobacilli. Analysis of the repeats and Cas proteins revealed clustering of these CRISPR components that mirrors the leader motif clustering, in agreement with the coevolution of CRISPR-Cas components. Based on our analysis of the type II-A CRISPR loci, we implicate leader end sequences that could confer site-specificity for the adaptation-machinery in the different subsets of type II-A CRISPR loci. PMID:28392985

  16. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

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    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+ into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+ release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+ mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion.

  17. Hα Spectral Diversity of Type II Supernovae: Correlations with Photometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Folatelli, Gastón; Morrell, Nidia I.; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Phillips, Mark M.; McCarthy, Patrick; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the Hα profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the Hα P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher Hα velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of Hα profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156, 078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  18. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: three decades of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been considerable progress towards III-V antimonide-based low dimensional solids development and device design innovations. From a physics point of view, the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice is an extremely attractive proposition. Their development results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe FPAs at reasonable cost and theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type-II superlattice (T2SL) detectors compared to HgCdTe. Lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime are equal. Based on these promising results it is obvious now that the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology is competing with HgCdTe third generation detector technology with the potential advantage of standard III-V technology to be more competitive in costs and as a consequence series production pricing. Comments to the statement whether the superlattice IR photodetectors can outperform the "bulk" narrow gap HgCdTe detectors is one of the most important questions for the future of IR photodetectors presented by Rogalski at the April 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, Florida, are more credible today and are presented in this paper. It concerns the trade-offs between two most competing IR material technologies: InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices and HgCdTe ternary alloy system.

  19. Social support in type II diabetes care: a case of too little, too late

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadasivan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Amudha Kadirvelu, Sivalal Sadasivan, Shu Hui NgSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: Coping with type II diabetic patients is increasingly posing large financial burdens, sorely felt especially by growing economies. Self-management has been found to be an effective approach towards maintaining good control in diabetics. However, although efforts at implementing self-management have had initial success, there has been a lack of sustainability. This review examines the different components impinging on self-care among type II diabetic patients. These include the critical role of social support, the need for support from health care providers, the value of support from family and friends, the influence of sex and cultural factors in self-care behavior, the benefits of peer support, and the role of literacy in diabetes self-care. Despite the mounting evidence for the effectiveness of social support in diabetes care, and the various stakeholders including this in their clinical guidelines, there has only been a lukewarm response from policy-makers towards ensuring its implementation. Hence, more effort is required from health care providers in moving away from just understanding the effects of new drugs and subsequently putting their patients on these drugs, and going back to the basics of communicating with the patients, understanding their woes, and helping to motivate/empower their patients. This paper analyzes the various components of social support, their influence on diabetes self-care, and how health care providers can help in this process.Keywords: type II diabetes mellitus, social support, self-management/self-care

  20. Spinal glomus (type II) arteriovenous malformations: a pooled analysis of hemorrhage risk and results of intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Du, Rose

    2013-01-01

    The natural history and treatment results for spinal glomus (type II) arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remain relatively obscure. To calculate spinal glomus (type II) AVM hemorrhages rates and amalgamate results of intervention. We performed a pooled analysis via the PubMed database through May 2012, including studies with at least 3 cases. Data on individual patients were extracted and analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model to obtain hazard ratios for hemorrhage risk factors. The annual hemorrhage rate before treatment was 4% (95% confidence interval [confidence interval]: 3%-6%), increasing to 10% (95% CI: 7%-16%) for AVMs with previous hemorrhage. The hazard ratio for hemorrhage after hemorrhagic presentation was 2.25 (95% CI: 0.71-7.07), increasing to 13.0 within the first 10 years (95% CI: 1.44-118). The overall rates of complete obliteration were 78% (95% CI: 72%-83%) for surgery and 33% (95% CI: 24%-43%) for endovascular treatment. Long-term clinical worsening occurred in 12% of patients after surgical treatment (95% CI: 8%-16%) and in 13% after endovascular treatment (95% CI: 7%-21%). No hemorrhages occurred after complete obliteration. After partial surgical treatment, the annual hemorrhage rate was 3% (95% CI: 1%-6%); no hemorrhages were reported over 196 patient-years after partial endovascular treatment. Spinal glomus (type II) AVMs with previous hemorrhage, particularly within 10 years, demonstrated a greater risk of hemorrhage. Complete obliteration and even partial endovascular treatment significantly decreased their hemorrhage rate.

  1. Yoga Practice for the Management of Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Adults: A systematic Review

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    Badr Aljasir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of practicing yoga for the management of type II Diabetes was assessed in this systematic review through searching related electronic databases and the grey literature to the end of May 2007 using Ovid. All randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing yoga practice with other type of intervention or with regular practice or both, were included regardless of language or type of publication. Each study was assessed for quality by two independent reviewers. Mean difference was used for summarizing the effect of each study outcomes with 95% confidence intervals. Pooling of the studies did not take place due to the wide clinical variation between the studies. Publication bias was assessed by statistical methods. Five trials with 363 participants met the inclusion criteria with medium to high risk of bias and different intervention characteristics. The studies’ results show improvement in outcomes among patients with diabetes type II. These improvements were mainly among short term or immediate diabetes outcomes and not all were statistically significant. The results were inconclusive and not significant for the long-term outcomes. No adverse effects were reported in any of the included studies. Short-term benefits for patients with diabetes may be achieved from practicing yoga. Further research is needed in this area. Factors like quality of the trials and other methodological issues should be improved by large randomized control trials with allocation concealment to assess the effectiveness of yoga on diabetes type II. A definitive recommendation for physicians to encourage their patients to practice yoga cannot be reached at present.

  2. Conserved DNA motifs in the type II-A CRISPR leader region

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    Mason J. Van Orden

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated (CRISPR-Cas systems consist of RNA-protein complexes that provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific immunity against bacteriophages, plasmids, and other mobile genetic elements. Bacteria and archaea become immune to phage or plasmid infections by inserting short pieces of the intruder DNA (spacer site-specifically into the leader-repeat junction in a process called adaptation. Previous studies have shown that parts of the leader region, especially the 3′ end of the leader, are indispensable for adaptation. However, a comprehensive analysis of leader ends remains absent. Here, we have analyzed the leader, repeat, and Cas proteins from 167 type II-A CRISPR loci. Our results indicate two distinct conserved DNA motifs at the 3′ leader end: ATTTGAG (noted previously in the CRISPR1 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 and a newly defined CTRCGAG, associated with the CRISPR3 locus of S. thermophilus DGCC7710. A third group with a very short CG DNA conservation at the 3′ leader end is observed mostly in lactobacilli. Analysis of the repeats and Cas proteins revealed clustering of these CRISPR components that mirrors the leader motif clustering, in agreement with the coevolution of CRISPR-Cas components. Based on our analysis of the type II-A CRISPR loci, we implicate leader end sequences that could confer site-specificity for the adaptation-machinery in the different subsets of type II-A CRISPR loci.

  3. Surgical outcomes in two different age groups with Focal Cortical Dysplasia type II: Any real difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Molina, Jorge Luis; Di Giacomo, Roberta; Mariani, Valeria; Deleo, Francesco; Cardinale, Francesco; Uscátegui-Daccarett, Angélica María; Lorenzana, Pablo; Tassi, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Focal Cortical Dysplasias (FCDs) represent a common architectural cortical disorder underlying drug-resistant focal epilepsy. So far, studies aimed at evaluating whether age at surgery is a factor influencing surgical outcome are lacking, so that data on the comparison between patients harboring Type II FCD operated at younger age and those operated at adult age are still scarce. We compared presurgical clinical features and surgical outcomes of patients with histopathologically diagnosed Type II FCD undergoing surgery at an earlier age with those operated after 20 years of age. We retrospectively analyzed 1660 consecutive patients operated at the "Claudio Munari" Epilepsy Surgery Centre. There were 289 patients (17.4%) with a neuropathological diagnosis of Type II FCD. We included two different groups of patients, the first one including patients operated on at less than 6years, the second sharing the same seizure onset age but with delayed surgery, carried out after the age of 20. Seizure characteristics and, neuropsychological and postoperative seizure outcomes were evaluated by study group. Forty patients underwent surgery before the age of 6 and 66 patients after the age of 20. Surgical outcome was favorable in the whole population (72.6% were classified in Engel's Class Ia+Ic), independently from age at surgery. In the children group, 32 patients were classified in Class I, including 30 (75%) children in classes Ia and Ic. In the adult group, 53 belonged to Class I of whom 47 (71%) were in classes Ia and Ic. The percentage of permanent complications, the surgical outcomes, and AED withdrawal did not significantly differ by study group. Our results indicate that there is no difference between the groups, suggesting that outcome depends mainly on the histological findings and not on timing of surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Olivares E, Felipe [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Schulze, Steve [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Bolt, Luis [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Krzemiński, Wojtek, E-mail: janderso@eso.org [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  5. The Effect of Cinnamon on Glucose of Type II Diabetes Patients

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    Farzaneh Hasanzade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of type II diabetes is increasing across the world. Dietary modifications help the patients to control blood glucose. Traditional herbs and spices are commonly used for control of glucose among which cinnamon (肉桂 Ròu Guì; Cinnamomum cassia has the greatest effect. Research has shown that adding cinnamon to diet can help to lower the glucose level. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cinnamon on the glucose level in blood. This was a Randomized clinical trial in which 70 Patients with type II diabetes were assigned randomly two groups (35 in cinnamon and 35 in placebo group. The groups were matched in terms of body mass index (BMI, HbAlc and fasting blood sugar (FBS. Patients were treated with cinnamon and the placebo group was treated with placebo in addition to their routine treatment for 60 days. FBG levels and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients on the first day, and 1 and 2 months after treatment were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and paired t-test in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS.16 software. The mean levels of FBS before, and 1 and 2 months after the intervention were 174±59, 169±43 and 177±45; respectively. The levels of HbAlc before and after the intervention in the cinnamon group were (8.9±1.7 and 8.9±1.6. There was no significant difference in FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin levels between the two groups (P=0.738 and P=0.87, respectively. Results showed that using certain amount of cinnamon for 60 days did not change the glucose level of diabetic patients. So, using cinnamon to type II diabetes patients cannot be recommended and more studies are needed in future.

  6. The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Sexual Function in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Haddadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is a common chronic disease that is increasingly observed in almost all countries of the world. The treatment and prevention of diabetes largely depend on patients’ self-efficacy in performing self-care behaviors. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and sexual performance in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: In the present correlational study, 200 patients with type II diabetes (based on physicians’ diagnosis participated. Using convenience sampling method, the samples were selected out of the whole population of diabetic patients who referred to Shahid Bahonar and Rajaei Hospitals in the city of Karaj (Iran. The data were collected through a multi-faceted questionnaire covering demographic characteristics of the participants, the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (DMSES, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI and the Male Sexual Function Index (MSFI. Then, the collected data were analyzed through Pearson correlation test, multiple linear regression analysis, independent t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed a positive significant relationship between self-efficacy and sexual function (p<0.001; regression coefficient of the predictor variable ‘self-efficacy’ was 0.217 (p<0.017. Conclusion:  Self-efficacy plays an important role in the lives of diabetic patients; it is also important in sexual performance of diabetic patients. Therefore, based on the results of this study, the significant relationship between self-efficacy and sexual function must be considered in the treatment of patients with type II diabetes.

  7. Type II NKT-TFH cells against Gaucher lipids regulate B-cell immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Verma, Rakesh; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ruhua; Pastores, Gregory M; Mistry, Pramod K; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2015-02-19

    Chronic inflammation including B-cell activation is commonly observed in both inherited (Gaucher disease [GD]) and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying B-cell activation in these settings remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22) and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1), 2 major sphingolipids accumulated in GD, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT) cells. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-reactive CD1d tetramer-positive T cells have a distinct T-cell receptor usage and genomic and cytokine profiles compared with the classical type I NKT cells. In contrast to type I NKT cells, βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells constitutively express T-follicular helper (TFH) phenotype. Injection of these lipids leads to an increase in respective lipid-specific type II NKT cells in vivo and downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of antilipid antibodies. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells can provide efficient cognate help to B cells in vitro. Frequency of LGL1-specific T cells in GD mouse models and patients correlates with disease activity and therapeutic response. Our studies identify a novel type II NKT-mediated pathway for glucosphingolipid-mediated dysregulation of humoral immunity and increased risk of B-cell malignancy observed in metabolic lipid disorders. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Laquinimod, a quinoline-3-carboxamide, induces type II myeloid cells that modulate central nervous system autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Schulze-Topphoff

    Full Text Available Laquinimod is a novel oral drug that is currently being evaluated for the treatment of relapsing-remitting (RR multiple sclerosis (MS. Using the animal model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, we examined how laquinimod promotes immune modulation. Oral laquinimod treatment reversed established RR-EAE and was associated with reduced central nervous system (CNS inflammation, decreased Th1 and Th17 responses, and an increase in regulatory T cells (Treg. In vivo laquinimod treatment inhibited donor myelin-specific T cells from transferring EAE to naive recipient mice. In vivo laquinimod treatment altered subpopulations of myeloid antigen presenting cells (APC that included a decrease in CD11c(+CD11b(+CD4(+ dendritic cells (DC and an elevation of CD11b(hiGr1(hi monocytes. CD11b(+ cells from these mice exhibited an anti-inflammatory type II phenotype characterized by reduced STAT1 phosphorylation, decreased production of IL-6, IL-12/23 and TNF, and increased IL-10. In adoptive transfer, donor type II monocytes from laquinimod-treated mice suppressed clinical and histologic disease in recipients with established EAE. As effects were observed in both APC and T cell compartments, we examined whether T cell immune modulation occurred as a direct effect of laquinimod on T cells, or as a consequence of altered APC function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 differentiation was observed only when type II monocytes or DC from laquinimod-treated mice were used as APC, regardless of whether myelin-specific T cells were obtained from laquinimod-treated or untreated mice. Thus, laquinimod modulates adaptive T cell immune responses via its effects on cells of the innate immune system, and may not influence T cells directly.

  9. Demonstration of a viable quantitative theory for interplanetary type II radio bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J. M., E-mail: jschmidt@physics.usyd.edu.au; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, Physics Road, Building A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-03-25

    Between 29 November and 1 December 2013 the two widely separated spacecraft STEREO A and B observed a long lasting, intermittent, type II radio burst for the extended frequency range ≈ 4 MHz to 30 kHz, including an intensification when the shock wave of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) reached STEREO A. We demonstrate for the first time our ability to quantitatively and accurately simulate the fundamental (F) and harmonic (H) emission of type II bursts from the higher corona (near 11 solar radii) to 1 AU. Our modeling requires the combination of data-driven three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations for the CME and plasma background, carried out with the BATS-R-US code, with an analytic quantitative kinetic model for both F and H radio emission, including the electron reflection at the shock, growth of Langmuir waves and radio waves, and the radiations propagation to an arbitrary observer. The intensities and frequencies of the observed radio emissions vary hugely by factors ≈ 10{sup 6} and ≈ 10{sup 3}, respectively; the theoretical predictions are impressively accurate, being typically in error by less than a factor of 10 and 20 %, for both STEREO A and B. We also obtain accurate predictions for the timing and characteristics of the shock and local radio onsets at STEREO A, the lack of such onsets at STEREO B, and the z-component of the magnetic field at STEREO A ahead of the shock, and in the sheath. Very strong support is provided by these multiple agreements for the theory, the efficacy of the BATS-R-US code, and the vision of using type IIs and associated data-theory iterations to predict whether a CME will impact Earth’s magnetosphere and drive space weather events.

  10. Photobiomodulation improves cutaneous wound healing in an animal model of type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Kimberly R; Barna, Lauren; Chenault, V Michelle; Waynant, Ronald W; Ilev, Ilko K; Longo, Leonardo; Miracco, Clelia; Johnson, Bryan; Anders, Juanita J

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effects of photobiomodulation (PBM) on cutaneous wound healing in an animal model of type II diabetes, Psammomys obesus (Sand Rats). 632-nm light has been established as the most effective wavelength for treatment of cutaneous wounds; however, the inconsistent efficacy of PBM may be due to inadequate treatment parameter selection. Using 632-nm light, an initial series of experiments were done to establish optimal treatment parameters for this model. Following creation of bilateral full-thickness skin wounds, non-diabetic Sand Rats were treated with PBM of differing dosages. Wound healing was assessed according to wound closure and histological characteristics of healing. Optimal treatment parameters were then used to treat type II diabetic Sand Rats while a diabetic control group received no irradiation. In order to elucidate the mechanism behind an improvement in wound healing, expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was assessed. Significant improvement in wound healing histology and wound closure were found following treatment with 4 J/cm(2) (16 mW, 250-sec treatments for 4 consecutive days; p wounds in the diabetic group in comparison to the non-irradiated diabetic group. Quantitative analysis of bFGF expression at 36 h post-injury revealed a threefold increase in the diabetic and non-diabetic Sand Rats after PBM. The results demonstrate that PBM at an energy density of 4 J/cm(2) is effective in improving the healing of cutaneous wounds in an animal model of type II diabetes, suggesting that PBM (632 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) would be effective in treating chronic cutaneous wounds in diabetic patients.

  11. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  12. The ecological and evolutionary energetics of hunter-gatherer residential mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Rupley, Eric; Youn, Hyejin; West, Geoffrey B

    2016-01-01

    Residential mobility is deeply entangled with all aspects of hunter-gatherer life ways, and is therefore an issue of central importance in hunter-gatherer studies. Hunter-gatherers vary widely in annual rates of residential mobility, and understanding the sources of this variation has long been of interest to anthropologists and archaeologists. Since mobility is, to a large extent, driven by the need for a continuous supply of food, a natural framework for addressing this question is provided by the metabolic theory of ecology. This provides a powerful framework for formulating formal testable hypotheses concerning evolutionary and ecological constraints on the scale and variation of hunter-gatherer residential mobility. We evaluate these predictions using extant data and show strong support for the hypotheses. We show that the overall scale of hunter-gatherer residential mobility is predicted by average human body size, and the limited capacity of mobile hunter-gatherers to store energy internally. We then s...

  13. MANAGEMENT OF DENS INVAGINATUS TYPE II WITH PERIAPICAL LESION: CASE REPORT*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Uzun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly resulting from epithelial invagination of the tooth crown before calcification. Endodontic treatment of teeth affected by dens invaginatusmay be difficult and complex due to aberrant anatomy. Combined orthograde and surgical approaches for successful treatment of dens invaginatus are effective. This report describes the successful treatmentand results atthe 12-month follow-up of a maxillary lateral incisor showing dens invaginatus type II, a large periapical lesion and an open apex by using combined surgical and endodontic treatment.

  14. Lip biting in a patient with Chiari type II malformation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurko, C; Errington, B D; Ben Taylor, W; Henry, R

    1999-01-01

    Self mutilation of lips and tongue is considered a common type of Self-Injurious Behavior (SIB). Treatment of SIB in the form of Lip-Biting in developmentally disabled individuals has been the focus of several related reports using different oral appliances preventing or inhibiting the SIB. In this paper we report a case of SIB in the form of Lip-Biting on an infant with Chiari Type II Malformation which was treated with a Lip-bumper. The Lip-bumper demonstrated to be a viable option in treating transient and acute episodes of SIB involving the lower lip and buccal mucosa.

  15. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

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    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  16. Exciton storage in type-II quantum dots using the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Climente, Juan I.; Planelles, Josep, E-mail: josep.planelles@uji.es [Departament de Química Física i Analítica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12080 Castelló (Spain)

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the bright-to-dark exciton conversion efficiency in type-II quantum dots subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. To this end, we take the exciton storage protocol recently proposed by Simonin and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 89, 075304 (2014)] and simulate its coherent dynamics. We confirm the storage is efficient in perfectly circular structures subject to weak external electric fields, where adiabatic evolution is dominant. In practice, however, the efficiency rapidly degrades with symmetry lowering. Besides, the use of excited states is likely unfeasible owing to the fast decay rates. We then propose an adaptation of the protocol which does not suffer from these limitations.

  17. Type II InAs/GaAsSb quantum dots: Highly tunable exciton geometry and topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, J. M.; Wewior, L.; Cardozo de Oliveira, E. R.; Alén, B., E-mail: benito.alen@csic.es [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Ulloa, J. M.; Utrilla, A. D.; Guzmán, A.; Hierro, A. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-11-02

    External control over the electron and hole wavefunctions geometry and topology is investigated in a p-i-n diode embedding a dot-in-a-well InAs/GaAsSb quantum structure with type II band alignment. We find highly tunable exciton dipole moments and largely decoupled exciton recombination and ionization dynamics. We also predicted a bias regime where the hole wavefunction topology changes continuously from quantum dot-like to quantum ring-like as a function of the external bias. All these properties have great potential in advanced electro-optical applications and in the investigation of fundamental spin-orbit phenomena.

  18. Pump Spectral Bandwidth, Birefringence, and Entanglement in Type-II Parametric Down Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Erenso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The twin photons produced by a type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion are well know as a potential source of photons for quantum teleportation due to the strong entanglement in polarization. This strong entanglement in polarization, however, depends on the spectral composition of the pump photon and the nature of optical isotropy of the crystal. By exact numerical calculation of the concurrence, we have shown that how pump photons spectral width and the birefringence nature of the crystal directly affect the degree of polarization entanglement of the twin photons.

  19. Spectroscopic classification of AT2017ffk as a Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Osmar; Pignata, Giuliano

    2017-09-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (500-900nm) of AT2017ffk on 2017 Sept 12.01 UT with the Goodman spectrograph, mounted on the SOAR telescope. Using the SNID code (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) we find a good match with a Type II supernova at more than two months after the explosion at z=0.015, consistent with the redshift of its host galaxy IC 991. From the FeII absorption minima we estimate an expansion velocity of about 3300 km/s.

  20. Bianchi type-II universe with wet dark fluid in general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Chandra Rekha; Sheikh, Azizur Rahman

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, dark energy models of the universe filled with wet dark fluid are constructed in the frame work of LRS Bianchi type-II space-time in General Theory of Relativity. A new equation of state modeled on the equation of state p = γ ( ρ - ρ_{*} ), which can describe liquid including water, is used. The exact solutions of Einstein's field equations are obtained in quadrature form and the models corresponding to the cases γ = 0 and γ = 1 are discussed in details.

  1. The low energy expansion of the one-loop type II superstring amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Michael B.; Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The one-loop four-graviton amplitude in either of the type II superstring theories is expanded in powers of the external momenta up to and including terms of order s^4 log s R^4, where R^4 denotes a specific contraction of four linearized Weyl tensors and s is a Mandelstam invariant. Terms in this series are obtained by integrating powers of the two-dimensional scalar field theory propagator over the toroidal world-sheet as well as the moduli of the torus. The values of these coefficients match expectations based on duality relations between string theory and eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  2. Keeping the wolves at bay: antitoxins of prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ting eChan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I – VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA

  3. A closed form of a kurtosis parameter of a hypergeometric-Gaussian type-II beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    F, Khannous; A, A. A. Ebrahim; A, Belafhal

    2016-04-01

    Based on the irradiance moment definition and the analytical expression of waveform propagation for hypergeometric-Gaussian type-II beams passing through an ABCD system, the kurtosis parameter is derived analytically and illustrated numerically. The kurtosis parameters of the Gaussian beam, modified Bessel modulated Gaussian beam with quadrature radial and elegant Laguerre-Gaussian beams are obtained by treating them as special cases of the present treatment. The obtained results show that the kurtosis parameter depends on the change of the beam order m and the hollowness parameter p, such as its decrease with increasing m and increase with increasing p.

  4. Keeping the Wolves at Bay: Antitoxins of Prokaryotic Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2016-01-01

    In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I-VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA antitoxins. We shall

  5. Noncollinear parametric amplification in the near-infrared based on type-II phase matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Bühler, J.; Heinrich, A.-C.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Brida, D.

    2015-09-01

    Noncollinear parametric amplification based on type-II phase matching for the generation of ultrabroadband and tunable spectra in the near infrared is investigated. In a noncollinear geometry the group velocity matching condition between signal and idler can be obtained in frequently used crystals such as β-barium borate (BBO) even for wavelengths fully located in the anomalous dispersion region. The extremely broadband operation, peculiar tuning possibilities and straightforward experimental implementation with the standard BBO crystal pave the way for a versatile NIR source in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  6. [Mixed type-II cryoglobulinemia associated with a chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, A; Vallina, E; Navascués, C A; Rodríguez, M; Otero, L; Sotorrío, N G; San Román, F; Rodrigo, L

    1993-04-01

    We describe the case of a patient with non A-non B post-transfusional cirrhosis and type-II mixed cryoglobulinemia, who showed in relation with said processes several acute symptoms of vasculitis, polyarthritis, pericarditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, finally dying due to an advanced hepatocellular insufficiency. In this patient the determination of antibodies against hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) was positive, that is why we assume a possible relationship between both processes and the first literature references, after the clonation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome, are reviewed.

  7. XIAP acts as a switch between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, Philipp J.; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D.; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C.S; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E.; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    FAS (APO-1/CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptotic death of unwanted or dangerous cells in many tissues, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development1-4. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the ‘death receptor’ FAS triggers their apoptosis1-4. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of ‘effector caspases’ by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and ...

  8. Orbital-angular-momentum mixing in type-II second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leonardo J.; Buono, Wagner T.; Tasca, Daniel S.; Dechoum, Kaled; Khoury, Antonio Z.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear mixing of orbital angular momentum in type-II second-harmonic generation with arbitrary topological charges imprinted on two orthogonally polarized beams. Starting from the basic nonlinear equations for the interacting fields, we derive the selection rules determining the set of paraxial modes taking part in the interaction. Conservation of orbital angular momentum naturally appears as the topological charge selection rule. However, a less intuitive rule applies to the radial orders when modes carrying opposite helicities are combined in the nonlinear crystal, an intriguing feature confirmed by experimental measurements.

  9. Ancient DNA reveals lack of continuity between neolithic hunter-gatherers and contemporary Scandinavians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Thomas, Mark G

    2009-01-01

    in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early farmers for more than a millennium before they vanished some 4,000 years ago [7, 8]. The prolonged coexistence......]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations....

  10. Orofacial digital syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal V Dave

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 10-year-old boy reported to us for delayed eruption of permanent teeth with classical features of orofacial digital syndrome (OFDS. The case of OFDS is being reported and the various clinico-radiological features of both type I and type II are compared. Chromosomal karyotyping of the case has also been performed.

  11. 12 CFR 1.130 - Type II securities; guidelines for obligations issued for university and housing purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... State or political subdivision or agency of a State or political subdivision for the purpose of... college-level institution, or financing loans for studies at such institutions, qualifies as a Type II...

  12. Relative potencies of Type I and Type II pyrethroids for inhibition of spontaneous firing in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids insecticides commonly used in pest control disrupt the normal function of voltage-sensitive sodium channels. We have previously demonstrated that permethrin (a Type I pyrethroid) and deltamethrin (a Type II pyrethroid) inhibit sodium channel-dependent spontaneous netw...

  13. No effects of acute hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia on skin microcirculation and endothelial markers in Type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, GD; Dullaart, RPF; Tervaert, JWC; Smit, AJ

    Background: Increased microvascular permeability is a hallmark of microangiopathy in Type I diabetes mellitus and is associated with endothelial dysfunction and haemodynamic alterations. Type II diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia. The purpose of this study

  14. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-07-24

    Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes-related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the "Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire" and SF-36 "Quality of Life Questionnaire". Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life.

  15. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  16. Hypoglycemic effect of hawthorn in type II diabetes mellitus rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aierken, Aili; Buchholz, Tina; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaoying; Melzig, Matthias F

    2017-10-01

    Hawthorn is a popular herb in many different traditional medicine systems, including traditional Chinese medicine, where it has long been used for the treatment of hyperglycemia. However, most of its varied biological activities remain unexplored. This study investigated the hypoglycemic effect of hawthorn extracts in type II diabetic (T2DM) rat model. A total of 54 rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group; type II diabetic model group (T2DM; these rats were induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin); high, middle and low concentrations of hawthorn treatment (HTH , HTM and HTL T2DM rats were given hawthorn extract at a dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg kg-1 body weight, respectively); and positive control group (orlistat 40 mg kg-1 body weight). Triglyceride and total cholesterol serum levels were lower in the hawthorn extract-treated groups than in the T2DM control group (P hawthorn extracts decreased blood glucose level and increased plasma insulin release from pancreas. Positive effects of hawthorn against streptozotocin-induced T2DM were demonstrated. This study suggests that hawthorn extract represents a useful agent for the prevention or treatment of T2DM. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  18. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II. In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  19. Lycium barbarum polysaccharide attenuates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Lv, Jun; Yang, Bo; Liu, Fang; Tian, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yongqing; Yang, Di; Ouyang, Jing; Sun, Fengjun; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2015-01-01

    No curative treatment is yet available for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), wherein chronic synovitis progresses to cartilage and bone destruction. Considering the recently recognized anti-inflammatory properties of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP; a derivative of the goji berry), we established the collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model to investigate the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of LBP. The CIA-induced changes and LBP-related effects were assessed by micro-computed tomography measurement of bone volume/tissue volume and by ELISA and western blotting detection of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The CIA mice showed substantial bone damage, bone loss, and increased concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, PGE2, MIP-1, anti-type II collagen IgG, MMP-1, and MMP-3. LBP treatments produced significant dose-dependent improvements in CIA-induced bone damage and bone loss, and significantly reduced CIA-stimulated expression of the inflammatory mediators and MMPs. Thus, LBP therapy can preserve bone integrity in CIA mice, possibly through down-regulation of inflammatory mediators. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An enzyme similar to animal type II photolyases mediates photoreactivation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M; Jarillo, J A; Klimczak, L J; Landry, L G; Peng, T; Last, R L; Cashmore, A R

    1997-02-01

    The important issue of photoreactivation DNA repair in plants has become even more interesting in recent years because a family of genes that are highly homologous to photoreactivating DNA repair enzymes but that function as blue light photoreceptors has been isolated. Here, we report the isolation of a novel photolyase-like sequence from Arabidopsis designated PHR1 (for photoreactivating enzyme). It shares little sequence similarity with either type I photolyases or the cryptochrome family of blue light photoreceptors. Instead, the PHR1 gene encodes an amino acid sequence with significant homology to the recently characterized type II photolyases identified in a number of prokaryotic and animal systems. PHR1 is a single-copy gene and is not expressed in dark-grown etiolated seedlings: the message is light inducible, which is similar to the expression profile for photoreactivation activity in plants. The PHR1 protein complements a photolyase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli and thus confers photoreactivation activity. In addition, an Arabidopsis mutant that is entirely lacking in photolyase activity has been found to contain a lesion within this Arabidopsis type II photolyase sequence. We conclude that PHR1 represents a genuine plant photolyase gene and that the plant genes with homology to type I photolyases (the cryptochrome family of blue light photoreceptors) do not contribute to photoreactivation repair, at least in the case of Arabidopsis.

  1. Major depressive disorder and type II diabetes mellitus: mechanisms underlying risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Danielle S; Carvalho, Andre F; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Ali, Muna M; McIntyre, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Introduction: Major Depressive Disorder is associated age-related medical conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus type II, Alzheimer's disease) that frequently manifest at an earlier age, contributing to excess and premature mortality. The foregoing observation provides the impetus to further refine potential mechanisms and molecular pathways subserving these disorders in order to more effectively treat these clinical populations by aiming to reduce and prevent cognitive impairment as well as downstream neurodegeneration. A review of computerized databases was performed to identify original studies that investigated the impact of the independent and comorbid association of major depressive disorder and type II diabetes mellitus on cognitive function and conversion to Alzheimer's disease. English-written articles were selected for review based on the adequacy of sample size, the use of standardized diagnostic instruments, and validated assessment measures. Individuals with persistent neuropsychiatric illness account for a disproportionate overall burden of disability mediated largely by decrements in cognitive performance. Mixed results from epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that insulin may mediate and/or moderate risk for cognitive dysfunction in subsets of individuals. Moreover, physiological changes, such as insulin resistance and the activation of neuroimmunoinflammatory systems result in glial and neuroendangerment. Disturbances in the metabolic milieu exert a neurotoxic effect on the central nervous system and poses a hazard to other organ systems.

  2. Diabetes type II: a risk factor for depression-Parkinson-Alzheimer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Peter; Bartl, Jasmin; Laux, Gerd; Grünblatt, Edna

    2011-02-01

    There is ample evidence that impairments in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are of etiopathobiochemical importance in a subgroup of patients with "depression", causing hypercortisolaemia as major metabolic effect. Chronic hypercortisolaemia causes insulin resistance. Therefore, it is not surprising that epidemiological studies demonstrate an association of "depression" with diabetes type II and vice versa. Chronic stress and hypercortisolaemia are conditions, which have been suggested to be causal for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as brain insulin resistance is associated with β-Amyloid-accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein. Depression is one of the significant symptomatology preceding AD. It is however, not known whether "depression" associated with hypercortisolaemia is the subgroup at risk for AD. In contrast to a subgroup of "depression" and to AD, in Parkinson's disease (PD) there is only weak evidence for an association with diabetes type II and insulin resistance. As "depression" is preceding PD in up to half of such patients, it remains to be elucidated whether this is a subgroup of depressed patients, which is not associated with disturbances of the HPA axis and hypercortisolaemia. Improved clinical and biochemical/molecular knowledge about "depression" associated with AD and PD in comparison to "pure" depression might lead to improved therapeutic strategies and even drug development focusing subtypes of "depression".

  3. Spatial carrier distribution in InP/GaAs type II quantum dots and quantum posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikawa, F; Donchev, V; Ivanov, Ts; Dias, G O; Tizei, L H G; Lang, R; Heredia, E; Gomes, P F; Brasil, M J S P; Cotta, M A; Ugarte, D; Martinez Pastor, J P; de Lima, M M; Cantarero, A

    2011-02-11

    We performed a detailed investigation of the structural and optical properties of multi-layers of InP/GaAs quantum dots, which present a type II interface arrangement. Transmission electronic microscopy analysis has revealed relatively large dots that coalesce forming so-called quantum posts when the GaAs layer between the InP layers is thin. We observed that the structural properties and morphology affect the resulting radiative lifetime of the carriers in our systems. The carrier lifetimes are relatively long, as expected for type II systems, as compared to those observed for single layer InP/GaAs quantum dots. The interface intermixing effect has been pointed out as a limiting factor for obtaining an effective spatial separation of electrons and holes in the case of single layer InP/GaAs quantum-dot samples. In the present case this effect seems to be less critical due to the particular carrier wavefunction distribution along the structures.

  4. Type-I and type-II topological nodal superconductors with s -wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beibing; Yang, Xiaosen; Xu, Ning; Gong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Topological nodal superconductors with protected gapless points in momentum space are generally realized based on unconventional pairings. In this work we propose a minimal model to realize these topological nodal phases with only s -wave interaction. In our model the linear and quadratic spin-orbit couplings along the two orthogonal directions introduce anisotropic effective unconventional pairings in momentum space. This model may support different nodal superconducting phases characterized by either an integer winding number in BDI class or a Z2 index in D class at the particle-hole invariant axes. In the vicinity of the nodal points the effective Hamiltonian can be described by either type-I or type-II Dirac equations, and the Lifshitz transition from type-I nodal phases to type-II nodal phases can be driven by external in-plane magnetic fields. We show that these nodal phases are robust against weak impurities, which only slightly renormalizes the momentum-independent parameters in the impurity-averaged Hamiltonian, thus these phases are possible to be realized in experiments with real semi-Dirac materials. The smoking-gun evidences to verify these phases based on scanning tunneling spectroscopy method are also briefly discussed.

  5. Pseudo-type-II tuning behavior and mode identification in whispering gallery optical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenheimer, Sarah-Katharina; Fürst, Josef Urban; Schiller, Annelie; Holderied, Florian; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2016-06-27

    Wavelength tuning of conventional mirror-based optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) exhibits parabolically-shaped tuning curves (type-0 and type-I phase matching) or tuning branches that cross each other with a finite slope (type-II phase matching). We predict and experimentally prove that whispering gallery OPOs based on type-0 phase matching show both tuning behaviors, depending on whether the mode numbers of the generated waves coincide or differ. We investigate the wavelength tuning of optical parametric oscillation in a millimeter-sized radially-poled lithium niobate disk pumped at 1 μm wavelength generating signal and idler waves between 1.7 and 2.6 μm wavelength. Our experimental findings excellently coincide with the theoretical predictions. The investigated whispering gallery optical parametric oscillator combines the employment of the highest nonlinear-optical coefficient of the material with a controlled type-II-like wavelength tuning and with the possibility of self-phase locking.

  6. PETER’S TYPE II ANOMALY ASSOCIATED WITH CONGENITAL HEART DEFECT: RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Reporting a case of Peters’ type II with congenital heart defect a rare form of anterior segment dysgenesis in which abnormal cleavage of the anterior chamber occurs. It is characterized by central corneal opacification secondary to defects in a posterior corneal stroma, Descemet's membrane, and endothelium. Majority of cases are sporadic, bilateral , and associated with other systemic malformations. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A18 year old female presented with a history of bilateral cloudy corneas and diminution of vision since early child hood. Visual acuity was RE 6/60, LE 6/60 with PH improvement in B E 6/36 . Slit lamp examination showed BE micro cornea with central and paracentral macular grade opacity with lenticulo - irido - corneal adhesions. Iris was found to be fused with the posterior s urface of the peripheral cornea with poor formation of the anterior chamber with coloboma of iris. Lens was cataractous. Fundus examination in the left eye showed no abnormality. She was diagnosed as Peters’ type II anomaly. Systemic examination revealed congenital heart defects. Echocardiography showed congenital bicuspid aortic valve, grade 3 aortic regurgitation. RESULT: Patient require penetrating keratoplasty with combined procedure ( C ataract extraction with trabeculectomy. CONCLUSION: Early detectio n of the disease will help in early treatment, with good vision development to combat amblyopia.

  7. Glossopharyngeal pistoning for lung insufflation in children with spinal muscular atrophy type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren-Bonnier, Malin; Markström, Agneta; Lindholm, Peter; Mattsson, Eva; Klefbeck, Brita

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate whether children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type II were able to learn glossopharyngeal pistoning for lung insufflation (GI), and to evaluate the effects of GI on pulmonary function and chest expansion. Eleven children with SMA type II were recruited. They performed 10 cycles of GI, four times per week, for 8 weeks. Lung function and chest expansion were measured before and after the 8-week period. Five of the 11 children learned the technique. The median GI volume was 0.28 (range 0.15-0.98) L. Four of the children who completed the study showed a mean increase in inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) of 0.13 L (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-0.23) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) of 116 L/min (95% CI 60-173). They also had an increased chest expansion with GI at the level of the xiphoid process of 1.50 cm (95% CI 0.16-2.84) and at the level of the fourth costa of 1.79 cm (95% CI 0.85-2.73). The children reported temporary symptoms of dizziness and tension in the chest. Five of the 11 children were able to learn the technique of GI and for the four who fulfilled the training, it had positive effects on IVC, PEF and chest expansion. GI did not cause major discomfort.

  8. Unraveling the functions of type II-prohibitins in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechota, Janusz; Bereza, Monika; Sokołowska, Aleksandra; Suszyński, Kondrad; Lech, Karolina; Jańska, Hanna

    2015-06-01

    In yeast and mammals, prohibitins (PHBs) are considered as structural proteins that form a scaffold-like structure for interacting with a set of proteins involved in various processes occurring in the mitochondria. The role of PHB in plant mitochondria is poorly understood. In the study, the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana was used to identify the possible roles of type-II PHBs (homologs of yeast Phb2p) in plant mitochondria. The obtained results suggest that the plant PHB complex participates in the assembly of multisubunit complexes; namely, respiratory complex I and enzymatic complexes carrying lipoic acid as a cofactor (pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and glycine decarboxylase). PHBs physically interact with subunits of these complexes. Knockout of two Arabidopsis type-II prohibitins (AtPHB2 and AtPHB6) results in a decreased abundance of these complexes along with a reduction in mitochondrial acyl carrier proteins. Also, the absence of AtPHB2 and AtPHB6 influences the expression of the mitochondrial genome and leads to the activation of alternative respiratory pathways, namely alternative oxidase and external NADH-dependent alternative dehydrogenases.

  9. Neutrinos from type-II supernovae and the neutrino-driven supernova mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, H.T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Supernova 1987A has confirmed fundamental aspects of our theoretical view of type-II supernovae: Type-II supernovae are a consequence of the collapse of the iron core of a massive evolved star and lead to the formation of a neutron star or black hole. This picture is most strongly supported by the detection of electron antineutrinos in the IMB and Kamiokande II experiments in connection with SN 1987A. However, the mechanism causing the supernova explosion is not yet satisfactorily understood. In this paper the properties of the neutrino emission from supernovae and protoneutron stars will be reviewed; analytical estimates will be derived and results of numerical simulations will be shown. It will be demonstrated that the spectral distributions of the emitted neutrinos show clear and systematic discrepancies compared with thermal (black body-type) emission. This must be taken into account when neutrino observations from supernovae are to be interpreted, or when implications of the neutrino emission on nucleosynthesis processes in mantle and envelope of the progenitor star are to be investigated. Furthermore, the influence of neutrinos on the supernova dynamics will be discussed, in particular their crucial role in causing the explosion by Wilson`s neutrino-driven delayed mechanism. Possible implications of convection inside the newly born neutron star and between surface and the supernova shock will be addressed and results of multi-dimensional simulations will be presented. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  10. Theoretical Study on the Origin of Anomalous Magneto-Photoluminescence in Type II Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kouzu, Kazuma; Masaru, Nishimura

    2001-03-01

    Magneto-photoluminescence in type II superlattices [1] and in the confinement structures [2] showed an anomalous reduction of PL intensity when an applied magnetic field along the superlattice direction increases up to 40 T. We propose that a bound exciton trapped in a quantum-dot like defect at the interface is responsible for the above phenomena. For this purpose, we first develop a general effective mass theory for a magneto-exciton trapped at the interface in the type II systems, where an electron and a hole lie in different layers. Based on this theory, we have calculated the binding enregy of a bound exciton in (GaP)_n(AlP)n superlattices with n=4 by a variational method as a function of a magnetic field. The calculated results explain successfully the observed anomalous redshift of PL peak energy and also the anomalous decrease of PL intensity. 1.K.Uchida et al., Phys.Rev. B 53 (1996) 4809. 2.N.Usami et al., Phys.Rev. B 60 (1999) 1879. Present address:Kobayashi, Reserch & Development Division, Bridgestone Corp.;Kouzu, Vision Care Co, HOYA Corp.

  11. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (pGallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (pgallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjljara@ugr.es [Instituto de Biotecnología, Campus Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bernier-Villamor, Laura [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Sevilla, Francisca [Departamento de Biología del Estrés y Patología Vegetal, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-30080 Murcia (Spain); Lázaro, Juan-José [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress.

  14. Establishment and evaluation of a stable cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Su

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  15. Myocardial glucose utilisation in type II diabetes mellitus patients treated with sulphonylurea drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Ikuo [International University of Health and Welfare, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sanno Hospital, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); University of Tokyo, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yusuke [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Moritan, Toshiyuki [Suzuka University of Medical Science, Department of Clinical Engineering, Faculty of Medical Engineering, Suzuka (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nagai, Ryozo [University of Tokyo, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    Chronic sulphonylurea treatment maintains improved glycaemic control through mechanisms other than enhancement of insulin secretion and may act on various organs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the chronic use of sulphonylurea drugs influences PET measurement of myocardial glucose utilisation (MGU) in type II diabetes mellitus. Forty-two patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 17 control subjects underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET to measure MGU during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamping. Twenty-one patients had been taking sulphonylurea drugs for more than 1 year (SU group), and the other 21 patients were drug naive (non-SU group). The haemoglobin A1c levels in the two patient groups were similar. Glucose disposal rate (GDR) was also determined as a marker of whole-body insulin resistance. GDR in the SU group (9.01{+-}2.53 mg min{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (4.10{+-}2.47, p<0.01) and was similar to that in the controls (9.76{+-}2.97). MGU in the SU group (7.66{+-}3.02 mg min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (5.53{+-}2.05, p<0.01) and was similar to that in the controls (7.49{+-}2.74). (orig.)

  16. Occurrence and activity of a type II CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus gasseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Selle, Kurt; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas), which collectively form an RNA-guided adaptive immune system against invasive genetic elements. In silico surveys have revealed that lactic acid bacteria harbour a prolific and diverse set of CRISPR-Cas systems. Thus, the natural evolutionary role of CRISPR-Cas systems may be investigated in these ecologically, industrially, scientifically and medically important microbes. In this study, 17 Lactobacillus gasseri strains were investigated and 6 harboured a type II-A CRISPR-Cas system, with considerable diversity in array size and spacer content. Several of the spacers showed similarity to phage and plasmid sequences, which are typical targets of CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Aligning the protospacers facilitated inference of the protospacer adjacent motif sequence, determined to be 5'-NTAA-3' flanking the 3' end of the protospacer. The system in L. gasseri JV-V03 and NCK 1342 interfered with transforming plasmids containing sequences matching the most recently acquired CRISPR spacers in each strain. We report the distribution and function of a native type II-A CRISPR-Cas system in the commensal species L. gasseri. Collectively, these results open avenues for applications for bacteriophage protection and genome modification in L. gasseri, and contribute to the fundamental understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacteria.

  17. SVMRFE based approach for prediction of most discriminatory gene target for type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way our body metabolizes sugar. The body's important source of fuel is now becoming a chronic disease all over the world. It is now very necessary to identify the new potential targets for the drugs which not only control the disease but also can treat it. Support vector machines are the classifier which has a potential to make a classification of the discriminatory genes and non-discriminatory genes. SVMRFE a modification of SVM ranks the genes based on their discriminatory power and eliminate the genes which are not involved in causing the disease. A gene regulatory network has been formed with the top ranked coding genes to identify their role in causing diabetes. To further validate the results pathway study was performed to identify the involvement of the coding genes in type II diabetes. The genes obtained from this study showed a significant involvement in causing the disease, which may be used as a potential drug target.

  18. ALOE VERA JUICE DECREASE THE AMOUNT OF BLOOD GLUCOSE LEVEL IN PATIENT WITH DIABETIC TYPE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aloe vera is a tropical plant that known can decrease the amount of blood glucose level in patient with diabetic type II. Diabetes mellitus is a disease cause by an increasing amount of blood glucose level that is reduce by conditions of the insulin. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of Aloe vera administering on decreasing blood glucose level for Diabetes mellitus type II patient. Method: A quasy experimental non randomized control group pre post test design was used in this study. There were 20 respondents divided into 3 group of treatment. Each group is given 100 gr/day 200 gr/day and 300 gr/day Aloe vera juice respectively. Data were collected by using observation and analyzed by using One way Anova and Paired t-Test with significance level α≤ 0.005. Result: The result showed that Aloe vera juice administering can decrease blood glucose level, with 100 gr/day, 200 gr/day, 300 gr/day (p=0.000.  Discussion: It can be proven that Aloe vera juice administering can decrease blood glucose level, it’s because the content of Aloe vera more complete and effect from alprogen which impede absorption glucose and blood glucose level. Further study are recommended to measure the effect of Aloe vera juice on blood glucose level with more consider on gender, age, total calorie consumption, obesity, activities, and stress.

  19. XIAP discriminates between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Philipp J; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C S; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2009-08-20

    FAS (also called APO-1 and CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptosis of unwanted or dangerous cells, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the 'death receptor' FAS triggers their apoptosis. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of 'effector caspases' by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing, whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, caspase cascade amplification through caspase-8-mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BID (BH3 interacting domain death agonist) is essential. Here we show that loss of XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) function by gene targeting or treatment with a second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC, also called DIABLO; direct IAP-binding protein with low pI) mimetic drug in mice rendered hepatocytes and beta-cells independent of BID for FAS-induced apoptosis. These results show that XIAP is the critical discriminator between type I and type II apoptosis signalling and suggest that IAP inhibitors should be used with caution in cancer patients with underlying liver conditions.

  20. XIAP acts as a switch between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Philipp J.; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D.; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C.S.; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E.; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    FAS (APO-1/CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptotic death of unwanted or dangerous cells in many tissues, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development1-4. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the ‘death receptor’ FAS triggers their apoptosis1-4. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of ‘effector caspases’ by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, amplification of the caspase cascade through caspase-8 mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BID5 is essential6-8. Here we show, that loss of X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)9,10 function by gene-targeting or treatment with a second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC11, also called DIABLO12: direct IAP binding protein with low pI) mimetic drug rendered hepatocytes independent of BID for FAS-induced apoptosis signalling. These results show that XIAP is the critical discriminator between type I versus type II apoptosis signalling and suggest that IAP inhibitors should be used with caution in cancer patients with underlying liver conditions. PMID:19626005

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVRIz light curves of 51 Type II supernovae (Galbany+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Maza, J.; de Jaeger, T.; Moraga, T.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Morrell, N. I.; Thomas-Osip, J.; Krzeminski, W.; Gonzalez, L.; Antezana, R.; Wishnjewski, M.; McCarthy, P.; Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Stritzinger, M.; Folatelli, G.; Anguita, C.; Galaz, G.; Green, E. M.; Impey, C.; Kim, Y.-C.; Kirhakos, S.; Malkan, M. A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Phillips, A. C.; Pizzella, A.; Prosser, C. F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Schommer, R. A.; Sherry, W.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wells, L. A.; Williger, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a sample of multi-band, visual-wavelength light curves of 51 type II supernovae (SNe II) observed from 1986 to 2003 in the course of four different surveys: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernovae Survey (CATS). Near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of this set of SNe II will be published in two companion papers. A list of the SNe II used in this study is presented in Table1. The first object in our list is SN 1986L and it is the only SN observed with photoelectric techniques (by M.M.P and S.K., using the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9m equipped with a photometer and B and V filters). The remaining SNe were observed using a variety of telescopes equipped with CCD detectors and UBV(RI)KCz filters (see Table5). The magnitudes for the photometric sequences of the 51 SNe II are listed in Table4. In every case, these sequences were derived from observations of Landolt standards (see Appendix D in Hamuy et al. 2001ApJ...558..615H for the definition of the z band and Stritzinger et al. 2002AJ....124.2100S for the description of the z-band standards). Table5 lists the resulting UBVRIz magnitudes for the 51 SNe. (3 data files).

  2. Explaining dark matter and neutrino mass in the light of TYPE-II seesaw model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Shaw, Avirup

    2018-02-01

    With the motivation of simultaneously explaining dark matter and neutrino masses, mixing angles, we have invoked the Type-II seesaw model extended by an extra SU(2) doublet Φ. Moreover, we have imposed a Z2 parity on Φ which remains unbroken as the vacuum expectation value of Φ is zero. Consequently, the lightest neutral component of Φ becomes naturally stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate. On the other hand, light Majorana masses for neutrinos have been generated following usual Type-II seesaw mechanism. Further in this framework, for the first time we have derived the full set of vacuum stability and unitarity conditions, which must be satisfied to obtain a stable vacuum as well as to preserve the unitarity of the model respectively. Thereafter, we have performed extensive phenomenological studies of both dark matter and neutrino sectors considering all possible theoretical and current experimental constraints. Finally, we have also discussed a qualitative collider signatures of dark matter and associated odd particles at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Mutations in LCA5 are an uncommon cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sylvie; Hanein, Sylvain; Perrault, Isabelle; Delphin, Nathalie; Aboussair, Nisrine; Leowski, Corinne; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Roche, Olivier; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2007-12-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe form of inherited retinal dystrophy responsible for blindness or severe visual impairment at birth or within the first months of life. Up to date, ten LCA genes have been identified. Three of them account for ca. 43% of families and are responsible for a congenital severe stationary cone-rod dystrophy (Type I, 60% of LCA) while the seven remaining genes account for 32% of patients and are responsible for a progressive yet severe rod-cone dystrophy (Type II, 40% of LCA ). Recently, mutations in LCA5, encoding the ciliary protein lebercilin, were reported to be a rare cause of leber congenital amaurosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of this novel gene and to look for genotype-phenotype correlations. Here we report the identification of three novel LCA5 mutations (3/3 homozygous) in three families confirming the modest implication of this gene in our series (3/179; 1.7%). Besides, we suggest that the phenotype of these patients affected with a particularly severe form of LCA type II may represent a continuum with LCA type I. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Towards a Microscopic Theory of the Knight Shift in an Anisotropic, Multiband Type-II Superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Klemm

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed to extend the zero-temperature Hall-Klemm microscopic theory of the Knight shift K in an anisotropic and correlated, multi-band metal to calculate K ( T at finite temperatures T both above and into its superconducting state. The transverse part of the magnetic induction B ( t = B 0 + B 1 ( t causes adiabatic changes suitable for treatment with the Keldysh contour formalism and analytic continuation onto the real axis. We propose that the Keldysh-modified version of the Gor’kov method can be used to evaluate K ( T at high B 0 both in the normal state, and by quantizing the conduction electrons or holes with Landau orbits arising from B 0 , also in the entire superconducting regime for an anisotropic, multiband Type-II BCS superconductor. Although the details have not yet been calculated in detail, it appears that this approach could lead to the simple result K S ( T ≈ a ( B 0 − b ( B 0 | Δ ( B 0 , T | 2 , where 2 | Δ ( B 0 , T | is the effective superconducting gap. More generally, this approach can lead to analytic expressions for K S ( T for anisotropic, multiband Type-II superconductors of various orbital symmetries that could aid in the interpretation of experimental data on unconventional superconductors.

  5. The fluctuation Hall conductivity and the Hall angle in type-II superconductor under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinh, Bui Duc, E-mail: tinhbd@hnue.edu.vn [Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, K7/25 Quang Trung, Danang (Viet Nam); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Thu, Le Minh [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • The time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau was used to calculate fluctuation Hall conductivity and Hall angle in type-II superconductor in 2D and 3D. • We obtain analytical expressions for the fluctuation Hall conductivity and the Hall angle summing all Landau levels without need to cutoff higher Landau levels to treat arbitrary magnetic field. • The results were compared to the experimental data on YBCO. - Abstract: The fluctuation Hall conductivity and the Hall angle, describing the Hall effect, are calculated for arbitrary value of the imaginary part of the relaxation time in the frame of the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau theory in type II-superconductor with thermal noise describing strong thermal fluctuations. The self-consistent Gaussian approximation is used to treat the nonlinear interaction term in dynamics. We obtain analytical expressions for the fluctuation Hall conductivity and the Hall angle summing all Landau levels without need to cutoff higher Landau levels to treat arbitrary magnetic field. The results are compared with experimental data on high-T{sub c} superconductor.

  6. 450 d of Type II SN 2013ej in optical and near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Jerkstrand, A.; Valenti, S.; Sollerman, J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Pastorello, A.; Schulze, S.; Chen, T.-W.; Childress, M. J.; Fraser, M.; Fremling, C.; Kotak, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Schmidt, B. P.; Smartt, S. J.; Taddia, F.; Terreran, G.; Tucker, B. E.; Barbarino, C.; Benetti, S.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Lee, M. Y.; Li, K. L.; Maguire, K.; Margheim, S.; Mehner, A.; Ochner, P.; Sullivan, M.; Tomasella, L.; Young, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013ej, in galaxy M74, from 1 to 450 d after the explosion. SN 2013ej is a hydrogen-rich supernova, classified as a Type IIL due to its relatively fast decline following the initial peak. It has a relatively high peak luminosity (absolute magnitude MV = -17.6) but a small 56Ni production of ˜0.023 M⊙. Its photospheric evolution is similar to other Type II SNe, with shallow absorption in the Hα profile typical for a Type IIL. During transition to the radioactive decay tail at ˜100 d, we find the SN to grow bluer in B - V colour, in contrast to some other Type II supernovae. At late times, the bolometric light curve declined faster than expected from 56Co decay and we observed unusually broad and asymmetric nebular emission lines. Based on comparison of nebular emission lines most sensitive to the progenitor core mass, we find our observations are best matched to synthesized spectral models with a MZAMS = 12-15 M⊙ progenitor. The derived mass range is similar to but not higher than the mass estimated for Type IIP progenitors. This is against the idea that Type IIL are from more massive stars. Observations are consistent with the SN having a progenitor with a relatively low-mass envelope.

  7. Effect of synbiotic supplementation on weight, body mass index and blood sugar in type II diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Kooshki; Tahereh Tofighian; Roya Akbarzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Obesity disrupts glucose homeostasis by metabolic disorders. Probiotics are nutritional and medicinal potential to control obesity and its related disorders. This study was aimed to investigate effects of synbiotic supplementation on weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) and blood sugar in type II diabetic patients. This clinical double-blind trial study was done on 43 (15 males and 28 females) type II diabetic patients who reffered to diabetes clinic in Sabzevar. The patients in the study were rando...

  8. An ecological analysis of food outlet density and prevalence of type II diabetes in South Carolina counties

    OpenAIRE

    AlHasan, Dana M.; Eberth, Jan Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that the built environment with high numbers of fast food restaurants and convenience stores and low numbers of super stores and grocery stores are related to obesity, type II diabetes mellitus, and other chronic diseases. Since few studies assess these relationships at the county level, we aim to examine fast food restaurant density, convenience store density, super store density, and grocery store density and prevalence of type II diabetes among counties in South ...

  9. The Unique Functions of the Type-II IL-4 Receptor are revealed in IL-13R¿1-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IL-4 receptor is a central mediator of Th2-mediated diseases and associates with either the common gamma chain (type-I IL-4R) or IL-13Ra1 (type-II IL-4R) to form two receptor complexes. Here, using IL-13Ra1-/- mice, we characterized the distinct functions of the type-II IL-4R. In contrast to IL-...

  10. Accurate segmentation of leukocyte in blood cell images using Atanassov's intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2014-06-01

    In this paper automatic leukocyte segmentation in pathological blood cell images is proposed using intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory. This is done to count different types of leukocytes for disease detection. Also, the segmentation should be accurate so that the shape of the leukocytes is preserved. So, intuitionistic fuzzy set and interval Type II fuzzy set that consider either more number of uncertainties or a different type of uncertainty as compared to fuzzy set theory are used in this work. As the images are considered fuzzy due to imprecise gray levels, advanced fuzzy set theories may be expected to give better result. A modified Cauchy distribution is used to find the membership function. In intuitionistic fuzzy method, non-membership values are obtained using Yager's intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Optimal threshold is obtained by minimizing intuitionistic fuzzy divergence. In interval type II fuzzy set, a new membership function is generated that takes into account the two levels in Type II fuzzy set using probabilistic T co norm. Optimal threshold is selected by minimizing a proposed Type II fuzzy divergence. Though fuzzy techniques were applied earlier but these methods failed to threshold multiple leukocytes in images. Experimental results show that both interval Type II fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy methods perform better than the existing non-fuzzy/fuzzy methods but interval Type II fuzzy thresholding method performs little bit better than intuitionistic fuzzy method. Segmented leukocytes in the proposed interval Type II fuzzy method are observed to be distinct and clear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Savita Sambashivaiah; Shivaprasad Bilichodmath; Nanjammanni Nanjaiah; Rithesh Kulal

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled study evaluated the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II Diabetes Mellitus. H. pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis, peptic ulcers and a risk factor for gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of H. pylori with chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus before and after treatment. The prevalence of H. p...

  12. Analytical approach for type-II semiconductor spherical core-shell quantum dots heterostructures with wide band gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Cheche, Tiberius O.; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-01-01

    A one-band model within the effective mass approximation is adopted to characterize the energy structure and oscillator strength of type-II semiconductor spherical core-shell quantum dots. The heteroepitaxial strain of the core-shell heterostructure is modeled by the elastic continuum approach. The model is applied to ZnTe/ZnSe core-shell, a wide band gap type-II heterostructure. The simulated absorption spectra are in fair agreement with available experimental results.

  13. Type II diabetes mellitus and the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in the cancer prevention study-II nutrition cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapstur, Susan M; Patel, Alpa V; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Gaudet, Mia M; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2012-11-01

    Despite consistent associations of type II diabetes mellitus with hormonally related cancers such as breast and endometrium, the relation between type II diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer risk is unclear. Associations of type II diabetes mellitus status, duration, and insulin use with epithelial ovarian cancer overall, and with serous and nonserous histologic subtypes were examined in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort, a prospective study of U.S. men and women predominantly aged 50 years and older. Between 1992 and 2007, 524 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified among 63,440 postmenopausal women. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using extended Cox regression to update diabetes status and bilateral oophorectomy status during follow-up. Type II diabetes mellitus status (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.75-1.46) and duration were not associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Although not statistically significantly different (P(difference) = 0.39), the RR was higher for type II diabetes mellitus with insulin use (RR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.74-2.24) than for type II diabetes mellitus without insulin use (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.43). Diabetes seemed to be more strongly associated with nonserous (RR = 1.41; 95% CI, 0.70-2.85) than serous (RR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.41-1.23) histologic subtypes. Type II diabetes mellitus was not associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, although higher risks with nonserous subtypes and among insulin users cannot be ruled out. Larger studies are needed to clarify associations of type II diabetes mellitus with or without insulin use with risk of ovarian cancer overall and by histologic subtypes. ©2012 AACR.

  14. Aggressive antihypertensive strategies based on hydrochlorothiazide, candesartan or lisinopril decrease left ventricular mass and improve arterial compliance in patients with type II diabetes melllitus and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra-de Man, A.M.; van Ittersum, F.J.; Schram, M.T.; Kamp, O.; van Dijk, R.; IJzerman, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of aggressive antihypertensive therapy based on hydrochlorothiazide, candesartan or lisinopril on left ventricular mass (LVM) index and arterial stiffness in hypertensive type II diabetic individuals. Seventy hypertensive type II diabetic individuals were treated with

  15. Aggressive antihypertensive strategies based on hydrochlorothiazide,candesartan or lisinopril decrease left ventricular mass and improve arterial compliance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra-de Man, A.M.; van Ittersum, F.J.; van Meeteren-Schram, M.T.; Kamp, O.; van Dijk, R.A.; IJzerman, R.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Brouwer, C.B.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of aggressive antihypertensive therapy based on hydrochlorothiazide, candesartan or lisinopril on left ventricular mass (LVM) index and arterial stiffness in hypertensive type II diabetic individuals. Seventy hypertensive type II diabetic individuals were treated with

  16. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells comprise a novel processing unit in mammalian vestibular organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B.; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here, we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell’s base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells range in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending 3–4 hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Further, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network amongst type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3–6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells, and they suggest type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. PMID:24825750

  17. Exercise as a Non-Pharmaceutical Treatment Modality to Prevent Comorbidity of Type II Diabetes and Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junggi Hong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type II diabetes and major depression are both considered epidemics in the United States,with a high rate of comorbidity. Although the diseases have a physiological connection, western medicinestill treats them separately, with medications that often exacerbate the other condition and come withdebilitating side effects. Exercise has been shown to be an effective treatment modality for both diseasesseparately, however, no research has been done on exercise as a treatment or preventative measure for thecomorbidity of the two conditions.Aim: The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the literature regarding theefficacy of exercise for the treatment and prevention of comorbid type II diabetes and major depression.Methodology: Academic Search Primere, Pubmed, Medline and Google Scholar were used to find sources.Search terms such as “type II diabetes, depression, exercise” were used. Sixty three studies were deemedappropriate for this literature review.Results: Results indicate that exercise is effective at treating type II diabetes and major depression, andwould also be effective at preventing the comorbidity of the two. Pharmaceuticals commonly used to treatthe two diseases bring with them unwanted side effects which are often more debilitating than the originalpathology, whereas side effects of exercise tend to be beneficial to one’s health.Conclusions: Exercise is an effective way to prevent comorbidity of major depression and type II diabeteswithout unwanted side effects. It should be implemented as the front line treatment for both type II diabetesand depression.

  18. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (Pniacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  19. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  20. Height of Shock Formation in the Solar Corona Inferred from Observations of Type II Radio Bursts and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Employing coronagraphic and EUV observations close to the solar surface made by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, we determined the heliocentric distance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the starting time of associated metric type II bursts. We used the wave diameter and leading edge methods and measured the CME heights for a set of 32 metric type II bursts from solar cycle 24. We minimized the projection effects by making the measurements from a view that is roughly orthogonal to the direction of the ejection. We also chose image frames close to the onset times of the type II bursts, so no extrapolation was necessary. We found that the CMEs were located in the heliocentric distance range from 1.20 to 1.93 solar radii (Rs), with mean and median values of 1.43 and 1.38 Rs, respectively. We conclusively find that the shock formation can occur at heights substantially below 1.5 Rs. In a few cases, the CME height at type II onset was close to 2 Rs. In these cases, the starting frequency of the type II bursts was very low, in the range 25-40 MHz, which confirms that the shock can also form at larger heights. The starting frequencies of metric type II bursts have a weak correlation with the measured CME/shock heights and are consistent with the rapid decline of density with height in the inner corona.