WorldWideScience

Sample records for hunter college program

  1. Hunter College Dance Therapy Masters Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmais, Claire; White, Elissa Q.

    Described is development of the Hunter College dance therapy 18-month 30-credit masters program involving 33 adult students, (in two classes beginning in 1971 and 1972), an educational model, internship in psychiatric institutions, and preparation of instructional materials. The dance therapist is said to incorporate the psychiatric patient's…

  2. The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College. A Partnership among Earth Science, Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, Haydee; Buonaiuto, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships to 40 academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics…

  3. Indice de Indices en la Biblioteca de Hunter College para el Estudiante Hispano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talero Bielsa, Alberto; And Others

    Designed for Spanish-speaking students of Hunter College of the City University of New York, this guide explains the use of 70 English-language indexes found in the college library. The explanations are given in Spanish in order to simplify the process of library research for students who are not completely comfortable with English. Each index is…

  4. Reducing Lead on the Landscape: Anticipating Hunter Behavior in Absence of a Free Nonlead Ammunition Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Chase

    Full Text Available Lead is a neurotoxin that has been documented to affect many forms of wildlife, and has been identified as a limiting factor in a population of California Condors in Northern Arizona. The Arizona Game and Fish Department provides vouchers for free nonlead ammunition to hunters selected to hunt within the distribution of California Condors, with the intention of having fewer lead-laden offal piles available to California Condors. Although wildlife agencies may reasonably assume voucher programs motivate hunters into choosing nonlead ammunition, the lead reduction efforts attributable to the voucher program has not been empirically quantified. Our intention was to compare a control group of hunters to a treatment group of hunters within California Condor occupied areas. Both groups received educational materials regarding the deleterious effects of lead, but the treatment group also received a voucher for a free initial box of ammunition. About half of the control group used nonlead ammunition, compared to about three-fourths of the treatment group. Prominent barriers to adoption of nonlead ammunition included a general difficulty of obtaining it, obtaining it in the desired caliber, and its costliness. Frequently mentioned motivations for using nonlead was the exhortation to use it by the Department, and the desire to aid California Condor recovery by hunters. The disparate compliance rates found herein confirm and quantify the success of nonlead ammunition voucher programs, but underscore the importance of working to increase the supply of nonlead ammunition with the end of facilitating its procurement and reducing its cost.

  5. A synergistic effort among geoscience, physics, computer science and mathematics at Hunter College of CUNY as a Catalyst for educating Earth scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, H.; Buonaiuto, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships for academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Led by Earth scientists the Program awarded scholarships to students in their junior or senior years majoring in computer science, geosciences, mathematics and physics to create two cohorts of students that spent a total of four semesters in an interdisciplinary community. The program included mentoring of undergraduate students by faculty and graduate students (peer-mentoring), a sequence of three semesters of a one-credit seminar course and opportunities to engage in research activities, research seminars and other enriching academic experiences. Faculty and peer-mentoring were integrated into all parts of the scholarship activities. The one-credit seminar course, although designed to expose scholars to the diversity STEM disciplines and to highlight research options and careers in these disciplines, was thematically focused on geoscience, specifically on ocean and atmospheric science. The program resulted in increased retention rates relative to institutional averages. In this presentation we will discuss the process of establishing the program, from the original plans to its implementation, as well as the impact of this multidisciplinary approach to geoscience education at our institution and beyond. An overview of accomplishments, lessons learned and potential for best practices will be presented.

  6. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  7. Vulnerable Hunter

    OpenAIRE

    Md.Asha Begum; Y.VishnuPriya; V.ManoranjanBabu; ,O.Srinivasu

    2016-01-01

    This project "VULNERABLE HUNTER" application main aim is to detect risk in our mobile applications. This application contains modules like Fetch Application, Generate Score, Uninstall and Display Graph. Through this application it detects risk so that this application is very useful to smart phone users Now-a-days so many people are using smart phones and people are crazy about new apps. But by installing all the applications into our mobile may reduce its performance. Some apps c...

  8. Innovative Partnerships Assist Community College Computing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Banion, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Relates efforts of major corporations in providing assistance to community college computing programs. Explains the goals of the League for Innovation in the Community College, a consortium of 19 community colleges, and cites examples of collaborative projects. (ML)

  9. [Community Service Program, Westmont College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Christina

    This report describes a 2-year project at Westmont College, California, which established a Community Service Program with the purposes of decreasing student debt and increasing student participation in community organizations. Eligible students worked 8-10 hours per week for a qualified community agency and received credit towards tuition for the…

  10. Marketing Your College Music Program to Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests the use of time-proven marketing methods to attract high school students to college music programs and keep them interested in the music program. Explores facets of the college and the program that draw students, including reputation, location, costs, and program content. (LS)

  11. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  12. Teaching Hunter Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crume, Charles T.; Lang, George M.

    This guide provides volunteer hunter-education instructors with background information on subjects related to hunter education. A major goal of hunter education is to develop an environmental ethic among outdoorsmen, based on a deeper understanding of the natural world. Chapter 1 clarifies terms frequently used within the broad context of outdoor…

  13. Hunters' motivations and values:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radder, Laetitia; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the values and motivations of South African biltong hunters. A hierarchical value map of associations between attributes, consequences and values resulted from laddering interviews with 34 hunters. The Means-End Chain approach proved useful in identifying: (a) personal value...

  14. Middlesex Community College Software Technical Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlesex Community Coll., Bedford, MA.

    This document describes the Software Technical Writing Program at Middlesex Community College (Massachusetts). The program is a "hands-on" course designed to develop job-related skills in three major areas: technical writing, software, and professional skills. The program was originally designed in cooperation with the Massachusetts High…

  15. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  16. [College Discovery: America's First PREP Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James J., Jr.

    The Predischarge Education Program (PREP) is a federally funded program, approved in 1970, to help educationally disadvantaged servicemen continue their education. Many junior colleges are running or planning PREP projects in cooperation with military installations and the Veterans Administration. This paper describes the first year of one PREP…

  17. The Off-Campus Clinical Program of the College of Optometry, Ferris State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramore, James E.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical education program at Ferris State College, College of Optometry, and the various clinics affiliated with the college are described. To ensure quality, all individuals with the responsibility of teaching the students are faculty of Ferris State. (MLW)

  18. Integrating Ethics in Community Colleges' Accounting Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton

    1990-01-01

    Argues that two-year college business programs need to provide moral guidance and leadership to students to help stem the proliferation of fraudulent and questionable financial reporting practices. Reviews amoral and moral unity theories of business ethics. Discusses barriers to ethical instruction in business curricula, and ways to overcome them.…

  19. Advanced Placement Program at Palo Verde College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitchell, Theodore G.

    This study reports the outcome of an initial implementation of a California law permitting mentally gifted high school students to attend a junior college part time. The program procedure is described in terms of (1) selection and enrollment, (2) discipline, (3) books, (4) matters relating to high school graduation, (5) information for parents,…

  20. HISTORICAL NOTE JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON) John Hunter FRS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON). John Hunter FRS (13 February 1728-16 October 1793) was a Scottish surgeon, one of the most distinguished scientists and surgeons of his day. He was an early advocate of careful observation and scientific method in medicine. He was the husband of Anne Hunter, a teacher, friend and ...

  1. The Relationship between a College Preparation Program and At-Risk Students' College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jennifer T.; Schaefle, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between elements of a college preparation program and the college readiness of low-income and/or Latina/o students at the completion of 6 years of participation in the program. Hours of participation in tutoring, mentoring, advising, college campus visits, summer programs, and educational field trips are…

  2. The Higgs hunter's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gunion, John F; Haber, Howard E; Kane, Gordon L

    1989-01-01

    The Higgs Hunter's Guide is a definitive and comprehensive guide to the physics of Higgs bosons. In particular, it discusses the extended Higgs sectors required by those recent theoretical approaches that go beyond the Standard Model, including supersymmetry and superstring-inspired models.

  3. Motivations of female Black Hills deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Covelli Metcalf, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    State fish and wildlife agencies are particularly interested in attracting female participation because of the potential to offset declining participation in hunting. Understanding female hunters’ motivations will be critical for designing effective recruitment and retention programs for women hunters. Although female participation in hunting is increasing, males still outnumber females by about tenfold. Gender differences in deer hunters were explored by comparing ratings of eight motivations (social, nature, excitement, meat, challenge, trophy, extra hunting opportunity, and solitude). Hunter types were defined by hunters’ selection of the most important motivation for why they like Black Hills deer hunting. Overall, females and males were relatively similar in their ratings of the eight motivations, and we found 85% gender similarity in the selection of the most important motivation. Women were slightly more motivated by the food aspect of the hunt while men placed slightly more value on the hunt as a sporting activity.

  4. Moving from College Aspiration to Attainment: Learning from One College Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyce, Cherrel Miller; Albold, Cheryll; Long, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 75 parents and high school students who were eligible for a college access program, this article examines parents' and students' college aspirations and their confidence in fulfilling that goal. The authors argue that pre-college preparation programs can benefit from the non-economic forms of capital that these families…

  5. Enterpreneurship/Small Business Degree Programs at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Associate degree programs at community colleges in small business/entrepreneurship were examined in this article. The study examined the community college programs in entrepreneurship and small business related, small business administration and entrepreneurship listed in "Perterson's Guide to Two-Year Colleges" (Oram, 2005). Current catalogs…

  6. Developing College English as a Second Language (ESL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Irina A.; Kennedy, Jelane A.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines available literature on college English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. The literature available on college ESL programs falls into three categories: (1) research reports and articles, (2) recent theoretical discussions on ESL teaching, and (3) thought pieces discussing college ESL curriculum development and assessment…

  7. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    research with my community college students by partnering with a research oceanographer. Through this partnership, students have had access to an active oceanographic researcher through classroom visits, use of data in curriculum, and research/cruise progress updates. With very little research activity currently going on at the community college, this "window" into scientific research is invaluable. Another important aspect of this project is the development of a summer internship program that has allowed four community college students to work directly with an oceanographer in her lab for ten weeks. This connection of community college students with world-class scientists in the field promotes better understanding of research and potentially may encourage more students to major in the sciences. In either approach, the interaction with scientists at different stages of their careers, from undergraduate and graduate students at universities to post docs and research scientists, also provides community college students with the opportunity to gain insight into possible career pathways. For both majors and non-majors, a key outcome of such experiences will be gaining experience in using inquiry and reasoning through the scientific method and becoming comfortable with data and technology.

  8. Georgia Power Company's college degree program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Georgia Power Company's on-site college degree program for nuclear power plant personnel. In February 1986, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a policy statement concerning engineering expertise on shift (Generic Letter 86-04), which appeared in Volume 50, Number 208 of the October 28, 1985 Federal Register. One of the options available to nuclear power plant personnel to meet the requirement was the combined senior reactor operator/shift technical adviser position. One of the methods for meeting the option included a bachelor's degree in engineering technology for an accredited institution, including course work in the physical, mathematical, or engineering sciences

  9. Dartmouth College Earth Sciences Mobile Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E. E.; Osterberg, E. C.; Dade, W. B.; Sonder, L. J.; Renshaw, C. E.; Kelly, M. A.; Hawley, R. L.; Chipman, J. W.; Mikucki, J.; Posmentier, E. S.; Moore, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    For the last 50 years the Department of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College has offered a term-long, undergraduate field program, informally called "the Stretch". A student typically enrolls during fall quarter of his or her junior year soon after choosing a major or minor. The program thus provides valuable field context for courses that a student will take during the remainder of his or her undergraduate career. Unlike many traditional field camps that focus on one particular region, the Stretch is a mobile program that currently travels through Western North America, from the Canadian Rockies to the Grand Canyon. The program spans two and a half months, during which time undergraduates, graduate TAs, and faculty live, work, and learn collaboratively. Dartmouth College faculty members sequentially teach individual 1- to 2-week segments that focus on their interests and expertise; currently, there are a total of eight segments led by eleven faculty members. Consequently, topics are diverse and include economic geology, geobiology, geomorphology, glaciology, glacial geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, paleontology, stratigraphy, structure and tectonics, and volcanology. The field localities are equally varied, including the alpine glaciers of western Alberta, the national parks of Montana, Wyoming and Utah, the eastern Sierra Nevada, the southern Great Basin, and highlight such classic geological field locales as Sheep Mountain in Wyoming's Bighorn Basin, Death Valley, and the Grand Canyon. Overall, the program aims to: 1) give students a broad perspective on the timing and nature of the processes that resulted in the landscape and underlying geology of western North America; and 2) introduce students to a wide variety of geological environments, field techniques, and research equipment. Students emerge from the program with wide-ranging exposure to active research questions as well as a working knowledge of core field skills in the earth sciences. Stretch students

  10. Hunters in the New Millennium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Peter

    that hunting is a common source of conflict between different interests, only very few studies has been made to produce knowledge about people hunting for leisure. The survey “Hunters in the new millennium” is an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of hunters and hunting in an increasing urbanized...

  11. Norco College's Summer Advantage Program: Leading Change to Increase College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, April

    2016-01-01

    Norco College, in Riverside County, California, developed the Summer Advantage program in 2012. This program is designed to reduce the number of students placed into precollegiate-level courses and increase first-year retention through participation in academic workshops, intrusive advisement, and college orientation. After four years, the Summer…

  12. High School Journalism Research: Community College Program Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Jack

    1987-01-01

    Reviews findings from a Journalism Education Association study comparing the American College Testing (ACT) Program standardized scores, writing samples, and Language Arts Survey responses of students who were involved in high school journalism programs with students who were not. Urges community college journalism educators to support high school…

  13. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  14. Marketing Strategy for Community College Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Linda; Miller, Bob W.

    1980-01-01

    Traces the expansion of marketing in postsecondary education. Enumerates the goals of Prince George's Community College's marketing task force. Defines marketing and suggests strategies for targeting marketing efforts toward high school students, business and industry, the general public, and students within the college. (AYC)

  15. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  16. Politics, Programs, and Local Governments: The Case of Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy Haffron

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on two aspects of governance and policy: the electoral process by which community college trustees are selected and the responsiveness of colleges to their communities as manifested by their programs. Available from Journal of Politics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. (Author/IRT)

  17. Initiating and Strengthening College and University Instructional Physical Activity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education supports the offering of strong college and university instructional physical activity programs (C/UIPAPs). With a rapid decline in physical activity levels, high stress levels, and unhealthy weight-loss practices among college-age students, it is apparent that C/UIPAPs embedded in the…

  18. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  19. Theater Program Development in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Martinez, Ed.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to find answers to how best colleges and universities can adapt the teaching of theatre in its curriculum. It was then necessary to track the different ways drama has evolved throughout time and how its adoption in formal education has affected its students, both present and past. To this end the researcher examined theater from its earliest inception to its adoption by schools of higher education, more specifically, public colleges and universities.

  20. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  1. Alpena Community College Commercial Driver's License Program. Evaluation Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpena Community Coll., MI.

    The Alpena Community College (ACC) Drivers Education Program was developed to deliver a basic skills program providing specific job-related basic skills instruction to approximately 300 workers throughout Michigan who desired to pass the Commercial Drivers License (CDL) examination. Other program goals were to establish greater partnerships…

  2. Southern Vermont College (SVC) and Wheelock College (WC): 2010 Urban and Rural Healthcare Academy Program (HAP) for College Progress and Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCiccio, Albert C.

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) This is a report about the Urban and Rural Healthcare Academy Pilot Program (HAP) that launched at Southern Vermont College (SVC) and Wheelock College (WC) in summer 2010. HAP enabled 18 vulnerable high school students to learn about how to progress to college, how to transition when they arrive on a college campus, and how to prepare…

  3. Male College Student Perceptions of Intercultural and Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to understand why men participate in study abroad at much lower rates than women, this study examines how male college students at a large research university perceive a university-run global education program, especially in terms of the expected costs and benefits of participating in such programs, and the extent to which gender…

  4. Lessons learned from a data-driven college access program: The National College Advising Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Eileen L; Evans, Brent J; Antonio, Anthony L; Foster, Jesse D; Kalamkarian, Hoori S; Hurd, Nicole F; Bettinger, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the collaboration between a national college access program, the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), and its research and evaluation team at Stanford University. NCAC is currently active in almost four hundred high schools and through the placement of a recent college graduate to serve as a college adviser provides necessary information and support for students who may find it difficult to navigate the complex college admission process. The advisers also conduct outreach to underclassmen in an effort to improve the school-wide college-going culture. Analyses include examination of both quantitative and qualitative data from numerous sources and partners with every level of the organization from the national office to individual high schools. The authors discuss balancing the pursuit of evaluation goals with academic scholarship. In an effort to benefit other programs seeking to form successful data-driven interventions, the authors provide explicit examples of the partnership and present several examples of how the program has benefited from the data gathered by the evaluation team. © WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Technical Assistance and Program Support: DoD Historical Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrews, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    ... (His), the United Negro College Fund Special Programs developed and implemented a comprehensive technical assistance and infrastructure program This program has provided HBCUs, HSIs, TCUs, and MIs...

  6. Planet Hunters: Kepler by Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C.; Fischer, D.; Smith, A. M.; Boyajian, T. S.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Schmitt, J.; Simpson, R.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the pubic Kepler light curves. Planet Hunters utilizes human pattern recognition to identify planet transits that may be missed by automated detection algorithms looking for periodic events. Referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’ or ‘citizen science’, the combined assessment of many non-expert human classifiers with minimal training can often equal or best that of a trained expert and in many cases outperform the best machine-learning algorithm. Visitors to the Planet Hunters' website are presented with a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler’s ~160,000 target stars and are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits in the web interface. 5-10 classifiers review each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 260,000 volunteers world wide have participated, contributing over 20 million classifications. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project’s more than 20 planet candidates, the discovery of PH1b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a quadruple star system, and the discovery of PH2-b, a confirmed Jupiter-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. I will provide an overview of Planet Hunters, highlighting several of project's most recent exoplanet and astrophysical discoveries. Acknowledgements: MES was supported in part by a NSF AAPF under award AST-1003258 and a American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant. We acknowledge support from NASA ADAP12-0172 grant to PI Fischer.

  7. Communication Technology Used among Parents and Their College Teens: Implications for College Health Promotion and Risk Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Caitlin C.; Abar, Beau; Turrisi, Robert; Belden, Calum

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the nature of parent-teen communication in college to re-evaluate the potential for parent inclusion in college success and risk prevention programs. During September 2006, 290 first-year college students were assessed for the frequency and form (e.g., cell phone, e-mail, text) of communication with their parents. Latent…

  8. Developmental Math Programs in California Community College: An Analysis of Math Boot Camp at Cosumnes River College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Torence J.

    2017-01-01

    The California Community College system, as an open access institution, is tasked with helping students who possess math skills far below college-level complete math course requirements for obtaining an associate degree or transfer to a university. Colleges have created various developmental math programs to achieve this mission; this paper…

  9. College of Lake County National Workplace Literacy Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Mary Kay

    The College of Lake County's 3-year National Workplace Literacy Program (1994-1997) contributed to economic development by meeting companies' changing educational and production needs as they fluctuated and met new challenges for global marketing and improvement. It assessed 883 employees at 8 business sites with customized assessment tools and…

  10. Asnuntuck Community College's Machine Technology Certificate and Degree Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlen, Harvey S.; Gulluni, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    States that although manufacturing remains a viable sector in Connecticut, it is experiencing skills shortages in the workforce. Describes the machine technology program's purpose, the development of the Asnuntuck Community College's (Connecticut) partnership with private sector manufacturers, the curriculum, the outcomes, and benefits of…

  11. Strategies And Initiatives That Revitalize Wesley College STEM Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J; Kroen, William K; Stephens, Charlene B; Kashmar, Richard J

    Church-related small private liberal arts baccalaureate minority-serving institutions like Wesley College have modest endowments, are heavily tuition-dependent, and have large numbers of financially-challenged students. In order to sustain the level of academic excellence and to continue to build student demographic diversity in its accessible robust Science and Mathematics (STEM) programs, the faculty sought federal and state funds to implement a coordinated program of curriculum enhancements and student support programs that will increase the number of students choosing STEM majors, increase their academic success, and improve retention.

  12. Richland Community College BioEnergy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Douglas C. [Richland Community College, Decatur, IL (United States)

    2012-09-25

    The purpose of this project was to focus on education and community outreach. As such, it reflected anticipated growth in the renewable/alternative energy industry creating a vast need for trained industry professionals, engineers, operations managers, and technicians to operate state-of-the art production facilities. This project's scope leveraged Richland's initial entry in the renewable energy education, which included Associate of Applied Science degrees and certificates in biofuels and bioprocessing. This facilitated establishing a more comprehensive sustainability and renewable energy programs including experiential learning laboratory components needed to support new renewable energy education degree and certificate specialties, as well as community outreach. Renewable energy technologies addressed included: a) biodiesel, c) biomass, d) wind, e) geothermal, and f) solar. The objective is to provide increasingly innovative hands on experiential learning and knowledge transfer opportunities.

  13. Evaluation of Achieving a College Education Plus: A Credit-Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gaye; Fowler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This ex post facto study evaluated Achieving a College Education (ACE) Plus program, a credit-based transition program between a high school district and a community college. Achieving a College Education Plus is an early outreach program. It is designed to aid at-risk students in graduating from high school and making a smooth transition to…

  14. Evaluation of PHI Hunter in Natural Language Processing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Andrew; Pickard, Steve; Meystre, Stephane; Scehnet, Jeffrey; Bolton, Dan; Heavirland, Julia; Weaver, Allison Lynn; Hope, Carol; Garvin, Jennifer Hornung

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a new, easily accessible tool using a common statistical analysis and business analytics software suite, SAS, which can be programmed to remove specific protected health information (PHI) from a text document. Removal of PHI is important because the quantity of text documents used for research with natural language processing (NLP) is increasing. When using existing data for research, an investigator must remove all PHI not needed for the research to comply with human subjects' right to privacy. This process is similar, but not identical, to de-identification of a given set of documents. PHI Hunter removes PHI from free-form text. It is a set of rules to identify and remove patterns in text. PHI Hunter was applied to 473 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) text documents randomly drawn from a research corpus stored as unstructured text in VA files. PHI Hunter performed well with PHI in the form of identification numbers such as Social Security numbers, phone numbers, and medical record numbers. The most commonly missed PHI items were names and locations. Incorrect removal of information occurred with text that looked like identification numbers. PHI Hunter fills a niche role that is related to but not equal to the role of de-identification tools. It gives research staff a tool to reasonably increase patient privacy. It performs well for highly sensitive PHI categories that are rarely used in research, but still shows possible areas for improvement. More development for patterns of text and linked demographic tables from electronic health records (EHRs) would improve the program so that more precise identifiable information can be removed. PHI Hunter is an accessible tool that can flexibly remove PHI not needed for research. If it can be tailored to the specific data set via linked demographic tables, its performance will improve in each new document set.

  15. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  16. Danes - The keen bargain hunters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    2008-01-01

    New research proves that Danes are keen bargain hunters, and that they do specific price checks before selecting a product.......New research proves that Danes are keen bargain hunters, and that they do specific price checks before selecting a product....

  17. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  18. Community college: Two-year and continuing education programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    In response to educational needs in the waste management industry that were expressed by companies located in Oak Ridge and Knoxville, Tennessee, Roane State Community College has developed an associate degree program in environmental health technology as well as related noncredit programs offered by the Waste Management Training Center. The degree program contains three options: health physics, industrial hygiene, and waste management technologies. Roane State's involvement in these programs was a direct response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) model concept. This model brings together the resources of the DOE, regulatory agencies, private industry, higher education, and various contractors to resolve waste disposal and waste cleanup problems. Firms such as International Technology, Scientific Ecology Group, and Bechtel National enhanced Roane State's awareness of the nature of some of the environmental problems these and many other firms are working to resolve

  19. The Gas Laws and the Kinetic Theory: Curriculum Guide for the Thirteen-College Curriculum Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Army; And Others

    This booklet is both a teacher's manual and a student's manual in a series of booklets that make up the core of a Physical Science course designed for the freshman year of college and used by teachers in the 27 colleges participating in the Thirteen College Curriculum Program. This program is a curriculum revision project in support of 13…

  20. Influence of Age and Educational Level on the Behavior of Hunters in Vojvodina Province (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Marković

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Education as an important factor in the development of economy has a major impact on the development of hunting and hunting tourism. In this research, it has conducted a survey of hunters from the territory of Vojvodina Province regarding their attitude and motives for hunting, importance of education, importance of GIS in hunting, poaching as well as their level of hunting ethics. Using SPSS program, it was cross-referenced the individual responses in relation to age category and level of education. The results show that the youngest hunters (18 to 35 years compared to middle age hunters (35-59 years and old hunters (over 60 visit hunting events more, they are the most informed about GIS and they are most willing to learn about these technologies. The number of hunters that took part in the poaching is proportional with their level of education, so that most hunters that participate in poaching hold a university degree. However, hunters holding a university degree in the highest percentage believe that GIS can contribute to the development of hunting largely, and are willing to participate in training.

  1. Pamplin College receives $1 million gift for program on capitalism and freedom

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business has received a $1 million gift from BBandT Charitable Foundation to establish a teaching program in the college's finance department that explores the foundations of capitalism and freedom.

  2. Fiber-optic displacement sensors on the Hunters Trophy UGT impulse gauge experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.E.L.; Poutiatine, A.I.

    1995-03-01

    As part of a program to develop gauges for measurement of various mechanical properties in hostile environments, the authors fielded purely optical displacement sensors at the ends of long fiber-optic cables as supplements to the regular displacement sensors of four impulse gauges fielded as part of a materials study on the Hunters Trophy underground effects test at the Nevada Test Site. These fiber-optic sensor systems and their performance on the Hunters Trophy test are described in this report.

  3. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and provides the results for 1992. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and was placed under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. MISS is part of a National Priorities List (NPL) site. The environmental surveillance program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analysis includes metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling the DOE objective of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses to members of the general public. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. The radiological data for all media sampled support the conclusion that doses to the public are not distinguishable from natural background radiation.

  4. Optical projects in the Clinic program at Harvey Mudd College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.

    2017-08-01

    Clinic program is the senior capstone program at Harvey Mudd College (HMC). Multidisciplinary and industry-sponsored projects allow a team of students to solve a real-world problem over one academic year. Over its 50 plus years, Clinic program has completed numerous optics related projects. This report gives an overview of the Clinic program, reviews recent optical projects and discusses how this program supports the learning of the HMC engineering students. A few sample optical projects with more details are presented to provide an insight of what challenges that undergraduates can overcome. Students achieve learning within the optics discipline and the related engineering disciplines. The experiences in these optical projects indicate the great potential to bringing optical hands-on projects into the undergraduate level. Because of the general engineering curriculum at HMC, these projects often work the best with a multidisciplinary nature even if the core of the project is optically focused. Students gain leadership training, oral and written communication skills and experiences in team work. Close relationship with the sponsor liaisons allows for the students to gain skills in professional conduct, management of tight schedule and a specified budget, and it well prepares the students to their engineering practice. Optical projects have their own sets of specific challenges, so it needs to be chosen properly to match the undergraduate skill sets such as those of HMC engineering students.

  5. To Strengthen Policy Guiding Regionalization of Occupational Programs in New Jersey County Community Colleges. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, S. V.; And Others

    In 1985 a project was developed to strengthen policy guiding regionalization of occupational programs in New Jersey county community colleges. The project had three major goals: to establish a policy for the regionalization of selected occupational programs offered by the colleges; to describe ways that programs could be identified for regional…

  6. The hunter a scientific novel

    CERN Document Server

    Genta, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th century: humankind has become a spacefaring civilization, colonizing the solar system and beyond. While no alien forms of life have yet been encountered in this expansion into space, colonists suddenly encounter machines of alien origin - huge robots able to reproduce themselves.  Called replicators by the colonists, they seem to have but a single goal: to destroy all organic life they come in contact with. Since the colonial governments have no means to fight this menace directly, they instead promise huge rewards to whoever destroys a replicator. As a result, the frontier attracts a new kind of adventurers, the Hunters, who work to find and destroy the replicators. Mike Edwards, a skilled young maintenance technician and robotics expert at a faraway outpost, will not only become one of them - but be the very first one to unlock the secret behind the replicators’ origin and mission.   The scientific and technical aspects underlying the plot - in particular space travel, robotics and self-replica...

  7. Access and Diversity in the Running Start Program: A Comparison of Washington's Running Start Program to Other State Level Dual Enrollment Programs Hosted on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Since 1990, high school students in Washington have had the choice of earning college credit through the Running Start program. Running start is a dual enrollment and dual credit program that allows eleventh and twelfth grade high school students to take college courses at any of Washington's 34 community and technical colleges, Central Washington…

  8. Houston Community College (HCC)-Mobile Go Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniel; Sterling, Cheryl; Grays, Shantay R.

    2010-01-01

    The Houston Community College Mobile Go Center brings college enrollment assistance to the doorstep of our community. It operates in a variety of settings, offering college-going material and person-to-person assistance at numerous city events. Services include assistance with academic advising, completing the FAFSA, college application process,…

  9. College Student for a Day: A Transition Program for High School Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Alexandra; Ross, Denise E.

    2015-01-01

    High school students with disabilities can benefit from early exposure to campus-based accommodations and supports as they transition to college. College Student for a Day (CSFAD) is an on-campus activity-based program that introduces high school students with disabilities to supports and accommodations on a college campus. This Practice Brief…

  10. Understanding College-Student Roles: Perspectives of Participants in a High School/Community College Dual-Enrollment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lile, Joy R.; Ottusch, Timothy M.; Jones, Terese; Richards, Leslie N.

    2018-01-01

    Dual-enrollment programs have been proposed as a useful way to ease students' transition from high school to community college. Several studies have shown that dual enrollment produces positive effects for students, but less is known about the mechanisms these programs use to support student success. Symbolic interactionism suggests that clarity…

  11. A Qualitative Study of African American Women in Engineering Technology Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of African American women in engineering technology programs in community colleges. There is a lack of representation of African American women in engineering technology programs throughout higher education, especially in community/technical colleges. There is also lack of representation of African American…

  12. Florida's Prepaid College Tuition Program: Marketing a Pre-Need Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauff, Joseph F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of Florida's college tuition prepayment program describes the plan and its options and examines its marketing implications as a preneed service. It is concluded that the program makes saving for college easy, economical, and completely safe but requires rethinking of conventional marketing strategies and mix. (MSE)

  13. North American Christian Study Abroad Programs: Wheaton College and Whitworth University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad programs are in vogue today, especially among Christian colleges and universities. It is, therefore, appropriate to ask tough questions of these programs. Do they help our students become more mature followers of Jesus? Are they respectful of people in the target culture? College and university leaders must focus in particular on how…

  14. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    1992-01-01

    Defines community-based programing as a cooperative process in which the community college serves as leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among community members, leaders, and groups. Recommends 15 tasks for community college leaders involved in community-based programing, including environmental scanning and coalition building. (DMM)

  15. Community College Healthcare Students' Conceptions of Empathy: A Program-Wide Mixed Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Kellee M.

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges play a vital role in the education of our Nations healthcare professions. In order to respond to the rising economic and social needs of the healthcare sector, community colleges are meeting the challenge by providing health professions skills and training programs to meet these shortages. These crucial programs are charged with…

  16. Examples of Pre-College Programs that Teach Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to help pre-college students understand the importance of Sustainability can be found around the world. A key feature for many is the collaboration among educators, researchers, and business. Two examples will be described to indicate what is being done and goals for the future. "Educação para a Sustentabilidade" ("Education for Sustainability", http://sustentabilidade.colband.net.br/) developed at the Colegio Bandeirantes in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is a popular extracurricular offering at one of Brazil's top schools that empowers students to investigate major issues facing their country and the world. They recognized that merely knowing is insufficient, so they have created several efforts towards an "environmentally friendly, socially just, and economically viable" world. The Education Project for Sustainability Science interacts with students in various grade levels within the school, participates in sustainability initiatives in other parts of the nation, and communicates electronically with like-minded programs in other countries. A second example will spotlight the CHANGE Viewer (Climate and Health Analysis for Global Education Viewer, http://climatechangehumanhealth.org/), a visualization tool that uses NASA World Wind to explore climate science through socio-economic datasets. Collaboration among scientists, programmers, and classroom educators created a suite of activities available to teach about Food Security, Water Resources, Rising Sea Level, and other themes.

  17. Evaluation of the Radiography Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Summer, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, V. David

    As part of a periodic evaluation of the occupational programs at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute (CCC&TI), a study of the radiography program was conducted to collect information to facilitate planning, aid in program improvement, and meet accountability demands. The specific objectives of the program evaluation were to…

  18. An Electronic Wellness Program to Improve Diet and Exercise in College Students: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Amy L; Ross, Jamisha T; Klein, Catherine J; Lei, Kai Y; Mackey, Eleanor R

    2016-01-01

    Background In transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, college students are faced with significant challenges to their health habits. Independence, stress, and perceived lack of time by college students have been known to result in poor eating and exercise habits, which can lead to increased disease risk. Objective To assess the feasibility and to determine preliminary efficacy of an electronic wellness program in improving diet and physical activity in college students. Methods A 24-week...

  19. "The Deer Hunter": Rhetoric of the Warrior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Janice Hocker; Frentz, Thomas S.

    A psychological/ritual model of criticism is used to examine the movie "The Deer Hunter" as a rhetorical event in which males undergo psychological change through their war and postwar experiences. The critical model depends on understanding a Jungian interpretation of the human psyche, the form and function of initiation rituals, and…

  20. PALEOLITHIC HUNTER-GATHERERS' DIETARY PATTERNS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Al-Domi

    the main aspects of Paleolithic hunter-gatherers' dietary patterns and its main long-term ... Hence, people in developing countries have been exposed to certain ... as food habits, which prompted possible negative impacts on health status leading to ... costs [5, 7]. .... Agricultural revolution with efficient production of grains,.

  1. Using "The Happiness Advantage" in a College Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Christine

    2015-01-01

    In the field of college success and retention, researchers have examined school facilities, grade point averages, SAT scores, high school grades, and student involvement among other variables. One of the additional variables that has been examined is how happiness affects college success. The matter of student happiness is of primary importance to…

  2. Marketing the Program. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, William A., Ed.; Keim, Marybelle C., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of essays examines the role of marketing in the recruitment and retention of community college students. First, Philip Kotler and Leslie A. Goldgehn define the marketing process and assess its potential benefits. Richard C. Richardson, Jr., and Donald S. Doucette question the effectiveness of marketing in the community college.…

  3. The Survey of College Marketing Programs. Volume 2: Print Advertising and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary Research Group, Inc., New York, NY.

    This report presents 213 tables detailing findings regarding types and costs of advertising within marketing programs at 68 colleges and universities. Highlights of this report include the following: these colleges print a mean number of 19,270 viewbooks and 16,380 catalogs; and advertise in newspapers (86.6 percent), in magazines (45.4 percent),…

  4. Environmentally Sustainable Practices among College Outdoor Programs and Their Association with Organizational Support Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauman, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability has gained increasing importance amongst both academic research and organizational practice over the past two decades (Davis & Challenger, 2014). The primary purpose of this study was to examine environmentally sustainable practices among college outdoor programs, while also examining how college level policy and infrastructural…

  5. Usage of Credit Cards Received through College Student-Marketing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John M.; Staten, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides benchmark measures of college student credit card usage by utilizing a pooled sample of over 300,000 recently opened credit card accounts. The analysis compares behavior over 12 months of account history for three groups of accounts: those opened by young adults through college student marketing programs; those opened through…

  6. Past, Present and Future. Dull Knife Memorial College (Indian Action Program Inc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978

    Five vocational training programs as well as academic coursework are offered on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation by Dull Knife Memorial College. Established and operated by the Northern Cheyenne, and located in Lame Deer, Montana, the college was chartered by a tribal ordinance in 1975. Approximately 75 trainees are currently involved in the…

  7. Community College Program Planning: A Method to Measure and Meet Community Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Vergara, Kelly; Lathrop, Rachel; Orlowski, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Offering academic programs that meet community need has long been a core mission of community colleges. However, determining which job skills and credentials are needed for employment in the community is challenging. In order to facilitate a holistic and community-based perspective, our 2-year community college developed a structured curricular…

  8. Exploring the Disjunctures between Theory and Practice in Community College Visual Arts Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ten community college visual arts faculty in five different community college settings with regard to the theory and practice disjunctures they were experiencing in their roles as instructors teaching foundational level courses within visual arts programs. The study illuminated the responses of community…

  9. High School Pre-Engineering Programs: Do They Contribute to College Retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Belinda; High, Karen; Weinland, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The study examines the retention of students in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University that enter college with a defined course sequence in a pre-engineering program from a regional career technology center as compared with the retention rates of university engineering students for the same time…

  10. Research on College Board Programs and Services: Annotated Bibliography 2012. Research in Review 2012-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Carol; Bausmith, Jennifer; Cooney, Siobhan; Laitusis, Vytas; Matos-Elefonte, Haifa; McKillip, Mary; Niu, Sunny; Rawls, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This annotated bibliography contains summaries of research studies examining a number of College Board assessments and programs. To be included in the bibliography, each study needed to meet a number of criteria. First, articles must have been published (as a College Board research report, in an external journal, or as an ETS research report).…

  11. Guidelines For Implementation of Industrial Programs For Proposed Community Colleges in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Pablo Maria

    The purpose of this study was to examine selected industrial education departments and programs of the community colleges in the United States, and to draw some beneficial implications for the establishment of the proposed community colleges in Venezuela. The procedure involved a review of the literature, the construction of a questionnaire, and…

  12. Working with the Wesley College Cannon Scholar Program: Improving Retention, Persistence, and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J.; Shuman, Kevin E.; Wentzien, Derald E.; Roeske, Kristopher P.

    2018-01-01

    Wesley College secured a five-year National Science Foundation (NSF) S-STEM (scholarships in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) grant (1355554) to provide affordability and access to its robust STEM programs. With these funds, the college initiated a freshman to senior level, mixed-cohort, Cannon Scholar (CS) learning community…

  13. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College. Institutes & Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    Community-based programming (CBP) is a cooperative process in which a community college serves as the leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among the people, leaders and community organizations in its service area. This report discusses the changing role of the community college, the nature of CBP, and expected outcomes of the process,…

  14. The Impact of a Community College Cooperative Education Program on the Performance of its Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Dan J.; Heinemann, Harry N.

    A study was conducted for the purpose of determining the impact of cooperative education (CE) on the experiences of community college students subsequent to their graduation. Comprehensive normative data on graduates and non-completers of LaGuardia Community College, which has a universal CE program, were collected by means of surveys.…

  15. Suicide Intervention Training for College Staff: Program Evaluation and Intervention Skill Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Lin, Yung-Wei Dennis; Shaw, Kelly; Wanna, Reema; Porter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a pressing issue for college communities. Consequently, gatekeeper trainings are often provided for staff. This study examines the effect of one such program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants: 51 college employees received ASIST in August of 2014 and were compared to 30 wait-list control…

  16. Groundwork for Success: A College Transition Program for Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmulsky, Solvegi; Gobbo, Ken; Donahue, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the Transition Program implemented at a liberal arts college for newly enrolled students who have the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The diagnosis of ASD has risen dramatically; consequently, more students are arriving on college campuses with needs related to social pragmatic functioning. The Transition…

  17. A Comprehensive Review of Selected Business Programs in Community Colleges and Area Vocational-Technical Centers. Program Review Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    In 1988, a review was conducted of the business component of associate in arts and associate in science (AS) degree programs, and of the certificate programs in business in Florida community colleges and area vocational-technical centers. Focusing primarily on business programs in marketing, general business management, and small business…

  18. GateWay Community College Water Resources Program Partnerships: An Opportunity for Program Success and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, M.

    2012-12-01

    GateWay Community College Water Resources Technologies (WRT) Program offers Certificate of Completions and Associate Degrees on Hydrologic Studies, Water Treatment and Wastewater Treatment. The program has been in existence since 1998 and has gone through several updates to meet the demand for professionals in those areas. The program includes theoretical and practical hands-on training in the monitoring of water quality and quantity as well as in water and industrial wastewater treatment. The WRT program offers online, face-to-face, and hybrid courses to address different student's needs for training. The program only Full-time faculty is supported by 15 adjunct- faculty professionals. Adjunct faculty is usually hired from a wide variety of professional people already working in the industry that have shown interest on teaching. Adjunct faculty also provide free tutoring to the WRT students when they are not teaching courses. The college Learning Center provides funding to support these tutoring activities. The program has an active Advisory Committee that provides guidance and recommends program changes to meet their training needs. This Advisory Committee is made of professionals from different federal, state, county agencies, and municipalities, private industry and consulting companies in the area. The Advisory Committee meets every year to provide feedback to GateWay on curriculum changes and commit to potential internship opportunities for the WRT students. Those internships (or voluntary work) are paid directly by the municipalities or agencies or can be paid by the GateWay WRT program. These internship jobs provides with an opportunity to actively promote the WRT program throughout the valley. The GateWay WRT program considers the Advisory Committee an essential component for the program success: the committee supports the program in recommending and acquiring the latest field equipment needed for the hands-on training. One of the main WRT program

  19. Geoscience at Community Colleges: Availability of Programs and Geoscience Student Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Community colleges served over 7.5 million students in 2009, and have a more diverse student population than four-year institutions. In 2008, 58% of community college students were women and 33% of students were underrepresented minorities. Community colleges provide a large diverse pool of untapped talent for the geosciences and for all science and engineering disciplines. The most recent data from NSF's 2006 NSCRG database indicate that within the physical sciences, 43% of Bachelor's, 31% of Master's and 28% of Doctoral recipients had attended community college. Until recently, fine-grained datasets for examining the prevalence of community college education in geoscience students' academic pathways has not been available. Additionally, there has been limited information regarding the availability of geoscience programs and courses at community colleges. In 2011, the American Geological Institute (AGI) expanded its Directory of Geoscience Departments (DGD) to cover 434 community colleges that offer either geoscience programs and/or geoscience curriculum, and launched the first pilot of a standardized National Geoscience Exit Survey. The survey collects information not only about students' pathways in the university system and future academic and career plans, but also about community college attendance including geoscience course enrollments and Associate's degrees. The National Geoscience Exit Survey will be available to all U.S. geoscience programs at two- and four-year colleges and universities by the end of the 2011-2012 academic year, and will also establish a longitudinal survey effort to track students through their careers. Whereas the updated DGD now provides wider coverage of geoscience faculty members and programs at community colleges, the Exit Survey provides a rich dataset for mapping the flow of students from community colleges to university geoscience programs. We will discuss the availability of geoscience courses and programs at community

  20. Revising the ACS Guidelines for Chemistry Programs in Two-Year Colleges: Shaping the Next Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, John V.; Wesemann, Jodi L.

    2008-06-01

    Much has changed since the second edition of the ACS Guidelines for Chemistry Programs in Two-Year Colleges was prepared in 1997. The roles that two-year college programs can and do play in providing access to and success in higher education are receiving more attention. Increased knowledge on how people learn, advances in technology, and demands for accountability are changing the educational landscape.

  1. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  2. What's Working: Program Factors Influencing California Community College Basic Skills Mathematics Students' Advancement to Transfer Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiero, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which basic skills program factors were exhibited by successful basic skills programs that helped students advance to transfer-level mathematics. This study specifically examined California community college basic skills programs that assist students who place in mathematics courses 2 levels…

  3. Colleges and Universities with Degree or Certificate Bearing Programs in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudess, Jo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a list of colleges and universities with degree or certificate bearing programs in creativity. Since this focuses only on degree bearing programs, an individual might also focus on creativity by working with a specific faculty member in a more general program such as industrial-organizational psychology or…

  4. Enhancing the College Student Experience: Outcomes of a Leisure Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine A.; Gagnon, Ryan J.; Anderson, Denise M.; Pilcher, June J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Experiential education in higher education provides opportunities for college student development that contribute to student success. As such, a leisure education program is posited as a complement to experiential education programming. Purpose: This study explored the impact of a leisure education program (leisure skills) on…

  5. Investigating GEAR-Up College Readiness Program's Influence on Postsecondary Decisions of Rural Hispanic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydstun, Kelli Dawn

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated how the GEAR-Up college readiness program influenced the postsecondary decisions of Hispanic students who participated in the GEAR-Up program for the recommended six-year period in a rural school district in Texas. It was not known how long-term participation in the GEAR-Up program at a rural school…

  6. The Influence of a Campus-based Culinary, Nutrition Education Program, "College CHEF," on College Students' Self-efficacy with Cooking Skills and Nutrition Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McMullen

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Findings support the implementation of campus-based programming to improve college students’ self-efficacy for using fruits, vegetables, and seasonings with cooking to promote healthier eating and cooking behaviors. Future research should explore the various means to promote self-efficacy (i.e., vicarious experiences, mastery experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological feedback among college students as part of similar programming.

  7. Impact of a University-Based Program on Obese College Students' Physical Activity Behaviors, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Melinda J.; McMullen, Jennifer; Pflug, Courtney; Westgate, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: More than one third of college students are either overweight or obese, making college campuses an ideal setting to target at risk behaviors while tailoring programs to the evolving lifestyle of college students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a 15-week, campus-based lifestyle modification program on…

  8. Cost Conscious: Incentive and Discount Programs Help Students Meet the Rising Cost of a Community College Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Aware that rising costs could force some community colleges to compromise their long-standing open-door policies, administrators have put in place programs and incentives to offset the higher price of the average community college education. This article features ideas and programs to help struggling community colleges cope with rising costs such…

  9. The Minority Recruitment Program at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Karen

    1987-01-01

    A program to recruit and retain minority group optometry students is described, including the program's design, student financial aid, a preenrollment enrichment program to ease the adjustment to professional school, and the personal and academic program outcomes. (MSE)

  10. Radium issues at Hunters Point Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radium was a common source of illumination used in numerous instruments and gauges for military equipment prior to 1970. As a result of its many military applications radium 226 is now a principle radionuclide of concern at military base closures sites throughout the United States. This is an overview of the site characterization strategy employed and a potential site remediation technology being considered at a radium contaminated landfill at Hunters Point Annex, a former U.S. Navy shipyard in San Francisco, California

  11. Injury and Illness Among Deer Hunters

    OpenAIRE

    McRae, Shelagh M.

    1989-01-01

    General practice and out-patient emergency records for a five-year period were reviewed for injuries and illnesses that occurred during the week of deer rifle hunting on Manitoulin Island. Of 65 hunters who were identified, most had lacerations secondary to knife injuries. There were two deaths (one shooting and one in a motor vehicle accident), and 19 persons required hospitalization. More than half of these serious accidents occurred on the weekends immediately preceding or following the hu...

  12. Hunter-gatherer energetics and human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A; Wood, Brian M; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Racette, Susan B; Marlowe, Frank W

    2012-01-01

    Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day) in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg(-1) m(-1)) and resting (kcal kg(-1) s(-1)) were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences.

  13. Hunter-gatherer energetics and human obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Pontzer

    Full Text Available Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg(-1 m(-1 and resting (kcal kg(-1 s(-1 were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences.

  14. A continuous quality improvement program to focus a college of pharmacy on programmatic advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip D; Dipiro, Joseph T; Rowen, Randall C; McNair, David

    2013-08-12

    To enhance the achievement of a college of pharmacy's goals for education, research, and service missions by implementing an excellence program based on the Studer Group model for continuous quality improvement. The Studer model was combined with university strategic planning for a comprehensive quality-improvement program that was implemented over 5 years. The program included identifying and measuring key performance indicators, establishing specific "pillar" goals, aligning behaviors with goals and values, and training leaders. Assessment of key performance indicators over 5 years demonstrated progress toward achieving college goals for student and faculty satisfaction, research funding, numbers of students seeking formal postgraduate training, and private giving. Implementation of a continuous quality-improvement program based on the Studer program enabled the college to focus on and meet its yearly and strategic goals for all components of its mission.

  15. On-campus programs to support college students in recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    The author argues that referral of alcohol-abusing college students to off-campus treatment services, although necessary for some, is not optimal for many. He advocates the implementation of comprehensive on-campus services for students committed to recovery in order to optimize their treatment while allowing them to remain in school and work towards their degree. The author suggests that such on-campus recovery services provide additional benefits to the college or university as well as to other students, and he proposes that on-campus alcohol-abusing students in recovery can serve as important opinion leaders and role models for their peers.

  16. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  17. Differential Programming Needs of College Students Preferring Web-Based Versus In-Person Physical Activity Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Forman, Evan M; Butryn, Meghan L; Herbert, James D

    2017-09-21

    College students report several barriers to exercise, highlighting a need for university-based programs that address these challenges. In contrast to in-person interventions, several web-based programs have been developed to enhance program engagement by increasing ease of access and lowering the necessary level of commitment to participate. Unfortunately, web-based programs continue to struggle with engagement and less-than-ideal outcomes. One explanation for this discrepancy is that different intervention modalities may attract students with distinctive activity patterns, motivators, barriers, and program needs. However, no studies have formally evaluated intervention modality preference (e.g., web-based or in-person) among college students. The current study sought to examine the relationship between intervention modality preference and physical activity programming needs. Undergraduate students (n = 157) enrolled in psychology courses at an urban university were asked to complete an online survey regarding current activity patterns and physical activity program preferences. Participants preferring web-based physical activity programs exercised less (p = .05), were less confident in their abilities to exercise (p = .01), were less likely to endorse the maintenance stage of change (p web-based programming may require programs that enhance self-efficacy by fostering goal-setting and problem-solving skills. A user-centered design approach may enhance the engagement (and therefore effectiveness) of physical activity promotion programs for college students.

  18. Building Effective Green Energy Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozell, Maureen R.; Liston, Cynthia D.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges across the country are engaged in large-scale federal and state initiatives to train low-income individuals for the nascent field that's become known as "green jobs." Many green economy advocates believe that green jobs training can be part of career pathways that help move unemployed and disconnected individuals--who are often…

  19. Evaluation of a Community College Technical Program by Local Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 11 of 17 plastics employers showed a low level of satisfaction with community college plastics courses. Focus groups of 10 plastics students indicated satisfaction with course costs and locations. Courses focused on associate degree requirements and articulation, whereas employers were interested in focused training for jobs and…

  20. Exploring the Success of Transfer Programs for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, Reginald S.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The state's educational systems must collaborate together to enable transfer students to gain the necessary skills that support degree completion strategies. Given the current economic state, an investment in California community college transfer students in order to provide the best possible university transition would seem wise and fiscally…

  1. Continuity of operations planning in college athletic programs: The case for incorporating Federal Emergency Management Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A; Allen, Brandon L; Phillips, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    College athletic departments have a responsibility to provide a safe environment for student-athletes; however, most colleges do not have a crisis management plan that includes procedures for displaced student-athletes or alternate facilities to perform athletic events. Continuity of operations planning ensures athletic programs are equipped to maintain essential functions during, or shortly after, a disruption of operations due to possible hazards. Previous studies have identified a lack of emergency preparedness and continuity planning in college athletic departments. The purpose of this article is to illustrate in detail one approach to disaster planning for college athletic departments, namely the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continuity of operations framework. By adhering to FEMA guidelines and promoting a best practices model, athletic programs can effectively plan to address potential hazards, as well as protect the organization's brand, image, and financial sustainability after a crisis event.

  2. Undergrad and Overweight: An Online Behavioral Weight Management Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Berino, Jean; Pope, Lizzy; Gold, Beth Casey; Leonard, Heather; Belliveau, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Explore the feasibility of an online behavioral weight management program for college students. Methods: The program focused on behavioral strategies to modify eating and exercise behaviors of students interested in losing weight and/or developing a healthy lifestyle. Specific tools included weekly chat meetings with a facilitator,…

  3. Employment, Salary & Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Karen A.

    More than forty-six career programs are offered at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas, in such areas as Cosmetology, Dental Assistance, and Travel and Tourism. These programs specialize in the types of industries that are currently growing at high rates, such as computer-related occupations and special education teachers. This…

  4. Effects of a Rape Awareness Program on College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Brasfield, Hope; Hill, Brent

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women's Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater…

  5. Equine Education Programs and Related Studies as Found in Colleges and Universities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Carol L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and scope of equine education programs being offered in the colleges and universities throughout the country and the attitudes of specialists toward these programs. The paper is organized into five major categories: (1) introduction, statement of purpose, design and scope of the study, and…

  6. The Feasibility of an Online Health Program for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Chiauzzi, Emil; Floyd, Deborah L.; Bond, Kathleen; Wood, Mollie

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive, four-phase approach was used to test the feasibility of an online, tailored health program for community college students. The prototype was perceived by students as relevant and useful; practitioners were favorable toward offering the program as part of orientation and in a credit-course format. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  7. The Rocky Road to Change: Implications for Substance Abuse Programs on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cynthia G.; Ambroson, DeAnn L.

    1994-01-01

    Examines college substance abuse prevention and intervention programs in the framework of the elaboration likelihood model. Discusses the role of persuasion and recommends careful analysis of the relevance, construction, and delivery of messages about substance use and subsequent program evaluation. Recommendations for increasing program…

  8. Should Your College Start a Center for the Delivery of Contract Training Programs? ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    Community colleges have been at the forefront in providing contract training programs for clients such as businesses, health care organizations, and government agencies. Many state governments are beginning to provide resources for these programs as an incentive to attract or retain business and industry. One of the consequences of the demand for…

  9. Evaluation of "College CHEF," a Campus-based, Culinary Nutrition Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McMullen

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions:  Campus-based culinary nutrition education programming has potential to positively impact college students’ fruit and vegetable consumption and cooking knowledge. Future programs should incorporate strategies such as additional opportunities to engage in hands-on practice and building cross-campus collaborations to promote sustainability.

  10. The Power of Peers in Employee Assistance: A Unique Program for a Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Marcia D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Red Deer College employee assistance program "Resources for Employee Assistance, Counselling and Health (REACH)" which has moved beyond this traditional approach to become an autonomous program run by employees for employees. Notes REACH is concerned with job performance and coping skills that contribute to individual and…

  11. College for Kids, An Innovative Enrichment Program for Gifted Elementary Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Donna Rae; Subkoviak, Michael J.

    One hundred fifty-six gifted elementary students (grades 3 through 6) responded to the Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory on a pre- and posttest basis during a 3 week, 45 hour College for Kids program, designed as an enrichment program with focus on critical thinking, problem solving, inquiry, research, and questioning. Thirty students responded to…

  12. Hunters syndrom og hørenedsaettelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiaer, Eva Kirkegaard; Møller, Troels Reinholdt; Wetke, Randi

    2010-01-01

    A 30 month-old boy with delayed language development was referred to the Department of Audiology in Aarhus. At the time of referral he had had 19 cases of acute otitis media and had been tubulated four times. Furthermore, the boy had not developed according to age in several respects: his motor...... functions and language were delayed, and he made audible respiratory sounds and was obviously nasally congested. The boy was referred for further investigations at the Department of Paediatrics. The tests showed that the boy suffered from Hunter Syndrome (MPSII) and he underwent relevant treatment....

  13. Undergraduate Planet Hunters: Tools and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Ferrell, Laura; Green, Gilbert; Kaiser, Maya; Kreke, Kira; Lundy, Samantha; Merritt, William; Passino, Matlin; Paxton, Harrison; Podaril, Alexandria; Stansfield, Alexis

    2018-06-01

    One student "Honors Experience" option at Florida Gulf Coast University is a research experience, and we have developed a "Planet Hunters" course to provide an astronomical research track that satisfies that requirement. Students spend the first semester learning astronomical background and exoplanet detection techniques, while the second semester is primarily devoted to planet searches in K2 data using student-oriented software tools developed specifically for the task. In this poster, we illustrate those tools and show results obtained by class participants during this years experience.

  14. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements at the NPE and Hunter`s Trophy: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sensors and recorders were deployed for both the Non-Proliferative Experiment (NPE) and Hunter`s Trophy to measure low-frequency (1-30 Hz) electric and magnetic fields accompanying the detonation. Two stations were used for each event, located at a slant range of about 500 m, with measurements of orthogonal horizontal electric field and orthogonal horizontal and vertical magnetic field. Signals were recorded digitally with at 200 Hz sampling rate. Separate magnetic and electric signals were recorded which can be related both to the detonation and the arrival of the shock wave. The detonation time signal from the nuclear explosion is a relatively short pulse occurring with no detectable delay (within 0.5 ms) ranging from 11-19 ms after the detonation time. The cause of the initial electromagnetic signal for both chemical and nuclear explosions is unknown; the differences between the NPE and Hunter`s Trophy results may be related to the different mechanisms involved with plasma generation between nuclear and chemical explosions.

  15. Review of Online Programming Characteristics and Pricing at Private Not-for-Profit Two Year Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Online programming has expanded greatly within higher education and much attention has been spent on public two year colleges (more commonly known as community colleges) and both private and public four year institutions. This research seeks to expand understanding of the small market of private not-for-profit two year colleges within the United…

  16. Interprofessional student education: exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Herron, Patrick D; Downie, Sherry A; Myers, Daniel C; Milan, Felise B; Olson, Todd R; Kligler, Ben E; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), of which estimated 38% of adults in the United States used in 2007, has engendered changes in medical school curricula to increase students' awareness of it. Exchange programs between conventional medical schools and CAM institutions are recognized as an effective method of interprofessional education. The exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein, Yeshiva University) and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY) is in its fifth year and is part of a broader relationship between the schools encompassing research, clinical training, interinstitutional faculty and board appointments, and several educational activities. The Einstein/PCOM-NY student education exchange program is part of the Einstein Introduction to Clinical Medicine Program and involves students from Einstein learning about Chinese medicine through a lecture, the experience of having acupuncture, and a four-hour preceptorship at the PCOM outpatient clinic. The students from PCOM learn about allopathic medicine training through an orientation lecture, a two-and-a-half-hour dissection laboratory session along side Einstein student hosts, and a tour of the clinical skills center at the Einstein campus. In the 2011/2012 offering of the exchange program, the participating Einstein and PCOM students were surveyed to assess the educational outcomes. The data indicate that the exchange program was highly valued by all students and provided a unique learning experience. Survey responses from the Einstein students indicated the need for greater emphasis on referral information, which has been highlighted in the literature as an important medical curriculum integrative medicine competency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Summary of activities, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1985 to 1986 activities of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Radioactive Waste Management Research Program sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The first set of three awards was made in September,1984. In September, 1985, two of these projects were renewed and a new proposal was funded. The program has been enthusiastically received by the community of HBCUs and the program sponsor

  18. Education program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor for pre-college science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.; Fecych, W.; Harling, O.K.

    1989-01-01

    A Pre-College Science Teacher (PCST) Seminar program has been in place at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory for 4 yr. The purpose of the PCST program is to educate teachers in nuclear technology and to show teachers, and through them the community, the types of activities performed at research reactors. This paper describes the background, content, and results of the MIT PCST program

  19. Center for Alternative Fuels Research Program | College of Engineering &

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical Engineering Instructional Laboratories Student Resources Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Academic Programs Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Major Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Minor Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering

  20. Radioactive caesium in hunters and their families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, G; Bergman, R [Natonal Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden); Drottz-Sjoeberg, B M [Center for Risk Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Enander, A [National Defence Research Establishment, Karlstad (Sweden); Johansson, K J [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    We have measured the whole-body content of radiocesium in men and women in households, where at least one member is a hunter. Hunter families live to a great extent on forest products, such as mushrooms, berries and meat from game. Measurements were performed in two areas in northern Sweden and in three areas in the middle part of Sweden with deposition levels between 7 to 80 kBq/m{sup 2}. The average whole body content of {sup 137}Cs varied between 0.3 to 1.9 kBq for women and 0.6 to 4.7 kBq for men, depending on the deposition level. Each individual in the measured group was also asked to fill in questionnaire and a food diary to provide complementary information of, e.g., food intake and other life conditions. The single dietary factor most clearly related to whole-body content in these groups is the intake of meat from moose. The best regression model with variables from the questionnaire explained 60% of the variance in the whole-body content of {sup 137}Cs in the measurement group. Some of the variables in this model were deposition level, sex, rate of intake and estimated consumption of moose meat and estimated amount of bilberries in the fridge. 6 refs, 5 figs, 14 tabs.

  1. Radioactive caesium in hunters and their families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, G.; Bergman, R.; Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M.; Enander, A.; Johansson, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    We have measured the whole-body content of radiocesium in men and women in households, where at least one member is a hunter. Hunter families live to a great extent on forest products, such as mushrooms, berries and meat from game. Measurements were performed in two areas in northern Sweden and in three areas in the middle part of Sweden with deposition levels between 7 to 80 kBq/m 2 . The average whole body content of 137 Cs varied between 0.3 to 1.9 kBq for women and 0.6 to 4.7 kBq for men, depending on the deposition level. Each individual in the measured group was also asked to fill in questionnaire and a food diary to provide complementary information of, e.g., food intake and other life conditions. The single dietary factor most clearly related to whole-body content in these groups is the intake of meat from moose. The best regression model with variables from the questionnaire explained 60% of the variance in the whole-body content of 137 Cs in the measurement group. Some of the variables in this model were deposition level, sex, rate of intake and estimated consumption of moose meat and estimated amount of bilberries in the fridge. 6 refs, 5 figs, 14 tabs

  2. Wildlife value orientations among hunters, landowners and the general public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    This article examined wildlife value orientations among hunters (n = 1,130) and landowners (n = 1,207) in comparison to the general public (n = 1,001 adults) in Denmark, a highly urbanized European country. Respondents were categorized into four value types based on their responses to 19 statements....... Significant differences in wildlife value orientations were found. Mutualists and distanced dominated in the public; most landowners and hunters were utilitarian followed by pluralist. Male hunters were more utilitarian than female. More active hunters were more utilitarian; hunters belonging to a hunting...... association were more utilitarian than those who did not belong to associations. Full-time farmers were more utilitarian than part-time farmers, and conventional farmers were more utilitarian than organic farmers. No significant difference with regard to residence for all three groups was found. Future...

  3. Akamai Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-17

    been  trained  through  the  ISEE   PDP     o 1  at  UH   Hilo   o 2  at   Hawaii  Community  College  (1  now...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0094 AKAMAI INTERNSHIP PROGRAM Lisa Hunter UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII SYSTEMS Final Report 04/17/2015 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution...NUMBER n/a 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER n/a 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Hawaii Systems 2530 Dole St. SAK D-200

  4. Programmed Multi-Image Lectures for College Biology Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William A.; Knauft, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the use of a programed multi-image lecture approach for teaching a botany course to nonmajor students at the University of California, Berkeley. Also considers the advantages, production, method of presentation, and design of the multimedia lectures. (HM)

  5. Connecting Scientists, College Students, Middle School Students & Elementary Students through Intergenerational Afterschool STEM Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Raftery, C. L.; Romero, V.; Harper, M. R.; Chilcott, C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.; Yan, D.; Ruderman, I.; Frappier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiverse education group at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Lab created the NASA-funded "Five Stars Pathway" model in which five "generations" of girls and women engage in science together in an afterschool setting, with each generation representing one stage in the pathway of pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). The five stages are: elementary-age students, middle-school-age students, undergraduate-level college students, graduate-level college students and professional scientists. This model was field-tested at two Girls Inc. afterschool locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and distributed to Girls Inc. affiliates and other afterschool program coordinators nationwide. This presentation will explore some of the challenges and success of implementing a multigenerational STEM model as well as distributing the free curriculum for interested scientists and college students to use with afterschool programs.

  6. Evaluation of a Community College's Nursing Faculty Advising Program Relative to Students' Satisfaction and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Johnna C.; Reglin, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Problem was the community college recognized a decline in student retention rates from 2009 to 2012 in the School of Nursing. Purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate a faculty advising program (FAP) in the School of Nursing at a community college in regard to students' satisfaction and retention. Evaluation period was from Fall 2012 to…

  7. The Importance and Implementation of Eight Components of College and Career Readiness Counseling in School Counselor Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusse, Rachelle; Poynton, Timothy A.; Parzych, Jennifer L.; Goodnough, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    School counselor education program administrators (N = 131) responded to an online questionnaire where the importance and extent of implementation of The College Board's National Office of School Counselor Advocacy (NOSCA) Eight Components of College and Career Readiness in their school counselor education program were assessed. The mean…

  8. Focus on Mentee-Mentor Relationships: The 10th Grade Implementation of iMentor's College Ready Program. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Lisa; Kang, David; Siman, Nina; Soltani, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    The iMentor College Ready Program is a model that combines school-based mentoring with technology and aspects of whole school reform. The program aims to create strong relationships between low-income youth and college-educated mentors--and to leverage these relationships to help students develop the mindsets, skills, and knowledge necessary to…

  9. Exploring Student and Advisor Experiences in a College-University Pathway Program: A Study of the Bachelor of Commerce Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is great interest across Ontario in the expansion of pathway programs between colleges and universities. Through strategic partnerships, two Ontario-based postsecondary institutions (a college and a university) have developed innovative and effective pathway programs that facilitate the transition of students between institutions…

  10. Beyond Rehabilitation: The Federal City College Lorton Project--A Model Prison Higher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andress

    1974-01-01

    A description and evaluation of the Federal City College (the first Urban Land Grant institution in the nation) higher education program offered in association with a group of Washington, D.C., penal institutions located in Lorton, Virginia. This Lorton Project has been adopted as a National Model by the Department of Health, Education, and…

  11. Developing Competence: A Qualitative Inquiry of College Student Leadership in University Outdoor Orientation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, J. David.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-nine formal research studies have been conducted on participants of college outdoor orientation programs. Although many variables have been examined for the incoming students, only one study has focused on the impact on the student leaders. The goal of this study was to understand how student leaders in outdoor orientation programs…

  12. An Investigation of the Relative Effectiveness of the Basic Mathematics Review Program at Essex Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jerome

    Basic Mathematics Review (BMR) is a remedial non-credit course at Essex Community College (Maryland) being taught on an individualized basis. Following diagnostic testing and placement, instruction utilizes programmed materials, tutors, and self-tests. Evaluation of the new individualized BMR and comparison with the traditional remedial course…

  13. College Financial Aid and the Employee Tuition Benefit Programs of the Fortune 500 Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph P.

    Ways are discussed that internal changes in pricing, tuition collection, and cash-flow management might be sources of financial aid for college students ineligible for state and federal assistance programs. The experiences described are the result of two FIPSE (Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education) projects, one dealing with…

  14. Individual Attitudes and Social Influences on College Students' Intent to Participate in Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liz C.; Gault, John; Christ, Paul; Diggin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in study abroad programs (SAPs) is widely viewed as offering important professional and personal benefits for college students. This study applies the "Theory of Reasoned Action" [Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980) and "Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior," Englewood Cliffs, NJ:…

  15. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  16. Predicting Employment Outcomes for Consumers in Community College Short-Term Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, K. Brigid; Benz, Michael R.; Yovanoff, Paul; Kato, Mary McGrath; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Postsecondary education has been linked to improved access to employment opportunities for individuals with and without disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with increased employment outcomes for Vocational Rehabilitation consumers enrolled in community college short term occupational skill training programs.…

  17. STUDY TO DEVELOP A RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR THE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN COLLEGE LIBRARIES. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Historical Evaluation and Research Organization, McLean, VA.

    THIS STUDY FORMULATES A RESEARCH PROGRAM TO FACILITATE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF LIBRARIES FOR SMALL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES USING MODERN LIBRARY METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY AND NEW TECHNIQUES OF INFORMATION STORAGE, RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER. AS A RESULT OF INTERVIEWS WITH LIBRARIANS AND OTHERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE AND FROM A REVIEW OF CURRENT…

  18. Impact of degree program satisfaction on the persistence of college students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Harskamp, Evert

    Many theories on college retention recognize the significance of student satisfaction as a positive factor in students' persistence. Yet, there are few theories that address the relationship of degree program satisfaction to study behaviour and dropout. This paper explores the impact of degree

  19. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

    Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

  1. Evaluating Outcomes of High Fidelity Simulation Curriculum in a Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlea, Gregory Richard

    2017-01-01

    This study took place at a Wake Technical Community College, a multi-campus institution in Raleigh, North Carolina. An evaluation of the return on investment in high fidelity simulation used by an associate degree of nursing program was conducted with valid and reliable instruments. The study demonstrated that comparable student outcomes are…

  2. Effects of a College Outdoor Orientation Program on Trait Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Forrest; Belknap, C. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effects of participation in a college outdoor orientation program (OOP) on participants' trait emotional intelligence (TEI). Three hundred seventeen outdoor orientation participants completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF) before and after participation in an OOP. Four…

  3. The Impact of Immersion Programs upon Undergraduate Students of Jesuit Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Statement of the problem: This research study examined the impact of international immersion programs upon undergraduate students at Jesuit colleges and universities. Students return from immersion experiences claiming that the experience changed their lives. This study offered an assessment strategy to give greater evidence as to the impact of…

  4. The Impact of the Social, Academic, and Moral Development Programs of an Achievable Dream on Students during Their College and University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation case study explores the impact of the An Achievable Dream social, academic, and moral program on college student's performance in college. Through this study, the researcher was able to provide insight on college student and college student advocates perceptions of An Achievable Dream's social, academic, and moral program's impact…

  5. Effects of a preventive intervention program for improving self-complexityon depression among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahito, Junko; Hori, Masashi; Otsuka, Yasumasa

    2010-01-01

    The present study developed an intervention program for self-complexity (SC; Linville, 1987), and examined the effects of this program on college students. Participants (N=40) were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received one session of psycho-education about SC, and kept daily records of self-aspects (social roles, interpersonal relationships, specific events/behaviors, traits, abilities, etc.) for one week. All participants were asked to...

  6. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  7. Discrete choice modeling of season choice for Minnesota turkey hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Cornicelli, Louis; Merchant, Steven S.

    2018-01-01

    Recreational turkey hunting exemplifies the interdisciplinary nature of modern wildlife management. Turkey populations in Minnesota have reached social or biological carrying capacities in many areas, and changes to turkey hunting regulations have been proposed by stakeholders and wildlife managers. This study employed discrete stated choice modeling to enhance understanding of turkey hunter preferences about regulatory alternatives. We distributed mail surveys to 2,500 resident turkey hunters. Results suggest that, compared to season structure and lotteries, additional permits and level of potential interference from other hunters most influenced hunter preferences for regulatory alternatives. Low hunter interference was preferred to moderate or high interference. A second permit issued only to unsuccessful hunters was preferred to no second permit or permits for all hunters. Results suggest that utility is not strictly defined by harvest or an individual's material gain but can involve preference for other outcomes that on the surface do not materially benefit an individual. Discrete stated choice modeling offers wildlife managers an effective way to assess constituent preferences related to new regulations before implementing them. 

  8. An Evaluation of Two Dating Violence Prevention Programs on a College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kerry; Sharps, Phyllis; Banyard, Victoria; Powers, Ráchael A; Kaukinen, Catherine; Gross, Deborah; Decker, Michele R; Baatz, Carrie; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2016-03-13

    Dating violence is a serious and prevalent public health problem that is associated with numerous negative physical and psychological health outcomes, and yet there has been limited evaluation of prevention programs on college campuses. A recent innovation in campus prevention focuses on mobilizing bystanders to take action. To date, bystander programs have mainly been compared with no treatment control groups raising questions about what value is added to dating violence prevention by focusing on bystanders. This study compared a single 90-min bystander education program for dating violence prevention with a traditional awareness education program, as well as with a no education control group. Using a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design with follow-up at 2 months, a sample of predominately freshmen college students was randomized to either the bystander (n = 369) or traditional awareness (n = 376) dating violence education program. A non-randomized control group of freshmen students who did not receive any education were also surveyed (n = 224). Students completed measures of attitudes, including rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and intent to help as well as behavioral measures related to bystander action and victimization. Results showed that the bystander education program was more effective at changing attitudes, beliefs, efficacy, intentions, and self-reported behaviors compared with the traditional awareness education program. Both programs were significantly more effective than no education. The findings of this study have important implications for future dating violence prevention educational programming, emphasizing the value of bystander education programs for primary dating violence prevention among college students. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Program to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Vlaskina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a training program on “Psychology of effective professional activity”, realized on the basis of the Ural College of the Beauty Industry. The purpose of this discipline is to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students acquiring professions of “Human-Human” type. To improve effectiveness of education and professional activities, this program provides formation of professionally important qualities of students. The results of the program can be: students’ acquisition of knowledge required for the effective performance of professional activities (ways to prevent burnout, increase self-confidence, etc.; mastery of professional skills (planning, simulation, etc.; formation of professionally important qualities (stress, tolerance, etc.; increasing the efficiency of their professional activities.

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of Student Performance between Host and Cooperating College Learners in the Dental Hygiene Program at Northcentral Technical College in Wausau, Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Jodi L.

    The academic performance of students enrolled in a distance education dental hygiene program at Northcentral Technical College (NTC) in Wausau, Wisconsin, was analyzed in a comparative, quasi-experimental study. The study sample consisted of five cohorts of program graduates (students graduating in 1997-2001). The experiment groups were divided…

  11. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process.

  12. Developing a comprehensive scale to assess college multicultural programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Miles, Joseph R; Bhaskar, Tripti; Chery, Nicole; Choi, Gahee; Sung, Mi-Ra

    2014-01-01

    A barrier to assessing effectiveness of multicultural programming is lack of a relatively brief instrument to measure the wide range of intended outcomes. A frequent goal of programming is to increase cultural empathy, but this is rarely the only intended outcome. We conducted focus groups of campus administrators, student affairs staff, and undergraduate instructors who identified a full range of racial/ethnic multicultural competencies that undergraduates should possess. An 84-item pool generated from these focus groups was combined with the 31-item Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy (SEE; Wang et al., 2003). These 115 items, together with instruments used to gauge concurrent validity, were administered to White undergraduate students in introductory psychology courses at the midpoint (n = 602) and end (n = 676) of fall semester. Exploratory factor analysis suggested 6 subscales for the Everyday Multicultural Competencies/Revised SEE (EMC/RSEE): (a) Cultural Openness and Desire to Learn; (b) Resentment and Cultural Dominance; (c) Anxiety and Lack of Multicultural Self-Efficacy; (d) Empathic Perspective-Taking; (e) Awareness of Contemporary Racism and Privilege; and (f) Empathic Feeling and Acting as an Ally. Item response theory principles guided final selection of subscale items. Analyses suggested good factor stability, reliability, and discriminant validity of the 48-item EMC/RSEE in these undergraduate samples. EMC/RSEE subscales were not strongly correlated with a measure of impression management and were significantly associated with measures of Openness to Diversity Challenge, and Universal-Diverse Orientation. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. [Residency in plastic surgery: comparison between the French and the Canadian Royal College programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinna, R; Harris, P G; Danino, A M

    2010-02-01

    Learning plastic surgery in Montreal is different from learning plastic surgery in a French university. In Canada, all residency programs are accredited by a national structure: the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. We tried to highlight the differences that exist between the French and a North American academic system. With the different rules and law that governs academic education in both countries, we analyzed the following elements: the residency selection, the program of plastic surgery (content and organisation), the system of evaluation and the diplomas. The training of a Canadian plastic surgeon is very controlled. The recommendations of the Royal College guarantee to the resident who enters a program to have the means to acquire a complete training in quantity and in quality. On the four studied items, none is completely similar between both countries. Each having advantages and inconveniences as, for example, the selection of residency by interview or by the classifying national exam. Actually, few French plastic surgery programs could satisfy the requirements of the Royal College on several points, however without failing the training of French plastic surgeons. Nevertheless, we could be inspired by several elements (rotation in private practice,grouping together several academic hospitals. . .) to improve our system of training.

  14. Energy management: a program of energy conservation for the community college facility. [Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various Authors

    1978-01-01

    This handbook developes helps for assessing and improving the energy efficiency of the community-college facility. The TEEM approach (Total Educational Energy Management) is a labor-intensive approach which requires the commitment and participation of all segments of the college community. The TEEM program presented here defines a series of tasks selected, ordered, and implemented in such a way as to achieve two basic objectives: (1) reducing campus energy requirements, and (2) meeting those reduced energy requirements more efficiently without adversely affecting the quality of educational programs. This guide to large-scale energy conservation on college campuses includes step-by-step procedures for establishing a program task force, defining specific tasks, and assigning responsibilities. Action plans are developed, energy consumption monitored, goals set, and conservation measures implemented. A series of appendices provides more detailed information, charts, and worksheets related to all aspects of energy use. The TEEM program provides the basic structure for achieving a significant reduction in campus energy costs.

  15. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  16. College 101: Strategies for First Year Success – A Program for High School Seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Raison

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Making the transition from high school to college can be one of the biggest challenges in life. The first year dropout rate stands at 26% nationally. Adolescent decision-making literature suggests that youths can achieve greater success and reduce negative consequences during their first year of college if they 1 increase knowledge of new social scene and academic protocols, and 2 work through a conjectural decision-making process prior to actual encounters. This program presents key points high school seniors “must know” in advance of their arrival on campus. It is research-based with first-hand advice from real college students including on-the-street video interviews. Topics cover: Choosing Classes, Test Strategies, Social Scene Changes, Budgeting, Roommates, Safety, Talking with Professors, Time Management, and more. The program is designed for any student planning to attend any 2 or 4-year college. Youth professionals can teach this loosely-scripted 1 or 2-hour PowerPoint-based seminar “out of the box.” The $159 curriculum package is free to the first 250 responders.

  17. VPI-NECM, Nuclear Engineering Program Collection for College Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honomichl, Jiri; Kulikowska, Teresa; Szczesna, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The VPI Modules consist of 6 independent programs designed to calculate: module FARCON - neutron slowing down and epithermal group constants, module SLOCON - thermal neutron spectrum and group constants, module DISFAC - slow neutron disadvantage factors, module ODOG - solution of a one group neutron diffusion equation, module ODMUG - three group critically problem, module FUELBURN - fuel burnup in slow neutron fission reactors. 2 - Method of solution: Module FARCON solves the diffusion equation for a homogeneous medium composed of N isotopes, in 33 groups in fast and resonance energy region. The solution in the thermal energy region carried out by module SLOCON is based on the Wigner-Wilkins approximation and applies the Runge-Kutta method. The burnup calculations are carried out in 3 energy groups. Only Xe-135 and Sm-149 are treated directly. All the other fission products are represented by 2 pseudo isotopes. Module ODOG solves the finite difference diffusion equation by a direct method. Module ODMUG uses the Chebyshev acceleration of outer iterations. It gives a possibility to calculate a critical boron concentration. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: It is assumed that the elementary reactor cell consists of the fuel rod surrounded by water. The library data are limited to isotopes typical for water power reactors. The reactor can be treated in one dimension only, i.e. as a slab, sphere or cylinder with one-dimensional symmetry

  18. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  19. Measures of Progress: 1995 Project Follow-Up, Los Rios Community College District (American River College, Cosumnes River College, Sacramento City College). Results of a Survey of 1993-94 Graduates and Non-Returning Students. Volume I of II--Frequencies and Percents by District, College and Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Judith A.; Pagtalunan, Jose

    In 1995, the three colleges in California's Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD) surveyed 6,151 former students from 1993-94 to gather information on student outcomes and characteristics. This report presents districtwide findings related to the frequencies and percents of responses by academic program. Following an executive summary and…

  20. Development of a College Transition and Support Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan W; Elias, Rebecca; Capriola-Hall, Nicole N; Smith, Isaac C; Conner, Caitlin M; Asselin, Susan B; Howlin, Patricia; Getzel, Elizabeth E; Mazefsky, Carla A

    2017-10-01

    Empirically based, consumer-informed programming to support students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) transitioning to college is needed. Informed by theory and research, the Stepped Transition in Education Program for Students with ASD (STEPS) was developed to address this need. The first level (Step 1) supports high school students and the second level (Step 2) is for postsecondary students with ASD. Herein, we review the extant research on transition supports for emerging adults with ASD and describe the development of STEPS, including its theoretical basis and how it was informed by consumer input. The impact of STEPS on promotion of successful transition into college and positive outcomes for students during higher education is currently being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  1. Improvements to the Hunter Dose tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-01

    Since 1965, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted deer hunts which are open to the general public. SRS performs field monitoring for cesium-137 (Cs-137) of each harvested animal to determine whether the animal may be released to the hunter. A new field system for measuring Cs-137 in the harvested animals has been developed. The system incorporates numerous enhancements compared to the original system. The original system was composed of two Ludlum Measurements scalar-driven 2 inch x 2 inch sodium iodide counters, while the new system is based on a single Ametek Ortec Digibase-driven 2 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch sodium iodide gamma spectrometer. The new system includes a series of easy-to-assemble stainless steel encapsulated lead shields. The combination of the larger detector size and lead shielding improved the detection limit of the new system by a factor of approximately three compared to the original system. This lower detection limit allows for a larger number of measurements to be directly compared to the laboratory results, in cases where animal portions have been sampled. The results from developing and using this system are presented as well as recommendations on improvements to the overall field monitoring of the SRS hunts.

  2. Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbesque, J Colette; Marlowe, Frank W; Shaw, Peter; Thompson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The idea that hunter-gatherer societies experience more frequent famine than societies with other modes of subsistence is pervasive in the literature on human evolution. This idea underpins, for example, the 'thrifty genotype hypothesis'. This hypothesis proposes that our hunter-gatherer ancestors were adapted to frequent famines, and that these once adaptive 'thrifty genotypes' are now responsible for the current obesity epidemic. The suggestion that hunter-gatherers are more prone to famine also underlies the widespread assumption that these societies live in marginal habitats. Despite the ubiquity of references to 'feast and famine' in the literature describing our hunter-gatherer ancestors, it has rarely been tested whether hunter-gatherers suffer from more famine than other societies. Here, we analyse famine frequency and severity in a large cross-cultural database, in order to explore relationships between subsistence and famine risk. This is the first study to report that, if we control for habitat quality, hunter-gatherers actually had significantly less--not more--famine than other subsistence modes. This finding challenges some of the assumptions underlying for models of the evolution of the human diet, as well as our understanding of the recent epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Effect of a 16-Week Yoga Program on Blood Pressure in Healthy College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Debra; Reed, Justy; Buck, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 16-week yoga program on blood pressure (BP) in healthy college students. Twenty-five students (Mage = 28.24, SD = 10.64) participated in yoga class twice per week for 16 weeks. Thirty-one students (Mage = 28.77, SD = 7.23) attended a lecture (control condition) at approximately the same time…

  4. Designing a Summer Transition Program for Incoming and Current College Students on the Autism Spectrum: A Participatory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Hotez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD face unique challenges transitioning from high school to college and receive insufficient support to help them navigate this transition. Through a participatory collaboration with incoming and current autistic college students, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two intensive week-long summer programs to help autistic students transition into and succeed in college. This process included: (1 developing an initial summer transition program curriculum guided by recommendations from autistic college students in our ongoing mentorship program, (2 conducting an initial feasibility assessment of the curriculum [Summer Transition Program 1 (STP1], (3 revising our initial curriculum, guided by feedback from autistic students, to develop a curriculum manual, and (4 pilot-testing the manualized curriculum through a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test assessment of a second summer program [Summer Transition Program 2 (STP2]. In STP2, two autistic college students assumed a leadership role and acted as “mentors” and ten incoming and current autistic college students participated in the program as “mentees.” Results from the STP2 pilot-test suggested benefits of participatory transition programming for fostering self-advocacy and social skills among mentees. Autistic and non-autistic mentors (but not mentees described practicing advanced forms of self-advocacy, specifically leadership, through their mentorship roles. Autistic and non-autistic mentors also described shared (e.g., empathy and unique (an intuitive understanding of autism vs. an intuitive understanding of social interaction skills that they contributed to the program. This research provides preliminary support for the feasibility and utility of a participatory approach in which autistic college students are integral to the development and implementation of programming to help less experienced autistic students develop the self

  5. The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) at Pierce College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Carolyn R.; Feig, M.; Mahmud, N.; Silic, T.; Rebull, L.; Hoette, V.; Johnson, C.; McCarron, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our team from Pierce Community College, Woodland Hills, CA, participated in the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) this past year (2010). (NITARP is described in another poster, Rebull et al.) Our team worked with archival Spitzer, 2MASS, and optical data to look for young stars in CG4, part of the Gum Nebula; our scientific results are described in a companion poster, Johnson et al. In this poster, we describe more about what we learned and how we incorporated our NITARP experiences into the Pierce College environment. Students developed critical thinking skills and an ability to organize their data analysis and develop a mental "big picture" of what is going on in the CG4 region. The NITARP program is one of several "Active Learning" programs going on at Pierce, and the other programs are briefly summarized in this poster as well. This program was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  6. Guiding Math Students to Campus Services: An Impact Evaluation of the Beacon Program at South Texas College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Mary; Butcher, Kristin F.; Cerna, Oscar S.

    2011-01-01

    This research rigorously evaluates whether a low-cost intervention can improve students' performance in developmental math. The "Beacon Mentoring Program" was developed at South Texas College by professors, administrators, and staff at the college. Surveys of students revealed that many did not have someone on campus whom they felt they…

  7. Building a sense of belonging among tertiary commuter students: The Monash Non-Residential Colleges program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Fernandes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Student engagement at university is significantly influenced by sense of belonging. In 2013, our university developed a novel extra-curricular program designed to foster a sense of belonging in students who commute to university – the Monash Non-Residential Colleges (NRC program. This study examines whether participation in the Monash NRC program changed students’ perceptions about their university experience and their sense of belonging to the university community. We show that our NRC program appears to be effective in fostering a more positive university experience for students when compared with non-NRC students. Additionally, we demonstrate that our NRC program influenced students’ sense of belonging through increased interaction with peers and staff as well as greater reported attendance on campus.

  8. An Electronic Wellness Program to Improve Diet and Exercise in College Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Amy L; Ross, Jamisha T; Klein, Catherine J; Lei, Kai Y; Mackey, Eleanor R

    2016-02-29

    In transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, college students are faced with significant challenges to their health habits. Independence, stress, and perceived lack of time by college students have been known to result in poor eating and exercise habits, which can lead to increased disease risk. To assess the feasibility and to determine preliminary efficacy of an electronic wellness program in improving diet and physical activity in college students. A 24-week diet and physical activity program was delivered via email to 148 college students. The intervention involved weekly, tailored, and interactive diet and physical activity goals. The control group received nondiet and nonexercise-related health fact sheets. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, as well as food frequency and physical activity surveys were conducted at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Students' choice of fruit as a snack was also monitored at study visits. Students were 18-20 years old, 69% female, and from a diverse college campus (46% Caucasian, 23% Asian, 20% African American, 11% other). At week 24, 84% of students reported reading at least half of all emails. Mean change (standard error [SE]) from baseline of saturated fat intake was marginally significant between the treatment groups at week 24, 0.7 (SE 0.42) % kcal for control and -0.3 (SE 0.30) % kcal for intervention (P=0.048). A significant difference in percent of snacks chosen that were fruit (χ(2)1, N=221 = 11.7, Pstudents and resulted in a decrease in saturated fat intake and an increase in observed fruit intake compared to a control group.

  9. Value of community pharmacy residency programs: college of pharmacy and practice site perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer, Jon C; Bonnarens, Joseph K; Brown, Lawrence M; Goode, Jean-Venable Kelly R

    2010-01-01

    To describe and compare perceptions of key informants representing U.S. colleges/schools of pharmacy and community pharmacy practice sites regarding (1) value associated with community pharmacy residency programs (CPRPs) and (2) barriers to offering CPRPs . Descriptive, non-experimental, cross-sectional study. United States, June 13, 2009, through July 13, 2009. 554 respondents to a Web-based survey. Key informants representing the following four organizational groups were surveyed: (1) colleges/schools of pharmacy participating in CPRPs, (2) colleges/schools of pharmacy not participating in CPRPs, (3) CPRP community pharmacy practice sites, and (4) non-CPRP community pharmacy practice sites. Value of CPRPs to participating pharmacies, value of CPRPs to participating colleges/schools of pharmacy, and barriers to offering CPRPs. Overall, 267 key informants from colleges/schools of pharmacy and 287 key informants from pharmacy practice sites responded to the survey (n = 554 total respondents). Of these, 334 responders provided data that were usable for analysis. The most important types of value to the respondents were altruistic in nature (e.g., pharmacy education development, pharmacy profession development, community engagement). However, barriers to offering CPRPs were more practical and included challenges related to accreditation and operational issues. Further, evidence indicated that (1) lack of leadership, (2) lack of revenue generated from such programs, and (3) the cost of reimbursement for residents may be fundamental, multidimensional barriers to implementing CPRPs. Guidelines for starting and continuing CPRPs, "industry norms" that would require CPRP training for certain types of employment, and creation of models for patient care revenue would help develop and position CPRPs in the future.

  10. American College of Radiology Accreditation Program for mammographic screening sites: Physical evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Haus, A.G.; Hubbard, L.B.; Lasky, H.J.; McCrohan, J.; McLelland, R.; Rothenberg, L.N.; Tanner, R.L.; Zinninger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The American College of Radiology has initiated a program for the accreditation of mammographic screening sites, which includes evaluation by mail of image quality and average glandular breast dose. Image quality is evaluated by use of a specially designed phantom (a modified RMI 152D Mammographic Phantom) containing simulated microcalcifications, fibrils and masses. Average glandular dose to a simulated 4.5-cm-thick (50% glandular, 50% fat) compressed breast is evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of entrance exposure and half value layer. Standards for acceptable image quality and patient doses are presented and preliminary results of the accreditation program are discussed

  11. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, X.; Hawk, S.T.; Winter, S.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  12. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  13. Should body image programs be inclusive? A focus group study of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciao, Anna C; Ohls, Olivia C; Pringle, Kevin D

    2018-01-01

    Most evidence-based body image programs for college students (e.g., the Body Project) are designed for female-only audiences, although body dissatisfaction is not limited to female-identified individuals. Furthermore, programs do not explicitly discuss diversity, although individuals with marginalized gender, racial, and sexual identities may be particularly vulnerable to body image disturbances. Making programs more inclusive may increase their disseminability. This qualitative study examined the feasibility of adapting the Body Project for universal and inclusive use with college students. Participants (N = 36; M age = 21.66 years; 73% female-identified; 20% sexual minority; 23% racial minority) attended one of five semi-structured focus groups to explore the inclusivity of appearance-based cultural norms using adapted Body Project activities and discuss the feasibility of universal and inclusive interventions. Inductive qualitative content analysis with three-rater consensus identified focus group themes. There was consensus that inclusive interventions could have a positive impact (broadening perspectives, normalizing body image concerns, increasing awareness) despite potential barriers (poor diversity representation, vulnerability). There was strong consensus regarding advice for facilitating inclusive interventions (e.g., skilled facilitation, education, increasing diversity). Results suggest that inclusive body image programs are desirable and provide a framework for creating the EVERYbody Project, a program for more universal audiences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Síndrome de Hunter-Hurler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Lefèvre

    1954-03-01

    Full Text Available Les deux cas de gargoylisme présentés ont appelé l'attention des auteurs et ont mérité leur publication vue la rareté de la maladie en question. Le diagnostic repose en un certain nombre de signes cliniques, lesquels, cependant, n'ont pas besoin d'être au complet pour que l'on puisse affermir le diagnostic du syndrome de Hunter-Hurler. C'est ce qui arrive, d'ailleurs, avec la majorité des maladies de caractère génétique, dans les-quelles il est possible de verifier la transmission de quelques traits seule-ment de Pensemble clinique, insuffisants pour caractériser la maladie sous tous ses aspects, mais suffisants pour permettre un diagnostic très sûr. Cas nº 1: les auteurs font ressortir la face caractéristique de la maladie, la petite taille, les doigts en griffe, les alterations très caractéristiques de forme des vertèbres lombaires et le retard psycho-moteur considérable; comme antécédents familiaux, il a été constaté qu'une cousine-germaine du côté paternel de la malade est morte à 1'âge de 12 ans d'une maladie semblable. Cas nº 2: ici ressortent la face caractéristique, la petite taille, le développement retardé, les altérations des vertèbres lombaires et, à l'examen oculaire, un aspect suggestif de l'opacité cornéenne considérée comme pathognomonique du gargoylisme. Aucun traitement a été tenté dans les deux cas.

  15. Workforce Investments: State Strategies to Preserve Higher-Cost Career Education Programs in Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulock, Nancy; Lewis, Jodi; Tan, Connie

    2013-01-01

    In today's highly-skilled economy, rewarding career pathways are available to those who acquire technical skills by enrolling in certificate and associate degree programs in a community or technical college. Such programs are often more costly to offer than liberal arts and sciences programs that prepare students to transfer to four-year…

  16. Joining Undergraduate Liberal Arts Colleges with a Graduate M.A.T. Program To Implement the Holmes and Carnegie Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stephen S.

    This paper describes a combined B.A.-M.A.T. program, a project planned jointly by Kenyon College and Tufts University for the recruitment of outstanding liberal arts students who are interested in teaching careers. The program fulfills the requirements for teacher certification at the middle or secondary level in Massachusetts. The program offered…

  17. A Preliminary Study of Library Programs Related to American Indian Studies Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles

    The presence of library programs and their relationship to academic programs of Native American Studies were surveyed in 27 institutions of higher education. Institutions surveyed were those with (1) a program for recruiting American Indians, (2) a distinct staff devoted to American Indians, and (3) some course about American Indians offered in a…

  18. Implementation and Effectiveness of Student Affairs Services Program in One Polytechnic College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ariel R. Ibarrientos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive survey using questionnaire was employed to determine the extent of implementation and effectiveness of the Student Affairs Services Program of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges in the Philippines for School Year 2012-2013. Generally, administrators, teachers and students articulated that CSPC’s Student Affairs Services Program was effectively implemented. Of the services provided, Guidance and Counselling and Housing Services show lower significant results in terms of effectiveness. T-test shows that there is no significant difference between its implementation and effectiveness. Significant agreements between the three groups of respondents were identified using the Kendall Coefficient of Concordance. Improvement of the delivery of CSPC’s Student Affairs Services Program will be effective upon adopting the researcher’s Comprehensive Development Plan.

  19. Decreasing Depression and Anxiety in College Youth Using the Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment Program (COPE) [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart Abney, Beverly G; Lusk, Pamela; Hovermale, Rachael; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2018-06-01

    College is a time of major transition in the lives of many young adults. Roughly 30% of college students have reported that anxiety and depressive symptoms negatively affect their lives and academic functioning. Currently, anxiety has surpassed depression as the reason college students seek help at counseling centers. Unfortunately, only one third of students receive treatment for anxiety and only 25% of students receive treatment for their depression. The objectives of this pilot project were to (a) assess levels of depression and anxiety in identified "at risk" college students who present to the college Student Health Services (Primary Care), (b) implement a new cognitive behavioral therapy-based intervention titled "Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment" (COPE), and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention on students' levels of depression and anxiety as well as satisfaction with the intervention. A one group pre- and post-test design was used. Students who received COPE demonstrated clinically meaningful improvement in depressive and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. COPE is an effective brief program for reducing depression and anxiety in college-age youth. Implementation of evidenced-based programs into the college experience could lead to less severe depression and anxiety and better academic performance, ultimately increasing the likelihood of students successfully completing their academic programs.

  20. Wealth Transmission and Inequality Among Hunter-Gatherers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim; Marlowe, Frank; Nolin, David; Wiessner, Polly; Gurven, Michael; Bowles, Samuel; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hertz, Tom; Bell, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    We report quantitative estimates of intergenerational transmission and population-wide inequality for wealth measures in a set of hunter-gatherer populations. Wealth is defined broadly as factors that contribute to individual or household well-being, ranging from embodied forms such as weight and hunting success to material forms such household goods, as well as relational wealth in exchange partners. Intergenerational wealth transmission is low to moderate in these populations, but is still expected to have measurable influence on an individual’s life chances. Wealth inequality (measured with Gini coefficients) is moderate for most wealth types, matching what qualitative ethnographic research has generally indicated (if not the stereotype of hunter-gatherers as extreme egalitarians). We discuss some plausible mechanisms for these patterns, and suggest ways in which future research could resolve questions about the role of wealth in hunter-gatherer social and economic life. PMID:21151711

  1. Efficacy of podcasting: use in undergraduate and graduate programs in a college of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlairet, Maura C

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this project was to create podcasts of classroom lectures from select courses across programs in a college of nursing and to explore associated outcomes using a Web-based course evaluation framework. Seventy undergraduate, second-degree, and graduate nursing students participated. Findings suggest that nurse educators can leverage students' positive attitudes and technologic skills with minimal investment of dollars and no impact on class attendance, building high-quality podcasts that align with students' unique learning environments and goals. Faculty should consider specific student attributes and associated needs when developing podcasts and in providing guidance and support for students who use these learning tools.

  2. Predictors of Prevention Failure in College Students Participating in Two Indicated Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L.; Otero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1) for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2) for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3) for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force. PMID:24714056

  3. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p sleep habits after participation in the extra credit sleep activity (p sleep learning module has the potential to enhance sleep literacy and change behavior among students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  4. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  5. Dynamics of a Successful Planned Giving Program Utilizing Shared Leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Robin Lynn Brunty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of a successful planned giving program utilizing shared leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This information will assist the leadership in determining if and how a successful planned giving program can be established for HBCUs. It is possible for planned gifts…

  6. Marketing Strategies Used to Promote Master of Business Administration Programs in Colleges and Universities in the Middle Atlantic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Paul F.

    Enrollments in Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programs and the use and effectiveness of marketing techniques for managing MBA enrollments were investigated in 1984. A 94-item questionnaire completed by 56 MBA programs offered at colleges and universities in the Middle Atlantic States addressed administration, awareness of marketing and…

  7. From Nothing to Something: The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Mentoring Program in a Health Sciences College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I report the development of a mentoring program in a College of Health Sciences comprised of schools of nursing, pharmacy, and health professions (which include physical therapy, speech pathology and audiology, applied psychology, and physician assistant programs) at a large private university. Although university-wide mentoring…

  8. Ruth Flockart and Dr Wood: A Crucial Relationship in the Development of Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College Music Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that particular working relationships within school music programs can have a significant affect on the program's development and progress. To explore this notion the research focussed on the working relationship of a music teacher at Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College (MLC), Ruth Flockart (1891-1985) and the…

  9. My Student Body: Effects of an Internet-Based Prevention Program to Decrease Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of My Student Body (MSB)-Nutrition, an Internet-based obesity prevention program for college students. Participants: Three hundred and twenty ethnically diverse undergraduate students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: MSB-Nutrition program, an on-campus weight management course, and a comparison group.…

  10. An Evaluation of the Employee Training and Development Process for Nicolet Area Technical College's Basic Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Luis C.

    The adult basic education (ABE) program at Nicolet Area Technical College (NATC) evaluated its training and development (T&D) process for new basic education instructors. The study gathered monitoring and screening criteria that addressed valuable components for use in an instrument for validating effectiveness of the ABE program (T&D)…

  11. Getting Foster Youth to and through College: Successes and Challenges of the New Jersey Foster Care Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maia; Losey, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of the New Jersey Foster Care Scholars program is a testament to its importance. Typical college students rely on parents for financial assistance and emotional support. Youth aging out of foster care often are on their own. The scholarship program offers an opportunity for higher education that many foster youth thought they would…

  12. Using Facebook and text messaging to deliver a weight loss program to college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Hayes, Sharon; Bennett, Gary G; Ives, Allison K; Foster, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    Between 31 and 35% of the college-aged population is overweight or obese, yet few weight loss trials for this population have been conducted. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of a technology-based 8-week weight loss intervention among college students. Students (N = 52) were randomly assigned to one of the three arms: Facebook (n = 17); Facebook Plus text messaging and personalized feedback (n = 18); Waiting List control (n = 17), with assessments at 4 weeks and 8 weeks (post-treatment). Participants were 20.47 ± 2.19 years old, 86.45 ± 17.11 kg, with a body mass index of 31.36 ± 5.3 kg/m(2) . Participants were primarily female (86.5%), and the sample was racially diverse (57.7% Caucasian, 30.8% African American, 5.8% Hispanic, and 5.7% other races). The primary outcome was weight loss after 8 weeks (post-treatment); 96.0% of the participants completed this assessment. At 8 weeks, the Facebook Plus group had significantly greater weight loss (-2.4 ± 2.5 kg) than the Facebook (-0.63 ± 2.4 kg) and Waiting List (-0.24 ± 2.6 kg) (both Ps Facebook and Waiting List groups. Results show preliminary efficacy and acceptability of the two active intervention arms (97.0% found the program helpful, 81.3% found the videos/handouts helpful, and 100% would recommend the program to others). Results indicate the potential for an innovative weight loss intervention that uses technology platforms (Facebook and text messaging) that are frequently used and already integrated into the cultural life of college students. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  13. Blogs, webinars and significant learning: A case report on a teacher training program for college teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Polanco-Bueno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This case study reports on a teacher training experience for college professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students’ learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design of students’ learning experiences. The learning experience consisted in an International Certificate on Significant Learning integrated by six modules, 20 hours each. Every module of the program consisted of two consecutive webinars with online activities in between. The results showed the positive impact of the program on participants’ perceptions about the quality of the contents, evidence of learning and products (E-portfolios that served as content mastery evidences, as well as learning products produced by their students. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i1.72

  14. HealthyhornsTXT: A Text-Messaging Program to Promote College Student Health and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Kirtz, Susan; Hughes Wagner, Jessica; Cance, Jessica Duncan; Barrera, Denise; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2018-01-01

    Text-messaging interventions positively affect health behaviors, but their use on college campuses has been limited. Text messaging serves as a relatively affordable way to communicate with large audiences and is one of the preferred modes of communication for young adults. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a campus-wide, health text-messaging program. The subscriber pool consisted of approximately 6,000 undergraduate students from a large, southern university. From that pool, 1,095 participants (64% female; 41% White) completed a posttest survey. Text messages covered a range of health topics and information about campus resources. Research was conducted from August through December 2015. Process data were collected throughout the semester; participants' attitudes were assessed via an online survey at the program's conclusion. Students demonstrated engagement with the messages throughout the semester as evidenced by replies to text-back keywords and clicks on website links embedded within messages. Messages about sleep, stress management, and hydration were considered most relevant. The majority of participants (61%) reported increased awareness regarding their health. Text-messaging interventions are a feasible strategy to improve college student health.

  15. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Reducing cyberbullying: A theory of reasoned action-based video prevention program for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, Ashley N; Kelley, Michelle L; Pearson, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of cyberbullying prevention/intervention programs. The goals of the present study were to develop a Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)-based video program to increase cyberbullying knowledge (1) and empathy toward cyberbullying victims (2), reduce favorable attitudes toward cyberbullying (3), decrease positive injunctive (4) and descriptive norms about cyberbullying (5), and reduce cyberbullying intentions (6) and cyberbullying behavior (7). One hundred sixty-seven college students were randomly assigned to an online video cyberbullying prevention program or an assessment-only control group. Immediately following the program, attitudes and injunctive norms for all four types of cyberbullying behavior (i.e., unwanted contact, malice, deception, and public humiliation), descriptive norms for malice and public humiliation, empathy toward victims of malice and deception, and cyberbullying knowledge significantly improved in the experimental group. At one-month follow-up, malice and public humiliation behavior, favorable attitudes toward unwanted contact, deception, and public humiliation, and injunctive norms for public humiliation were significantly lower in the experimental than the control group. Cyberbullying knowledge was significantly higher in the experimental than the control group. These findings demonstrate a brief cyberbullying video is capable of improving, at one-month follow-up, cyberbullying knowledge, cyberbullying perpetration behavior, and TRA constructs known to predict cyberbullying perpetration. Considering the low cost and ease with which a video-based prevention/intervention program can be delivered, this type of approach should be considered to reduce cyberbullying. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The impact of a College of Nursing Retention Program on the graduation rates of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, E; Payne, J L

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the impact of a College of Nursing's (CON) Retention Program on students enrolled in a baccalaureate degree nursing program. Within the last ten years, undergraduate nurses increasingly have utilized the CON retention program. These students traditionally face a number of barriers to their academic endeavors. This study was designed to assess the effect of the CON program on the barriers to academic success of students who entered the CON in the Fall classes of 1991, 1992 and 1993. The sample size was 320 students. The control group consisted of 137 students who received no intervention and the experimental group was comprised of 183 students who attended intervention sessions with the Retention Coordinator in the CON. It was hypothesized that the most successful students during this period (1991-1993) were the most frequent attendees of the CON retention program intervention sessions. The alternative hypothesis was that those persons who did not attend the sessions, but were still highly persistent and successful, were enrollees who had entered with high entrance credentials as demonstrated by the transfer grade point averages (GPA). The results of this study indicated the need, use and value of this systematic approach to retention.

  18. 75 FR 32877 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... resources, aquatic-life forms, and sport fishing; and (e) develop responsible attitudes and ethics toward..., Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... governing the Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter...

  19. Hot subduction: Magmatism along the Hunter Ridge, SW Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, A.J.; Verbeeten, A.; Danyushevsky, L.V.; Sigurdsson, I.A.; Maillet, P.; Monzier, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hunter 'fracture zone' is generally regarded as a transform plate boundary linking the oppositely dipping Tongan and Vanuatu subduction systems. Dredging along the Hunter Ridge and sampling of its northernmost extent, exposed as the island of Kadavu in Fiji, has yielded a diversity of magmatic suites, including arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites, high-Mg lavas with some affinities to boninites and some affinities to adakites, and true adakitic lavas associated with remarkable low-Fe, high-Na basalts with 8-16 ppm Nb (herein high-Nb basalts). Lavas which show clear evidence of slab melt involvement in their petrogenesis occur at either end of the Hunter Ridge, whereas the arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites appear to be restricted to the south central part of the ridge. Mineralogical and whole rock geochemical data for each of these suites are summarized, and a tectono-magmatic model for their genesis and distribution is suggested. Trace element features and radiogenic isotope data for the Hunter Ridge lavas indicate compositions analogue to Pacific MORB-like mantle

  20. Planet Hunters 2 in the K2 Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Fischer, Debra; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Ishikawa, Sascha; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Schmitt, Joseph; Snyder, Chris; Wang, Ji; Barclay, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org) is an online citizen science project enlisting hundreds of thousands of people to search for planet transits in the publicly released Kepler data. Volunteers mark the locations of visible transits in a web interface, with multiple independent classifiers reviewing a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment. In September 2014, Planet Hunters entered a new phase. The project was relaunched with a brand new online classification interface and discussion tool built using the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) latest technology and web platform. The website has been optimized for the rapid discovery and identification of planet candidates in the light curves from K2, the two-wheeled ecliptic plane Kepler mission. We will give an overview of the new Planet Hunters classification interface and Round 2 review system in context of the K2 data. We will present the first results from the Planet Hunters 2 search of K2 Campaigns 0 and 1 including a summary of new planet candidates.

  1. perceptions and adaptations of beekeepers and honey hunters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    honey sector (i.e. honey hunters) to climate change are, however, not adequately explored. The objective of .... The statistical software SPSS Version 16 was used for this purpose. ... content analysis is an effort of interpretation, that balances ... FORM. Discontinue. N o = 0 ; Yes = 1. ±. Creditavability. CRED. Discontinue. N.

  2. Systems theory as a framework for examining a college campus-based support program for the former foster youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbe, Lisa; Randolph, Karen A; Yelick, Anna; Cheatham, Leah P; Groton, Danielle B

    2018-01-01

    Increased attention to former foster youth pursuing post-secondary education has resulted in the creation of college campus based support programs to address their need. However, limited empirical evidence and theoretical knowledge exist about these programs. This study seeks to describe the application of systems theory as a framework for examining a college campus based support program for former foster youth. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 program stakeholders including students, mentors, collaborative members, and independent living program staff. Using qualitative data analysis software, holistic coding techniques were employed to analyze interview transcripts. Then applying principles of extended case method using systems theory, data were analyzed. Findings suggest systems theory serves as a framework for understanding the functioning of a college campus based support program. The theory's concepts help delineate program components and roles of stakeholders; outline boundaries between and interactions among stakeholders; and identify program strengths and weakness. Systems theory plays an important role in identifying intervention components and providing a structure through which to identify and understand program elements as a part of the planning process. This study highlights the utility of systems theory as a framework for program planning and evaluation.

  3. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height we...

  4. College and University Environmental Programs as a Policy Problem (Part 2): Strategies for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan G.; Rutherford, Murray B.; Auer, Matthew R.; Cherney, David N.; Wallace, Richard L.; Mattson, David J.; Clark, Douglas A.; Foote, Lee; Krogman, Naomi; Wilshusen, Peter; Steelman, Toddi

    2011-05-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity—defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved.

  5. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 2): Strategies for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity-defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Bystander programs addressing sexual violence on college campuses: A systematic review and meta-analysis of program outcomes and delivery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Krauss, Alison; Vu, Nicole L; Banyard, Victoria L; McDonald, Renee

    2018-02-06

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the effectiveness of bystander programs that address sexual violence on college campuses. Program effects on student attitudes/beliefs and bystander behavior were examined. Durability of program outcomes and the influence of program-delivery methods (e.g., facilitator-led programs vs. video, online or poster campaign programs) and program-parameters (e.g., program length) were also evaluated. Twenty-four studies met criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis, and 207 separate results from these studies were coded. Students who participated in a bystander program, compared to those who had not, had more pro-social attitudes/beliefs about sexual violence and intervening to prevent it, and engaged in more bystander behavior. Program effects diminished over time, but meaningful changes persisted for at least three months following program delivery. Longer programs had greater effects than shorter programs on attitudes/beliefs. Bystander programs can be a valuable addition to colleges' violence prevention efforts.

  7. Avian influenza prevalence among hunter-harvested birds in a remote Canadian First Nation community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberda, Eric N; Meldrum, Richard; Charania, Nadia A; Davey, Robert; Tsuji, Leonard Js

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) prevalence has been associated with wild game and other bird species. The contamination of these birds may pose a greater risk to those who regularly hunt and consumed infected species. Due to resident concerns communicated by local Band Council, hunter-harvested birds from a remote First Nation community in subArctic Ontario, Canada were assessed for AIV. Hunters, and especially those who live a subsistence lifestyle, are at higher risk of AIV exposure due to their increased contact with wild birds, which represent an important part of their diet. Cloacal swabs from 304 harvested game birds representing several species of wild birds commonly hunted and consumed in this First Nation community were analyzed for AIV using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subtyping was performed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sequences were assembled using Lasergene, and the sequences were compared to Genbank. In total, 16 of the 304 cloacal swab samples were positive for AIV. Of the 16 positive samples, 12 were found in mallard ducks, 3 were found in snow geese (wavies), and 1 positive sample was found in partridge. The AIV samples were subtyped, when possible, and found to be positive for the low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtypes H3 and H4. No samples were positive for subtypes of human concern, namely H5 and H7. This work represents the first AIV monitoring program results of hunter-harvested birds in a remote subsistence First Nation community. Community-level surveillance of AIV in remote subsistence hunting communities may help to identify future risks, while educating those who may have the highest exposure about proper handling of hunted birds. Ultimately, only low pathogenic strains of AIV were found, but monitoring should be continued and expanded to safeguard those with the highest exposure risk to AIV.

  8. Whose College Readiness Is It Anyway? College Readiness, Cultural, Economic and Social Capital, and Access to Pre-College Transition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Nicolas, Nakia Marissa

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, the majority of high school graduates are not academically prepared for the rigor of postsecondary education or equipped with the skills necessary to enter the workforce (American College Test [ACT], 2012; Barnes & Slate, 2010; Conley, 2007a, 2007b). Often blamed for this lack preparation are inconsistent linkages between…

  9. Topics in nuclear and radiochemistry for college curricula and high school science programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The concern with the current status and trends of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education in academic institutions was addressed in a recent workshop. The 1988 workshop considered the important contributions that scientist with nuclear and radiochemistry backgrounds have made and are continuing to make to other sciences and to various applied fields. Among the areas discussed were environmental studies, life sciences, materials science, separation technology, hot atom chemistry, cosmochemistry, and the rapidly growing field of nuclear medicine. It is intent of the organizer and participants of this symposium entitled Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for College Curricula and High School Science Program'' to provide lecture material on topics related to nuclear and radiochemistry to educators. It is our hope that teachers, who may or may not be familiar with the field, will find this collections of articles useful and incorporate some of them into their lectures.

  10. Topics in nuclear and radiochemistry for college curricula and high school science programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The concern with the current status and trends of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education in academic institutions was addressed in a recent workshop. The 1988 workshop considered the important contributions that scientist with nuclear and radiochemistry backgrounds have made and are continuing to make to other sciences and to various applied fields. Among the areas discussed were environmental studies, life sciences, materials science, separation technology, hot atom chemistry, cosmochemistry, and the rapidly growing field of nuclear medicine. It is intent of the organizer and participants of this symposium entitled ''Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for College Curricula and High School Science Program'' to provide lecture material on topics related to nuclear and radiochemistry to educators. It is our hope that teachers, who may or may not be familiar with the field, will find this collections of articles useful and incorporate some of them into their lectures

  11. Assessment of the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University Photovoltaic Research Associates Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posey-Eddy, F.; McConnell, R. D.

    2002-08-01

    This report details the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Photovoltaic Research Associates Program, a small but remarkable program that directly affected dozens of minority undergraduate students in ways that changed many of their lives. The progress and accomplishments of undergraduates within the nine participating universities were monitored and assessed through their presentations at an annual NREL-sponsored HBCU conference. Although the funding was small, typically $400,000 per year, the money made a significant impact. The best students sometimes went on to the nation's top graduate schools (e.g., MIT) or important management positions in large companies. Other students had opportunities to learn how renewable energy could positively affect their lives and their neighbors' lives. A few were lucky enough to install photovoltaic lighting and water-pumping systems in Africa, and to see and feel firsthand the technical and emotional benefits of this technology for families and villages. Two of the schools, Texas Southern University and Central State University, were particularly successful in leveraging their DOE/NREL funding to obtain additional funding for expanded programs.

  12. [Effects of a preventive intervention program for improving self-complexity on depression among college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Junko; Hori, Masashi; Otsuka, Yasumasa

    2010-06-01

    The present study developed an intervention program for self-complexity (SC; Linville, 1987), and examined the effects of this program on college students. Participants (N = 40) were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received one session of psycho-education about SC, and kept daily records of self-aspects (social roles, interpersonal relationships, specific events/behaviors, traits, abilities, etc.) for one week. All participants were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire three times (pre, post, and follow-up). The questionnaire was comprised of items evaluating depression (The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), SC, positive self-complexity (P-SC), and negative self-complexity (N-SC). The results indicated that P-SC at the post-test was significantly increased and P-SC at the follow-up test was marginally increased in the intervention group, compared with the control group. Furthermore, structured equation modeling revealed that in the intervention group, high P-SC was related to low level of depressed mood after the program.

  13. Environmental restoration technology programs at Mesa State College: A strategic look at manpower needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.J.; Emilia, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The environmental cleanup of Department of Energy (DOE) sites within the next 30 years requires strategic planning to ensure adequate manpower is available when needed. Manpower needs projections within DOE have been based on analyses of current industry trends that indicate a substantial shortage of scientists and engineers. This paper explores the idea that the manpower requirements of DOE's environmental restoration program are not yet fully realized by most sites, which are currently in the predecisional work phase. Experience at the Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO), which has had environmental restoration as it primary mission for about 10 years, shows that in the postdecisional phases the manpower need for scientists and engineers decreases while the manpower need for technologists in technical, management, and support roles increases. The GJPO, with Mesa State College in Grand Junction, Colorado, has developed an Environmental Restoration Associate degree program based on a strategic look at its manpower needs. This program receives start-up funding from DOE and has received donations in the million dollar range from various industry and state government partners

  14. Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career-Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Heidi; Yoder, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    "Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career and Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Work," demonstrates Ohio's progress in developing strong policies for career and technical education (CTE) programs to promote rigor, including college- and career-ready graduation…

  15. GUIDELINES FOR HOSPITALITY EDUCATION IN JUNIOR COLLEGES, A MANUAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS IN THE HOTEL-MOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL INDUSTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALMARODE, RICHARD L.

    THIS REPORT DISCUSSES JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAMS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS AND INDUSTRY. THE STUDENTS RECEIVE BOTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING, WHILE INDUSTRY RECEIVES COMPETENT EMPLOYEES. BEFORE DEVELOPING THIS OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM, THE COLLEGE SHOULD SURVEY LOCAL INDUSTRY NEEDS, OPPORTUNITIES FOR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING, POSSIBILITIES OF PART-TIME WORK…

  16. Motorcycle Safety Education Programs: Report of a Survey of State Departments of Education and of Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association, Washington, DC.

    A survey of State departments of education and colleges and universities, conducted by the Motorcycle Industry Council Safety and Education Foundation, revealed the need for more teacher education programs, instructional materials, and organized workshops that promote motorcycle safety education. The primary interest indicated by State departments…

  17. The Short-Term Effectiveness of a Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training Program in a College Setting with Residence Life Advisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Tanya L.; Witt, Jody

    2009-01-01

    Although the college years prove to be a vulnerable time for students and a critical period for suicide prevention, few school-based prevention strategies have been empirically evaluated. The current study examined the short-term effects of Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR), a gatekeeper training program that teaches how to recognize warning…

  18. Traditional and Hybrid Dental Assisting Program: An Exploration of Design and Optimal Outcomes for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate an accredited dental assisting educational program at a Midwest community college. The Bureau of Labor of Statistics (2015) claimed the profession of dental assisting is one of the fastest growing occupation, along with ongoing research that good oral health is linked to overall general health, thereby…

  19. Impact of the Personal Strengths Program on Self-Determination Levels of College Students with LD and/or ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jennie L.; Allsopp, David H.; Ferron, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of The Personal Strengths Program (PSP) on seven college students with learning disabilities and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (LD/ADHD) using a multiple baseline design. Students with LD/ADHD experience increased challenges in school settings and decreased post-secondary outcomes when compared with…

  20. Transition to Community College: The Journey of Adult Basic Education English Learners from Non-Credit to Credit Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csepelyi, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the transition of a group of adult English language learners from an Adult Basic Education program to a community college. The purpose of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of the driving forces of Adult Basic Education English language learners who had successfully transitioned from a non-credit…

  1. The Development of an Individualized Instructional Program in Beginning College Mathematics Utilizing Computer Based Resource Units. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockhill, Theron D.

    Reported is an attempt to develop and evaluate an individualized instructional program in pre-calculus college mathematics. Four computer based resource units were developed in the areas of set theory, relations and function, algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Objectives were determined by experienced calculus teachers, and…

  2. The Effectiveness of Two Types of Rape Prevention Programs in Changing the Rape-Supportive Attitudes of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Linda A.; Stoelb, Matthew P.; Duggan, Peter; Hieger, Brad; Kling, Kathleen H.; Payne, June P.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of two rape-prevention programs in changing college students' rape-supportive attitudes was investigated. (N=215) Conditions included an interactive mock talk show and a structured video intervention. Both interventions were effective, but attitudes were found to rebound over time. Implications for future rape-prevention…

  3. Focus on Mentee-Mentor Relationships: The 10th Grade Implementation of iMentor's College Ready Program. Technical Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Lisa; Kang, David; Siman, Nina; Soltani, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the technical appendices that accompany the full report entitled:"Focus on Mentee-Mentor Relationships: The 10th Grade Implementation of iMentor's College Ready Program." The appendices include: (1) Mentor Survey Construct Items; (2) Qualative Data Collection and Analysis Methods; and (3) Methods for Estimating the…

  4. The Impact of the College Assistance Migrant Program on Migrant Student Academic Achievement in the California State University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian D.

    2012-01-01

    The 7-year longitudinal study examined the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) impact on migrant student achievement in the California State University system. Participants included migrant students, Latinos, and general student populations from 2002-2009. The analysis of variance and chi-square test of independence were used to explore…

  5. Change Management Model for Implementing an Effective First-Year Experience Program in the Community College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joy C.

    2015-01-01

    This study provides evidence that systematic management of change can facilitate the implementation of first-year experience programming that leads to improved results in retention and student success for community college students. The study includes four major themes: (a) first-year experience, (b) change management, (c) change leadership, and…

  6. The Use of Grounded Theory to Develop a Framework for Understanding Student Retention in Community College Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priode, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    Gaining admission into pre-licensure nursing programs has proven to be quite difficult for the average college student. Topping the list of crucial priorities for many academic institutions is the retention of these nursing students. Yet, the reality is that many students decide not to complete their course of study for reasons other than academic…

  7. A Case Study of Prior Knowledge, Learning Approach and Conceptual Change in an Introductory College Chemistry Tutorial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Per Christian; Hewson, Peter W.

    This paper presents a case study involving a small group of students enrolled in a tutorial program learning introductory college chemistry. The underlying theoretical framework of this investigation was a constructivist view of learning, but more specifically it was based on Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning. The findings of this…

  8. Salinity and resource management in the Hunter Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Cooke, R.; Simons, M. [RA Creelman & Associates (Australia)

    1995-08-01

    If excess water salinity is to be managed in the Hunter Valley, its causes and behaviour must be understood. Although Hunter Valley hydrology, hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry require further study, there is now enough information available to begin the development of both temporal and spatial models as valley management tools. Currently the Department of Water Resources is developing a model known as Integrated Water Quality and Quantity Model (IQQM). IQQM which includes a salinity module is essentially a surface water simulation model. It wll enable testing of alternate management and operation policies such as the salinity property rights trading scheme recently introduced by the EPA to manage salt release from coal mines and power stations. An overview is presented of the progress made to date on the salinity module for IQQM, and an outline is given of the geological and hydrogeochemical concepts that have been assembled to support the salinity module of IQQM. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion.

  10. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. HiggsHunters - a citizen science project for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of HiggsHunters.org in November 2014, citizen science volunteers have classified more than a million points of interest in images from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Volunteers have been looking for displaced vertices and unusual features in images recorded during LHC Run-1. We discuss the design of the project, its impact on the public, and the surprising results of how the human volunteers performed relative to the computer algorithms in identifying displaced secondary vertices.

  12. Sacrificing Steve: How I Killed the Crocodile Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Carman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Bob Hodge and Vijay Mishra argue that the complex issues of illegitimacy at the core of Australian identity are repressed through a continual process of cyclical silencing, where traces of a shameful past are exorcised by a focus on images of a mythologised ‘legend’, embodied in characters such as 'The Man from Snowy River'. This article explores such a 'schizophrenic' cycle in relation to the life, death and resurrection of Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin.

  13. Lack of implementation of eating disorder education and prevention programs in high schools: Data from incoming college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emalee T; Venta, Amanda

    2018-03-22

    The purpose of this study was to examine the implementation of eating disorder education and prevention programs in high schools retrospectively, as reported by incoming college freshmen, exploring whether characteristics of the school influenced implementation. The sample, 169 first-year students from a public university, participated in an online survey inquiring about exposure to programs and high school characteristics. Results demonstrated few students exposed to any eating disorder programming (29.0%), with no students reporting exposure to prevention programming. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the implementation based on school characteristics, suggesting that this is a universal issue across high schools.

  14. Cooperation and the evolution of hunter-gatherer storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Schlaepfer, Philip; Major, Katie; Dyble, Mark; Page, Abigail E; Thompson, James; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Mace, Ruth; Astete, Leonora; Ngales, Marilyn; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2017-12-05

    Storytelling is a human universal. From gathering around the camp-fire telling tales of ancestors to watching the latest television box-set, humans are inveterate producers and consumers of stories. Despite its ubiquity, little attention has been given to understanding the function and evolution of storytelling. Here we explore the impact of storytelling on hunter-gatherer cooperative behaviour and the individual-level fitness benefits to being a skilled storyteller. Stories told by the Agta, a Filipino hunter-gatherer population, convey messages relevant to coordinating behaviour in a foraging ecology, such as cooperation, sex equality and egalitarianism. These themes are present in narratives from other foraging societies. We also show that the presence of good storytellers is associated with increased cooperation. In return, skilled storytellers are preferred social partners and have greater reproductive success, providing a pathway by which group-beneficial behaviours, such as storytelling, can evolve via individual-level selection. We conclude that one of the adaptive functions of storytelling among hunter gatherers may be to organise cooperation.

  15. Reality Television Programs Are Associated With Illegal Drug Use and Prescription Drug Misuse Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Alexander

    2016-01-02

    Reality television watching and social media use are popular activities. Reality television can include mention of illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. To determine if reality television and social media use of Twitter are associated with either illegal drug use or prescription drug misuse. Survey of 576 college students in 2011. Independent variables included watching reality television (social cognitive theory), parasocial interaction (parasocial interaction theory), television hours watched (cultivation theory), following a reality television character on Twitter, and demographics. Outcome variables were illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Watching reality television and also identifying with reality TV program characters were each associated with greater odds for illegal drug use. Also, following a reality TV character on Twitter had greater odds for illegal drug use and also in one analytical model for prescription drug misuse. No support was seen for cultivation theory. Those born in the United States had greater odds for illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Women and Asians had lower odds for illegal drug use. African Americans and Asians had lower odds for prescription drug misuse. Physicians, psychologists, and other healthcare practitioners may find it useful to include questions in their clinical interview about reality television watching and Twitter use. Physician and psychology groups, public health practitioners, and government health agencies should consider discussing with television broadcasting companies the potential negative impact of including content with illegal drugs and prescription drug misuse on reality television programs.

  16. Does Lateral Transmission Obscure Inheritance in Hunter-Gatherer Languages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowern, Claire; Epps, Patience; Gray, Russell; Hill, Jane; Hunley, Keith; McConvell, Patrick; Zentz, Jason

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance) status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages in [1]. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56), despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of borrowing were

  17. The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Shu- Ting Kao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Nabokov’s Lolita, Humbert Humbert’s The Enchanted Hunters, as a quest for love, aims to reconstruct a felicitous world or integrate various fragmentary details into an organic unity that revives a lost love, experiencing it on the basis of irony, and revealing a simulation of the desire, violence, and despondency which have been expressed in myths of nymphs and Persephone. The protagonist never reaches this unity, but his narrative of erotic and romantic love reveals him as a pathetic addict engaged in mechanical reproduction related to the phenomena of desire, seduction, violence, and sex. His The Enchanted Hunters does not simulate what he expects of his childhood love with Annabel; rather, it simulates the erotic imagination suggested in Mary D. Sheriff’s term “nymphomania,” in which artists fall degenerately to a model of tragedy. Keywords: simulation, nymph, nymphomania, The Enchanted Hunters The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita refers to the name of a hotel and the title of a play. This seeming coincidence is actually not coincidental: Nabokov weaves a story concerning a pedophile’s seduction of a prepubescent child into a “story within a story,” in which the girl is imagined as a seducer who bewitches a number of hunters. Just as the girl in the play is a figment of a poet’s imagination, so Lolita in the novel Lolita is an imaginary production of a middle-aged pedophile. Yet Lolita is not so much a novel revealing guilt and mental disorder, but a mélange of art and reality, or more specifically, it is about a coinage in which the author fabricates art and myth in real life. Parallel to the protagonist who simulates what he expects of his childhood love, Annabel, in the form of the nymphet, Lolita, Nabokov replicates the beauty of butterflies in the pursuit of beauty and immortality, and develops the world of art with a pathetic tone whereby we gradually perceive a simulation of the desire, violence, and

  18. The Effects of Performance Budgeting and Funding Programs on Graduation Rate in Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-cheol Shinn

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine whether states with performance budgeting and funding (PBF programs had improved institutional performance of higher education over the five years (1997 through 2001 considered in this study. First Time in College (FTIC graduation rate was used as the measure of institutional performance. In this study, the unit of analysis is institution level and the study population is all public four-or-more-year institutions in the United States. To test PBF program effectiveness, Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM growth analysis was applied. According to the HLM analysis, the growth of graduation rates in states with PBF programs was not greater than in states without PBF programs. The lack of growth in institutional graduation rates, however, does not mean that PBF programs failed to achieve their goals. Policy-makers are advised to sustain PBF programs long enough until such programs bear their fruits or are proven ineffective.

  19. Factors that Influence the Success of Male and Female Computer Programming Students in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinkenbeard, Drew A.

    As the demand for a technologically skilled work force grows, experience and skill in computer science have become increasingly valuable for college students. However, the number of students graduating with computer science degrees is not growing proportional to this need. Traditionally several groups are underrepresented in this field, notably women and students of color. This study investigated elements of computer science education that influence academic achievement in beginning computer programming courses. The goal of the study was to identify elements that increase success in computer programming courses. A 38-item questionnaire was developed and administered during the Spring 2016 semester at California State University Fullerton (CSUF). CSUF is an urban public university comprised of about 40,000 students. Data were collected from three beginning programming classes offered at CSUF. In total 411 questionnaires were collected resulting in a response rate of 58.63%. Data for the study were grouped into three broad categories of variables. These included academic and background variables; affective variables; and peer, mentor, and role-model variables. A conceptual model was developed to investigate how these variables might predict final course grade. Data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as linear regression, factor analysis, and path analysis. Ultimately this study found that peer interactions, comfort with computers, computer self-efficacy, self-concept, and perception of achievement were the best predictors of final course grade. In addition, the analyses showed that male students exhibited higher levels of computer self-efficacy and self-concept compared to female students, even when they achieved comparable course grades. Implications and explanations of these findings are explored, and potential policy changes are offered.

  20. GeoX: A New Pre-college Program to Attract Underrepresented Minorities and First Generation Students to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. C.; Garcia, S. J.; Houser, C.; GeoX Team

    2011-12-01

    An emerging challenge in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education is the recruitment of underrepresented groups in those areas of the workforce. This paper describes the structure and first-year results of the Geosciences Exploration Summer Program (GeoX) at Texas A&M University. Recent evidence suggest that pipeline programs should target junior and senior high school students who are beginning to seriously consider future career choices and appropriate college programs. GeoX is an overnight program that takes place during the summer at Texas A&M University. Over the course of a week, GeoX participants interact with faculty from the College of Geosciences, administrators, current students, and community leaders through participation in inquiry-based learning activities, field trips, and evening social events. The aim of this project is to foster a further interest in pursuing geosciences as an undergraduate major in college and thereby increase participation in the geosciences by underrepresented ethnic minority students. With funding from industry and private donors, high achieving rising junior and rising senior students, with strong interest in science and math, were invited to participate in the program. Students and their parents were interviewed before and after the program to determine if it was successful in introducing and enhancing awareness of the: 1) various sub-disciplines in the geosciences, 2) benefits of academia and research, 3) career opportunities in each of those fields and 4) college admission process including financial aid and scholarship opportunities. Results of the survey suggest that the students had a very narrow and stereotypical view of the geosciences that was almost identical to the views of their parents. Following the program, the students had a more expanded and positive view of the geosciences compared to the pre-program survey and compared to their parents. While it remains to be seen how many of those

  1. Engaging diverse community college students in the geosciences through a year-round career mentoring and research workforce program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, V.; Barge, L. M.; Smith, M.

    2017-12-01

    Student attrition from STEM majors most often occurs in the first or second year of college. To retain underrepresented minority students who are largely enrolled in community colleges in STEM pathways, it is critical to provide hands-on experiences and exposure to STEM occupations in a supportive community, before the students transfer to four-year colleges. The goal of the Bridge to the Geosciences is to provide community college students with year-round career mentoring, exposure to different fields and organizations in the geosciences through small field or research experiences, and community-building within the cohort and in connection with a broader community of scientists. Each year, 20 students from Citrus College in Glendora, California participate in research "geomodules" organized around the planetary, atmospheric, ocean, and environmental science subfields of the geosciences at: (1) the Oak Crest Institute of Science, a chemistry research and diversity-oriented education organization in Monrovia, CA; (2) the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a NASA center in Pasadena, CA; (3) the University of Southern California's (USC) Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, a research center on Catalina Island; and (4) the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder, CO. A peak experience of the program is a ten-day mini-internship at UCAR in Colorado where the students are immersed in atmospheric research, training, fieldwork, and presenting at a premier facility. Professional development, mentoring, science communication and cohort-development are woven across all four geomodules and throughout the year. This program is funded by the National Science Foundation's Improving Undergraduate STEM Education or IUSE program. Preliminary results indicate that the students' interest in the geosciences, confidence in their skills and identify as a scientist, and their sense of belonging to a cohort are increased by participation in this program.

  2. Overview of an REU program: A case study in gender parity, ethnic diversity, and community college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. K.; Noriega, G.; Benthien, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (USEIT) is an REU Internship Program focused in multi-disciplinary, collaborative research offered through the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC); a research consortium focused on earthquake science. USEIT is an 8-week intensive undergraduate research program. The program is designed for interns to work as a collaborative engine to solve an overarching real-world earthquake problem referred to as the "Grand Challenge". The interns are organized in teams and paired with mentors that have expertise in their specific task in the Grand Challenge. The program is focused around earthquake system science, where students have the opportunity to use super computers, programming platforms, geographic information systems, and internally designed and developed visualization software. The goal of the USEIT program is to motivate undergraduates from diverse backgrounds towards careers in science and engineering through team-based research in the field of earthquake information technology. Efforts are made to recruit students with diverse backgrounds, taking into consideration gender, ethnic background, socioeconomic standing, major, college year, and institution type (2-year and 4-year colleges). USEIT has a partnership with two local community colleges to recruit underserved students. Our emphasis is to attract students that would 1) grow and develop technical skills, soft skills, and confidence from the program, and 2) provide perspective and innovation to the program. USEIT offers on-campus housing to provide a submerged learning environment, recruits diverse majors to foster interdisciplinary collaboration, maintains a full time in lab mentor for day-to-day intern needs, takes students on field trips to provide context to their research, and plans activities and field trips for team building and morale. Each year metrics are collected through exit surveys, personal statements, and intern experience

  3. The role and importance of internship programs as part of formal education: Students' perceptions: The case of college of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimičević Dario

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the fastest growing industries tourism is in increasing need for well educated and skillful employees on both operational and managerial level. Institutions of higher education are requested by tourism industry to produce quality human resources able to respond immediately to their needs and to be involved in working processes as fast as possible with low or without any additional costs for future employees' initial job training. With inclusion of training and internship programs into, primarily vocational, but also, into bachelor studies students will be trained for their future jobs through real business situations and environment. This paper focuses on students' perceptions of internship and training programs as part of their formal education. Through analysis of the survey distributed among students of the College of Tourism it will be shown how students perceive the internship programs and importance of these programs for their future employment. Also, it will be shown the level of their satisfaction with tourism companies where they are performing internship programs and the level of their satisfaction with activities of the College of Tourism in communications during the internship, program management and implementation of the internship programs.

  4. Development of "College CHEF," a Campus-Based Culinary Nutrition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jennifer; Ickes, Melinda; Noland, Melody; Erwin, Heather; Helme, Don

    2017-01-01

    Background: More than one third of college students are obese, with many lacking the knowledge and skills necessary to cook healthfully. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the PRECEDE-PROCEED model-driven primary and secondary needs assessments (PNA, SNA), which contributed to the development of the College CHEF. Methods: Staff…

  5. The Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Campus-Based Culinary Nutrition Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    College students, on average, do not consume enough fruits and vegetables. Contributing to poor eating habits is an overall decline in young adults' cooking skills as compared to previous decades, with today's college students often relying on ubiquitous convenience food options. The detriments associated with these food choices are linked to a…

  6. Success of First-Generation College Students in a Selective Doctor of Optometry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Sharon T.

    2017-01-01

    What happens when former first-generation college (FGC) students successfully graduate from college and then aim for post-undergraduate education? The purpose of this dissertation is to compare differences between FGC students and non-FGC admissions profiles regarding end-of-first-year performance at UC Berkeley's School of Optometry. The aims of…

  7. Making It Happen: How Career Academies Can Build College and Career Exploration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Mary G.; Altuna, Jacklyn N.; Safran, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The phrase "preparing students for college and career" has become so ubiquitous that it has become almost a mantra in educators' discourse in recent years. Whether mentioned in the Common Core State Standards, in the mission statements of high schools, or in political campaigns, improving the college and career readiness of young people…

  8. Helping Former Foster Youth Graduate From College: Campus Support Programs in California and Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Perez, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    The economic benefits of a college education are well documented; however, data from studies of young people transitioning out of foster care indicate that the college graduation rate for this population is very low. The child welfare system has traditionally done a poor job of encouraging foster youth to pursue postsecondary education. Although…

  9. From Foster Care to College: The Seita Scholars Program at Western Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrau, Yvonne A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 32,000 young people in the United States exit the foster care system in a typical year by aging out to independence (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2011). Despite available financial support for post-secondary education through the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, only 20% of college-qualified foster youth attend college and…

  10. Critical Components of Suicide Prevention Programs for Colleges and Universities: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite debate over whether or not college student suicide rates are greater or less than similar age groups not enrolled in higher education, the rates of college students experiencing suicide ideation, attempting suicide, and successfully committing suicide are indeed rising. A steady increase in these rates over the last 15 years is evidence…

  11. The Development of the Financial Literacy Program at the Community College of Baltimore County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams-Johnson, Ansa; Delker, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Student debt has increasingly become an important topic in higher education. Many students, particularly low-income and first-generation college students, do not have a solid understanding of managing personal finances. This becomes further compounded upon entering college, as these students lack the financial acumen to understand the long-term…

  12. An Analysis of the Effects of a Program To Reduce Heavy Drinking among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Colin M.; Far, Jeanne; Miller, John; Brigham, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effects of a Peer Norms Correction (PNC) procedure on college students' perceptions of campus drinking and their actual drinking behavior. Results suggest that PNC may be useful in correcting misperceptions about the norms for alcohol use but not for decreasing heavy drinking among college students. (Contains 28 references and 2…

  13. Distance Education Programs in Texas Community & Technical Colleges: Assessing Student Support Services in a Virtual Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Cherry Beth

    This project evaluates the status of distance learning at 54 public, two-year community, and technical colleges in Texas. Data was collected from the Web sites of each of the institutions. The Web site data indicted that 44 of the colleges refer specifically to distance education courses offered. To assess what student support services are…

  14. Predicting the admission into medical school of African American college students who have participated in summer academic enrichment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, A; Cregler, L L; Lewis, L

    1998-02-01

    To identify cognitive and noncognitive variables as predictors of the admission into medical school of African American college students who have participated in summer academic enrichment programs (SAEPs). The study sample comprised 309 African American college students who participated in SAEPs at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine from 1980 to 1989 and whose educational and occupational statuses were determined by follow-up tracking. A three-step logistic regression was used to analyze the data (with alpha = .05); the criterion variable was admission to medical school. The 17 predictor variables studied were one of two types, cognitive and noncognitive. The cognitive variables were (1) Scholastic Aptitude Test mathematics (SAT-M) score, (2) SAT verbal score, (3) college grade-point average (GPA), (4) college science GPA, (5) SAEP GPA, and (6) SAEP basic science GPA (BSGPA). The noncognitive variables were (1) gender, (2) highest college level at the time of the last SAEP application, (3) type of college attended (historically African American or predominately white), (4) number of SAEPs attended, (5) career aspiration (physician or another health science option) (6) parents who were professionals, (7) parents who were health care role models, (8) evidence of leadership, (9) evidence of community service, (10) evidence of special motivation, and (11) strength of letter of recommendation in the SAEP application. For each student the rating scores for the last four noncognitive variables were determined by averaging the ratings of two judges who reviewed relevant information in each student's file. In step 1, which explained 20% of the admission decision variance, SAT-M score, SAEP BSGPA, and college GPA were the three significant cognitive predictors identified. In step 2, which explained 31% of the variance, the three cognitive predictors identified in step 1 were joined by three noncognitive predictors: career aspiration, type of college, and

  15. Evaluation of an Avatar-Based Training Program to Promote Suicide Prevention Awareness in a College Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Benjamin A; McNeil, Daniel W; Hayes, Allison R; Hawkins, T Anne; Ng, H Mei; Yura, Catherine A

    2018-02-20

    Training programs exist that prepare college students, faculty, and staff to identify and support students potentially at risk for suicide. Kognito is an online program that trains users through simulated interactions with virtual humans. This study evaluated Kognito's effectiveness in preparing users to intervene with at-risk students. Training was completed by 2,727 university students, faculty, and staff from April, 2014 through September, 2015. Voluntary and mandatory participants at a land-grant university completed Kognito modules designed for higher education, along with pre- and post-assessments. All modules produced significant gains in reported Preparedness, Likelihood, and Self-Efficacy in intervening with troubled students. Despite initial disparities in reported abilities, after training participants reported being similarly capable of assisting at-risk students, including LGBTQ and veteran students. Kognito training appears to be effective, on a large scale, in educating users to act in a facilitative role for at-risk college students.

  16. HiggsHunters - a citizen science project for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00053405; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the launch of HiggsHunters.org in November 2014, citizen science volunteers have classified more than a million points of interest in images from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Volunteers have been looking for displaced vertices and unusual features in images recorded during LHC Run-1. We discuss the design of the project, its impact on the public, and the results of how the human volunteers performed relative to the computer algorithms in identifying displaced secondary vertices. People were better than existing algorithms at identifying displaced vertices for some masses and lifetimes, and showed good ability to recognize unexpected new features in the data.

  17. Can Low-Cost Online Summer Math Programs Improve Student Preparation for College-Level Math? Evidence from Randomized Experiments at Three Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; Griffiths, Rebecca J.; Mulhern, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Every year many students enter college without the math preparation needed to succeed in their desired programs of study. Many of these students struggle to catch up, especially those who are required to take remedial math courses before entering college-level math. Increasing the number of students who begin at the appropriate level of math has…

  18. Examining the Efficacy of an mHealth Media Literacy Education Program for Sexual Health Promotion in Older Adolescents Attending Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, Tracy Marie; Kupersmidt, Janis Beth; Malik, Christina Valerie; Keefe, Elyse Mallory

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of a mobile health (mHealth), media literacy education program, "Media Aware", for improving sexual health outcomes in older adolescent community college students. Participants: 184 community college students (ages 18-19) participated in the study from April-December 2015. Methods: Eight community…

  19. The College Opportunity Grant Program of the California State Scholarship and Loan Commission; A Report on and Evaluation of the 1969 and 1970 COG Selection Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhofer, Edwin L.

    The College Opportunity Grant (COG) program was established by the California legislature in 1968 and was intended to provide monetary grants to financially needy students, primarily from ethnic minorities, to assist them while attending college. This paper contains: (1) a side-by-side description of the characteristics of the 1969 and 1970…

  20. Hunter disease eClinic: interactive, computer-assisted, problem-based approach to independent learning about a rare genetic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan Laura

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-based teaching (CBT is a well-known educational device, but it has never been applied systematically to the teaching of a complex, rare, genetic disease, such as Hunter disease (MPS II. Aim To develop interactive teaching software functioning as a virtual clinic for the management of MPS II. Implementation and Results The Hunter disease eClinic, a self-training, user-friendly educational software program, available at the Lysosomal Storage Research Group (http://www.lysosomalstorageresearch.ca, was developed using the Adobe Flash multimedia platform. It was designed to function both to provide a realistic, interactive virtual clinic and instantaneous access to supporting literature on Hunter disease. The Hunter disease eClinic consists of an eBook and an eClinic. The eClinic is the interactive virtual clinic component of the software. Within an environment resembling a real clinic, the trainee is instructed to perform a medical history, to examine the patient, and to order appropriate investigation. The program provides clinical data derived from the management of actual patients with Hunter disease. The eBook provides instantaneous, electronic access to a vast collection of reference information to provide detailed background clinical and basic science, including relevant biochemistry, physiology, and genetics. In the eClinic, the trainee is presented with quizzes designed to provide immediate feedback on both trainee effectiveness and efficiency. User feedback on the merits of the program was collected at several seminars and formal clinical rounds at several medical centres, primarily in Canada. In addition, online usage statistics were documented for a 2-year period. Feedback was consistently positive and confirmed the practical benefit of the program. The online English-language version is accessed daily by users from all over the world; a Japanese translation of the program is also available. Conclusions The

  1. Hunter disease eClinic: interactive, computer-assisted, problem-based approach to independent learning about a rare genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jasmi, Fatma; Moldovan, Laura; Clarke, Joe T R

    2010-10-25

    Computer-based teaching (CBT) is a well-known educational device, but it has never been applied systematically to the teaching of a complex, rare, genetic disease, such as Hunter disease (MPS II). To develop interactive teaching software functioning as a virtual clinic for the management of MPS II. The Hunter disease eClinic, a self-training, user-friendly educational software program, available at the Lysosomal Storage Research Group (http://www.lysosomalstorageresearch.ca), was developed using the Adobe Flash multimedia platform. It was designed to function both to provide a realistic, interactive virtual clinic and instantaneous access to supporting literature on Hunter disease. The Hunter disease eClinic consists of an eBook and an eClinic. The eClinic is the interactive virtual clinic component of the software. Within an environment resembling a real clinic, the trainee is instructed to perform a medical history, to examine the patient, and to order appropriate investigation. The program provides clinical data derived from the management of actual patients with Hunter disease. The eBook provides instantaneous, electronic access to a vast collection of reference information to provide detailed background clinical and basic science, including relevant biochemistry, physiology, and genetics. In the eClinic, the trainee is presented with quizzes designed to provide immediate feedback on both trainee effectiveness and efficiency. User feedback on the merits of the program was collected at several seminars and formal clinical rounds at several medical centres, primarily in Canada. In addition, online usage statistics were documented for a 2-year period. Feedback was consistently positive and confirmed the practical benefit of the program. The online English-language version is accessed daily by users from all over the world; a Japanese translation of the program is also available. The Hunter disease eClinic employs a CBT model providing the trainee with realistic

  2. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology Research Grant Program:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D.; Dellon, Evan S.; Bright, Stephanie D.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Methods Demographic data, year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient’s institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. Similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. Results A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred in 255 of the awards (69%). Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of 341 past awardees, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (pacademics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. Conclusion The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publications, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology. PMID:19319125

  3. Outcomes of Concurrent Operations: Results From the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Berian, Julia R; Ban, Kristen A; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Angelos, Peter; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Hoyt, David B; Hall, Bruce L; Ko, Clifford Y

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether concurrently performed operations are associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Concurrent operations occur when a surgeon is simultaneously responsible for critical portions of 2 or more operations. How this practice affects patient outcomes is unknown. Using American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2014 to 2015, operations were considered concurrent if they overlapped by ≥60 minutes or in their entirety. Propensity-score-matched cohorts were constructed to compare death or serious morbidity (DSM), unplanned reoperation, and unplanned readmission in concurrent versus non-concurrent operations. Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to account for the clustered nature of the data while controlling for procedure and case mix. There were 1430 (32.3%) surgeons from 390 (77.7%) hospitals who performed 12,010 (2.3%) concurrent operations. Plastic surgery (n = 393 [13.7%]), otolaryngology (n = 470 [11.2%]), and neurosurgery (n = 2067 [8.4%]) were specialties with the highest proportion of concurrent operations. Spine procedures were the most frequent concurrent procedures overall (n = 2059/12,010 [17.1%]). Unadjusted rates of DSM (9.0% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001), reoperation (3.6% vs 2.7%; P < 0.001), and readmission (6.9% vs 5.1%; P < 0.001) were greater in the concurrent operation cohort versus the non-concurrent. After propensity score matching and risk-adjustment, there was no significant association of concurrence with DSM (odds ratio [OR] 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.21), reoperation (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.40), or readmission (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.99-1.29). In these analyses, concurrent operations were not detected to increase the risk for adverse outcomes. These results do not lessen the need for further studies, continuous self-regulation and proactive disclosure to patients.

  4. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Karla

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Results Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID. Conclusion Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  5. Energy expenditure and activity among Hadza hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A; Wood, Brian M; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Racette, Susan B; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Marlowe, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of total energy expenditure, (TEE; kcal/day) among traditional populations have challenged current models relating habitual physical activity to daily energy requirements. Here, we examine the relationship between physical activity and TEE among traditional Hadza hunter-gatherers living in northern Tanzania. Hadza adults were studied at two camps, with minimal intervention so as to monitor energy expenditure and activity during normal daily life. We measured daily walking distance and walking speed using wearable GPS units for 41 adults. For a subset of 30 adults, we measured TEE using doubly labeled water, three indices of work load (foraging return rate, maternal status, and number of dependent children), and urinary biomarkers of metabolic activity and stress (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, cortisol, and testosterone). Fat-free mass was the single strongest predictor of TEE among Hadza adults (r(2)  = 0.66, P < 0.001). Hadza men used greater daily walking distances and faster walking speeds compared with that of Hadza women, but neither sex nor any measure of physical activity or work load were correlated with TEE in analyses controlling for fat-free mass. Compared with developed, industrial populations, Hadza adults had similar TEE but elevated levels of metabolic stress as measured by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Our results indicate that daily physical activity may not predict TEE within traditional hunter-gatherer populations like the Hadza. Instead, adults with high levels of habitual physical activity may adapt by reducing energy allocation to other physiological activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Harper, T; Georges, K; Bridgewater, E

    2001-01-01

    Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID). Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  7. A phenomenographic study of students' experiences with transition from pre-college engineering programs to first-year engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Noah

    Recent national dialogues on the importance of preparing more students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics has driven the development of formal and informal learning opportunities for children and adolescents to explore engineering. Despite the growth of these programs, relatively little research exists on how participation in these programs affects students who choose to pursue further study in engineering. The present study addressed this gap through an exploration of the different ways that First-Year Engineering students experience the transition from pre-college engineering to undergraduate engineering studies. Given the focus of this research on students' experiences, phenomenography was chosen to explore the phenomenon of transition from pre-college to first-year engineering at a large, public Midwestern university. This facilitated understanding the range of variation in the ways that students experienced this transition. Twenty-two students with different amounts of participation in a variety of different engineering programs were selected to be interviewed using a purposeful maximum variation sampling strategy. The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview protocol that encouraged the participants to reflect on their pre-college engineering experiences, their experiences in First-Year Engineering, and the transition between the two domains. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenographic methods to develop an outcome space consisting of five qualitatively different but related ways of experiencing the transition from pre-college to First-Year Engineering. These categories of description included Foreclosure, Frustration, Tedium, Connection, and Engaging Others. With the exception of the first category which was characterized by a lack of passion and commitment to engineering, the remaining four categories formed a hierarchical relationship representing increasing integration in First-Year Engineering. The

  8. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. New Jersey City University's College of Education Writing Assessment Program: Profile of a Local Response to a Systemic Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This profile presents New Jersey City University's Writing Assessment Program from its creation in 2002 to its elimination in 2017. The program arose as an attempt to raise the writing skills of the diverse, first generation teacher certification candidates in the College of Education. Despite political missteps, the program gained greater…

  10. Legitimization of regulatory norms: Waterfowl hunter acceptance of changing duck bag limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Lawrence, Jeffrey S.; Cordts, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined response to regulatory change over time, or addressed hunter attitudes about changes in hunting bag limits. This article explores Minnesota waterfowl hunters’ attitudes about duck bag limits, examining attitudes about two state duck bag limits that were initially more restrictive than the maximum set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), but then increased to match federal limits. Results are from four mail surveys that examined attitudes about bag limits over time. Following two bag limit increases, a greater proportion of hunters rated the new bag limit “too high” and a smaller proportion rated it “too low.” Several years following the first bag limit increase, the proportion of hunters who indicated that the limit was “too high” had declined, suggesting hunter acceptance of the new regulation. Results suggest that waterfowl bag limits may represent legal norms that influence hunter attitudes and gain legitimacy over time.

  11. The Path to Baltimore's "Best Prospect" Jobs without a College Degree: Career Credentialing Programs at Baltimore's Community Colleges. The Abell Report. Volume 28, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Only one in five graduates of Baltimore City Public Schools matriculates to a four-year college; the vast majority enroll in community college or look for a full-time job. Baltimore graduates and job-seekers need postsecondary training that works. "The Path to Baltimore's 'Best Prospect' Jobs without a College Degree: Career Credentialing…

  12. Career Opportunities: Career Technical Education and the College Completion Agenda. Part II: Inventory and Analysis of CTE Programs in the California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Colleen; Jez, Su Jin; Chisholm, Eric; Shulock, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The Obama Administration has once again demonstrated the important role community colleges play in educating the nation's workforce and boosting the nation's economy with its recently proposed Community College to Career Fund. This $8 billion fund is aimed at forging partnerships between colleges and businesses to train workers for good-paying…

  13. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual individuals; and (c) altered participants' attitudes toward premarital sex and monogamy. The program used diverse teaching methods, providing 6 sessions over a period of 9 weeks about sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes to college students (age 18-26 years) in Southwest China. Sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes of 80 comprehensive sexual education class students (education group) and 92 general mental health education class students (control group) were measured at baseline, the end of course (posttest), and 3 weeks after the end of course (follow-up). There were significant effects of the program on (a) sexual health knowledge, including reproductive health, contraception, condom use, and HIV/AIDS and (b) positive attitudes toward sexual minorities, although these changes may require further reinforcement. In contrast, the program did not alter students' attitudes about premarital sex or monogamy. The results are discussed in terms of recommendations of sex education in China and future directions for research. © 2013 APJPH.

  14. Nursing students' perceptions of their educational environment in the bachelor's programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Gideon; Ishtiaq, Muhammad; Parveen, Subia

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate nursing students' perceptions of their educational environment in a private college. Perceptions were compared between genders and 2 bachelor's programs. A total of 219 students participated in this study, drawn from the Generic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (GBSN) and the Post-Registered Nurse Bachelor of Science in Nursing (PRBSN) programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure was utilized for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate total scores, as well as means and standard deviations, and the t-test was applied for comparisons according to program and gender. The overall total mean score (119 of 200) is suggestive of more positive than negative perceptions of the educational environment. The mean score of 13 of 28 on the social self-perception subscale suggests that the social environment was felt to be 'not a nice place.' The t-test revealed more positive perceptions among students enrolled in the PRBSN program (Pnursing students. Both positive and negative perceptions were reported; the overall sense of a positive environment was present, but the social component requires immediate attention, along with other unsatisfactory components. Establishing a supportive environment conducive to competence-based learning would play an important role in bringing desirable changes to the educational environment.

  15. College education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Space Grant Colleges and Universities must build the space curriculum of the future on the firm basis of deep knowledge of an involvement with the present operating programs of the nation and an on-going and extensive program of leading edge research in the aerospace sciences and engineering, management, law, finance, and the other arts that are integral to our planetary society. The Space Grant College and Fellowship Program must create new academic fields of enquiry, which is a long and difficult process that will require deeper and broader interaction between NASA and academia than has previously existed.

  16. Planning for College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPNet, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Planning for College Success" (PCS) is a curriculum model designed by Sharon Downs, M.S., for a course intended to assist deaf and hard of hearing students during their initial introduction to college life. This program allows students to work one-on-one with a counselor to plan for their college success. The program includes short-term goals and…

  17. Gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, Stephanie L; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Basaglia, Giulia; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; De Bellis, Gianluca; Luiselli, Donata; Brigidi, Patrizia; Mabulla, Audax; Marlowe, Frank; Henry, Amanda G; Crittenden, Alyssa N

    2014-04-15

    Human gut microbiota directly influences health and provides an extra means of adaptive potential to different lifestyles. To explore variation in gut microbiota and to understand how these bacteria may have co-evolved with humans, here we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolite production of the gut microbiota from a community of human hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. We show that the Hadza have higher levels of microbial richness and biodiversity than Italian urban controls. Further comparisons with two rural farming African groups illustrate other features unique to Hadza that can be linked to a foraging lifestyle. These include absence of Bifidobacterium and differences in microbial composition between the sexes that probably reflect sexual division of labour. Furthermore, enrichment in Prevotella, Treponema and unclassified Bacteroidetes, as well as a peculiar arrangement of Clostridiales taxa, may enhance the Hadza's ability to digest and extract valuable nutrition from fibrous plant foods.

  18. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Alyssa N; Zes, David A

    2015-01-01

    Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society.

  19. Evidence for early hunters beneath the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, John M; Meadows, Guy A

    2009-06-23

    Scholars have hypothesized that the poorly understood and rarely encountered archaeological sites from the terminal Paleoindian and Archaic periods associated with the Lake Stanley low water stage (10,000-7,500 BP) are lost beneath the modern Great Lakes. Acoustic and video survey on the Alpena-Amberley ridge, a feature that would have been a dry land corridor crossing the Lake Huron basin during this time period, reveals the presence of a series of stone features that match, in form and location, structures used for caribou hunting in both prehistoric and ethnographic times. These results present evidence for early hunters on the Alpena-Amberley corridor, and raise the possibility that intact settlements and ancient landscapes are preserved beneath Lake Huron.

  20. Factors impacting hunter access to private lands in southeast Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walberg, Eric; Cornicelli, Louis; Fulton, David C.

    2018-01-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have important socioeconomic and ecological impacts in the United States. Hunting is considered to be important for the effective management of deer and relies on access to privately owned lands. In 2013, we surveyed nonindustrial private landowners in southeast Minnesota and created two logit models to examine factors that impact landowners’ decision to (a) allow public hunting access and (b) post private property. Parcel characteristics were found to impact landowner decisions to allow hunting access, particularly the size of the property and whether it was posted. Hunting access to small properties was more likely to be restricted to family, friends, and neighbors (83%) compared to medium (74%) or large properties (60%). Hunter concerns (e.g., liability) and knowledge about deer management was significant in both models, suggesting there are opportunities to educate landowners about the importance of allowing public hunting access and available liability protections.

  1. An Overview of the Roles and Responsibilities of Chinese Medical Colleges in Body Donation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low…

  2. A Framework for Evaluating Implementation of Community College Workforce Education Partnerships and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnall, Louise; Tennant, Elizabeth; Stites, Regie

    2016-01-01

    Greater investments in community college workforce education are fostering large-scale partnerships between employers and educators. However, the evaluation work in this area has focused on outcome and productivity metrics, rather than addressing measures of implementation quality, which is critical to scaling any innovation. To deepen…

  3. 77 FR 32612 - Proposed Priorities; Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs; College...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... English learners and students with disabilities, to enable them to obtain a secondary school diploma and... lack of financial literacy and indicators thereof-- such as overestimating the price of college, not... knowledge base on the relationship between asset-building strategies and education outcomes for students...

  4. College or Training Programs: How to Decide. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c115

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A high school diploma opens the door to many exciting new options. These might include a first full-time job, or part-time or full-time attendance at a technical school, community college, or university. Students might want to obtain a certificate, an associate degree, or a diploma. With so many choices, it can be a challenge to decide which path…

  5. Honors Programs at Smaller Colleges. 3rd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This monograph focuses upon areas of special concern to those working with honors at smaller colleges and universities: mission, recruitment, facilities, administration, budget, and curriculum. In each area, the author makes some general suggestions about overall operating principles, note specific issues that can lead to difficulties, and suggest…

  6. Development of an Instrument for Indirect Assessment of College Business Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Eileen A.; Lusher, Anna; Mondal, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of continuous improvement, universities are constantly seeking ways to measure and enhance their effectiveness. Within colleges of business, the importance of assessment has been highlighted recently by AACSB accreditation standards dealing with assurance of learning. While AACSB standards focus primarily on direct measures of…

  7. Travel and Tourism Industry: Program Options for City College of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA.

    In an effort to determine the current occupational outlook and resulting implications for education and training, the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), in California, undertook a study of current trends in the travel and tourism industry. This report provides findings from the project, which involved consultation with local and national…

  8. The Pew National Dental Education Program at the University of Florida College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Donbald R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Strategic planning at the University of Florida College of Dentistry identified: the needs of the elderly population; the remote location of the dental school relative to the population in the state; the need to expand clinical research; the need to utilize computers; the reliance on state funding; etc. (MLW)

  9. Blogs, Webinars and Significant Learning: A Case Report on a Teacher Training Program for College Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Bueno, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This case study reports on a teacher training experience for college professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students' learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design…

  10. Enabling Persistence of Veteran Students at North Carolina Community Colleges through Institutional Support Programs and Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzes, Janice Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Over two million service men and women, returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, will take advantage of the educational benefits of the Post-9/11 GI Bill and will enroll in community colleges. Despite over 70 years of education benefits for U.S. veterans, there has been little research into the availability and effectiveness of…

  11. Smooth Move: A Psychoeducational Program for High School Seniors to Ease the Emotional Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Mary H.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to college is considered to be a stressful time. Nearly all first year students experience loneliness, but many also experience stress, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and suicidal thoughts (Compas, Wagner, Slavia, & Vannatta, 1986; Nicpon, Huser, Blanks, Sollenberger, Befort, & Robinson Kurpius, 2006-2007;…

  12. 75 FR 3212 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; College Assistance Migrant... INFORMATION CONTACT: David De Soto, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Migrant Education, 400 [email protected] , or Tara Ramsey, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Migrant Education, 400 Maryland...

  13. Community College Faculty Recruitment Practices: The Effects of Applicant Gender, Instructional Programs, and Job Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study that applied marketing and advertising theory to recruit community-college business faculty. The reactions of male and female target applicants to recruitment advertisements and job descriptions were assessed, with differences found between the two groups. Discusses results, and implications for practice, theory and research. (36…

  14. Transportability of Equivalence-Based Programmed Instruction: Efficacy and Efficiency in a College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    College students in a psychology research-methods course learned concepts related to inferential statistics and hypothesis decision making. One group received equivalence-based instruction on conditional discriminations that were expected to promote the emergence of many untaught, academically useful abilities (i.e., stimulus equivalence group). A…

  15. A Systems Approach to the Design and Operation of Effective Marketing Programs in Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigliano, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a research-based marketing model consisting of an environmental scanning process, a series of marketing audits, and an information-processing scheme. Views the essential elements of college marketing as information flow; high-level, long-term commitment; diverse strategies; innovation; and a broad view of marketing. Includes a marketing…

  16. College Information Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Margaret A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of a sampling of college-bound high school seniors in Arizona was undertaken to determine students' information needs for college choice. Items, including institutional, student, and program characteristics, are ranked in order of perceived importance. (MSE)

  17. The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Program: Immunohistochemistry Breast Marker Audit Overview 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffajee, Zenobia Ayesha Mohamed; Kumar, Beena; Francis, Glenn; Peck, Martyn; Badrick, Tony

    2017-11-20

    The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Program (RCPAQAP) Anatomical Pathology provides a comprehensive External Quality Assurance (EQA) exercise to review the reporting of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH) breast markers through an audit of clinical results. The aim of this exercise was to provide information regarding the quality of breast marker testing within clinical laboratories from 2005 to 2015. This comprehensive audit included estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 marker reporting. This was an important quality assurance activity established in response to ongoing difficulties experienced in laboratories in this area of testing.

  18. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height were 20.8 years and 161.9 cm, respectively. After 8 weeks, there were significant reductions in body weight, body fat mass, percent body fat, waist-hip ratio and BMI. The dietary habit score such as a balanced diet, regularity of mealtime, overeating, eating while watching TV or using the computer and eating salty food were increased significantly. Serum lipid levels such as total cholesterol level, LDL-cholesterol level and triglyceride level were decreased but not significantly. There were decreases in intake of energy, protein and fat and increases in intakes of dietary fiber, folic acid, calcium and potassium from the beginning to the end of the program. There were significant improvements on subcomponents of quality of life; physical functioning, general-health and vitality. The limitation of this study was the fact that there was no control group, but an overall evaluation suggests the 8-week body weight control program consisting of diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification with supplementation of sea tangle would be helpful to improve the body composition, dietary habits, daily nutrient intakes and quality of life in Korean female college students. PMID:20098584

  19. Nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the bachelor’s programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Victor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in a private college. Perceptions were compared between genders and 2 bachelor’s programs. Methods A total of 219 students participated in this study, drawn from the Generic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (GBSN and the Post-Registered Nurse Bachelor of Science in Nursing (PRBSN programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure was utilized for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate total scores, as well as means and standard deviations, and the t-test was applied for comparisons according to program and gender. Results The overall total mean score (119 of 200 is suggestive of more positive than negative perceptions of the educational environment. The mean score of 13 of 28 on the social self-perception subscale suggests that the social environment was felt to be ‘not a nice place.’ The t-test revealed more positive perceptions among students enrolled in the PRBSN program (P<0.0001 than among those enrolled in the GBSN program and more positive perceptions among female students than among male students (P<0.0001. Conclusion Commonalities and differences were found in the perceptions of the nursing students. Both positive and negative perceptions were reported; the overall sense of a positive environment was present, but the social component requires immediate attention, along with other unsatisfactory components. Establishing a supportive environment conducive to competence-based learning would play an important role in bringing desirable changes to the educational environment.

  20. Attracting Students Into Science: Insights From a Summer Research Internship Program for Community College Students in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. P.; Smith, L. K.; Gold, A. U.; Batchelor, R. L.; Monday, B.

    2014-12-01

    Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs commonly serve students already committed to careers in science. To spark student interest in the sciences early in their college career, the CIRES diversity initiative teamed with the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory to build an REU for Colorado community college students. A group of 7 students was selected from consideration of diversity, prior training, and personal statements. Each student was paired with a research science mentor. Field excursions and team-building exercises filled the first week of the 8-week program. Students received weekly training in science communication, responsible conduct of research, use of spreadsheet and graphing software, and statistical analysis. Each student presented their research in a poster session, an oral presentation, and a written report. Several aspects of this pilot program worked well. The students formed a very supportive cohort, despite the fact that they were not in residence. Cohesion grew out of the immersion in field trips, and was reinforced with weekly check-ins. The trainings were essential for seeing projects through to written and oral presentations. Teaming students for fieldwork was an effective strategy to build support, and reduce mentor fatigue. Each student produced useful data. In the future, we would include a workshop on personal finances to address a clear need. Transportation support will be provided. A residential program might attract some but could preclude participation of students with families or other life-issues. Personal tutoring tailored to research projects would address low math skills. All 7 students completed the program; several elected to submit to the undergraduate virtual poster session at Fall AGU. Students all reported enormous personal and academic growth. Some are discussing transfer and graduate school opportunities with their mentors. The enthusiasm and appreciation of the students was unparalleled.

  1. The impact of student diversity on interest, design, and promotion of Web-based tailored nutrition and physical activity programs for community colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; De Jesus, Maria; Wallington, Sherrie Flynt

    2011-01-01

    To examine an organizational level perspective of the process of adopting Web-based tailored nutrition and physical activity programs for community college students. In this qualitative study, 21 individual key informant interviews of community college student services and health center administrators were used to examine organizational-level perceptions of interest in, design characteristics of, and ways to promote health programs. A cross-classification matrix of a priori and emergent themes related to student diversity was created to describe cross-cutting patterns. Findings revealed 5 emergent themes for consideration in program development related to student diversity: (1) multiple roles played by students, (2) limited access to financial resources, (3) varied student demographics, (4) different levels of understanding, and (5) commuting to campus. Nutrition and physical activity programs for community colleges need to specifically address the diverse nature of their students to increase the potential of adoption. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the efficacy of an mHealth media literacy education program for sexual health promotion in older adolescents attending community college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, Tracy Marie; Kupersmidt, Janis Beth; Malik, Christina Valerie; Keefe, Elyse Mallory

    2018-04-01

    To determine the feasibility of a mobile health (mHealth), media literacy education program, Media Aware, for improving sexual health outcomes in older adolescent community college students. 184 community college students (ages 18-19) participated in the study from April-December 2015. Eight community college campuses were randomly assigned to either the intervention or a wait-list control group. Student participants from each campus completed web-based pretest and posttest questionnaires. Intervention group students received Media Aware in between questionnaires. Several intervention effects of the Media Aware program were significant, including reducing older adolescents' self-reported risky sexual behaviors; positively affecting knowledge, attitudes, normative beliefs, and intentions related to sexual health; and increasing media skepticism. Some gender differences in the findings were revealed. The results from this study suggest that Media Aware is a promising means of delivering comprehensive sexual health education to older adolescents attending community college.

  3. The Effect of a Computer Program Designed with Constructivist Principles for College Non-Science Majors on Understanding of Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielard, Valerie Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to learn what effect a computer program would have on academic achievement and attitude toward science of college students enrolled in a biology class for non-science majors. It became apparent that the instructor also had an effect on attitudes toward science. The researcher designed a computer program,…

  4. Using a Merit-Based Scholarship Program to Increase Rates of College Enrollment in an Urban School District: The Case of the Pittsburgh Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozick, Robert; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Engberg, John

    2015-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Promise is a scholarship program that provides $5,000 per year toward college tuition for public high school graduates in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who earned a 2.5 GPA and a 90% attendance record. This study used a difference-in-difference design to assess whether the introduction of the Promise scholarship program directly…

  5. "Context-Specific" Teacher Preparation for New York City: An Exploration of the Content of Context in Bard College's Urban Teacher Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerness, Karen; Craig, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examine a residency program that was developed to prepare teachers specifically for New York City schools--the Bard College Master of Arts in Teaching Urban Teacher Residency program. This focused preparation on the particular urban context of New York City provides us with a unique opportunity to examine the nature of…

  6. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorders and Obesity among Female College Students: 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the effects of a prevention program targeting both eating disorders and obesity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Method: Female college students at risk for these outcomes because of body image concerns (N = 398) were randomized to the "Healthy Weight 2" group-based 4-hr prevention program, which promotes lasting healthy…

  7. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  8. An overview of the status of nuclear science education in pre-college programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.C.; Atwood, C.H.

    1993-01-01

    This communication will provide an overview of the papers given in the Symposium entitled 'Pre-College Education in Nuclear Science' held under the auspices of the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society, and given at the 204th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C., on August 24-28, 1992. The Symposium consisted of 45 invited papers, and covered topics in nuclear science education at the high school, middle school, and elementary school levels. The Symposium also presented an overview of the involvement of university and federal laboratories in providing teaching and research opportunities for pre-college faculty and students, curriculum enhancement by special interest groups such as power and utility companies, as well as funding opportunities from private and federal agencies. (author)

  9. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  10. Environmental monitors : creative sentencing leads to new training program with Fort McMurray's Keyano College and local residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collison, M.

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, levels of chlorine in drinking water at EnCana's Christina Lake work camp fell below minimum requirements. The internal audit that followed demonstrated a need for further training of the work camp's staff. EnCana was eventually fined $242,402. EnCana's response was to propose an environmental monitoring program to the Aboriginal education department at Keyano College. The program was designed to attract students with local traditional knowledge who wished to remain in their own communities. The monitors were trained to consider the impact of human and industrial activities on the environment and assist in wildlife counts, surveys, and water quality testing. The success of the program's pilot year has led to other companies in the oil and gas industry investing further funds in the program to ensure its continuance. The program considers 6 main subjects, notably (1) traditional land use, (2) environmental planning, (3) environmental impact assessment processes, (4) global information systems, (5) waste management, and (6) reclamation. 4 figs

  11. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. OV-1/AC-119 Hunter-Killer Team

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sexton, Richard R; Hodgson, William M

    1972-01-01

    Hunter-Killer operations were but a logical extension of the resourceful thinking behind the development of gunships as a solution to some of the tactical problems of the unique war in Southeast Asia...

  12. Mental health perspectives of Hunter syndrome: Case reports of two biological siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hunter syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulphatase, leading to progressive accumulation of a substance called glycosaminoglycans in nearly all cell types, tissues, and organs. Hunter syndrome presents with facial dysmorphism, airway diseases, skeletal defects, cardiomyopathies, and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Mental subnormality is a cardinal feature in Hunter syndrome. This is a progressive cognitive decline that is not amenable to enzyme replacement therapy. Due to progressive cognitive decline, training the children to improve the adaptive functioning is a challenge that creates immense stress for the caregivers. Patients with Hunter syndrome should undergo serial assessment of intellectual ability and may be trained accordingly.

  13. Think Warm Thoughts: Plan Ahead for Summertime Information Literacy Programs! The College Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasowitz-Scheer, Abby

    2009-01-01

    It's winter! While it is frosty outside, one can at least think warm thoughts by starting now to plan ahead for summer information literacy programs. This article is designed to provide some ideas for planning next summer's reading, sleuthing, and research programs. It features a variety of programs organized by academic librarians this past…

  14. Employee Alcoholism and Assistance Programs: Adapting an Innovation for College and University Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M.

    1980-01-01

    Strategies for initiating employee alcoholism and assistance programs in higher education institutions are considered. Barriers to faculty utilization of such programs include visibility of work performance and nature of supervision. Modes for adapting existing program designs to higher education are suggested. (Author/JMF)

  15. Effectiveness of sleep education programs to improve sleep hygiene and/or sleep quality in college students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Shellene K; Francis-Jimenez, Coleen M; Knibbs, Melida Delcina; Umali, Ismael L; Truglio-Londrigan, Marie

    2016-09-01

    Sleep health is essential for overall health, quality of life and safety. Researchers have found a reduction in the average hours of sleep among college students. Poor sleep has been associated with deficits in attention, reduction in academic performance, impaired driving, risk-taking behaviors, depression, impaired social relationships and poorer health. College students may have limited knowledge about sleep hygiene and the behaviors that supports sleep health, which may lead to poor sleep hygiene behavior. To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of sleep education programs in improving sleep hygiene knowledge, sleep hygiene behavior and/or sleep quality versus traditional strategies. All undergraduate or graduate college students, male or female, 18 years and older and of any culture or ethnicity. Formal sleep education programs that included a curriculum on sleep hygiene behavior. Educational delivery methods that took place throughout the participants' college experience and included a variety of delivery methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies. Sleep hygiene knowledge, sleep hygiene behavior and/or sleep quality. Literature including published and unpublished studies in the English language from January 1, 1980 through August 17, 2015. A search of CINAHL, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Academic Search Complete, PsychINFO, Healthsource: Nursing/Academic edition, ProQuest Central, PubMed and ERIC were conducted using identified keywords and indexed terms. A gray literature search was also performed. Quantitative papers were assessed by two reviewers using critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Data were extracted using the JBI-MAStARI data extraction tool. Data extracted included interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and objectives. Meta

  16. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  17. Lead shot pellets dispersed by hunters: ingested by ducks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danell, K [Univ. of Umea, Sweden; Andersson, A; Marcstrom, V

    1977-01-01

    Many of the lead pellets shot by waterfowl hunters over shores and waters fall on the feeding grounds of ducks and geese. These pellets, picked up and ingested by the birds, can remain in the gizzard where they are eroded by mechanical and chemical action. In some cases the bird absorbs enough lead to cause lead poisoning. This report describes the incidence of ingested lead shot pellets found in 928 ducks collected in Sweden during hunting season. Pellets were found in both dabbling and diving ducks and were present in birds from six of the eight localities sampled. Usually one or two pellets were found but some ducks contained up to 62 pellets. As the incidence of ingested pellets in the present study is approximately the same as that found in North America, where the annual duck loss due to lead poisoning is estimated to be 2 to 3 percent of the population, it may be assumed that lead poisoning is a mortality factor for Swedish ducks also.

  18. Social networks and cooperation in hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, Coren L; Marlowe, Frank W; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2012-01-25

    Social networks show striking structural regularities, and both theory and evidence suggest that networks may have facilitated the development of large-scale cooperation in humans. Here, we characterize the social networks of the Hadza, a population of hunter-gatherers in Tanzania. We show that Hadza networks have important properties also seen in modernized social networks, including a skewed degree distribution, degree assortativity, transitivity, reciprocity, geographic decay and homophily. We demonstrate that Hadza camps exhibit high between-group and low within-group variation in public goods game donations. Network ties are also more likely between people who give the same amount, and the similarity in cooperative behaviour extends up to two degrees of separation. Social distance appears to be as important as genetic relatedness and physical proximity in explaining assortativity in cooperation. Our results suggest that certain elements of social network structure may have been present at an early point in human history. Also, early humans may have formed ties with both kin and non-kin, based in part on their tendency to cooperate. Social networks may thus have contributed to the emergence of cooperation.

  19. Rabbit hunter uveitis: case report of tularemia uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrada, Céline; Azza, Said; Bodaghi, Bahram; Le Hoang, Phuc; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Literature reports on ophthalmological manifestations related to tularemia, a zoonose caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, largely refer to Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, which consists of the association of conjunctivitis with preauricular lymphadenitis. In this paper, we report a case of intraocular inflammation during tularemia infection. A 52-year-old Caucasian man was diagnosed with unilateral uveitis. The uveitis was posterior, with a 2+ vitritis and a large yellowish lesion involving the macula with an overlying sub-retinal detachment, extending inferiorly, and subretinal hemorrhages. Fluorescein angiography showed a late hyperfluorescence with focal vascular leakage. Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed the presence of a 3.8 mm parietal granuloma with a few calcifications in the left eye. While extensive work-up eliminated any other infectious and non-infectious etiology, tularemia was diagnosed by advanced serology consisting of two-dimensional Western-immunoblotting. The patient, a hunter, recalled having killed rabbits in the days before the symptoms appeared. Uveitis was rapidly controlled following treatment with doxycycline, yet three years after initiation of the treatment, the patient still complained of loss of vision in the left eye with a central scotoma. Posterior uveitis may be an infrequent manifestation of tularemia infection, and therefore this infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraocular inflammation in areas where F. tularensis is endemic.

  20. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-27

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  1. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa N Crittenden

    Full Text Available Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society.

  2. Profile of idursulfase for the treatment of Hunter syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sestito S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Simona Sestito, Ferdinando Ceravolo, Michele Grisolia, Elisa Pascale, Licia Pensabene, Daniela Concolino Department of Pediatrics, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; Hunter syndrome is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with recombinant human IDS, available since 2005, is currently the most appropriate treatment for this progressive, multisystemic, chronic, and life-threatening disease. Efficacy and safety of therapy with idursulfase have been assessed in several clinical trials, and confirmed in many clinical reports. Long-term follow-up of patients receiving ERT has demonstrated the importance of an early onset of treatment with idursulfase, before irreversible pathological changes occur. Intravenously administered idursulfase is not able to cross the blood–brain barrier, so neurological signs and symptoms cannot benefit from ERT, still remaining a major challenge in the treatment of MPS II. Keywords: MPS II, glycosaminoglycans, enzyme replacement therapy, ERT

  3. Parental experience of enzyme replacement therapy for Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraczewska, M; O'Leary, D; Walsh, O; Monavari, A; Crushell, E

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to establish the profile of Irish patients with Hunter Syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) receiving weekly intravenous Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with recombinant iduronate-2-sulfatase and to assess the social impact and parental opinion of ERT through the use of a parental questionnaire. Nine patients aged 3.5- 14 years have received a mean of 2 (range 0.5-3.5) years of ERT. Treatment was associated with clinical improvements from baseline in hepatosplenomegaly in 6/7 (85%) respiratory manifestations in 4/6 (67%) and a mean reduction in urinary glycosaminoglycan excretion of 62%. Changes noted by parents included increased energy 3/9 (33%) and softening of skin, hair and facial features 8/9 (89%). Parents report that seven hours weekly were spent on hospitalizations for ERT. Parental employment was adversely affected in 8 (89%) families. One day of school/preschool (20%) was lost every week for 8 (89%) children. All parents believed the benefits of ERT out-weigh the difficulties involved. All families would welcome the introduction of home based therapy. In conclusion the social and educational burden of hospital-based ERT on these children and their families is significant. The introduction of home-based therapy is likely to improve overall quality of life for MPSII patients and their families.

  4. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Anderson, Janis L; Hodge, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course.

  5. Humans as predators: an overview of predation strategies of hunters with contrasting motivational drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Dalerum

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Predator-prey theory suggests that generalist predators are linked to demographic stability of prey whereas specialists are destabilizing. We overview the demographic consequences of different predation strategies and hypothesize that subsistence hunting occurs opportunistically, persecution hunters behave like specialist predators, and recreational hunters behave like generalist predators. Under this hypothesis, persecution hunting would have destabilizing effects, whereas the effects of subsistence and recreational hunting would be neutral or stabilizing. We found poor empirical support for this hypothesis, but there was scarce empirical data. Recreational hunters mainly hunted opportunistically and hunting as managed persecution followed a type III functional response, i.e. with low hunting intensity at low game abundances and a switch to an increased intensity at some level of abundance. We suggest that recreational hunters have limited destabilizing effects on game populations and that hunting may be an ineffective way of complete the removal of invasive species. We urge for further studies quantifying the responses of hunters to game abundances, in particular studies evaluating the responses of subsistence hunters and illegal persecution.

  6. Ride, shoot, and call: wildlife use among contemporary urban hunters in Três Fronteiras, Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie van Vliet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most bushmeat studies in the Amazon region focus on hunting patterns of indigenous populations in rural settings. Our study describes the existence of urban hunters in medium-sized towns. Using a variety of data collection methods, we describe the main socioeconomic characteristics of urban hunters in Benjamin Constant and Atalaia do Norte, Brazil. We analyze the patterns and motivations of urban hunters as well as the type of prey harvested and quantities traded. All interviewed hunters are caboclos, people of mixed Brazilian indigenous and European origins from rural areas who now live in urban and peri-urban areas. Living in these more populated spaces allows these hunters better market options for their harvest and allows them to alternate hunting with other economic activities. Only 29% of the interviewed hunters relied solely on hunting. In total, 11.6 tons of bushmeat were harvested (of which 97% was traded by four hunters during the monitoring period (60 days. The most hunted species were terecay (Podocnemis unifilis, curassow (Crax sp., paca (Cuniculus paca, and tapir (Tapirus terrestris. The ratio of bushmeat sold to that consumed, as well as the level of participation in the bushmeat market chain, allowed us to differentiate between specialized and diversified hunters. Specialized hunters sell 81% of the bushmeat caught to known wholesalers in the city. Diversified hunters sell 21% of their total catch to families, neighbors, or friends directly as fresh meat, avoiding intermediaries. For all hunters, hunting localities are associated with peri-urban roadways that are easily reached by motorbike or bicycle from the hunters' houses in the urban areas or city fringes. Our results show that urban hunters in medium-sized towns exemplify how traditional hunting systems can be adapted in the face of globalization, by living close to the market, at relatively manageable distances from hunting grounds, and using modern methods of

  7. EXPANDING HORIZONS: A PILOT MENTORING PROGRAM LINKING COLLEGE/GRADUATE STUDENTS AND TEENS WITH ASD

    OpenAIRE

    Curtin, Carol; Humphrey, Kristin; Vronsky, Kaela; Mattern, Kathryn; Nicastro, Susan; Perrin, Ellen C.

    2015-01-01

    A small pilot program of nine youth ages 13–18 with high functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or Asperger’s syndrome assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of an individualized mentoring program. Youth met weekly for 6 months with trained young adult mentors at a local Boys and Girls Clubs. Participants reported improvements in self-esteem, social anxiety, and quality of life. Participants, parents, mentors, and staff reported that the program improved participa...

  8. An exploration of the biomedical optics course construction of undergraduate biomedical engineering program in medical colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shijun; Lyu, Jie; Zhang, Peiming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the teaching goals, teaching contents and teaching methods in biomedical optics course construction are discussed. From the dimension of teaching goals, students should master the principle of optical inspection on the human body, diagnosis and treatment of methodology and instruments, through the study of the theory and practice of this course, and can utilize biomedical optics methods to solve practical problems in the clinical medical engineering practice. From the dimension of teaching contents, based on the characteristics of biomedical engineering in medical colleges, the organic integration of engineering aspects, medical optical instruments, and biomedical aspects dispersed in human anatomy, human physiology, clinical medicine fundamental related to the biomedical optics is build. Noninvasive measurement of the human body composition and noninvasive optical imaging of the human body were taken as actual problems in biomedical optics fields. Typical medical applications such as eye optics and laser medicine were also integrated into the theory and practice teaching. From the dimension of teaching methods, referencing to organ-system based medical teaching mode, optical principle and instrument principle were taught by teachers from school of medical instruments, and the histological characteristics and clinical actual need in areas such as digestive diseases and urinary surgery were taught by teachers from school of basic medicine or clinical medicine of medical colleges. Furthermore, clinical application guidance would be provided by physician and surgeons in hospitals.

  9. CLEP college mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Mel

    2012-01-01

    Earn College Credit with REA's Test Prep for CLEP* College Mathematics Everything you need to pass the exam and get the college credit you deserve.CLEP* is the most popular credit-by-examination program in the country, accepted by more than 2,900 colleges and universities. For over 15 years, REA has helped students pass the CLEP* exam and earn college credit while reducing their tuition costs. Our test prep for CLEP* College Mathematics and the free online tools that come with it, allow you to create a personalized CLEP* study plan that can be customized to fit you: your schedule, your lea

  10. Near-source surface seismic measurements for the NPE, NPE Calibration, Hunter`s Trophy, and Mineral Quarry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, R.E.; Leverette, J.A. [Field Command Defense Nuclear Agency, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    An extensive seismic network was deployed on the surface of Rainier Mesa for both the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) Calibration shot as well as the full scale NPE event. This network was very similar to previous deployments for the nuclear events MISTY ECHO, MINERAL QUARRY, and HUNTERS TROPHY. For the full scale NPE event three-component accelerometers and seismometers were fielded at 32 sites across the mesa. A slightly smaller network with 28 stations was in operation for the 300 pound NPE calibration event. The mesa top array included both accelerometers and seismometers. The accelerometers were used to obtain data from the main NPE event while the seismometers with their higher sensitivity were used to record the 300 pound cal shot and several hundred after events from the NPE. Large spatial variations in ground motion are evident in both the full mesa data set as well as a small (80 m on a side) aperture, 9-element triangular array. This paper summarizes the data and discusses wave propagation effects. A companion paper presents a comparative source analysis.

  11. College Programs in Women's Prisons: Faculty Perceptions of Teaching Higher Education behind Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Kymberly

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, the RAND Safety and Justice Program published a comprehensive analysis that "found, on average, inmates who participated in correctional education programs had 43 percent lower odds of recidivating than inmates who did not and that correctional education may increase post-release employment" Davis et al., 2014, p. xvi). The RAND…

  12. Visual Basic Programming Impact on Cognitive Style of College Students: Need for Prerequisites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Garry L.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the impact learning a visual programming language, Visual Basic, has on hemispheric cognitive style, as measured by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator (HMI). The question to be answered is: will a computer programming course help students improve their cognitive abilities in order to perform well? The cognitive styles for…

  13. Value Added: The Costs and Benefits of College Preparatory Programs. American Higher Education Report Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swail, Watson Scott

    2004-01-01

    Rarely do stakeholders ask about the effectiveness of outreach programs or whether they are an efficient use of tax dollars and philanthropic funds. As government budgets continue to be constrained and philanthropic investment gets more competitive, there is a growing acknowledgment of the need to look at the cost/benefit of these programs and…

  14. Aspects Fostering the Programming of Today's College Radio Station: The Advisor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    To help ascertain leadership, guidance, and capabilities of the station advisor (those who foster the efforts of their student staffs), this paper provides an overview of programming elements discussing such topics as programming philosophy, general formats, and legal and ethical issues. It states that those advising the campus radio station can…

  15. Royal College surgical objectives of urologic training: A survey of faculty members from Canadian training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Ahmed S.; Haddad, Richard; Dragomir, Alice; Kassouf, Wassim; Andonian, Sero; Aprikian, Armen G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: According to the Royal College objectives of training in urology, urologic surgical procedures are divided as category A, B and C. We wanted to determine the level of proficiency required and achieved by urology training faculty for Royal College accreditation. Methods: We conducted a survey that was sent electronically to all Canadian urology training faculty. Questions focused on demographics (i.e., years of practice, geographic location, subspecialty, access to robotic surgery), operating room contact with residents, opinion on the level of proficiency required from a list of 54 surgical procedures, and whether their most recent graduates attained category A proficiency in these procedures. Results: The response rate was 43.7% (95/217). Among respondents, 92.6% were full timers, 21.1% practiced urology for less than 5 years and 3.2% for more than 30 years. Responses from Quebec and Ontario formed 69.4% (34.7% each). Of the respondents, 37.9% were uro-oncologists and 75.7% reported having access to robotic surgery. Sixty percent of faculty members operate with R5 residents between 2 to 5 days per month. When respondents were asked which categories should be listed as category A, only 8 procedures received 100% agreement. Also, results varied significantly when analyzed by sub-specialty. For example, almost 50% or more of uro-oncologists believed that radical cystectomy, anterior pelvic exenteration and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be category A. The following procedures had significant disagreement suggesting the need for re-classification: glanular hypospadias repair, boari flap, entero-vesical and vesicovaginal fistulae repair. Overall, more than 80% of faculty reported that their recent graduating residents had achieved category A proficiency, in a subset of procedures. However, more than 50% of all faculty either disagreed or were ambivalent that all of their graduating residents were Category A proficient in several procedures

  16. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to lumbopelvic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermet, Shannon; McGinnis, Karen; Boodham, Melissa; Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine to what extent the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught in the undergraduate program used for patients with lumbopelvic conditions are expected to be utilized by students during their clinical internship program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College or are being used by the clinical faculty. A confidential survey was distributed to clinical faculty at the college. It consisted of a list of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used for lumbopelvic conditions taught at that college. Clinicians were asked to indicate the frequency with which they performed or they required students to perform each item. Seventeen of 23 clinicians responded. The following procedures were most likely required to be performed by clinicians: posture; ranges of motion; lower limb sensory, motor, and reflex testing; and core orthopedic tests. The following were less likely to be required to be performed: Waddell testing, Schober's test, Gillet tests, and abdominal palpation. Students were expected to perform (or clinicians performed) most of the mobilization (in particular, iliocostal, iliotransverse, and iliofemoral) and spinal manipulative therapies (in particular, the procedures referred to as the lumbar roll, lumbar pull/hook, and upper sacroiliac) taught at the college. This study suggests that there was considerable, but not complete, vertical integration between the undergraduate and clinical education program at this college.

  17. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Skills Curriculum: adoption rate, challenges and strategies for effective implementation into surgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndorffer, James R; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Paige, John; McClusky, David A; Stefanidis, Dimitris

    2013-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (ACS/APDS) National Skills Curriculum is a 3-phase program targeting technical and nontechnical skills development. Few data exist regarding the adoption of this curriculum by surgical residencies. This study attempted to determine the rate of uptake and identify implementation enablers/barriers. A web-based survey was developed by an international expert panel of surgical educators (5 surgeons and 1 psychologist). After piloting, the survey was sent to all general surgery program directors via email link. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the residency program characteristics and perceptions of the curriculum. Implementation rates for each phase and module were calculated. Adoption barriers were identified quantitatively and qualitatively using free text responses. Standardized qualitative methodology of emergent theme analysis was used to identify strategies for success and details of support required for implementation. Of the 238 program directors approached, 117 (49%) responded to the survey. Twenty-one percent (25/117) were unaware of the ACS/APDS curriculum. Implementation rates for were 36% for phase I, 19% for phase II, and 16% for phase III. The most common modules adopted were the suturing, knot-tying, and chest tube modules of phase I. Over 50% of respondents identified lack of faculty protected time, limited personnel, significant costs, and resident work-hour restrictions as major obstacles to implementation. Strategies for effective uptake included faculty incentives, adequate funding, administrative support, and dedicated time and resources. Despite the availability of a comprehensive curriculum, its diffusion into general surgery residency programs remains low. Obstacles related to successful implementation include personnel, learner, and administrative issues. Addressing these issues may improve the adoption rate of the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc

  18. College and university programs for meeting the needs of educating nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.; De Vuono, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    ANS, INPO, and NRC are considering various recommendations for university courses to be required for all nuclear power plant licensed personnel. This paper discusses these recommendations and compares them with the content and constraints of traditional university academic programs. One solution being pursued by utilities in Ohio is discussed. In this program, courses are being obtained from several different educational institutions for presentation at the power plant site. The program provides sufficient flexibility so that decisions on specific degree options do not have to be made at this time

  19. Predictors of mental illness stigma and attitudes among college students: using vignettes from a campus common reading program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Prager, Laura S; Moylan, Lois B; Smith, Kathleen Maurer; Cullinan, Meritta

    2014-09-01

    Research has demonstrated that stigmatizing mentally ill individuals is prevalent and often results in lack of adherence to or avoidance of treatment. The present study sought to examine attitudes of college students regarding mental illness as part of a campus-wide "common readings" program. The book selected was a non-fiction account of a young girl with mental illness and the program was developed to initiate dialogue about young people with mental problems. Faculty from multiple disciplines collaborated on the project. A sample of 309 students completed a web-based survey after reading a vignette about an adolescent girl with mental illness. The vignette description was based on a character in the book selected in the program. The instruments measured attribution of stigma, social distance, and familiarity with people who have mental illness. Results demonstrated that younger students and those who are less familiar with mental illness were more likely to stigmatize and maintain social distance from those who are mentally ill. Awareness of the study findings can assist health professionals and mental health workers to identify interventions that can decrease stigma. Psychiatric mental health nurses are well positioned to lead the education effort aimed at reducing stigmatizing attitudes among the public.

  20. The night of the hunter: children & adults in the secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry caesar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Night of the Hunter is  the 1956 Charles Laughton’s film considered  one of the best discussions about childhood. In this film, the story revolves around the fate of John and Pearl, two orphaned siblings whose father was hanged for stealing. The father had given the children the money, and they hid the money inside the girl’s doll. When the Preacher Powell enters their lives , both John and Pearl are in danger. The siblings have to keep a secret which is both where they put the money, and the fact that, for children, money is simply paper.

  1. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level.Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years].REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations.After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  2. State-Level Reforms That Support College-Level Program Changes in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, R. Edward; Morrissey, Sharon; Fouts, George M.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the concurrent reforms occurring in North Carolina--both campus-level changes focused on such issues as developing structured programs of study and state-level reforms aimed at supporting the campus efforts.

  3. The Graduate Program in Pharmacology at the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkman, Allan M.

    1976-01-01

    Ohio State's traditional graduate program is discussed in terms of student requirements, including competence in research strategy and experimental design, manipulative technique, and oral and written communication. Methods for meeting these requirements are reviewed briefly. (LBH)

  4. Colleges Finding 'Wellness' Programs Cut Absenteeism, Boost Productivity and Morale of Their Staff Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Liz

    1986-01-01

    Health-promotion programs provided for higher education staff are increasing. They draw on the expertise of physical education and athletic staff, counseling services, and medical centers to encourage employees to adopt lifetime regimens of healthy living. (MSE)

  5. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  6. Drivers of change in hunter offtake and hunting strategies in Sendje, Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, David J C; Fa, John E; Rowcliffe, J Marcus; Kümpel, Noëlle F

    2012-12-01

    Economic development in Africa is expected to increase levels of bushmeat hunting through rising demand for meat and improved transport infrastructure. However, few studies have tracked long-term changes in hunter behavior as a means of testing this prediction. We evaluated changes in hunter behavior in a rural community in Equatorial Guinea over a period of rapid national economic growth, during which time road access to the regional capital greatly improved. We conducted offtake surveys (Supporting Information) over 3 7-week periods at the same time of year in 1998, 2003, and 2010 and conducted hunter and household interviews (Supporting Information) in 2003 and 2010. We tested whether relations existed among catch, hunting effort, hunting strategy, and income earned through hunting and other livelihoods in 2003 and 2010. Although village offtake increased from 1775 kg in 1998 to 4172 kg in 2003, it decreased in 2010 to 1361 kg. Aggregate catch per unit effort (i.e., number of carcasses caught per hunter and per trap) decreased from 2003 to 2010, and the majority of hunters reported a decrease in abundance of local fauna. Although these results are indicative of unsustainable hunting, cumulative changes in offtake and catch per unit effort were driven by a contraction in the total area hunted following an out-migration of 29 of the village's hunters, most of whom left to gain employment in the construction industry, after 2003. Hunters operating in both 2003 and 2010 hunted closer to the village because an increased abundance of elephants posed a danger and because they desired to earn income through other activities. Our study provides an example of national economic development contributing to a reduction in the intensity and extent of hunting. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Master’s Degree Programs of Camarines Norte State College, Philippines: Impact on Its Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Godofredo E. Peteza, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    This research determined the impact of the master’s degree programs offered in the Graduate School such as Master in Business Administration, Master in Public Administration, Master in Management majors in Human Resource Management and Educational Planning and Management on its graduates from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive-survey method supplemented by interview was employed to identify specifically the profile of the graduates of master’s degree programs in terms of age, sex, civil ...

  8. Optical Science Discovery Program: Pre-College Outreach and So Much More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Miriam

    2010-03-01

    Recruiting and retaining women into the physical sciences is an ongoing struggle for universities, with the gap between men and women in physics remaining strong. Research shows a precipitous drop in female participation in the physical sciences around the 7th grade year of primary education, where girls begin losing interest during middle school, the drain continuing throughout high school with another significant drop at the bachelors level. To combat the loss of women in the physical sciences, the Oregon Center for Optics at the University of Oregon has created the Optical Science Discovery Program (OSDP), a precollege outreach program that targets girls in middle and high school. This program uses optical sciences as the medium through which girls explore experimental science. The program consists of a one-week intensive summer camp, a mentored monthly science club, summer internships and mentoring opportunities for camp alumni. By utilizing media often at the core of teenage life (e.g. Facebook, MySpace) we also aim to interact with program participants in a familiar and informal environment. Mentoring of OSDP activities is carried out by faculty and students of all levels. This in turn allows other education and outreach efforts at the University of Oregon to incorporate OSDP activities into their own, contributing to our broader university goals of surmounting barriers to higher education and creating a more scientifically literate populace. This talk will describe the OSDP program and its incorporation into the broader spectrum of outreach and education efforts.

  9. Master’s Degree Programs of Camarines Norte State College, Philippines: Impact on Its Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godofredo E. Peteza, Jr.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This research determined the impact of the master’s degree programs offered in the Graduate School such as Master in Business Administration, Master in Public Administration, Master in Management majors in Human Resource Management and Educational Planning and Management on its graduates from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive-survey method supplemented by interview was employed to identify specifically the profile of the graduates of master’s degree programs in terms of age, sex, civil status, level of appointment before and after taking the master’s degree program, monthly income before and after taking the master’s degree program, number of promotions after graduation, and years in service and the impact of the CNSC Graduate School’s Master’s Degree Programs along professional practice, career development; and employment. Results show that majority of the respondents are in the middle age from 31 -37 years old, married, mostly females, 6-10 years in service and have one promotion after they have graduated from their respective master’s degrees. The level of appointment of the respondents has a positive movement from rank and file to supervisory and managerial levels positions. The Graduate School’s Master’s degree programs provided high impact on the graduates’ professional practice, and on employment while average impact on career development.

  10. Integration of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD) into a College Orientation Program: Depression and Alcohol Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; MacPherson, Laura; Tull, Matthew T.; Baruch, David E.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    College freshmen face a variety of academic and social challenges as they adjust to college life that can place them at risk for a number of negative outcomes, including depression and alcohol-related problems. Orientation classes that focus on teaching incoming students how to better cope with college-oriented stress may provide an opportunity to…

  11. Fight the Good Fight: Leaders Share Strategies and Programs Proven to Get Community Colleges the Help They Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Lynette Brown-Snow, vice president of marketing and government relations for the Community College of Philadelphia, is one of several community college leaders across the country who have taken up one of the challenges proffered by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) in its 2012 report, "Reclaiming the American Dream:…

  12. Articulating the Value Base of the Communication Curriculum in a New Program at a Small Private College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Thomas A.

    In the spring of 1996, the Board of Regents of Bethany Lutheran College in Mankato, Minnesota, decided to ask the administration and faculty to do what was needed to change the small private church-related two-year college into a small private church-related four-year college. The first designated major was to be Communication. The first step in…

  13. A Promising Tool for Helping Vulnerable Workers? An Exploration of the Use of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) to Help Low-Wage Workers on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew B.

    2005-01-01

    Employee assistance programs, or EAPs, are an employee benefit designed to help workers meet their work and family needs. However, questions have been raised about the design, utilization, and scale of services that EAPs make possible for low-wage workers. This article explores whether on college campuses an EAP benefit can simultaneously meet the…

  14. Alcohol Use Problems Mediate the Relation between Cannabis Use Frequency and College Functioning among Students Mandated to an Alcohol Diversion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McChargue, Dennis E.; Klanecky, Alicia K.; Anderson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which alcohol use problems explained the relationship between cannabis use frequency and college functioning. Undergraduates (N = 546) mandated to an alcohol diversion program at a Midwestern United States university completed screening questionnaires between October 2003 and April 2006. Sobel's (1982) test…

  15. Using ePortfolios to Assess Applied and Collaborative Learning and Academic Identity in a Summer Research Program for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer-Freeman, Karen; Bastone, Linda; Skrivanek, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the extent to which ePortfolios can be used to assess applied and collaborative learning and academic identity among community college students from underrepresented minority groups who participated in a summer research program. Thirty-eight students were evaluated by their research sponsor and two or three naïve faculty evaluators.…

  16. A Tenured Faith and an Adjunct Faculty: Successes and Challenges in Instructor Formation at Catholic Colleges that Offer Business Programs in an Accelerated Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrall, Doug; Newcomb, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Many Catholic colleges in the United States offer Business programs in an accelerated format, featuring evening courses for adult learners, with few faculty contact hours than traditional classes. Most of these institutions believe in the ideals of Catholic Social Teaching and wish to integrate those principles into their curricula for the sake of…

  17. Interact for What? The Relationship between Interpersonal Interaction Based on Motivation and Educational Outcomes among Students in Manufacturing Programs at Two-Year Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the relationship between different types of interpersonal interaction, characterized by their underlying motivations, and educational outcomes among students in manufacturing programs at two-year colleges. While there exist several ways to classify interaction, motivation as an inherent attribute that fuels behaviors…

  18. Students in a Teacher College of Education Develop Educational Programs and Activities Related to Intelligent Use of the Web: Cultivating New Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadmany, Rivka; Zeichner, Orit; Melamed, Orly

    2014-01-01

    Students in a teacher training college in Israel have developed and taught curricula on the intelligent use of the Web. The educational programs were based on activities thematically related to the world of digital citizenship, such as the rights of the child and the Internet, identity theft, copyrights, freedom of expression and its limitations,…

  19. Report of the State Auditor. State Colleges in Colorado. Financial, State-Funded Student Financial Assistance Programs, and NCAA Audits. Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, J. David

    The results of a Colorado State audit of the consolidated financial statements are reported, along with the statements of appropriations, expenditures, transfers and reversions for state-funded Student Financial Assistance Programs for the four State Colleges in Colorado for the year ended June 30, 1995. Specific recommendations are given for each…

  20. Expanding Horizons: A Pilot Mentoring Program Linking College/Graduate Students and Teens With ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Carol; Humphrey, Kristin; Vronsky, Kaela; Mattern, Kathryn; Nicastro, Susan; Perrin, Ellen C

    2016-02-01

    A small pilot program of 9 youth 13 to 18 years old with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or Asperger's syndrome assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of an individualized mentoring program. Youth met weekly for 6 months with trained young adult mentors at a local boys and girls club. Participants reported improvements in self-esteem, social anxiety, and quality of life. Participants, parents, mentors, and staff reported that the program improved participants' social connectedness. Although the pilot study was small, it provides preliminary data that mentoring for youth with ASD has promise for increasing self-esteem, social skills, and quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [French training program for medical students in transfusion medicine. Transfusion Medicine Teachers' College].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, J-L; Cabaud, J-J; Cazenave, J-P; Fialon, P; Fruchart, M-F; Joussemet, M; Leblond, V; Muller, J-Y; Rouger, P; Vignon, D; Waller, C; Lefrère, J-J; Worms, B; Vileyn, F

    2005-02-01

    In France, transfusion medicine training program has been updated. A national committee of professors in transfusion medicine propose a series of 13 items which represent the minimum knowledge that general practitioners should possess. This overview of transfusion medicine is far below the level that specialists should reach and they will need an additional specialized training. Several French universities have set up their own training program which is quite similar to the work of the committee of professors. The following recommendations are not strict guidelines but is a common basis which will be improved in 2005 according to new evidence based transfusion medicine.

  2. An examination of the stretching practices of Division I and Division III college football programs in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Craig, Bruce; Baudendistal, Steve; Bodey, Kimberly J

    2009-07-01

    Research supports the use of preactivity warm-up and stretching, and the purpose of this study was to determine whether college football programs follow these guidelines. Questionnaires designed to gather demographic, professional, and educational information, as well as specific pre- and postactivity practices, were distributed via e-mail to midwestern collegiate programs from NCAA Division I and III conferences. Twenty-three male coaches (12 from Division IA schools and 11 from Division III schools) participated in the study. Division I schools employed certified strength coaches (CSCS; 100%), whereas Division III schools used mainly strength coordinators (73%), with only 25% CSCS. All programs used preactivity warm-up, with the majority employing 2-5 minutes of sport-specific jogging/running drills. Pre stretching (5-10 minutes) was performed in 19 programs (91%), with 2 (9%) performing no pre stretching. Thirteen respondents used a combination of static/proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation/ballistic and dynamic flexibility, 5 used only dynamic flexibility, and 1 used only static stretching. All 12 Division I coaches used stretching, whereas only 9 of the 11 Division III coaches did (p = 0.22). The results indicate that younger coaches did not use pre stretching (p = 0.30). The majority of the coaches indicated that they did use post stretching, with 11 of the 12 Division I coaches using stretching, whereas only 5 of the 11 Division III coaches used stretching postactivity (p = 0.027). Divisional results show that the majority of Division I coaches use static-style stretching (p = 0.049). The results of this study indicate that divisional status, age, and certification may influence how well research guidelines are followed. Further research is needed to delineate how these factors affect coaching decisions.

  3. Anterior Hypopituitarism and Treatment Response in Hunter Syndrome: A Comparison of Two Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munier A. Nour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism is a clinically important diagnosis and has not previously been reported in Hunter syndrome. We contrast two cases with anatomic pituitary anomalies: one with anterior panhypopituitarism and the other with intact pituitary function. Patient 1, a 10-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for poor growth and an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Endocrine testing revealed growth hormone (GH deficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency, and tertiary hypothyroidism. An improvement in growth velocity with hormone replacement (GH, thyroxine, and corticosteroid was seen; however, final adult height remained compromised. Patient 2, a 13-year-old male with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for growth failure. He had a large empty sella turcica with posteriorly displaced pituitary. Functional endocrine testing was normal and a trial of GH-treatment yielded no significant effect. Panhypopituitarism associated with pituitary anomalies has not been previously reported in Hunter syndrome and was an incidental finding of significant clinical importance. In the setting of documented anterior hypopituitarism, while hormone replacement improved growth velocity, final height remained impaired. In patient 2 with equivocal GH-testing results, treatment had no effect on linear growth. These cases highlight the importance of careful clinical assessment in Hunter syndrome and that judicious hormone replacement may be indicated in individual cases.

  4. Comparing Road-Kill Datasets from Hunters and Citizen Scientists in a Landscape Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heigl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic has severe effects on animals, especially when road-kills are involved. In many countries, official road-kill data are provided by hunters or police; there are also road-kill observations reported by citizen scientists. The aim of the current study was to test whether road-kill reports by hunters stem from similar landscapes than those reported by citizen scientists. We analysed the surrounding landscapes of 712 road-kill reportings of European hares in the province of Lower Austria. Our data showed that road-killed hares reported both by hunters and citizens are predominantly surrounded by arable land. No difference of hedges and solitary trees could be found between the two datasets. However, significant differences in landcover classes and surrounding road networks indicate that hunters’ and citizen scientists’ data are different. Hunters reported hares from landscapes with significantly higher percentages of arable land, and greater lengths of secondary roads. In contrast, citizens reported hares from landscapes with significantly higher percentages of urban or industrial areas and greater lengths of motorways, primary roads, and residential roads. From this we argue that hunters tend to report data mainly from their hunting areas, whereas citizens report data during their daily routine on the way to/from work. We conclude that a citizen science approach is an important source for road-kill data when used in addition to official data with the aim of obtaining an overview of road-kill events on a landscape scale.

  5. Hunter-gatherer genomic diversity suggests a southern African origin for modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brenna M; Gignoux, Christopher R; Jobin, Matthew; Granka, Julie M; Macpherson, J M; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Rodríguez-Botigué, Laura; Ramachandran, Sohini; Hon, Lawrence; Brisbin, Abra; Lin, Alice A; Underhill, Peter A; Comas, David; Kidd, Kenneth K; Norman, Paul J; Parham, Peter; Bustamante, Carlos D; Mountain, Joanna L; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-03-29

    Africa is inferred to be the continent of origin for all modern human populations, but the details of human prehistory and evolution in Africa remain largely obscure owing to the complex histories of hundreds of distinct populations. We present data for more than 580,000 SNPs for several hunter-gatherer populations: the Hadza and Sandawe of Tanzania, and the ≠Khomani Bushmen of South Africa, including speakers of the nearly extinct N|u language. We find that African hunter-gatherer populations today remain highly differentiated, encompassing major components of variation that are not found in other African populations. Hunter-gatherer populations also tend to have the lowest levels of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium among 27 African populations. We analyzed geographic patterns of linkage disequilibrium and population differentiation, as measured by F(ST), in Africa. The observed patterns are consistent with an origin of modern humans in southern Africa rather than eastern Africa, as is generally assumed. Additionally, genetic variation in African hunter-gatherer populations has been significantly affected by interaction with farmers and herders over the past 5,000 y, through both severe population bottlenecks and sex-biased migration. However, African hunter-gatherer populations continue to maintain the highest levels of genetic diversity in the world.

  6. Future Discounting in Congo Basin Hunter-Gatherers Declines with Socio-Economic Transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Deniz Salali

    Full Text Available Humans have a tendency to discount the future; that is we value small, short-term rewards over larger, long-term rewards. The degree of future discounting, however, changes in response to socio-ecological factors. Here, we study Mbendjele BaYaka hunter-gatherers of northern Congo and their farmer neighbours to investigate adaptations in inter-temporal preferences in humans. We argue that in immediate-return systems, where food storage is absent and egalitarianism is enforced through levelling mechanisms, future discounting is an adaptive strategy to prevent wealth accumulation and the emergence of hierarchies. This ensures food sharing and allows for survival in unpredictable environments where there is risk of an energy shortfall. On the other hand, when food storage is made possible by the emergence of agriculture or as seen in some delayed-return hunter-gatherer populations, wealth accumulation, hierarchies and lower discount rates become the adaptive strategy. Therefore, individuals in immediate-return, egalitarian societies will discount the future more than those in non-egalitarian, delayed-return societies. Consistent with the predictions we found that market integration and socio-economic transitions decrease the future discounting in Mbendjele hunter-gatherers. Our measures of socio-economic differences marked this transition in hunter-gatherers living in a logging town. The degree of future-discounting was the same between more market-integrated hunter-gatherers and their farmer neighbours.

  7. An Innovative Model to Design an Academic and Social Development Program for International College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaba, Abir

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of economies and societies has created many positive influences on American universities. One relevant influence is increasing the number of international students. Conversely, these students encounter many social and academic challenges. Therefore, universities should adapt their programs to assist international students in…

  8. The ARAMCO Industrial Traiing Centers: Academic Training and College Preparatory Programs: A Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARAMCO Services Co., Houston, TX.

    The report describes the components of the educational program provided by the Industrial Training Centers of the Training and Career Development Organization of ARAMCO (Arabian American Oil Company) in Saudi Arabia. ARAMCO provides in-house academic or job skills training to over 15,000 employees. Characteristics of the company's training program…

  9. Archaeology as an Avocation--A Certificate Program at Norwalk Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Olivia

    1979-01-01

    Archaeology as an Avocation program certifies students as competent amateur archaeologists. The article describes how an independent study at local excavation sites grew into a community club that trains its members as archaeologists who help discover the archaeological potential of the community and help federal agencies in planning area…

  10. Program Administrator's Handbook. Strategies for Preventing Alcohol and Other Drug Problems. The College Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook is for administrators of programs in higher education settings which deal with alcohol and other drug (AOD) related problems. Chapter 1, "Defining the Problem, Issues, and Trends" examines the problem from various perspectives and presents the latest statistics on the extent of AOD use on campuses, specific problems affecting…

  11. 78 FR 76136 - Application for New Awards; College Assistance Migrant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ..., such as annual performance reports, project evaluation reports, site visit reports, and the previously..., including minorities, individuals with disabilities, and women. Note: Applicants could consider increasing... such as referrals to STEM- oriented work-based learning experiences, exposure to academic programs and...

  12. In College and in Recovery: Reasons for Joining a Collegiate Recovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C.; Moberg, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs), a campus-based peer support model for students recovering from substance abuse problems, grew exponentially in the past decade, yet remain unexplored. Methods: This mixed-methods study examines students' reasons for CRP enrollment to guide academic institutions and referral sources. Students (N =…

  13. A Summer Program Designed to Educate College Students for Careers in Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilowicz, Beverly; Johnston, Wendie; Sharp, Sandra B.; Warter-Perez, Nancy; Momand, Jamil

    2007-01-01

    A summer program was created for undergraduates and graduate students that teaches bioinformatics concepts, offers skills in professional development, and provides research opportunities in academic and industrial institutions. We estimate that 34 of 38 graduates (89%) are in a career trajectory that will use bioinformatics. Evidence from…

  14. An Exploratory Study of the Impact of College Student Leadership Programs upon the Construct of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness is a key skill that produces the greater psychological awareness identified by most leadership scholars as being essential to effective leadership. This study conducted an exploratory assessment of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cocurricular collegiate leadership programs through pre- and post-participation application of the…

  15. Implementation and Evaluation of a Condom Availability Program on a College Campus: Lessons from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman-Mueller, Heather P.; Gomez-Scott, Jessica R.; Jung, Ae-Kyung; Oswalt, Sara B.; Hagglund, Kristofer

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advocate access to condoms as a critical sexual health prevention strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the implementation and evaluation of a condom availability program using dispensing machines in residence halls at a Midwestern U.S. university. Undergraduate students (N = 337)…

  16. What Can Schools, Colleges, and Youth Programs Do with Predictive Analytics? Practitioner Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Rekha; Porter, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Many low-income young people are not reaching important milestones for success (for example, completing a program or graduating from school on time). But the social-service organizations and schools that serve them often struggle to identify who is at more or less risk. These institutions often either over- or underestimate risk, missing…

  17. Considerations for Expanding, Eliminating, and Maintaining Community College Athletic Teams and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Heather J.; Mullin, Christopher M.; Horton, David, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Collegiate athletic programs have often been referred to as the "front porch" of an institution. Coaches, athletic teams, student athletes, and athletic department staff serve as a "link between the immediate campus family and the larger community. It is this front-porch principle that makes managing intercollegiate athletics a unique and…

  18. Affective Education: Its Implications for Teaching a Communication Arts Course in the College English Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sada Mae

    This study reviews, analyzes, and summarizes the scientific research and professional literature pertaining to affective education (education concerned with the emotional needs of the learners) in order to determine its implications for a communication arts course in the English program. A review of the literature indicated that when the basic…

  19. College Student-Athletes as Peer Educators for Substance Abuse Prevention: An Interactive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Athletes can be involved as role models and leaders--in collaboration with coaches and other staff--to enhance life skills and prevent substance use among their peers. "Drugs in Sport" is a peer education program involving collegiate athletes visiting middle schools to speak with school children. This article discusses the structure of the Drugs…

  20. Science Faculty Belief Systems in a Professional Development Program: Inquiry in College Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristen L.; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how science faculty members' belief systems about inquiry-based teaching changed through their experience in a professional development program. The program was designed to support early career science faculty in learning about inquiry and incorporating an inquiry-based approach to teaching laboratories. Data sources for this qualitative study included three semi-structured interviews, observations during the program and during faculty members' implementation in their courses, and a researcher's journal. In the first phase of data analysis, we created profiles for each of the four participants. Next, we developed assertions, and tested for confirming and disconfirming evidence across the profiles. The assertions indicated that, through the professional development program, participants' knowledge and beliefs about inquiry-based teaching shifted, placing more value on student-directed learning and classroom inquiry. Participants who were internally motivated to participate and held incoming positive attitudes toward the mini-journal inquiry-based approach were more likely to incorporate the approach in their future practice. Students' responses played a critical role in participants' belief systems and their decision to continue using the inquiry-based format. The findings from this study have implications for professional development design.

  1. College Teaching and Community Outreaching: Service Learning in an Obesity Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himelein, Melissa; Passman, Liz; Phillips, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Service learning can enrich students' knowledge, skills and commitment to occupational goals while positively affecting communities. Undergraduate students in a course on obesity engaged in service learning by assisting with a family-based obesity prevention program, Getting Into Fitness Together (GIFT). Purpose: The impact of GIFT on…

  2. A Pre-Engineering Program Using Robots to Attract Underrepresented High School and Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Pauline Helen; Liu, Yun; Hargrove, S. Keith; Doswell, Jayfus T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a new pre-engineering program--Robotics Technician Curriculum--that uses robots to solicit underrepresented students pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The curriculum uses a project-based learning environment, which consists of part lecture and part laboratory. This program…

  3. The Relationship between Participation in Campus Recreation Programs and College Student Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Jessica E.

    2017-01-01

    The academic success of undergraduate students is necessary for degree attainment and fulfilling career goals. Universities recognize factors that affect academic achievement and promote strategies that support satisfactory grades, progression through degree programs, and graduation for students. It is essential to determine predictors of success…

  4. Interviews with College Students: Evaluating Computer Programming Environments for Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2014-01-01

    Different methods, strategies, or tools have been proposed for teaching Object Oriented Programming (OOP). However, it is still difficult to introduce OOP to novice learners. The problem may be not only adopting a method or language, but also use of an appropriate integrated development environment (IDE). Therefore, the focus should be on the…

  5. Raising a Red Flag on Dating Violence: Evaluation of a Low-Resource, College-Based Bystander Behavior Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, Amanda E; McDonnell, Karen; Turner, Monique Mitchell; Rimal, Rajiv

    2016-03-09

    Encouraging bystanders to intervene safely and effectively in situations that could escalate to violence-known as bystander behavior programs-is a growing yet largely untested strategy to prevent dating violence. Using a quasi-experimental design, we evaluate a low-resource, low-intensity intervention aimed at preventing dating violence among college students. The integrated behavioral model (IBM) was used to guide the evaluation. We also assess which IBM variables were most strongly associated with bystander behaviors. Participants were drawn from two Virginia colleges that predominantly train females in the health profession sciences. The intervention group (n = 329) participated in a university-wide bystander behavior intervention consisting of a 30-min presentation on dating violence at new-student orientation and a week-long "red flag" social marketing campaign on campus to raise awareness of dating violence. Controlling for changes at the comparison university, results showed an increase in bystander behaviors, such as encouraging a friend who may be in an abusive relationship to get help, after the intervention and adjusting for potential confounders (increase of 1.41 bystander behaviors, p = .04). However, no significant changes were found for bystander intentions, self-efficacy, social norms, or attitudes related to dating violence from pre- to post-intervention. Self-efficacy had a direct relationship with bystander behaviors. Results suggest that low-resource interventions have a modest effect on increasing bystander behaviors. However, higher resource interventions likely are needed for a larger impact, especially among students who already demonstrate strong baseline intentions to intervene and prevent dating violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Immunohistochemistry practices of cytopathology laboratories: a survey of participants in the College of American Pathologists Nongynecologic Cytopathology Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew H; Schwartz, Mary R; Moriarty, Ann T; Wilbur, David C; Souers, Rhona; Fatheree, Lisa; Booth, Christine N; Clayton, Amy C; Kurtyz, Daniel F I; Padmanabhan, Vijayalakshmi; Crothers, Barbara A

    2014-09-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is important for cytology but poses special challenges because preanalytic conditions may differ from the conditions of IHC-positive controls. To broadly survey cytology laboratories to quantify preanalytic platforms for cytology IHC and identify problems with particular platforms or antigens. To discover how validation guidelines for HER2 testing have affected cytology. A voluntary survey of cytology IHC practices was sent to 1899 cytology laboratories participating in the College of American Pathologists Nongynecologic Cytopathology Education Program in the fall of 2009. A total of 818 laboratories (43%) responded to the survey by April 2010. Three hundred fourty-five of 791 respondents (44%) performed IHC on cytology specimens. Seventeen different fixation and processing platforms prior to antibody reaction were reported. A total of 59.2% of laboratories reported differences between the platforms for cytology specimens and positive controls, but most (155 of 184; 84%) did not alter antibody dilutions or antigen retrieval for cytology IHC. When asked to name 2 antibodies for which staining conditions differed between cytology and surgical samples, there were 18 responses listing 14 antibodies. A total of 30.6% of laboratories performing IHC offered HER2 testing before publication of the 2007 College of American Pathologists/American Society of Clinical Oncologists guidelines, compared with 33.6% afterward, with increased performance of testing by reference laboratories. Three laboratories validated a nonformalin HER2 platform. The platforms for cytology IHC and positive controls differ for most laboratories, yet conditions are uncommonly adjusted for cytology specimens. Except for the unsuitability of air-dried smears for HER2 testing, the survey did not reveal evidence of systematic problems with any antibody or platform.

  7. Comparison of Onsite Versus Online Chart Reviews as Part of the American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Heron, Dwight E; Mundt, Arno J; Yashar, Catheryn; Feigenberg, Steven; Koltis, Gordon; Regine, William F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Patel, Shilpen; Sharma, Navesh; Hebert, Mary; Wallis, Norman; Kuettel, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Accreditation based on peer review of professional standards of care is essential in ensuring quality and safety in administration of radiation therapy. Traditionally, medical chart reviews have been performed by a physical onsite visit. The American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program has remodeled its process whereby electronic charts are reviewed remotely. Twenty-eight radiation oncology practices undergoing accreditation had three charts per practice undergo both onsite and online review. Onsite review was performed by a single reviewer for each practice. Online review consisted of one or more disease site-specific reviewers for each practice. Onsite and online reviews were blinded and scored on a 100-point scale on the basis of 20 categories. A score of less than 75 was failing, and a score of 75 to 79 was marginal. Any failed charts underwent rereview by a disease site team leader. Eighty-four charts underwent both onsite and online review. The mean scores were 86.0 and 86.9 points for charts reviewed onsite and online, respectively. Comparison of onsite and online reviews revealed no statistical difference in chart scores ( P = .43). Of charts reviewed, 21% had a marginal (n = 8) or failing (n = 10) score. There was no difference in failing charts ( P = .48) or combined marginal and failing charts ( P = .13) comparing onsite and online reviews. The American College of Radiation Oncology accreditation process of online chart review results in comparable review scores and rate of failing scores compared with traditional on-site review. However, the modern online process holds less potential for bias by using multiple reviewers per practice and allows for greater oversight via disease site team leader rereview.

  8. Intervention program in college instrumental musicians, with kinematics analysis of cello and flute playing: a combined program of yogic breathing and muscle strengthening-flexibility exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hie; Carey, Stephanie; Dubey, Rajiv; Matz, Rachel

    2012-06-01

    College musicians encounter health risks not dissimilar to those of professional musicians. Fifteen collegiate instrumental musicians participated in the intervention program of yogic-breathing and muscle-strengthening and flexibility exercises for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention data from the Health-Pain-Injury Inventory (HPI) and the Physical & Musical-Performance Efficacy Assessment Survey (PME) were analyzed for the effects of the program on the musicians' physical and musical-performance efficacy. HPI results showed that the majority of our sample had healthy lifestyles and minimal pain and injuries but irregular eating and exercise habits. The pre-intervention PME data showed a high level of musical efficacy (i.e., awareness of music technique, tone, and flow) but a low-level of physical efficacy (i.e., awareness of posture, tension, and movement flexibility). Post-intervention data showed that the program improved physical efficacy by increased awareness of posture and tension. In 2 volunteer musicians, kinematics motion analysis was conducted for exploratory purposes. Our cellist played the scale using a larger range of motion (ROM) in right shoulder flexion and abduction and slightly increased rotation while keeping decreased right elbow ROM after the intervention program. The flutist shifted the body weight from one foot to the other more in the second playing post-intervention. These changes can be attributed to the increased physical efficacy that allowed freedom to express musicality. Findings from these case scenarios provide empirically based hypotheses for further study. We share our experience so that others may use our model and instruments to develop studies with larger samples.

  9. The School of Public Safety at Valencia College: Visioning and Implementation of a College-Wide Distributive and Collaborative Program Model for the Central Florida Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The central Florida region, faced with record tourism, a large service population, and significant population growth over the next few decades, must rely on a community-based institution of higher education with lifelong learning offerings, a local community college, to create world class public safety education and training for the region.…

  10. Core Self-Evaluations as a Mediator between Functional Disability and Life Satisfaction in College Students with Disabilities Majoring in Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph S.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Weaver, Hayley; da Silva Cardoso, Elizabeth; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the mediational effect of core self-evaluations (CSE) on the relationship between functional disability and life satisfaction. Methods: A quantitative descriptive design using multiple regression analysis. The participants were 97 college students with disabilities receiving services through Hunter College's Minority-Disability…

  11. Leadership styles and occupational stress among college athletic directors: the moderating effect of program goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, Todd A

    2002-03-01

    The interaction between an individual's abilities and the perceived demands of the workplace appears to make a unique contribution to job-related stress above and beyond that of dispositional or situational factors alone (R. S. Lazarus, 1990). In the present study, the author evaluated this contention among 245 male intercollegiate athletic directors by assessing the combined influence of leadership style and program goals on occupational stress. Regression analyses revealed the presence of both significant main effects and interaction effects of leadership style and program goals in the prediction of emotional exhaustion, daily job stress, and personal accomplishment. Findings are discussed in terms of person-environment fit theory (J. R. P. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the notion of perceived control within the occupational setting.

  12. An examination of gender bias on the eighth-grade MEAP science test as it relates to the Hunter Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Hall, Judy Gail

    The purpose of this study was to apply the Hunter-Gatherer Theory of sex spatial skills to responses to individual questions by eighth grade students on the Science component of the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) to determine if sex bias was inherent in the test. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory on Spatial Sex Differences, an original theory, that suggested a spatial dimorphism concept with female spatial skill of pattern recall of unconnected items and male spatial skills requiring mental movement. This is the first attempt to apply the Hunter-Gatherer Theory on Spatial Sex Differences to a standardized test. An overall hypothesis suggested that the Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences could predict that males would perform better on problems involving mental movement and females would do better on problems involving the pattern recall of unconnected items. Responses to questions on the 1994-95 MEAP requiring the use of male spatial skills and female spatial skills were analyzed for 5,155 eighth grade students. A panel composed of five educators and a theory developer determined which test items involved the use of male and female spatial skills. A MANOVA, using a random sample of 20% of the 5,155 students to compare male and female correct scores, was statistically significant, with males having higher scores on male spatial skills items and females having higher scores on female spatial skills items. Pearson product moment correlation analyses produced a positive correlation for both male and female performance on both types of spatial skills. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences appears to be able to predict that males could perform better on the problems involving mental movement and females could perform better on problems involving the pattern recall of unconnected items. Recommendations for further research included: examination of male/female spatial skill differences at early elementary and high school levels to

  13. PLANET HUNTERS: ASSESSING THE KEPLER INVENTORY OF SHORT-PERIOD PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Simpson, Robert J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of ≥2 R ⊕ planets on short-period ( ⊕ Planet Hunters ≥85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler ≥4 R ⊕ planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of ≥4 R ⊕ short-period planets is nearly complete.

  14. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugal, Cherie; van Beest, Floris; Vander Wal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk...... areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012...... juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts...

  15. Clarifying beliefs underlying hunter intentions to support a ban on lead shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Doncarlos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Shot from hunting adds toxic lead to environments worldwide. Existing lead shot regulations have been instituted with little understanding of hunter beliefs and attitudes. This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action, using a multilevel, multivariate approach, to clarify how positive and negative beliefs relate to attitudes about a ban on lead shot. Structure coefficients and commonality analysis were employed to further examine relationships between beliefs and attitudes. Results suggest that while both positive and negative outcomes influence attitudes, positive outcomes were more influential for supporters and negative beliefs for opposers. Management may need to focus on the results from hunters who indicated that they would be unlikely to support a ban, as these hunters include those who may actively oppose additional efforts to regulate lead.

  16. Molecular characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum isolated from an outbreak in treasure hunters Histoplasma capsulatum in treasure hunters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Bertha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, primary pulmonary histoplasmosis is the most relevant clinical form of the disease. The geographical distribution of specific strains of Histoplasma capsulatum circulating in Mexico has not been fully established. Outbreaks must be reported in order to have current, updated information on this disease, identifying new endemic areas, manner of exposure to the fungi, and molecular characterization of the causative agents. We report a recent outbreak of histoplasmosis in treasure hunters and the molecular characterization of two isolates obtained from these patients. Methods Six patients admitted to the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER in Mexico City presented severe respiratory symptoms suggestive of histoplasmosis. They acquired the infection in the Veracruz (VZ endemic zone. Diagnosis was made by X-ray and Computed tomography (CT, liver function, immunological techniques, and culture. Identification of H. capsulatum isolates was confirmed by using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was conducted with a probe from the M antigen, and the isolates were characterized by means of Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR employed the 1253 oligonucleotide and a mixture of oligonucleotides 1281 and 1283. These were compared to eight reference strain isolates from neighboring areas. Results X-ray and CT revealed disseminated micronodular images throughout lung parenchyma, as well as bilateral retrocaval, prevascular, subcarinal, and hilar adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, and altered liver function tests. Five of the six patients developed disseminated histoplasmosis. Two H. capsulatum strains were isolated. The same band profile was detected in both strains, indicating that both isolates corresponded to the sole H. capsulatum strain. Molecular characterization of the isolates was similar in 100% with the EH-53 Hidalgo human (HG strain (reference strain integrated into the LAm A clade described for

  17. Fairy tales? Marion Jones, C.J. Hunter and the framing of doping in American newspapers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfister, Gertrud Ursula; Gems, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the images, metaphors and narratives in the media coverage of doping in the United States. It presents a case study with a focus on Marion Jones, the most celebrated track athlete of the turn of the millennium, and her husband, C.J. Hunter, a shot put world champion...... under suspicion. At the same time, the 2000 Olympics can be considered a watershed in American anti-doping policy. The media portrayed Jones and Hunter as the Beauty and the Beast or Svengali and his victim, using a famous fairy tale and a well-known novel to capture attention, label the protagonists...

  18. Comparing Road-Kill Datasets from Hunters and Citizen Scientists in a Landscape Context

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Heigl; Carina R. Stretz; Wolfgang Steiner; Franz Suppan; Thomas Bauer; Gregor Laaha; Johann G. Zaller

    2016-01-01

    Road traffic has severe effects on animals, especially when road-kills are involved. In many countries, official road-kill data are provided by hunters or police; there are also road-kill observations reported by citizen scientists. The aim of the current study was to test whether road-kill reports by hunters stem from similar landscapes than those reported by citizen scientists. We analysed the surrounding landscapes of 712 road-kill reportings of European hares in the province of Lower Aust...

  19. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. OV-1/AC-119 Hunter-Killer Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-10-10

    between Phan Rang, Phu Cat , and Danang in order to provide best coverage of the Vietnamese conflict. -- On 16 February 1970, three AC -ll9Ks and 70...SOUTHEAST ASIA D D DDiv AY/XDOSQA I OV-1/ AC -119 " i IWB I HUNTER-KILLER TEAM 19’.1’ CONTINUING REPORT CLASSIFIED Ey 7AFIDOOC DOWNGRADE TjU SECRET...xamination of C urrent, 0 per’tions I~ I fF!lr T I TII TIIII I OV=1/ AC -119 HUNTER-KILLER TEAMI 1 10 OCTOBER 1972 HQ PACAF Directorate of Operations

  20. Fundación Book Hunters: Atrévete a experimentar con la lectura

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Mejía, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    La fundación Book Hunters es una organización sin ánimo de lucro que busca fortalecer la relación de la lectura en los niños desde temprana edad, involucrando a la comunidad y promoviendo el entendimiento del entorno que rodea hoy en día la infancia. El equipo considera que, para lograr los objetivos es necesario transformar el significado ha perseguido a la lectura durante años, es decir, para Book Hunters leer va más allá de tomar un libro e involucrarse en la historia, en cambio, el si...

  1. Ethical acceptability of recreational hunting - does the motive of the hunter matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard; Sandøe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recreational hunting can be a way of taking responsibility for acquiring one’s own meat. However, many recreational hunters focus instead on hunting as a hobby or sport. This distinction, between two rather different motives for hunting, is relevant to the activity’s moral justifiability. The pub......Recreational hunting can be a way of taking responsibility for acquiring one’s own meat. However, many recreational hunters focus instead on hunting as a hobby or sport. This distinction, between two rather different motives for hunting, is relevant to the activity’s moral justifiability...

  2. Effect of Exposure Type and Timing of Injuries in Division I College Football: A 4-year Single Program Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Michael K; Borchers, James R; Hoffman, Joshua T; Tatarski, Rachel L; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-02-01

    Football players compete with a high risk of injury due to the sport. With the recent efforts to improve safety, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) established new terminology to clearly define exposure types and reduce the number of high contact exposures. To compare football injury rates (IR) with a focus on game versus practice, time in season of injury, mechanism of injury and utilizing recent exposure types defined by the NCAA (live contact, full-pads and non-contact). Licensed medical professionals monitored a college football program regular season from 2012-2015. Each injury was classified by timing of the injury, mechanism of injury, and whether it occurred in game or practice. Player attendance and type of exposure (non-contact, full-pad or live contact, which involves live tackling to the ground and/or full-speed blocking and can occur in full-pad or half-pad ('shell') equipment) was documented. IR were calculated per 1000 athlete-exposures (AE). Mid-exact P tests compared rates between variables. The game IR was over three times as high as the practice IR (p football season occurred in the pre-season at 5.769/1000 AE. Overall IR observed in this cohort were lower than prior studies published before recent NCAA rule changes and guideline implementation to improve athlete safety. Athletes in this cohort were at significantly increased risk of injury from live contact exposures.

  3. The Readiness of Sorsogon State College Faculty for Teaching with ICT: Basis for a Faculty Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. De Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICT such as computers, multimedia systems, productivity software, and the Internet have greatly improved the performance of different organizations and influenced higher learning institutions like Sorsogon State College (SSC to develop and implement innovative teaching and learning methods. However, despite the many benefits of ICT when used in education, there are still faculty members who do not use these technologies for teaching. Hence, this research was conducted to assess their readiness for teaching with ICT. Findings revealed that most of the surveyed respondents were above forty-five years old, have 1-10 years of government service, and have specialization in the field of education. In terms of readiness to teach with ICT, the results disclosed that they were fairly ready along human-resource readiness, ready along technological skill readiness, and much ready along equipment readiness. Their age was not significantly related to their human resource readiness but significantly related to their technological skill and equipment readiness. The respondents’ number of years in the government was significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT in terms of human resource, technological skill, and equipment readiness. Their field of specialization was not significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT. Among the most identified factors why some of them do not use ICT resources were unavailability of ICT resources, lack of knowledge and lack of familiarity to ICT. The output of this research is a faculty training program to enhance their know

  4. Development of Competency-Based Articulated Automotive Program. Big Bend Community College and Area High Schools. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buche, Fred; Cox, Charles

    A competency-based automotive mechanics curriculum was developed at Big Bend Community College (Washington) in order to provide the basis for an advanced placement procedure for high school graduates and experienced adults through a competency assessment. In order to create the curriculum, Big Bend Community College automotive mechanics…

  5. Sustainability of Foundation-Funded Grant Programs beyond Initial Funding: A Multicase Study at Selective Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Deborah Chang

    2010-01-01

    College and university leaders must remain responsive to their environments by promoting institutional innovation and change. External grant-funders, such as foundations, view themselves as initiators of change. Foundations can provide the necessary tools to jump start innovation within colleges and universities. However, despite the best…

  6. Putting Big Data to Work: Community Colleges Use Detailed Reports to Design Smarter Workforce Training and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Bob Woods reports that "Big data" is all the rage on college campuses, and it makes sense that administrators would use what they know to boost student outcomes. Woods points out that community colleges around the country are using the data: (1) to guide the systematic expansion of its curriculum, providing targeted…

  7. The seed hunter in het spoor van Vavilov (interview met C. Kik)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanderink, R.; Kik, C.

    2013-01-01

    Er moet voor een veredelaar een grote variatie aan plantmateriaal aanwezig zijn om uit te kunnen putten zodat onze gewassen, die vaak bestaan uit monoculturen, voor de toekomst veiliggesteld worden. Het vinden van die variatie is het werk van seed hunters of zadenverzamelaars. Eén van die seed

  8. Teaching Experientially with the Madeline Hunter Method: An Application in a Marketing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alvin C.

    2006-01-01

    Due to concerns about the disparity of learning and the high nonresponse rates encountered by student marketing research teams working with sponsors, the author adopted the Hunter Method to restructure his course. This method requires the use of a model onto which students can map their learning via guided practice as well as independent practice.…

  9. Big game hunting practices, meanings, motivations and constraints: a survey of Oregon big game hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh K. Shrestha; Robert C. Burns

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a self-administered mail survey in September 2009 with randomly selected Oregon hunters who had purchased big game hunting licenses/tags for the 2008 hunting season. Survey questions explored hunting practices, the meanings of and motivations for big game hunting, the constraints to big game hunting participation, and the effects of age, years of hunting...

  10. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... these regulations on June 10, 2010, to address changes in law, regulation, policy, technology, and... Service 50 CFR Part 80 Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter... 80 [Docket No. FWS-R9-WSR-2009-0088; 91400-5110-POLI-7B; 91400-9410-POLI- 7B] RIN 1018-AW65 Financial...

  11. Deer hunting and television: are tv shows creating expectations among deer hunters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua D. Agee; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the past two decades new media outlets emphasizing trophy deer hunting have come to dominate hunting culture. Using data collected through a mail survey of Illinois deer hunters (n = 2,683, 78.5-percent response), we tested two hypotheses to determine factors that contribute to preference for hunting trophy deer. In particular, we examined the relationship...

  12. Period Determination of Binary Asteroid Targets Observed at Hunters Hill Observatory: May-September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David; Oey, Julian; Pravec, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Lightcurves for seven confirmed or possible binary asteroids were obtained at the Hunters Hill Observatory (HHO) and Leura Observatory from 2009 May through 2010 September: 1453 Fennia, 2501 Lohja, 3076 Garbor, 4029 Bridges, 5325 Silver, 6244 Okamoto, and (6265) 1985 TW3.

  13. High adult mortality among Hiwi hunter-gatherers: implications for human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A M; Walker, R S

    2007-04-01

    Extant apes experience early sexual maturity and short life spans relative to modern humans. Both of these traits and others are linked by life-history theory to mortality rates experienced at different ages by our hominin ancestors. However, currently there is a great deal of debate concerning hominin mortality profiles at different periods of evolutionary history. Observed rates and causes of mortality in modern hunter-gatherers may provide information about Upper Paleolithic mortality that can be compared to indirect evidence from the fossil record, yet little is published about causes and rates of mortality in foraging societies around the world. To our knowledge, interview-based life tables for recent hunter-gatherers are published for only four societies (Ache, Agta, Hadza, and Ju/'hoansi). Here, we present mortality data for a fifth group, the Hiwi hunter-gatherers of Venezuela. The results show comparatively high death rates among the Hiwi and highlight differences in mortality rates among hunter-gatherer societies. The high levels of conspecific violence and adult mortality in the Hiwi may better represent Paleolithic human demographics than do the lower, disease-based death rates reported in the most frequently cited forager studies.

  14. Levels and sources of forest fire prevention knowledge of California hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    William S. Folkman

    1963-01-01

    Males 30-50 years of age from the smaller urban centers (under 25,000 population) make up the bulk of the California hunter population. They are mainly from the skilled-semiskilled and professional-managerial occupations. Their level of knowledge about forest fire prevention is generally high, but their knowledge is weak in some pertinent areas. Most frequently...

  15. Historic Rust College: Fulfilling a Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Carl

    1989-01-01

    Describes Rust College, a Mississippi college dedicated to educating Blacks from economically and educationally impoverished backgrounds. Discusses the college's financial management, recent fund-raising efforts, building program, and academic programs. Examines the role of the predominantly Black college and Rust's mission to help students…

  16. Hunter-gatherers in southeast Asia: from prehistory to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Anatomically modern hunter-gatherers expanded from Africa into Southeast Asia at least 50,000 years ago, where they probably encountered and interacted with populations of Homo erectus and Homo floresiensis and the recently discovered Denisovans. Simulation studies suggest that these hunter-gatherers may well have followed a coastal route that ultimately led to the settlement of Sahul, while archaeology confirms that they also crossed significant seas and explored well into the interior. They also adapted to marked environmental changes that alternated between relatively cool and dry conditions and warmer, wetter interludes. During the former, the sea fell by up to 120 m below its present level, which opened up a vast low-lying area known as Sundaland. Three principal alignments can be identified: the first involved the occupation of rock shelters in upland regions, the second has identified settlement on broad riverine floodplains, and the last concentrated on the raised beaches formed from about five millennia ago when the sea level was elevated above its present position. This cultural sequence was dislocated about 4 kya when rice and millet farmers infiltrated the lowlands of Southeast Asia ultimately from the Yangtze River valley. It is suggested that this led to two forms of interaction. In the first, the indigenous hunter-gatherers integrated with intrusive Neolithic communities and, while losing their cultural identity, contributed their genes to the present population of Southeast Asia. In the second, hunter-gatherers withdrew to rainforest refugia and, through selective pressures inherent in such an environment, survived as the small-bodied, dark-skinned humans found to this day in the Philippines, Peninsular Malaysia and Thailand, and the Andaman Islands. Beyond the impact of expansive rice farmers in Melanesia and Australia, hunter-gatherers continued to dominate until they encountered European settlement. Copyright © 2013 Wayne State University Press

  17. State Need-Based College Scholarship and Grant Programs: A Study of Their Development, 1969-1980. College Board Report No. 81-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; Boyd, Joseph D.

    Trends in state comprehensive programs of gift (nonrepayable) from 1969-70 through 1979-80 and the relationship of state student aid with funding for institutional operations and with federal programs were studied. The relatively small number of scholarships and grants were included with the need-based grants in the analysis. The first stage of…

  18. Wound healing in plastic surgery: does age matter? An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Efstathios; Osgood, Geoff; Siddiqui, Aamir; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2015-03-01

    Increasing age has traditionally been associated with impairment in wound healing after operative interventions. This is based mostly on hearsay and anecdotal information. This idea fits with the authors’ understanding of biology in older organisms. This dictum has not been rigorously tested in clinical practice. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was retrospectively queried for all patients undergoing plastic surgery from 2005 to 2010. Variables extracted included basic demographics, comorbidities, previous steroid and tobacco use, wound classification at the end of the surgery, and development of postoperative surgical-site infections. Multivariate analyses were used to investigate the impact of aging in wound dehiscence. A total of 25,967 patients were identified. Overall, the incidence of wound dehiscence was 0.75 percent (n = 196). When patients younger than 30 years were compared to older patient groups, no difference in the probability of developing wound dehiscence was noted. Specifically, the groups of patients aged 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years did not have statistically significant wound healing deficiencies [adjusted OR, 0.63 (95 percent CI, 0.11 to 3.63), adjusted p = 0.609; 2.79 (0.55 to 14.18), adjusted p = 0.217, for 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years, respectively]. Factors independently associated with wound dehiscence included postoperative abscess development, paraplegia, quadriplegia, steroid and tobacco use, deep surgical-site infection development, increasing body mass index, and wound classification at the end of surgery. In patients undergoing plastic surgery, wound dehiscence is a rare complication (0.75 percent). Aging is not associated with an increased incidence of wound dehiscence. Risk, III.

  19. Productivity of Veterans Health Administration laboratories: a College of American Pathologists Laboratory Management Index Program (LMIP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Paul N; Wang, Edward; O'Donohue, Tom

    2003-12-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) operates the largest integrated laboratory network in the United States. To assess whether the unique characteristics of VA laboratories impact efficiency of operations, we compared the productivity of VA and non-VA facilities. Financial and activity data were prospectively collected from 124 VA and 131 non-VA laboratories enrolled in the College of American Pathologists Laboratory Management Index Program (LMIP) during 2002. In addition, secular trends in 5 productivity ratios were calculated for VA and non-VA laboratories enrolled in LMIP from 1997 through 2002. Veterans Health Administration and non-VA facilities did not differ significantly in size. Inpatients accounted for a lower percentage of testing at VA facilities than non-VA facilities (21.7% vs 37.3%; P benefits; P depreciation, and maintenance than their non-VA counterparts (all P <.001), resulting in lower overall cost per on-site test result (2.64 dollars vs 3.40 dollars; P <.001). Cost per referred (sent-out) test did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Analysis of 6-year trends showed significant increases in both VA (P <.001) and non-VA (P =.02) labor productivity (on-site tests/total FTE). Expenses at VA laboratories for labor per test, consumables per test, overall expense per test, and overall laboratory expense per discharge decreased significantly during the 6-year period (P <.001), while in non-VA facilities the corresponding ratios showed no significant change. Overall productivity of VA laboratories is superior to that of non-VA facilities enrolled in LMIP. The principal advantages enjoyed by the VA are higher-than-average labor productivity (tests/FTE) and lower-than-average consumable expenses.

  20. Hunter versus CIE color measurement systems for analysis of milk-based beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ni; Barbano, David M; Drake, Mary Anne

    2018-06-01

    The objective of our work was to determine the differences in sensitivity of Hunter and International Commission on Illumination (CIE) methods at 2 different viewer angles (2 and 10°) for measurement of whiteness, red/green, and blue/yellow color of milk-based beverages over a range of composition. Sixty combinations of milk-based beverages were formulated (2 replicates) with a range of fat level from 0.2 to 2%, true protein level from 3 to 5%, and casein as a percent of true protein from 5 to 80% to provide a wide range of milk-based beverage color. In addition, commercial skim, 1 and 2% fat high-temperature, short-time pasteurized fluid milks were analyzed. All beverage formulations were HTST pasteurized and cooled to 4°C before analysis. Color measurement viewer angle (2 vs. 10°) had very little effect on objective color measures of milk-based beverages with a wide range of composition for either the Hunter or CIE color measurement system. Temperature (4, 20, and 50°C) of color measurement had a large effect on the results of color measurement in both the Hunter and CIE measurement systems. The effect of milk beverage temperature on color measurement results was the largest for skim milk and the least for 2% fat milk. This highlights the need for proper control of beverage serving temperature for sensory panel analysis of milk-based beverages with very low fat content and for control of milk temperature when doing objective color analysis for quality control in manufacture of milk-based beverages. The Hunter system of color measurement was more sensitive to differences in whiteness among milk-based beverages than the CIE system, whereas the CIE system was much more sensitive to differences in yellowness among milk-based beverages. There was little difference between the Hunter and CIE system in sensitivity to green/red color of milk-based beverages. In defining milk-based beverage product specifications for objective color measures for dairy product

  1. Linking Hunter Knowledge with Forest Change to Understand Changing Deer Harvest Opportunities in Intensively Logged Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J. Brinkman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of landscape changes caused by intensive logging on the availability of wild game are important when the harvest of wild game is a critical cultural practice, food source, and recreational activity. We assessed the influence of extensive industrial logging on the availability of wild game by drawing on local knowledge and ecological science to evaluate the relationship between forest change and opportunities to harvest Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. We used data collected through interviews with local deer hunters and GIS analysis of land cover to determine relationships among landscape change, hunter access, and habitat for deer hunting over the last 50 yr. We then used these relationships to predict how harvest opportunities may change in the future. Intensive logging from 1950 into the 1990s provided better access to deer and habitat that facilitated deer hunting. However, successional changes in intensively logged forests in combination with a decline in current logging activity have reduced access to deer and increased undesirable habitat for deer hunting. In this new landscape, harvest opportunities in previously logged landscapes have declined, and hunters identify second-growth forest as one of the least popular habitats for hunting. Given the current state of the logging industry in Alaska, it is unlikely that the logging of the remaining old-growth forests or intensive management of second-growth forests will cause hunter opportunities to rebound to historic levels. Instead, hunter opportunities may continue to decline for at least another human generation, even if the long-term impacts of logging activity and deer harvest on deer numbers are minimal. Adapting hunting strategies to focus on naturally open habitats such as alpine and muskeg that are less influenced by external market forces may require considerably more hunting effort but provide the best option for

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccine motivators and barriers among community college students: Considerations for development of a successful vaccination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Jacqueline M; Batuuka, Denise N; Gross, Tyra T; Cofie, Leslie; Berenson, Abbey B

    2018-02-14

    Previous interventions in colleges to improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination have not been highly successful. Although barriers have been assessed in traditional colleges, less is known about vaccination barriers in community colleges. We approached students aged 18-26 years old enrolled at a community college for an in-person semi-structured qualitative interview on HPV vaccination and health, with questions guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior. Data collection took place between April 2015 and December 2015. Thematic analysis techniques were used to analyze the data. During interviews with 19 students, 4 themes emerged, including: general vaccine attitudes, barriers to HPV vaccination, motivators to HPV vaccination, and social influences. Participants felt that vaccines were beneficial, but were concerned about side effects. They felt that getting the HPV vaccine would be inconvenient, and they did not know enough about it to decide. Most would not trust their friends' opinions, but would want to know about side effects that their vaccinated friends experienced. Successful interventions at community colleges should include several components to increase convenience as well as utilize interactive methods to promote HPV vaccine awareness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  4. Human behavior. Sex equality can explain the unique social structure of hunter-gatherer bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyble, M; Salali, G D; Chaudhary, N; Page, A; Smith, D; Thompson, J; Vinicius, L; Mace, R; Migliano, A B

    2015-05-15

    The social organization of mobile hunter-gatherers has several derived features, including low within-camp relatedness and fluid meta-groups. Although these features have been proposed to have provided the selective context for the evolution of human hypercooperation and cumulative culture, how such a distinctive social system may have emerged remains unclear. We present an agent-based model suggesting that, even if all individuals in a community seek to live with as many kin as possible, within-camp relatedness is reduced if men and women have equal influence in selecting camp members. Our model closely approximates observed patterns of co-residence among Agta and Mbendjele BaYaka hunter-gatherers. Our results suggest that pair-bonding and increased sex egalitarianism in human evolutionary history may have had a transformative effect on human social organization. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Co-residence patterns in hunter-gatherer societies show unique human social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim R; Walker, Robert S; Bozicević, Miran; Eder, James; Headland, Thomas; Hewlett, Barry; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Marlowe, Frank; Wiessner, Polly; Wood, Brian

    2011-03-11

    Contemporary humans exhibit spectacular biological success derived from cumulative culture and cooperation. The origins of these traits may be related to our ancestral group structure. Because humans lived as foragers for 95% of our species' history, we analyzed co-residence patterns among 32 present-day foraging societies (total n = 5067 individuals, mean experienced band size = 28.2 adults). We found that hunter-gatherers display a unique social structure where (i) either sex may disperse or remain in their natal group, (ii) adult brothers and sisters often co-reside, and (iii) most individuals in residential groups are genetically unrelated. These patterns produce large interaction networks of unrelated adults and suggest that inclusive fitness cannot explain extensive cooperation in hunter-gatherer bands. However, large social networks may help to explain why humans evolved capacities for social learning that resulted in cumulative culture.

  6. Beyond the Cut Hunter: A Historical Epidemiology of HIV Beginnings in Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Stephanie; Ambata, Philippe; Narat, Victor; Giles-Vernick, Tamara

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of direct evidence, an imagined "cut hunter" stands in for the index patient of pandemic HIV/AIDS. During the early years of colonial rule, this explanation goes, a hunter was cut or injured from hunting or butchering a chimpanzee infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, resulting in the first sustained human infection with the virus that would emerge as HIV-1M. We argue here that the "cut hunter" relies on a historical misunderstanding and ecological oversimplification of human-chimpanzee (Pan Troglodytes troglodytes) interactions that facilitated pathogenic transmission. This initial host shift cannot explain the beginnings of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Instead, we must understand the processes by which the virus became transmissible, possibly between Sangha basin inhabitants and ultimately reached Kinshasa. A historical epidemiology of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, provides a much-needed corrective to the major shortcomings of the cut hunter. Based on 62 oral historical interviews conducted in southeastern Cameroon and archival research, we show that HIV emerged from ecological, economic, and socio-political transformations of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The gradual imposition of colonial rule built on and reoriented ecologies and economies, and altered older patterns of mobility and sociality. Certain changes may have contributed to the initial viral host shift, but more importantly, facilitated the adaptation of HIV-1M to human-to-human transmission. Our evidence suggests that the most critical changes occurred after 1920. This argument has important implications for public health policy, underscoring recent work emphasizing alternative pathways for zoonotic spillovers into human beings.

  7. Sex differences in Nintendo Wii performance as expected from hunter-gatherer selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Isabelle D; Poss, Jordan L

    2008-06-01

    To test the hunter-gatherer theory of cognitive sex differences, men and women each played four video games on a Wii console: two games simulating skills necessary for hunting (navigation and shooting) and two games simulating skills necessary for gathering (fine motor and visual search). Men outperformed women on the two hunting games, whereas there were no sex differences on the gathering skill games. The findings are discussed in terms of evolutionary psychology theory.

  8. Coccidioidomycosis in armadillo hunters from the state of Ceará, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Brillhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Moreira Filho, Renato Evando; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Fechine, Maria Auxiliadora Bezerra; Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves de; Picanço, Yuri Vieira Cunha; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Queiroz, José Ajax Nogueira; Araujo, Roberto Wagner Bezerra de; Mesquita, Jacó Ricarte Lima de; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis with a variable clinical presentation. Misdiagnosis of coccidioidomycosis as bacterial pneumopathy leads to inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and delayed diagnosis. This report describes an outbreak among armadillo hunters in northeastern Brazil in which an initial diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia was later confirmed as coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides posadasii. Thus, this mycosis should be considered as an alternative diagnosis in pa...

  9. Favorable ecological circumstances promote life expectancy in chimpanzees similar to that of human hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian M; Watts, David P; Mitani, John C; Langergraber, Kevin E

    2017-04-01

    Demographic data on wild chimpanzees are crucial for understanding the evolution of chimpanzee and hominin life histories, but most data come from populations affected by disease outbreaks and anthropogenic disturbance. We present survivorship data from a relatively undisturbed and exceptionally large community of eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. We monitored births, deaths, immigrations, and emigrations in the community between 1995 and 2016. Using known and estimated ages, we calculated survivorship curves for the whole community, for males and females separately, and for individuals ≤2 years old when identified. We used a novel method to address age estimation error by calculating stochastic survivorship curves. We compared Ngogo life expectancy, survivorship, and mortality rates to those from other chimpanzee communities and human hunter-gatherers. Life expectancy at birth for both sexes combined was 32.8 years, far exceeding estimates of chimpanzee life expectancy in other communities, and falling within the range of human hunter-gatherers (i.e., 27-37 years). Overall, the pattern of survivorship at Ngogo was more similar to that of human hunter-gatherers than to other chimpanzee communities. Maximum lifespan for the Ngogo chimpanzees, however, was similar to that reported at other chimpanzee research sites and was less than that of human-hunter gatherers. The absence of predation by large carnivores may contribute to some of the higher survivorship at Ngogo, but this cannot explain the much higher survivorship at Ngogo than at Kanyawara, another chimpanzee community in the same forest, which also lacks large carnivores. Higher survivorship at Ngogo appears to be an adaptive response to a food supply that is more abundant and varies less than that of Kanyawara. Future analyses of hominin life history evolution should take these results into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. Ancient DNA reveals lack of continuity between neolithic hunter-gatherers and contemporary Scandinavians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Thomas, Mark G

    2009-01-01

    of the two cultures in Scandinavia has been cited as an argument against population replacement between the Mesolithic and the present [7, 8]. Through analysis of DNA extracted from ancient Scandinavian human remains, we show that people of the Pitted Ware culture were not the direct ancestors of modern......]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations....

  11. Intergroup aggression in chimpanzees and war in nomadic hunter-gatherers: evaluating the chimpanzee model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrangham, Richard W; Glowacki, Luke

    2012-03-01

    Chimpanzee and hunter-gatherer intergroup aggression differ in important ways, including humans having the ability to form peaceful relationships and alliances among groups. This paper nevertheless evaluates the hypothesis that intergroup aggression evolved according to the same functional principles in the two species-selection favoring a tendency to kill members of neighboring groups when killing could be carried out safely. According to this idea chimpanzees and humans are equally risk-averse when fighting. When self-sacrificial war practices are found in humans, therefore, they result from cultural systems of reward, punishment, and coercion rather than evolved adaptations to greater risk-taking. To test this "chimpanzee model," we review intergroup fighting in chimpanzees and nomadic hunter-gatherers living with other nomadic hunter-gatherers as neighbors. Whether humans have evolved specific psychological adaptations for war is unknown, but current evidence suggests that the chimpanzee model is an appropriate starting point for analyzing the biological and cultural evolution of warfare.

  12. JEFX 10 demonstration of Cooperative Hunter Killer UAS and upstream data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Brian K.; Castelli, Jonathan C.; Watkins, Adam S.; McCubbin, Christopher B.; Marshall, Steven J.; Barton, Jeffrey D.; Newman, Andrew J.; Peterson, Cammy K.; DeSena, Jonathan T.; Dutrow, Daniel A.; Rodriguez, Pedro A.

    2011-05-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory deployed and demonstrated a prototype Cooperative Hunter Killer (CHK) Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) capability and a prototype Upstream Data Fusion (UDF) capability as participants in the Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment 2010 in April 2010. The CHK capability was deployed at the Nevada Test and Training Range to prosecute a convoy protection operational thread. It used mission-level autonomy (MLA) software applied to a networked swarm of three Raven hunter UAS and a Procerus Miracle surrogate killer UAS, all equipped with full motion video (FMV). The MLA software provides the capability for the hunter-killer swarm to autonomously search an area or road network, divide the search area, deconflict flight paths, and maintain line of sight communications with mobile ground stations. It also provides an interface for an operator to designate a threat and initiate automatic engagement of the target by the killer UAS. The UDF prototype was deployed at the Maritime Operations Center at Commander Second Fleet, Naval Station Norfolk to provide intelligence analysts and the ISR commander with a common fused track picture from the available FMV sources. It consisted of a video exploitation component that automatically detected moving objects, a multiple hypothesis tracker that fused all of the detection data to produce a common track picture, and a display and user interface component that visualized the common track picture along with appropriate geospatial information such as maps and terrain as well as target coordinates and the source video.

  13. Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of Hunter Syndrome for clinicians in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide clinicians in Latin America with the most current information on the clinical aspects, diagnosis, and management of Hunter syndrome, a serious and progressive disease for which specific treatment is available. Hunter syndrome is a genetic disorder where iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S, an enzyme that degrades glycosaminoglycans, is absent or deficient. Clinical manifestations vary widely in severity and involve multiple organs and tissues. An attenuated and a severe phenotype are recognized depending on the degree of cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis is vital for disease management. Clinical signs common to children with Hunter syndrome include inguinal hernia, frequent ear and respiratory infections, facial dysmorphisms, macrocephaly, bone dysplasia, short stature, sleep apnea, and behavior problems. Diagnosis is based on screening urinary glycosaminoglycans and confirmation by measuring I2S activity and analyzing I2S gene mutations. Idursulfase (recombinant I2S (Elaprase®, Shire enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, designed to address the underlying enzyme deficiency, is approved treatment and improves walking capacity and respiratory function, and reduces spleen and liver size and urinary glycosaminoglycan levels. Additional measures, responding to the multi-organ manifestations, such as abdominal/inguinal hernia repair, carpal tunnel surgery, and cardiac valve replacement, should also be considered. Investigational treatment options such as intrathecal ERT are active areas of research, and bone marrow transplantation is in clinical practice. Communication among care providers, social workers, patients and families is essential to inform and guide their decisions, establish realistic expectations, and assess patients' responses.

  14. Wild-harvested venison yields and sharing by Michigan deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Amber D.; Riley, Shawn J.; Organ, John F.; Rudolph, Brent A.

    2018-01-01

    An increased societal focus on wildlife as food and recent policy deliberations regarding legal markets for wild-harvested meat are encouraging wildlife managers and researchers to examine the amount, use, and distribution of meat yielded through recreational hunting. We used responses to questions on the Michigan Deer Harvest Study to estimate the maximum yield of edible venison and assess hunters’ sharing behaviors. We estimated 11,402–14,473 metric tons of edible venison were procured during the 2013 hunting season. Of hunters who harvested a deer, 85% shared their venison. Hunters who shared did so with an average of 5.6 people (SD = 4.5). Sharing occurred most frequently within tight social networks: members of hunters’ households (69%), relatives (52%), and friends, neighbors, or coworkers (50%). In the absence of legal markets, venison is distributed widely by hunters and greatly amplifies the number of people benefiting from hunting. Nonetheless, we also identified the potential breadth of exposure to disease or contaminants from wild-harvested meat.

  15. Estimating the mercury exposure dose in a population of migratory bird hunters in the St. Lawrence River region, Quebec, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, J.-F.; Levesque, B.; Gauvin, Denis; Braune, Birgit; Gingras, Suzanne; Dewailly, E.

    2004-01-01

    St. Lawrence River hunters (Quebec, Canada) are exposed to the pollutants, especially mercury, that contaminate birds and fish. However, the health risks of this have remained unclear because of a lack of information about the hunters' duck, geese, and sportfish consumption habits. A nutritional survey was set up to characterize waterfowl and sportfish consumption in St. Lawrence River duck hunters and to estimate their daily exposure to mercury. During the winter of 2000, 512 hunters selected from the Canadian Wildlife Service database completed a self-administered questionnaire. Daily exposure to contaminants was measured using data from the Canadian Wildlife Service (waterfowl) and available data on St. Lawrence River sportfish. The annual average consumption was 7.5 meals of ducks and geese and 8.7 meals of sportfish. The daily exposure to mercury related to waterfowl consumption was below the Canadian tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.47 μg/kg body wt/day for all participants. The daily mercury intake associated with fish consumption was greater than the TDI in 2 duck hunters. The daily exposure to mercury was higher than the TDI in 4 participants when both waterfowl and fish consumption were combined. Our results suggest that fish consumption (especially freshwater fish) represents the main source of exposure to pollutants in duck hunters

  16. Collaborative Workshops and Student Academic Performance in Introductory College Mathematics Courses: A Study of a Treisman Model Math Excel Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Hollis; Dick, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Treisman model which involves supplemental workshops in which college students solve problems in collaborative learning groups. Reports on the effectiveness of Math Excel, an implementation of the Treisman model for introductory mathematics courses at Oregon State University over five academic terms. Reveals a significant effect on…

  17. Copyright Laws and Fair Use in the Digital Era: Implications for Distance-Education Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhon, Tommie; Ennis-Cole, Demetria; Lawhon, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Practical information on the necessity for community colleges, instructors, and students to understand and abide by the copyright laws is essential. Whether developing, structuring, maintaining, or presenting courses, or instructing students on the development of their own papers, one must be knowledgeable about plagiarism, the Fair Use Act, and…

  18. A Co-Created Journey: Designing a College-Wide Graduate Certificate Program in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Linda P.; Yelich Biniecki, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    A strengths assessment of the College of Education at Kansas State University in the United States showed that a majority of faculty had strong interests in social justice issues in education. The need for providing continuing post-graduate education in social justice education with theory-to-practice relevancy is critical in formal and informal…

  19. A sociodrama: an innovative program engaging college students to learn and self-reflect about alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Diane M; Winters, Justin

    2011-08-01

    A sociodrama addressing college drinking.   This article reports on the development, production, and evaluation of an innovative sociodrama addressing college drinking mental health professionals caring for students who drink at levels that cause negative consequences can use techniques addressed in the sociodrama to help students self-reflect on their alcohol use. The goal is to help students make healthy choices to decrease the negative consequences as a result of drinking. A script for the sociodrama was developed and five students acted out the sociodrama. A facilitator engaged the audience of college students, at scripted pauses, during the production to reflect on the scenes presented. The purpose of the sociodrama is to foster a discussion, to aid in student understanding concerning college drinking, to have students consider and commit to use harm reduction techniques, to access resources, and to correct misperceptions about drinking. The sociodrama format can help address communication challenges, problem solving, and self-awareness. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to test commitment to use harm reduction techniques, assess the perception of a student's own drinking pattern to the perception of their fellow student colleague drinking, assess the student use of resources, and assess the effectiveness of the sociodrama as a means of learning. This research was Institutional Review Board approved. Over 41% of students reported not consuming alcohol the last time they partied or socialized yet reported only 3.8% of their students colleagues did not consume alcohol. Most students (94%) reported that drinking five or more drinks would place them at risk as opposed to estimating that the same amount would put fewer students at risk (75%). Students significantly increased their commitment to use harm reduction techniques. A sociodrama is an effective method of involving students in discussions about college drinking and engaging them in conversation and

  20. The History of College Health Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crihfield, Connie; Grace, Ted W.

    2011-01-01

    Almost from the beginning of formal college health programs in the second half of the 19th century, college health nurses were there to care for students in college and university settings. By the end of the 20th century, the role of college health nurses had evolved with the nursing field in general, but with enough unique features for the…

  1. Poachers and Poverty: Assessing Objective and Subjective Measures of Poverty among Illegal Hunters Outside Ruaha National Park, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli J Knapp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Illegal hunters in Africa may be making rational decisions about the hunting activities they partake in. These decisions could be linked to their socioeconomic status and the livelihood opportunities available to them. In particular, poverty is widely considered the leading driver that causes a household's inhabitants to take up poaching in protected areas. Programs aiming to protect vulnerable wildlife populations by mitigating poaching have historically relied upon income-based poverty metrics in efforts to reduce regional poverty and incentivise local inhabitants to discontinue poaching activities. Because such data sets that deal with poachers directly are rare, assumptions about the role of poverty, and the extent of poverty, that drives poaching have been hard to test. This study uses a unique sample of 173 self-admitted poachers living in villages adjacent to Ruaha National Park in Tanzania to explore the influence of poverty on poaching. Results indicated high demographic and household economy heterogeneity among poaching households. Capability deprivation examined more subjective measures of poverty and revealed that poachers are strongly motivated by the need to improve their incomes, but are not necessarily the poorest of the poor.

  2. Planet hunters. VI. An independent characterization of KOI-351 and several long period planet candidates from the Kepler archival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Moriarty, John C.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Jek, Kian J.; LaCourse, Daryll; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Goodman, Samuel Jon; Jebson, Tony; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Paterson, David A.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of 14 new transiting planet candidates in the Kepler field from the Planet Hunters citizen science program. None of these candidates overlapped with Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) at the time of submission. We report the discovery of one more addition to the six planet candidate system around KOI-351, making it the only seven planet candidate system from Kepler. Additionally, KOI-351 bears some resemblance to our own solar system, with the inner five planets ranging from Earth to mini-Neptune radii and the outer planets being gas giants; however, this system is very compact, with all seven planet candidates orbiting ≲ 1 AU from their host star. A Hill stability test and an orbital integration of the system shows that the system is stable. Furthermore, we significantly add to the population of long period transiting planets; periods range from 124 to 904 days, eight of them more than one Earth year long. Seven of these 14 candidates reside in their host star's habitable zone.

  3. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA

  4. Opportunities at Independent Colleges and Universities in New York State through the Higher Education Opportunity Program = Oportunidades en los colegios y universidades independientes en el Estado de Nueva York a traves de los programas de oportunidad en educacion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    Information on programs that address special needs of students from disadvantaged backgrounds who attend private colleges and universities in New York State is provided in separate English and Spanish reports. The Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) provides supportive services and financial aid. Information is provided on: eligibility for…

  5. Online Education in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejda, Brent

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the tremendous growth in the use of the Internet to deliver distance education at community colleges. The author examines various definitions of online education, including the types of courses, programs, and degrees available and the types of community colleges that offer greater amounts of online programming. Considerations…

  6. Cardiac performance measure compliance in outpatients: the American College of Cardiology and National Cardiovascular Data Registry's PINNACLE (Practice Innovation And Clinical Excellence) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S; Oetgen, William J; Buchanan, Donna; Mitchell, Kristi; Fiocchi, Fran F; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Philip G; Breeding, Tracie; Thrutchley, Duane; Rumsfeld, John S; Spertus, John A

    2010-06-29

    We examined compliance with performance measures for 14,464 patients enrolled from July 2008 through June 2009 into the American College of Cardiology's PINNACLE (Practice Innovation And Clinical Excellence) program to provide initial insights into the quality of outpatient cardiac care. Little is known about the quality of care of outpatients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure, and atrial fibrillation, and whether sex and racial disparities exist in the treatment of outpatients. The PINNACLE program is the first, national, prospective office-based quality improvement program of cardiac patients designed, in part, to capture, report, and improve outpatient performance measure compliance. We examined the proportion of patients whose care was compliant with established American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and American Medical Association-Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement (ACC/AHA/PCPI) performance measures for CAD, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. There were 14,464 unique patients enrolled from 27 U.S. practices, accounting for 18,021 clinical visits. Of these, 8,132 (56.4%) had CAD, 5,012 (34.7%) had heart failure, and 2,786 (19.3%) had nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Data from the PINNACLE program were feasibly collected for 24 of 25 ACC/AHA/PCPI performance measures. Compliance with performance measures ranged from being very low (e.g., 13.3% of CAD patients screened for diabetes mellitus) to very high (e.g., 96.7% of heart failure patients with blood pressure assessments), with moderate (70% to 90%) compliance observed for most performance measures. For 3 performance measures, there were small differences in compliance rates by race or sex. For more than 14,000 patients enrolled from 27 practices in the outpatient PINNACLE program, we found that compliance with performance measures was variable, even after accounting for exclusion criteria, suggesting an important opportunity to improve the quality of

  7. Contrasts in livelihoods and protein intake between commercial and subsistence bushmeat hunters in two villages on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, María Grande; Carpinetti, Bruno; Duarte, Jesús; Fa, John E

    2013-06-01

    Across West and Central Africa, wildlife provides a source of food and income. We investigated the relation between bushmeat hunting and household wealth and protein consumption in 2 rural communities in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. One village was dedicated to commercial hunting, the other trapped game primarily for food. We tested whether commercial-hunter households were nutritionally advantaged over subsistence-hunter households due to their higher income from the bushmeat trade and greater access to wild-animal protein. We conducted bushmeat-offtake surveys in both villages (captures by hunters and carcasses arriving to each village). Mammals (including threatened primates: black colobus [Colobus satanas], Preussi's guenon [Allochrocebus preussi], and russet-eared guenon [Cercopithecus erythrotis]), birds, and reptiles were hunted. The blue duiker (Philantomba monticola), giant pouched rat (Cricetomys emini), and brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) contributed almost all the animal biomass hunted, consumed, or sold in both villages. Monkeys and Ogilbyi's duikers (Cephalophus ogilbyi) were hunted only by commercial hunters. Commercial hunters generated a mean of US$2000/year from bushmeat sales. Households with commercial hunters were on average wealthier, generated more income, spent more money on nonessential goods, and bought more products they did not grow. By contrast, households with subsistence hunters spent less on market items, spent more on essential products, and grew more of their own food. Despite these differences, average consumption of vegetable protein and domestic meat and bushmeat protein did not differ between villages. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the socioeconomic and nutritional context of commercial and subsistence bushmeat hunting to correctly interpret ways of reducing their effects on threatened species and to enable the sustainable offtake of more productive taxa. © 2013 Society for Conservation

  8. The Core Curricula of Information Systems Undergraduate Programs: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the present state of information systems undergraduate programs in the United States. He reviewed 516 institutions and collected data on 234 institutions offering information systems (IS) undergraduate programs. Of seven core courses required by the IS 2010 curriculum model, four are required by more than 50% of the programs,…

  9. Reentry Orientation and Alumni Networking in U.S. Colleges and Universities with Agriculture and Natural Resources Programs. Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Paul E.

    This report presents results of a survey of U.S. postsecondary institutions with agriculture and natural resources programs, concerning institutional support for reentry orientation and alumni networking programs. Reentry orientation" involves programs that help international students become aware of the adjustment aspects of returning home,…

  10. Using obsidian transfer distances to explore social network maintenance in late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned; Moutsiou, Theodora

    2014-12-01

    Social behaviour is notoriously difficult to study archaeologically and it is unclear how large the networks of prehistoric humans were, or how they remained connected. Maintaining social cohesion was crucial for early humans because social networks facilitate cooperation and are imperative for survival and reproduction. Recent hunter-gatherer social organisation typically comprises a number of nested layers, ranging from the nuclear family through to the ~1500-strong ethnolinguistic tribe. Here we compare maximum obsidian transfer distances from the late Pleistocene with ethnographic data on the size of the geographic areas associated with each of these social grouping layers in recent hunter-gatherers. The closest match between the two is taken to indicate the maximum social layer within which contact could be sustained by Pleistocene hominins. Within both the (sub)tropical African and Subarctic biomes, the maximum obsidian transfer distances for Pleistocene modern humans (~200km and ~400km respectively) correspond to the geographic ranges of the outermost tribal layer in recent hunter-gatherers. This suggests that modern humans could potentially sustain the cohesion of their entire tribe at all latitudes, even though networks are more dispersed nearer the poles. Neanderthal obsidian transfer distances (300km) indicate that although Neanderthal home ranges are larger than those of low latitude hominins, Neanderthals travelled shorter distances than modern humans living at the same high latitudes. We argue that, like modern humans, Neanderthals could have maintained tribal cohesion, but that their tribes were substantially smaller than those of contemporary modern humans living in similar environments. The greater time taken to traverse the larger modern human tribal ranges may have limited the frequency of their face-to-face interactions and thus necessitated additional mechanisms to ensure network connectivity, such as the exchange of symbolic artefacts

  11. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Randall Haas

    Full Text Available Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare-behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.

  12. Game meat consumption by hunters and their relatives: A probabilistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano Morales, Jesus; Moreno-Ortega, Alicia; Amaro Lopez, Manual Angel; Arenas Casas, Antonio; Cámara-Martos, Fernando; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael

    2018-06-18

    This study aimed to estimate the consumption of meat and products derived from hunting by the consumer population and, specifically, by hunters and their relatives. For this purpose, a survey was conducted on the frequency of consuming meat from the four most representative game species in Spain, two of big game, wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) and two of small game, rabbit (Oryctolagus cunulucus) and red partridge (Alectoris rufa), as well as of processed meat products (salami-type sausage) made from those big game species. The survey was carried out on 337 habitual consumers of these types of products (hunters and their relatives). The total mean game meat consumption, per capita in this population group, is 6.87 kg/person/year of meat and 8.57 kg/person/year if the processed meat products are also considered. Consumption of rabbit, red partridge, red deer and wild boar, individually, was 1.85, 0.82, 2.28 and 1.92 kg/person/year, respectively. It was observed that hunters generally registered a larger intake of game meat, this being statistically significant in the case of rabbit meat consumption. Using probabilistic methods, the meat consumption frequency distributions for each hunting species studied were estimated, as well as the products made from big game species and the total consumption both of meat by itself and that including the products made from it. The consumption frequency distributions were adjusted to exponential ones, verified by the test suitable for it according to Akaike Information Criterion, Bayesian Information Criterion, the Chi-Squared and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. In addition, the consumption percentiles of the different distributions were obtained. The latter could be a good tool when making nutrition or contaminant studies since they permit the assessment of exposure to the compound in question.

  13. Mortality, fertility, and the OY ratio in a model hunter-gatherer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew A

    2014-06-01

    An agent-based model (ABM) is used to explore how the ratio of old to young adults (the OY ratio) in a sample of dead individuals is related to aspects of mortality, fertility, and longevity experienced by the living population from which the sample was drawn. The ABM features representations of rules, behaviors, and constraints that affect person- and household-level decisions about marriage, reproduction, and infant mortality in hunter-gatherer systems. The demographic characteristics of the larger model system emerge through human-level interactions playing out in the context of "global" parameters that can be adjusted to produce a range of mortality and fertility conditions. Model data show a relationship between the OY ratios of living populations (the living OY ratio) and assemblages of dead individuals drawn from those populations (the dead OY ratio) that is consistent with that from empirically known ethnographic hunter-gatherer cases. The dead OY ratio is clearly related to the mean ages, mean adult mortality rates, and mean total fertility rates experienced by living populations in the model. Sample size exerts a strong effect on the accuracy with which the calculated dead OY ratio reflects the actual dead OY ratio of the complete assemblage. These results demonstrate that the dead OY ratio is a potentially useful metric for paleodemographic analysis of changes in mortality and mean age, and suggest that, in general, hunter-gatherer populations with higher mortality, higher fertility, and lower mean ages are characterized by lower dead OY ratios. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of Piper chaba Hunter, Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and Piper interruptum Opiz. on natural killer cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthong, Sumalee; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-08-01

    Immune system is the most important system ofhuman body. Thaifolk doctors have used some medicinal plants as an adaptogenic drug or immunomodulatory agent. Piper chaba Hunter, Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and Piper interruptum Opiz. are used by folk doctors to activate immune response in cancer patients. To investigate the effect on natural killer cell activity and on lymphocyte proliferation activity of water extract of P chaba Hunter P. sarmentosum Roxb. and P interruptum Opiz. MATERIAL ANDMETHOD: Plant materials were extracted by decoction method. All extracts were testedfor an immunomodulatory effect using PBMCs from twelve healthy donors by chromium release assay. Lymphocyte proliferation was also determined by 3H-thymidine uptake assay. The degree of activation was expressed as the stimulation index. The water extract of P chaba Hunter significantly increased lymphocyte proliferation at concentrations ofl ng/ml, 10 ng/ml, 1 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml. P sarmentosum Roxb., and P interruptum Opiz. extracts at those concentrations significantly stimulated lymphocyteproliferation. P sarmentosum Roxb. extractsignificantly increased natural killer (NK) cell activity at a concentration of 100 μg/ml but P chaba Hunter and P interruptum Opiz. extracts did not significantly stimulate natural killer cell activity. P chaba Hunter, P interruptum Opiz. andP sarmentosum Roxb. have an immunomodulatory effect especially for P sarmentosum Roxb. extract which can activate both lymphocyte proliferation and NK cell activity.

  15. Perception Of Pre-Service Trainees To The Training Program And Teaching Profession The Case Of Adwa Teachers And Educational Leadership College 2012 Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Workneh Gebreselassie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The federal democratic republic government of Ethiopia has practiced the education training policy since 1994. The target of the policy has been the improvement of access quality relevance equity efficiency in education sector In order to enhance the implementation of the policy several programs and interventions have been introduced such as system of training quality teachers both pre-service and in-service USAID and MOE 2008. This research work has intended to assess the reaction of the 2012 graduates of Adwa teachers and educational leadership College after they covered their three years training program and prepared to celebrate their graduation. Objective Assess the reaction of the senior trainees to the quality of the training program and identify specific areas that need further intervention. Methodology-institutional based cross sectional study design was employed. This research work has been carried by dispatching 250 questionnaires randomly to 2012 graduate students of Adwa Teachers and Educational leadership College. Among these 220 88 returned. In total among the 424 2012 graduates of Adwa Teachers and Educational leadership College 220 51.9 were involved in responding the questionnaires. The collected data was analyzed quantitatively entering in to a computer using SPSS version 16 using Ch-square Annova Sign test. Result- Among the respondents of this pre-service teachers training majority 152 69 entered to the training with interest towards the teaching profession whereas 68 31 entered without interest. Majority of the trainees 111 73 had joined to the training with interest to the teaching profession because the profession plays a role as foundation for the development of the country. Among of the trainee who joined to the training without interest to the profession 59 86.8 were with negative attitude to the profession because teachers are with subsistence life condition. Majority of the trainees weather heshe entered

  16. Environmental injustice and air pollution in coal affected communities, Hunter Valley, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginbotham, N.; Freeman, S.; Connor, L.; Albrecht, G. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). School of Medicine & Public Health

    2010-03-15

    The authors describe environmental injustice from air pollution in the Upper Hunter, Australia, and analyse the inaction of state authorities in addressing residents' health concerns. Obstacles blocking a public-requested health study and air monitoring include: the interdependence of state government and corporations in reaping the economic benefits of coal production; lack of political will, regulatory inertia and procedural injustice; and study design and measurement issues. We analyse mining- and coal-related air pollution in a contested socio-political arena, where residents, civil society and local government groups struggle with corporations and state government over the burden of imposed health risk caused by air pollution.

  17. Coccidioidomycosis in armadillo hunters from the state of Ceará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Moreira Filho, Renato Evando; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Fechine, Maria Auxiliadora Bezerra; Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves de; Picanço, Yuri Vieira Cunha; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Queiroz, José Ajax Nogueira; Araujo, Roberto Wagner Bezerra de; Mesquita, Jacó Ricarte Lima de; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2012-09-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis with a variable clinical presentation. Misdiagnosis of coccidioidomycosis as bacterial pneumopathy leads to inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and delayed diagnosis. This report describes an outbreak among armadillo hunters in northeastern Brazil in which an initial diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia was later confirmed as coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides posadasii. Thus, this mycosis should be considered as an alternative diagnosis in patients reporting symptoms of pneumonia, even if these symptoms are only presented for a short period, who are from areas considered endemic for this disease.

  18. Coccidioidomycosis in armadillo hunters from the state of Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira Brillhante

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis with a variable clinical presentation. Misdiagnosis of coccidioidomycosis as bacterial pneumopathy leads to inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and delayed diagnosis. This report describes an outbreak among armadillo hunters in northeastern Brazil in which an initial diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia was later confirmed as coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides posadasii. Thus, this mycosis should be considered as an alternative diagnosis in patients reporting symptoms of pneumonia, even if these symptoms are only presented for a short period, who are from areas considered endemic for this disease.

  19. Period Determination of Asteroid Targets Observed at Hunters Hill Observatory: May 2009 - September 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David

    2011-01-01

    Lightcurves for 27 asteroids were obtained at the Hunters Hill Observatory (HHO) from 2009 May through 2010 September: 308 Polyxo, 326 Tamara, 369 Aeria, 504 Cora, 822 Lalage, 1164 Kobolda, 1619 Ueta, 1625 The NORC, 1685 Toro, 2189 Zaragoza, 2287 Kalmykia, 2639 Planman, 3695 Fiaia, 4786 Tatianina, 5333 Kanaya, (5452) 1937 NN, 6170 Levasseur, 7741 Fedoseev, 14815 Rutberg, 15724 Zille, 16525 Shumarinaiko, (21996) 1993 XP31, (29729) 1999 BY1, (35404) 1997 YV5, (39087) 2000 VN50, (66146) 1998 TU3, and (101769) 1999 FF52.

  20. MRI findings in the mild type of mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter's syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda-Matsubayashi, S.; Ito, T.; Hattori, N.; Okuma, Y.; Mizuno, Y.; Kuru, Y.; Sumie, H.

    1990-01-01

    Neuroradiological findings in a 44-year-old male with the typical mild type of Hunter's disease are reported. Cranial MRI revealed patchy areas of increased and decreased signals in T1- and T2-weighted images in the thalamus and the basal ganglia giving rise to a honey comb-like appearance as a whole. The deep white matter showed high signals in the T2-weighted image. To our knowledge, the honey comb-like appearance has never been reported in this disorder. Deposition of mucopolysaccharides and/or glycolipids and increase in fluid content seem to be responsible for these changes. (orig.)

  1. College Explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, David H.

    1985-01-01

    The "College Explorer" is a software package (for the 64K Apple II, IBM PC, TRS-80 model III and 4 microcomputers) which aids in choosing a college. The major features of this package (manufactured by The College Board) are described and evaluated. Sample input/output is included. (JN)

  2. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type and severity of the disease. Complications can affect the lungs, heart, joints, connective tissue, and brain and nervous system. Respiratory complications An enlarged tongue, thickened gums, and ...

  3. Colleges without Walls But with Foundations: Integrated College and Communications Development in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Ronald L.

    The evolvement of the community college in Saskatchewan is discussed. The college concept, which is embodied in seven principles, is essentially one of a communtiy college in which the community is the campus--the "college" exists wherever its programs are offered. Existing school and community facilities are utilized. In the first year…

  4. Diagnosis of Hunter's syndrome carriers; radioactive sulphate incorporation into fibroblasts in the presence of fructose 1-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toennesen, T.; Lykkelund, C.; Guettler, F.

    1982-01-01

    Mutual correction of co-cultivated fibroblasts from patients with Hunter's and Hurler's syndrome could be inhibited by either fructose 1-phosphate or mannose 6-phosphate. In the presence of fructose 1-phosphate a 50% mixture of fibroblasts from a patient with Hunter's syndrome and a normal homozygous individual showed an increased 35 S-sulphate incorporation into acid mucopolysaccharides. When fibroblast cultures from one obligate and two possible carriers of Hunter's syndrome were tested for 35 S-sulphate incorporation, the cultures showed either twice the normal 35 S-sulphate incorporation into acid mucopolysaccharides in the presence of fructose 1-phosphate or an abnormally high incorporation in the presence as well as in the absence of the sugar phosphate. (orig.)

  5. Project based education as motivation factor in undergraduate program in Electronics at Copenhagen University College of Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the contents of our experience with project based courses and team work in the undergraduate program in Electronics. The main points of our program are described in this paper, where the leading idea is to combine theory with practical engineering projects. Our students work...

  6. Information Needs Perceived as Important by Leaders in Advanced Technological Education: Alignment with Community College Program Improvement Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badway, Norena Norton; Somerville, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze what leaders of Advanced Technological Education (ATE) programs funded by the National Science Foundation believe are their most important needs for research information. Data was collected through a Delphi process, and results were analyzed through frameworks associated with program improvement initiatives…

  7. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Systems Management College. Volume 23, Number 1, January-February 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Jones, Jr. PROGRAM MANAGER Managing Editor Esther M. Farria Art Director Greg Caruth Typography and Design Paula Croisetlere Program Manager (ISSN 0199...Company bombers to implement the strategic organization - President Clayton 1. Brukner commu- bombing doctrine. This would take all brand -new cre

  8. Seasonal and Long-term Variations in 137Cs Among Adults from Swedish Hunter Families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agren, G.

    2001-01-01

    To study seasonal variations in 137 Cs, whole-body content measurements of adults from Swedish hunter families have been performed in autumn 1997 and spring 1998. Measurements were performed in three locations, By, Harbo and Gavle, geographically close (within 100 km of each other) but with large differences in ground deposition levels. The hunter families at these three locations were previously measured in 1994. The measured persons were also asked for their frequency of intake of moose, roe-deer, freshwater fish, mushrooms and berries. A statistically significant lower frequency of intake of mushrooms and berries in By, moose, roe-deer and mushrooms in Harbo, and moose in Gavle was found in springtime compared to autumn. In one of the locations, there was a statistically significant lower average 137 Cs whole-body content in spring 1998 than in autumn 1997 while in the other two locations no such effects could be seen. The 137 Cs whole-body content has decreased by 37% from 1994 and to 1998 (including physical decay) correlated to an effective ecological half time of 6 years. (author)

  9. High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmlund Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes and culture are believed to interact, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence for the process. One candidate example that has been put forward is lactase persistence in adulthood, i.e. the ability to continue digesting the milk sugar lactose after childhood, facilitating the consumption of raw milk. This genetic trait is believed to have evolved within a short time period and to be related with the emergence of sedentary agriculture. Results Here we investigate the frequency of an allele (-13910*T associated with lactase persistence in a Neolithic Scandinavian population. From the 14 individuals originally examined, 10 yielded reliable results. We find that the T allele frequency was very low (5% in this Middle Neolithic hunter-gatherer population, and that the frequency is dramatically different from the extant Swedish population (74%. Conclusions We conclude that this difference in frequency could not have arisen by genetic drift and is either due to selection or, more likely, replacement of hunter-gatherer populations by sedentary agriculturalists.

  10. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport along Hunter Creek, southwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Krista L.; Wallick, J. Rose; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Risley, John C.

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary assessment of (1) bed-material transport in the Hunter Creek basin, (2) historical changes in channel condition, and (3) supplementary data needed to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel extraction revealed the following: Along the lower 12.4 km (kilometers) of Hunter Creek from its confluence with the Little South Fork Hunter Creek to its mouth, the river has confined and unconfined segments and is predominately alluvial in its lowermost 11 km. This 12.4-km stretch of river can be divided into two geomorphically distinct study reaches based primarily on valley physiography. In the Upper Study Reach (river kilometer [RKM] 12.4-6), the active channel comprises a mixed bed of bedrock, boulders, and smaller grains. The stream is confined in the upper 1.4 km of the reach by a bedrock canyon and in the lower 2.4 km by its valley. In the Lower Study Reach (RKM 6-0), where the area of gravel bars historically was largest, the stream flows over bed material that is predominately alluvial sediments. The channel alternates between confined and unconfined segments. The primary human activities that likely have affected bed-material transport and the extent and area of gravel bars are (1) historical and ongoing aggregate extraction from gravel bars in the study area and (2) timber harvest and associated road construction throughout the basin. These anthropogenic activities likely have varying effects on sediment transport and deposition throughout the study area and over time. Although assessing the relative effects of these anthropogenic activities on sediment dynamics would be challenging, the Hunter Creek basin may serve as a case study for such an assessment because it is mostly free of other alterations to hydrologic and geomorphic processes such as flow regulation, dredging, and other navigation improvements that are common in many Oregon coastal basins. Several datasets are available that may support a more detailed physical assessment

  11. How Do Hunter-Gatherer Children Learn Subsistence Skills? : A Meta-Ethnographic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew-Levy, Sheina; Reckin, Rachel; Lavi, Noa; Cristóbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Ellis-Davies, Kate

    2017-12-01

    Hunting and gathering is, evolutionarily, the defining subsistence strategy of our species. Studying how children learn foraging skills can, therefore, provide us with key data to test theories about the evolution of human life history, cognition, and social behavior. Modern foragers, with their vast cultural and environmental diversity, have mostly been studied individually. However, cross-cultural studies allow us to extrapolate forager-wide trends in how, when, and from whom hunter-gatherer children learn their subsistence skills. We perform a meta-ethnography, which allows us to systematically extract, summarize, and compare both quantitative and qualitative literature. We found 58 publications focusing on learning subsistence skills. Learning begins early in infancy, when parents take children on foraging expeditions and give them toy versions of tools. In early and middle childhood, children transition into the multi-age playgroup, where they learn skills through play, observation, and participation. By the end of middle childhood, most children are proficient food collectors. However, it is not until adolescence that adults (not necessarily parents) begin directly teaching children complex skills such as hunting and complex tool manufacture. Adolescents seek to learn innovations from adults, but they themselves do not innovate. These findings support predictive models that find social learning should occur before individual learning. Furthermore, these results show that teaching does indeed exist in hunter-gatherer societies. And, finally, though children are competent foragers by late childhood, learning to extract more complex resources, such as hunting large game, takes a lifetime.

  12. The coexistence of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) and indigenous hunters in northeastern Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Marc; Estrada, Nereyda; Smith, Derek A

    2012-12-01

    The Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) is a popular game species throughout Central America, particularly among indigenous populations, and is currently endangered. Research on Miskitu hunting was conducted over 4 months in a remote region in northeastern Honduras that overlaps with the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve. The hunting zone was mapped together with hunters and interviews were conducted with elders and other community members about tapir hunting. Results show that tapir harvesting is targeted toward specific habitats at specific times of year. Harvest rates for one year suggest that tapir hunting in the area exceeds estimates of maximum sustainable production. Nevertheless, field surveys reveal the presence of tapir within 1 km of the community, and its harvest tends to be nearby, in both forested and agricultural landscapes, suggesting that the animal has not been depleted in the area. It appears that the existence of forest areas adjacent to the hunting zone that do not experience hunting, together with the anthropogenic habitats created through shifting cultivation, are factors that help explain the presence of tapirs in the area. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the potential positive role of indigenous hunters in tapir conservation throughout its distribution range. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd, ISZS and IOZ/CAS.

  13. Firewood, food and human niche construction: the potential role of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in actively structuring Scotland's woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Rosie R.; Church, Mike J.; Rowley-Conwy, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the potential role of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in actively constructing their own niches, through the management of wild plants, has frequently been discussed. It is probable that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers systematically exploited specific woodland resources for food and fuel and influenced the 'natural' abundance or distribution of particular species within Mesolithic environments. Though there has been considerable discussion of the pollen evidence for potential small-scale human-woodland manipulation in Mesolithic Scotland, the archaeobotanical evidence for anthropogenic firewood and food selection has not been discussed in this context. This paper assesses the evidence for the active role of Mesolithic hunter-gatherer communities in systematically exploiting and managing woodlands for food and fuel in Scotland. While taphonomic factors may have impacted on the frequency of specific species in archaeobotanical assemblages, it is suggested that hunter-gatherers in Mesolithic Scotland were systematically using woodland plants, and in particular hazel and oak, for food and fuel. It is argued that the pollen evidence for woodland management is equivocal, but hints at the role of hunter-gatherers in shaping the structure of their environments, through the maintenance or creation of woodland clearings for settlement or as part of vegetation management strategies. It is proposed that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers may have actively contributed to niche construction and that the systematic use of hazel and oak as a fuel may reflect the deliberate pruning of hazel trees to increase nut-yields and the inadvertent - or perhaps deliberate - coppicing of hazel and oak during greenwood collection.

  14. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to cervical and cranial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009-2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and "muscle" adjustments. There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction.

  15. Prioritizing Service to the Academically Talented: The Honors College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Holloway, Alexandria

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes community college honors programs and courses, emphasizing in particular the Honors College at Miami Dade College in Florida. The chapter discusses pros and cons of honors programs and courses in the context of their appropriateness to the community college mission of open access and egalitarianism. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. Preparation of Underrepresented Males for Scientific Careers: A Study of the Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program at Morehouse College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rahmelle C; Monroe-White, Thema; Xavier, Jeffrey; Howell, Courtney; Moore, Myisha Roberson; Haynes, J K

    Equal representation within higher education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and the STEM workforce in the United States across demographically diverse populations is a long-standing challenge. This study uses two-to-one nearest-neighbor matched-comparison group design to examine academic achievement, pursuit of graduate science degree, and classification of graduate institution attended by students participating in the Hopps Scholars Program (Hopps) at Morehouse College. Hopps is a highly structured enrichment program aimed at increasing participation of black males in STEM fields. Morehouse institutional records, Hopps Program records, and National Student Clearinghouse data were used to examine differences between Hopps and non-Hopps STEM graduates of Morehouse. Two-way sample t tests and chi-square tests revealed significant differences in academic achievement, likelihood of STEM degree pursuit, and the classification of graduate institutions attended by Hopps versus non-Hopps students. Hopps Scholars were significantly more likely than non-Hopps STEM graduates both to pursue STEM doctoral degrees and to attend doctoral-granting institutions with higher research activity. The Hopps Program's approach to training black male students for scientific careers is a model of success for other programs committed to increasing the number of black males pursuing advanced degrees in STEM. © 2016 R. C. Thompson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. University of California Sea Grant College Program, Annual Report 1974-1975. September 1, 1974 to August 31, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Robert, Ed.

    Presented is a general overview and summary of the 1974-1975 Sea Grant Program activities and research. Included are marine advisory services, education, coastal resources, aquaculture, fisheries, new marine products, and energy resources. (SL)

  18. Closing the gap-cardiovascular risk and primary prevention: results from the American College of Physicians quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Vincenza; Reynolds, Cara Egan; Bennett, Lia; Weiss, Kevin B; Snooks, Qianna; Qaseem, Amir

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to study the impact of a practice-based quality improvement program on practice teams' care for patients who have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A total of 54 team members from 18 internal medicine practices participated in an educational program that used a pre-post intervention study design and focused on measures related to cardiovascular risk factors. The program involved live instruction, faculty-led conference calls, practice data collection, and progress reports detailing practices' improvement strategies. Data on 817 patients were reported. Practices showed significant improvement in counseling for diet (70% to 78%), exercise (67% to 74%), and weight loss (64% to 72%). Use of aspirin (53% to 64%) and statins (83% to 89%) also showed significant improvement. Administration of flu vaccine increased significantly from 51% to 54%. Improvements in patient counseling and medication management, if sustained, should lead to fewer cardiovascular events. However, program duration did not allow the capture of outcomes measures improvement.

  19. A Comparative Analysis between Researchers, Innovative Practitioners, and Department Chairs of Critical Issues for Turnaround Leadership in Community College Instructional Programs and Services 2010 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, Matthew J.; Campbell, Dale F.

    2011-01-01

    The Community College Futures Assembly has met annually in Orlando, Florida since 1995 to serve as a showcase for best practices in community colleges as well as a think tank for research into the critical issues facing community colleges. Select conference attendees would have the opportunity to participate in focus groups with respect to…

  20. Tri-Squared Qualitative and Mixed Methods Analysis of Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Student Athlete Leadership Academy [SALA]: A Character Development and College Preparatory Program for Young African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Harvey; Osler, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the major dimensions and overall effectiveness of the Student Athlete Leadership Academy (or "SALA"). SALA is a character development and college preparatory program designed for middle grade student athletes. The focus of this paper is to provide information about year 1 of SALA. At the same time the paper will…