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Sample records for hunter college program

  1. Hunter College Dance Therapy Masters Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmais, Claire; White, Elissa Q.

    Described is development of the Hunter College dance therapy 18-month 30-credit masters program involving 33 adult students, (in two classes beginning in 1971 and 1972), an educational model, internship in psychiatric institutions, and preparation of instructional materials. The dance therapist is said to incorporate the psychiatric patient's…

  2. The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College. A Partnership among Earth Science, Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, Haydee; Buonaiuto, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships to 40 academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics…

  3. Representation of Self among Chinese College Job-hunters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嗣群

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction: Some of their researches (Booher, 1988; Smith and Bernhardt, 1996; Munter, 2006) have been concentrated on teaching students writing skills.On the other hand, some of their researches (Lakoff, 1975; Labov, 1990; Coates, 1998) have been carried on about identifying and instantiating possible differences in linguistic styles between males and females.However, little work has been undertaken on investigating gender differences reflected in business letters writing, especially job-application letter, by analyzing the genre components and politeness strategies.In this project, by providing a content analysis of 20 job application letters written by Chinese college job applicants, I try to explore the differences between Chinese male and female college job hunters presented in their job application letters.

  4. Indice de Indices en la Biblioteca de Hunter College para el Estudiante Hispano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talero Bielsa, Alberto; And Others

    Designed for Spanish-speaking students of Hunter College of the City University of New York, this guide explains the use of 70 English-language indexes found in the college library. The explanations are given in Spanish in order to simplify the process of library research for students who are not completely comfortable with English. Each index is…

  5. Reducing Lead on the Landscape: Anticipating Hunter Behavior in Absence of a Free Nonlead Ammunition Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Chase

    Full Text Available Lead is a neurotoxin that has been documented to affect many forms of wildlife, and has been identified as a limiting factor in a population of California Condors in Northern Arizona. The Arizona Game and Fish Department provides vouchers for free nonlead ammunition to hunters selected to hunt within the distribution of California Condors, with the intention of having fewer lead-laden offal piles available to California Condors. Although wildlife agencies may reasonably assume voucher programs motivate hunters into choosing nonlead ammunition, the lead reduction efforts attributable to the voucher program has not been empirically quantified. Our intention was to compare a control group of hunters to a treatment group of hunters within California Condor occupied areas. Both groups received educational materials regarding the deleterious effects of lead, but the treatment group also received a voucher for a free initial box of ammunition. About half of the control group used nonlead ammunition, compared to about three-fourths of the treatment group. Prominent barriers to adoption of nonlead ammunition included a general difficulty of obtaining it, obtaining it in the desired caliber, and its costliness. Frequently mentioned motivations for using nonlead was the exhortation to use it by the Department, and the desire to aid California Condor recovery by hunters. The disparate compliance rates found herein confirm and quantify the success of nonlead ammunition voucher programs, but underscore the importance of working to increase the supply of nonlead ammunition with the end of facilitating its procurement and reducing its cost.

  6. College Outcomes Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, T. Edward

    Guidelines and implementation options for a program to evaluate the outcomes of collegiate education in New Jersey are discussed. A good program must seek to: (1) maintain public confidence; (2) nuture institutional autonomy and individual diversity; and (3) stimulate educational excellence. College outcomes that the program should cover are:…

  7. A synergistic effort among geoscience, physics, computer science and mathematics at Hunter College of CUNY as a Catalyst for educating Earth scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, H.; Buonaiuto, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships for academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Led by Earth scientists the Program awarded scholarships to students in their junior or senior years majoring in computer science, geosciences, mathematics and physics to create two cohorts of students that spent a total of four semesters in an interdisciplinary community. The program included mentoring of undergraduate students by faculty and graduate students (peer-mentoring), a sequence of three semesters of a one-credit seminar course and opportunities to engage in research activities, research seminars and other enriching academic experiences. Faculty and peer-mentoring were integrated into all parts of the scholarship activities. The one-credit seminar course, although designed to expose scholars to the diversity STEM disciplines and to highlight research options and careers in these disciplines, was thematically focused on geoscience, specifically on ocean and atmospheric science. The program resulted in increased retention rates relative to institutional averages. In this presentation we will discuss the process of establishing the program, from the original plans to its implementation, as well as the impact of this multidisciplinary approach to geoscience education at our institution and beyond. An overview of accomplishments, lessons learned and potential for best practices will be presented.

  8. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  9. Using the Madeline Hunter Direct Instruction Model to Improve Outcomes Assessments in Marketing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Michelle D.; Martin, Gregory S.; Burns, Alvin C.; Bush, Ronald F.

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces marketing educators to the Madeline Hunter Direct Instruction Model (HDIM) as an approach to significantly and substantially improve student learning through course-embedded assessment. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated in three different marketing courses taught by three different marketing professors. The…

  10. Vulnerable Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Asha Begum

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This project "VULNERABLE HUNTER" application main aim is to detect risk in our mobile applications. This application contains modules like Fetch Application, Generate Score, Uninstall and Display Graph. Through this application it detects risk so that this application is very useful to smart phone users Now-a-days so many people are using smart phones and people are crazy about new apps. But by installing all the applications into our mobile may reduce its performance. Some apps contain more risk. But user may not know the effects that are caused by the app which is installed until the performance of mobile is reduced. With the prosperity of the Android app economy, many apps have been published and sold in various markets. However, short development applications and insufficient security development apps have led to many vulnerable apps. So to reduce these type of problems Vulnerable Hunter is proposed. Through the proposed application user can see which application is risky and then the user may uninstall that application. The main advantage of designing this app is without internet also the users will use this application. Users also feel more convenient to work with mobile apps.

  11. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  13. Program Costing in a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinsky, Warren; Burns, John

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses improving the budget control process for a community college by use of program cost accounting. The authors suggest that adoption of such a program will improve resource allocation and program evaluation, aid planning, and better inform the public about the purposes, costs, and results of school programs. (JG)

  14. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Criminal Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in criminal justice. The report first outlines the information gathered in an interview with the program chairperson, conducted to determine program objectives and goals and how they were determined,…

  15. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Aviation Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in aviation maintenance. The report first provides the results of an interview with the program chairperson, which sought information on program objectives and goals and their determination, the extent…

  16. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Fire Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in fire sciences. The report first provides the results of an interview with the program chairperson, which sought information on program objectives and goals and their determination, the extent to…

  17. El Camino College Academic Program Review Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    This document presents El Camino College's academic program review guidelines as of January 1999. Academic programs are scheduled for full evaluation once every six years and involve a two-year process. By or before the beginning of each fall semester, the Office of Academic Affairs notifies the dean of each division as to which programs are to be…

  18. An Evaluation of a College Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A. J.

    A college reading improvement program (CRIP) at the University of South Florida was examined to determine if it was of benefit to the participating students. Sixty-five freshmen took part in the 15-week program which used individually planned programs and different methods and materials. Pretesting had shown these 65 students to be significantly…

  19. Hunters' motivations and values:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radder, Laetitia; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the values and motivations of South African biltong hunters. A hierarchical value map of associations between attributes, consequences and values resulted from laddering interviews with 34 hunters. The Means-End Chain approach proved useful in identifying: (a) personal values......, (b) wildlife value orientations, and (c) motivations associated with desired benefits and satisfactions. Values reflected socialization, achievement, stimulation, hedonism, universalism, and conformity. Materialism, attraction/interest, respect, environmentalism, and rational/scientific were...... the predominant wildlife value orientations. Motivations included male identity, escape, appreciation of nature, and bonding with family and friends. The study refuted perceptions that biltong hunters primarily hunt for the meat or for the sake of killing an animal....

  20. Hunters' motivations and values:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radder, Laetitia; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the values and motivations of South African biltong hunters. A hierarchical value map of associations between attributes, consequences and values resulted from laddering interviews with 34 hunters. The Means-End Chain approach proved useful in identifying: (a) personal values......, (b) wildlife value orientations, and (c) motivations associated with desired benefits and satisfactions. Values reflected socialization, achievement, stimulation, hedonism, universalism, and conformity. Materialism, attraction/interest, respect, environmentalism, and rational/scientific were...... the predominant wildlife value orientations. Motivations included male identity, escape, appreciation of nature, and bonding with family and friends. The study refuted perceptions that biltong hunters primarily hunt for the meat or for the sake of killing an animal....

  1. Community Services Programs in Non-Urban Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Wally

    Responsibilities of nonurban community colleges can appropriately embrace such activities and programs as short courses, workshops, seminars, conferences, civic action programs, paraprofessional training, counseling, career retraining, and other community oriented programs. These colleges and the communities they serve have special…

  2. Effective nutrition support programs for college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, D M

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Husky Sport Nutrition Program at the University of Washington. This program is a component of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Total Student-Athlete Program, an NCAA-sponsored CHAMPS/Life Skills Program that provides life skills assistance to student-athletes. Successful integration of a sport nutrition program requires an understanding of the athletic culture, physiological milestones, and life stressors faced by college athletes. The sport nutritionist functions as an educator, counselor, and administrator. Team presentations and individual nutrition counseling provide athletes with accurate information on healthy eating behaviors for optimal performance. For women's sports, a multidisciplinary team including the sport nutritionist, team physician, clinical psychologist, and athletic trainer work to prevent and treat eating disorders. Case studies are presented illustrating the breadth of nutrition-related issues faced by a sport nutritionist working with college athletes.

  3. The Higgs hunter's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gunion, John F; Haber, Howard E; Kane, Gordon L

    1989-01-01

    The Higgs Hunter's Guide is a definitive and comprehensive guide to the physics of Higgs bosons. In particular, it discusses the extended Higgs sectors required by those recent theoretical approaches that go beyond the Standard Model, including supersymmetry and superstring-inspired models.

  4. Motivations of female Black Hills deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Covelli Metcalf, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    State fish and wildlife agencies are particularly interested in attracting female participation because of the potential to offset declining participation in hunting. Understanding female hunters’ motivations will be critical for designing effective recruitment and retention programs for women hunters. Although female participation in hunting is increasing, males still outnumber females by about tenfold. Gender differences in deer hunters were explored by comparing ratings of eight motivations (social, nature, excitement, meat, challenge, trophy, extra hunting opportunity, and solitude). Hunter types were defined by hunters’ selection of the most important motivation for why they like Black Hills deer hunting. Overall, females and males were relatively similar in their ratings of the eight motivations, and we found 85% gender similarity in the selection of the most important motivation. Women were slightly more motivated by the food aspect of the hunt while men placed slightly more value on the hunt as a sporting activity.

  5. Integrating Ethics in Community Colleges' Accounting Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton

    1990-01-01

    Argues that two-year college business programs need to provide moral guidance and leadership to students to help stem the proliferation of fraudulent and questionable financial reporting practices. Reviews amoral and moral unity theories of business ethics. Discusses barriers to ethical instruction in business curricula, and ways to overcome them.…

  6. The York College observatory outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, T.; Spergel, M.

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory Outreach Program is to im- prove minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens: the York Col- lege Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy?s popular appeal to at- tract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for high schools and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and collaborations with other institutions.

  7. Developing College English as a Second Language (ESL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Irina A.; Kennedy, Jelane A.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines available literature on college English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. The literature available on college ESL programs falls into three categories: (1) research reports and articles, (2) recent theoretical discussions on ESL teaching, and (3) thought pieces discussing college ESL curriculum development and assessment…

  8. Small College Teacher Preparation Program Evaluations: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saynes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The methods of evaluating teacher preparation programs are becoming increasingly more reliant on student test data. These test data driven formats, however, are not appropriate for small colleges. Small colleges are currently left off the Tennessee Report Card on the Effectiveness of Teacher Training Programs because the colleges did not produce…

  9. Bossier Parish Community College and Delgado Community College Collaborative Pharmacy Technician Program Distance Education Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossier Parish Community Coll., Bossier City, LA.

    Two Louisiana community colleges--Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) and Delgado Community College (DCC)--proposed, developed, and implemented a collaborative Pharmacy Technician program for delivery through the use of two-way interactive video. The new program was inspired by new certification requirements instituted by the state of…

  10. Directory of Programs: High School Equivalency Program (HEP) and College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Anne

    This directory lists currently funded High School Equivalency Programs (HEPs) and College Assistance Migrant Programs (CAMPs) in the United States. The HEP allows migrant workers or their dependents to prepare for the General Educational Development high school equivalency diploma in a residential college setting or as commuters to class. Career…

  11. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    research with my community college students by partnering with a research oceanographer. Through this partnership, students have had access to an active oceanographic researcher through classroom visits, use of data in curriculum, and research/cruise progress updates. With very little research activity currently going on at the community college, this "window" into scientific research is invaluable. Another important aspect of this project is the development of a summer internship program that has allowed four community college students to work directly with an oceanographer in her lab for ten weeks. This connection of community college students with world-class scientists in the field promotes better understanding of research and potentially may encourage more students to major in the sciences. In either approach, the interaction with scientists at different stages of their careers, from undergraduate and graduate students at universities to post docs and research scientists, also provides community college students with the opportunity to gain insight into possible career pathways. For both majors and non-majors, a key outcome of such experiences will be gaining experience in using inquiry and reasoning through the scientific method and becoming comfortable with data and technology.

  12. Teaching Leadership in Technical Programs at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlauw, Amanda L.; Daugherty, Jenny L.

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive study explored how community colleges are teaching leadership in technical programs. Leadership education curricular offerings were identified via a survey and selected programs reviewed. 68 Deans, Directors, or Chairpersons of a Business, Management, or Technology program completed the survey, representing 61 community colleges.…

  13. The Role of Alternative Programming in College Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    College radio is quite often viewed as the true alternative to commercial radio. However, what is alternative radio and how does college radio factor into the ideal? To further understand this concept, this paper focuses on the role of alternative programming in college radio. Areas discussed include alternative radio as a non-mainstream form of…

  14. Dartmouth College Earth Sciences Mobile Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E. E.; Osterberg, E. C.; Dade, W. B.; Sonder, L. J.; Renshaw, C. E.; Kelly, M. A.; Hawley, R. L.; Chipman, J. W.; Mikucki, J.; Posmentier, E. S.; Moore, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    For the last 50 years the Department of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College has offered a term-long, undergraduate field program, informally called "the Stretch". A student typically enrolls during fall quarter of his or her junior year soon after choosing a major or minor. The program thus provides valuable field context for courses that a student will take during the remainder of his or her undergraduate career. Unlike many traditional field camps that focus on one particular region, the Stretch is a mobile program that currently travels through Western North America, from the Canadian Rockies to the Grand Canyon. The program spans two and a half months, during which time undergraduates, graduate TAs, and faculty live, work, and learn collaboratively. Dartmouth College faculty members sequentially teach individual 1- to 2-week segments that focus on their interests and expertise; currently, there are a total of eight segments led by eleven faculty members. Consequently, topics are diverse and include economic geology, geobiology, geomorphology, glaciology, glacial geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, paleontology, stratigraphy, structure and tectonics, and volcanology. The field localities are equally varied, including the alpine glaciers of western Alberta, the national parks of Montana, Wyoming and Utah, the eastern Sierra Nevada, the southern Great Basin, and highlight such classic geological field locales as Sheep Mountain in Wyoming's Bighorn Basin, Death Valley, and the Grand Canyon. Overall, the program aims to: 1) give students a broad perspective on the timing and nature of the processes that resulted in the landscape and underlying geology of western North America; and 2) introduce students to a wide variety of geological environments, field techniques, and research equipment. Students emerge from the program with wide-ranging exposure to active research questions as well as a working knowledge of core field skills in the earth sciences. Stretch students

  15. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  16. Secretarial Internships: A Feasible Program for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Doris D.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of a secretarial internship program to the student, the employer, and the college are explored. The author suggests a strategy for developing such a program and discusses curriculum design. (CT)

  17. Evaluation of the College Possible Program: Results from a Randomized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a randomized trial of the College Possible program, which provides two years of college preparatory work for high school juniors and seniors in Minneapolis and St. Paul. The trial involved 238 students, including 134 who were randomly selected for admission to the program. The results indicate that the College…

  18. College Discovery and Development Program; School Year, 1975-76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenn, Victor W.

    The primary objective of the College Discovery and Development Program (CDD), funded under the Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, has been the discovery and development of the college potential of high school youth who are academically and financially disadvantaged. This program was designed to improve the reading and mathematics…

  19. College Reading Improvement Programs: An Issue of Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ronald B.

    College Reading Improvement Programs (CRIPs) have become increasingly significant in higher education because there is an increased need for the services they provide in colleges and universities. The first such program appeared in 1915. From 1956 to the present, research has documented a marked increase in the number of CRIPs. In examining the…

  20. College Inside: A Case Study of the Design and Implementation of a Successful Prison College Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a specific initiative to offer a college program within the Oregon Department of Corrections, with a focus on the interpersonal and interinstitutional relationships needed to build such programs.

  1. The Infrared Hunter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 This image composite compares infrared and visible views of the famous Orion nebula and its surrounding cloud, an industrious star-making region located near the hunter constellation's sword. The infrared picture is from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, and the visible image is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, headquartered in Tucson, Ariz. In addition to Orion, two other nebulas can be seen in both pictures. The Orion nebula, or M42, is the largest and takes up the lower half of the images; the small nebula to the upper left of Orion is called M43; and the medium-sized nebula at the top is NGC 1977. Each nebula is marked by a ring of dust that stands out in the infrared view. These rings make up the walls of cavities that are being excavated by radiation and winds from massive stars. The visible view of the nebulas shows gas heated by ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars. Above the Orion nebula, where the massive stars have not yet ejected much of the obscuring dust, the visible image appears dark with only a faint glow. In contrast, the infrared view penetrates the dark lanes of dust, revealing bright swirling clouds and numerous developing stars that have shot out jets of gas (green). This is because infrared light can travel through dust, whereas visible light is stopped short by it. The infrared image shows light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns (red and orange) comes mainly from dust that has been heated by starlight. Light of 4.5 microns (green) shows hot gas and dust; and light of 3.6 microns (blue) is from starlight.

  2. College campus smoking policies and programs and students' smoking behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Lee

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although tobacco use in the United States has declined over the past 20 years, cigarette use among college students remains high. Additional research is thus needed to determine how university tobacco control policies and preventive education programs affect college students' smoking behaviors. Methods Approximately 13,000 undergraduate students at 12 universities or colleges in the state of Texas completed a web-based survey. College smoking policies were obtained from a survey of college administrators and from college websites. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the effects of individual smoking policies and programs on the odds of cigarette smoking. Results Of the individual programs, only having a preventive education program on campus was associated with lower odds of smoking. The existence of smoking cessation programs and designated smoking areas were associated with higher odds of smoking. Policies governing the sale and distribution of cigarettes were insignificantly associated with smoking. Conclusion Rather than focusing on policies restricting cigarette sales and use, college administrators should consider implementing or expanding tobacco prevention and education programs to further reduce student smoking rates.

  3. Planet Hunters: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Orosz, J. A.; Carter, J. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Crepp, J. R.; Welsh, W. F.; Kaib, N. A.; Lintott, C. J.; Terrell, D.; Jek, K. J.; Gagliano, R.; Parrish, M.; Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org) citizen science project uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. Planet Hunters uses the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) platform to present visitors to the Planet Hunters website with a randomly selected 30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's 160,000 target stars. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits with multiple independent classifiers reviewing each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 12.5 million classifications searching the 1 1/2 years of publicly released Kepler observations. Planet Hunters is a novel and complementary technique to the automated transit detection algorithms, providing an independent assessment of the completeness of the Kepler exoplanet inventory. We report the latest results from Planet Hunters, highlighting in particular our latest efforts to search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting a binary star) and single transit events in the first 1.5 years of public Kepler data. We will present a status report of our search of the first 6 Quarters of Kepler data, introducing our new planet candidates and sharing the results of our observational follow-up campaign to characterize these planetary systems. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258. This is research is supported in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

  4. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  5. Developing a GIS Program at a Tribal College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelnick, John C.; Rowley, Rex J.; McDermott, David; Bowen, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Programs in geographic information systems (GIS) and related areas (e.g., GPS, remote sensing) have become important additions to the curriculum at colleges and universities of all sizes and types, including tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) such as Haskell Indian Nations University. This article discusses the recent development of a GIS…

  6. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  7. General Education in Occupational Education Programs Offered by Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Robert R.

    This report, directed toward junior college board members, presidents, deans, department heads, and teachers, as well as legislators, attempts to stimulate thought and action to improve general education in occupational programs offered by junior colleges. Following a review of the unsatisfactory status of present curricula, a rationale and…

  8. Identification and specialization as a waterfowl hunter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Lawrence, Jeffrey S.; Cordts, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Like specialization, identity offers a way for differentiating and understanding recreationists and for gaining insight into the question of participant progression in an activity. We examined how identity related to measures of specialization among lapsed and current waterfowl hunters. Lapsed hunters included those who had purchased a Minnesota waterfowl stamp between 2000 and 2004, but not since this time. Current hunters had purchased a 2010 stamp. Results suggested that some waterfowl hunters specialize and progress toward a waterfowl-hunter identity. Others, however, either hunt for years but never specialize and identify as waterfowl hunters, or move toward but do not attain a waterfowl hunter identity. Individuals who achieve a waterfowl hunter identity may also later relinquish this identity. Identification was associated with increased specialization and resistance to change from a preference for waterfowl hunting. Individuals who had relinquished their identity retained social and knowledge-based commitment to waterfowl hunting, whereas attraction and centrality declined.

  9. Motives of Students' Joining Master Program at Princess Alia University College/Al Balqa Applied University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Habahbeh, Abdullah Eid

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at knowing the motives of students' joining master program at Princess Alia University College/Al Balqa Applied University by the graduate students and a degree of their importance and succession, and to know whether these motives differed according to the variables of gender, specialization, age, and marital status. To achieve…

  10. Virginia Tech, Sweet Briar College formalize student exchange program

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech and Sweet Briar College have formalized a student exchange program that will broaden the education opportunities of students, provide a diverse campus environment, and facilitate cooperation and collaboration among student and faculty at each institution.

  11. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  12. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  13. Impact of NASA Stress Laboratory Program on US Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, S. P.

    1971-01-01

    A programmatic narrative of the effects of NASA stress lab program on physical education in U.S. schools and colleges is presented. Individual non-structured programs were set up where students participate during his or her free time. The program is also in accordance with the medical history of the student. Preliminary results indicate more student interest and participation in the program and that students are generally more physically fit than in previous structured programs.

  14. Factor Pattern Comparisons of EPPS Scales of High School, College, and Innovative College Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Paul W.; Ahern, Elsie H.

    1973-01-01

    EPPS scores from 167 high school seniors (Study 1, S1), 137 introductory psychology students (S2), and students from an innovative college program (S3) were compared using analysis of variance, image analysis, and factor pattern comparison. (Editor)

  15. Theater Program Development in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Martinez, Ed.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to find answers to how best colleges and universities can adapt the teaching of theatre in its curriculum. It was then necessary to track the different ways drama has evolved throughout time and how its adoption in formal education has affected its students, both present and past. To this end the researcher examined theater from its earliest inception to its adoption by schools of higher education, more specifically, public colleges and universities.

  16. Education Program of Data Base System at College or University

    OpenAIRE

    田村,聡一郎

    1993-01-01

    Education programs of computer system are established at the faculty of Technology, Science or Information Engineering, but those have not been established yet at the other faculties or departments in college or university. At the faculty or department which don't relate to the science or information engineering, education programs of computer system have been on trial at present. Then an education program of computer system, especially about the education program of Data Base System, at th...

  17. Male College Student Perceptions of Intercultural and Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to understand why men participate in study abroad at much lower rates than women, this study examines how male college students at a large research university perceive a university-run global education program, especially in terms of the expected costs and benefits of participating in such programs, and the extent to which gender…

  18. Factors Influencing Student Participation in College Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Soumava; Bandyopadhyay, Kakoli

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework to investigate the factors that influence student participation in college study abroad programs. The authors posit that students' general perceptions regarding the study abroad experience and their expectations of intercultural awareness from study abroad programs will impact their perceptions of…

  19. Trends and Issues in College Reading Improvement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ronald B.

    This paper presents a review of the literature that identifies the salient issues, trends, questions, and programs which bear upon the growth, development, and future professionalism of college reading improvement programs (CRIPS). The paper reviews the four broad areas of: (1) administrative concerns (including organizational structure,…

  20. Analysis of heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to conduct a postconstruction evaluation of the air-source heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field (AAF). The objective of this project was to investigate and resolve concerns about an increase in energy costs at Hunter AAF following the installation of heat pumps in November 1992. After completing several analyses and a field inspection of the heat pumps in family housing at Hunter AAF, the following conclusions were made: the installation of air-source heat pumps reduced the annual energy cost in family housing by $46,672 in 1993; the heat pump thermostat controls in Hunter AAF family housing appear to be incorrectly installed; and the Hunter AAF electric utility bill increased 10% during the first 6 months of 1993 compared to the first 6 months of 1992.

  1. Accommodating Mobile Learning in College Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices and applications are expected to have a significant impact on teaching and learning in the near future. Yet colleges and universities are currently facing severe budget constraints and discretionary funding is restricted for new initiatives. The question addressed in this paper is: "What strategy should an institution of higher…

  2. Travels with the Fossil Hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Peter J.

    2000-04-01

    Whether dodging bullets in West Africa, or rabid dogs in Pakistan, surviving yak-butter tea in Tibet, or eating raw fish in China, the life of a globe-trotting fossil hunter is often hazardous and always filled with surprises. Travels with the Fossil Hunters lets readers share the wonder, joys of discovery, and excitement of these intrepid scientists. Packed with more than 100 beautiful, full-color photographs, the volume takes readers on twelve expeditions to remote parts of the world in search of diverse fossil remains, from those of dinosaurs to human ancestors. Each expedition by paleontologists from London's Natural History Museum reveals the problems and challenges of working in extreme conditions, from the deserts of the Sahara and Yemen to the frozen wastes of Antarctica, from the mountains of India to the forests of Latvia. Along the way they also describe the paleontology and geology of the countries they visit and the scientific reasons for their expeditions. With a foreword from Sir David Attenborough and an introduction from Richard Fortey, this fascinating book will appeal to amateur and professional fossil hunters alike and to readers interested in accounts of exotic locales. Peter Whybrow is a research scientist at the Natural History Museum, London. His research interests include Arabian Miocene vertebrates, paleoclimates, paleogeography, and biotic diversity. He is senior editor with A. Hill of Fossil Vertebrates of Arabia (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1999).

  3. Hunter Valley的诚信%Hunter Valley's Honesty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 去年圣诞节假期,我和小T曾和大连狮子一家三口,到悉尼附近知名旅游地Hunter Valley(猎人谷)度过了快乐充实的三天. 我们一行五人在圣诞节那天乘坐提前预订好的马车,大约走访了八、九个大大小小的葡萄洒园.

  4. Hunters in the new millennium”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Peter

    of the modern world continue to practice hunting? What are the preferences of the modern hunter? How are the preferences and conduct of hunters related to the social and demographic factors? What are the social, political and economical impacts of hunting? What motivates people to hunt? - In spite of the fact...... that hunting is a common source of conflict between different interests, only very few studies has been made to produce knowledge about people hunting for leisure. The survey “Hunters in the new millennium” is an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of hunters and hunting in an increasing urbanized...

  5. Freshmen and Sophomores Abroad: Community Colleges and Overseas Academic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gerhard

    The mechanics of establishing and maintaining overseas academic programs are examined in this monograph with respect to the community college level. Chapter 1 provides a history of internationalism in institutions of higher learning from ancient times in India, China, Persia, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Chapter 2 presents a rationale for the…

  6. Pamplin College student and professor selected for GM Sullivan Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2007-01-01

    A student and a faculty member from Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business have again been selected to participate in the GM Sullivan Fellowship Program that seeks to promote principles of corporate social responsibility developed by the late Rev. Leon H. Sullivan.

  7. Mountain View College's Cognitive Style Program: A Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Harryette B.

    Several issues are discussed related to the administration and operation of Mountain View College's (MVC) Cognitive Style Program, an assessment system based on the Modified Hill Model, which determines preferred learning styles for each student and thus aids the student in selecting appropriate classroom environments. After introductory material…

  8. Toward Useful Program Evaluation in College Foreign Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M., Ed.; Davis, John McE., Ed.; Sinicrope, Castle, Ed.; Watanabe, Yukiko, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume reports on innovative, useful evaluation work conducted within U.S. college foreign language programs. An introductory chapter scopes out the territory, reporting key findings from research into the concerns, impetuses, and uses for evaluation that FL educators identify. Seven chapters then highlight examples of evaluations conducted…

  9. Freshmen and Sophomores Abroad: Community Colleges and Overseas Academic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gerhard

    The mechanics of establishing and maintaining overseas academic programs are examined in this monograph with respect to the community college level. Chapter 1 provides a history of internationalism in institutions of higher learning from ancient times in India, China, Persia, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Chapter 2 presents a rationale for the…

  10. A College Leadership Program Helps a Mother Consider Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Melissa P. Deputy, a 49-year-old mother of five and a community-college student, has long harbored desires to run for public office. Deputy decided to nurture her dreams of entering politics by attending a five-day program at Rutgers University earlier this month intended to encourage undergraduate women to run for elected office. Rutgers has held…

  11. Exploring an Accelerated College Program for Adult Learners: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleking, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Many colleges and universities have expanded their mission to include adult learners. Programs range from scheduling traditional courses in the evening to designing new programs tailored to meet the needs of working adults. Program designers have relied on theorists such, as Mezirow (1991), Houle (1996), and Knowles, Holton, and Swanson (1998), to…

  12. The Houston Community College Eligible Legalized Alien Program. Evaluation Program. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Don F.; Cuellar, Sylvia

    The Houston Community College (Texas) program (TOTAL ACCESS) designed in response to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, is described and evaluated. The program offers classes to eligible aliens (97% Hispanic Americans from Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala) wishing to pursue the educational program required for legalization. Program…

  13. Communication Technology Used among Parents and Their College Teens: Implications for College Health Promotion and Risk Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Caitlin C.; Abar, Beau; Turrisi, Robert; Belden, Calum

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the nature of parent-teen communication in college to re-evaluate the potential for parent inclusion in college success and risk prevention programs. During September 2006, 290 first-year college students were assessed for the frequency and form (e.g., cell phone, e-mail, text) of communication with their parents. Latent…

  14. Communication Technology Used among Parents and Their College Teens: Implications for College Health Promotion and Risk Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Caitlin C.; Abar, Beau; Turrisi, Robert; Belden, Calum

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the nature of parent-teen communication in college to re-evaluate the potential for parent inclusion in college success and risk prevention programs. During September 2006, 290 first-year college students were assessed for the frequency and form (e.g., cell phone, e-mail, text) of communication with their parents. Latent…

  15. The College Ambition Program: Indicators of College Plans-Ambitions and Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Justina

    2011-01-01

    This study is part of a larger project that will test the effectiveness of the College Ambition Program intervention model beginning with two schools experimental schools and two control schools. The study will evaluate the effectiveness of the overall intervention, as well as each of the four specific programmatic components. Data will be…

  16. Danes - The keen bargain hunters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    2008-01-01

    New research proves that Danes are keen bargain hunters, and that they do specific price checks before selecting a product.......New research proves that Danes are keen bargain hunters, and that they do specific price checks before selecting a product....

  17. Influence of Age and Educational Level on the Behavior of Hunters in Vojvodina Province (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Marković

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Education as an important factor in the development of economy has a major impact on the development of hunting and hunting tourism. In this research, it has conducted a survey of hunters from the territory of Vojvodina Province regarding their attitude and motives for hunting, importance of education, importance of GIS in hunting, poaching as well as their level of hunting ethics. Using SPSS program, it was cross-referenced the individual responses in relation to age category and level of education. The results show that the youngest hunters (18 to 35 years compared to middle age hunters (35-59 years and old hunters (over 60 visit hunting events more, they are the most informed about GIS and they are most willing to learn about these technologies. The number of hunters that took part in the poaching is proportional with their level of education, so that most hunters that participate in poaching hold a university degree. However, hunters holding a university degree in the highest percentage believe that GIS can contribute to the development of hunting largely, and are willing to participate in training.

  18. Evaluation of Achieving a College Education Plus: A Credit-Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gaye; Fowler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This ex post facto study evaluated Achieving a College Education (ACE) Plus program, a credit-based transition program between a high school district and a community college. Achieving a College Education Plus is an early outreach program. It is designed to aid at-risk students in graduating from high school and making a smooth transition to…

  19. A Guide to Energy-Related Curriculum at California Community Colleges and Certain Other Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Philip C.; And Others

    Information is provided in five separate sections on California community college energy programs for students interested in selecting a program and for college personnel interested in beginning or improving a program. Contents of most sections are arranged alphabetically according to the name of the college, project, or organization. Section I…

  20. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and provides the results for 1992. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and was placed under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. MISS is part of a National Priorities List (NPL) site. The environmental surveillance program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analysis includes metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling the DOE objective of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses to members of the general public. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. The radiological data for all media sampled support the conclusion that doses to the public are not distinguishable from natural background radiation.

  1. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  2. Richland Community College BioEnergy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Douglas C. [Richland Community College, Decatur, IL (United States)

    2012-09-25

    The purpose of this project was to focus on education and community outreach. As such, it reflected anticipated growth in the renewable/alternative energy industry creating a vast need for trained industry professionals, engineers, operations managers, and technicians to operate state-of-the art production facilities. This project's scope leveraged Richland's initial entry in the renewable energy education, which included Associate of Applied Science degrees and certificates in biofuels and bioprocessing. This facilitated establishing a more comprehensive sustainability and renewable energy programs including experiential learning laboratory components needed to support new renewable energy education degree and certificate specialties, as well as community outreach. Renewable energy technologies addressed included: a) biodiesel, c) biomass, d) wind, e) geothermal, and f) solar. The objective is to provide increasingly innovative hands on experiential learning and knowledge transfer opportunities.

  3. An Evaluation of the Savannah Early College Program: An Action Oriented Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearse, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah Early College Program (SECP) opened its doors in August 2007 to make a difference in the lives of all students who enrolled. Its primary mission was to combine academic rigor and support to help students enter college early and graduate from high school with up to 2 years of college credit. Since SECP joined the Early College High…

  4. Getting Back on Track: Effects of a Community College Program for Probationary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivener, Susan; Sommo, Colleen; Collado, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    As part of MDRC's multisite Opening Doors demonstration, Chaffey College, a large community college in Southern California, ran two versions of a program that was designed to improve outcomes among students who are on probation. Both versions offered a "College Success" course, taught by a college counselor, which provided basic…

  5. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Bushby; Kimberly Woodruff; Jake Shivley

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary u...

  6. The Impact of Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship Program on High School Performance and College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkreader, Steve; Hughes, John; Tozzi, Melanie Hicks; Vanlandingham, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Florida's Bright Futures program is one of the nation's largest merit-based scholarship initiatives. This study used high school transcript and college enrollment data to examine the program's impact on high school course-taking patterns, school grades, college entrance exam scores, and rates of college attendance over time. The study indicates…

  7. Options in Education Transcript: Programs Nos. 184-187 (Cheating in College, Black Colleges, College Marketing, Co-Education in College).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    Transcripts from a four-part National Public Radio "Options in Education" series are presented in this publication. The first program examines student cheating at colleges. Students and faculty discuss methods of cheating, reasons for cheating, student attitudes toward cheating, specific instances of cheating, and provide insights into why…

  8. The hunter a scientific novel

    CERN Document Server

    Genta, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th century: humankind has become a spacefaring civilization, colonizing the solar system and beyond. While no alien forms of life have yet been encountered in this expansion into space, colonists suddenly encounter machines of alien origin - huge robots able to reproduce themselves.  Called replicators by the colonists, they seem to have but a single goal: to destroy all organic life they come in contact with. Since the colonial governments have no means to fight this menace directly, they instead promise huge rewards to whoever destroys a replicator. As a result, the frontier attracts a new kind of adventurers, the Hunters, who work to find and destroy the replicators. Mike Edwards, a skilled young maintenance technician and robotics expert at a faraway outpost, will not only become one of them - but be the very first one to unlock the secret behind the replicators’ origin and mission.   The scientific and technical aspects underlying the plot - in particular space travel, robotics and self-replica...

  9. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  10. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bushby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  11. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-04-24

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  12. Fitness Programs for the Aged: A Study of College and University Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, William F.; Lyon, Lesley B.

    1983-01-01

    A national survey identified innovative physical fitness programs for older adults at colleges and universities. Survey results concerning program area, type of activities, target population, and whether programs focus on the healthy elderly or on rehabilitation are reported. (PP)

  13. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  14. Report on Community College Program Review, Fiscal Year 1988. Agenda Item #10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    During fiscal year 1988, the public community colleges of Illinois completed the final year of their first five-year cycle of program review. The statewide program review process was implemented in 1983 for the evaluation of both instructional programs and student and academic support services. Reports submitted by the colleges in 1988 indicate…

  15. To Strengthen Policy Guiding Regionalization of Occupational Programs in New Jersey County Community Colleges. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, S. V.; And Others

    In 1985 a project was developed to strengthen policy guiding regionalization of occupational programs in New Jersey county community colleges. The project had three major goals: to establish a policy for the regionalization of selected occupational programs offered by the colleges; to describe ways that programs could be identified for regional…

  16. Legacy of the Post-WWII Growth Years for Community College Leadership Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of graduate programs for community college leaders, focusing on trends in the community college field and events from 1945 to 1975. Reviews the impact of philanthropic foundations that supported the development of leadership programs and analyzes the legacy of the programs. (11 citations) (AJL)

  17. The Power Within: Institution-Based Leadership Development Programs in Rural Community Colleges in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbini, Jaleh T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine institution-based leadership development programs in rural community colleges in Illinois, and the impact of these programs in supporting and preparing future community college leaders. The study also explored the efficacy of these programs and whether their implementation aligns with the institutions'…

  18. 2014 AERA Presidential Address: The College Ambition Program: A Realistic Transition Strategy for Traditionally Disadvantaged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The College Ambition Program (CAP) is designed to encourage low-income and minority students to enroll in college. The following analysis presents updated results from my AERA presidential talk in 2014. Results indicate that CAP, which is a schoolwide intervention, increased college attendance for low-income and minority students in seven…

  19. Do College-Prep Programs Improve Long-Term Outcomes? NBER Working Paper No. 17859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. Kirabo

    2012-01-01

    I analyze the longer-run effects of a college-preparatory program implemented in inner-city schools that included payments to eleventh- and twelfth- grade students and their teachers for passing scores on Advanced Placement exams. Affected students attended college in greater numbers, were more likely to remain in college beyond their first year,…

  20. College Student for a Day: A Transition Program for High School Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Alexandra; Ross, Denise E.

    2015-01-01

    High school students with disabilities can benefit from early exposure to campus-based accommodations and supports as they transition to college. College Student for a Day (CSFAD) is an on-campus activity-based program that introduces high school students with disabilities to supports and accommodations on a college campus. This Practice Brief…

  1. Bridging the Education Gap through College Access Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Kenyae L.

    2008-01-01

    College access and subsequently college attendance rates of students of color, students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, and those who would be first-generation college students are still significantly below second generation students and European-Americans. The gap exists because the dissemination of college information is inconsistent and…

  2. Houston Community College (HCC)-Mobile Go Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniel; Sterling, Cheryl; Grays, Shantay R.

    2010-01-01

    The Houston Community College Mobile Go Center brings college enrollment assistance to the doorstep of our community. It operates in a variety of settings, offering college-going material and person-to-person assistance at numerous city events. Services include assistance with academic advising, completing the FAFSA, college application process,…

  3. With Eyes of Equality: Older and Younger Students Learn in a Community College Senior Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, June Sark

    In contrast to many senior education programs, the senior program at Triton College (TC) has as one of its aims bringing together younger and older students in both noncredit and credit courses without neglecting the need and desire of many older adults to learn in their own age group. The term "older students" is loosely defined at the college,…

  4. The Current Status of Drug Intervention and Prevention in College Athletic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Raymond; Cook, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I universities concerning existence, nature, and effect of drug testing and drug education programs upon college athletes. Findings from 43 head athletic trainers indicated that the trainers believed drug testing helped reduce incidence of drug abuse in college sports programs.…

  5. Florida's Prepaid College Tuition Program: Marketing a Pre-Need Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauff, Joseph F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of Florida's college tuition prepayment program describes the plan and its options and examines its marketing implications as a preneed service. It is concluded that the program makes saving for college easy, economical, and completely safe but requires rethinking of conventional marketing strategies and mix. (MSE)

  6. Structure in Community College Career-Technical Programs: A Qualitative Analysis. CCRC Working Paper No. 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noy, Michelle; Weiss, Madeline Joy; Jenkins, Davis; Barnett, Elisabeth A.; Wachen, John

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from interviews and program websites at Washington community and technical colleges, the authors of this study examine the structure of community college career-technical programs in allied health, business and marketing, computer and information studies, and mechanics and repair. A framework for structure with four…

  7. Nurturing a Generation of Leaders: The College Library Directors' Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The College Library Directors' Mentor Program has operated for more than 20 years, during which a substantial portion of the target audience of first-year library directors of small colleges has participated. Through this article, the authors identify the purpose of the program, describe its evolution and current status, and examine the nature of…

  8. Nurturing a Generation of Leaders: The College Library Directors' Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The College Library Directors' Mentor Program has operated for more than 20 years, during which a substantial portion of the target audience of first-year library directors of small colleges has participated. Through this article, the authors identify the purpose of the program, describe its evolution and current status, and examine the nature of…

  9. North American Christian Study Abroad Programs: Wheaton College and Whitworth University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad programs are in vogue today, especially among Christian colleges and universities. It is, therefore, appropriate to ask tough questions of these programs. Do they help our students become more mature followers of Jesus? Are they respectful of people in the target culture? College and university leaders must focus in particular on how…

  10. Expanding Pathways: A Summer Bridge Program for Community College STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaburg, Lubella; Aguirre, Ofelia; Goodchild, Fiona; Kuhn, Jens-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the transition of community college students to degree programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The paper presents the results of an evaluation of a two-week residential summer bridge program that recruited community college students from a wide range of academic, ethnic, and socioeconomic…

  11. Florida's Prepaid College Tuition Program: Marketing a Pre-Need Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauff, Joseph F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of Florida's college tuition prepayment program describes the plan and its options and examines its marketing implications as a preneed service. It is concluded that the program makes saving for college easy, economical, and completely safe but requires rethinking of conventional marketing strategies and mix. (MSE)

  12. Chemistry - Part III, An Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Student Workbook for the Thirteen-College Curriculum Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Edward; And Others

    This booklet is a student manual in a series of booklets that make up the core of a Physical Science course designed for the freshman year of college and used by teachers in the 27 colleges participating in the Thirteen College curriculum Program. This program is a curriculum revision project in support of 13 predominantly Negro colleges and…

  13. Promoting Interest in Plant Biology with Biographies of Plant Hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisey, Peggy

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of biographical stories to promote student interest in plant biology. Discusses plant hunters of various time periods, including ancient, middle ages, renaissance, colonial Americas, and 18th and 19th centuries; women plant hunters of the 1800s and early 1900s; and modern plant hunters. Discusses classroom strategies for the…

  14. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636.10... Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed at Hunter Army Airfield are required to register their privately owned vehicles within five days...

  15. Native grasses for rehabilitating Hunter Valley minesites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxtable, C. [NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation, NSW (Australia)

    1998-04-01

    Introduced plant species, particularly grasses, have long been used to rehabilitate mined land in Australia. Interest in using native species spawned a research project in the Hunter Valley which has demonstrated the suitability of certain native species for rehabilitation and put forward guidelines to enhance the chance of their successful establishment. 4 photos., 1 tab.

  16. Hunters Try to Capture Their Past

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    China Daily

    2012-01-01

    Mo Guizhen was 5 when she saw a real bed for the first time.She refused to sleep on it,accustomed as she was to deer furs laid on the ground of hunters' huts in the depths of the Greater Hinggan Mountains in northeastern China.

  17. Hunters syndrom og hørenedsaettelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiaer, Eva Kirkegaard; Møller, Troels Reinholdt; Wetke, Randi

    2010-01-01

    functions and language were delayed, and he made audible respiratory sounds and was obviously nasally congested. The boy was referred for further investigations at the Department of Paediatrics. The tests showed that the boy suffered from Hunter Syndrome (MPSII) and he underwent relevant treatment....

  18. The effects of a Summer Science Enrichment Program on college enrollment, college majors, and career preferences of inner city youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Joy Miller

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to evaluate the effects of a summer science intervention program on the college enrollment, college majors, and career preferences of students attending the inner city high schools within the Memphis City Schools district. The subjects were 10, 11, and 12 grade students who applied and qualified for participation in the Summer Science Enrichment Program (SSEP) offered by the University of Tennessee, Memphis during the years of 1994, 1995, and 1996. A control group was formed consisting of students who met the selection criteria but who did not participate in the program; participants of the program comprised the experimental group. A total of 136 subjects were included in the study. All subjects were mailed questionnaires; 76% (n = 103) responded. Chi-square analyses were performed to test for significant difference between the participant and non-participant groups on the following dependent variables: college enrollment, choice of college major, career preference, advanced science course selection in high school, and advanced course selection in college. An independent t-test was performed to test for significant difference between the two groups on self-reported ACT scores. Findings indicate no significant difference between participants and non-participants on college enrollment patterns and advanced science course selection in college. Data analyses reveal that significantly larger proportions of participants selected science college majors, indicated a preference for science careers, and completed advanced high school science courses. Further, findings show that program participants reported significantly higher scores on the ACT. While this study suggests one program's success in motivating and preparing students in inner city schools for science careers, further study is recommended of the long-term impact of intervention programs on the lives of these youth. The efficacy of intervention programs has been

  19. History and Development of the Schmidt-Hunter Meta-Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I provide answers to the questions posed by Will Shadish about the history and development of the Schmidt-Hunter methods of meta-analysis. In the 1970s, I headed a research program on personnel selection at the US Office of Personnel Management (OPM). After our research showed that validity studies have low statistical power, OPM…

  20. Examples of Pre-College Programs that Teach Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to help pre-college students understand the importance of Sustainability can be found around the world. A key feature for many is the collaboration among educators, researchers, and business. Two examples will be described to indicate what is being done and goals for the future. "Educação para a Sustentabilidade" ("Education for Sustainability", http://sustentabilidade.colband.net.br/) developed at the Colegio Bandeirantes in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is a popular extracurricular offering at one of Brazil's top schools that empowers students to investigate major issues facing their country and the world. They recognized that merely knowing is insufficient, so they have created several efforts towards an "environmentally friendly, socially just, and economically viable" world. The Education Project for Sustainability Science interacts with students in various grade levels within the school, participates in sustainability initiatives in other parts of the nation, and communicates electronically with like-minded programs in other countries. A second example will spotlight the CHANGE Viewer (Climate and Health Analysis for Global Education Viewer, http://climatechangehumanhealth.org/), a visualization tool that uses NASA World Wind to explore climate science through socio-economic datasets. Collaboration among scientists, programmers, and classroom educators created a suite of activities available to teach about Food Security, Water Resources, Rising Sea Level, and other themes.

  1. The effects of harvest regulations on behaviors of duck hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Matthew T.; Powell, Larkin A.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists as to how duck harvest regulations influence waterfowl hunter behavior. We used the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Parts Collection Survey to examine how harvest regulations affected behaviors of Central Flyway duck hunters. We stratified hunters into ranked groups based on seasonal harvest and identified three periods (1975–1984, 1988–1993, 2002–2011) that represented different harvest regulations (moderate, restrictive, and liberal, respectively; season length and daily bag limits smallest in restrictive seasons and largest in liberal seasons). We examined variability of seven measures of duck hunter behaviors across the periods: days harvesting ducks, daily harvest, hunter mobility, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) selectivity, gender selectivity, daily female mallard harvest, and timing of harvest. Hunters reported harvesting ducks on more days, at a higher efficiency, and in slightly more counties during liberal seasons relative to restrictive and moderate seasons. We provide evidence to suggest that future regulation change will affect hunter behaviors.

  2. Guidelines for Chemistry and Chemical Technology Programs in Two-Year Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Designed for use in institutional self-studies and program reviews, these guidelines provide a comprehensive model for chemistry and chemical technology programs in two-year, associate-degree-granting colleges. The eight sections of the guide suggest 90 standards in the areas of: (1) chemistry program mission and periodic program review; (2)…

  3. STEP: A Science Education Program Emphasizing High School-College Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, John A.; Kissinger, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    Science Training Enrichment Program (STEP) is a program designed to improve high school-college cooperation. Program objectives and activities to meet the objectives are described. The latter include Saturday science seminars, lecture series, computer workshops for students/teachers, consultant program, and a two-week summer practicum for high…

  4. Rhetorical Motives of Identity, Consubstantiality, and Hierarchy: An Analysis of Community College Program Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkis Pettit, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation focuses on three academic programs at Tarrant County College, Northeast Campus, specifically the documents used to create and sustain these programs. The purpose of this study includes the following: first, to identify the terminology specific to each program and/or the documents used within the program; second and third to…

  5. GateWay Community College Water Resources Program Partnerships: An Opportunity for Program Success and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, M.

    2012-12-01

    GateWay Community College Water Resources Technologies (WRT) Program offers Certificate of Completions and Associate Degrees on Hydrologic Studies, Water Treatment and Wastewater Treatment. The program has been in existence since 1998 and has gone through several updates to meet the demand for professionals in those areas. The program includes theoretical and practical hands-on training in the monitoring of water quality and quantity as well as in water and industrial wastewater treatment. The WRT program offers online, face-to-face, and hybrid courses to address different student's needs for training. The program only Full-time faculty is supported by 15 adjunct- faculty professionals. Adjunct faculty is usually hired from a wide variety of professional people already working in the industry that have shown interest on teaching. Adjunct faculty also provide free tutoring to the WRT students when they are not teaching courses. The college Learning Center provides funding to support these tutoring activities. The program has an active Advisory Committee that provides guidance and recommends program changes to meet their training needs. This Advisory Committee is made of professionals from different federal, state, county agencies, and municipalities, private industry and consulting companies in the area. The Advisory Committee meets every year to provide feedback to GateWay on curriculum changes and commit to potential internship opportunities for the WRT students. Those internships (or voluntary work) are paid directly by the municipalities or agencies or can be paid by the GateWay WRT program. These internship jobs provides with an opportunity to actively promote the WRT program throughout the valley. The GateWay WRT program considers the Advisory Committee an essential component for the program success: the committee supports the program in recommending and acquiring the latest field equipment needed for the hands-on training. One of the main WRT program

  6. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study, "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment" examined whether students who enrolled in courses at a high school that combined academics and technical education had higher college enrollment rates than students who did not. The research described in this report does not meet What Works…

  7. Guide to Sources: Colleges & Universities, Graduate Programs, Transfer Information, Financial Aid. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Bryan

    This library guide lists some of the more useful sources of information about colleges and universities that are available in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. The 99 items cited are listed in four categories: (1) colleges and universities, including general, graduate, and foreign programs; (2) preparation for admission exams; (3)…

  8. Succession Planning: A Doctoral Program Partnership for Emerging Community College Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gaye

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a doctoral program partnership between a university and a community college district that addresses the need of employment-planning strategies for building leadership capacity in the community college system. Succession planning information is provided as a foundational framework to plan for the next generation of community…

  9. Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions" examines the ways in which historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions have used the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) funds to enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  10. Parents Teaching Parents: A Career and College Knowledge Program for Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Martin, Jesus; Fossum, Michelle; Martinez, Sybil; Solorio, Maria; Martinez, Hipolito

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent progress, college attendance rates of Latino students continue to lag behind those of White students in the United States. Research suggests that outreach programs designed to increase the college knowledge of Latino students and families hold promise for reducing the observed discrepancy. Based on participant observer methods, this…

  11. Succession Planning: A Doctoral Program Partnership for Emerging Community College Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gaye

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a doctoral program partnership between a university and a community college district that addresses the need of employment-planning strategies for building leadership capacity in the community college system. Succession planning information is provided as a foundational framework to plan for the next generation of community…

  12. The Survey of College Marketing Programs. Volume 2: Print Advertising and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary Research Group, Inc., New York, NY.

    This report presents 213 tables detailing findings regarding types and costs of advertising within marketing programs at 68 colleges and universities. Highlights of this report include the following: these colleges print a mean number of 19,270 viewbooks and 16,380 catalogs; and advertise in newspapers (86.6 percent), in magazines (45.4 percent),…

  13. Academic and Facility Programs for Physical and Recreational Education at Napa College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Denis P.

    This comprehensive, detailed planning guide was initiated to insure better preparation of Napa College (Napa, California) physical and recreational education majors transferring to 4-year institutions, and to better fulfill the college's community recreational responsibility. The guide examines the academic program to be developed, the facilities…

  14. Toward a Capacity Framework for Useful Student Learning Outcomes Assessment in College Foreign Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John McEwan

    2016-01-01

    The educational impacts of mandated assessment in U.S. colleges is part of a growing research agenda focused on how methodologies of program evaluation best enable educators to improve teaching and learning. Accordingly, research has tried to identify the key aspects of evaluation/assessment "capacity" in college language departments…

  15. A Small, Rural Community College's Role in Community-Based Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Howard S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Chronicles the efforts of North Carolina's James Sprunt Community College to improve the quality of life for residents of its service area through the use of community-based programming (C-BP). Reviews the C-BP process utilized at the college, highlighting the formation of three planning teams charged with developing coalitions, strategic plans,…

  16. More than Words, A Way of Life: Language Restoration Programs Reach beyond Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskus, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In North America, and worldwide, Indigenous languages are disappearing at an alarming rate. There are, however, models of success for language revitalization in immersion language programs, usually found in tribal colleges and universities. Whether the language learners are tribal college students greeting one another in their native language,…

  17. CAPP: A Comprehensive Preventative Program Model Addressing Alcohol Misuse among College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption by college students in the United States has increased in quantity and frequency over the past five years. With this increase, there has come evidence of a rise in negative consequences caused by alcohol misuse. To help reduce these problems, colleges and universities nationwide have begun implementing alcohol programs for…

  18. Usage of Credit Cards Received through College Student-Marketing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John M.; Staten, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides benchmark measures of college student credit card usage by utilizing a pooled sample of over 300,000 recently opened credit card accounts. The analysis compares behavior over 12 months of account history for three groups of accounts: those opened by young adults through college student marketing programs; those opened through…

  19. CAPP: A Comprehensive Preventative Program Model Addressing Alcohol Misuse among College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption by college students in the United States has increased in quantity and frequency over the past five years. With this increase, there has come evidence of a rise in negative consequences caused by alcohol misuse. To help reduce these problems, colleges and universities nationwide have begun implementing alcohol programs for…

  20. Using "The Happiness Advantage" in a College Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Christine

    2015-01-01

    In the field of college success and retention, researchers have examined school facilities, grade point averages, SAT scores, high school grades, and student involvement among other variables. One of the additional variables that has been examined is how happiness affects college success. The matter of student happiness is of primary importance to…

  1. A Technical College Grow-Your-Own Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ken; Sanders-McBryde, Tennie

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of baby boomers (born 1946-1964) looming, considerable discussion and research has been conducted into succession planning and the educational impact from the loss of these leadership skills and experiences in community colleges. To prepare for this eventuality, many community colleges have begun Grow-Your-Own (GYO) leadership…

  2. Marketing the Program. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, William A., Ed.; Keim, Marybelle C., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of essays examines the role of marketing in the recruitment and retention of community college students. First, Philip Kotler and Leslie A. Goldgehn define the marketing process and assess its potential benefits. Richard C. Richardson, Jr., and Donald S. Doucette question the effectiveness of marketing in the community college.…

  3. International Asteroid Search Campaign: An Educational Outreach Program in Astronomy for High Schools and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. P.; Juliano, D.; Davis, J. W.; Holmes, R. E.; Devore, H.; Raab, H.; Pennypacker, C. R.; White, G. L.; Gould, A.

    2008-03-01

    The International Asteroid Search Campaign is an Internet-based program for high schools and colleges. Schools receive images, analyzed by students searching for asteroids and NEOs. Students have 71 asteroid discoveries and 1376 NEO observations.

  4. Effects of a Rational-Emotive Treatment Program on Type A Behavior Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Christopher W.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of rational-emotive therapy in treating Type A behavior in college students (N=22). Results showed the RET program was significantly more effective than no treatment in reducing Type A behavior, irrational beliefs, and anxiety. (JAC)

  5. Introduction of Program Hunter%程式猎人Program Hunter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学峰

    2002-01-01

    @@ 程式猎人是一个方便易用的资源管理软件,主要用于自动查找硬盘上的应用程序,帮你自动分类进行管理.软件引入了"程序组"与"程序项"的概念,用户可以建立一个程序组,将常用的应用程序项目添加到程序组中.

  6. The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Rio Hondo College: A Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Joseph

    During 1975-76, an evaluation of the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Rio Hondo College was undertaken which involved: (1) surveying all nursing graduates in the classes of 1973, 1974, and 1975, and all fourth semester students currently enrolled in the program; (2) surveying or interviewing all instructional staff for the ADN program;…

  7. Program Evaluation of Community College Learning Assistance Centers: What Do LAC Directors Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Doug; Blankenberger, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks to determine the nature of current program evaluation practices for learning assistance centers (LACs), the practices being used for program evaluation, and whether LAC directors believe their practices are appropriate for evaluating program effectiveness. Method: We conducted a survey (n = 61) of community college LAC…

  8. Colleges and Universities with Degree or Certificate Bearing Programs in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudess, Jo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a list of colleges and universities with degree or certificate bearing programs in creativity. Since this focuses only on degree bearing programs, an individual might also focus on creativity by working with a specific faculty member in a more general program such as industrial-organizational psychology or…

  9. Evaluation of the Industrial Maintenance Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, V. David

    In 1982-83, a study was conducted at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute to determine whether the objectives of the Industrial Maintenance Program were being met, to measure program success, and to identify aspects needing improvement. Surveys were sent to 30 students who graduated from the program before 1978, yielding a 57%…

  10. Program Evaluation of Community College Learning Assistance Centers: What Do LAC Directors Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Doug; Blankenberger, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks to determine the nature of current program evaluation practices for learning assistance centers (LACs), the practices being used for program evaluation, and whether LAC directors believe their practices are appropriate for evaluating program effectiveness. Method: We conducted a survey (n = 61) of community college LAC…

  11. Evaluation of the Cosmetology Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Fall, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, V. David

    In fall 1981, the cosmetology program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute (CCC&TI) was evaluated as part of a process to create a model for the periodic evaluation of all occupational programs at the school. In addition to collecting information for planning and program improvement, the study sought to assess the achievement of…

  12. The Lived Experience of Nurses Enrolled in the Regents College Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reflection by 15 nurses in the Regents College Nursing Program, an external degree program based on four criterion-referenced tests, uncovered motivations for selecting the program, clarified such needs as support networks and learning resources, and revealed a pervasive pattern of stress that affected exam preparation and performance. (SK)

  13. Design and Implementation of an English as a Second Language Program in a Bilingual College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Clara Virgen

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a complete English as a Second Language (ESL) program for a bilingual college-level curriculum. It includes the theoretical basis, the linguistic sociological, and self-oriented goals, the personnel and funding needed for the program and the relationship of the program to the surrounding community.…

  14. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  15. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  16. Design and Implementation of an English as a Second Language Program in a Bilingual College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Clara Virgen

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a complete English as a Second Language (ESL) program for a bilingual college-level curriculum. It includes the theoretical basis, the linguistic sociological, and self-oriented goals, the personnel and funding needed for the program and the relationship of the program to the surrounding community.…

  17. Chemistry - Part III, An Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Teacher's Curriculum Guide for the Thirteen-College Curriculum Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Edward; And Others

    This booklet is a teacher's manual in a series of booklets that make up the core of a Physical Science course designed for the freshman year of college and used by teachers in the Thirteen College Curriculum Program. This program is a curriculum revision project in support of 13 predominantly Negro colleges and reflects educational research in the…

  18. [St. Luke's College of Nursing: student's motivation for selecting both nursing program and St. Luke's College for study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, M; Iwai, I; Oota, K; Kaharu, C; Misao, H

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, we published "A Study of Students' Motivation for Selecting a Nursing Program". Now, as the circumstances surrounding nursing education and the social situation are changing, we studied this matter again. The purpose of this survey is a) to find the motive for selecting a nursing program as well as this college, and b) to compare the results with those of the previous study. The questionnaire delineating reasons for selecting a nursing program and St. Luke's College were distributed to the 392 students who entered this college from 1989 to 1995. The response rate was 93.9%. The findings were as follows: 1) Many students selected a nursing program as an occupational choice. Responses noted that "nursing is worth while work", "nursing provide a service to people". They also selected nursing as "a way of life" so that "they would be able to grow" and "be useful to others". These results were almost the same as those of the previous study. 2) In the last two years, students demonstrated a tendency to choose two or three reasons for selecting a nursing program. The number of students who chose the reason "for myself" and "as a study" also increased. 3) "Christianity" was a unique reason for choosing this college. "Good quality of education", "high estimation of graduated", "recommendation of others" were also main reasons. Over the last 13 years, there was no change in motivation for selecting a nursing program. However, students showed a tendency to provide several reasons for choosing nursing. There was an increase in the number of students who were 1) interested in nursing for their own satisfaction and 2) who saw nursing as a intellectual study.

  19. Wildlife value orientations among hunters, landowners and the general public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    . Significant differences in wildlife value orientations were found. Mutualists and distanced dominated in the public; most landowners and hunters were utilitarian followed by pluralist. Male hunters were more utilitarian than female. More active hunters were more utilitarian; hunters belonging to a hunting...... association were more utilitarian than those who did not belong to associations. Full-time farmers were more utilitarian than part-time farmers, and conventional farmers were more utilitarian than organic farmers. No significant difference with regard to residence for all three groups was found. Future...

  20. Hunter standoff killer team (HSKT) ground and flight test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Balinda; Ennis, Mark; Yeates, Robert; Condon, Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Since the inception of powered flight, manned aerial vehicles have been a force multiplier on the battlefield. With the emergence of new technology, the structure of the military battlefield is changing. One such technology, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has emerged as a valuable asset for today's war fighter. UAVs have traditionally been operated by ground control stations, yet minimum research has been targeted towards UAV connectivity. Airborne Manned Unmanned System Technology Baseline (AMUST-Baseline) was a concept that demonstrated the battlefield synergy gained by Manned and Unmanned Vehicle teaming. AMUST-Baseline allowed an Apache Longbow's (AH-64D) co-pilot gunner (CPG) to have Level IV control of a Hunter fixed wing UAV. Level IV control of a UAV includes payload control, flight control and direct data receipt. With the success of AMUST-Baseline, AATD, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, and the Boeing Company worked towards enhanced Manned and Unmanned connectivity through a technology investment agreement. This effort named Airborne Manned Unmanned System Technology Demonstration (AMUST-D) focused on the connectivity between two manned platforms, Apache Longbow (AH-64D) and Command and Control (C2) Blackhawk, and Hunter UAV. It allows robust communication from the UAV to each platform through the Tactical Common Data Link (TCDL). AMUST-D used decision aiding technology developed under the Rotorcraft Pilots Associate (RPA) Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) as to assist in control of the Hunter UAV, as well as assist the pilot in regularly performed duties. Through the use of decision aiding and UAV control, the pilot and commander were better informed of potential threats and targets, thus increasing his situational awareness. The potential benefits of improved situational awareness are increased pilot survivability, increased lethality, and increased operational effectiveness. Two products were developed under the AMUST-D program, the

  1. A study on the correlation between program contact hours and the successful matriculation into college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer D; Kiovsky, Richard D

    2014-10-01

    Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) play an important role in the recruitment and training of students to serve as practicing health care professionals in rural, primary care, and medically underserved communities. To analyze the relationship between the accumulated contact hours of past students in AHEC programs and their known matriculation into college. 5,189 students, whom participated in Indiana AHEC Network programs, were grouped into eight categories based on accumulated contact hours and matched against two college matriculation databases. The relationship between the number of accumulated contact hours and known college matriculation was statistically significant. The analysis of the data suggests two significant break points in which the number of accumulated contact hours appears to be correlated with increased known college matriculation. The findings indicate accumulated contact hours are significantly correlated with known college matriculation. Furthermore, two significant break points in contact hours at the 5 and 20 contact hours demonstrated increased correlations between program contact hours and known college matriculation. The results of this analysis between participation in area health education center programming and matriculation into higher education may be transferable to other areas of health education.

  2. Radioactive caesium in hunters and their families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, G.; Bergman, R. [Natonal Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden); Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M. [Center for Risk Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Enander, A. [National Defence Research Establishment, Karlstad (Sweden); Johansson, K.J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    We have measured the whole-body content of radiocesium in men and women in households, where at least one member is a hunter. Hunter families live to a great extent on forest products, such as mushrooms, berries and meat from game. Measurements were performed in two areas in northern Sweden and in three areas in the middle part of Sweden with deposition levels between 7 to 80 kBq/m{sup 2}. The average whole body content of {sup 137}Cs varied between 0.3 to 1.9 kBq for women and 0.6 to 4.7 kBq for men, depending on the deposition level. Each individual in the measured group was also asked to fill in questionnaire and a food diary to provide complementary information of, e.g., food intake and other life conditions. The single dietary factor most clearly related to whole-body content in these groups is the intake of meat from moose. The best regression model with variables from the questionnaire explained 60% of the variance in the whole-body content of {sup 137}Cs in the measurement group. Some of the variables in this model were deposition level, sex, rate of intake and estimated consumption of moose meat and estimated amount of bilberries in the fridge. 6 refs, 5 figs, 14 tabs.

  3. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Health Promotion Program in a College Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shirley P.; Fisher, Michele M.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of a health promotion program for employees at a New Jersey state college assessed the physical fitness and exercise program with educational components. Comparisons of experimental and control subjects indicated significant differences on high density lipoprotein (HDL), total cholesterol/HDL ratio, triglycerides, and body weight in…

  4. Undergrad and Overweight: An Online Behavioral Weight Management Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Berino, Jean; Pope, Lizzy; Gold, Beth Casey; Leonard, Heather; Belliveau, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Explore the feasibility of an online behavioral weight management program for college students. Methods: The program focused on behavioral strategies to modify eating and exercise behaviors of students interested in losing weight and/or developing a healthy lifestyle. Specific tools included weekly chat meetings with a facilitator,…

  5. P.E.E.R.: Dickinson College's Summer Gown/Town Program for Elementary Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytim, James A.

    Dickinson College has operated the Program for Education, Enrichment, and Recreation (P.E.E.R.) for 66 children ages 7-11 since 1968. The program operates for an 8-week summer session for elementary school children who may benefit from a supervised, structured, small group experience. Swimming instruction is provided along with other sports, arts…

  6. Leadership Styles at Middle- and Early-College Programs: A Quantitative Descriptive Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berksteiner, Earl J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to determine if associations existed between middle- and early-college (MEC) principals' leadership styles, teacher motivation, and teacher satisfaction. MEC programs were programs designed to assist high school students who were not served well in a traditional setting (Middle…

  7. Older College Students as Tutors for Adult Learners in an Urban Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntiri, Daphne W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a university literacy tutorial program in which older adult college students received tutor training and then carried out one-to-one reading tutorials with adult male learners who were rehabilitating addicts. Offers two case studies, and shows that the program had a significant impact on tutors' commitment to community volunteerism and…

  8. Employment, Salary & Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Karen A.

    More than forty-six career programs are offered at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas, in such areas as Cosmetology, Dental Assistance, and Travel and Tourism. These programs specialize in the types of industries that are currently growing at high rates, such as computer-related occupations and special education teachers. This…

  9. Violence against Women on the College Campus: Evaluating Anti-Violence Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Roberta E.

    2010-01-01

    Violence against women is a significant problem on America's college campuses. In response to this violence, many universities have developed direct service programs to assist the survivors of violence as well as educational programs to raise awareness about and/or reduce the likelihood of such violence. There has been no scholarly inquiry…

  10. Effects of a Rape Awareness Program on College Women: Increasing Bystander Efficacy and Willingness to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Brasfield, Hope; Hill, Brent

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program on 279 college women that focused on learning characteristics of male perpetrators and teaching bystander intervention techniques. After seeing The Women's Program, participants reported significantly greater bystander efficacy and significantly greater…

  11. Undergrad and Overweight: An Online Behavioral Weight Management Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Berino, Jean; Pope, Lizzy; Gold, Beth Casey; Leonard, Heather; Belliveau, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Explore the feasibility of an online behavioral weight management program for college students. Methods: The program focused on behavioral strategies to modify eating and exercise behaviors of students interested in losing weight and/or developing a healthy lifestyle. Specific tools included weekly chat meetings with a facilitator,…

  12. Leadership Styles at Middle- and Early-College Programs: A Quantitative Descriptive Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berksteiner, Earl J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to determine if associations existed between middle- and early-college (MEC) principals' leadership styles, teacher motivation, and teacher satisfaction. MEC programs were programs designed to assist high school students who were not served well in a traditional setting (Middle…

  13. Features of Engaging and Empowering Experiential Learning Programs for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study describes three collegiate programs that have a high interest in creating engaging learning environments outside of the classroom. The three settings in this study are a three-year degree granting college focusing on internship-based learning, a nationally recognized service-learning program at a private university, and a small private…

  14. Impact of Degree Program Satisfaction on the Persistence of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Harskamp, Egbert G.

    2007-01-01

    Many theories on college retention recognize the significance of student satisfaction as a positive factor in students' persistence. Yet, there are few theories that address the relationship of degree program satisfaction to study behaviour and dropout. This paper explores the impact of degree program satisfaction on academic accomplishment and…

  15. Evaluation of the Policies, Practices and Procedures: Cooperative Career Education Program, El Camino College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstiens, Gene

    A study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of El Camino College's Cooperative Career Education (CCE) program, which awards credit for on-the-job experiential learning related to a student's course of study. Surveys designed to obtain demographic data, information on course withdrawals, and perceptions of the program were distributed to 735…

  16. Iowa Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Program Development Guide: Kindergarten-Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Bureau of Technical and Vocational Education.

    This resource guide for comprehensive counseling and guidance programs provides counselors, student service personnel, and administrators of Iowa's K-12 schools and community colleges with a means to improve or design programs. With the rapidly changing global society and the increase in violence at all levels of society, there is a critical need…

  17. Exploring Factors Facilitating and Hindering College-University Pathway Program Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Augusto Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway Programs), but also the social-cultural facilitators and barriers throughout the students' Pathway experience. Design/methodology/approach: The experience of students and…

  18. Laney College Transfer Opportunities Program, Sponsored by the Ford Foundation. A Narrative Report, 1983-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Milton

    Activities and outcomes of a Transfer Opportunities Program developed at Laney College, with a grant from the Ford Foundation, are presented in this report. Introductory material outlines the purpose of the program (i.e., to establish an intervention strategy to improve student academic performance and persistence; increase the number of students…

  19. College and Career Readiness and Success: Inventory of Policies, Programs, and Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    College and Career Readiness and Success Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This inventory is designed to assist state education agencies and other stakeholders to identify the policies, programs, and initiatives in their states that support students on their pathways to success in college and careers. In other words, it addresses the question: What policies, programs, and initiatives does your state have in place to…

  20. Evidence-Based Research: The Impact of the College Crusade GEAR UP Program in RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Neeta P.; Harrington, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program, more commonly known as GEAR UP, is a product of federal legislation designed to increase high school completion and college attendance of low-­income youth. It is a federally funded discretionary grant program that is planned, organized and operated at the state and local level.…

  1. Duck hunters' perceptions of risk for avian influenza, Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Hope; Stallknecht, David; Cole, Dana

    2010-08-01

    To determine duck hunters'risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza, we surveyed duck hunters in Georgia, USA, during 2007-2008, about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We found they engage in several practices that could expose them to the virus. Exposures and awareness were highest for those who had hunted >10 years.

  2. Play as a Foundation for Hunter-Gatherer Social Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author offers the thesis that hunter-gatherers promoted, through cultural means, the playful side of their human nature and this made possible their egalitarian, nonautocratic, intensely cooperative ways of living. Hunter-gatherer bands, with their fluid membership, are likened to social-play groups, which people could freely join or leave.…

  3. Attribute-based analysis of hunters' lease preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Anwar; Munn, Ian A; Hudson, Darren; West, Ben

    2010-12-01

    Understanding of hunter preferences for hunting lease attributes is important to landowners because such knowledge provides key information for managing and marketing fee-hunting in order to maximize revenues. Premised on this insight, we used attribute based modeling to investigate how hunter preferences for potential leases were influenced by lease and hunter-specific attributes. A mail survey of Mississippi licensed hunters provided the necessary data. Estimation results based on McFadden conditional logit regression suggested that lease attributes including game diversity, lease location relative to hunter residence, lease size, lease duration and lease rate influenced willingness to pay for additional units of lease attributes. Depending on the specific levels of these attributes, WTP could vary as much as $5.70 per acre. Of the hunter-specific attributes, age and income significantly influenced hunter decision to buy a lease or opt for status quo. Results of this study should assist landowners in increasing financial returns from fee-hunting endeavors through appropriate changes to their hunting access policies and wildlife management activities in response to hunter preferences regarding lease attributes.

  4. Wild boar hunters profile in Shimane prefecture, western Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda, G.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild boars have been expanding their range and seriously damage agricultural crops all over Japan. Such situation is obvious in Shimane Prefecture, western end of Honshu Island, where most of its territory is mountainous. Populaton control is strongly expected by farmers and administration. However, the number of hunters has been drastically decreasing since the 1970’s. To maintain and increase hunters, we must investigate their activities and attitudes to clarify the problems. Questionnaires were conducted in 2001 on 310 hunters who renewed their hunting license at local office. The response rate was 80.0%. Wild boar hunters accounted for 61.6%, and the others were mostly bird hunters (32.5%. The objective of wild boar hunting was predominantly nuisance control, and very few hunted for money despite of its high commercial value. Most of them were farmers (35.8% and/or farm village dwellers (53.6%, and used the leg snare (61.4%. Despite the stable number of hunters, the number of hunters using guns is decreasing. Hunters do not to appear to be interested in maintaining the local hunting society. Leisure is the most pursued objective rather nuisance control. Therefore, actions should be taken to stimulate hunting as a leisure activity thus maintaining an important tool for wild boar management.

  5. 78 FR 77113 - Bakken Hunter, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Bakken Hunter, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 2, 2013 Bakken Hunter, LLC (Bakken), 410 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, filed in Docket No....

  6. Making Content Accessible to Promote Second Language Acquisition: The ESL Intensive Program at Hostos Community College (CUNY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Diana M.; Justicia, Nellie T.; Levine, Lewis

    An English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) Intensive Program was established at Hostos Community College, New York, to help accelerate students' acquisition of ESL by combining three semesters of the college's regular ESL program into two semesters. Each level of this program provides 15 hours of classroom instruction per week, a 6-hour reading and…

  7. Continuity of operations planning in college athletic programs: The case for incorporating Federal Emergency Management Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A; Allen, Brandon L; Phillips, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    College athletic departments have a responsibility to provide a safe environment for student-athletes; however, most colleges do not have a crisis management plan that includes procedures for displaced student-athletes or alternate facilities to perform athletic events. Continuity of operations planning ensures athletic programs are equipped to maintain essential functions during, or shortly after, a disruption of operations due to possible hazards. Previous studies have identified a lack of emergency preparedness and continuity planning in college athletic departments. The purpose of this article is to illustrate in detail one approach to disaster planning for college athletic departments, namely the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continuity of operations framework. By adhering to FEMA guidelines and promoting a best practices model, athletic programs can effectively plan to address potential hazards, as well as protect the organization's brand, image, and financial sustainability after a crisis event.

  8. Why do good hunters have higher reproductive success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric Alden

    2004-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence from many hunter-gatherer societies suggests that successful hunters experience higher prestige and greater reproductive success. Detailed quantitative data on these patterns are now available for five widely dispersed cases (Ache, Hadza, !Kung, Lamalera, and Meriam) and indicate that better hunters exhibit higher age-corrected reproductive success than other men in their social group. Leading explanations to account for this pattern are: (1) direct provisioning of hunters' wives and offspring, (2) dyadic reciprocity, (3) indirect reciprocity, (4) costly signaling, and (5) phenotypic correlation. I examine the qualitative and quantitative evidence bearing on these explanations and conclude that although none can be definitively rejected, extensive and apparently unconditional sharing of large game somewhat weakens the first three explanations. The costly signaling explanation has support in some cases, although the exact nature of the benefits gained from mating or allying with or deferring to better hunters needs further study.

  9. Darton College Customized Nursing Program for the Fort Benning Community and Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Texas. Through the flexibility and support of the program he was able Darton State College 6 W81XWH-11-2-0205 Final Report to make up his clinical ...whenever needed. Students reported that the Fort Benning faculty was also very good about scheduling class times, tutoring sessions, and clinical rotations...be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. Darton State College

  10. A Physics-Oriented College Motivation Program for Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Willard R.; Baur, James F.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a four-week summer session for Mexican-American high school sophomores in the urban Denver area to encourage them to attend college. It consists of discussion groups, lectures, and laboratories followed during the winter with some tutoring and counseling. (TS)

  11. Building Effective Green Energy Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozell, Maureen R.; Liston, Cynthia D.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges across the country are engaged in large-scale federal and state initiatives to train low-income individuals for the nascent field that's become known as "green jobs." Many green economy advocates believe that green jobs training can be part of career pathways that help move unemployed and disconnected individuals--who are often…

  12. Pikes Peak Community College Deaf Prep Program Study Skills Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paula

    This study skills curriculum is designed to assist students who are deaf or hearing impaired to prepare for college life. It presents lesson plans and activities that address the following topics: (1) effective school tools; (2) effective school attitudes; (3) effective school behaviors; (4) time management and goal settings, including keeping…

  13. The New Mexico EPSCoR Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program: A Successful Summer Research Program for Community College and PUI College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The statewide NSF New Mexico EPSCoR Program (Climate Change and Water in New Mexico) sponsored a summer undergraduate research program from 2009 to 2013. This program was open to undergraduates attending the state's community colleges and primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). Participants who are chosen for the program attend a week of workshops on climate change, hydrology, water quality and professional development. Following that, they spend eight weeks working with an EPSCoR-funded scientist at a research intensive university or related field site. Participants are paired during their research project. This strategy has been shown to be a key factor in the success and comfort level of the participants. The program concludes with a research conference and many of the participants later present their work at national and regional conferences. The program has shown to be effective at introducing students from non-research institutions to authentic research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences and improving their confidence in future success at higher degree levels. The program is also successful at recruiting underrepresented minority students, mainly from Hispanic and Native American populations. We will also present data on participant degree completions, transfers to four year colleges, STEM career attainment, and graduate school admissions.

  14. A Needs Assessment Study and Curriculum Development for a Public and Private Security Program at Alvin Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethscheider, John

    A needs assessment for a community college curriculum in public and private security was conducted by surveying 50 high schools, four-year colleges, and private security agencies in the Alvin Community College area; 36 institutions responded. Findings revealed: most have a designated director of their security program; most would rather hire the…

  15. Review of Online Programming Characteristics and Pricing at Private Not-for-Profit Two Year Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Online programming has expanded greatly within higher education and much attention has been spent on public two year colleges (more commonly known as community colleges) and both private and public four year institutions. This research seeks to expand understanding of the small market of private not-for-profit two year colleges within the United…

  16. DM-style program caters to behavioral needs of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Modeled after traditional employee assistance programs, a new program offered by CIGNA Behavioural Health is designed to meet the needs of college students, many of whom are vulnerable to emotional disorders as they grapple with independence and the rigors of campus life for the first time. Conditions such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse are on the rise in college-age individuals, and developers of the new approach suggest that early intervention can get such problems under control before they reach the crisis stage.

  17. Interprofessional student education: exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Herron, Patrick D; Downie, Sherry A; Myers, Daniel C; Milan, Felise B; Olson, Todd R; Kligler, Ben E; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), of which estimated 38% of adults in the United States used in 2007, has engendered changes in medical school curricula to increase students' awareness of it. Exchange programs between conventional medical schools and CAM institutions are recognized as an effective method of interprofessional education. The exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein, Yeshiva University) and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY) is in its fifth year and is part of a broader relationship between the schools encompassing research, clinical training, interinstitutional faculty and board appointments, and several educational activities. The Einstein/PCOM-NY student education exchange program is part of the Einstein Introduction to Clinical Medicine Program and involves students from Einstein learning about Chinese medicine through a lecture, the experience of having acupuncture, and a four-hour preceptorship at the PCOM outpatient clinic. The students from PCOM learn about allopathic medicine training through an orientation lecture, a two-and-a-half-hour dissection laboratory session along side Einstein student hosts, and a tour of the clinical skills center at the Einstein campus. In the 2011/2012 offering of the exchange program, the participating Einstein and PCOM students were surveyed to assess the educational outcomes. The data indicate that the exchange program was highly valued by all students and provided a unique learning experience. Survey responses from the Einstein students indicated the need for greater emphasis on referral information, which has been highlighted in the literature as an important medical curriculum integrative medicine competency.

  18. Under What Conditions Do Children Thrive in the Madeline Hunter Model? A Report of Project Follow Through, Napa, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Jane; And Others

    This study evaluated the effect of a comprehensive training program for teachers based on Madeline Hunter's Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP). To examine the question of implementation, teachers in the first through fourth grades in Napa Valley elementary schools were observed teaching two reading and two mathematics classes before and…

  19. A Study of Remedial Mathematics Programs (RMP) at Two Year Colleges (TYC) in New York State (NYS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, James

    1974-01-01

    Members of the New York State Mathematics Association of Two-Year Colleges were surveyed concerning characteristics of remedial programs, objectives of such programs, and facilities necessary. The results of the survey are reported and discussed. (SD)

  20. Exploring Student and Advisor Experiences in a College-University Pathway Program: A Study of the Bachelor of Commerce Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is great interest across Ontario in the expansion of pathway programs between colleges and universities. Through strategic partnerships, two Ontario-based postsecondary institutions (a college and a university) have developed innovative and effective pathway programs that facilitate the transition of students between institutions…

  1. Developments in Instruction in Selected Four Year College Reading Improvement Programs Throughout the United States, 1950-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Virginia Pearl Hymes

    The purpose of this study was to examine the organization, program format and duration of college reading improvement instructional programs (CRIPs) in selected four-year American colleges and universities from 1950-1974, and to gather information which is vital to effective curricula and planning for higher education in the area of reading…

  2. Modeling the effects of study abroad programs on college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin H. Yu; Garry E. Chick; Duarte B. Morais; Chung-Hsien Lin

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of modeling the effects of a study abroad program on students from a university in the northeastern United States. A program effect model was proposed after conducting an extensive literature review and empirically examining a sample of 265 participants in 2005. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA),...

  3. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety; Final Rule #0;#0... Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule... Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and...

  4. Connecting Scientists, College Students, Middle School Students & Elementary Students through Intergenerational Afterschool STEM Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Raftery, C. L.; Romero, V.; Harper, M. R.; Chilcott, C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.; Yan, D.; Ruderman, I.; Frappier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiverse education group at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Lab created the NASA-funded "Five Stars Pathway" model in which five "generations" of girls and women engage in science together in an afterschool setting, with each generation representing one stage in the pathway of pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). The five stages are: elementary-age students, middle-school-age students, undergraduate-level college students, graduate-level college students and professional scientists. This model was field-tested at two Girls Inc. afterschool locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and distributed to Girls Inc. affiliates and other afterschool program coordinators nationwide. This presentation will explore some of the challenges and success of implementing a multigenerational STEM model as well as distributing the free curriculum for interested scientists and college students to use with afterschool programs.

  5. The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program: The First Five Years 1989-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, J.; Ward, E.

    1996-03-01

    NASA accepted the Congressional mandate to manage the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (NSGC&FP) and announced the original competition for Space Grant awards in 1989. Currently, 52 independently governed Space Grant consortia administer programs in three areas of university and NASA concern: research, education, and public service. NASA funds have remained stable at $15 million since 1991, but the consortia have leveraged matching funds, including in-kind contributions, to approximately double the Space Grant awards. The number of affiliated Space Grant institutions has grown from 86 affiliates in 1990 to over 550 affiliates in 1996. Members include many of the finest colleges and universities in the nation, internationally competitive business and industrial partners, small businesses, state and local government agencies, private colleges, community colleges, medical colleges, and other nonprofit organizations. Though the program has been fully operational in all 52 consortia for less than five years, the benefits to the taxpayer have been significant. Space Grant faculty and students obtained funding for over 300 research proposals. Since 1990, the NSGC&FP has served close to 6500 citizens by providing tuition assistance. Among these 6500 were significant numbers of students from underrepresented groups in science and engineering. Space Grant consortia leveraged $16.5 million for precollege activities and administered over 1300 precollege projects that promote NASA-related science education. Space Grant precollege programs, serving both teachers and students, provide good examples of higher education faculty working well with local school systems. The consortia administered over 600 public service programs and leveraged approximately $4.5 million. Space Grant funds provided science and technology lectures, demonstrations, science exhibits, space-related periodicals, audio and video productions of NASA-related subjects, and have helped to

  6. Implementing a high-fidelity simulation program in a community college setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuoriniemi, Pamela; Schott-Baer, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    Despite their relatively high cost, there is heightened interest by faculty in undergraduate nursing programs to implement high-fidelity simulation (HFS) programs. High-fidelity simulators are appealing because they allow students to experience high-risk, low-volume patient problems in a realistic setting. The decision to purchase a simulator is the first step in the process of implementing and maintaining an HFS lab. Knowledge, technical skill, commitment, and considerable time are needed to develop a successful program. The process, as experienced by one community college nursing program, is described.

  7. College and University Italian Programs in North America: Where Is Italian Phonetics and Phonology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Keith

    1990-01-01

    Argues for the inclusion of courses in phonetics and phonology in college Italian programs, claiming that the myth of Italian as a phonetic language blurs the clear need for such training and that students actually require advanced coursework in phonetics and phonology to improve their articulation and pronunciation. (43 references) (Author/CB)

  8. Bridge to Success: Insight into Summer Bridge Program Students' College Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, MaryBeth; Simmerman, Herb; Mack, Cathy; Mills, John T.; Scales, Michael; Albano, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the college transition of students who participated in a summer bridge program. Three surveys collected longitudinal data on these students' aspirations and academic and social activities. Data provided from institutional research on their academic progress were also analyzed. A control group composed of non-participating…

  9. Attitudes of College Students Enrolled in 2-Year Health Care Programs towards Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Dalya

    2012-01-01

    Colleges offering 2-year diplomas to high-school graduates were among the forefront leaders in online learning however studies illustrating appropriate course construction for such student populations are scarce. Pharmacy Math (MATH16532) is a core course for students enrolled in the Practical Nursing (PN) and Pharmacy Technician (PT) programs at…

  10. Pre-Education Programs: A Comprehensive Project at Henry Ford Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Deborah; Smyrski, Larry

    This document presents an overview of a four-year comprehensive pre-education project at Henry Ford Community College (HFCC) in Michigan. To meet the needs of school districts that preferred a 32-credit certificate program as well as districts that preferred a 60-unit associate degree, HFCC employed a career-ladder approach: A 32-credit…

  11. Programs to Enhance Participation, Retention, and Success of Minority Students at Florida Community Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Louis W.; Blanco, Cheryl D.

    This five-part report describes the methods and findings of a study of programs implemented at Florida's 9 public universities and 28 community colleges to enhance the participation of minority and disadvantaged students in postsecondary education. Following introductory material on the project, study design, and methods, an inventory of…

  12. College and University Italian Programs in North America: Where Is Italian Phonetics and Phonology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Keith

    1990-01-01

    Argues for the inclusion of courses in phonetics and phonology in college Italian programs, claiming that the myth of Italian as a phonetic language blurs the clear need for such training and that students actually require advanced coursework in phonetics and phonology to improve their articulation and pronunciation. (43 references) (Author/CB)

  13. Peer Helping Programs in the Colleges and Universities of Quebec and Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Presents examination of peer helping in 19 colleges and universities. Summarizes research associated with peer helping. Notes educational institutions concerned about meeting the needs of their students, creating positive influences in their development and helping them to be productive in their academic lives can rely on peer programs to achieve…

  14. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  15. Impact of Community College of Philadelphia Allied Health Programs on the Philadelphia Region. Report #117.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philadelphia Community Coll., PA.

    This report discusses the Allied Health programs at Community College of Philadelphia (CCP): (1) Clinical Laboratory Technician; (2) Dental Assisting Hygiene; (3) Dental Assisting Certificate; (4) Diagnostic Medical Imaging; (5) Dietetic Technician; (6) Health Information Technology; (7) Medical Assisting and Office Management; (8) Nursing; and…

  16. Evaluation of Napa Valley College's Student Orientation, Assessment, Advisement and Retention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Jack

    In fall 1983, Napa Valley College fully implemented its Student Orientation, Assessment, Advisement, and Retention (SOAAR) program, which consisted of assessment of first-time students' math and reading skills, advisement about enrolling in regular or developmental courses based on scores, course advisement, and the provision of information on…

  17. Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

    Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

  18. Impact of degree program satisfaction on the persistence of college students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Harskamp, Egbert G.

    2007-01-01

    Many theories on college retention recognize the significance of student satisfaction as a positive factor in students' persistence. Yet, there are few theories that address the relationship of degree program satisfaction to study behaviour and dropout. This paper explores the impact of degree progr

  19. English Program Review at Coastline Community College, Fountain Valley, California. [A Preliminary Report, October 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yglesias, Kenneth D., Comp.; Fry, Marilyn, Comp.

    Prepared as part of the program review process at California's Coastline Community College (CCC), this report describes and evaluates CCC's English Department, highlighting problems and successes from 1976 to 1987. Part I offers a narrative account of: (1) the changes that took place in the department between 1976 and 1987, focusing on early…

  20. 75 FR 3212 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) Catalog of.... Department of Education, Office of Migrant Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 3E344, Washington, DC.... Department of Education, Office of Migrant Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., room 3E323, Washington,...

  1. Mapping the Future Today: The Community College of Baltimore County Geospatial Applications Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Scott; Alvarez, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    The Geospatial Applications Program at the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC), located five miles west of downtown Baltimore, Maryland, provides comprehensive instruction in geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing and global positioning systems (GPS). Geospatial techniques, which include computer-based mapping and remote…

  2. Individual Attitudes and Social Influences on College Students' Intent to Participate in Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liz C.; Gault, John; Christ, Paul; Diggin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in study abroad programs (SAPs) is widely viewed as offering important professional and personal benefits for college students. This study applies the "Theory of Reasoned Action" [Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980) and "Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior," Englewood Cliffs, NJ:…

  3. Individual Attitudes and Social Influences on College Students' Intent to Participate in Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liz C.; Gault, John; Christ, Paul; Diggin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in study abroad programs (SAPs) is widely viewed as offering important professional and personal benefits for college students. This study applies the "Theory of Reasoned Action" [Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980) and "Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior," Englewood Cliffs, NJ:…

  4. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  5. THE NEED TO ESTABLISH A MARINE SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM AT SHORELINE COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEEL, WARD; AND OTHERS

    DURING THE SUMMER OF 1966, FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE COLLEGE CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW SURVEY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF ESTABLISHING A MARINE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM. MANPOWER NEEDS OF 70 INDUSTRIES, INSTITUTIONS, AND GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES CONCERNED WITH THE FIELDS OF OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE BIOLOGY WERE STUDIED IN TERMS OF JOBS PERFORMED BY…

  6. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  7. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  8. Graduation Rates of Students in Technical Programs at an Urban Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Aubra J.

    2010-01-01

    With an increasingly technological and competitive world economy, more jobs require employees to have achieved the advanced skills and knowledge gained only through postsecondary education. The data regarding the supply and demand between the workforce and higher education present a challenge for community college technical programs. These are the…

  9. Assembling a Career: Labor Market Outcomes for Manufacturing Program Students in Two-Year Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Christopher J.; Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Research on labor market outcomes for individuals who enroll in technical colleges is limited, with even less attention to the effects of short-term certificates than associate degrees. Also, despite the importance of manufacturing programs, there is a lack of research on employment outcomes for individuals who enroll in these programs…

  10. Personal Well-Being of Gifted Students Following Participation in an Early College-Entrance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boazman, Janette; Sayler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this study, life satisfaction and its correlates were explored through analysis of the experiences and psychological traits of highly gifted students who were accelerated into an early college-entrance program. Happiness, fulfillment in life, assuredness, and good dispositions are constructs that point toward positive character development and…

  11. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs: College Student Satisfaction with an Interactive Educational Software Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotunda, Rob J.; West, Laura; Epstein, Joel

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol and drug use education and prevention continue to be core educational issues. In seeking to inform students at all levels about drug use, the present exploratory study highlights the potential educational use of interactive computer programs for this purpose. Seventy-three college students from two substance abuse classes interacted for at…

  12. Can I Make It? A Transition Program for College Bound Learning Disabled Students and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ellen; Czamanske, Jackie

    The metaphor of a family road trip is used to describe a 10-week seminar program at the Rochester Institute of Technology (New York) for learning disabled high school students and their parents in preparation for student transition to college. The small group format (maximum eight families) allows for both whole group and separate (parents and…

  13. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  14. The Hunter Drain Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Fallon, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines water quality concerns related to the operation of the Hunter Drain located in the vicinity of the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  15. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  16. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  17. perceptions and adaptations of beekeepers and honey hunters to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    honey sector (i.e. honey hunters) to climate change are, however, not adequately explored. The objective ... resort, beekeepers that are severely affected by climate change had no other choice than abandoned beekeeping for .... Trees, shrub.

  18. Morality and Gender: A Commentary on Pratt, Golding, and Hunter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems in Pratt, Golding, and Hunter's investigation (in this issue) of two propositions central to Gilligan's (1982) thesis on the mismeasurement of women's moral orientation and development. Describes research addressing the problems and indicates directions for further research. (RH)

  19. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  20. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  1. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  2. [A case of tularemia in a Danish hunter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edfors, Robert; Smith, Birgitte; Lillebaek, Troels

    2010-02-01

    "Rabbit fever" (Francisella Tularensis) is a rare infection in Denmark. It was first described in Denmark in 1987. It is most likely to affect people who come into close contact with infected animals or ticks, such as hunters, butchers and veterinarians. The diagnosis should be suspected in such persons presenting with fever, headache, lethargy, lymphadenitis and bite wounds. We present a Danish case describing the diagnosis and treatment of a hunter infected with T. tularensis.

  3. Hunter perceptions and acceptance of alternative deer management regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornicelli, L.; Fulton, D.C.; Grund, M.D.; Fieberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife managers are often confronted with a policy paradox where a majority of the public supports an outcome, but there is no agreement on specific management strategies to achieve this outcome. Previous research has also reported a link between regulatory acceptance, hunter satisfaction, and hunter participation rates. Thus, human dimensions research aimed at understanding hunter motivations and behavior is needed for effective management. In 2005, we surveyed Minnesota (USA) deer hunters (n = 6,000; 59% response) to evaluate attitudes regarding alternative deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvest regulations. We also conducted a series of forced choice experiments in which respondents were asked to select an option from a list of representative regulations that might be adopted to achieve a particular deer management goal. Specifically, we modeled 5 deer population scenarios ranging from low populations with high buck-harvest rates to populations 50% over goal density. Our results indicate that hunters preferred different regulations depending on the population scenario, but generally preferred antler-point restrictions and disliked limiting buck licenses through a lottery. We also found consistency among scenarios, in that a small percentage of respondents indicated they would not hunt if regulations were changed. The results from this study should help wildlife managers design deer harvest regulations that are both acceptable to hunters and achieve management objectives. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  4. 'Impact hunters' catalyse cooperative hunting in two wild chimpanzee communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilby, Ian C; Machanda, Zarin P; Mjungu, Deus C; Rosen, Jeremiah; Muller, Martin N; Pusey, Anne E; Wrangham, Richard W

    2015-12-05

    Even when hunting in groups is mutually beneficial, it is unclear how communal hunts are initiated. If it is costly to be the only hunter, individuals should be reluctant to hunt unless others already are. We used 70 years of data from three communities to examine how male chimpanzees 'solve' this apparent collective action problem. The 'impact hunter' hypothesis proposes that group hunts are sometimes catalysed by certain individuals that hunt more readily than others. In two communities (Kasekela and Kanyawara), we identified a total of five males that exhibited high hunt participation rates for their age, and whose presence at an encounter with red colobus monkeys increased group hunting probability. Critically, these impact hunters were observed to hunt first more often than expected by chance. We argue that by hunting first, these males dilute prey defences and create opportunities for previously reluctant participants. This by-product mutualism can explain variation in group hunting rates within and between social groups. Hunting rates declined after the death of impact hunter FG in Kasekela and after impact hunter MS stopped hunting frequently in Kanyawara. There were no impact hunters in the third, smaller community (Mitumba), where, unlike the others, hunting probability increased with the number of females present at an encounter with prey.

  5. A Storm-by-Storm Analysis of Alpine and Regional Precipitation Dynamics at the Mount Hunter Ice Core Site, Denali National Park, Central Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Winski, D.

    2014-12-01

    In May-June 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000-year ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940291, -151.087616, 3912 m). The snow accumulation record from these ice cores will provide key insight into late Holocene precipitation variability in central Alaska, and compliment existing precipitation paleorecords from the Mt. Logan and Eclipse ice cores in coastal SE Alaska. However, correct interpretation of the Mt. Hunter accumulation record requires an understanding of the relationships between regional meteorological events and micrometeorological conditions at the Mt. Hunter ice core collection site. Here we analyze a three-month window of snow accumulation and meteorological conditions recorded by an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) at the Mt. Hunter site during the summer of 2013. Snow accumulation events are identified in the Mt. Hunter AWS dataset, and compared on a storm-by-storm basis to AWS data collected from the adjacent Kahiltna glacier 2000 m lower in elevation, and to regional National Weather Service (NWS) station data. We also evaluate the synoptic conditions associated with each Mt. Hunter accumulation event using NWS surface maps, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis data, and the NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectory model. We categorize each Mt. Hunter accumulation event as pure snow accumulation, drifting, or blowing snow events based on snow accumulation, wind speed and temperature data using the method of Knuth et al (2009). We analyze the frequency and duration of events within each accumulation regime, in addition to the overall contribution of each event to the snowpack. Preliminary findings indicate that a majority of Mt. Hunter accumulation events are of pure accumulation nature (55.5%) whereas drifting (28.6%) and blowing (15.4%) snow events play a secondary role. Our results will characterize the local accumulation dynamics on

  6. Pre-matriculation program at the University of South Florida College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M T

    1999-04-01

    Underrepresented-minority (URM) students at the University of South Florida College of Medicine increased from 4.9% to 10.5% of the total student body from 1991 to 1997. During that period it became clear that some majority and minority students had serious academic difficulties with the first-year curriculum and that a higher proportion of the minority matriculants had difficulties. In response, the college in 1997 created the Summer Pre-matriculation Program to reduce the number of first-year students who had academic difficulty. In the summer before they matriculate in the college, the students complete a six-week program of lectures, small-group discussions, compute-aided instruction, and laboratory instruction in biochemistry, human embryology, and gross anatomy. URM students, non-science majors, and students who have been away from the academic environment (e.g., pursuing medicine as a second career) are given priority for the 20 positions available each year. At the end of the first cohort's first medical school year, the academic performances of program participants and other students were compared, and it was clear that the program participants had performed as well as or slightly better than their counterparts in gross anatomy, biochemistry, and human embryology. Further, the program participants performed at or above the class average in medical school courses for which they had not had targeted instruction during the program. The College of Medicine is committed to diversifying its student body and realizes that diverse students bring varying levels of academic preparation as well as diversity in cultural and academic backgrounds. Concerted efforts such as the pre-matriculation program may be required to normalize the "playing field" at the very outset of medical school and to ensure that every matriculant has an equal opportunity to succeed.

  7. Improvements to the Hunter Dose tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-01

    Since 1965, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted deer hunts which are open to the general public. SRS performs field monitoring for cesium-137 (Cs-137) of each harvested animal to determine whether the animal may be released to the hunter. A new field system for measuring Cs-137 in the harvested animals has been developed. The system incorporates numerous enhancements compared to the original system. The original system was composed of two Ludlum Measurements scalar-driven 2 inch x 2 inch sodium iodide counters, while the new system is based on a single Ametek Ortec Digibase-driven 2 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch sodium iodide gamma spectrometer. The new system includes a series of easy-to-assemble stainless steel encapsulated lead shields. The combination of the larger detector size and lead shielding improved the detection limit of the new system by a factor of approximately three compared to the original system. This lower detection limit allows for a larger number of measurements to be directly compared to the laboratory results, in cases where animal portions have been sampled. The results from developing and using this system are presented as well as recommendations on improvements to the overall field monitoring of the SRS hunts.

  8. An Evaluation of Two Dating Violence Prevention Programs on a College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kerry; Sharps, Phyllis; Banyard, Victoria; Powers, Ráchael A; Kaukinen, Catherine; Gross, Deborah; Decker, Michele R; Baatz, Carrie; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2016-03-13

    Dating violence is a serious and prevalent public health problem that is associated with numerous negative physical and psychological health outcomes, and yet there has been limited evaluation of prevention programs on college campuses. A recent innovation in campus prevention focuses on mobilizing bystanders to take action. To date, bystander programs have mainly been compared with no treatment control groups raising questions about what value is added to dating violence prevention by focusing on bystanders. This study compared a single 90-min bystander education program for dating violence prevention with a traditional awareness education program, as well as with a no education control group. Using a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design with follow-up at 2 months, a sample of predominately freshmen college students was randomized to either the bystander (n = 369) or traditional awareness (n = 376) dating violence education program. A non-randomized control group of freshmen students who did not receive any education were also surveyed (n = 224). Students completed measures of attitudes, including rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and intent to help as well as behavioral measures related to bystander action and victimization. Results showed that the bystander education program was more effective at changing attitudes, beliefs, efficacy, intentions, and self-reported behaviors compared with the traditional awareness education program. Both programs were significantly more effective than no education. The findings of this study have important implications for future dating violence prevention educational programming, emphasizing the value of bystander education programs for primary dating violence prevention among college students.

  9. An Electronic Wellness Program to Improve Diet and Exercise in College Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jamisha T; Klein, Catherine J; Lei, Kai Y; Mackey, Eleanor R

    2016-01-01

    Background In transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, college students are faced with significant challenges to their health habits. Independence, stress, and perceived lack of time by college students have been known to result in poor eating and exercise habits, which can lead to increased disease risk. Objective To assess the feasibility and to determine preliminary efficacy of an electronic wellness program in improving diet and physical activity in college students. Methods A 24-week diet and physical activity program was delivered via email to 148 college students. The intervention involved weekly, tailored, and interactive diet and physical activity goals. The control group received nondiet and nonexercise-related health fact sheets. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, as well as food frequency and physical activity surveys were conducted at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Students’ choice of fruit as a snack was also monitored at study visits. Results Students were 18-20 years old, 69% female, and from a diverse college campus (46% Caucasian, 23% Asian, 20% African American, 11% other). At week 24, 84% of students reported reading at least half of all emails. Mean change (standard error [SE]) from baseline of saturated fat intake was marginally significant between the treatment groups at week 24, 0.7 (SE 0.42) % kcal for control and -0.3 (SE 0.30) % kcal for intervention (P=0.048). A significant difference in percent of snacks chosen that were fruit (χ2 1, N=221 = 11.7, P<0.001) was detected between the intervention and control group at week 24. Conclusions Use of an electronic wellness program is feasible in college students and resulted in a decrease in saturated fat intake and an increase in observed fruit intake compared to a control group. PMID:26929118

  10. Environmental Service-Learning Programs in Florida High Schools and Colleges: Nature, Status, and Effects as Determined by a Statewide Program Census

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Yuliya A.; Marcinkowski, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe environmental service-learning (SL) programs in Florida high schools and colleges through a statewide program census that explored (a) academic, service, and reflection program features; (b) effects of Furco's SL outcome domains on student outcomes; and (c) program partnerships. The results of the study reveal that secondary…

  11. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  12. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  13. Industrial Chemistry Program at a Small Undergraduate College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Recognizing that the vast majority of students will enter the chemical industry, an optional four-course sequence related to industrial chemistry was introduced. Program details are given along with information on how it was integrated into the curriculum of a small school with minimal staff size changes and limited facitlities. (JN)

  14. Values and Issues: The Humanities Program at Wofford College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoroughman, Thomas V.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a new humanities program is described. This includes a freshman seminar as an introduction to humanistic study, the modification of traditional language requirements, and the establishment of a writing and reading lab, an issues and values interdisciplinary seminar, and humanities and intercultural majors. (Author/MLW)

  15. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process.

  16. Longitudinal Analysis of Student Performance between Host and Cooperating College Learners in the Dental Hygiene Program at Northcentral Technical College in Wausau, Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Jodi L.

    The academic performance of students enrolled in a distance education dental hygiene program at Northcentral Technical College (NTC) in Wausau, Wisconsin, was analyzed in a comparative, quasi-experimental study. The study sample consisted of five cohorts of program graduates (students graduating in 1997-2001). The experiment groups were divided…

  17. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Garner, S. M.; Schmidt, S. J.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Agol, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar where they learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. Here we examine the success of the program in attracting underrepresented minorities and in facilitating better STEM retention and academic performance among incoming UW students. We use the University of Washington Student Database to study both the performance of Pre-MAP students and the overall UW student body over the past 8 years. We show that Pre-MAP students are generally more diverse than the overall UW population and also come in with a variety of different math backgrounds, which we show to be an important factor on STEM performance for the overall UW population. We find that that Pre-MAP students are both more academically successful and more likely to graduate in STEM fields than their UW peers, regardless of initial math placement.

  18. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics pre-college outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E.; Bacon, L.; Copper, K.; Hansen, L. J.; Sanchez, M.; Aiaa Precollege Outreach Committee

    Throughout the United States school child perceive science technology engineering and mathematics STEM as difficult boring and often irrelevant subjects The possible reasons for this problem are endlessly debated however the economic social and overall national importance of producing graduates who are technically literate and enthusiastic in their support of a rational scientific world should motivate many scientific and engineering societies around the world to develop outreach programs aimed at children ages 5-18 and corresponding support programs aimed at schools and teachers covering kindergarten through 12 th grade The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics AIAA is among those organizations that have identified the need to educate students and teachers about STEM current events and their direct affects on the United States population a way that motivates both to get more involved The AIAA has established a pre-college outreach program that has several major elements that will be described in this paper These elements include a pre-college Educator Associate Membership program a program to award small development grants to class room teachers and Educator of the Year awards and recognition program mechanisms for sharing and encouraging innovative local support programs and two national workshop events The first workshop event Passport to the Future is held annually in conjunction with the Joint Propulsion Conference It is intended to provide summertime training in Aerospace science education to classroom

  19. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  20. Energy management: a program of energy conservation for the community college facility. [Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various Authors

    1978-01-01

    This handbook developes helps for assessing and improving the energy efficiency of the community-college facility. The TEEM approach (Total Educational Energy Management) is a labor-intensive approach which requires the commitment and participation of all segments of the college community. The TEEM program presented here defines a series of tasks selected, ordered, and implemented in such a way as to achieve two basic objectives: (1) reducing campus energy requirements, and (2) meeting those reduced energy requirements more efficiently without adversely affecting the quality of educational programs. This guide to large-scale energy conservation on college campuses includes step-by-step procedures for establishing a program task force, defining specific tasks, and assigning responsibilities. Action plans are developed, energy consumption monitored, goals set, and conservation measures implemented. A series of appendices provides more detailed information, charts, and worksheets related to all aspects of energy use. The TEEM program provides the basic structure for achieving a significant reduction in campus energy costs.

  1. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  2. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program

    CERN Document Server

    Garner, Sarah; Schmidt, Sarah J; Wisniewski, John P; Agol, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington (UW) Department of Astronomy has made a concentrated effort to recruit and retain underrepresented undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This paper evaluates Pre-MAP in the context of the larger UW student population using data compiled by the University's student database. We evaluate the Pre-MAP program in terms of our goals of recruiting a more diverse population than the University and in terms of a higher fraction of students successfully completing degrees. We find that Pre-MAP serves a higher percentage of underrepresented minorities and equal percentages of women compared to entering freshmen classes at UW. Additionally, Pre-MAP has a higher percentage of degree completion with higher average GPA's and similar time to completion when compared to UW as a whole and other STEM majors, particularly with students that place into lower-level math courses (such as basic algebra or pre...

  3. Developing a comprehensive scale to assess college multicultural programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Miles, Joseph R; Bhaskar, Tripti; Chery, Nicole; Choi, Gahee; Sung, Mi-Ra

    2014-01-01

    A barrier to assessing effectiveness of multicultural programming is lack of a relatively brief instrument to measure the wide range of intended outcomes. A frequent goal of programming is to increase cultural empathy, but this is rarely the only intended outcome. We conducted focus groups of campus administrators, student affairs staff, and undergraduate instructors who identified a full range of racial/ethnic multicultural competencies that undergraduates should possess. An 84-item pool generated from these focus groups was combined with the 31-item Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy (SEE; Wang et al., 2003). These 115 items, together with instruments used to gauge concurrent validity, were administered to White undergraduate students in introductory psychology courses at the midpoint (n = 602) and end (n = 676) of fall semester. Exploratory factor analysis suggested 6 subscales for the Everyday Multicultural Competencies/Revised SEE (EMC/RSEE): (a) Cultural Openness and Desire to Learn; (b) Resentment and Cultural Dominance; (c) Anxiety and Lack of Multicultural Self-Efficacy; (d) Empathic Perspective-Taking; (e) Awareness of Contemporary Racism and Privilege; and (f) Empathic Feeling and Acting as an Ally. Item response theory principles guided final selection of subscale items. Analyses suggested good factor stability, reliability, and discriminant validity of the 48-item EMC/RSEE in these undergraduate samples. EMC/RSEE subscales were not strongly correlated with a measure of impression management and were significantly associated with measures of Openness to Diversity Challenge, and Universal-Diverse Orientation.

  4. Integration of Academic and Vocational Programs in Illinois Community Colleges. The Status of Integration Activities Funded through the Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Quality Assurance Program (QAP) integration activities were studied at eight Illinois community and junior colleges. Data collection involved telephone interviews with career deans at the colleges, 11 follow-up site observations, and attendance at a regional vocational education system directors meeting. When classroom observations occurred,…

  5. The Role of Faculty, Counselors, and Support Programs on Latino/a Community College Students' Success and Intent to Persist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Esau

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how interactions with institutional agents (faculty and academic counselors) and select student support programs influence success (i.e., grade point average) and intentions to persist to degree completion for Latino/a community college students. Using social capital theory and college impact models, the study controls for the…

  6. Guiding Math Students to Campus Services: An Impact Evaluation of the Beacon Program at South Texas College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Mary; Butcher, Kristin F.; Cerna, Oscar S.

    2011-01-01

    This research rigorously evaluates whether a low-cost intervention can improve students' performance in developmental math. The "Beacon Mentoring Program" was developed at South Texas College by professors, administrators, and staff at the college. Surveys of students revealed that many did not have someone on campus whom they felt they…

  7. The Employers IV: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    In a survey of 374 career curriculum graduates of Montgomery Community College in 1976, 280 indicated they were working in jobs related to their college programs. Of these, 225 (80%) gave employer names and addresses and permission to contact them. Questionnaires drew responses of 159 employers to questions about skill levels of students, employee…

  8. Issues of Education at Community Colleges: Essays by Fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princeton Univ., NJ. Mid-Career Fellowship Program.

    This document contains the following nine essays by fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University, New Jersey: (1) Promotion Processes at the Public Community Colleges of New Jersey, by Harvey Braverman; (2) Plagiarism in ESL Contexts at the Community College, by Barrie Chi. Contains eight references; (3) Partnership and…

  9. The Role of Faculty, Counselors, and Support Programs on Latino/a Community College Students' Success and Intent to Persist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Esau

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how interactions with institutional agents (faculty and academic counselors) and select student support programs influence success (i.e., grade point average) and intentions to persist to degree completion for Latino/a community college students. Using social capital theory and college impact models, the study controls for the…

  10. The Impact of the Norton High School Early College Program on the Academic Performance of Students at Norton High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Eric Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Norton High School Early College Early College Program on academic measures for students at Norton High School. Measures of achievement include the results of the English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Social Science, and Science portions of the California Standards Test (CST), Student…

  11. Braving the Challenges of Being Small--The Unique Physics Program at Manhattanville College

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Z

    2004-01-01

    We present the formulation and development of the unique physics program at Manhattanville College. By addressing challenges faced by small physics departments in liberal arts colleges, such as the lack of critical mass, lack of significant funding, and under-staffing, we share our efforts and experiences in revitalization of the program into one that is small but of rigor and vitality, with unique features that take advantage of the resources available, including adoption of computer technology in instructional laboratory, collaborations with nearby institutions, and joint efforts with colleagues of other departments/schools. Also included are some discussions on the balance between service and the major, on the relationship with K-12 physics education, and on the rigor of the curriculum, particularly in view of the opposite but converging trends in US and in China.

  12. Addressing the Effectiveness of Athletics Intramural Programs in Tehran Medical College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Mousavi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to Evaluate the effectiveness of Athletic Intramural Programs in Tehran Medical Unit. The research community was all male and female students in Tehran Medical college of whom 150 were randomly chosen. It was descriptive research study whose data were collected with a researcher-made questionnaire. To determine the factors determining the relationship between academic achievement, student satisfaction levels, gender and educational groups of subjects participated in this program, we applied x 2 tests. Extracurricular sports programs in Qom and Tehran Medical Units were highly effective (P<0.05 . There was no significant difference between gender and subjects participation in extracurricular sports activities (P=0.581 .Also, there was no significant difference between students' satisfaction and their participation in extracurricular sports programs (P=0.055. Participation in extracurricular sports programs were affected by educational groups and humanities students had participated in these activities more than other students (p=0.002.

  13. Core Hunter II: fast core subset selection based on multiple genetic diversity measures using Mixed Replica search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beukelaer Herman De

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sampling core subsets from genetic resources while maintaining as much as possible the genetic diversity of the original collection is an important but computationally complex task for gene bank managers. The Core Hunter computer program was developed as a tool to generate such subsets based on multiple genetic measures, including both distance measures and allelic diversity indices. At first we investigate the effect of minimum (instead of the default mean distance measures on the performance of Core Hunter. Secondly, we try to gain more insight into the performance of the original Core Hunter search algorithm through comparison with several other heuristics working with several realistic datasets of varying size and allelic composition. Finally, we propose a new algorithm (Mixed Replica search for Core Hunter II with the aim of improving the diversity of the constructed core sets and their corresponding generation times. Results Our results show that the introduction of minimum distance measures leads to core sets in which all accessions are sufficiently distant from each other, which was not always obtained when optimizing mean distance alone. Comparison of the original Core Hunter algorithm, Replica Exchange Monte Carlo (REMC, with simpler heuristics shows that the simpler algorithms often give very good results but with lower runtimes than REMC. However, the performance of the simpler algorithms is slightly worse than REMC under lower sampling intensities and some heuristics clearly struggle with minimum distance measures. In comparison the new advanced Mixed Replica search algorithm (MixRep, which uses heterogeneous replicas, was able to sample core sets with equal or higher diversity scores than REMC and the simpler heuristics, often using less computation time than REMC. Conclusion The REMC search algorithm used in the original Core Hunter computer program performs well, sometimes leading to slightly better results

  14. Effect of a 16-Week Yoga Program on Blood Pressure in Healthy College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Debra; Reed, Justy; Buck, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 16-week yoga program on blood pressure (BP) in healthy college students. Twenty-five students (Mage = 28.24, SD = 10.64) participated in yoga class twice per week for 16 weeks. Thirty-one students (Mage = 28.77, SD = 7.23) attended a lecture (control condition) at approximately the same time…

  15. Effect of a 16-Week Yoga Program on Blood Pressure in Healthy College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Debra; Reed, Justy; Buck, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 16-week yoga program on blood pressure (BP) in healthy college students. Twenty-five students (Mage = 28.24, SD = 10.64) participated in yoga class twice per week for 16 weeks. Thirty-one students (Mage = 28.77, SD = 7.23) attended a lecture (control condition) at approximately the same time…

  16. An Undergraduate Summer Research Program Through A University-Community College Partnership: Design and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Carol E.; Hood, Michael; Woodney, Laura

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for an undergraduate summer research program in astronomy targeted at 2-year and 4-year students and the short-term success of student participants. California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) is Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) serving 16,000 students, with no dominant ethnic or racial majority. Most (80%) CSUSB students are first-generation college students, and many of the students - both minority and “majority” - are economically disadvantaged and cannot afford to take on research projects without compensation. Approximately 60 percent of our students transfer from two year colleges, and all of the local community colleges are also officially designated as minority serving institutions. Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) is the largest single-campus community college in the state of California. It serves a student population of approximately 60,000 students (~35,000 full-time equivalent), also with no dominant ethnic or racial majority. Mt. SAC is currently 5th in the state in transfer ranking into the CSU system.In an effort to involve students in research as early as possible, we selected 2 students from each campus to participate in a summer research program. This program taught students observational techniques, data reduction and analysis skills, and then allowed them to work on more complex faculty astronomical research projects. These students were not selected based on their grades, or specific courses completed, simply based on their essays expressing their interests in astronomy. Students were only required to have already completed at least 1 physics or astronomy class and typically would be classified as freshman or sophomores. This program ran for 2 summers, before funding ran out. By the end of each summer, students were able to run the state-of-the-art campus observatory, and many chose to continue working on their research projects into the school year. To date, 3 students were selected for further summer research

  17. Nursing Education in Indian Country: Salish Kootenai College Offers a Growing Nursing Program for the Flathead Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolberry, Jacque

    1992-01-01

    Describes the nursing program at Salish Kootenai College, focusing on recruitment, retention, individual curriculum plans, remedial/refresher courses in math and science, staffing, clinical practica, student responses, and funding. (DMM)

  18. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, X.; Hawk, S.T.; Winter, S.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  19. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  20. Effectiveness of a liaison program in meeting information needs of college of pharmacy faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Sandra S; Martin, Jennifer R; Schlimgen, Joan B; Slack, Marion K; Martin, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the creation and implementation of focus groups to evaluate the effectiveness of a health sciences library's liaison program of the College of Pharmacy faculty and to better understand the faculty's information needs in order to design new and improved library services. The liaison services support the teaching and research needs of faculty and students through literature research, classroom teaching, and an extensive library collection of pharmacy literature. Focus group results demonstrated a high level of satisfaction with library liaison services and collections. Opportunities exist for expanded interaction with graduate students and greater marketing of library services to increase faculty awareness of specific library programs.

  1. Student Retention and First-Year Programs: A Comparison of Students in Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeff S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the retention rate and 9 first-year student programs at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South, a region in the southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Nine first-year programs were studied: Summer Bridge Programs, Preterm Orientation, Outdoor Adventure Orientation,…

  2. Workforce Investments: State Strategies to Preserve Higher-Cost Career Education Programs in Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulock, Nancy; Lewis, Jodi; Tan, Connie

    2013-01-01

    In today's highly-skilled economy, rewarding career pathways are available to those who acquire technical skills by enrolling in certificate and associate degree programs in a community or technical college. Such programs are often more costly to offer than liberal arts and sciences programs that prepare students to transfer to four-year…

  3. A Brief History and a Framework for Understanding Commonalities and Differences of Community College Student Success Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Deryl K.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews ways that researchers have presented variously narrow and broad groupings of special student success programs over the course of decades. Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is proposed as a way to conceptualize various kinds of community college student success programs as instances of a more general type of program.

  4. Serving Students with Significant Disabilities in Two-Year Colleges: ABLE Program, Longview Community College, Lee's Summit, MO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerty, John, Ed.; Knutsen, Caryl, Ed.

    This report is an outcome of a project designed to seek, screen, evaluate, describe, and disseminate highly effective approaches used by two-year colleges to serve students with significant disabilities. "Two-year colleges" included academic institutions, technical colleges, and vocational institutes. From a pool of 18 applicants, the…

  5. On a periodic two-component Hunter-Saxton equation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohlmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We determine the solution of the geodesic equation associated with a periodic two-component Hunter-Saxton system on a semidirect product obtained from the diffeomorphism group of the circle, modulo rigid rotations, and a space of scalar functions. In particular, we compute the time of breakdown of the geodesic flow. As a further goal, we establish a local well-posedness result for the two-component Hunter-Saxton system in the smooth category. The paper gets in line with some recent results for the generalized Hunter-Saxton equation provided by Escher, Wu and Wunsch in [J. Escher, Preprint 2010] and [H. Wu, M. Wunsch, arXiv:1009.1688v1 [math.AP

  6. NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

  7. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics pre-college outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A.; Bacon, L.; Copper, K. K.; Hansen, L. J.; Sanchez, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Many United States, school children perceive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as difficult, boring and often irrelevant subjects. The possible reasons for this problem are endlessly debated. However, the economic, social, and overall national importance of producing graduates who are technically literate and enthusiastic in their support of a rational scientific world is essential to our nation. This apparent STEM crisis should motivate the many scientific and engineering societies to develop STEM outreach programs aimed at students, parents, teachers and schools (grades K-12). The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is among those organizations that have identified the need to educate students and teachers about STEM current events and their direct effects on the United States population in a way that motivates both. The AIAA has established a pre-college outreach program that has several major elements that will be described in this paper. Elements focused on the teachers include a pre-college Educator Associate Membership program, classroom grants to support hands-on learning activities, Educator of the Year awards and recognition program and two national workshop events. The first workshop event, Passport to the Future, is held annually in conjunction with the Joint Propulsion Conference. It is intended to provide summertime training in Aerospace science education to classroom teachers, in conjunction with a national professional conference. The second workshop, Education Alley, is held in the fall in conjunction with the “Space” series of conferences. This program is aimed at direct outreach to local students in the conference host city, providing fun, interesting, and educational events that promote STEM. The AIAA also encourages and supports pre-college outreach activities sponsored by the local AIAA sections through leadership training, activity and material support.

  8. ESPRESSO: the ultimate rocky exoplanets hunter for the VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégevand, Denis; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Cabral, Alexandre; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Amate, Manuel; Pepe, Francesco; Cristiani, Stefano; Rebolo, Rafael; Santos, Nuno C.; Dekker, Hans; Abreu, Manuel; Affolter, Michael; Avila, Gerardo; Baldini, Veronica; Bristow, Paul; Broeg, Christopher; Carvas, Pedro; Cirami, Roberto; Coelho, João.; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cupani, Guido; D'Odorico, Valentina; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Delabre, Bernard; Figueira, Pedro; Fleury, Michel; Fragoso, Ana; Genolet, Ludovic; Gomes, Ricardo; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay; Hughes, Ian; Iwert, Olaf; Kerber, Florian; Landoni, Marco; Lima, Jorge; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Lovis, Christophe; Maire, Charles; Mannetta, Marco; Martins, Carlos; Moitinho, André; Molaro, Paolo; Monteiro, Manuel; Rasilla, José Luis; Riva, Marco; Santana Tschudi, Samuel; Santin, Paolo; Sosnowska, Danuta; Sousa, Sergio; Spanò, Paolo; Tenegi, Fabio; Toso, Giorgio; Vanzella, Eros; Viel, Matteo; Zapatero Osorio, Maria Rosa

    2012-09-01

    ESPRESSO, the VLT rocky exoplanets hunter, will combine the efficiency of modern echelle spectrograph with extreme radial-velocity precision. It will be installed at Paranal on ESO's VLT in order to achieve a gain of two magnitudes with respect to its predecessor HARPS, and the instrumental radial-velocity precision will be improved to reach 10 cm/s level. We have constituted a Consortium of astronomical research institutes to fund, design and build ESPRESSO on behalf of and in collaboration with ESO, the European Southern Observatory. The project has passed the preliminary design review in November 2011. The spectrograph will be installed at the so-called "Combined Coudé Laboratory" of the VLT, it will be linked to the four 8.2 meters Unit Telescopes (UT) through four optical "Coudé trains" and will be operated either with a single telescope or with up to four UTs. In exchange of the major financial and human effort the building Consortium will be awarded with guaranteed observing time (GTO), which will be invested in a common scientific program. Thanks to its characteristics and the ability of combining incoherently the light of 4 large telescopes, ESPRESSO will offer new possibilities in many fields of astronomy. Our main scientific objectives are, however, the search and characterization of rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of quiet, near-by G to M-dwarfs, and the analysis of the variability of fundamental physical constants. In this paper, we present the ambitious scientific objectives, the capabilities of ESPRESSO, the technical solutions for the system and its subsystems, enlightening the main differences between ESPRESSO and its predecessors. The project aspects of this facility are also described, from the consortium and partnership structure to the planning phases and milestones.

  9. Do state expenditures on tobacco control programs decrease use of tobacco products among college students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciecierski, Christina Czart; Chatterji, Pinka; Chaloupka, Frank J; Wechsler, Henry

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of state tobacco control program expenditures on individual-level tobacco use behaviors among young adults. Data come from the 1997, 1999 and 2001 waves of the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (CAS). Our findings indicate that a higher level of state spending on tobacco control programs in the prior year is associated with a statistically significant increase in the probability that current daily smokers report at least one attempt to quit smoking in the past year. We also find evidence that higher state expenditures on tobacco control programs in the prior year are associated with reductions in the prevalence of daily smoking and 30-day cigar use among college students. We do not find any statistically significant association between state tobacco control program expenditures and the number of attempts to quit smoking among those with at least one attempt, or on the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use in the past month.

  10. Hunter-gatherer plant use in southwest Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otaegui, Amaia Arranz; Ibañez, Juan José; Zapata, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on plant use by the last hunter-gatherers in the Levant, from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the first experiments with plant cultivation at the beginning of the Holocene. This review of Epipaleolithic and Early Neolithic plant use summarises available archaeobotanical and t...

  11. Planet Hunters 2 in the K2 Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Fischer, Debra; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Ishikawa, Sascha; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Schmitt, Joseph; Snyder, Chris; Wang, Ji; Barclay, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org) is an online citizen science project enlisting hundreds of thousands of people to search for planet transits in the publicly released Kepler data. Volunteers mark the locations of visible transits in a web interface, with multiple independent classifiers reviewing a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment. In September 2014, Planet Hunters entered a new phase. The project was relaunched with a brand new online classification interface and discussion tool built using the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) latest technology and web platform. The website has been optimized for the rapid discovery and identification of planet candidates in the light curves from K2, the two-wheeled ecliptic plane Kepler mission. We will give an overview of the new Planet Hunters classification interface and Round 2 review system in context of the K2 data. We will present the first results from the Planet Hunters 2 search of K2 Campaigns 0 and 1 including a summary of new planet candidates.

  12. Planet Hunters: Assessing the Kepler Inventory of Short Period Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwamb, Megan E; Fischer, Debra A; Giguere, Matthew J; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M; Brewer, John M; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of \\geq 2 R\\oplus planets on short period (< 15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, \\geq 4 R\\oplus Planet Hunters \\geq 85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Ke...

  13. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives.

  14. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Karla; Harper Tisha; Lans Cheryl; Bridgewater Elmo

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Results Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Pe...

  15. Sources of nonresponse to the Federal Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, R.J.; Geissler, P.H.; Hoover, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Response rates to the Federal Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey (WHQS) have declined since the 1950's, suggesting that harvest estimates may be biased. Consequently, we investigated reasons for WHQS nonresponse using surveys of waterfowl hunters in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Texas [USA]. Sampling frames were constructed using lists of buyers of state hunting licenses or state duck stamps. We mailed questionnaires to 16,452 randomly selected hunters, with 2 follow-up mailings at 3-week intervals. Questionnaires were completed by 8,812 respondents, and a further 587 interviews were conducted by telephone. Post offices accounted for between 53.7% (Minn.) and 92.8% (N.J.) of federal waterfowl duck stamp sales, and stores accounted for most other sales. Of hunters who bought a federal waterfowl stamp from sample post offices, between 16.7% (Minn.) and 40.0% (Ark.) reported receiving a WHQS contact card. Of those receiving contact cards, between 30.0% (N.J.) and 64.3% (La. and Tex.) reported returning them. Because survey coverage of the target population is poor, we recommend that a new sampling frame be developed for the WHQS.

  16. Hot subduction: Magmatism along the Hunter Ridge, SW Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, A.J.; Verbeeten, A.; Danyushevsky, L.V.; Sigurdsson, I.A. [SRC for Ore Deposit Research, Hobart, TAS (Australia); Maillet, P. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Geology; Maillet, P. [ORSTOM Centre de Brest, France, (France); Monzier, M. [ORSTOM Centre, Ecuador, (Ecuador)

    1997-12-31

    The Hunter `fracture zone` is generally regarded as a transform plate boundary linking the oppositely dipping Tongan and Vanuatu subduction systems. Dredging along the Hunter Ridge and sampling of its northernmost extent, exposed as the island of Kadavu in Fiji, has yielded a diversity of magmatic suites, including arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites, high-Mg lavas with some affinities to boninites and some affinities to adakites, and true adakitic lavas associated with remarkable low-Fe, high-Na basalts with 8-16 ppm Nb (herein high-Nb basalts). Lavas which show clear evidence of slab melt involvement in their petrogenesis occur at either end of the Hunter Ridge, whereas the arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites appear to be restricted to the south central part of the ridge. Mineralogical and whole rock geochemical data for each of these suites are summarized, and a tectono-magmatic model for their genesis and distribution is suggested. Trace element features and radiogenic isotope data for the Hunter Ridge lavas indicate compositions analogue to Pacific MORB-like mantle. Extended abstract. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justine Shu- Ting Kao

    2017-01-01

    In Nabokov’s Lolita, Humbert Humbert’s The Enchanted Hunters, as a quest for love, aims to reconstruct a felicitous world or integrate various fragmentary details into an organic unity that revives a lost love, experiencing it on the...

  18. Camp stability predicts patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Dyble, Mark; Thompson, James; Major, Katie; Page, Abigail E; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Mace, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Humans regularly cooperate with non-kin, which has been theorized to require reciprocity between repeatedly interacting and trusting individuals. However, the role of repeated interactions has not previously been demonstrated in explaining real-world patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation. Here we explore cooperation among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using data from both actual resource transfers and two experimental games across multiple camps. Patterns of cooperation vary greatly between camps and depend on socio-ecological context. Stable camps (with fewer changes in membership over time) were associated with greater reciprocal sharing, indicating that an increased likelihood of future interactions facilitates reciprocity. This is the first study reporting an association between reciprocal cooperation and hunter-gatherer band stability. Under conditions of low camp stability individuals still acquire resources from others, but do so via demand sharing (taking from others), rather than based on reciprocal considerations. Hunter-gatherer cooperation may either be characterized as reciprocity or demand sharing depending on socio-ecological conditions.

  19. Librarians as Hunter-Gatherers: Lessons Learned from an Excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by the pressing need for electronic resource usage statistics, librarians are finding themselves being thrust into the role of hunter-gatherer. This article discusses the work done at University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to provide usage statistics for all its paid subscriptions for a 3-year period. The…

  20. Hunter syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are about thirteen different clinical syndromes of. MPS.2 We report a case of Hunter syndrome, as far as we know this is the .... egaly and cardiovascular complications after the transplant in children. ' .... Bone marrow trans- plantation in ...

  1. Science for Kids Outreach Programs: College Students Teaching Science to Elementary Students and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Park, Lee Y.; Kaplan, Lawrence J.

    1999-11-01

    For a number of years we have been organizing and teaching a special outreach course during our Winter Study Program (the month of January). College students plan, develop, and present hands-on workshops to fourth-grade students and their parents, with faculty providing logistical support and pedagogical advice. Recent topics have been "Forensic Science", "Electricity and Magnetism", "Chemistry and Cooking", "Waves", "Natural Disasters", "Liquids", "Pressure", "Color and Light", "Momentum and Inertia", "Illusions", and "The Senses". The two-hour workshops, held one weekend on campus, emphasize hands-on experiments involving both the kids and the parents. Handouts for each workshop give instructions for doing several experiments at home. This program has been a great success for all involved: the college students gain insight into an aspect of science and what it takes to develop and teach that topic, the elementary school students participate in an exciting and challenging scientific exploration, and the parents have a chance to learn some science while spending time working on projects with their children. We provide an overview of the pedagogical aims of our current approach and a sense of the time-line for putting together such a program in a month.

  2. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric: a phase 1 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Mehul V; Dillon, Peter W; Bruny, Jennifer L; Ko, Clifford Y; Hall, Bruce L; Moss, R Lawrence; Oldham, Keith T; Richards, Karen E; Vinocur, Charles D; Ziegler, Moritz M

    2011-01-01

    There has been a long-standing desire to implement a multi-institutional, multispecialty program to address surgical quality improvement for children. This report documents results of the initial phase of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric. From October 2008 to December 2009, patients from 4 pediatric referral centers were sampled using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program methodology tailored to children. A total of 7,287 patients were sampled, representing general/thoracic surgery (n = 2,237; 30.7%), otolaryngology (n = 1,687; 23.2%), orthopaedic surgery (n = 1,367; 18.8%), urology (n = 893; 12.3%), neurosurgery (n = 697; 9.6%), and plastic surgery (n = 406; 5.6%). Overall mortality rate detected was 0.3% and 287 (3.9%) patients had postoperative occurrences. After accounting for demographic, preoperative, and operative factors, occurrences were 4 times more likely in those undergoing inpatient versus outpatient procedures (odds ratio [OR] = 4.71; 95% CI, 3.01-7.35). Other factors associated with higher likelihood of postoperative occurrences included nutritional/immune history, such as preoperative weight loss/chronic steroid use (OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.03-2.15), as well as physiologic compromise, such as sepsis/inotrope use before surgery (OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-1.95). Operative factors associated with occurrences included multiple procedures under the same anesthetic (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.21-2.06) and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification category 4/5 versus 1 (OR = 5.74; 95% CI, 2.94-11.24). Specialty complication rates varied from 1.5% for otolaryngology to 9.0% for neurosurgery (p Pediatric has the potential to identify outcomes of children's surgical care that can be targeted for quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of podcasting: use in undergraduate and graduate programs in a college of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlairet, Maura C

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this project was to create podcasts of classroom lectures from select courses across programs in a college of nursing and to explore associated outcomes using a Web-based course evaluation framework. Seventy undergraduate, second-degree, and graduate nursing students participated. Findings suggest that nurse educators can leverage students' positive attitudes and technologic skills with minimal investment of dollars and no impact on class attendance, building high-quality podcasts that align with students' unique learning environments and goals. Faculty should consider specific student attributes and associated needs when developing podcasts and in providing guidance and support for students who use these learning tools.

  4. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  5. Financial Aid and Persistence in Community Colleges: Assessing the Effectiveness of Federal and State Financial Aid Programs in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.; Malcolm, Zaria

    2009-01-01

    Using a longitudinal, state-wide dataset, this study assessed the effect of financial aid on the persistence of full-time students in associate's degree programs at the Oklahoma community colleges. Three financial-aid sources were examined: the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Pell grants, and Stafford loans. Results indicate that…

  6. Quality Assurance in Higher Education: An Outline Adaptable to Small Colleges Offerings On and Off-Campus Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkrauss, Philip J.; Kranz, M. Rosaria

    A Quality Assurance Program (QAP) developed at the College of St. Francis is presented that is based on an open systems approach. The model allows an institution to continually monitor, evaluate, and, when necessary, modify its academic programs, graduates or undergraduate, traditionally or non-traditionally delivered, to assure quality. Part I…

  7. An Evaluation of La Salle College's Master of Arts Program in Bilingual/Bicultural Studies (Spanish), 1982-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenberg, Robert M.

    La Salle College's three-track Bilingual/Bicultural Master of Arts Program is described and its first operational year (September 1982 - August 1983) is evaluated. Track I served teachers of English as a second language, Spanish as a first language, and other classes within bilingual education programs. Track II served students from other fields…

  8. Helping Community College Students Cope with Financial Emergencies: Lessons from the Dreamkeepers and Angel Fund Emergency Financial Aid Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckeler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lumina Foundation for Education created the Dreamkeepers and Angel Fund Emergency Financial Aid Programs to assist community college students who are at risk of dropping out because of unexpected financial crises. Both programs are multiyear pilot projects that began in 2005 and are administered by Scholarship America and the American Indian…

  9. From Nothing to Something: The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Mentoring Program in a Health Sciences College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I report the development of a mentoring program in a College of Health Sciences comprised of schools of nursing, pharmacy, and health professions (which include physical therapy, speech pathology and audiology, applied psychology, and physician assistant programs) at a large private university. Although university-wide mentoring…

  10. Effectiveness of Selected Advanced Placement Programs on the Academic Performance and College Readiness of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Traschell S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected Advanced Placement (AP) programs on the academic performance and college readiness of high school students. Specifically, the researcher was concerned with ascertaining the effectiveness of social science, math, science, English, music/art and language AP programs on the…

  11. High School Seniors' Career Interests, Educational Plans, and Perceptions of Programs and Services Available at Walla Walla Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanAusdle, Steven L.; And Others

    In order to develop a marketing program for potential students and assist in institutional planning, a study was conducted at Walla Walla Community College (WWCC), Washington, to obtain information from high school seniors regarding their career interests, educational plans, and perceptions of WWCC's programs and services. Questionnaires were…

  12. Their Portfolios, Our Role: Examining a Community College Teacher Education Digital Portfolio Program from the Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisir, Jean Y.; Hachey, Alyse C.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    In the of Fall 2006, our large, urban community college implemented digital portfolio development for all of the preservice early childhood educators registered in the infant-toddler and preschool-early elementary programs. Three years after implementation of the program, we conducted survey research to assess our students' perceptions of their…

  13. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  14. My Student Body: Effects of an Internet-Based Prevention Program to Decrease Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of My Student Body (MSB)-Nutrition, an Internet-based obesity prevention program for college students. Participants: Three hundred and twenty ethnically diverse undergraduate students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: MSB-Nutrition program, an on-campus weight management course, and a comparison group.…

  15. Ruth Flockart and Dr Wood: A Crucial Relationship in the Development of Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College Music Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that particular working relationships within school music programs can have a significant affect on the program's development and progress. To explore this notion the research focussed on the working relationship of a music teacher at Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College (MLC), Ruth Flockart (1891-1985) and the…

  16. My Student Body: Effects of an Internet-Based Prevention Program to Decrease Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of My Student Body (MSB)-Nutrition, an Internet-based obesity prevention program for college students. Participants: Three hundred and twenty ethnically diverse undergraduate students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: MSB-Nutrition program, an on-campus weight management course, and a comparison group.…

  17. Predictors of Prevention Failure in College Students Participating in Two Indicated Depression Prevention Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Blanco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1 for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2 for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3 for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force.

  18. Predictors of prevention failure in college students participating in two indicated depression prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L; Otero, Patricia

    2014-04-04

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1) for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2) for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3) for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force.

  19. O‘ahu Forest - Hunter Outreach and Volunteer Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Feral pigs are a severe threat to the OFNWR. Pig rooting and wallowing damages sensitive stream habitats, destroys rare species, and significantly alters native...

  20. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

    2011-06-01

    To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed.

  1. A Study of Persistence in the Northeast State Community College Health-Related Programs of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Allana R.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify factors that were positively associated with persistence to graduation by students who were admitted to Health-Related Programs leading to the degree associate of applied science at Northeast State Community College. The criterion variable in this study was persistence, which was categorized into two groups the persister group (program completers) and the nonpersister (program noncompleters) group. The predictor variables included gender, ethnic origin, first- (or nonfirst-) generation-student status, age, specific major program of study, number of remedial and/or developmental courses taken, grades in selected courses (human anatomy and physiology I and II, microbiology, probability and statistics, composition I, clinical I, clinical II), and number of mathematics and science credit hours earned prior to program admission. The data for this ex post facto nonexperimental design were located in Northeast State's student records database, Banner Information System. The subjects of the study were students who had been admitted into Health-Related Programs of study at a 2-year public community college between the years of 1999 and 2008. The population size was 761. Health-Related Programs of study included Dental Assisting, Cardiovascular Technology, Emergency Medical Technology -- Paramedic, Medical Laboratory Technology, Nursing, and Surgical Technology. A combination of descriptive and inferential statistics was used in the analysis of the data. Descriptive statistics included measures of central tendency, standard deviations, and percentages, as appropriate. Independent samples t-tests were used to determine if the mean of a variable on one group of subjects was different from the mean of the same variable with a different group of subjects. It was found that gender, ethnic origin, first-generation status, and age were not significantly associated with persistence to graduation. However, findings did reveal a statistically

  2. Reducing cyberbullying: A theory of reasoned action-based video prevention program for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, Ashley N; Kelley, Michelle L; Pearson, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of cyberbullying prevention/intervention programs. The goals of the present study were to develop a Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)-based video program to increase cyberbullying knowledge (1) and empathy toward cyberbullying victims (2), reduce favorable attitudes toward cyberbullying (3), decrease positive injunctive (4) and descriptive norms about cyberbullying (5), and reduce cyberbullying intentions (6) and cyberbullying behavior (7). One hundred sixty-seven college students were randomly assigned to an online video cyberbullying prevention program or an assessment-only control group. Immediately following the program, attitudes and injunctive norms for all four types of cyberbullying behavior (i.e., unwanted contact, malice, deception, and public humiliation), descriptive norms for malice and public humiliation, empathy toward victims of malice and deception, and cyberbullying knowledge significantly improved in the experimental group. At one-month follow-up, malice and public humiliation behavior, favorable attitudes toward unwanted contact, deception, and public humiliation, and injunctive norms for public humiliation were significantly lower in the experimental than the control group. Cyberbullying knowledge was significantly higher in the experimental than the control group. These findings demonstrate a brief cyberbullying video is capable of improving, at one-month follow-up, cyberbullying knowledge, cyberbullying perpetration behavior, and TRA constructs known to predict cyberbullying perpetration. Considering the low cost and ease with which a video-based prevention/intervention program can be delivered, this type of approach should be considered to reduce cyberbullying.

  3. Faculty and Administrator's Perceptions of the Utilization of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) Program Review and Planning Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    California community colleges have been inconsistent in their efforts to meet the program review and planning accreditation standards established by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC). To assist colleges in their effort to meet the accreditation standards and to improve educational quality, the ACCJC developed the…

  4. Summer Melt" and the Entering First-Year College Student: Insights from the College Match Pilot Program. College Match Issue Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MDRC, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Many students fail to enroll in college even after they have made a formal commitment to attend. Research has shown that nationally, between 10 percent and 40 percent of high school graduates who intend to go to college don't enroll the following fall. Among low-income students, these "summer melt" rates are even higher. The College…

  5. A bivalent scale for measuring crowding among deer hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Chase, Loren

    2014-01-01

    One factor that may influence satisfaction in outdoor recreation is crowding, which historically has been defined as a negative evaluation of the density of other participants. While this definition is suitable for most scenarios, there are circumstances where encounters with others in the area are evaluated positively and thus contribute to the satisfaction of the participant. To adequately describe this phenomenon we suggest a more inclusive measurement of crowding that allows for both positive and negative evaluations of participant density to more accurately explore the relationship between crowding and satisfaction. We identified a sub-group of deer hunters who negatively evaluated the low density of other hunters, which reduced their satisfaction with their overall hunting experience. The methodology for measuring crowding in recreation research may have an important effect in identifying the relationship crowding has with other relevant variables as well as management implications.

  6. HiggsHunters - a citizen science project for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the launch of HiggsHunters.org in November 2014, citizen science volunteers have classified more than a million points of interest in images from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Volunteers have been looking for displaced vertices and unusual features in images recorded during LHC Run-1. We discuss the design of the project, its impact on the public, and the surprising results of how the human volunteers performed relative to the computer algorithms in identifying displaced secondary vertices.

  7. Sacrificing Steve: How I Killed the Crocodile Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Carman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Bob Hodge and Vijay Mishra argue that the complex issues of illegitimacy at the core of Australian identity are repressed through a continual process of cyclical silencing, where traces of a shameful past are exorcised by a focus on images of a mythologised ‘legend’, embodied in characters such as 'The Man from Snowy River'. This article explores such a 'schizophrenic' cycle in relation to the life, death and resurrection of Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin.

  8. HiggsHunters - a citizen science project for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of HiggsHunters.org in November 2014, citizen science volunteers have classified more than a million points of interest in images from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Volunteers have been looking for displaced vertices and unusual features in images recorded during LHC Run-1. We discuss the design of the project, its impact on the public, and the surprising results of how the human volunteers performed relative to the computer algorithms in identifying displaced secondary vertices.

  9. Sacrificing Steve : how I killed the Crocodile Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carman, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bob Hodge and Vijay Mishra argue that the complex issues of illegitimacy at the core of Australian identity are repressed through a continual process of cyclical silencing, where traces of a shameful past are exorcised by a focus on images of a mythologised ‘legend’, embodied in characters such as 'The Man from Snowy River'. This article explores such a 'schizophrenic' cycle in relation to the life, death and resurrection of Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin.

  10. Hunter Fleming与Access合作开发oligotropin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆义(摘)

    2005-01-01

    英国Hunter Fleming公司已与美国的药物输送公司Access Pharmaceuticals签署合作协议,采用Access公司的维生素B12口服药物输送技术,开发治疗亨廷顿氏阿尔茨海默氏病的口服制剂oligotropin(HF0420)。

  11. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion.

  12. Solar neutrino detectors as sterile neutrino hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Marco; Borexino-SOX Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cloué, O.; Cribier, M.; D’Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gschwender, M.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Ortica, F.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Reinert, Y.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssière, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The large size and the very low radioactive background of solar neutrino detectors such as Borexino at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy offer a unique opportunity to probe the existence of neutrino oscillations into new sterile components by means of carefully designed and well calibrated anti-neutrino and neutrino artificial sources. In this paper we briefly summarise the key elements of the SOX experiment, a program for the search of sterile neutrinos (and other short distance effects) by means of a 144Ce-144Pr anti-neutrino source and, possibly in the medium term future, with a 51Cr neutrino source.

  13. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 2): Strategies for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity-defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Evolutionary history of hunter-gatherer marriage practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The universality of marriage in human societies around the world suggests a deep evolutionary history of institutionalized pair-bonding that stems back at least to early modern humans. However, marriage practices vary considerably from culture to culture, ranging from strict prescriptions and arranged marriages in some societies to mostly unregulated courtship in others, presence to absence of brideservice and brideprice, and polyandrous to polygynous unions. The ancestral state of early human marriage is not well known given the lack of conclusive archaeological evidence. METHODOLOGY: Comparative phylogenetic analyses using data from contemporary hunter-gatherers around the world may allow for the reconstruction of ancestral human cultural traits. We attempt to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gatherer phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. RESULTS: Arranged marriages are inferred to go back at least to first modern human migrations out of Africa. Reconstructions are equivocal on whether or not earlier human marriages were arranged because several African hunter-gatherers have courtship marriages. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that marriages in early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny (low reproductive skew and reciprocal exchanges between the families of marital partners (i.e., brideservice or brideprice. DISCUSSION: Phylogenetic results suggest a deep history of regulated exchange of mates and resources among lineages that enhanced the complexity of human meta-group social structure with coalitions and alliances spanning across multiple residential communities.

  15. PhosphoHunter: An Efficient Software Tool for Phosphopeptide Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tiengo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation is a protein posttranslational modification. It is responsible of the activation/inactivation of disease-related pathways, thanks to its role of “molecular switch.” The study of phosphorylated proteins becomes a key point for the proteomic analyses focused on the identification of diagnostic/therapeutic targets. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS is the most widely used analytical approach. Although unmodified peptides are automatically identified by consolidated algorithms, phosphopeptides still require automated tools to avoid time-consuming manual interpretation. To improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency, a novel procedure was developed and implemented in a Perl/C tool called PhosphoHunter, here proposed and evaluated. It includes a preliminary heuristic step for filtering out the MS/MS spectra produced by nonphosphorylated peptides before sequence identification. A method to assess the statistical significance of identified phosphopeptides was also formulated. PhosphoHunter performance was tested on a dataset of 1500 MS/MS spectra and it was compared with two other tools: Mascot and Inspect. Comparisons demonstrated that a strong point of PhosphoHunter is sensitivity, suggesting that it is able to identify real phosphopeptides with superior performance. Performance indexes depend on a single parameter (intensity threshold that users can tune according to the study aim. All the three tools localized >90% of phosphosites.

  16. The prevalence and characteristics of dual PharmD/MPH programs offered at US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortney, Justine S; Seed, Sheila; Borja-Hart, Nancy; Young, Veronica; Woodard, Lisa J; Nobles-Knight, Dolores; Scott, David M; Nash, James D

    2013-08-12

    To assess the prevalence and characteristics of curriculum in dual doctor of pharmacy (PharmD)/master of public health (MPH) degree programs offered by US pharmacy programs. An 18-item survey instrument was developed and distributed online to faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Of the 110 colleges and schools that responded, 23 (21%) offered a PharmD/MPH degree. Common characteristics of these 23 programs included current PharmD program structure (3 + 1 year), early curricular recruitment, small enrollment, and interdisciplinary coursework occurring online and in the classroom. The impact of the dual degree on the curriculum and longevity of the dual-degree programs varied. About 55% of responding programs without a formal dual-degree program reported that additional public health training was available. Twenty-one percent of colleges and schools of pharmacy offer a combined PharmD/MPH dual degree. Most programs required an additional 1 or 2 semesters to complete both degrees.

  17. College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two…

  18. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  19. Does lateral transmission obscure inheritance in hunter-gatherer languages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowern, Claire; Epps, Patience; Gray, Russell; Hill, Jane; Hunley, Keith; McConvell, Patrick; Zentz, Jason

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance) status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56), despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of borrowing were

  20. Does lateral transmission obscure inheritance in hunter-gatherer languages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bowern

    Full Text Available In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56, despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of

  1. The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Shu- Ting Kao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Nabokov’s Lolita, Humbert Humbert’s The Enchanted Hunters, as a quest for love, aims to reconstruct a felicitous world or integrate various fragmentary details into an organic unity that revives a lost love, experiencing it on the basis of irony, and revealing a simulation of the desire, violence, and despondency which have been expressed in myths of nymphs and Persephone. The protagonist never reaches this unity, but his narrative of erotic and romantic love reveals him as a pathetic addict engaged in mechanical reproduction related to the phenomena of desire, seduction, violence, and sex. His The Enchanted Hunters does not simulate what he expects of his childhood love with Annabel; rather, it simulates the erotic imagination suggested in Mary D. Sheriff’s term “nymphomania,” in which artists fall degenerately to a model of tragedy. Keywords: simulation, nymph, nymphomania, The Enchanted Hunters The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita refers to the name of a hotel and the title of a play. This seeming coincidence is actually not coincidental: Nabokov weaves a story concerning a pedophile’s seduction of a prepubescent child into a “story within a story,” in which the girl is imagined as a seducer who bewitches a number of hunters. Just as the girl in the play is a figment of a poet’s imagination, so Lolita in the novel Lolita is an imaginary production of a middle-aged pedophile. Yet Lolita is not so much a novel revealing guilt and mental disorder, but a mélange of art and reality, or more specifically, it is about a coinage in which the author fabricates art and myth in real life. Parallel to the protagonist who simulates what he expects of his childhood love, Annabel, in the form of the nymphet, Lolita, Nabokov replicates the beauty of butterflies in the pursuit of beauty and immortality, and develops the world of art with a pathetic tone whereby we gradually perceive a simulation of the desire, violence, and

  2. Planet Hunters, Undergraduate Research, and Detection of Extrasolar Planet Kepler-818 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David; Crannell, Graham; Duncan, James; Hays, Aryn; Hendrix, Landon

    2017-01-01

    Detection of extrasolar planets provides an excellent research opportunity for undergraduate students. In Spring 2012, we searched for transiting extrasolar planets using Kepler spacecraft data in our Research Experience in Physics course at Austin College. Offered during the regular academic year, these Research Experience courses engage students in the scientific process, including proposal writing, paper submission, peer review, and oral presentations. Since 2004, over 190 undergraduate students have conducted authentic scientific research through Research Experience courses at Austin College.Zooniverse’s citizen science Planet Hunters web site offered an efficient method for rapid analysis of Kepler data. Light curves from over 5000 stars were analyzed, of which 2.3% showed planetary candidates already tagged by the Kepler team. Another 1.5% of the light curves suggested eclipsing binary stars, and 1.6% of the light curves had simulated planets for training purposes.One of the stars with possible planetary transits had not yet been listed as a planetary candidate. We reported possible transits for Kepler ID 4282872, which later was promoted to planetary candidate KOI-1325 in 2012 and confirmed to host extrasolar planet Kepler-818 b in 2016 (Morton et al. 2016). Kepler-818 b is a “hot Neptune” with period 10.04 days, flux decrease during transit ~0.4%, planetary radius 4.69 Earth radii, and semi-major axis 0.089 au.

  3. Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY) Solar and Atmospheric Research and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantale Damas, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Queensborough Community College (QCC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), a Hispanic and minority-serving institution, is the recipient of a 2-year NSF EAGER (Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research) grant to design and implement a high-impact practice integrated research and education program in solar, geospace and atmospheric physics. Proposed is a year-long research experience with two components: 1) during the academic year, students are enrolled in a course-based introductory research (CURE) where they conduct research on real-world problems; and 2) during the summer, students are placed in research internships at partner institutions. Specific objectives include: 1) provide QCC students with research opportunities in solar and atmospheric physics as early as their first year; 2) develop educational materials in solar and atmospheric physics; 3) increase the number of students, especially underrepresented minorities, that transfer to 4-year STEM programs. A modular, interdisciplinary concept approach is used to integrate educational materials into the research experience. The project also uses evidence-based best practices (i.e., Research experience, Mentoring, Outreach, Recruitment, Enrichment and Partnership with 4-year colleges and institutions) that have proven successful at increasing the retention, transfer and graduation rates of community college students. Through a strong collaboration with CUNY’s 4-year colleges (Medgar Evers College and the City College of New York’s NOAA CREST program); Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado, Boulder; and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the project trains and retains underrepresented community college students in geosciences-related STEM fields. Preliminary results will be presented at this meeting.*This project is supported by the National Science Foundation Geosciences Directorate under NSF Award

  4. GUIDELINES FOR HOSPITALITY EDUCATION IN JUNIOR COLLEGES, A MANUAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS IN THE HOTEL-MOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL INDUSTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALMARODE, RICHARD L.

    THIS REPORT DISCUSSES JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAMS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS AND INDUSTRY. THE STUDENTS RECEIVE BOTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING, WHILE INDUSTRY RECEIVES COMPETENT EMPLOYEES. BEFORE DEVELOPING THIS OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM, THE COLLEGE SHOULD SURVEY LOCAL INDUSTRY NEEDS, OPPORTUNITIES FOR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING, POSSIBILITIES OF PART-TIME WORK…

  5. Group Investigation in a College English Program at a Chinese University:A Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hao; CAI Ning; QIU Hu; PAN Yi; LIU Zi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the application and the effect of Group Investigation (GI) in the College English Program in a Chinese University. A qualitative case study method was used to understand the GI system used by Chinese instructors as well as the achievements acquired and challenges met by the participants. Three instructors and fifteen second-year-undergraduates tak⁃ing a course titled Sources of European Culture participated. Interviews, observations, and documents were used to collect the da⁃ta. Data analysis showed Chinese instructors applied a GI technique similar to that discussed by Johnson and Johnson ( 1999);how⁃ever, GI in the Chinese context demanded more effort from the teacher for designing tasks and provided help in modeling uses of English and in preparing visual, especially PowerPoint, presentations. Although participants used their mother tongue at some stages, their autonomy over English learning was activated, and horizons in the course content were broadened.

  6. Topics in nuclear and radiochemistry for college curricula and high school science programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The concern with the current status and trends of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education in academic institutions was addressed in a recent workshop. The 1988 workshop considered the important contributions that scientist with nuclear and radiochemistry backgrounds have made and are continuing to make to other sciences and to various applied fields. Among the areas discussed were environmental studies, life sciences, materials science, separation technology, hot atom chemistry, cosmochemistry, and the rapidly growing field of nuclear medicine. It is intent of the organizer and participants of this symposium entitled Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for College Curricula and High School Science Program'' to provide lecture material on topics related to nuclear and radiochemistry to educators. It is our hope that teachers, who may or may not be familiar with the field, will find this collections of articles useful and incorporate some of them into their lectures.

  7. Systematic review of articles describing experience and supports of individuals with autism enrolled in college and university programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbar, Nicholas W; Smith, Isaac; Reichow, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The increase in the number of higher-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is likely to lead to an increased interest in postsecondary opportunities including degree-granting college and university programs. To provide an understanding of the current evidence-base for supporting individuals with ASD in higher education, this article reports the results of a systematic review of the literature concerning college students with ASD. Overall, 20 articles describing 69 individuals met the inclusion criteria. This small number of articles and participants indicates the scarcity of research on this topic and only two of these studies were experimental in nature. These studies described a video-self modeling intervention and a counseling intervention respectively. Eighteen "case studies" were also present in the literature that described difficulties ranging from anxiety to housing concerns. This review deliniates the limitation of our understanding of effective college programming for individuals with ASD.

  8. The ecological and evolutionary energetics of hunter-gatherer residential mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Rupley, Eric; Youn, Hyejin; West, Geoffrey B

    2016-01-01

    Residential mobility is deeply entangled with all aspects of hunter-gatherer life ways, and is therefore an issue of central importance in hunter-gatherer studies. Hunter-gatherers vary widely in annual rates of residential mobility, and understanding the sources of this variation has long been of interest to anthropologists and archaeologists. Since mobility is, to a large extent, driven by the need for a continuous supply of food, a natural framework for addressing this question is provided by the metabolic theory of ecology. This provides a powerful framework for formulating formal testable hypotheses concerning evolutionary and ecological constraints on the scale and variation of hunter-gatherer residential mobility. We evaluate these predictions using extant data and show strong support for the hypotheses. We show that the overall scale of hunter-gatherer residential mobility is predicted by average human body size, and the limited capacity of mobile hunter-gatherers to store energy internally. We then s...

  9. Admissions Testing at Career College and Trade School Training Programs. Test Score Guidelines, Norms, and Student Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlic, Charles F.; And Others

    This report provides a method for determining minimum score by vocational program based on the use of the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam (SLE). The SLE has been demonstrated to be a highly accurate and reliable measure of adult cognitive ability. It is currently in use as an admissions test at many career colleges and trade schools. The SLE test…

  10. Ready for College: Assessing the Influence of Student Engagement on Student Academic Motivation in a First-Year Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Keyana Chamere

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Summer Academy (VTSA) Program, developed by through a collaborative partnership between faculty, administrators and staff concerned by attrition among first year students, was introduced in summer 2012 as a campus initiative to assist first-year college students transition and acclimate to the academic and social systems of the…

  11. Systematic Review of Articles Describing Experience and Supports of Individuals with Autism Enrolled in College and University Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Smith, Isaac; Reichow, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the number of higher-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is likely to lead to an increased interest in postsecondary opportunities including degree-granting college and university programs. To provide an understanding of the current evidence-base for supporting individuals with ASD in higher education, this…

  12. A Case Study of Prior Knowledge, Learning Approach and Conceptual Change in an Introductory College Chemistry Tutorial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Per Christian; Hewson, Peter W.

    This paper presents a case study involving a small group of students enrolled in a tutorial program learning introductory college chemistry. The underlying theoretical framework of this investigation was a constructivist view of learning, but more specifically it was based on Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning. The findings of this…

  13. The Employers II: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Jones, Robert F.

    As part of a student follow-up system, a survey was conducted of employers of 1973-74 career program graduates of Montgomery College (MC). The survey was divided into three major areas: the value of an associate degree in the working world, an evaluation of the job preparation given to MC graduates, and suggestions for improvements in individual…

  14. The Employers III: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    As part of a student follow-up system, a survey was conducted of employers of 1975 career program graduates of Montgomery Community College (MCC). The survey was designed to elicit responses in three major areas: the value of an associate degree in the working world, an evaluation of job preparation given to MCC graduates, and suggestions for…

  15. Cope and Grow: A Grounded Theory Approach to Early College Entrants' Lived Experiences and Changes in a STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, David Yun; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying; Zhou, Yehan

    2015-01-01

    In this grounded theory qualitative study, we interviewed 34 graduates from one cohort of 51 students from a prestigious early college entrance program in China. Based on the interview data, we identified distinct convergent and divergent patterns of lived experiences and changes. We found several dominant themes, including peers' mutual…

  16. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, X.; Hawk, S.T.; Winter, S.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward lesbian

  17. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward lesbian

  18. Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the English Program Taught at the College of Technological Studies in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaihani, Hussein A.; Shuqair, Khaled M.; Alotaibi, Abdullah M.; Alrabah, Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at examining the Students' perceptions of the effectiveness of the English program implemented in the College of Technological Studies in Kuwait. A sample of 242 students was randomly selected from the population. The students were asked to respond to a 21-statement questionnaire designed to obtain information about how they…

  19. George W. Wingate High School, Bilingual Demonstration College Preparatory Program. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostrom, Barbara R.; Sica, Michael

    The Bilingual Demonstration College Preparatory Program, in its second year of funding, provided English as a second language (ESL) and native language instruction, in addition to bilingual instruction in mathematics, social studies, and science, to 120 Spanish-speaking students in grades 9-12 at George W. Wingate High School (Brooklyn, New York).…

  20. The Impact of the College Assistance Migrant Program on Migrant Student Academic Achievement in the California State University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian D.

    2012-01-01

    The 7-year longitudinal study examined the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) impact on migrant student achievement in the California State University system. Participants included migrant students, Latinos, and general student populations from 2002-2009. The analysis of variance and chi-square test of independence were used to explore…

  1. The Impact of the College Assistance Migrant Program on Migrant Student Achievement in the California State University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian Dee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the 7-year longitudinal study was to examine the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP), a student services intervention, to determine its impact on migrant student achievement in the California State University (CSU) system. Participants included 336 migrant students who were enrolled as first-time, full-time freshmen in fall…

  2. Ready for College: Assessing the Influence of Student Engagement on Student Academic Motivation in a First-Year Experience Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Keyana Chamere

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Summer Academy (VTSA) Program, developed by through a collaborative partnership between faculty, administrators and staff concerned by attrition among-first year students, was introduced in summer 2012 as a campus initiative to assist first-year college students transition and acclimate to the academic and social systems of the campus environment. VTSA is a six-week intensive residential summer-bridge program that provides academic preparation, highly-individualized advising...

  3. Maximum likelihood methods for investigating reporting rates of rings on hunter-shot birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, M.J.; Morgan, B.J.T.; North, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that hunters do not report 100% of the rings that they find on shot birds. Reward studies can be used to estimate what this reporting rate is, by comparison of recoveries of rings offering a monetary reward, to ordinary rings. A reward study of American Black Ducks (Anas rubripes) is used to illustrate the design, and to motivate the development of statistical models for estimation and for testing hypotheses of temporal and geographic variation in reporting rates. The method involves indexing the data (recoveries) and parameters (reporting, harvest, and solicitation rates) by geographic and temporal strata. Estimates are obtained under unconstrained (e.g., allowing temporal variability in reporting rates) and constrained (e.g., constant reporting rates) models, and hypotheses are tested by likelihood ratio. A FORTRAN program, available from the author, is used to perform the computations.

  4. Border to Beltway: A Formative Field Exchange Program between Two Community Colleges for Non-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, J. I.; Bentley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Community College students account for over 40% of all undergraduates in the US as well as the majority of minority students attending undergraduate courses. With issues in the geosciences such as; being the least diverse of all major STEM fields, an increasing number of retiring geoscientists, and a projected geoscience job growth not matching the number of geoscience graduates, the geoscience community needs to look at community colleges as a solution to these issues. A key factor for students entering and excelling in the geoscience is the opportunity for formative undergraduate field experiences. Formative field experiences go beyond one-day field excursions by incorporating field projects, interactive learning, and community building between participants in regions students are unfamiliar with. Unfortunately, these types of formative experiences often require logistics and resources that are not available or known to community college faculty. In order to build a framework for implementing formative field experiences by community colleges a two-week "field exchange" between two community colleges with different geological, social, and cultural settings was conducted. Supported with a supplemental grant from NSF, the "Border to Beltway" program provided 11 students from El Paso Community College and another 13 from Northern Virginia Community College with two one-week regional geology field trips: First, to West Texas in March 2014, and second, to the mid-Atlantic region in May 2014. Students were selected based on academic standing, non-traditional (minority, female, over 35, veteran) status, and interest in geology. Qualitative data collected from participants regarding the implementation of the field exchange include; student perception of geology before and after exchange, challenges students faced in the field or traveling for the first time, quantity and quality of projects given, and working with others from different backgrounds. Data regarding planning

  5. The Effects of Performance Budgeting and Funding Programs on Graduation Rate in Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-cheol Shinn

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine whether states with performance budgeting and funding (PBF programs had improved institutional performance of higher education over the five years (1997 through 2001 considered in this study. First Time in College (FTIC graduation rate was used as the measure of institutional performance. In this study, the unit of analysis is institution level and the study population is all public four-or-more-year institutions in the United States. To test PBF program effectiveness, Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM growth analysis was applied. According to the HLM analysis, the growth of graduation rates in states with PBF programs was not greater than in states without PBF programs. The lack of growth in institutional graduation rates, however, does not mean that PBF programs failed to achieve their goals. Policy-makers are advised to sustain PBF programs long enough until such programs bear their fruits or are proven ineffective.

  6. Ascending and Descending into the System: A Comparison of Broadcasting Media Programs in Ontario Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianos, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities released Ontario's Differentiation Policy Framework for Postsecondary Education, for colleges and universities in the province. All 24 Ontario colleges responded to this Framework by presenting their Strategic Mandate Agreements (SMA). The Framework contrasts the original…

  7. The Hunter pulmonary angiography catheter for a brachiocephalic vein approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Galia; Kowalik, Karen J; Ganguli, Suverano; Hunter, David W

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a "C-shaped" curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk.

  8. Hunter disease eClinic: interactive, computer-assisted, problem-based approach to independent learning about a rare genetic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan Laura

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-based teaching (CBT is a well-known educational device, but it has never been applied systematically to the teaching of a complex, rare, genetic disease, such as Hunter disease (MPS II. Aim To develop interactive teaching software functioning as a virtual clinic for the management of MPS II. Implementation and Results The Hunter disease eClinic, a self-training, user-friendly educational software program, available at the Lysosomal Storage Research Group (http://www.lysosomalstorageresearch.ca, was developed using the Adobe Flash multimedia platform. It was designed to function both to provide a realistic, interactive virtual clinic and instantaneous access to supporting literature on Hunter disease. The Hunter disease eClinic consists of an eBook and an eClinic. The eClinic is the interactive virtual clinic component of the software. Within an environment resembling a real clinic, the trainee is instructed to perform a medical history, to examine the patient, and to order appropriate investigation. The program provides clinical data derived from the management of actual patients with Hunter disease. The eBook provides instantaneous, electronic access to a vast collection of reference information to provide detailed background clinical and basic science, including relevant biochemistry, physiology, and genetics. In the eClinic, the trainee is presented with quizzes designed to provide immediate feedback on both trainee effectiveness and efficiency. User feedback on the merits of the program was collected at several seminars and formal clinical rounds at several medical centres, primarily in Canada. In addition, online usage statistics were documented for a 2-year period. Feedback was consistently positive and confirmed the practical benefit of the program. The online English-language version is accessed daily by users from all over the world; a Japanese translation of the program is also available. Conclusions The

  9. Implementing the Internationalization Promotion Program at Tomakomai National College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Wataru; Ishikawa, Nozomi; Matsuda, Kanaho; Ono, Masatsugu

    We introduce the internationalization promotion program conducted in Tomakomai National College of Technology (TNCT) . In order for the students to improve their international understanding and communication skills, the program was undertaken by means of collaborative education and distance education. TNCT delegates consisting of 2 teachers, 6 students, an office staff, and an engineer were sent to New Zealand, and worked on a project in cooperation with faculty members of Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawke‧s Bay (EIT) . The students explored environmental issues through discussions with other international students. At the end of the two-week on-site project, they reported the result via a video conferencing system. Additionally, this system served as a medium for international exchange in an intercultural communication class. Since the most of the students did not go to NZ, it was a good opportunity for them to communicate with people overseas. We discuss the effectiveness of both the collaborative education on practical topics and the distance education using a video conferencing system.

  10. The Fugue Pattern in The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭主美

    2013-01-01

    Carson McCullers The Heart is a Lonely Hunter is her representative work. McCullers deploys the skill of fugue pattern through the multi-voices reflected in the characters, tactfully unite the form and content into a whole. By adopting Bakhtin ’s theory of polyphony, this paper aims to analyze the fugue pattern together with its multi-voices in the three parts, namely, the exposition, the development and the return reflected in the novel, which highlights its theme of universal loneliness so impressive-ly.

  11. GeoX: A New Pre-college Program to Attract Underrepresented Minorities and First Generation Students to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. C.; Garcia, S. J.; Houser, C.; GeoX Team

    2011-12-01

    An emerging challenge in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education is the recruitment of underrepresented groups in those areas of the workforce. This paper describes the structure and first-year results of the Geosciences Exploration Summer Program (GeoX) at Texas A&M University. Recent evidence suggest that pipeline programs should target junior and senior high school students who are beginning to seriously consider future career choices and appropriate college programs. GeoX is an overnight program that takes place during the summer at Texas A&M University. Over the course of a week, GeoX participants interact with faculty from the College of Geosciences, administrators, current students, and community leaders through participation in inquiry-based learning activities, field trips, and evening social events. The aim of this project is to foster a further interest in pursuing geosciences as an undergraduate major in college and thereby increase participation in the geosciences by underrepresented ethnic minority students. With funding from industry and private donors, high achieving rising junior and rising senior students, with strong interest in science and math, were invited to participate in the program. Students and their parents were interviewed before and after the program to determine if it was successful in introducing and enhancing awareness of the: 1) various sub-disciplines in the geosciences, 2) benefits of academia and research, 3) career opportunities in each of those fields and 4) college admission process including financial aid and scholarship opportunities. Results of the survey suggest that the students had a very narrow and stereotypical view of the geosciences that was almost identical to the views of their parents. Following the program, the students had a more expanded and positive view of the geosciences compared to the pre-program survey and compared to their parents. While it remains to be seen how many of those

  12. The Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement: a pioneering multi-ethnic human service organization (1971-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Ellen; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement is a nonprofit organization established in 1971 to defend the legal rights of African-Americans living in its community. Over the years, the agency diversified its services to include mental health and substance abuse treatment, violence prevention, youth programming, and HIV services. The organization has overcome multiple challenges during its 37-year history in relation to social, political, and economic changes that have influenced the way the organization has financed and delivered its services. The history of the organization presents a collaborative approach to community problem-solving and exemplifies the important role that external relationships play in relationship to nonprofit growth and survival.

  13. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ¢/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  14. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Karla

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Results Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID. Conclusion Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  15. Metagenome Sequencing of the Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampelli, Simone; Schnorr, Stephanie L; Consolandi, Clarissa; Turroni, Silvia; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Crittenden, Alyssa N; Henry, Amanda G; Candela, Marco

    2015-06-29

    Through human microbiome sequencing, we can better understand how host evolutionary and ontogenetic history is reflected in the microbial function. However, there has been no information on the gut metagenome configuration in hunter-gatherer populations, posing a gap in our knowledge of gut microbiota (GM)-host mutualism arising from a lifestyle that describes over 90% of human evolutionary history. Here, we present the first metagenomic analysis of GM from Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania, showing a unique enrichment in metabolic pathways that aligns with the dietary and environmental factors characteristic of their foraging lifestyle. We found that the Hadza GM is adapted for broad-spectrum carbohydrate metabolism, reflecting the complex polysaccharides in their diet. Furthermore, the Hadza GM is equipped for branched-chain amino acid degradation and aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. Resistome functionality demonstrates the existence of antibiotic resistance genes in a population with little antibiotic exposure, indicating the ubiquitous presence of environmentally derived resistances. Our results demonstrate how the functional specificity of the GM correlates with certain environment and lifestyle factors and how complexity from the exogenous environment can be balanced by endogenous homeostasis. The Hadza gut metagenome structure allows us to appreciate the co-adaptive functional role of the GM in complementing the human physiology, providing a better understanding of the versatility of human life and subsistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Harper, T; Georges, K; Bridgewater, E

    2001-01-01

    Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID). Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  17. Integration of Pre-college Chemistry Education and the GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Zapata, R.; López-Garriga, J.

    2000-12-01

    Pre-college chemistry objectives can be strengthened through incorporation of the chemistry activities of the GLOBE program. In this initiative, pre-college teachers and students perform scientific protocols and measurements related to the atmosphere, hydrology, land cover/biology, and soil. These cooperative-learning activities develop skills in chemistry, earth science, mathematics, data analysis, computer communications, and use of the global positioning system and global information system. Chemistry activities involve measuring pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, alkalinity, potassium, nitrogen, and phosphorus in water, air, and soil environments. These exercises develop knowledge and skills in qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis. Our program combines a week-long workshop, follow-up Saturday academies, and visits to the K through 12 schools to ensure that teachers are well prepared to establish and continue the program at their schools. These activities, with the teacher's GLOBE manual, the basic equipment provided to perform measurements in the field, and continuous interaction between teachers and GLOBE training team, resulted in 91 percent of teachers feeling that their preparation to establish the program at their schools was excellent or very good. We conclude that the GLOBE protocols are an effective way to promote environmental chemistry education at the pre-college level.

  18. The Effect of iMentor's College Ready Program on High School Students' College Aspirations and Non-Cognitive Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Lisa; Siman, Nina; Kang, David; Soltani, Jasmine; Wulach, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that school-based mentoring programs can be a flexible and cost-effective way to improve student outcomes. Effective mentoring programs create close bonds between students and caring adults, providing students with an important source of emotional support. This study tests the effects of a new model--whole…

  19. Modern day relevance of William Hunter's approach to teaching "The organ of hearing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Helena; Smith, Robert A; Mackay, Sarah

    2013-07-01

    William Hunter, a pioneering teacher of Anatomy in the the eighteenth century, championed the use of dissected specimens as aids in the teaching of anatomy. Although Hunter promoted the Paris method of learning Anatomy, by student dissection, he also used prosected material as an adjunct to his lectures. We are fortunate that Hunter bequeathed his extensive collection of over 3,000 museum specimens to the University of Glasgow, many of which are housed in the Laboratory of Human Anatomy in the Thomson Building. Regions such as the temporal bone are frequently difficult for students, and indeed postgraduate trainees in ear nose and throat surgery, to visualize and understand. Hunter overcame this difficulty by producing elegant specimens highlighting the three-dimensional complexity of the area. The current vignette stresses the importance of Hunter in his contemporary setting, but also demonstrates the potential of his approach for current and future teaching programmes in this age of the Internet.

  20. Legitimization of regulatory norms: Waterfowl hunter acceptance of changing duck bag limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Lawrence, Jeffrey S.; Cordts, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined response to regulatory change over time, or addressed hunter attitudes about changes in hunting bag limits. This article explores Minnesota waterfowl hunters’ attitudes about duck bag limits, examining attitudes about two state duck bag limits that were initially more restrictive than the maximum set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), but then increased to match federal limits. Results are from four mail surveys that examined attitudes about bag limits over time. Following two bag limit increases, a greater proportion of hunters rated the new bag limit “too high” and a smaller proportion rated it “too low.” Several years following the first bag limit increase, the proportion of hunters who indicated that the limit was “too high” had declined, suggesting hunter acceptance of the new regulation. Results suggest that waterfowl bag limits may represent legal norms that influence hunter attitudes and gain legitimacy over time.

  1. Outcomes of Concurrent Operations: Results From the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Berian, Julia R; Ban, Kristen A; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Angelos, Peter; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Hoyt, David B; Hall, Bruce L; Ko, Clifford Y

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether concurrently performed operations are associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Concurrent operations occur when a surgeon is simultaneously responsible for critical portions of 2 or more operations. How this practice affects patient outcomes is unknown. Using American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2014 to 2015, operations were considered concurrent if they overlapped by ≥60 minutes or in their entirety. Propensity-score-matched cohorts were constructed to compare death or serious morbidity (DSM), unplanned reoperation, and unplanned readmission in concurrent versus non-concurrent operations. Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to account for the clustered nature of the data while controlling for procedure and case mix. There were 1430 (32.3%) surgeons from 390 (77.7%) hospitals who performed 12,010 (2.3%) concurrent operations. Plastic surgery (n = 393 [13.7%]), otolaryngology (n = 470 [11.2%]), and neurosurgery (n = 2067 [8.4%]) were specialties with the highest proportion of concurrent operations. Spine procedures were the most frequent concurrent procedures overall (n = 2059/12,010 [17.1%]). Unadjusted rates of DSM (9.0% vs 7.1%; P continuous self-regulation and proactive disclosure to patients.

  2. Measuring attributes of success of college students in nursing programs: a psychometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Jean Ann; Wong, Sabrina T; Keane, Dennis; Grumbach, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Because of the most recent nurse shortage it has become important to determine retention factors of nursing students in the context of various aspects of college nursing programs and institutional systems. The purpose of this article is to describe the psychometric properties of a new measure that could be useful in examining nursing student retention related to the educational institution characteristics, educational processes, and individual student characteristics. The measurement instrument was conceptually designed around 4 constructs and was administered to a test group and a validation group. The dispositional construct loaded differently for each group (test group: math and science ability, confidence in the future, and confidence in ability; validation group: math and science ability, confidence in the future, self-expectation, and confidence in ability). The situational construct factored on 4 subscales (financial issues, social support, missed classes, and work issues); the institutional construct on 4 factors (peer, overall experience, diversity, and faculty); the career values construct on 5 factors (job characteristics, autonomy, caring, flexibility, and work style). Based on the results of the factor analyses and alpha reliability, evidence supported using the dispositional subscales of math and science ability, the career values subscales of job characteristics and work style, the situational subscales of work issues and financial issues, and the institutional subscales of diversity and faculty. The other potential subscales need further refinement and testing.

  3. 77 FR 32612 - Proposed Priorities; Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs; College...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... indicators thereof-- such as overestimating the price of college, not applying for Federal student aid, and... in postsecondary education by means that include promotion of financial literacy and...

  4. What Factors Predict Middle School Students Sign Up for Washington's College Bound Scholarship Program? A Mixed Methods Evaluation. Working Paper 175

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan; Long, Mark C.; Person, Ann E.; Rooklyn, Jordan

    2017-01-01

    We investigate factors influencing student sign-ups for Washington State's College Bound Scholarship (CBS) program. We find a substantial share of eligible middle school students fail to sign the CBS, forgoing college financial aid. Student characteristics associated with signing the scholarship parallel characteristics of low-income students who…

  5. 75 FR 21663 - Maysteel, LLC Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, QPS, and Service First, Menomonee Falls, WI; Amended Certification Regarding..., including on-site leased workers from Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, and QPS, Menomonee Falls... Maysteel, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, QPS,...

  6. Knowledge and use of folic acid among college women: a pilot health promotion program led by pharmacy students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Bethany L; Dipietro, Natalie A; Kier, Karen L

    2010-10-01

    As pharmacists and pharmacy students are increasingly called upon to assume roles in public health activities, it is important to recognize unique opportunities to educate community members on health, wellness, and disease prevention. To evaluate the impact of a pilot health promotion program on college women's knowledge regarding folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects (NTD) and frequency of multivitamin use. A health promotion program was developed by a pharmacy student and two pharmacy faculty members that included an oral presentation and reminder messages. A multiple-choice test assessing knowledge of folic acid and NTD and frequency of multivitamin use was given to participants before and immediately after the presentation. Participants then received a reminder message regarding folic acid once a week for three weeks. Knowledge and multivitamin use were reassessed four weeks post-intervention. Thirty-two college women voluntarily attended the oral presentation. Twenty-five women (78.2%) completed the four-week post-test. Compared to the pre-test, there were statistically significant increases in average test score (pfolic acid and NTD (pknowledge about folic acid and frequency of multivitamin use. A similarly-modeled health promotion program may be an effective way of increasing folic acid and NTD knowledge and changing behaviors of multivitamin use in college women.

  7. Economic Diversity among Selective Colleges: Measuring the Enrollment Impact of "No-Loan" Programs. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Students from low-income families are underrepresented in higher education, despite the fact that many of them are well qualified to enroll. When low-income students do enroll in college, they tend to be overrepresented in public community colleges and for-profit institutions, or if they attend four-year institutions, tend to attend regional state…

  8. Making It Happen: How Career Academies Can Build College and Career Exploration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Mary G.; Altuna, Jacklyn N.; Safran, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The phrase "preparing students for college and career" has become so ubiquitous that it has become almost a mantra in educators' discourse in recent years. Whether mentioned in the Common Core State Standards, in the mission statements of high schools, or in political campaigns, improving the college and career readiness of young people is a…

  9. Why the Big Change in Student Program Selection at Two-Year Colleges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Robert F.

    1984-01-01

    Factors in the 1970s' dramatic shift from liberal arts to career education enrollment in community colleges include an infusion of federal funds, rapid growth of the student population, rapid technological growth, and a faltering economy resulting in unemployment and reduced educational benefits for four-year college graduates. (MSE)

  10. Development of "College CHEF," a Campus-Based Culinary Nutrition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jennifer; Ickes, Melinda; Noland, Melody; Erwin, Heather; Helme, Don

    2017-01-01

    Background: More than one third of college students are obese, with many lacking the knowledge and skills necessary to cook healthfully. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the PRECEDE-PROCEED model-driven primary and secondary needs assessments (PNA, SNA), which contributed to the development of the College CHEF. Methods: Staff…

  11. From Foster Care to College: The Seita Scholars Program at Western Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrau, Yvonne A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 32,000 young people in the United States exit the foster care system in a typical year by aging out to independence (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2011). Despite available financial support for post-secondary education through the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, only 20% of college-qualified foster youth attend college and…

  12. The Development of the Financial Literacy Program at the Community College of Baltimore County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams-Johnson, Ansa; Delker, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Student debt has increasingly become an important topic in higher education. Many students, particularly low-income and first-generation college students, do not have a solid understanding of managing personal finances. This becomes further compounded upon entering college, as these students lack the financial acumen to understand the long-term…

  13. Community College Student Success Programs: A Synthesis, Critique, and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Gloria; Taggart, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    A narrative review was developed to add to the discussion and dissemination of research on community colleges. The review adds to existing work by synthesizing and critiquing the empirical research to date specific to three of the most prevalent programmatic efforts presently seen on community college campuses: (a) learning communities, (b)…

  14. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Alyssa N; Zes, David A

    2015-01-01

    Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society.

  15. Visual Analysis of Biological Activity Data with Scaffold Hunter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karsten; Koch, Oliver; Kriege, Nils; Mutzel, Petra; Schäfer, Till

    2013-12-01

    The growing interest in chemogenomics approaches over the last years has led to an increasing amount of data regarding chemical and the corresponding biological activity space. The resulting data, collected in either in-house or public databases, need to be analyzed efficiently to speed-up the increasingly difficult task of drug discovery. Unfortunately, the discovery of new chemical entities or new targets for known drugs ('drug repurposing') is not suitable to a fully automated analysis or a simple drill down process. Visual interactive interfaces that allow to explore chemical space in a systematic manner and facilitate analytical reasoning can help to overcome these problems. Scaffold Hunter is a tool for the visual analysis of chemical compound databases that provides integrated visualization and analysis of biological activity data and fosters the interactive exploration of data imported from a variety of sources. We describe the features and illustrate the use by means of an exemplary analysis workflow.

  16. Costs and benefits in hunter-gatherer punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Hunter-gatherer punishment involves costs and benefits to individuals and groups, but the costs do not necessarily fit with the assumptions made in models that consider punishment to be altruistic--which brings in the free-rider problem and the problem of second-order free-riders. In this commentary, I present foragers' capital punishment patterns ethnographically, in the interest of establishing whether such punishment is likely to be costly; and I suggest that in many cases abstentions from punishment that might be taken as defections by free-riders are actually caused by social-structural considerations rather than being an effect of free-rider genes. This presentation of data supplements the ethnographic analysis provided by Guala.

  17. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  18. The Bayesian image retrieval system, PicHunter: theory, implementation, and psychophysical experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, I J; Miller, M L; Minka, T P; Papathomas, T V; Yianilos, P N

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the theory, design principles, implementation and performance results of PicHunter, a prototype content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system. In addition, this document presents the rationale, design and results of psychophysical experiments that were conducted to address some key issues that arose during PicHunter's development. The PicHunter project makes four primary contributions to research on CBIR. First, PicHunter represents a simple instance of a general Bayesian framework which we describe for using relevance feedback to direct a search. With an explicit model of what users would do, given the target image they want, PicHunter uses Bayes's rule to predict the target they want, given their actions. This is done via a probability distribution over possible image targets, rather than by refining a query. Second, an entropy-minimizing display algorithm is described that attempts to maximize the information obtained from a user at each iteration of the search. Third, PicHunter makes use of hidden annotation rather than a possibly inaccurate/inconsistent annotation structure that the user must learn and make queries in. Finally, PicHunter introduces two experimental paradigms to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the system, and psychophysical experiments are presented that support the theoretical claims.

  19. A phenomenographic study of students' experiences with transition from pre-college engineering programs to first-year engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Noah

    Recent national dialogues on the importance of preparing more students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics has driven the development of formal and informal learning opportunities for children and adolescents to explore engineering. Despite the growth of these programs, relatively little research exists on how participation in these programs affects students who choose to pursue further study in engineering. The present study addressed this gap through an exploration of the different ways that First-Year Engineering students experience the transition from pre-college engineering to undergraduate engineering studies. Given the focus of this research on students' experiences, phenomenography was chosen to explore the phenomenon of transition from pre-college to first-year engineering at a large, public Midwestern university. This facilitated understanding the range of variation in the ways that students experienced this transition. Twenty-two students with different amounts of participation in a variety of different engineering programs were selected to be interviewed using a purposeful maximum variation sampling strategy. The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview protocol that encouraged the participants to reflect on their pre-college engineering experiences, their experiences in First-Year Engineering, and the transition between the two domains. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenographic methods to develop an outcome space consisting of five qualitatively different but related ways of experiencing the transition from pre-college to First-Year Engineering. These categories of description included Foreclosure, Frustration, Tedium, Connection, and Engaging Others. With the exception of the first category which was characterized by a lack of passion and commitment to engineering, the remaining four categories formed a hierarchical relationship representing increasing integration in First-Year Engineering. The

  20. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with muco­polysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Link

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS. The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years. Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required.

  1. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual individuals; and (c) altered participants' attitudes toward premarital sex and monogamy. The program used diverse teaching methods, providing 6 sessions over a period of 9 weeks about sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes to college students (age 18-26 years) in Southwest China. Sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes of 80 comprehensive sexual education class students (education group) and 92 general mental health education class students (control group) were measured at baseline, the end of course (posttest), and 3 weeks after the end of course (follow-up). There were significant effects of the program on (a) sexual health knowledge, including reproductive health, contraception, condom use, and HIV/AIDS and (b) positive attitudes toward sexual minorities, although these changes may require further reinforcement. In contrast, the program did not alter students' attitudes about premarital sex or monogamy. The results are discussed in terms of recommendations of sex education in China and future directions for research.

  2. Knowledge and use of folic acid among college women: a pilot health promotion program led by pharmacy students and faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy BL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As pharmacists and pharmacy students are increasingly called upon to assume roles in public health activities, it is important to recognize unique opportunities to educate community members on health, wellness, and disease prevention. Objective: To evaluate the impact of a pilot health promotion program on college women’s knowledge regarding folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects (NTD and frequency of multivitamin use. Methods: A health promotion program was developed by a pharmacy student and two pharmacy faculty members that included an oral presentation and reminder messages. A multiple-choice test assessing knowledge of folic acid and NTD and frequency of multivitamin use was given to participants before and immediately after the presentation. Participants then received a reminder message regarding folic acid once a week for three weeks. Knowledge and multivitamin use were re-assessed four weeks post-intervention. Results: Thirty-two college women voluntarily attended the oral presentation. Twenty-five women (78.2% completed the four-week post-test. Compared to the pre-test, there were statistically significant increases in average test score (p<0.0001 and correct responses to questions regarding folic acid and NTD (p<0.05 for each question. Participants reported a statistically significant increase in regular (≥4 times/week multivitamin use (p=0.023. Conclusion: Participants in the pilot health promotion program demonstrated a statistically significant increase in knowledge about folic acid and frequency of multivitamin use. A similarly-modeled health promotion program may be an effective way of increasing folic acid and NTD knowledge and changing behaviors of multivitamin use in college women.

  3. Symmetry Reduction and Group Invariant Solutions of Hunter-Saxton Equations%Hunter-Saxton方程的对称约化与群不变解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    檀美英; 胡恒春

    2016-01-01

    借助符号计算软件Maple,根据微分方程单参数不变群和群不变解的概念,利用李群对称的待定系数法,得到Hunter-Saxton方程的包含5个任意常数和一个任意函数的一般形式的对称.通过该对称中任意的函数和常数的不同选取,将Hunter-Saxton方程约化为不同形式的常微分方程.最后对约化后的常微分方程进行变换求解,进一步得出Hunter-Saxton方程的一些群不变解和精确解.

  4. Assessing the Main-Belt Comet Population with Comet Hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Hsieh, Henry H.; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ying-Tung; Lintott, Chris; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Mishra, Ishan

    2017-01-01

    Cometary activity in the asteroid belt is a recent discovery. Evidence suggests recent collisions play a role excavating subsurface water ice in these Main Belt Comets (MBCs). MBCs may be an alternative source of Earth’s water. The properties and origins of the MBCs remain elusive. To date ~15 MBCs are known, but only with many tens to 100s of MBCs can we fully explore this new reservoir and its implications for the early Earth.Automated routines identify cometary objects by comparing the point spread functions (PSFs) of moving objects to background stars. This approach may miss cometary activity with low-level dust comae or trails that are too weak or extended to affect an object's near-nucleus PSF profile. Direct visual inspection of moving objects by survey team members can often catch such unusual objects, but such an approach is impractical for the largest surveys to date, and will only become more intractable with the next generation wide-field surveys.With the Internet, tens of thousands of people can be engaged in the scientific process. With this citizen science approach, the combined assessment of many non-experts often equals or rivals that of a trained expert and in many cases outperforms automated algorithms. The Comet Hunters (http://www.comethunters.org) project enlists the public to search for MBCs in data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) wide survey. HSC is to date the largest field-of-view camera (covering a 1.5 degree diameter circle on sky) on a 8-10-m class telescope. The HSC wide survey provides the sensitivity to detect cometary activity at lower levels than have been possible for previous surveys.We will give an overview of the Comet Hunters project. We will present the results from the first ~10,000 HSC asteroids searched and provide an estimate on the frequency of cometary activity in the Main Asteroid beltAcknowledgements: This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global

  5. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  6. Integrability and Solutions of the (2 + 1)-dimensional Hunter-Saxton Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong-Liu; Qu, Chang-Zheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the (2 + 1)-dimensional Hunter-Saxton equation is proposed and studied. It is shown that the (2 + 1)-dimensional Hunter-Saxton equation can be transformed to the Calogero-Bogoyavlenskii-Schiff equation by reciprocal transformations. Based on the Lax-pair of the Calogero-Bogoyavlenskii-Schiff equation, a non-isospectral Lax-pair of the (2 + 1)-dimensional Hunter-Saxton equation is derived. In addition, exact singular solutions with a finite number of corners are obtained. Furthermore, the (2 + 1)-dimensional μ-Hunter-Saxton equation is presented, and its exact peaked traveling wave solutions are derived. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11471174 and NSF of Ningbo under Grant No. 2014A610018

  7. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  8. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  9. Hunter Harvest and Effort North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2001-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Reports contains summarized yearly harvest of game species on Coldwater River, Dahomey, and Tallahatchie NWRs and the total hunter effort based on daily use cards...

  10. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  11. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  12. Sources of stress for students in high school college preparatory and general education programs: group differences and associations with adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M; Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Thalji, Amanda; Michalowski, Jessica; Shaffer, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Navigating puberty while developing independent living skills may render adolescents particularly vulnerable to stress, which may ultimately contribute to mental health problems (Compas, Orosan, & Grant, 1993; Elgar, Arlett, & Groves, 2003). The academic transition to high school presents additional challenges as youth are required to interact with a new and larger peer group and manage greater academic expectations. For students enrolled in academically rigorous college preparatory programs, such as the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, the amount of stress perceived may be greater than typical (Suldo, Shaunessy, & Hardesty, 2008). This study investigated the environmental stressors and psychological adjustment of 162 students participating in the IB program and a comparison sample of 157 students in general education. Factor analysis indicated students experience 7 primary categories of stressors, which were examined in relation to students' adjustment specific to academic and psychological functioning. The primary source of stress experienced by IB students was related to academic requirements. In contrast, students in the general education program indicated higher levels of stressors associated with parent-child relations, academic struggles, conflict within family, and peer relations, as well as role transitions and societal problems. Comparisons of correlations between categories of stressors and students' adjustment by curriculum group reveal that students in the IB program reported more symptoms of psychopathology and reduced academic functioning as they experienced higher levels of stress, particularly stressors associated with academic requirements, transitions and societal problems, academic struggles, and extra-curricular activities. Applied implications stem from findings suggesting that students in college preparatory programs are more likely to (a) experience elevated stress related to academic demands as opposed to more typical adolescent

  13. Randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a web-based stress management program among community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Patricia; Meredith, Liza; Greer, Christiaan; Paulsen, Jacob A; Howard, Kelli; Dietz, Lindsey R; Qin, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based stress management program among community college students that focused on increasing perceived control over stressful events. Students (N = 257) were randomly assigned to a Present Control Intervention or a Stress-information only comparison group. Primary outcomes were perceived stress and stress symptoms; secondary outcomes were depression and anxiety. Self-report measures were completed online at preintervention, postintervention, and three-week follow-up. Intervention effects were estimated using linear mixed models. Seventy-five percent of the sample (n = 194) completed the pretest and comprised the intent-to-treat sample. Participants in the intervention group reported significant increases in present control, and significant decreases in all four primary and secondary outcome measures from baseline to postintervention and follow-up. Within-group effect sizes were small to medium at postintervention (mean d = -.34) and follow-up (mean d = -.49). The mean between-group effect size on the four outcome measures was d = .35 at postintervention but d = .12 at follow-up, due to unexpected decreases in distress in the comparison group. Our online program is a cost-effective mental health program for college students. Limitations and future direction are discussed.

  14. 弱耗散μ-Hunter-Saxton 方程的爆破%Blow-up of a weakly dissipative μ-Hunter-Saxton equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕红杰; 刘静静; 齐静; 刘硕

    2015-01-01

    研究了弱耗散μ-Hunter-Saxton 方程 Caucly 问题的爆破现象。给出了一个新的爆破结果,推导出爆破强解精确的爆破率。%We study the Cauchy problem of the weakly dissipative μ-Hunter-Saxton equation.The present work is main-ly concerned with blow-up phenomena of the equation.We first present a new blow-up result for strong solutions to the equation.Then,we drive the precise blow-up rate for strong solutions to the equation.

  15. The Path to Baltimore's "Best Prospect" Jobs without a College Degree: Career Credentialing Programs at Baltimore's Community Colleges. The Abell Report. Volume 28, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Only one in five graduates of Baltimore City Public Schools matriculates to a four-year college; the vast majority enroll in community college or look for a full-time job. Baltimore graduates and job-seekers need postsecondary training that works. "The Path to Baltimore's 'Best Prospect' Jobs without a College Degree: Career Credentialing…

  16. Serving Students with Significant Disabilities in Two-Year Colleges. Program Accessibility Committee, Florence-Darlington Technical College, Florence, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerty, John, Ed.; Knutsen, Caryl, Ed.

    This report is an outcome of a project designed to seek, screen, evaluate, describe, and disseminate highly effective approaches used by two-year colleges to serve students with significant disabilities. "Two-year colleges" included academic institutions, technical colleges, and vocational institutes. From a pool of 18 applicants, the…

  17. Evaluating cost-efficiency and accuracy of hunter harvest survey designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, P.M.; Gude, J.A.; Russell, R.E.; Ackerman, B.B.

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of harvested wildlife often requires accurate estimates of the number of animals harvested annually by hunters. A variety of techniques exist to obtain harvest data, such as hunter surveys, check stations, mandatory reporting requirements, and voluntary reporting of harvest. Agencies responsible for managing harvested wildlife such as deer (Odocoileus spp.), elk (Cervus elaphus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) are challenged with balancing the cost of data collection versus the value of the information obtained. We compared precision, bias, and relative cost of several common strategies, including hunter self-reporting and random sampling, for estimating hunter harvest using a realistic set of simulations. Self-reporting with a follow-up survey of hunters who did not report produces the best estimate of harvest in terms of precision and bias, but it is also, by far, the most expensive technique. Self-reporting with no followup survey risks very large bias in harvest estimates, and the cost increases with increased response rate. Probability-based sampling provides a substantial cost savings, though accuracy can be affected by nonresponse bias. We recommend stratified random sampling with a calibration estimator used to reweight the sample based on the proportions of hunters responding in each covariate category as the best option for balancing cost and accuracy. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  18. Next Evolution of the Seneca College Outdoor Recreation Program: One Year of High Level Professional Outdoor Training and Development for Post-Diploma/Post-Degree Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Clare

    1998-01-01

    Describes the steps in utilizing fast-tracking to phase out the overloaded two-year Outdoor Recreation Technician Co-op program at Seneca College (Ontario) and phase in a one-year graduate Outdoor Recreation Certificate program with a lower teacher-student ratio. A concept model relates generalist core skills to specializations and outdoor…

  19. Un Programa de Espanol para Colegio Universitario: Esfuerzos por Lograr una Mejor Articulacion (A Spanish Program for Colleges and Universities: Efforts to Improve Articulation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latoja, Luis E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a three-year plan for colleges and universities in which the Spanish program attempts to increase its course offerings and improve articulation within the institution. The program is designed to put into practice the goals of a regional collaborative project on articulation of which the university is an integral part. (six references)…

  20. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  1. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorders and Obesity among Female College Students: 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the effects of a prevention program targeting both eating disorders and obesity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Method: Female college students at risk for these outcomes because of body image concerns (N = 398) were randomized to the "Healthy Weight 2" group-based 4-hr prevention program, which promotes lasting healthy…

  2. Computer Related Mathematics and Science Curriculum Materials - A National Science Foundation Cooperative College-School Science Program in Computing Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chuan C.

    Reported is the Cooperative College-School Science Program in Computing Science Education which was conducted by the University of Colorado Department of Civil Engineering in the summer of 1967. The program consisted of two five-week terms. The course work was composed of two formal lecture courses in Computer Related Mathematics and Computer…

  3. Utilization of the Continuing Education Unit in Conferences, Institutions, Short Courses, Workshops, Seminars, and Special Training Programs within the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, John Augustus, Jr.

    Recognizing the need for a uniform method of measurement to apply to non-degree adult education programs, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools incorporated the Continuing Education Unit (CEU) for use December 1, 1971. The purpose of this study was to forecast the utilization of the CEU in these programs within the Southern Association…

  4. Using a Merit-Based Scholarship Program to Increase Rates of College Enrollment in an Urban School District: The Case of the Pittsburgh Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozick, Robert; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Engberg, John

    2015-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Promise is a scholarship program that provides $5,000 per year toward college tuition for public high school graduates in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who earned a 2.5 GPA and a 90% attendance record. This study used a difference-in-difference design to assess whether the introduction of the Promise scholarship program directly…

  5. An Experimental Evaluation of Programed Instruction as One of Two Review Techniques for Two-Year College Students Concerned with Solving Acid-Base Chemical Equilibrium Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Jared Bear

    The major purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a programed instructional unit for a first year college chemistry course. The topic of the unit was the categorization and solution of acid-base equilibria problems. The experimental programed instruction text was used by 41 students and the fifth edition of Schaum's Theory and Problems of…

  6. The Effect of a Computer Program Designed with Constructivist Principles for College Non-Science Majors on Understanding of Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielard, Valerie Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to learn what effect a computer program would have on academic achievement and attitude toward science of college students enrolled in a biology class for non-science majors. It became apparent that the instructor also had an effect on attitudes toward science. The researcher designed a computer program,…

  7. Student Financial Aid: Characteristics of Jobs Provided through the College Work-Study Program. Briefing Report to the Honorable Harris Wofford, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report presents information concerning jobs funded through the College Work-Study (CWS) program, a program that provides part-time employment to students needing financial assistance to help defray the costs of attending a postsecondary educational institution. Almost 95 percent of the students' CWS earnings for the 12-month period ending…

  8. Healing the Earth: Through Programs in Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, the Tribal Colleges Are Working Together to Solve the Nation's Most Pressing Environmental Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Carlos

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promoting Environmental Restoration/Management for American Indians" (PERMA), a joint effort of all Indian controlled colleges to create certificate programs in environmental and waste management. PERMA includes a summer bridge program to build science/math skills; a core academic transfer curriculum; a vocationally oriented two-year…

  9. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-27

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  10. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa N Crittenden

    Full Text Available Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society.

  11. Genetic and cultural kinship among the Lamaleran whale hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvard, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The human ability to form large, coordinated groups is among our most impressive social adaptations. Larger groups facilitate synergistic economies of scale for cooperative breeding, such economic tasks as group hunting, and success in conflict with other groups. In many organisms, genetic relationships provide the structure for sociality to evolve via the process of kin selection, and this is the case, to a certain extent, for humans. But assortment by genetic affiliation is not the only mechanism that can bring people together. Affinity based on symbolically mediated and socially constructed identity, or cultural kinship, structures much of human ultrasociality. This paper examines how genetic kinship and two kinds of cultural kinship--affinal kinship and descent--structure the network of cooperating whale hunters in the village of Lamalera, Indonesia. Social network analyses show that each mechanism of assortment produces characteristic networks of different sizes, each more or less conducive to the task of hunting whales. Assortment via close genetic kin relationships (r = 0.5) produces a smaller, denser network. Assortment via less-close kin relations (r = 0.125) produces a larger but less dense network. Affinal networks are small and diffuse; lineage networks are larger, discrete, and very dense. The roles that genetic and cultural kinship play for structuring human sociality is discussed in the context of these results.

  12. Adaptive memory: fitness relevance and the hunter-gatherer mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairne, James S; Pandeirada, Josefa N S; Gregory, Karie J; Van Arsdall, Joshua E

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that human memory systems are "tuned" to remember information that is processed in terms of its fitness value. When people are asked to rate the relevance of words to a survival scenario, performance on subsequent surprise memory tests exceeds that obtained after most other known encoding techniques. The present experiments explored this effect using survival scenarios designed to mimic the division of labor thought to characterize early hunter-gatherer societies. It has been suggested that males and females have different cognitive specializations due to the unique survival tasks (hunting and gathering, respectively) they typically performed during periods of human evolution; the present experiments tested whether such specializations might be apparent in memory for words rated for relevance to these activities. Males and females were asked to rate the relevance of random words to prototypical hunting and gathering scenarios or to matched, non-fitness-relevant control scenarios (gathering food on a scavenger hunt or in a hunting contest). Surprise retention tests revealed superior memory for the words when they were rated for relevance to hunting and gathering scenarios, compared with when they were rated for relevance to the control scenarios, but no sex differences were found in memory performance.

  13. Conservation laws and symmetries of Hunter-Saxton equation: revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kai; Liu, Q. P.

    2016-03-01

    Through a reciprocal transformation {{T}0} induced by the conservation law {{\\partial}t}≤ft(ux2\\right)={{\\partial}x}≤ft(2uux2\\right) , the Hunter-Saxton (HS) equation {{u}xt}=2u{{u}2x}+ux2 is shown to possess conserved densities involving arbitrary smooth functions, which have their roots in infinitesimal symmetries of {{w}t}={{w}2} , the counterpart of the HS equation under {{T}0} . Hierarchies of commuting symmetries of the HS equation are studied under appropriate changes of variables initiated by {{T}0} , and two of these are linearized while the other is identical to the hierarchy of commuting symmetries admitted by the potential modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. A fifth order symmetry of the HS equation is endowed with a sixth order hereditary recursion operator, which is proved to have a bi-Hamiltonian factorization, by its connection with the Fordy-Gibbons equation. These results reveal the origin for the rich and remarkable structures of the HS equation and partially answer the questions raised by Wang (2010 Nonlinearity 23 2009).

  14. Rabbit hunter uveitis: case report of tularemia uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrada, Céline; Azza, Said; Bodaghi, Bahram; Le Hoang, Phuc; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Literature reports on ophthalmological manifestations related to tularemia, a zoonose caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, largely refer to Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, which consists of the association of conjunctivitis with preauricular lymphadenitis. In this paper, we report a case of intraocular inflammation during tularemia infection. A 52-year-old Caucasian man was diagnosed with unilateral uveitis. The uveitis was posterior, with a 2+ vitritis and a large yellowish lesion involving the macula with an overlying sub-retinal detachment, extending inferiorly, and subretinal hemorrhages. Fluorescein angiography showed a late hyperfluorescence with focal vascular leakage. Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed the presence of a 3.8 mm parietal granuloma with a few calcifications in the left eye. While extensive work-up eliminated any other infectious and non-infectious etiology, tularemia was diagnosed by advanced serology consisting of two-dimensional Western-immunoblotting. The patient, a hunter, recalled having killed rabbits in the days before the symptoms appeared. Uveitis was rapidly controlled following treatment with doxycycline, yet three years after initiation of the treatment, the patient still complained of loss of vision in the left eye with a central scotoma. Posterior uveitis may be an infrequent manifestation of tularemia infection, and therefore this infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraocular inflammation in areas where F. tularensis is endemic.

  15. Comet Hunters: A Citizen Science Project to Search for Comets in the Main Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Schwamb, Megan Elizabeth; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ying-Tung; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Lintott, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Fully automated detection of comets in wide-field surveys remains a challenge, as even highly successful comet-finding surveys like Pan-STARRS rely on a combination of both automated flagging algorithms and vetting by human eyes. To take advantage of the long-noted superiority of the human eye over computer algorithms in certain types of pattern recognition, particularly when dealing with a range of target morphologies of interest, we have created a citizen science website with the aim of allowing the general public to aid in the search for active asteroids, which are objects that occupy dynamically asteroidal orbits yet exhibit comet-like dust emission due to sublimation, impact disruption, rotational destabilization, or other effects. Located at comethunters.org, the Comet Hunters website was built using the Zooniverse Project Builder (https://www.zooniverse.org/lab), and displays images of known asteroids obtained either from archival data obtained between 1999 and 2014 by the Suprime-Cam wide-field imager mounted on the 8-m Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, or more contemporary data obtained by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) wide-field imager also on the Subaru Telescope as part of the ongoing HSC Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) survey. By using observations from such a large-aperture telescope, most of which have never been searched for solar system objects, much less cometary ones, we expect that volunteers should be able to make genuinely scientifically significant discoveries, and also provide valuable insights into the potential and challenges of searching for comets in the LSST era. To date, over 13,000 registered volunteers have contributed 350,000 classifications. We will discuss the design and construction of the Comet Hunters website, and also discuss early results from the project.This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global Impact Award from Google, and by the Alfred P. Sloan

  16. Mount Pinatubo, inflammatory cytokines, and the immunological ecology of Aeta hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Robin M; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2013-01-01

    Early growth cessation and reproduction are predicted to maximize fitness under conditions of high adult mortality, factors that could explain the pygmy phenotype of many rainforest hunter-gatherers. This life-history hypothesis is elegant but contentious in part because it lacks a clear biological mechanism. One mechanism stems from the field of human immunological ecology and the concept of inflammation "memory" across the life cycle and into subsequent generations. Maternal exposures to disease can influence immunological cues present in breast milk; because maternal provisioning via lactation occurs during critical periods of development, it is plausible that these cues can also mediate early growth cessation and small body size. Such epigenetic hypotheses are difficult to test, but the concept of developmental programming is attractive because it could explain how the stature of a population can change over time, in terms of both secular increases and rapid intergenerational decreases. Here we explore this concept by focusing on the Aeta, a population of former hunter-gatherers, and the Ilocano, a population of rice farmers. We predicted that Aeta mothers would produce breast milk with higher concentrations of four bioactive factors due to high infectious burdens. Further, we predicted that the concentrations of these factors would be highest in the cohort of women born in the early 1990s, when exposure to infectious disease was acute following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. We analyzed levels of adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and epidermal growth factor in the milk of 24 Aeta and 31 Ilocano women and found no detectable differences, whereas levels of transforming growth factor-?2 were elevated among the Aeta, particularly as a function of maternal age. We found no difference between cohorts divided by the volcanic eruption (n = 43 born before, n = 12 born after). We discuss the implications of our findings for the terminal investment

  17. One Decade of Active Avian Influenza Wild Bird Surveillance in Belgium Showed a Higher Viroprevalence in Hunter-Harvested Than in Live-Ringed Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, M; Vangeluwe, D; Linden, A; Houdart, Ph; van den Berg, Thierry P; Lambrecht, B

    2016-05-01

    Active monitoring of avian influenza (AI) viruses in wild birds was initiated in Belgium in 2005 in response to the first highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks occurring in Europe. In Belgium, active wild bird surveillance that targeted live-ringed and hunter-harvested wild birds was developed and maintained from 2005 onward. After one decade, this program assimilated, analyzed, and reported on over 35,000 swabs. The 2009-2014 datasets were used for the current analysis because detailed information was available for this period. The overall prevalence of avian influenza (AI) in samples from live-ringed birds during this period was 0.48% whereas it was 6.12% in hunter-harvested samples. While the ringing sampling targeted a large number of bird species and was realized over the years, the hunting sampling was mainly concentrated on mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) during the hunting season, from mid-August to late January. Even when using just AI prevalence for live-ringed A. platyrhynchos during the hunting season, the value remained significantly lower (2.10%) compared to that detected for hunter-harvested mallards. One explanation for this significant difference in viroprevalence in hunter-harvested mallards was the game restocking practice, which released captive-bred birds in the wild before the hunting period. Indeed, the released game restocking birds, having an AI-naïve immune status, could act as local amplifiers of AI viruses already circulating in the wild, and this could affect AI epidemiology. Also, the release into the wild of noncontrolled restocking birds might lead to the introduction of new strains in the natural environment, leading to increased AI presence in the environment. Consequently, the release of naïve or infected restocking birds may affect AI dynamics.

  18. Pedagogy and Processes for a Computer Programming Outreach Workshop--The Bridge to College Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Brendan; Oldham, Elizabeth; Conneely, Claire; Barrett, Stephen; Lawlor, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a model for computer programming outreach workshops aimed at second-level students (ages 15-16). Participants engage in a series of programming activities based on the Scratch visual programming language, and a very strong group-based pedagogy is followed. Participants are not required to have any prior programming experience.…

  19. Community College Faculty Recruitment Practices: The Effects of Applicant Gender, Instructional Programs, and Job Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study that applied marketing and advertising theory to recruit community-college business faculty. The reactions of male and female target applicants to recruitment advertisements and job descriptions were assessed, with differences found between the two groups. Discusses results, and implications for practice, theory and research. (36…

  20. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  1. A Study of Environmental Health and Safety Programs at Research Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Universities and colleges in the United States are vital communities, teeming with people and vast resources. Because of such factors as class schedules, on-going research, tight academic calendars and highly transient populations, these communities function with diverse operations that need a constant degree of normality for maximum…

  2. Information Literacy Program Development for ESL Classes in a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracha, Christina; Stout, Mary; Jurkowitz, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    At Pima Community College's Downtown Campus, the ESL lead faculty, library intern and librarian collaborated to create a comprehensive, progressive information literacy curriculum, based upon principles and best practices in both Second Language Acquisition Theory and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for a suite of ESL courses. The…

  3. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  4. McDaniel Step Ahead: A Summer Transitional Program for First Year College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Dana L.; Gould, Sarah A.; Conley, Melanie L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of students with disabilities seeking postsecondary education. The complexity of needs is also increasing, resulting in more students withdrawing from college or taking leaves of absence in their first year. In 2012, the Student Academic Support Services office (SASS) at McDaniel…

  5. An Overview of the Roles and Responsibilities of Chinese Medical Colleges in Body Donation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low…

  6. FEASIBILITY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN MARINE TECHNOLOGY AT CLATSOP COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOLONEN, PAUL

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTS TO DETERMINE WHAT BASES EXIST FOR ESTABLISHING THE FIRST CURRICULUM OF THIS NATURE ON THE WEST COAST. DISCUSSIONS WERE HELD BETWEEN LOCAL MARITIME PEOPLE AND THE COLLEGE STAFF. RESULTS OF A SURVEY OF 51 HIGH SCHOOLS SHOWED 264 STUDENTS INTERESTED IN ENROLLING. A SURVEY OF 79 GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS INDICATED THAT 142…

  7. Student Teaching Competencies in Lehman College's Competency-Based Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Fay Paula

    In an attempt to establish the rank ordering of the 17 personal and professional traits identified by Lehman College as "student teacher competencies," this questionnaire was circulated to 87 student and cooperating teachers during the fall 1977 and the spring 1978 semesters. The results indicate a medium to high level of consistency in the rating…

  8. Travel and Tourism Industry: Program Options for City College of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA.

    In an effort to determine the current occupational outlook and resulting implications for education and training, the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), in California, undertook a study of current trends in the travel and tourism industry. This report provides findings from the project, which involved consultation with local and national…

  9. Enabling Persistence of Veteran Students at North Carolina Community Colleges through Institutional Support Programs and Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzes, Janice Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Over two million service men and women, returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, will take advantage of the educational benefits of the Post-9/11 GI Bill and will enroll in community colleges. Despite over 70 years of education benefits for U.S. veterans, there has been little research into the availability and effectiveness of…

  10. Honors Programs at Smaller Colleges. 3rd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This monograph focuses upon areas of special concern to those working with honors at smaller colleges and universities: mission, recruitment, facilities, administration, budget, and curriculum. In each area, the author makes some general suggestions about overall operating principles, note specific issues that can lead to difficulties, and suggest…

  11. Rhodes's Work Program Gives Students Experience and Saves the College Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Jillian Carr is still an undergraduate, but in the office of institutional research at Rhodes College, she is a full-fledged colleague. A recent analysis she did of student data will probably be used in training for academic advisers this fall. Ms. Carr found that students who overestimate their verbal ability when selecting courses risk a lower…

  12. College or Training Programs: How to Decide. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c115

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A high school diploma opens the door to many exciting new options. These might include a first full-time job, or part-time or full-time attendance at a technical school, community college, or university. Students might want to obtain a certificate, an associate degree, or a diploma. With so many choices, it can be a challenge to decide which path…

  13. Transportability of Equivalence-Based Programmed Instruction: Efficacy and Efficiency in a College Classroom

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    Fienup, Daniel M.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    College students in a psychology research-methods course learned concepts related to inferential statistics and hypothesis decision making. One group received equivalence-based instruction on conditional discriminations that were expected to promote the emergence of many untaught, academically useful abilities (i.e., stimulus equivalence group). A…

  14. Measuring the Accountability of CTE Programs: Factors that Influence Postcollege Earnings among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Kenneth J.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos; Friedel, Janice N.

    2012-01-01

    In this study specific factors were examined to determine their ability to influence fifth-year earnings of community college students in the Manufacturing/Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) career cluster and the Arts/Audiovisual/Technology/ Communication career cluster. State and national data sets from Iowa's Management…

  15. Blogs, Webinars and Significant Learning: A Case Report on a Teacher Training Program for College Teachers

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    Polanco-Bueno, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This case study reports on a teacher training experience for college professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students' learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design…

  16. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Management College. Volume 16, Number 5, September-October 1987,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Defense Systems Knowledge of civilian and military engineering or Management .- , current DOD segments of DOD engineering College production/ improve... markt ur h’elin isthat pric gstrategy i -a fit a rc "-js Iten pt,turt he h firm can take m, le tnliuenCTd hv financial con ’tagc. Since executives

  17. Human Resource Development Planning in a Community College Program Based on a View of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Steven B.

    In recognition of the importance of futures information in planning efforts and continued staff development in achieving institutional goals, Lincoln Land Community College (LLCC), in Springfield, Illinois, undertook a project to develop and validate a strategic planning process for human resource development of faculty and staff in a radiologic…

  18. Developing a Self-Directed Computer Training Program for El Camino College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Donald F.

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) establish existing computer literacy levels among faculty members at El Camino College, California; (2) determine the principal obstacles to self-directed computer training, along with strategies designed to overcome these obstacles; and (3) develop recommendations concerning the structure of self-directed,…

  19. A Review of the Mathematics Assessment of Saddleback College Students through the Matriculation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sworder, Steven

    In 1989, a study was conducted of the mathematics assessment portion of the matriculation process at California's Saddleback College (SC). The two main purposes of the study were to examine student enrollment behavior in recommended mathematics courses as well as to compare the success rates of students who enrolled in the recommended courses with…

  20. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Management College, Volume 23 Number 4, July-August 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Caruth Typography and Design Paula Croisetiere P’rograim Ma1nager (ISSN OtQY-7t 14) is Published bimonthly by the Defense Systems EQ 0 Management College...provides a standard black-and-white cover without illustrations showing the title, author, TR number and DSMC logo and similar title page. -The TRs

  1. Reflections on Developing an Employment Mentoring Program for College Students Who Are Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mally, Jamie; Steverson, Anne

    2017-01-01

    In a competitive employment climate, college graduates with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) face challenges securing work. Employment barriers among visually impaired individuals include: limited early work experience, negative employer attitudes, transportation issues, lack of exposure to successful role…

  2. College or Training Programs: How to Decide. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c115

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A high school diploma opens the door to many exciting new options. These might include a first full-time job, or part-time or full-time attendance at a technical school, community college, or university. Students might want to obtain a certificate, an associate degree, or a diploma. With so many choices, it can be a challenge to decide which path…

  3. Exploring the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program in reducing anxiety in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Gregg; Keffer, Steven; Abrahamson, Craig; Horst, S Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Given the pervasiveness of stress and anxiety in our culture it is important to develop and implement interventions that can be easily utilized by large numbers of people that are readily available, inexpensive and have minimal side effects. Two studies explored the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program on reducing anxiety and negative mood in college students. A pilot project (n = 9) of highly anxious students revealed sizable decreases in anxiety and negative mood following utilizing the program for 4 weeks. A second study (n = 35) employing an immediate versus delayed treatment design replicated the results, although the magnitude of the impact was not quite as strong. Despite observing decreases in anxiety, the expected changes in psychophysiological coherence were not observed.

  4. College Women's Health

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    ... the College Women's Social Media Kit! College Women's Social Media Toolkit Use the Social Media Toolkit to ... International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & ...

  5. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level. METHODS: Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years]. RESULTS: REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  6. The night of the hunter: children & adults in the secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry caesar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Night of the Hunter is  the 1956 Charles Laughton’s film considered  one of the best discussions about childhood. In this film, the story revolves around the fate of John and Pearl, two orphaned siblings whose father was hanged for stealing. The father had given the children the money, and they hid the money inside the girl’s doll. When the Preacher Powell enters their lives , both John and Pearl are in danger. The siblings have to keep a secret which is both where they put the money, and the fact that, for children, money is simply paper.

  7. The Effects of Changing Sea Ice on Marine Mammals and Their Hunters in Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, H.; Quakenbush, L.; Nelson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Marine mammals are important sources of food for indigenous residents of northern Alaska. Changing sea ice patterns affect the animals themselves as well as access by hunters. Documenting the traditional knowledge of Iñupiaq and Yupik hunters concerning marine mammals and sea ice makes accessible a wide range of information and insight relevant to ecological understanding, conservation action, and the regulation of human activity. We interviewed hunters in villages from northern Bering Sea to the Beaufort Sea, focusing on bowhead whales, walrus, and ice seals. Hunters reported extensive changes in sea ice, with resulting effects on the timing of marine mammal migrations, the distribution and behavior of the animals, and the efficacy of certain hunting methods, for example the difficulty of finding ice thick enough to support a bowhead whale for butchering. At the same time, hunters acknowledged impacts and potential impacts from changing technology such as more powerful outboard engines and from industrial activity such as shipping and oil and gas development. Hunters have been able to adapt to some changes, for example by hunting bowhead whales in fall as well as spring on St. Lawrence Island, or by focusing their hunt in a shorter period in Nuiqsut to accommodate work schedules and worse weather. Other changes, such as reduced availability of ice seals due to rapid retreat of pack ice after spring break-up, continue to defy easy responses. Continued environmental changes, increased disturbance from human activity, and the introduction of new regulations for hunting may further challenge the ability of hunters to provide food as they have done to date, though innovation and flexibility may also provide new sources of adaptation.

  8. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  9. Open-cut coal mining in Australia's Hunter Valley: Sustainability and the industry's economic, ecological and social implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Cottle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article questions the sustainability of open-cut coal mining in the Hunter Valley region of Australia. The issue of sustainability is examined in relation to the economic, ecological and social implications of the Hunter Valley’s open-cut coal mining industry. The article demonstrates that critical social and ecological ramifications have been overshadowed by the open-cut coal mining industry’s importance to the economy of the Hunter region and of New South Wales.

  10. The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College Technical Report. Science Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-31

    Franklin Professor of Physics Harvard University Irene Little-Marenin Associate Professor of Astronomy Wellesley College 9 Nanette Orme-Johnson Professor of...Fellows DELIA DIX AGUILAR ROSEMARY A.JOYCE ROSALIND 1H. SHAW Fellow (Women’s Studies) Flo~wýArithropology) Fellow (Anthropology) olngGen State...Also I joined with Prof. Elizabeth Simmons of Boston University and Prof. Melissa Franklin of Harvard University (both women at Harvard during my

  11. Blogs, webinars and significant learning: A case report on a teacher training program for college teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Polanco-Bueno, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a teacher training experience for College professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students’ learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design of students’ learning experiences. The learning experience consisted in an International Certificate on Significant Learning integrated by six modules, 2...

  12. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Systems Management College. Volume 19. Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    years. Fayol , Henri . General and Industrial Seatl, Washin"tn. He isa 1989groduate The current effort-the Defense Management. Toronto, Canada: Sir of...Institute, noted and Acquisition Costs," (Abellera); General Charles Henry , USA; and there are many congressional "Exchange Rates and Product Cost," Major...has been a Defense Systems Management College tions. Each Service has professional deterioration since 1986. The crucial were Mr. Henry Alberts, Dr

  13. The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

  14. Medicine and music: a note on John Hunter (1728-93) and Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Louis

    2010-05-01

    Joseph Haydn was a central figure in the development and growth of the European classical musical tradition in its transition from the Baroque period. John Hunter as the Founder of Scientific Surgery was a dominant figure in 18th-century British medical science. Anne Hunter née Home (1742-1821) was in her own right a figure of some eminence in the literary circles of 18th-century London. Attracted to the burgeoning medical and musical scenes of London, John Hunter married Anne Home and became a famous surgeon; Haydn became acquainted with the Hunters. The people, the opportunities and the circumstances had coincided.

  15. Assessment of factors impacting success for incoming college engineering students in a summer bridge program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisel, John R.; Jablonski, Marissa; Hosseini, Hossein; Munson, Ethan

    2012-06-01

    A summer bridge program for incoming engineering and computer science freshmen has been used at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee from 2007 to 2010. The primary purpose of this program has been to improve the mathematics course placement for incoming students who initially place into a course below Calculus I on the math placement examination. The students retake the university's math placement examination after completing the bridge program to determine if they then place into a higher-level mathematics course. If the students improve their math placement, the program is considered successful for that student. The math portion of the bridge program is designed around using the ALEKS software package for targeted, self-guided learning. In the 2007 and 2008 versions of the program, both an on-line version and an on-campus version with additional instruction were offered. In 2009 and 2010, the program was exclusively in an on-campus format, and also featured a required residential component and additional engineering activities for the students. From the results of these four programs, we are able to evaluate the success of the program in its different formats. In addition, data has been collected and analysed regarding the impact of other factors on the program's success. The factors include student preparation before the beginning of the program (as measured by math ACT scores) and the amount of time the student spent working on the material during the program. Better math preparation and the amount of time spent on the program were found to be good indicators of success. Furthermore, the on-campus version of the program is more effective than the on-line version.

  16. Anterior Hypopituitarism and Treatment Response in Hunter Syndrome: A Comparison of Two Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Paola; Wei, Xing-Chang; Khan, Aneal

    2016-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a clinically important diagnosis and has not previously been reported in Hunter syndrome. We contrast two cases with anatomic pituitary anomalies: one with anterior panhypopituitarism and the other with intact pituitary function. Patient 1, a 10-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for poor growth and an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Endocrine testing revealed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency, and tertiary hypothyroidism. An improvement in growth velocity with hormone replacement (GH, thyroxine, and corticosteroid) was seen; however, final adult height remained compromised. Patient 2, a 13-year-old male with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for growth failure. He had a large empty sella turcica with posteriorly displaced pituitary. Functional endocrine testing was normal and a trial of GH-treatment yielded no significant effect. Panhypopituitarism associated with pituitary anomalies has not been previously reported in Hunter syndrome and was an incidental finding of significant clinical importance. In the setting of documented anterior hypopituitarism, while hormone replacement improved growth velocity, final height remained impaired. In patient 2 with equivocal GH-testing results, treatment had no effect on linear growth. These cases highlight the importance of careful clinical assessment in Hunter syndrome and that judicious hormone replacement may be indicated in individual cases. PMID:28018694

  17. Applications of resilience theory in management of a moose-hunter system in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Brown

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated wildfire-related effects on a slow ecological variable, i.e., forage production, and fast social-ecological variables, i.e., seasonal harvest rates, hunter access, and forage offtake, in a moose-hunter system in interior Alaska. In a 1994 burn, average forage production increased slightly (5% between 2007 and 2013; however, the proportional removal across all sites declined significantly (10%. This suggests that moose are not utilizing the burn as much as they have in the past and that, as the burn has aged, the apparent habitat quality has declined. Areas with a greater proportion of accessible burned area supported both high numbers of hunters and harvested moose. Our results suggest that evaluating ecological variables in conjunction with social variables can provide managers with information to forecast management scenarios. We recommend that wildlife managers monitor fast variables frequently, e.g., annually, to adapt and keep their management responsive as resources fluctuate; whereas slower variables, which require less frequent monitoring, should be actively incorporated into long-term management strategies. Climate-driven increases in wildfire extent and severity and economically driven demographic changes are likely to increase both moose density and hunting pressure. However, the future resilience of this moose-hunter system will depend on integrated management of wildfire, hunter access, and harvest opportunities.

  18. DBD-Hunter: a knowledge-based method for the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2008-07-01

    The structures of DNA-protein complexes have illuminated the diversity of DNA-protein binding mechanisms shown by different protein families. This lack of generality could pose a great challenge for predicting DNA-protein interactions. To address this issue, we have developed a knowledge-based method, DNA-binding Domain Hunter (DBD-Hunter), for identifying DNA-binding proteins and associated binding sites. The method combines structural comparison and the evaluation of a statistical potential, which we derive to describe interactions between DNA base pairs and protein residues. We demonstrate that DBD-Hunter is an accurate method for predicting DNA-binding function of proteins, and that DNA-binding protein residues can be reliably inferred from the corresponding templates if identified. In benchmark tests on approximately 4000 proteins, our method achieved an accuracy of 98% and a precision of 84%, which significantly outperforms three previous methods. We further validate the method on DNA-binding protein structures determined in DNA-free (apo) state. We show that the accuracy of our method is only slightly affected on apo-structures compared to the performance on holo-structures cocrystallized with DNA. Finally, we apply the method to approximately 1700 structural genomics targets and predict that 37 targets with previously unknown function are likely to be DNA-binding proteins. DBD-Hunter is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/webservice/DBD-Hunter/.

  19. Future Discounting in Congo Basin Hunter-Gatherers Declines with Socio-Economic Transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Deniz Salali

    Full Text Available Humans have a tendency to discount the future; that is we value small, short-term rewards over larger, long-term rewards. The degree of future discounting, however, changes in response to socio-ecological factors. Here, we study Mbendjele BaYaka hunter-gatherers of northern Congo and their farmer neighbours to investigate adaptations in inter-temporal preferences in humans. We argue that in immediate-return systems, where food storage is absent and egalitarianism is enforced through levelling mechanisms, future discounting is an adaptive strategy to prevent wealth accumulation and the emergence of hierarchies. This ensures food sharing and allows for survival in unpredictable environments where there is risk of an energy shortfall. On the other hand, when food storage is made possible by the emergence of agriculture or as seen in some delayed-return hunter-gatherer populations, wealth accumulation, hierarchies and lower discount rates become the adaptive strategy. Therefore, individuals in immediate-return, egalitarian societies will discount the future more than those in non-egalitarian, delayed-return societies. Consistent with the predictions we found that market integration and socio-economic transitions decrease the future discounting in Mbendjele hunter-gatherers. Our measures of socio-economic differences marked this transition in hunter-gatherers living in a logging town. The degree of future-discounting was the same between more market-integrated hunter-gatherers and their farmer neighbours.

  20. Comparing Road-Kill Datasets from Hunters and Citizen Scientists in a Landscape Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heigl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic has severe effects on animals, especially when road-kills are involved. In many countries, official road-kill data are provided by hunters or police; there are also road-kill observations reported by citizen scientists. The aim of the current study was to test whether road-kill reports by hunters stem from similar landscapes than those reported by citizen scientists. We analysed the surrounding landscapes of 712 road-kill reportings of European hares in the province of Lower Austria. Our data showed that road-killed hares reported both by hunters and citizens are predominantly surrounded by arable land. No difference of hedges and solitary trees could be found between the two datasets. However, significant differences in landcover classes and surrounding road networks indicate that hunters’ and citizen scientists’ data are different. Hunters reported hares from landscapes with significantly higher percentages of arable land, and greater lengths of secondary roads. In contrast, citizens reported hares from landscapes with significantly higher percentages of urban or industrial areas and greater lengths of motorways, primary roads, and residential roads. From this we argue that hunters tend to report data mainly from their hunting areas, whereas citizens report data during their daily routine on the way to/from work. We conclude that a citizen science approach is an important source for road-kill data when used in addition to official data with the aim of obtaining an overview of road-kill events on a landscape scale.

  1. Anterior Hypopituitarism and Treatment Response in Hunter Syndrome: A Comparison of Two Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munier A. Nour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism is a clinically important diagnosis and has not previously been reported in Hunter syndrome. We contrast two cases with anatomic pituitary anomalies: one with anterior panhypopituitarism and the other with intact pituitary function. Patient 1, a 10-year-old boy with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for poor growth and an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Endocrine testing revealed growth hormone (GH deficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency, and tertiary hypothyroidism. An improvement in growth velocity with hormone replacement (GH, thyroxine, and corticosteroid was seen; however, final adult height remained compromised. Patient 2, a 13-year-old male with Hunter syndrome, was evaluated for growth failure. He had a large empty sella turcica with posteriorly displaced pituitary. Functional endocrine testing was normal and a trial of GH-treatment yielded no significant effect. Panhypopituitarism associated with pituitary anomalies has not been previously reported in Hunter syndrome and was an incidental finding of significant clinical importance. In the setting of documented anterior hypopituitarism, while hormone replacement improved growth velocity, final height remained impaired. In patient 2 with equivocal GH-testing results, treatment had no effect on linear growth. These cases highlight the importance of careful clinical assessment in Hunter syndrome and that judicious hormone replacement may be indicated in individual cases.

  2. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  3. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  4. Kindergarten to College (K2C): A First-in-the-Nation Initiative to Set All Kindergartners on the Path to College. Asset Building Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Leigh; Stuhldreher, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In the Spring of 2011, the City of San Francisco automatically opened college savings accounts for over 1,000 San Francisco Kindergartners. The City also "seeded" every account with an initial deposit of $50. The account openings marked the official launch of San Francisco's Kindergarten to College initiative, or "K2C." This initiative, the first…

  5. Public Relations in the Community College: How to Start up an Operation, Determine the Program, and Master the Skills of Community College Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Richard L., Ed.

    This nine-chapter manual provides a practical guide to community college public relations (PR) for PR officers with expanding responsibilities. Chapter I explores the philosophy of community college public relations, considering the issue of community, the role of the PR director, and potential problem areas. Chapters II and III provide guidelines…

  6. An examination of gender bias on the eighth-grade MEAP science test as it relates to the Hunter Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Hall, Judy Gail

    The purpose of this study was to apply the Hunter-Gatherer Theory of sex spatial skills to responses to individual questions by eighth grade students on the Science component of the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) to determine if sex bias was inherent in the test. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory on Spatial Sex Differences, an original theory, that suggested a spatial dimorphism concept with female spatial skill of pattern recall of unconnected items and male spatial skills requiring mental movement. This is the first attempt to apply the Hunter-Gatherer Theory on Spatial Sex Differences to a standardized test. An overall hypothesis suggested that the Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences could predict that males would perform better on problems involving mental movement and females would do better on problems involving the pattern recall of unconnected items. Responses to questions on the 1994-95 MEAP requiring the use of male spatial skills and female spatial skills were analyzed for 5,155 eighth grade students. A panel composed of five educators and a theory developer determined which test items involved the use of male and female spatial skills. A MANOVA, using a random sample of 20% of the 5,155 students to compare male and female correct scores, was statistically significant, with males having higher scores on male spatial skills items and females having higher scores on female spatial skills items. Pearson product moment correlation analyses produced a positive correlation for both male and female performance on both types of spatial skills. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Sex Differences appears to be able to predict that males could perform better on the problems involving mental movement and females could perform better on problems involving the pattern recall of unconnected items. Recommendations for further research included: examination of male/female spatial skill differences at early elementary and high school levels to

  7. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Anderson, Janis L; Hodge, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p level, at the end of the semester. In addition, 55.9% of the SS group versus 45.1% of the SI group indicated that they made changes in their sleep habits after participation in the extra credit sleep activity (p students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course.

  8. 78 FR 7390 - Information Collection Request; Economic Assessment of Conservation Reserve Program Lands for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    .... Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audio... program conditions. The research proposal has been discussed with the respective State Fish and Game... survey because the State Fish and Game agencies do not have email addresses for all hunters, and hunters...

  9. The benefits of a leadership program and executive coaching for new nursing academic administrators: one college's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Weinstock, Beth; Lachman, Vicki; Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Dreher, H Michael

    2009-01-01

    Despite attention given to the nursing shortage and now the nursing faculty shortage, what is perhaps less visible but equally critical are the pending retirements of most of the current cadre of academic nursing administrators in the next decade. With only 2.1% of current deans, directors, and department chairs in 2006 aged 45 years or younger, there may be a pending crisis in leadership development and succession planning in our nursing schools and colleges. This article describes an innovative leadership development program for largely new nursing academic administrators, which combined a formal campus-based leadership symposia and executive coaching. This article is particularly useful and practical in that actual case studies are described (albeit modified slightly to protect the identity of the individual administrator), providing a real-life narrative that rarely makes its way into the nursing academic administration literature. The executive coaching focus is very sparsely used in nursing academia, and this college's success using this professional development strategy is likely to become a template for other institutions to follow.

  10. Planet Hunters: Assessing the Kepler Inventory of Short-period Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of >=2 R ⊕ planets on short-period (=4 R ⊕ Planet Hunters >=85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler >=4 R ⊕ planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of >=4 R ⊕ short-period planets is nearly complete.

  11. Ancient DNA reveals lack of continuity between neolithic hunter-gatherers and contemporary Scandinavians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Thomas, Mark G

    2009-01-01

    The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1-3]. Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3-5]. Scandinavia holds a unique pla......]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations....... in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early farmers for more than a millennium before they vanished some 4,000 years ago [7, 8]. The prolonged coexistence...

  12. Zoonotic disease risk and the bushmeat trade: assessing awareness among hunters and traders in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Melanie

    2012-12-01

    The bushmeat industry has been a topic of increasing importance among both conservationists and public health officials for its influence on zoonotic disease transmission and animal conservation. While the association between infectious diseases and the bushmeat trade is well established in the research community, risk perception among bushmeat hunters and traders has not been well characterized. I conducted surveys of 123 bushmeat hunters and traders in rural Sierra Leone to investigate hunting practices and awareness of zoonotic disease risk associated with the bushmeat trade. Twenty-four percent of bushmeat hunters and traders reported knowledge of disease transmission from animals to humans. Formal education did not significantly affect awareness of zoonotic disease transmission. Individuals who engaged exclusively in preparation and trading of bushmeat were more likely to accidentally cut themselves compared to those who primarily engaged in bushmeat hunting (P zoonotic pathogens through accidental self-cutting compared to men (P zoonotic disease transmission risk among vulnerable communities.

  13. Clarifying beliefs underlying hunter intentions to support a ban on lead shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.; Doncarlos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Shot from hunting adds toxic lead to environments worldwide. Existing lead shot regulations have been instituted with little understanding of hunter beliefs and attitudes. This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action, using a multilevel, multivariate approach, to clarify how positive and negative beliefs relate to attitudes about a ban on lead shot. Structure coefficients and commonality analysis were employed to further examine relationships between beliefs and attitudes. Results suggest that while both positive and negative outcomes influence attitudes, positive outcomes were more influential for supporters and negative beliefs for opposers. Management may need to focus on the results from hunters who indicated that they would be unlikely to support a ban, as these hunters include those who may actively oppose additional efforts to regulate lead.

  14. Ethical acceptability of recreational hunting - does the motive of the hunter matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard; Sandøe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ,001) and hunters (n=1,130) in Denmark. In this survey just under half of the general public indicated that the hunters’ motives affected their attitude to the acceptability of hunting. A significant difference in wildlife value orientations was found between the two groups. Motives relating to nature, the social...... is to assess the extent to which the perceived motive for recreational hunting plays a role in its public acceptance. We also compare public perceptions of the importance of motive with those of hunters. We conducted a nationally representative survey (web-based questionnaires) of the general public (n=1......’, ‘the sport’, ‘the excitement’, and ‘to kill’ to recreational hunting to a much greater degree than the hunters themselves; and these motives were associated with lower assessments of the acceptability of recreational hunting among the public. The mismatch between presumed and professed motives among...

  15. A Training Program for College Residence Hall Advisors: Rincon Hall, California State University, Northridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Ruth

    This program was devised in an attempt to train more effective resident advisors for the 1972-73 school year at a dormitory at California State University. The special characteristics of the dormitory--racially mixed and discordant--seemed to indicate a need for a special kind of resident advisor training program, one that attempted to better…

  16. The Impact of Adult Degree Programs on the Private College or University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    Those who work within adult higher education know there is something unique about their perspective on academic life. Employed in the adult education arena in one capacity or another since 1993, the author has had the privilege of working at an institution with a small adult program and an institution with a very large adult program. In this…

  17. Predicting Successful College Experiences: Evidence from a First Year Retention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Kimberly; Flynn, Nicole T.; Lee, James D.; Hilton, David

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that programs designed to target first year students increase their likelihood of success during that year and their chances of completing an undergraduate education (Bureau & Rromrey, 1994; Conner & Colton, 1999). Theoretically, such programs should help in part because they foster integration into campus communities…

  18. A "Sleep 101" Program for College Students Improves Sleep Hygiene Knowledge and Reduces Maladaptive Beliefs about Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Nash, Christina O; Walsh, Colleen M; Culnan, Elizabeth; Horsey, Sarah; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Sensitizing young adults about sleep hygiene knowledge and helpful sleep attitudes may have the potential to instill long-lasting healthy sleep practices. Towards these ends, evaluation of psychoeducational program "Sleep 101" tailored to college students was undertaken. Following two weeks of sleep-log recordings, participants were randomly assigned to a Sleep 101 (experimental) condition or a sleep monitoring (control) condition. The Sleep 101 condition was comprised of two 90-minute workshops aimed to educate students about healthy sleep practices, helpful thoughts about sleep, and ways to improve sleep. The sleep monitoring group received a sleep hygiene handout and completed sleep logs for the study duration. Sleep 101 participants endorsed fewer maladaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep, increased sleep hygiene knowledge, and reduced sleep onset latency compared to the sleep monitoring participants. Brief psychoeducational courses may be a cost-effective way to alleviate current, and/or prevent future, sleep problems in young adults.

  19. Predictors of mental illness stigma and attitudes among college students: using vignettes from a campus common reading program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Prager, Laura S; Moylan, Lois B; Smith, Kathleen Maurer; Cullinan, Meritta

    2014-09-01

    Research has demonstrated that stigmatizing mentally ill individuals is prevalent and often results in lack of adherence to or avoidance of treatment. The present study sought to examine attitudes of college students regarding mental illness as part of a campus-wide "common readings" program. The book selected was a non-fiction account of a young girl with mental illness and the program was developed to initiate dialogue about young people with mental problems. Faculty from multiple disciplines collaborated on the project. A sample of 309 students completed a web-based survey after reading a vignette about an adolescent girl with mental illness. The vignette description was based on a character in the book selected in the program. The instruments measured attribution of stigma, social distance, and familiarity with people who have mental illness. Results demonstrated that younger students and those who are less familiar with mental illness were more likely to stigmatize and maintain social distance from those who are mentally ill. Awareness of the study findings can assist health professionals and mental health workers to identify interventions that can decrease stigma. Psychiatric mental health nurses are well positioned to lead the education effort aimed at reducing stigmatizing attitudes among the public.

  20. NSF Programs That Support Research in the Two-Year College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, V.; Ryan, J. G.; Singer, J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Science Foundation recognizes the significant role provided by two-year institutions in providing high quality STEM courses to large numbers of students. For some students the STEM courses completed while attending a two-year institution represent the only STEM courses a student may take; for others the courses serve as the foundation to continue on into a STEM major at a four-year institution; and some students complete STEM courses that lead directly into the workforce. Several programs in the Division of Undergraduate Research, including the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, STEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP), and the Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM (TUES) program, support the inclusion of student research experiences at two-year institutions. Information about these programs and examples of successful funded projects will be provided. Resources for faculty considering applying for support will be shared with special attention to a faculty development program designed to help faculty learn about funding opportunities and prepare proposals for submission to the TUES and ATE programs.