WorldWideScience

Sample records for humidity timely variation

  1. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  2. Sensitivity of honeybee hygroreceptors to slow humidity changes and temporal humidity variation detected in high resolution by mobile measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between -1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  3. Volumetric humidity timely variation, at different depths, in soils of a toposequence of the Reconcavo Baiano - Brazil; Variacao da umidade volumetrica ao longo do tempo, em diferentes profundidades, em solos de uma topossequencia do Reconcavo Baiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos; Costa, Liovando Marciano da [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Paiva, Arlicelio de Queiroz [UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Agrarias e Ambientais. E-mail: aqpaiva@jacaranda.uescba.com.br; Souza, Luciano da Silva [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura. E-mail: lsouza@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Santana, Marlete Bastos [Bahia Univ., Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia

    1997-07-01

    Aiming the time basis volumetric humidity evaluation, at different depths, the present work has been developed in a Reconcavo Baiano toposequence consisting of three different soils, in accordance with the distances from the toposequence begin. A neutron probe has been used for determination of the soil water contents. The relative counting of the neutron probe has been converted to gravimetric humidity by using regression equation for each type of soil.

  4. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these two satellite combinations are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hpa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is ~7 RHi for humidity and ~50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass for these regions is found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maxima in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (outside the 1-σ uncertainty. The models also show clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to varying degrees.

  5. Soil variations on hillslopes in humid temperate climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Gerrard, A.

    1990-09-01

    Considerable insight into the nature and causes of soil variations on hillslopes has been provided by studies which have incorporated both pedological and geomorphological concepts into their methodology. Even so, there is still a great deal of uncertainty concerning the relationships between soils and landforms. This paper attempts to outline the conceptual and methodological issues involved in such a synthesis by examining the nature of soil variation on specific examples of landscapes in humid temperate climates. It has not been possible to examine soils across the whole of this region but soil-landform relationships on the Chalk of southeast England, the granite uplands of Dartmoor and in the Wyre Forest of England have been used to examine a number of well-established principles. One of these principles is that many landscapes possess slopes with easily identifiable toposequences. The hillslopes analysed have shown that relationships do exist between soils and landforms but the idea that many slopes are integrated along their entire length is not necessarily true. Individual components of slopes possess soil characteristics that appear to be related to the morphological nature of those components but the slopes, as a whole, do not possess integrated soil systems. Different parts of the slope appear to act independently. This questions the validity of employing traditional concepts such as that of the catena in soil-landform relationships.

  6. Analysis of Skin Humidity Variation Between Sasang Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Oh Jung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between variations in skin humidity (SH induced by perspiration across Sasang types and to identify novel and effective Sasang classification factors. We also analyzed the responses of each Sasang type to sweating-related QSCC II items. The results revealed a significant difference in SH across gender and significant differences in SH before and after perspiration between Tae-Eum and So-Eum men. In addition, Tae-Eum women showed significant differences in SH compared with women classified as another Sasang type. Furthermore, evaluation of the items related to sweating in the QSCC II and their relationship to each constitution revealed a significant difference between Tae-Eum and other Sasang types. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there is a distinct SH difference following perspiration between Tae-Eum and other Sasang types. Such findings may aid in Sasang typology diagnostic testing with the support of further sophisticated clinical studies.

  7. Agro-morphological variation in lowland humid forest accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In year 2004 Ninety-height maize accessions (eighty-six landraces and twelve improved varieties) were collected from the lowland humid forest zone of Cameroon and evaluated on the basis of fifteen agro-morphological characters in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The objectives of this study ...

  8. Effect of particle size variation of Ag nanoparticles in Polyaniline composite on humidity sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, Madhavi V; Kanitkar, Prajakta; Kulkarni, Milind; Kale, B B; Aiyer, R C

    2010-04-15

    The results of synthesis of Ag-Polyaniline nanocomposite along with an investigation of optical fiber based humidity sensor using evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy are discussed. The sensor was fabricated using Ag-Polyaniline nanocomposite deposited on an optical fiber clad and tested in the range of 5-95% relative humidity (RH). Optimization of clad length (2-8mm) was done and then particle size (15-30 nm) variation of silver nanoparticles in Polyaniline composite was studied for better performance of sensor. The effect of particle size on sensing humidity was investigated. The reduction of particle size, leads to a dramatic improvement in sensitivity and speed of response. The optimized clad length of 6mm exhibits the better results for 15 nm particle size of Ag nanoparticles dispersed in Polyaniline. The sensor response is fully reversible having almost 1% of standard deviation. Response time of the sensor is 30s with a slow recovery of 90 s. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperature, humidity and time. Combined effects on radiochromic film dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of both relative humidity and temperature during irradiation on the dose response of FWT-60-00 and Riso B3 radiochromic film dosimeters have been investigated in the relative humidity (RH) range 11-94% and temperature range 20-60 degrees C for irradiation by Co-60 photons and 10-Me......V electrons. The results show that humidity and temperature cannot be treated as independent variables, rather there appears to be interdependence between absorbed dose, temperature, and humidity. Dose rate does not seem to play a significant role. The dependence of temperature during irradiation is +0.......25 +/- 0.1% per degrees C for the FWT-60-00 dosimeters and +0.5 +/- 0.1% per degrees C For Riso B3 dosimeters at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C and at relative humidities between 20 and 53%. At extreme conditions both with respect to temperature and to humidity, the dosimeters show much stronger...

  10. Spectroscopy of growing and evaporating water droplets: exploring the variation in equilibrium droplet size with relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchem, Laura; Buajarern, Jariya; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Ward, Andrew D; Gilham, Richard J J; Johnston, Roy L; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-07-06

    We demonstrate that the thermodynamic properties of a single liquid aerosol droplet can be explored through the combination of a single-beam gradient force optical trap with Raman spectroscopy. A single aqueous droplet, 2-6 microm in radius, can be trapped in air indefinitely and the response of the particle to variations in relative humidity investigated. The Raman spectrum provides a unique fingerprint of droplet composition, temperature, and size. Spontaneous Raman scattering is shown to be consistent with that from a bulk phase sample, with the shape of the OH stretching band dependent on the concentration of sodium chloride in the aqueous phase and on the polarization of the scattered light. Stimulated Raman scattering at wavelengths commensurate with whispering gallery modes is demonstrated to provide a method for determining the size of the trapped droplet with nanometer precision and with a time resolution of 1 s. The polarization dependence of the stimulated scatter is consistent with the dependence observed for the spontaneous scatter from the droplet. By characterizing the spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering from the droplet, we demonstrate that it is possible to measure the equilibrium size and composition of an aqueous droplet with variation in relative humidity. For this benchmark study we investigate the variation in equilibrium size with relative humidity for a simple binary sodium chloride/aqueous aerosol, a typical representative inorganic/aqueous aerosol that has been studied extensively in the literature. The measured equilibrium sizes are shown to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of Köhler theory. We suggest that this approach could provide an important new strategy for characterizing the thermodynamic properties and kinetics of transformation of aerosol particles.

  11. Computer-generated versus nurse-determined strategy for incubator humidity and time to regain birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2008-01-01

    To compare effects on premature infants' weight gain of a computer-generated and a nurse-determined incubator humidity strategy. An optimal humidity protocol is thought to reduce time to regain birthweight. Prospective randomized controlled design. Level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit in the

  12. Predicting Indian Summer Monsoon onset through variations of surface air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall has an enormous effect on Indian agriculture, economy, and, as a consequence, life and prosperity of more than one billion people. Variability of the monsoonal rainfall and its onset have a huge influence on food production, agricultural planning and GDP of the country, which on 22% is determined by agriculture. Consequently, successful forecasting of the ISM onset is a big challenge and large efforts are being put into it. Here, we propose a novel approach for predictability of the ISM onset, based on critical transition theory. The ISM onset is defined as an abrupt transition from sporadious rainfall to spatially organized and temporally sustained rainfall. Taking this into account, we consider the ISM onset as is a critical transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon, which take place in time and also in space. It allows us to suggest that before the onset of ISM on the Indian subcontinent should be areas of critical behavior where indicators of the critical transitions can be detected through an analysis of observational data. First, we identify areas with such critical behavior. Second, we use detected areas as reference points for observation locations for the ISM onset prediction. Third, we derive a precursor for the ISM onset based on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity variations in these reference points. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this precursor on two observational data sets. The proposed approach allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. The ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In the anomalous years, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the

  13. Impact of small variations in temperature and humidity on the reproductive activity and survival of Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae); Impacto de pequenas variacoes de temperatura e umidade na atividade reprodutiva e sobrevivencia de Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ethiene Arruda Pedrosa de Almeida; Santos, Eloina Maria de Mendonca; Correia, Juliana Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Cleide Maria Ribeiro de, E-mail: cleide.ufpe@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Zoologia

    2010-07-01

    In short space of time increase in temperature and rainfall can affect vector populations and, consequently, the diseases for them transmitted. The present study analyzed the effect of small temperature and humidity variations on the fecundity, fertility and survival of Aedes aegypti. These parameters were analyzed using individual females at temperatures ranging from 23 to 27 deg C (mean 25 deg C); 28 to 32 deg C (mean 30 deg C) and 33 to 37 deg C (mean 35 deg C) associated to 60 +- 8% and 80 +- 6% relative humidity. Females responded to an increase in temperature by reducing egg production, oviposition time and changing oviposition patterns. At 25 deg C and 80% relative humidity, females survived two-fold more and produced 40% more eggs when compared to those kept at 35 deg C and 80% relative humidity. However, in 45% of females kept at 35 deg C and 60% relative humidity oviposition was inhibited and only 15% females laid more than 100 eggs, suggesting that the intensity of the temperature effect was influenced by humidity. Gradual reductions in egg fertility at 60% relative humidity were observed with the increase in temperature, although such effect was not found in the 80% relative humidity at 25 deg C and 30 deg C. These results suggest that the reduction in population densities recorded in tropical areas during seasons when temperatures reach over 35 deg C is likely to be strongly influenced by temperature and humidity, with a negative effect on several aspects of mosquito biology. (author)

  14. Crystallization of amorphous lactose at high humidity studied by terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Alexander I.; Yang, Bin; Goldup, Stephen M.; Watkinson, Michael; Donnan, Robert S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the first use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to study the hydration and crystallization of an amorphous molecular solid at high humidity. Lactose in its amorphous and monohydrate forms exhibits different terahertz spectra due to the lack of long range order in the amorphous material. This difference allowed the transformation of amorphous lactose to its monohydrate form at high humidity to be studied in real time. Spectral fitting of frequency-domain data allowed kinetic data to be obtained and the crystallization was found to obey Avrami kinetics. Bulk changes during the crystallization could also be observed in the time-domain.

  15. Measurement of Rapid Variations in Lower-Tropospheric Humidity Profiles Using Ground-Based Scanning Compact Microwave Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Bosch-Lluis, X.; Reising, S. C.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of the troposphere, particularly water vapor content and temperature, change in response to physical mechanisms, including frictional drag, evaporation, transpiration, heat transfer, pollutant emission and flow modification due to terrain. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is characterized by a greater rate of change in the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere than at higher altitudes in the troposphere. Measurement of these changes, such as large horizontal gradients in water vapor and vertical profiles, provides very important data for improved weather prediction. Sensitivity studies for severe storm prediction indicate that a lack of accurate observations of water vapor densities throughout the lower troposphere limits the forecasting of severe storms. Therefore, measurements of water vapor density using microwave radiometers may help to improve accuracy of severe weather prediction. The HUMidity EXperiment 2011 (HUMEX11) was conducted to validate remote sensing of tropospheric humidity using ground-based scanning Compact Microwave Radiometers for Humidity profiling (CMR-H). Two microwave radiometers were scanned to sample an atmospheric volume at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility. Scientific objectives of HUMEX11 were to measure water vapor profiles in the lower troposphere with high vertical and temporal resolution and to track rapid variations in water vapor in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. The principal reason for conducting the campaign at the SGP Climate Research Facility was the ability to compare the water vapor profile results with other measurements like ARM microwave radiometers and Raman lidar. The Raman lidar water vapor profiles were used as truth for comparison with the retrieved profiles. The study also focuses on optimizing the size of the background data set to minimize retrieval error as well as varying the

  16. Durability Improvement of Solid Electrolyte CO2 Sensor Against Humidity Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Kun; Choi, Nak-Jin; Moon, Seung Eon; Heo, Jin Ah; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Jongdae

    2015-01-01

    The sensing materials of potentiometric CO2 sensors utilize alkali/alkali-earth metal carbonates or their combinations. However, lithium carbonate easily responds to humidity resulting in incorrect information regarding CO2 concentration. Herein, the authors report a new sensing material combination (Li2CO3/BaCO3/LiOH/Ba(OH)2 (1:2:0.05:0.1 molar ratio)) for a potentiometric CO2 sensor that is not affected by humidity. The electromotive force (EMF) of the sensor using a combination of Li2CO3, BaCO3, LiOH, and Ba(OH)2 drifted by 1.5% when the relative humidity was changed from 25% to 70%, which is superior to a drift of 6% of a sensor using Li2CO3 and BaCO3, as this sensing material is known to be robust to changes in humidity.

  17. Temperature and Humidity Calibration of a Low-Cost Wireless Dust Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the design, calibration, and validation of a low-cost portable sensor for the real-time measurement of dust particles within the environment. The proposed design consists of low hardware cost and calibration based on temperature and humidity sensing to achieve accurate processing of airborne dust density. Using commercial particulate matter sensors, a highly accurate air quality monitoring sensor was designed and calibrated using real world variations in humidity and temperature for indoor and outdoor applications. Furthermore, to provide a low-cost secure solution for real-time data transfer and monitoring, an onboard Bluetooth module with AES data encryption protocol was implemented. The wireless sensor was tested against a Dylos DC1100 Pro Air Quality Monitor, as well as an Alphasense OPC-N2 optical air quality monitoring sensor for accuracy. The sensor was also tested for reliability by comparing the sensor to an exact copy of itself under indoor and outdoor conditions. It was found that accurate measurements under real-world humid and temperature varying and dynamically changing conditions were achievable using the proposed sensor when compared to the commercially available sensors. In addition to accurate and reliable sensing, this sensor was designed to be wearable and perform real-time data collection and transmission, making it easy to collect and analyze data for air quality monitoring and real-time feedback in remote health monitoring applications. Thus, the proposed device achieves high quality measurements at lower-cost solutions than commercially available wireless sensors for air quality.

  18. Seasonal Variations of Indoor Microbial Exposures and Their Relation to Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Air Exchange Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Mika; Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total...... inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m3) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m3). Indoor...... bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m3) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m3). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass...

  19. Bond Strength of Resin Composite to Dentin with Different Adhesive Systems: Influence of Relative Humidity and Application Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Fabienne; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the influence of relative humidity and application time on bond strength to dentin of different classes of adhesive systems. A total of 360 extracted human molars were ground to mid-coronal dentin. The dentin specimens were treated with one of six adhesive systems (Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE, Xeno Select, or Scotchbond Universal), and resin composite (Filtek Z250) was applied to the treated dentin surface under four experimental conditions (45% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 45% relative humidity/reduced application time; 85% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 85% relative humidity/reduced application time). After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), shear bond strength (SBS) was measured and data analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing (level of significance: α = 0.05). Increased relative humidity and reduced application time had no effect on SBS for Clearfil SE Bond and Scotchbond Universal (p = 1.00). For Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, AdheSE, and Xeno Select there was no effect on SBS of reduced application time of the adhesive system (p ≥ 0.403). However, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS for Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, and Xeno Select irrespective of application time (p ≤ 0.003), whereas for AdheSE, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS at recommended application time only (p = 0.002). Generally, increased relative humidity had a detrimental effect on SBS to dentin, but reduced application time had no effect.

  20. Observation on Responsive OCV Variation od Zinc-Air Cell with Relative Humidity Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanisah Manshor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 64 371 International Islamic University 3 1 434 14.0 96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE Zinc/MCM-41/air cell, in its dry form without the electrolyte,demonstrates humidity sensing property. A good linear correlation between the cell's open circuit voltage (OCV and the relative humidity content is observed. The systempossesses the potential to be developed into a low cost microhumidity sensor. An ultra thin cell of thickness not more than 40 μm has been fabricated and its use as a humiditysensor is substantiated.ABSTRAK: Sel zinc/MCM-41/udara, dalam keadaan kering tanpa elektrolit, menunjukkan sifat pencirian kelembapan. Voltan litar terbuka sel didapati menunjukkan korelasi linear yang baik terhadap kandungan kelembapan relatif. Sistem ini berpotensi untuk dibangunkan menjadi penciri kelembapan mikro yang murah. Sel yang amat nipis dengan ketebalan tidak melebihi 40 μm telah difabrikasi and kegunaannya sebagai penciri kelembapan dibuktikan.

  1. Graphene based humidity-insensitive films

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-09-08

    A humidity nonsensitive material based on reduced-graphene oxide (r-GO) and methods of making the same are provided, in an embodiment, the materia! has a resistance/humidity variation of about -15% to 15% based on different sintering time or temperature. In an aspect, the resistance variation to humidity can be close to zero or -0.5% to 0.5%, showing a humidity non sensitivity property. In an embodiment, a humidity nonsensitive material based on the r-GO and carbon nanotube (CNT) composites is provided, wherein the ratio of CNT to r-GO is adjusted. The ratio can be adjusted based on the combined contribution of carbon nanotube (positive resistance variation) and reduced- graphene oxide (negative resistance variation) behaviors.

  2. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Relative Humidity (%) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS Surface Relative Humidity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast...

  3. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M. [CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Martínez, C. [Observatorio Astronómico de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  4. Predicting time to failure in bending of wood particleboards under cyclic humidity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Golfín Seco, J. I.

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Time to failure tests under constant load (30, 40, 50 and 60 % stress levels were conducted on four different 19 mm thick particleboards with three layers. Two of them were uncoated (UF and MUF bonded and the rest were melamine (80 g/m2 and veneer (Mukally overlaid. Tests were carried out in cyclic humidity conditions (30 % - 90 %, at 20º C, 7 days at each condition. Time to failure was recorded, fitting mathematical models to predict time to failure. Melamine coating reduces predicting errors and increases time to failure.

    Los ensayos para observar el tiempo de rotura bajo carga constante (30, 40, 50 y 60 % de los niveles fueron llevados a cabo sobre cuatro tableros diferentes de 19 mm de espesor, constando de tres capas: dos de ellas sin recubrir (unidas mediante UF y MUF y la restante fue cubierta mediante melamina (80 g/m2 y chapada (Mukally. Los ensayos fueron realizados bajo condiciones cíclicas de humedad (30% - 90%, a 20 ºC y durante 7 días para cada caso. Se registró el tiempo de rotura, adaptándose a modelos matemáticos para predecir el tiempo de rotura. El recubrimiento con melamina reduce los errores previstos y aumenta el tiempo de rotura.

  5. Real-time Humidity Sensor Based on Microwave Resonator Coupled with PEDOT:PSS Conducting Polymer Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Kwan; Kang, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Jo; Choi, Hyang Hee; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2018-01-11

    A real-time humidity sensor based on a microwave resonator coupled with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) conducting polymer (CP) film is proposed in this paper. The resonator is patterned on a printed circuit board and is excited by electromagnetic field coupling. To enhance the sensitivity of the sensor, the CP film is located in the area with the strongest electric field in the resonator. To investigate the performance, the proposed sensor is placed alongside a reference sensor in a humidity chamber, and humidity is injected at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the electrical properties of the resonator with the CP film, such as the transmission coefficient (S 21) and resonance frequency, change with the relative humidity (RH). Specifically, as the RH changes from 5% to 80%, S 21 and the resonance frequency change simultaneously. Moreover, the proposed sensor exhibits great repeatability in the middle of the sensing range, which is from 40% to 60% RH. Consequently, our resonator coupled with the CP film can be used as a real-time humidity-sensing device in the microwave range, where various radio-frequency devices are in use.

  6. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  7. Annual variation in canopy openness, air temperature and humidity inthe understory of three forested sites in southern Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marayana Prado Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at contributing to the knowledge of physical factors affecting community structure in Atlantic Forest remnants of southern Bahia state, Brazil, we analyzed the annual variation in the understory microclimate of a hillside forest fragment in the ‘Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Serra do Teimoso’ (RST and a rustic cacao agroforestry system (Cabruca, located nearby the RST. Canopy openness (CO, air temperature (Ta, air relative humidity (RH and vapor pressure deficit (VPD data were collected between April, 2005 and April, 2006 at the base (RSTB, 340 m and the top (RSTT, 640 m of the RST and at the Cabruca (CB, 250 m. Data of rainfall, Ta, RH and VPD were also collected in an open area (OA, 270 m. The highest rainfalls (> 100 mm occurred in November, 2005 and April, 2006, whereas October, 2005 was the driest month (< 20 mm. CO ranged between 2.5 % in the CB (April, 2006 and 7.7 % in the RST (October, 2005. Low rainfall in October, 2005 affected VPDmax in all sites. Those effects were more pronounced in OA, followed by CB, RSTB and RSTT. During the period of measurements, the values of Ta, RH and VPD in CB were closer to the values measured in OA than to the values measured inside the forest.

  8. Numerical study on response time of a parallel plate capacitive polyimide humidity sensor based on microhole upper electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenhe; He, Xuan; Wu, Jianyun; Wang, Liangbi; Wang, Liangcheng

    2017-07-01

    The parallel plate capacitive humidity sensor based on the grid upper electrode is considered to be a promising one in some fields which require a humidity sensor with better dynamic characteristics. To strengthen the structure and balance the electric charge of the grid upper electrode, a strip is needed. However, it is the strip that keeps the dynamic characteristics of the sensor from being further improved. The numerical method is time- and cost-saving, but the numerical study on the response time of the sensor is just of bits and pieces. The numerical models presented by these studies did not consider the porosity effect of the polymer film on the dynamic characteristics. To overcome the defect of the grid upper electrode, a new structure of the upper electrode is provided by this paper first, and then a model considering the porosity effects of the polymer film on the dynamic characteristics is presented and validated. Finally, with the help of software FLUENT, parameter effects on the response time of the humidity sensor based on the microhole upper electrode are studied by the numerical method. The numerical results show that the response time of the microhole upper electrode sensor is 86% better than that of the grid upper electrode sensor, the response time of humidity sensor can be improved by reducing the hole spacing, increasing the aperture, reducing film thickness, and reasonably enlarging the porosity of the film.

  9. A search for transit timing variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramm U.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photometric follow-ups of transiting exoplanets (TEPs may lead to discoveries of additional, less massive bodies in extrasolar systems. This is possible by detecting and then analysing variations in transit timing of transiting exoplanets. In 2009 we launched an international observing campaign, the aim of which is to detect and characterise signals of transit timing variation (TTV in selected TEPs. The programme is realised by collecting data from 0.6-2.2-m telescopes spread worldwide at different longitudes. We present our observing strategy and summarise first results for WASP-3b with evidence for a 15 Earth-mass perturber in an outer 2:1 orbital resonance.

  10. Multivariate analysis of effects of diurnal temperature and seasonal humidity variations by tropical savanna climate on the emissions of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Chitsan

    2014-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particularly those from anthropogenic sources, have been of substantial concern. In this study, the influences of diurnal temperature and seasonal humidity variations by tropical savanna climate on the distributions of VOCs from stationary industrial sources were investigated by analyzing the concentrations during the daytime and nighttime in the dry and wet seasons and assessing the results by principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. Kaohsiung City in Southern Taiwan, known for its severe VOC pollution, was chosen as the location to be examined. In the results, the VOC concentrations were lower during the daytime and in the wet season, possibly attributed to the stronger photochemical reactions and increasing inhibition of VOC emissions and transports by elevating humidity levels. Certain compounds became appreciably more important at higher humidity, as these compounds were saturated hydrocarbons with relatively low molecular weights. The influence of diurnal temperature variation on VOC distribution behaviors seemed to be less important than and interacted with that of seasonal humidity variation. Heavier aromatic hydrocarbons with more complex structures and some aliphatic compounds were found to be the main species accounting for the maximum variances of the data observed at high humidity, and the distinct grouping of compounds implied a pronounced inherent characteristic of each cluster in the observed VOC distributions. Under the influence of diurnal temperature variation, selected VOCs that may have stronger photochemical resistances and/or longer lifetimes in the atmosphere were clustered with each other in the cluster analysis, whereas the other groups might consist of compounds with different levels of vulnerability to sunlight or high temperatures. These findings prove the complications in the current knowledge regarding the VOC contaminations and providing insight for managing the adverse impacts of

  11. Timing Variations in Two Balkan Percussion Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Goldberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many songs and dance pieces from the Balkan Peninsula employ aksak meter, in which two categorically different durations, long and short, coexist in the sequence of beats that performers emphasize and listeners move to. This paper analyzes the durations of aksak beats and measures in two recorded percussion performances that use a particular aksak beat sequence, long-short-short. The results suggest that the timing of beats varies in conjunction with factors including melodic grouping and interaction among members of a performing ensemble and audience. Timing variation linked to melodic groups occurs on a solo recording of a Macedonian Romani folk song. The performer, Muzafer Bizlim, taps an ostinato while singing, and the timing of his taps seems to mark some local and large-scale group boundaries. Melodic organization also seems relevant to the timing of beats and measures on a recording of Bulgarian percussionist Mitko Popov playing the tŭpan, a double-headed bass drum, in a small folk music ensemble. In Popov’s performance, however, timing differences might be related to characteristics of the ensemble dynamic, such as the coordination of multiple musical participants. These interpretations generate possibilities for future study of timing variations in relation to rhythm and meter.

  12. Absolute Humidity and Pandemic Versus Epidemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Edward; Lipsitch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicates that variations of absolute humidity account for the onset and seasonal cycle of epidemic influenza in temperate regions. A role for absolute humidity in the transmission of pandemic influenza, such as 2009 A/H1N1, has yet to be demonstrated and, indeed, outbreaks of pandemic influenza during more humid spring, summer, and autumn months might appear to constitute evidence against an effect of humidity. However, here the authors show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions, as well as wintertime transmission of epidemic influenza. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility, and changes in population-mixing and contact rates. PMID:21081646

  13. A Spectral Approach to Transit Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv; Xie, Ji-Wei; Jiang, Chao-Feng; Sari, Re’em; Aharonson, Oded

    2018-01-01

    The high planetary multiplicity revealed by Kepler implies that transit timing variations (TTVs) are intrinsically common. The usual procedure for detecting these TTVs is biased to long-period, deep transit planets, whereas most transiting planets have short periods and shallow transits. Here we introduce the Spectral Approach technique to TTVs that allows expanding the TTV catalog toward lower TTV amplitude, shorter orbital period, and shallower transit depth. In the spectral approach, we assume that a sinusoidal TTV exists in the data and then calculate the improvement to χ 2 that this model allows over that of the linear-ephemeris model. This enables detection of TTVs even in cases where the transits are too shallow, so that individual transits cannot be timed. The spectral approach is more sensitive because it has fewer free parameters in its model. Using the spectral approach, we (a) detect 129 new periodic TTVs in Kepler data (an increase of ∼2/3 over a previous TTV catalog); (b) constrain the TTV periods of 34 long-period TTVs and reduce amplitude errors of known TTVs; and (c) identify cases of multi-periodic TTVs, for which absolute planetary mass determination may be possible. We further extend our analysis by using perturbation theory assuming a small TTV amplitude at the detection stage, which greatly speeds up our detection (to a level of few seconds per star). Our extended TTV sample shows no deficit of short-period or low-amplitude transits, in contrast to previous surveys, in which the detection schemes were significantly biased against such systems.

  14. Seasonal variation in coat characteristics, tick loads, cortisol levels, some physiological parameters and temperature humidity index on Nguni cows raised in low- and high-input farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyatiya, C L F; Muchenje, V; Mushunje, A

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal variations in hair length, tick loads, cortisol levels, haematological parameters (HP) and temperature humidity index (THI) in Nguni cows of different colours raised in two low-input farms, and a commercial stud was determined. The sites were chosen based on their production systems, climatic characteristics and geographical locations. Zazulwana and Komga are low-input, humid-coastal areas, while Honeydale is a high-input, dry-inland Nguni stud farm. A total of 103 cows, grouped according to parity, location and coat colour, were used in the study. The effects of location, coat colour, hair length and season were used to determine tick loads on different body parts, cortisol levels and HP in blood from Nguni cows. Highest tick loads were recorded under the tail and the lowest on the head of each of the animals (P cows recorded the highest tick loads under the tails of all the cows used in the study from the three farms (P tick loads were recorded for cows with long hairs. Hair lengths were longest during the winter season in the coastal areas of Zazulwana and Honeydale (P cows had significantly longer (P tick loads on different body parts and heat stress in Nguni cows.

  15. Seasonal variation in coat characteristics, tick loads, cortisol levels, some physiological parameters and temperature humidity index on Nguni cows raised in low- and high-input farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyatiya, C. L. F.; Muchenje, V.; Mushunje, A.

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal variations in hair length, tick loads, cortisol levels, haematological parameters (HP) and temperature humidity index (THI) in Nguni cows of different colours raised in two low-input farms, and a commercial stud was determined. The sites were chosen based on their production systems, climatic characteristics and geographical locations. Zazulwana and Komga are low-input, humid-coastal areas, while Honeydale is a high-input, dry-inland Nguni stud farm. A total of 103 cows, grouped according to parity, location and coat colour, were used in the study. The effects of location, coat colour, hair length and season were used to determine tick loads on different body parts, cortisol levels and HP in blood from Nguni cows. Highest tick loads were recorded under the tail and the lowest on the head of each of the animals ( P Cortisol and THI were significantly lower ( P cortisol levels, THI, HP and tick loads on different body parts and heat stress in Nguni cows.

  16. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  17. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric temperature and humidity gradients controlled by local urban land use intensity in Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Hutyra, L.; Li, D.; Friedl, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Cities are home to the majority of humanity. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that control urban climates has substantial societal importance to a variety of sectors, including public health and energy management. While it is widely known that the surface climate of cities is modified by urban land use, relatively few studies have examined how spatial variability in urban land use intensity controls spatio-temporal variation in urban microclimates. We used data from an urban sensor network (n=25) and medium resolution remote sensing to explore the nature and magnitude of urban air temperature (Ta) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) dependence on local land use and land cover on both diurnal and seasonal time scales in the Boston metropolitan area. We observed positive correlations between the amount of local impervious surface area (ISA) and Ta as well as strong positive correlations between local ISA and VPD. Dependence on local urbanization intensity peaked at night during the growing season, when urban Ta and VPD increased by up to 0.03 C and 0.008 kPa, respectively, for every 1% increase in ISA. In the daytime during the growing season, corresponding maximum gradients were 0.015 C and 0.006 kPa per for every 1% increase in ISA. Air temperatures and VPDs are coupled to each other, and their relationship exhibits significant diurnal hysteresis during the growing season with changes in VPD gradients generally preceding changes in Ta gradients. By removing the effect of changes in temperature on VPD, we show that 79% of the urban-rural difference in VPD was explained by differences in near surface atmospheric water content, which we attribute to lower rates of evapotranspiration arising from higher ISA, lower canopy cover, and lower leaf area in Boston relative to nearby rural areas. Combining medium resolution remote sensing data and ground measurements, we estimate spatially-explicit maps of net Ta and VPD enhancement resulting from Boston's spatially

  18. Time-Dependent Variations in Structure of Sheep Wool Irradiated by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hanzlíková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool scoured in tap water with no special degreasing and containing a balanced humidity responding to usual laboratory conditions was irradiated by accelerated electron beam in the range of 0–350 kGy dose. Time variations of the wool structure were measured using FTIR, Raman, and EPR spectroscopy. The aim was to determine whether preexposure treatment of the wool, as well as postexposure time, affects the properties of the irradiated wool. Reactive products such as S-sulfonate, cystine monoxide, cystine dioxide, cysteic acid, disulphides, and carboxylates displayed a considerable fluctuation in quantity depending on both the absorbed dose and time. Mutual transformations of S-oxidized products into cysteic acid appeared to be faster than those in dry and degreased wool assuming that the present humidity inside the fibres is decisive as an oxygen source. EPR results indicated a longer lifetime for free radicals induced by lower doses compared with the radicals generated by higher ones. The pattern of the conformational composition of the secondary structure (α-helix, β-sheet, random, and residual conformations also showed a large variability depending on absorbed dose as well as postexposure time. The most stable secondary structure was observed in nonirradiated wool but even this showed a small but observable change after a longer time, too.

  19. A complexity measure based method for studying the dependance of 222Rn concentration time series on indoor air temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, D T; Udovičić, V; Krmar, M; Arsenić, I

    2014-02-01

    We have suggested a complexity measure based method for studying the dependence of measured (222)Rn concentration time series on indoor air temperature and humidity. This method is based on the Kolmogorov complexity (KL). We have introduced (i) the sequence of the KL, (ii) the Kolmogorov complexity highest value in the sequence (KLM) and (iii) the KL of the product of time series. The noticed loss of the KLM complexity of (222)Rn concentration time series can be attributed to the indoor air humidity that keeps the radon daughters in air. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Humid coolers. Humid-Cooler (Feuchtekuehler)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, H. de (Vritex KG, Leinfelden-Echterdingen (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Some edibles as well as perishable goods and other goods to be cooled must be stored at low temperatures and a 100% relative moisture. Particular care must be taken to observe the latter requirement, and to cool down the goods concerned as rapidly as possible. Humid coolers exhibit a number of technical advantages in addition to those of conventional solutions. Using them, the gradients of cooling curves are particularly marked, and the gain in time compared with conventional methods is considerable. Humid coolers contribute to energy conservation for being coupled with ice storage systems. Since the refrigerator needed for such units may be combined both with the ice storage system and with the humid cooler, goods are cooled directly and cool-down phases are short. Examples, results, and comparisons with regard to energy conservation are given. (orig./HW).

  1. Cultivar Differences in Plant Transpiration Rate at High Relative Air Humidity Are Not Related to Genotypic Variation in Stomatal Responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebraegziabher, Habtamu Giday; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    decline in plant transpiration by high RH, and that the variation in plant transpiration rate can be reflected by differences in leaf temperature (Tleaf). Plant leaf area, stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, together with plant transpiration and leaf temperature at growth conditions were analyzed...... in ten rose cultivars grown at moderate (60%) or high (85%) RH. Plants grown at high RH had a larger (9%) leaf area, and transpired less (45-50%) during the light period. At nighttime, plant transpiration decreased (28-49%) by high RH in three or four cultivars, depending on the light conditions. Within...

  2. Effect of deposition times on structure of Ga-doped ZnO thin films as humidity sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Faridzatul Shahira; Awang, Rozidawati [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) has good electrical property. It is widely used as transparent electrode in photovoltaic devices, and sensing element in gas and pressure sensors. GZO thin film was prepared using magnetron sputtering. Film deposition times were set at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes to get samples of different thickness. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the structure of GZO thin films. Structure for GZO thin film is hexagonal wurtzite structure. Morphology and thickness of GZO thin films was observed from FESEM micrographs. Grain size and thickness of thin films improved with increasing deposition times. However, increasing the thickness of thin films occur below 25 minutes only. Electrical properties of GZO thin films were studied using a four-point probe technique. The changes in the structure of the thin films lead to the changed of their electrical properties resulting in the reduction of the film resistance. These thin films properties significantly implying the potential application of the sample as a humidity sensor.

  3. Effect of deposition times on structure of Ga-doped ZnO thin films as humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Faridzatul Shahira; Awang, Rozidawati

    2014-09-01

    Gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) has good electrical property. It is widely used as transparent electrode in photovoltaic devices, and sensing element in gas and pressure sensors. GZO thin film was prepared using magnetron sputtering. Film deposition times were set at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes to get samples of different thickness. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the structure of GZO thin films. Structure for GZO thin film is hexagonal wurtzite structure. Morphology and thickness of GZO thin films was observed from FESEM micrographs. Grain size and thickness of thin films improved with increasing deposition times. However, increasing the thickness of thin films occur below 25 minutes only. Electrical properties of GZO thin films were studied using a four-point probe technique. The changes in the structure of the thin films lead to the changed of their electrical properties resulting in the reduction of the film resistance. These thin films properties significantly implying the potential application of the sample as a humidity sensor.

  4. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the development times and survival of Synopsyllus fonquerniei and Xenopsylla cheopis, the flea vectors of plague in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreppel, Katharina S; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Morse, Andy; Baylis, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is found in Asia, the Americas but mainly in Africa, with the island of Madagascar reporting almost one third of human cases worldwide. In the highlands of Madagascar, plague is transmitted predominantly by two flea species which coexist on the island, but differ in their distribution. The endemic flea, Synopsyllus fonquerniei, dominates flea communities on rats caught outdoors, while the cosmopolitan flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, is found mostly on rats caught in houses. Additionally S. fonquerniei seems restricted to areas above 800 m. Climatic constraints on the development of the two main vectors of plague could explain the differences in their distribution and the seasonal changes in their abundance. Here we present the first study on effects of temperature and relative humidity on the immature stages of both vector species. We examined the two species' temperature and humidity requirements under experimental conditions at five different temperatures and two relative humidities. By employing multivariate and survival analysis we established the impact of temperature and relative humidity on development times and survival for both species. Using degree-day analysis we then predicted the average developmental threshold for larvae to reach pupation and for pupae to complete development under each treatment. This analysis was undertaken separately for the two relative humidities and for the two species. Development times and time to death differed significantly, with the endemic S. fonquerniei taking on average 1.79 times longer to complete development and having a shorter time to death than X. cheopis under adverse conditions with high temperature and low humidity. Temperature had a significant effect on the development times of flea larvae and pupae. While humidity did not affect the development times of either species, it did influence the time of death of S. fonquerniei. Using degree-day analysis we estimated an

  5. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  6. Stepwise drying of Lake Turkana at the end of the African Humid Period: a forced regression modulated by solar activity variations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu

    2016-12-01

    Although the timing of the termination of the African Humid Period (AHP) is now relatively well established, the modes and controlling factors of this drying are still debated. Here, through a geomorphological approach, we characterize the regression of Lake Turkana at the end of the AHP. We show that lake level fall during this period was not continuous but rather stepwise and consisted of five episodes of rapid lake level fall separated by episodes marked by slower rates of lake level fall. Whereas the overall regressive trend reflects a decrease in regional precipitations linked to the gradual reduction in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, itself controlled by orbital precession, we focus discussion on the origin of the five periods of accelerated lake level fall. We propose that these periods are due to temporary reductions in rainfall across the Lake Turkana area associated with repeated westward displacement of the Congo Air Boundary (CAB) during solar activity minima.

  7. Genetic architecture of flowering time variation in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transition to reproductive development is a crucial step of a plant’s life cycle, and the timing of this transition is an important factor in crop yields. Here, we report new insights into the genetic control of natural variation in flowering time in Brachypodium distachyon, a non-domesticated c...

  8. Development of Smart Ventilation Control Algorithms for Humidity Control in High-Performance Homes in Humid U.S. Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Less, Brennan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ticci, Sara [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    , Orlando, Houston, Charleston, Memphis and Baltimore). The control options were compared to a baseline system that supplies outdoor air to a central forced air cooling (and heating) system (CFIS) that is often used in hot humid climates. Simulations were performed with CFIS ventilation systems operating on a 33% duty-cycle, consistent with 62.2-2013. The CFIS outside airflow rates were set to 0%, 50% and 100% of 62.2-2013 requirements to explore effects of ventilation rate on indoor high humidity. These simulations were performed with and without a dehumidifier in the model. Ten control algorithms were developed and tested. Analysis of outdoor humidity patterns facilitated smart control development. It was found that outdoor humidity varies most strongly seasonally—by month of the year—and that all locations follow the similar pattern of much higher humidity during summer. Daily and hourly variations in outdoor humidity were found to be progressively smaller than the monthly seasonal variation. Patterns in hourly humidity are driven by diurnal daily patterns, so they were predictable but small, and were unlikely to provide much control benefit. Variation in outdoor humidity between days was larger, but unpredictable, except by much more complex climate models. We determined that no-sensor strategies might be able to take advantage of seasonal patterns in humidity, but that real-time smart controls were required to capture variation between days. Sensor-based approaches are also required to respond dynamically to indoor conditions and variations not considered in our analysis. All smart controls face trade-offs between sensor accuracy, cost, complexity and robustness.

  9. Variations in water level for Lake Turkana in the past 8500 years near Mt. Porr, Kenya and the transition from the African Humid Period to Holocene aridity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Steven L.; Wright, David K.; Bloszies, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    A stratigraphic and geomorphic study of relict beaches up to 80 m above current water level of Lake Turkana reveal four major lake level fluctuations of >50 m between ca 8.5 and 4.5 ka during the transition from the African Humid Period to Holocene aridity. We hypothesize that high stands of Lake Turkana reflect complex hydrological processes with variability in Atlantic and Indian Ocean-derived moisture into East Africa, ultimately linked to changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Lake level rise was also amplified regionally by increased precipitation causing overflow from the adjacent Suguta and Chew Bahir basins, particularly during high stands at ca >8.5 ka and at 6.4 ka. The timing of transgressive and regressive events is constrained by 14C dating of carefully selected lacustrine mollusks, incorporation of previous shell ages with sufficient elevational control, and OSL dating of quartz grains from littoral and sublittoral deposits by a multiple aliquot regeneration (MAR) approach. There was a high water level up to at least 70 m at >8.5 ka that probably reached the spillover limit ˜100 m. A brief (lake level by 4.6 ka. Evidence from relict Porr strand plain indicate that lake level was probably below 20 m since ca 4.5 ka, though there were two noticeable high stands up to 12-20 m at ca 830 years ago and <100 years, the latter age is consistent with the historic record.

  10. High order variational solutions of time dependent neutron transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    High order numerical solutions of the time-dependent one speed neutron transport equation are developed using cubic hermite polynomial trial functions, variational techniques, and exponential matrix operators. Two new numerical solutions are developed that are high order with respect to both time and space variables. In the first method, the time-dependent P/sub N/ equations are transformed into Generalized Telegrapher's Equations (GTE) that are valid for any order P/sub N/ approximation. The Generalized Telegrapher's Equations form a coupled set of second order differential equations with respect to both time and space. In the second method, the time-dependent P/sub N/ equations are transformed into coupled Transport Diffusion Equations (TDE), keeping the additional terms that maintain the transport nature of the solution. The Transport Diffusion Equations are first order in time and second order in space. Numerically evaluated time-dependent analytic solutions are also developed for homogeneous media transport problems in the P/sub 1/ and P/sub 3/ approximations via Laplace Transforms in order to validate the variational GTE and TDE solutions. The analytic solutions allow anisotropic scattering, up to the appropriate P/sub N/ order. The analytic solutions are not limited to the non-precise extrapolation boundary condition, like many time-dependent analytic P/sub N/ solutions, but allow any of the standard transport vacuum boundary condition approximations.

  11. Effect of concentration, exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity on the toxicity of sulfur dioxide to the spores of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.; Uota, M.

    1961-12-01

    When spores of Botrytis cinerea are exposed to SO/sub 2/ gas, the subsequent reduction in spore germination is quantitatively proportional to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the exposure time. The toxicity of SO/sub 2/ increases with increasing relative humidity. In an atmosphere of 96% RH, SO/sub 2/ is more than 20 times as effective as at 75% RH. The toxicity also increases about 1.5 times for each 10/sup 0/C rise in temperature between 0/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. Time variation of radon daughters concentration in snowfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T; Aoki, M; Okabe, S

    1984-05-01

    Time variation of radon daughters concentration in snowfall was measured continuously. The relations of radon daughters concentration in snowfall to the precipitation and to atmospheric radon daughters concentration were investigated. It has become clear that when precipitation is small, radon daughters concentration in snowfall is distributed in a wide range, and that the quantity of radon daughters brought to ground surface by snowfall is proportional to precipitation. Washout effect of the snowfall on atmospheric radon daughters was also investigated.

  13. VAB Temperature and Humidity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Muktarian, Edward; Nurge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, 17 data loggers were placed in the VAB to measure temperature and humidity at 10-minute intervals over a one-year period. In 2013, the data loggers were replaced with an upgraded model and slight adjustments to their locations were made to reduce direct solar heating effects. The data acquired by the data loggers was compared to temperature data provided by three wind towers located around the building. It was found that the VAB acts as a large thermal filter, delaying and reducing the thermal oscillations occurring outside of the building. This filtering is typically more pronounced at higher locations in the building, probably because these locations have less thermal connection with the outside. We surmise that the lower elevations respond more to outside temperature variations because of air flow through the doors. Temperatures inside the VAB rarely exceed outdoor temperatures, only doing so when measurements are made directly on a surface with connection to the outside (such as a door or wall) or when solar radiation falls directly on the sensor. A thermal model is presented to yield approximate filter response times for various locations in the building. Appendix A contains historical thermal and humidity data from 1994 to 2009.

  14. Flowering Time Gene Variation in Brassica Species Shows Evolutionary Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessl, Sarah V; Huettel, Bruno; Kuehn, Diana; Reinhardt, Richard; Snowdon, Rod J

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time genes have a strong influence on successful reproduction and life cycle adaptation. However, their regulation is highly complex and only well understood in diploid model systems. For crops with a polyploid background from the genus Brassica, data on flowering time gene variation are scarce, although indispensable for modern breeding techniques like marker-assisted breeding. We have deep-sequenced all paralogs of 35 Arabidopsis thaliana flowering regulators using Sequence Capture followed by Illumina sequencing in two selected accessions of the vegetable species Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, respectively. Using these data, we were able to call SNPs, InDels and copy number variations (CNVs) for genes from the total flowering time network including central flowering regulators, but also genes from the vernalisation pathway, the photoperiod pathway, temperature regulation, the circadian clock and the downstream effectors. Comparing the results to a complementary data set from the allotetraploid species Brassica napus, we detected rearrangements in B. napus which probably occurred early after the allopolyploidisation event. Those data are both a valuable resource for flowering time research in those vegetable species, as well as a contribution to speciation genetics.

  15. Flowering Time Gene Variation in Brassica Species Shows Evolutionary Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V. Schiessl

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time genes have a strong influence on successful reproduction and life cycle adaptation. However, their regulation is highly complex and only well understood in diploid model systems. For crops with a polyploid background from the genus Brassica, data on flowering time gene variation are scarce, although indispensable for modern breeding techniques like marker-assisted breeding. We have deep-sequenced all paralogs of 35 Arabidopsis thaliana flowering regulators using Sequence Capture followed by Illumina sequencing in two selected accessions of the vegetable species Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, respectively. Using these data, we were able to call SNPs, InDels and copy number variations (CNVs for genes from the total flowering time network including central flowering regulators, but also genes from the vernalisation pathway, the photoperiod pathway, temperature regulation, the circadian clock and the downstream effectors. Comparing the results to a complementary data set from the allotetraploid species Brassica napus, we detected rearrangements in B. napus which probably occurred early after the allopolyploidisation event. Those data are both a valuable resource for flowering time research in those vegetable species, as well as a contribution to speciation genetics.

  16. Root-to-shoot ABA signaling does not contribute to genotypic variation in stomatal functioning induced by high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Dália R.A.; Fanourakis, D.; Correia, M.J.; Monteiro, J.A.; Araújo-Alves, J.P.L.; Vasconcelos, M.W.; Almeida, D.P.F.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto de Carvalho, S.

    2016-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH ≥85%) during leaf expansion hampers stomatal responsiveness to closing stimuli, a genotype-dependent effect. Genotypes with reduced stomatal closure in response to closing stimuli (i.e., sensitive genotypes) show low bulk leaf abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]). We

  17. Time expression in Hispano-American variations of Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mištinová

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Not with standing the diffusion of standard Spanish as a multinational and multicultural language, it still shows many differences on all linguistic levels. This is especially true in its vocabulary and phonetics, which reflect more intensively than other levels of the language the characteristics of the various Hispano-American variations. Nevertheless, in both diatopic and diastratic differentiation, the morphosyntactic phenomena that appear, for instance, in the system of grammatical tenses or of pronominal paradigms connected to modes of address addressing people and that off er a series of peculiarities, must not be omitted. Not all phenomena connected to the use of different tenses in Hispano-American variants have been thoroughly examined. The language is also in a process of constant development, so changes do occur. The variability of the Spanish language is the cause of a marked polycentric distinction that impinges upon numerous geolinguistic, sociolinguistic and extralinguistic aspects. Various criteria concerning the category of time in Hispano-American variations are analysed in this paper. They represent the most important questions with regard to pluricentric standards and use of geolinguistic variations, while taking into consideration both the diachronic and synchronic dimensions.

  18. Immobilization of Bovine Serum Albumin Upon Multiwall Carbon Nanotube for High Speed Humidity Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sankhya; Sasmal, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-speed humidity sensor based on immobilization of bovine serum albumin upon multiwall carbon nanotube (IBC). A simple and versatile drop casting technique was employed to make the humidity sensor using novel material IBC at room temperature. IBC was synthesized using easy solution process technique. The working principle of the IBC humidity sensor depends upon the variation of output current or conductance with the exposure of different humidity level. Humidity sensing properties of our device is explained on the basis of charge transfer from water molecules to IBC and bovine serum albumin to multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Our sensor exhibits faster response time around 1.2 s and recovery time 1.5 s respectively.

  19. Humid free efficient solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Manoj Kumar; Panjwani, Suresh Kumar; Mangi, Fareed Hussain; Khan, Danish; Meicheng, Li

    2017-09-01

    The paper examines the impact of the humidity on the Solar panels which makes a space for the drastic variation in the power generated and makes the device less efficient. Humidity readily affects the efficiency of the solar cells and creates a minimal layer of water on its surface. It also decreases the efficiency by 10-20% of the total power output produced. Moreover, to handle this issue, all around characterized measures are required to be taken to guarantee the smooth working of the solar panels utilized in humid areas. In connection with this issue, Karachi, the biggest city of Pakistan which is located near the costal line touching Arabian Sea, was taken as a reference city to measure the humidity range. In Karachi, the average humidity lies between 25-70% (as per Pakistan Meteorological Department PMD), that indirectly leads in decreasing power acquired from a Solar Panel and develops various complexities for the solar system. The system on average experiences stability issues, such as those of power fluctuations etc., due to which, the whole solar system installed observes abnormal variations in acquired power. Silica Gel was used as a desiccant material in order to assure dryness over the solar panel. More than four experiments were conducted with the usage of water absorbent to improve the efficiency and to make system more power efficient.

  20. Timing of the southward retreat of the ITCZ at the end of the Holocene Humid Period in Southern Arabia: Data-model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lézine, Anne-Marie; Ivory, Sarah J.; Braconnot, Pascale; Marti, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    New pollen data from Omani mangroves (Kwar-al-Jaramah [22.49° N - 59.76° E] and Filim [20.61° N - 58.17° E]), in addition to previously published paleohydrological records from Southern Arabia improve our understanding of the timing and amplitude of the southward retreat of the Indian monsoon influence in Southern Arabia along a north-south transect. Comparison with simulations performed with the IPSL climate model, considering both snapshot experiments and transient simulations from 6000 cal yr BP to the present, confirm the latitudinally time-transgressive nature of the humid-arid transition at the end of the Holocene Humid Period. This occurred in two steps, respectively dated at around 5000 and 2700 cal yr BP. At around 5000 cal yr BP, the southward ITCZ shift was orbitally-driven and led to the abrupt aridification at Kwar-al-Jaramah and the progressive increase of dryness at Filim as the mean position of the ITCZ was centered ca 22.30°N. At 2700 cal yr BP, aridity was fully in place over all of southern Arabia due to increased climate variability. More intense rainy events during the last millennium, however, may have contributed to the discrete hydrological improvement without any impact on the regional vegetation which has remained desert to the present day.

  1. Developments in Planet Detection using Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-12-01

    In a transiting planetary system, the presence of a second planet will cause the time interval between transits to vary. These transit timing variations (TTV) are particularly large near mean-motion resonances and can be used to infer the orbital elements of planets with masses that are too small to detect by any other means. The author presents the results of a study of simulated data where they show the potential that this planet detection technique has to detect and characterize secondary planets in transiting systems. These results have important ramifications for planetary transit searches since each transiting system presents an opportunity for additional discoveries through a TTV analysis. They present such an analysis for 13 transits of the HD 209458 system that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis indicates that a putative companion in a low-order, mean-motion resonance can be no larger than the mass of the Earth and constitutes, to date, the most sensitive probe for extrasolar planets that orbit main sequence stars. The presence or absence of small planets in low-order, mean-motion resonances has implications for theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Since TTV is most sensitive in these regimes, it should prove a valuable tool not only for the detection of additional planets in transiting systems, but also as a way to determine the dominant mechanisms of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems.

  2. Divorce risk factors and their variation over time in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bernardi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyse the determinants of marriage dissolution in Spain and their variation over time for women married between 1949 and 2006. Data are drawn from the Survey of Fertility, Family and Values of 2006. The article analyses the transition from first marriage to marital dissolution for couples who married in two eras: one prior to the Divorce Law of 1981, during which social and legal barriers to dissolution were many, and one in the period after the law was introduced, during which barriers to marriage dissolution were far fewer. Analyses are conducted using a continuous time event history model. The results indicate some similarities between Spain and other countries, such as the positive relationship between the typical features of unconventional families and marital dissolution, but also some specific differences, such as an increase in the importance of premarital pregnancy and/or not having children. It is also important to stress the declining importance of socio-economic variables, such as education and the labour market situation of women.

  3. Time-causal decomposition of geomagnetic time series into secular variation, solar quiet, and disturbance signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigler, E. Joshua

    2017-04-26

    A theoretical basis and prototype numerical algorithm are provided that decompose regular time series of geomagnetic observations into three components: secular variation; solar quiet, and disturbance. Respectively, these three components correspond roughly to slow changes in the Earth’s internal magnetic field, periodic daily variations caused by quasi-stationary (with respect to the sun) electrical current systems in the Earth’s magnetosphere, and episodic perturbations to the geomagnetic baseline that are typically driven by fluctuations in a solar wind that interacts electromagnetically with the Earth’s magnetosphere. In contrast to similar algorithms applied to geomagnetic data in the past, this one addresses the issue of real time data acquisition directly by applying a time-causal, exponential smoother with “seasonal corrections” to the data as soon as they become available.

  4. Dry-wet variations and cause analysis in Northeast China at multi-time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Pan, Feifei; Pan, Xuebiao; Hu, Liting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Pengyu; Wei, Pei; Pan, Zhihua

    2017-07-01

    Global warming has caused unevenly distributed changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration, which has and will certainly impact on the wet-dry variations. Based on daily meteorological data collected at 91 weather stations in Northeast China (NEC), the spatiotemporal characteristics of dry and wet climatic variables (precipitation, crop reference evapotranspiration (ET0), and humid index (HI)) are analyzed, and the probable reasons causing the changes in these variables are discussed during the period of 1961-2014. Precipitation showed non-significant trend over the period of 1961-2014, while ET0 showed a significant decreasing trend, which led to climate wetting in NEC. The period of 2001-2012 exhibited smaller semiarid area and larger humid area compared to the period of 1961-1980, indicating NEC has experienced wetting process at decadal scale. ET0 was most sensitive to relative humidity, and wind speed was the second most sensitive variable. Sunshine hours and temperature were found to be less influential to ET0 in the study area. The changes in wind speed in the recent 54 years have caused the greatest influence on ET0, followed by temperature. For each month, wind speed was the most significant variable causing ET0 reduction in all months except July. Temperature, as a dominant factor, made a positive contribution to ET0 in February and March, as well as sunshine hours in June and July, and relative humidity in August and September. In summary, NEC has experienced noticeable climate wetting due to the significantly decreasing ET0, and the decrease in wind speed was the biggest contributor for the ET0 reduction. Although agricultural drought crisis is expected to be partly alleviated, regional water resources management and planning in Northeast China should consider the potential water shortage and water conflict in the future because of spatiotemporal dry-wet variations in NEC.

  5. STUDIES ON TIME VARIATION OF AMBIENT SEA NOISE AND SCATTERING OF ACOUSTIC SIGNALS FROM ROUGH SURFACES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is a collection of three papers on two subjects: the scattering of acoustic waves from rough surfaces and the time variation of ambient ...experimental program to investigate the time variation of low-frequency ambient sea noise. (Author)

  6. A 17-month time course study of human RNA and DNA degradation in body fluids under dry and humid environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirker, Miriam; Schneider, Peter M; Gomes, Iva

    2016-11-01

    Blood, saliva, and semen are some of the forensically most relevant biological stains commonly found at crime scenes, which can often be of small size or challenging due to advanced decay. In this context, it is of great importance to possess reliable knowledge about the effects of degradation under different environmental conditions and to use appropriate methods for retrieving maximal information from limited sample amount. In the last decade, RNA analysis has been demonstrated to be a reliable approach identifying the cell or tissue type of an evidentiary body fluid trace. Hence, messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is going to be implemented into forensic casework to supplement the routinely performed short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, and therefore, the ability to co-isolate RNA and DNA from the same sample is a prerequisite. The objective of this work was to monitor and compare the degradation process of both nucleic acids for human blood, saliva, and semen stains at three different concentrations, exposed to dry and humid conditions during a 17-month time period. This study also addressed the question whether there are relevant differences in the efficiency of automated, magnetic bead-based single DNA or RNA extraction methods compared to a manually performed co-extraction method using silica columns. Our data show that mRNA, especially from blood and semen, can be recovered over the entire time period surveyed without compromising the success of DNA profiling; mRNA analysis indicates to be a robust and reliable technique to identify the biological source of aged stain material. The co-extraction method appears to provide mRNA and DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for all different forensic investigation procedures. Humidity and accompanied mold formation are detrimental to both nucleic acids.

  7. Influence of simultaneous variations in temperature and relative humidity on chemical stability of two vitamin C forms and implications for shelf life models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Ashley N; Taylor, Lynne S; Mauer, Lisa J

    2010-03-24

    Vitamin C powder ingredients are popular food fortificants and are among the most commonly added nutrients. While information on degradation kinetics and shelf life of vitamin C exists, current models are limited in their applicability to systems where relative humidity (RH) and temperature are varied simultaneously, and where phase transformations occur. This study monitored stability of two forms of vitamin C (sodium ascorbate and ascorbic acid) under various RH and temperature conditions. Vitamin C was measured colorimetrically, and stability data were used to improve understanding of vitamin C shelf life when deliquescence occurs during storage. RH and temperature both significantly impacted vitamin stability, though RH had a larger effect. Vitamin dissolution preceded extensive degradation and was found to be a good predictor of vitamin C loss. This research highlights the importance of considering phase transformations when constructing shelf life models and maintaining vitamin C in the solid state for enhanced stability.

  8. Time variation of fundamental constants in nonstandard cosmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, M. E.; Civitarese, O.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we have studied the lithium problem in nonstandard cosmological models. In particular, by using the public code alterbbn, we have included in the computation of the primordial light nuclei abundances, the effects of the inclusion of dark energy and dark entropy, along with the variation of the fine structure constant and the Higgs vacuum expectation value. In order to set constrains on the variation of the fundamental constants we have compared our theoretical results with the available observational data. We have found that the lithium abundance is reduced for not-null variation at the 3 σ -level of both constants.

  9. New planar trace humidity sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Tiebe, Carlo; Hübert, Thomas; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    A new planar sensor element for continuous coulometric trace humidity measurements in industrial gases has been developed. In order to ensure precise measurements a calibration facility including a precision dew point hygrometer as a reference device was developed. The sensor can measure the humidity in the frost point temperature range of -20 °C to -80 °C and has an expanded uncertainty of 2 K, a fast reaction time and a settling time of the entire system from 15 to 30 min.

  10. Transit timing observations from Kepler. V. Transit timing variation candidates in the first sixteen months from polynomial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, E.B.; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during...

  11. Humidity fluctuations in the marine boundary layer measured at a coastal site with an infrared humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1996-01-01

    An extensive set of humidity turbulence data has been analyzed from 22-m height in the marine boundary layer. Fluctuations of humidity were measured by an ''OPHIR'', an infrared humidity sensor with a 10 Hz scanning frequency and humidity spectra were produced. The shapes of the normalized spectra...... follow the established similarity functions. However the 10-min time averaged measurements underestimate the value of the absolute humidity. The importance of the humidity flux contribution in a marine environment in calculating the Obukhov stability length has been studied. Deviations from Monin......-Obukhov similarity theory seem to be connected to a low correlation between humidity and temperature....

  12. Effects of thermal mass, window size, and night-time ventilation on peak indoor air temperature in the warm-humid climate of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Abanyie, S; Akuffo, F O; Kutin-Sanwu, V

    2013-01-01

    Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+) simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT). An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  13. Effects of Thermal Mass, Window Size, and Night-Time Ventilation on Peak Indoor Air Temperature in the Warm-Humid Climate of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amos-Abanyie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+ simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT. An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  14. Fiber loop ringdown humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Haifa; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    An optical fiber relative humidity (RH) sensor based on the evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown (EF-FLRD) technique is demonstrated. The sensor was placed inside a chamber that provides a humidity reference and is monitored by a humidity meter. The presence of moisture in the chamber changes the refractive index of the medium; thus the ringdown time changes due to a change in the EF scattering loss induced in the sensor head. The sensor demonstrated a fast response (∼1  s), high sensitivity, and excellent reproducibility and reversibly. The EF-FLRD sensor can measure RH in a wide dynamic range of 4% to 100% at a constant temperature of 20±1°C.

  15. Effects of thermal mass, window size, and night-time ventilation on peak indoor air temperature in the warm-humid climate of Ghana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amos-Abanyie, S; Akuffo, F O; Kutin-Sanwu, V

    2013-01-01

    Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing...

  16. Effects of Thermal Mass, Window Size, and Night-Time Ventilation on Peak Indoor Air Temperature in the Warm-Humid Climate of Ghana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amos-Abanyie, S; Akuffo, F. O; Kutin-Sanwu, V

    2013-01-01

    Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing...

  17. Humidity sensing properties of LnFeO3 nanofibers synthesized by electrospinning (Ln = Sm, Nd, La)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hefeng; Zhang, Yong; Duan, Zaihua; Tong, Yexing; Peng, Jinfeng; Zheng, Xuejun

    2018-01-01

    LnFeO3 (Ln = Sm, Nd, La) nanofibers are synthesized via electrospinning and the humidity sensors based on LnFeO3 nanofibers are fabricated and measured at different relative humidity to investigate the humidity sensing properties. The optimal working frequency of LnFeO3 nanofibers humidity sensors are all 100 Hz at which the sensors are of good linearity and high response. Compared with other LnFeO3 nanofibers humidity sensors, SmFeO3 nanofibers humidity sensor shows the best sensitivity and the impedance variation is more than five orders of magnitude with the relative humidity changing from 11% to 95%. The response time is about 10 s and the impedance versus RH curve is of good linearity. (The linear correlation coefficient is 0.98.) The results indicate that the SmFeO3 nanofibers with low Ln–O binding energy exhibit the best humidity sensing properties compared with others. We expect that our work has a great significance for fabricating high-performance humidity sensors.

  18. Winter blues and time variation in the price of risk

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Ian; Kamstra, Mark; Kramer, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has documented robust links between seasonal variation in length of day, seasonal depression (known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD), risk aversion, and stock market returns. The influence of SAD on market returns, known as the SAD effect, is large. The authors study the SAD effect in the context of an equilibrium asset pricing model to determine whether the seasonality can be explained using a conditional version of the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) that allows ...

  19. Humidity Sensing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjin, Anders; Zaharieva, Emanuela E; Frank, Dominic D; Mansourian, Suzan; Suh, Greg S B; Gallio, Marco; Stensmyr, Marcus C

    2016-05-23

    Environmental humidity influences the fitness and geographic distribution of all animals [1]. Insects in particular use humidity cues to navigate the environment, and previous work suggests the existence of specific sensory mechanisms to detect favorable humidity ranges [2-5]. Yet, the molecular and cellular basis of humidity sensing (hygrosensation) remains poorly understood. Here we describe genes and neurons necessary for hygrosensation in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that members of the Drosophila genus display species-specific humidity preferences related to conditions in their native habitats. Using a simple behavioral assay, we find that the ionotropic receptors IR40a, IR93a, and IR25a are all required for humidity preference in D. melanogaster. Yet, whereas IR40a is selectively required for hygrosensory responses, IR93a and IR25a mediate both humidity and temperature preference. Consistent with this, the expression of IR93a and IR25a includes thermosensory neurons of the arista. In contrast, IR40a is excluded from the arista but is expressed (and required) in specialized neurons innervating pore-less sensilla of the sacculus, a unique invagination of the third antennal segment. Indeed, calcium imaging showed that IR40a neurons directly respond to changes in humidity, and IR40a knockdown or IR93a mutation reduced their responses to stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that the preference for a specific humidity range depends on specialized sacculus neurons, and that the processing of environmental humidity can happen largely in parallel to that of temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An accretion disk model for periodic timing variations of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Xue, Y. Q.; Xu, R. X.; Wang, H. G.; Xiao, B. W.

    2003-08-01

    The long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations in both the pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of two isolated pulsars (PSRs) PSR B1828-11 and PSR B1642-03 were discovered recently. This phenomenon may provide evidence for ``free precession'' as suggested in the literature. Some authors presented various kinds of models to explain this phenomenon within the framework of free precession. Here we present an accretion disk model for this precession phenomenon instead. Under reasonable parameters, the observed phenomenon can be explained by an isolated pulsar with a fossil disk. This may link radio pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and present an indirect evidence for the existence of the fossil disk in nature.

  1. Variations of extreme rainfall in space and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Ida Bülow; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2012-01-01

    . This study focuses on variations of extreme rainfall events, observed at 70 different locations in Denmark over a period of 31 years. The aim is to identify and compare variables, both spatially and temporally, which can explain different parts of the variability in this data set. Assuming that the number...... of extremes at each location is generated by a point process, we develop a spatio-temporal model based on Poisson regression. The starting point of the analysis is two marginal models formulated for number of events 1) averaged over all years of observations 2) averaged over all measurement sites. The first....... Still there are challenges when we explicitly model the number of extreme events at a given year, at a given location. It was found that the goodness of the model highly depends on assumptions in the generalized linear model, notably the link function between the continuous regression model...

  2. High-Cadence Transit Timing Variation Monitoring of Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naef D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We report ground-based high-cadence transit timing observations of the extrasolar planet WASP-2b. We achieve a typical timing error of 15-30 sec. The data show no significant deviations from the predicted ephemeris.

  3. variation of reverberation time with quantity of absorbers in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    reverberation time with quantity of absorber at frequency of 500Hz are given in Fig 1 for both the measured and calculated values while those at 1000Hz are given in Fig. 2. In comparison, the reverberation times whether measured or calculated are lower at higher frequencies. This is consistent with theory that there is high ...

  4. Handheld mechanical nociceptive threshold testing in dairy cows - intra-individual variation, inter-observer agreement and variation over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raundal, Peter M.; Andersen, Pia H.; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    All methods showed a high degree of intra-individual variation, and no combination of device and stimulation site showed superior precision. Mean difference between observers was low, and MNT was not consistent over time. Further development of the methods is required before they can be used in r...

  5. MONITORING IONOSPHERIC VARIATION FOR A DEFINITE PERIOD TIME IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Inyurt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere has been studied by a number of scientists in recent years. Since GPS observations cannot provide TEC value directly, it can be estimated from combination of observations. In this study TEC values derived from GPS observations were produced variations with two hours increments from the eighth day to fifteenth day in months just after beginning of each season, namely January, April, July and October in 2014 for ZONG TUSAGA-Aktif station and 41 other stations (TUSAGA-Aktif, EUREF, IGS. TEC values computed by the Bernese 5.0 software were compared with the Global Ionosphere Model (GIM TEC values regularly published by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012 TEC values. As a result of this study, with the comparison of GPS TEC values to GIM TEC values, it has become obvious that GPS TEC values are quite similar to the GIM TEC values. The differences of TEC values derived from GPS TEC and GIM TEC change from 0.91 TECU (January to 1.88 TECU (October. On the other hand, GPS TEC values are also compared with IRI TEC values, and found out that there is a considerable difference between the two TEC values ranging from 6.30 TECU (January to 15.15 TECU (April. Moreover, TEC values derived from GPS measurements are attained similar to GIM TEC, but found to stray from IRI-2012 TEC values remarkably.

  6. Monitoring Ionospheric Variation for a Definite Period Time in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyurt, S.; Mekik, C.; Yildirim, O.

    2015-12-01

    Ionosphere has been studied by a number of scientists in recent years. Since GPS observations cannot provide TEC value directly, it can be estimated from combination of observations. In this study TEC values derived from GPS observations were produced variations with two hours increments from the eighth day to fifteenth day in months just after beginning of each season, namely January, April, July and October in 2014 for ZONG TUSAGA-Aktif station and 41 other stations (TUSAGA-Aktif, EUREF, IGS). TEC values computed by the Bernese 5.0 software were compared with the Global Ionosphere Model (GIM) TEC values regularly published by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) TEC values. As a result of this study, with the comparison of GPS TEC values to GIM TEC values, it has become obvious that GPS TEC values are quite similar to the GIM TEC values. The differences of TEC values derived from GPS TEC and GIM TEC change from 0.91 TECU (January) to 1.88 TECU (October). On the other hand, GPS TEC values are also compared with IRI TEC values, and found out that there is a considerable difference between the two TEC values ranging from 6.30 TECU (January) to 15.15 TECU (April). Moreover, TEC values derived from GPS measurements are attained similar to GIM TEC, but found to stray from IRI-2012 TEC values remarkably.

  7. Controlling arbitrary humidity without convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasnik, Priyanka S; N'guessan, Hartmann E; Tadmor, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show a way that allows for the first time to induce arbitrary humidity of desired value for systems without convective flow. To enable this novelty we utilize a semi-closed environment in which evaporation is not completely suppressed. In this case, the evaporation rate is determined both by the outer (open) humidity and by the inner (semi-closed) geometry including the size/shape of the evaporating medium and the size/shape of the semi-closure. We show how such systems can be used to induce desired humidity conditions. We consider water droplet placed on a solid surface and study its evaporation when it is surrounded by other drops, hereon "satellite" drops and covered by a semi-closed hemisphere. The main drop's evaporation rate is proportional to its height, in agreement with theory. Surprisingly, however, the influence of the satellite drops on the main drop's evaporation suppression is not proportional to the sum of heights of the satellite drops. Instead, it shows proportionality close to the satellite drops' total surface area. The resultant humidity conditions in the semi-closed system can be effectively and accurately induced using different satellite drops combinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Speech Timing Deficit of Stuttering: Evidence from Contingent Negative Variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ning

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the speech preparation processes of adults who stutter (AWS. Fifteen AWS and fifteen adults with fluent speech (AFS participated in the experiment. The event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded in a foreperiod paradigm. The warning signal (S1 was a color square, and the following imperative stimulus (S2 was either a white square (the Go signal that required participants to name the color of S1 or a white dot (the NoGo signal that prevents participants from speaking. Three differences were found between AWS and AFS. First, the mean amplitude of the ERP component parietal positivity elicited by S1 (S1-P3 was smaller in AWS than in AFS, which implies that AWS may have deficits in investing working memory on phonological programming. Second, the topographic shift from the early phase to the late phase of contingent negative variation occurred earlier for AWS than for AFS, thus suggesting that the motor preparation process is promoted in AWS. Third, the NoGo effect in the ERP component parietal positivity elicited by S2 (S2-P3 was larger for AFS than for AWS, indicating that AWS have difficulties in inhibiting a planned speech response. These results provide a full picture of the speech preparation and response inhibition processes of AWS. The relationship among these three findings is discussed. However, as stuttering was not manipulated in this study, it is still unclear whether the effects are the causes or the results of stuttering. Further studies are suggested to explore the relationship between stuttering and the effects found in the present study.

  9. Surface Temperature Variation Prediction Model Using Real-Time Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Vant-Hull, B.; Nazari, R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Combination of climate change and urbanization are heating up cities and putting the lives of millions of people in danger. More than half of the world's total population resides in cities and urban centers. Cities are experiencing urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. Hotter days are associated with serious health impacts, heart attaches and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Densely populated cities like Manhattan, New York can be affected by UHI impact much more than less populated cities. Even though many studies have been focused on the impact of UHI and temperature changes between urban and rural air temperature, not many look at the temperature variations within a city. These studies mostly use remote sensing data or typical measurements collected by local meteorological station networks. Local meteorological measurements only have local coverage and cannot be used to study the impact of UHI in a city and remote sensing data such as MODIS, LANDSAT and ASTER have with very low resolution which cannot be used for the purpose of this study. Therefore, predicting surface temperature in urban cities using weather data can be useful.Three months of Field campaign in Manhattan were used to measure spatial and temporal temperature variations within an urban setting by placing 10 fixed sensors deployed to measure temperature, relative humidity and sunlight. Fixed instrument shelters containing relative humidity, temperature and illumination sensors were mounted on lampposts in ten different locations in Manhattan (Vant-Hull et al, 2014). The shelters were fixed 3-4 meters above the ground for the period of three months from June 23 to September 20th of 2013 making measurements with the interval of 3 minutes. These high resolution temperature measurements and three months of weather data were used to predict temperature variability from weather forecasts. This study shows that the amplitude of spatial and temporal variation in temperature for each day can be predicted

  10. Transducer frequency response variations investigated by time reversal calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), A16-A16 ISSN 1213-3825. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing /32./. 07.09.2016-09.09.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : calibration * time reversal * transducer * frequency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  11. Variation of reverberation time with quantity of absorbers in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental investigation of reverberation of sound at frequencies of 500 and 1000Hz in a room of 35.27m3 has been carried out using B & K Type acoustic instruments. Varied amount of Celotex ceiling board was used as the sound absorber. The result showed that the reverberation time falls progressively with ...

  12. Dynamics of Gaussian Wigner functions derived from a time-dependent variational principle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Svensson, S. Karl-Mikael; Nyman, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    By using a time-dependent variational principle formulated for Wigner phase-space functions, we obtain the optimal time-evolution for two classes of Gaussian Wigner functions, namely those of either...

  13. Variation of tumour radiosensitivity with time after anaesthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nias, A.H.W.; Perry, P.M. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK). Richard Dimbleby Research Lab.)

    1989-10-01

    Transplanted C{sub 3}H mouse mammary tumours were given single doses of X irradiation in air or oxygen at 1 atmosphere (atm) with or without anaesthesia of recipient mice by ketamine and diazepam. The radiation response to single doses of 25 Gy was determined in terms of time taken to reach 3.5 times the treatment volume. Under all conditions there was more growth delay in tumours irradiated in pure oxygen than in air. In air and oxygen, the radiation response for anaestheitized animals tended to fall below the level for non-anaesthetized ones when only 10 min had elapsed after administration of anaesthesia. After 25 min, the response in air was back to the level for non-anaesthetized animals but the oxygen group then showed significant sensitization compared with the oxygen without anaesthetic group. After 40 min, the air group showed slight sensitization and the oxygen group still showed significant sensitization by the anaesthetic. (author).

  14. Effects of lowering body temperature via hyperhydration, with and without glycerol ingestion and practical precooling on cycling time trial performance in hot and humid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Megan LR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypohydration and hyperthermia are factors that may contribute to fatigue and impairment of endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combining glycerol hyperhydration and an established precooling technique on cycling time trial performance in hot environmental conditions. Methods Twelve well-trained male cyclists performed three 46.4-km laboratory-based cycling trials that included two climbs, under hot and humid environmental conditions (33.3 ± 1.1°C; 50 ± 6% r.h.. Subjects were required to hyperhydrate with 25 g.kg-1 body mass (BM of a 4°C beverage containing 6% carbohydrate (CON 2.5 h prior to the time trial. On two occasions, subjects were also exposed to an established precooling technique (PC 60 min prior to the time trial, involving 14 g.kg-1 BM ice slurry ingestion and applied iced towels over 30 min. During one PC trial, 1.2 g.kg-1 BM glycerol was added to the hyperhydration beverage in a double-blind fashion (PC+G. Statistics used in this study involve the combination of traditional probability statistics and a magnitude-based inference approach. Results Hyperhydration resulted in large reductions (−0.6 to −0.7°C in rectal temperature. The addition of glycerol to this solution also lowered urine output (330 ml, 10%. Precooling induced further small (−0.3°C to moderate (−0.4°C reductions in rectal temperature with PC and PC+G treatments, respectively, when compared with CON (0.0°C, P Conclusions Despite increasing fluid intake and reducing core temperature, performance and thermoregulatory benefits of a hyperhydration strategy with and without the addition of glycerol, plus practical precooling, were not superior to hyperhydration alone. Further research is warranted to further refine preparation strategies for athletes competing in thermally stressful events to optimize health and maximize performance outcomes.

  15. Stormtime electric fields in the inner magnetosphere: local time variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, D.; Wygant, J.

    2003-04-01

    The large-scale quasi-static electric field in the inner magnetosphere during major storms has been shown to be a major contributor to ring current energization and plasmaspheric transport [Rowland and Wygant; 1998, Wygant et al., 1998]. Previous studies showing that the convection field can reach magnitudes of 6-8 frac{mV}{m} and potential drops of 80 kV deep in the inner magnetosphere have been limited to the premidnight and dusk local time sectors. We will draw upon electric field measurements from the Polar spacecraft made at other local times during major geomagnetic storms to show how these premidnight observations fit into the general context of enhanced electric fields and particle transport during disturbed intervals. We have identified several main and recovery phase passes in which Polar was in the inner and middle magnetosphere (L=3 to L=10). We will determine potential drops along these trajectories and display these as a function of local time. We will interpret these results in the light of recent results from {IMAGE}, in which {ENA} measurements suggest a stagnation point near dusk, and in terms of the {MIT} radar results, which show the global character of the convection pattern, based on ground-based measurements. We will also assess the electric fields measured by Polar in situ to predictions of the Rice Convection Model.

  16. Influence of breed, milk yield, and temperature-humidity index on dairy cow lying time, neck activity, reticulorumen temperature, and rumination behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, A E; Jones, B W; Becker, C A; Bewley, J M

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare weekly mean lying time (LT), neck activity (NA), reticulorumen temperature (RT), and rumination time (RU) among 3 breed groups, milk yield (MY), and temperature-humidity index (THI). Cows (n = 36; 12 Holstein, 12 crossbred, and 12 Jersey) were blocked by parity group (primiparous or multiparous), days in milk, and MY. Lying time, NA, RT, RU, and MY were recorded and averaged by day and then by week for each cow. For study inclusion, each cow was required to have 10 wk of LT, NA, RT, and RU data. Maximum THI were recorded and averaged daily. Mean (±SE) days in milk, LT, MY, RT, RU, NA, and maximum THI were 159.0 ± 6.0 d, 11.1 ± 0.1 h/d, 28.7 ± 0.5 kg/d, 38.8 ± 0.0°C, 6.4 ± 0.1 h/d, 323.8 ± 3.8 activity units, and 56.5 ± 0.6, respectively. The MIXED Procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was used to evaluate fixed effects of breed, MY, parity, THI, and their interactions on LT, NA, RT, and RU with cow nested within breed as subject. All main effects remained in each model regardless of significance level. Stepwise backward elimination was used to remove nonsignificant interactions. The interactions of breed × parity group and maximum THI × parity group were associated with RT. Increasing THI coincided with increasing RT. Least squares means LT for multiparous cows was significantly greater than LT for primiparous cows (11.4 ± 0.3 and 10.5 ± 0.5 h/d, respectively). Least squares means NA for primiparous cows was greater than for multiparous cows of all breeds (372.1 ± 10.9 and 303.4 ± 7.8, respectively). The CORR Procedure of SAS was used to evaluate relationships among RT, RU, LT, NA, and MY. Rumination time was positively correlated with MY (r = 0.30) and negatively correlated with LT (r = -0.14). Reticulorumen temperature was negatively correlated with MY (r = -0.11). Rumination time was positively correlated with NA (r = 0.18) and negatively correlated with LT (r = -0.14). Lying time and NA were

  17. Acoustic Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.; Venkateshan, Shakkottai

    1990-01-01

    Industrial humidity sensor measures volume fraction of water in air via its effect on speed of sound. Only portion of sensor exposed to sensed atmosphere is pair of stainless-steel tubes, one containing dry air and other containing moist air. Counters measure intervals between reflected pulses. Sensor rugged enough for use in harsh environments like those used to control drying of paper in paper mills, where most humidity sensors do not survive.

  18. Humidity effect on organic semiconductor NiPc films deposited at different gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, N.; Ahmed, M. M.; Karimov, Kh. S.; Ahmedov, Kh.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, thin films of Nickel Phthalocyanine (NiPc) were deposited by centrifugation at high gravity (70g), and also at normal gravity (1g) conditions to fabricate humidity sensors. Ceramic alumina sheet, coated with silver electrodes, having interelectrode distance of 0.2l mm were used to assess the electrical properties of the sensors. Room temperature capacitance and impedance variations were measured as a function of relative humidity ranging from 25% ∼⃒ 95% at 1 kHz frequency. It was observed that sensors fabricated at 70g were more sensitive compared to sensors fabricated at 1g. Sensors fabricated at 70g exhibited 1.8 times decrease in their impedance and1.5 times increase in their capacitance at peak ambient humidity. SEM images showed more roughness for the films deposited at 70g compared to films deposited at 1g. It was assumed that surface irregularities might have increased active surface area of 70g sensors hence changed the electrical response. Impedance-humidity and capacitance-humidity relationships were modeled and a good agreement was observed between experimental and modeled data. Experimental data showed that NiPc films could be useful for instrumentation industry to fabricate organic humidity sensors.

  19. CALENDAR VARIATION MODEL FOR FORECASTING TIME SERIES DATA WITH ISLAMIC CALENDAR EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartono Suhartono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop a statistical model for explaining and forecasting the time series that contains Islamic Calendar effect. In time series literature, calendar variation is defined as a periodic and recurrent pattern with variation length period that usually caused by cultures and religions of people in a certain area. In Indonesia, the effect of the Eids holiday in many daily activities, such as transportation, inflation and consumption, is one example of calendar variations. This holiday happens on different month after three years or shift to previous month after at the same month on three years. This paper evaluates the disadvantage of seasonal classical time series model, such as Winter’s, Decomposition and ARIMA models, and develops a Calendar Variation model for forecasting time series that contain Islamic Calendar Effect. In this research, a real data about monthly sales of sardines are used as a case study. The results show that classical time series models, such as Winter’s, Decomposition and ARIMA models, cannot describe the calendar variation effect and yield invalid and unreliable forecast, particularly at the time (month when the calendar variation happens. On the contrary, Calendar Variation model is a model that can explain precisely the impact of the calendar variation effect and gives valid and reliable forecasts.

  20. Enigma variations: unraveling interprofessional education in time and place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Hugh

    2013-09-01

    Designing the learning environment for the health care professionals of tomorrow is less than complete unless and until it includes interprofessional education (IPE). Progress depends on establishing a shared understanding of IPE between architects and teachers as the dialogue between them during the forum confirmed. My brief presentation provided no more than the catalyst. This paper goes further. It locates IPE within a coherent, consistent and pervasive rationale distilled over time from its roots in different countries and fields of practice, including the formulation of objectives, the adaptation of a repertoire of learning methods, the adoption of a definition and values and the framing of principle and competency-based outcomes, before alerting readers to some of the many complexities during the planning process.

  1. Latitudinal and Seasonal Investigations of Storm-Time TEC Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.; Adebiyi, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere responds markedly and unpredictably to varying magnetospheric energy inputs caused by solar disturbances on the geospace. Knowledge of the impact of the space weather events on the ionosphere is important to assess the environmental effect on the operations of ground- and space-based technologies. Thus, global positioning system (GPS) measurements from the international GNSS service (IGS) database were used to investigate the ionospheric response to 56 geomagnetic storm events at six different latitudes comprising the northern and southern hemispheres in the Afro-European sector. Statistical distributions of total electron content (TEC) response show that during the main phase of the storms, enhancement of TEC is more pronounced in most of the seasons, regardless of the latitude and hemisphere. However, a strong seasonal dependence appears in the TEC response during the recovery phase. Depletion of TEC is majorly observed at the high latitude stations, and its appearance at lower latitudes is seasonally dependent. In summer hemisphere, the depletion of TEC is more pronounced in nearly all the latitudinal bands. In winter hemisphere, enhancement as well as depletion of TEC is observed over the high latitude, while enhancement is majorly observed over the mid and low latitudes. In equinoxes, the storm-time TEC distribution shows a fairly consistent characteristic with the summer distribution, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

  2. Effect of humidity on the a.c. impedance of CH3NH3SnCl3 hybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, R.; Ferro, P.; Besagni, T.; Calestani, D.; Chiarella, F.; Licci, F.

    2011-09-01

    Impedance spectroscopy measurements show that complex conductivity of thermally ablated CH3NH3SnCl3 films is strongly enhanced when humidity increases. Coplanar two-electrode test devices are modeled through an equivalent circuit comprising one resistance and two constant phase elements. It is shown that the influence of ambient humidity is mainly resistive. The dynamic responses of the devices to humidification/dehumidification cycles point out that the a.c. current varies by more than three orders of magnitude when humidity is varied between dry air and 80% relative humidity. The rise times are few hundred seconds while fall times are as short as few tens of seconds. This observation suggests that impedance variations are determined by mechanisms involving loosely bound water molecules physisorbed at the surface of the hybrid film. The results obtained are discussed in terms of protonic conduction.

  3. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Theodore A. Endreny; David J. Nowak

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat...

  4. Feynman’s clock, a new variational principle, and parallel-in-time quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Jarrod R.; Parkhill, John A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a discrete-time variational principle inspired by the quantum clock originally proposed by Feynman and use it to write down quantum evolution as a ground-state eigenvalue problem. The construction allows one to apply ground-state quantum many-body theory to quantum dynamics, extending the reach of many highly developed tools from this fertile research area. Moreover, this formalism naturally leads to an algorithm to parallelize quantum simulation over time. We draw an explicit connection between previously known time-dependent variational principles and the time-embedded variational principle presented. Sample calculations are presented, applying the idea to a hydrogen molecule and the spin degrees of freedom of a model inorganic compound, demonstrating the parallel speedup of our method as well as its flexibility in applying ground-state methodologies. Finally, we take advantage of the unique perspective of this variational principle to examine the error of basis approximations in quantum dynamics. PMID:24062428

  5. Optical humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  6. Ceramic thick film humidity sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassas, Ahmad, E-mail: a.kassas.mcema@ul.edu.lb [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Laboratoire Universitaire des Sciences Appliquées de Cherbourg (LUSAC), 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Bernard, Jérôme; Lelièvre, Céline; Besq, Anthony; Guhel, Yannick; Houivet, David; Boudart, Bertrand [Laboratoire Universitaire des Sciences Appliquées de Cherbourg (LUSAC), 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Lakiss, Hassan [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Faculty of Engineering, Section III, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Hamieh, Tayssir [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The fabricated sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF materials used the spin coating technology. • The response time is 70 s to detect variation between 5 and 95% relative humidity. • The addition of Scleroglucan controls the viscosity and decreases the roughness of thick film surface. • This humidity sensor is a promising, low-cost, high-quality, reliable ceramic films, that is highly sensitive to humidity. - Abstract: The feasibility of humidity sensor, consisting of a thick layer of MgTiO{sub 3}/LiF materials on alumina substrate, was studied. The thermal analysis TGA-DTGA and dilatometric analysis worked out to confirm the sintering temperature. An experimental plan was applied to describe the effects of different parameters in the development of the thick film sensor. Structural and microstructural characterizations of the developed thick film were made. Rheological study with different amounts of a thickener (scleroglucan “sclg”), showing the behavior variation, as a function of sclg weight % was illustrated and rapprochement with the results of thickness variation as a function of angular velocity applied in the spin coater. The electrical and dielectric measurements confirmed the sensitivity of the elaborated thick film against moisture, along with low response time.

  7. Training and evaluation of neural networks for multi-variate time series processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Torben L.; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1995-01-01

    We study the training and generalization for multi-variate time series processing. It is suggested to used a quasi-maximum likelihood approach rather than the standard sum of squared errors, thus taking dependencies among the errors of the individual time series into account. This may lead...... to improved generalization performance. Further, we extend the optimal brain damage pruning technique to the multi-variate case. A key ingredient is an algebraic expression for the generalization ability of a multi-variate model. The variability of the suggested techniques are successfully demonstrated...

  8. MoS{sub 2}-modified ZnO quantum dots nanocomposite: Synthesis and ultrafast humidity response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ze, Lu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Yueqiu, Gong, E-mail: yqgong@xtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Xujun, Li; Yong, Zhang [School of Physics and Optoelectronics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs composite structure was synthesized by two-steps methods. • Ultrafast humidity sensing response is achieved by MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs humidity sensor. • Sensor performs excellent cycle stability from 11% to 95% RH. • Humidity sensor could detect wide humidity range (11–95%). - Abstract: In this work, ZnO quantum dots (QDs), layered MoS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}-modified ZnO QDs (MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs) nanocomposite were synthesized and then applied as humidity sensor. The crystal structure, morphology and element distribution of ZnO QDs, MoS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, respectively. The humidity sensing characteristics of the MoS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs against various relative humidity were measured at room temperature. The results show that the MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs sensor exhibits high sensitivity with an impedance variation of three or four orders of magnitude to relative humidity range of 11–95% and it exhibits a short response-recovery time (1 s for adsorption and 20 s for desorption) and excellent repeatability. The mechanisms of the excellent performance for humidity sensing of MoS{sub 2}@ZnO QDs sensor were discussed based on its impedance properties. Our work could offer guidelines to design higher performance especially ultrafast humidity response sensor utilizing the nanocomposite structure with two dimensional material and QDs.

  9. Competing bounds on the present-day time variation of fundamental constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2009-04-01

    We compare the sensitivity of a recent bound on time variation of the fine structure constant from optical clocks with bounds on time-varying fundamental constants from atomic clocks sensitive to the electron-to-proton mass ratio, from radioactive decay rates in meteorites, and from the Oklo natural reactor. Tests of the weak equivalence principle also lead to comparable bounds on present variations of constants. The “winner in sensitivity” depends on what relations exist between the variations of different couplings in the standard model of particle physics, which may arise from the unification of gauge interactions. Weak equivalence principle tests are currently the most sensitive within unified scenarios. A detection of time variation in atomic clocks would favor dynamical dark energy and put strong constraints on the dynamics of a cosmological scalar field.

  10. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  11. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaponenko, I., E-mail: iaroslav.gaponenko@unige.ch; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P. [DQMP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai E. Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  12. Methods of humidity determination Part II: Determination of material humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Rübner, Katrin; Balköse, Devrim; Robens, E.

    2008-01-01

    Part II covers the most common methods of measuring the humidity of solid material. State of water near solid surfaces, gravimetric measurement of material humidity, measurement of water sorption isotherms, chemical methods for determination of water content, measurement of material humidity via the gas phase, standardisation, cosmonautical observations are reviewed.

  13. Reducing lumber thickness variation using real-time statistical process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Young; Brian H. Bond; Jan Wiedenbeck

    2002-01-01

    A technology feasibility study for reducing lumber thickness variation was conducted from April 2001 until March 2002 at two sawmills located in the southern U.S. A real-time statistical process control (SPC) system was developed that featured Wonderware human machine interface technology (HMI) with distributed real-time control charts for all sawing centers and...

  14. Biological variation in tPA-induced plasma clot lysis time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Talens (Simone); J.J.M.C. Malfliet (Joyce); G. Rudež (Goran); H.M.H. Spronk (Henri); N.A.H. Janssen (Nicole); P. Meijer (Piet); C. Kluft (Cornelius); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); D.C. Rijken (Dingeman)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHypofibrinolysis is a risk factor for venous and arterial thrombosis, and can be assessed by using a turbidimetric tPA-induced clot lysis time (CLT) assay. Biological variation in clot lysis time may affect the interpretation and usefulness of CLT as a risk factor for thrombosis.

  15. The effect of humidity and temperature on visual outcomes after myopic corneal laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Christopher T; Shtein, Roni M; Veldheer, Daniel; Hussain, Munira; Niziol, Leslie M; Musch, David C; Mian, Shahzad I

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether procedure room environmental conditions are associated with outcomes after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or laser-assisted keratomileusis (LASEK). Retrospective chart review. Eight hundred sixty-three eyes of 458 consecutive patients at a university-based academic practice. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients who underwent LASIK or LASEK over a 3-year period. Linear mixed regression models were used to investigate the association of laser room temperature and humidity with the outcomes of visual acuity and postoperative manifest spherical equivalent refraction. Repeated measures logistic regression models were used for the outcomes of diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and need for enhancement surgery. Subjects were on an average 38.6 years old at the time of surgery (standard deviation [SD] =10.3) and the average spherical equivalent refraction of eyes was 3.8 diopters (SD =2.03). Regression models did not reveal a significant association between temperature and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) or corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), or between humidity and UDVA (P>0.05 for all). However, increased humidity was associated with a small but statistically significant improvement in CDVA after LASIK at 1 day, 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year postoperatively (Prefraction. While increased laser room humidity was consistently associated with small improvements in CDVA after myopic LASIK over time, variations in room temperature and humidity were not associated with UDVA, the need for enhancement, the incidence of DLK, or refraction after myopic LASIK or LASEK.

  16. Standardised Resting Time Prior to Blood Sampling and Diurnal Variation Associated with Risk of Patient Misclassification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh Andersen, Ida; Brasen, Claus L.; Christensen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to current recommendations, blood samples should be taken in the morning after 15 minutes' resting time. Some components exhibit diurnal variation and in response to pressures to expand opening hours and reduce waiting time, the aims of this study were to investigate...... the impact of resting time prior to blood sampling and diurnal variation on biochemical components, including albumin, thyrotropin (TSH), total calcium and sodium in plasma. METHODS: All patients referred to an outpatient clinic for blood sampling were included in the period Nov 2011 until June 2014 (opening...... hours: 7am-3pm). Each patient's arrival time and time of blood sampling were registered. The impact of resting time and the time of day for all components was analysed using simple linear regression. The "maximum allowable bias" was used as quality indicator for the change in reference interval. RESULTS...

  17. Variations in automatically recorded rumination time as explained by variations in intake of dietary fractions and milk production, and between-cow variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byskov, M V; Nadeau, E; Johansson, B E O; Nørgaard, P

    2015-06-01

    Individual recording of rumination time (RT) is now possible in commercial dairy herds, through development of a microphone-based sensor, which is able to record RT by the sound of rumination activity. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between daily RT and intakes of different dietary fractions, the relationship between RT in minutes per kilogram of dry matter intake (DMI) and milk production, and to examine the variation in RT within and between mid-lactating dairy cows. Data from 3 production trials were used in which a total of 27 different diets were fed. The data contained 761, 290, and 203 daily recordings of RT, milk yield, milk components, DMI, and intake of dietary fractions recorded on 29, 26, and 24 Holstein and Swedish Red cows from trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The dietary fractions included forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF), concentrate NDF, crude protein, sugar, starch, and the remaining fraction represented by organic matter--(forage NDF+concentrate NDF+crude protein+sugar+starch). The relationship between the dietary fractions and RT was analyzed in 2 steps. In step 1, the dietary fractions, which were significantly related to RT, were selected and simultaneously checked for multicollinearity between the dietary components; in step 2, a multivariate model, including the effect of repeated measurements, the main effect of the selected dietary fractions from step 1, random effects of cow(trial) and trial, and information on breed, days in milk, and parity was used to analyze the relationship between RT and the selected dietary fractions. Relationships between RT in minutes per kilogram of DMI and milk yield and milk components were analyzed, using the same multivariate model as in step 2. Approximately 32% of the variation in daily RT could be explained by variations in intakes of the dietary fractions, whereas 48% of the total variation in RT was accounted for by individual variations between cows. Intakes of

  18. RADON IN GROUNDWATERS IN THE BAIKAL REGION AND TRANSBAIKALIA: VARIATIONS IN SPACE AND TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2016-01-01

    -fault water sources (Group II. Despite the distinct variations in radioactivity, the Q values recorded through most of the monitoring time do not exceed the threshold Q values for the respective groups. It appears that the observed periodic anomalously high and low contents of radon are due to seasonally variable meteorological parameters (see Fig. 6.The correlation analysis of Q values and atmospheric pressure (P, air humidity (U and temperature (T shows a clear dependence of the content of radon in groundwater on T and P values (Table 3. Following the major seasonal trend of air temperature, the level of radioactivity is increased in the water samples taken in winter and decreased in summer (see Fig. 6. Q values are indirectly influenced by parameter T via changes of water temperature, variations in flow rates of water sources, freezing of the top layer of soil and other processes, which parameters require further research.According to the monitoring data (see Table 3, and Fig. 6, A, the content of radon in near-surface water sources (Group I can vary by a few and the first dozens of units, while changes by tens of becquerel per liter are recorded in the deeper near-fault water sources (Group II. As a consequence, in short periods of extreme Q values, the content of radon in a water source may increase or decrease to a value corresponding to a neighbouring radon-radioactivity group.This paper provides an overview of the radon activity of groundwater in the Baikal region and Transbaikalia with a focus on regularities in the spatial and temporal patterns of 222Rn in the water sources with Q<185 Bq/l. The nonradon waters are more abundant in the Baikal region, including areas of active use of natural resources. Although the content of 222Rn in low, such waters should be a target of further research aimed to explore medicinal water sources, assess drinking water quality, and discover the emanation precursors of strong earthquakes in the study region.

  19. Running vacuum in the Universe and the time variation of the fundamental constants of Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Harald [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Munich (Germany); Sola, Joan [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona (ICCUB), Institute of Cosmos Sciences, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nunes, Rafael C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Dept. de Fisica, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    We compute the time variation of the fundamental constants (such as the ratio of the proton mass to the electron mass, the strong coupling constant, the fine-structure constant and Newton's constant) within the context of the so-called running vacuum models (RVMs) of the cosmic evolution. Recently, compelling evidence has been provided that these models are able to fit the main cosmological data (SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB) significantly better than the concordance ΛCDM model. Specifically, the vacuum parameters of the RVM (i.e. those responsible for the dynamics of the vacuum energy) prove to be nonzero at a confidence level >or similar 3σ. Here we use such remarkable status of the RVMs to make definite predictions on the cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. It turns out that the predicted variations are close to the present observational limits. Furthermore, we find that the time evolution of the dark matter particle masses should be crucially involved in the total mass variation of our Universe. A positive measurement of this kind of effects could be interpreted as strong support to the ''micro-macro connection'' (viz. the dynamical feedback between the evolution of the cosmological parameters and the time variation of the fundamental constants of the microscopic world), previously proposed by two of us (HF and JS). (orig.)

  20. Running vacuum in the Universe and the time variation of the fundamental constants of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Solà, Joan; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2017-03-01

    We compute the time variation of the fundamental constants (such as the ratio of the proton mass to the electron mass, the strong coupling constant, the fine-structure constant and Newton's constant) within the context of the so-called running vacuum models (RVMs) of the cosmic evolution. Recently, compelling evidence has been provided that these models are able to fit the main cosmological data (SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB) significantly better than the concordance Λ CDM model. Specifically, the vacuum parameters of the RVM (i.e. those responsible for the dynamics of the vacuum energy) prove to be nonzero at a confidence level ≳ 3σ . Here we use such remarkable status of the RVMs to make definite predictions on the cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. It turns out that the predicted variations are close to the present observational limits. Furthermore, we find that the time evolution of the dark matter particle masses should be crucially involved in the total mass variation of our Universe. A positive measurement of this kind of effects could be interpreted as strong support to the "micro-macro connection" (viz. the dynamical feedback between the evolution of the cosmological parameters and the time variation of the fundamental constants of the microscopic world), previously proposed by two of us (HF and JS).

  1. Temporal variation of tidal parameters in superconducting gravimeter time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurers, Bruno; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Pálinkáš, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Analysing independent 1-yr data sets of 10 European superconducting gravimeters (SG) reveals statistically significant temporal variations of M2 tidal parameters. Both common short-term (2 yr) features are identified in all SG time-series but one. The averaged variations of the amplitude factor are about 0.2‰. The path of load vector variations equivalent to the temporal changes of tidal parameters suggests the presence of an 8.85 yr modulation (lunar perigee). The tidal waves having the potential to modulate M2 with this period belong to the 3rd degree constituents. Their amplitude factors turn out to be much closer to body tide model predictions than that of the main 2nd degree M2, which indicates ocean loading for 3rd degree waves to be less prominent than for 2nd degree waves within the M2 group. These two different responses to the loading suggest that the observed modulation is more due to insufficient frequency resolution of limited time-series rather than to time variable loading. Presently, SG gravity time-series are still too short to prove if time variable loading processes are involved too as in case of the annual M2 modulation known to appear for analysis intervals of less than 1 yr. Whatever the variations are caused by, they provide the upper accuracy limit for earth model validation and permit estimating the temporal stability of SG scale factors and assessing the quality of gravity time-series.

  2. Bioethanol From Pineapple Peel with Saccharomyces Cereviceae Mass and Fermentation TIME Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Nanik Astuti Rahman, Harimbi Setyawati

    2011-01-01

    As a waste from pineapple, pineapple peel still contains high carbohydrate and glucose.The aim of this study was to made bioethanol from pineapple peel with variation fromSaccharomyces cereviceae mass addition and fermentation time variation. The variablesused are Saccaromyces cereviceae mass 20, 30, 40 grams, fermentation pH 4 and 5,andthe length of fermentation time 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 days. The analysis of the obtained resultsshowed: the initial glucose level of pineapple peel extract 8.532...

  3. Time-Variation of Imbalance of Order Book in Foreign Exchange Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueshige, Takumi; Kanazawa, Kiyoshi; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    The time-variation of the limit order book is studied in terms of the imbalance of the bid and ask sides for foreign exchange markets. We first introduce a set of variables quantifying the imbalance between the bid and ask orders, and study the probability distribution of the imbalance to show its time-variation. We also suggest an approximate Gaussian fit for the imbalance distributions for cross-sectional views. This result implies the localization tendency of the order book imbalance around the Gaussian peak.

  4. Stability Analysis and Variational Integrator for Real-Time Formation Based on Potential Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengqing Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a framework of real-time formation of autonomous vehicles by using potential field and variational integrator. Real-time formation requires vehicles to have coordinated motion and efficient computation. Interactions described by potential field can meet the former requirement which results in a nonlinear system. Stability analysis of such nonlinear system is difficult. Our methodology of stability analysis is discussed in error dynamic system. Transformation of coordinates from inertial frame to body frame can help the stability analysis focus on the structure instead of particular coordinates. Then, the Jacobian of reduced system can be calculated. It can be proved that the formation is stable at the equilibrium point of error dynamic system with the effect of damping force. For consideration of calculation, variational integrator is introduced. It is equivalent to solving algebraic equations. Forced Euler-Lagrange equation in discrete expression is used to construct a forced variational integrator for vehicles in potential field and obstacle environment. By applying forced variational integrator on computation of vehicles' motion, real-time formation of vehicles in obstacle environment can be implemented. Algorithm based on forced variational integrator is designed for a leader-follower formation.

  5. The variation of corrosion potential with time for coated metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of corrosion potential (EsubCORR) with time has been measured for 4130 steel coated with a preservative compound and for primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum. The data for coated steel samples show a great deal of scatter, and a smoothing procedure has been developed to enable proper interpretation of the data. The EsubCORR-time curves for coated steel exhibit a maximum, in agreement with the results of previous studies, where the data were the average of those for a large number of samples, while the present data were obtained from a single sample. In contrast, the EsubCORR-time curves for primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum samples show no significant variations, although considerable activity is indicated by the resistance-time and corrosion rate-time curves.

  6. Dynamic temperature and humidity environmental profiles: impact for future emergency and disaster preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, William J; Louie, Richard F; Tang, Chloe S; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Kost, Gerald J

    2014-02-01

    During disasters and complex emergencies, environmental conditions can adversely affect the performance of point-of-care (POC) testing. Knowledge of these conditions can help device developers and operators understand the significance of temperature and humidity limits necessary for use of POC devices. First responders will benefit from improved performance for on-site decision making. To create dynamic temperature and humidity profiles that can be used to assess the environmental robustness of POC devices, reagents, and other resources (eg, drugs), and thereby, to improve preparedness. Surface temperature and humidity data from the National Climatic Data Center (Asheville, North Carolina USA) was obtained, median hourly temperature and humidity were calculated, and then mathematically stretched profiles were created to include extreme highs and lows. Profiles were created for: (1) Banda Aceh, Indonesia at the time of the 2004 Tsunami; (2) New Orleans, Louisiana USA just before and after Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005; (3) Springfield, Massachusetts USA for an ambulance call during the month of January 2009; (4) Port-au-Prince, Haiti following the 2010 earthquake; (5) Sendai, Japan for the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami with comparison to the colder month of January 2011; (6) New York, New York USA after Hurricane Sandy made landfall in 2012; and (7) a 24-hour rescue from Hawaii USA to the Marshall Islands. Profiles were validated by randomly selecting 10 days and determining if (1) temperature and humidity points fell inside and (2) daily variations were encompassed. Mean kinetic temperatures (MKT) were also assessed for each profile. Profiles accurately modeled conditions during emergency and disaster events and enclosed 100% of maximum and minimum temperature and humidity points. Daily variations also were represented well with 88.6% (62/70) of temperature readings and 71.1% (54/70) of relative humidity readings falling within diurnal patterns. Days

  7. Variation in saltgrass growth and time of fall dormancy related to geographical and climatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvoje Rukavina; Harrison Hughes; Randy Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Development of a new turfgrass cultivar requires an evaluation of numerous traits as well as an understanding of environmental factors influencing those traits. Growth or ability to fill in gaps and time of fall dormancy (fall color retention) that indicates cold hardiness are important traits for turfgrasses. This study was initiated to characterize variation in...

  8. The time variation in infrared water-vapour bands in Mira variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuura, M; Yamamura, [No Value; Cami, J; Onaka, T; Murakami, H; Yamamura, I.

    The time variation in the water-vapour bands in oxygen-rich Mira variables has been investigated using multi-epoch ISO/SWS spectra of four Mira variables in the 2.5-4.0 mum region. All four stars show H2O bands in absorption around minimum in the visual light curve. At maximum, H2O emission features

  9. Space-time variational saddle point formulations of Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guberovic, R.; Schwab, C.; Stevenson, R.

    2014-01-01

    The instationary Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations are considered in a simultaneously space-time variational saddle point formulation, so involving both velocities u and pressure p. For the instationary Stokes problem, it is shown that the corresponding operator is a boundedly invertible linear

  10. An Exploration of the Effects of Cycle Time and Force Variations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of two intermittent task parameters on muscle fatigue, namely cycle time and force level variation. Of particular interest was whether a constant low-level underlying force would contribute to fatigue. Twelve students participated in four experimental conditions, each lasting 8 minutes.

  11. Variation in the timing of reproduction of the four-striped field mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the four-striped field mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrmann, 1784), to test the hypothesis that reproduction in a small, short-lived mammal will be opportunistic, characterized by temporal and spatial variation in the timing of events, and only be inhibited under harsh and predictable winter conditions. Field mice ...

  12. Co-gradient variation in growth rate and development time of a broadly distributed butterfly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Barton

    Full Text Available Widespread species often show geographic variation in thermally-sensitive traits, providing insight into how species respond to shifts in temperature through time. Such patterns may arise from phenotypic plasticity, genetic adaptation, or their interaction. In some cases, the effects of genotype and temperature may act together to reduce, or to exacerbate, phenotypic variation in fitness-related traits across varying thermal environments. We find evidence for such interactions in life-history traits of Heteronympha merope, a butterfly distributed across a broad latitudinal gradient in south-eastern Australia. We show that body size in this butterfly is negatively related to developmental temperature in the laboratory, in accordance with the temperature-size rule, but not in the field, despite very strong temperature gradients. A common garden experiment on larval thermal responses, spanning the environmental extremes of H. merope's distribution, revealed that butterflies from low latitude (warmer climate populations have relatively fast intrinsic growth and development rates compared to those from cooler climates. These synergistic effects of genotype and temperature across the landscape (co-gradient variation are likely to accentuate phenotypic variation in these traits, and this interaction must be accounted for when predicting how H. merope will respond to temperature change through time. These results highlight the importance of understanding how variation in life-history traits may arise in response to environmental change. Without this knowledge, we may fail to detect whether organisms are tracking environmental change, and if they are, whether it is by plasticity, adaptation or both.

  13. Rate variation and estimation of divergence times using strict and relaxed clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ziheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding causes of biological diversity may be greatly enhanced by knowledge of divergence times. Strict and relaxed clock models are used in Bayesian estimation of divergence times. We examined whether: i strict clock models are generally more appropriate in shallow phylogenies where rate variation is expected to be low, ii the likelihood ratio test of the clock (LRT reliably informs which model is appropriate for dating divergence times. Strict and relaxed models were used to analyse sequences simulated under different levels of rate variation. Published shallow phylogenies (Black bass, Primate-sucking lice, Podarcis lizards, Gallotiinae lizards, and Caprinae mammals were also analysed to determine natural levels of rate variation relative to the performance of the different models. Results Strict clock analyses performed well on data simulated under the independent rates model when the standard deviation of log rate on branches, σ, was low (≤0.1, but were inappropriate when σ>0.1 (95% of rates fall within 0.0082-0.0121 subs/site/Ma when σ = 0.1, for a mean rate of 0.01. The independent rates relaxed clock model performed well at all levels of rate variation, although posterior intervals on times were significantly wider than for the strict clock. The strict clock is therefore superior when rate variation is low. The performance of a correlated rates relaxed clock model was similar to the strict clock. Increased numbers of independent loci led to slightly narrower posteriors under the relaxed clock while older root ages provided proportionately narrower posteriors. The LRT had low power for σ = 0.01-0.1, but high power for σ = 0.5-2.0. Posterior means of σ2 were useful for assessing rate variation in published datasets. Estimates of natural levels of rate variation ranged from 0.05-3.38 for different partitions. Differences in divergence times between relaxed and strict clock analyses were greater in two

  14. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  15. Approximate solution of time-fractional advection-dispersion equation via fractional variational iteration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiş, Birol; Bayram, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to obtain the approximate solution of time-fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE) involving Jumarie's modification of Riemann-Liouville derivative by the fractional variational iteration method (FVIM). FVIM provides an analytical approximate solution in the form of a convergent series. Some examples are given and the results indicate that the FVIM is of high accuracy, more efficient, and more convenient for solving time FADEs.

  16. Identifying significant temporal variation in time course microarray data without replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Weston

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of time course microarray studies is the identification of genes that demonstrate significant time-dependent variation in their expression levels. Until recently, available methods for performing such significance tests required replicates of individual time points. This paper describes a replicate-free method that was developed as part of a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland in which no replicate data was collected. Results A temporal test statistic is proposed that is based on the degree to which data are smoothed when fit by a spline function. An algorithm is presented that uses this test statistic together with a false discovery rate method to identify genes whose expression profiles exhibit significant temporal variation. The algorithm is tested on simulated data, and is compared with another recently published replicate-free method. The simulated data consists both of genes with known temporal dependencies, and genes from a null distribution. The proposed algorithm identifies a larger percentage of the time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. Use of the algorithm in a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland resulted in the identification of genes exhibiting distinct circadian variation. These results were confirmed in follow-up laboratory experiments. Conclusion The proposed algorithm provides a new approach for identifying expression profiles with significant temporal variation without relying on replicates. When compared with a recently published algorithm on simulated data, the proposed algorithm appears to identify a larger percentage of time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. The development of the algorithm was instrumental in revealing the presence of circadian variation in the virgin rat mammary gland during the estrous cycle.

  17. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  18. Deep Zonal Flow and Time Variation of Jupiter’s Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hao; Stevenson, David J.

    2017-10-01

    All four giant planets in the Solar System feature zonal flows on the order of 100 m/s in the cloud deck, and large-scale intrinsic magnetic fields on the order of 1 Gauss near the surface. The vertical structure of the zonal flows remains obscure. The end-member scenarios are shallow flows confined in the radiative atmosphere and deep flows throughout the entire planet. The electrical conductivity increases rapidly yet smoothly as a function of depth inside Jupiter and Saturn. Deep zonal flows will advect the non-axisymmetric component of the magnetic field, at depth with even modest electrical conductivity, and create time variations in the magnetic field.The observed time variations of the geomagnetic field has been used to derive surface flows of the Earth’s outer core. The same principle applies to Jupiter, however, the connection between the time variation of the magnetic field (dB/dt) and deep zonal flow (Uphi) at Jupiter is not well understood due to strong radial variation of electrical conductivity. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the connection between dB/dt and Uphi for Jupiter adopting realistic interior electrical conductivity profile, taking the likely presence of alkali metals into account. This provides a tool to translate expected measurement of the time variation of Jupiter’s magnetic field to deep zonal flows. We show that the current upper limit on the dipole drift rate of Jupiter (3 degrees per 20 years) is compatible with 10 m/s zonal flows with < 500 km vertical scale height below 0.972 Rj. We further demonstrate that fast drift of resolved magnetic features (e.g. magnetic spots) at Jupiter is a possibility.

  19. Variational superposed Gaussian approximation for time-dependent solutions of Langevin equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2015-04-01

    We propose a variational superposed Gaussian approximation (VSGA) for dynamical solutions of Langevin equations subject to applied signals, determining time-dependent parameters of superposed Gaussian distributions by the variational principle. We apply the proposed VSGA to systems driven by a chaotic signal, where the conventional Fourier method cannot be adopted, and calculate the time evolution of probability density functions (PDFs) and moments. Both white and colored Gaussian noises terms are included to describe fluctuations. Our calculations show that time-dependent PDFs obtained by VSGA agree excellently with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. The correlation between the chaotic input signal and the mean response are also calculated as a function of the noise intensity, which confirms the occurrence of aperiodic stochastic resonance with both white and colored noises.

  20. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  1. The use of ambient humidity conditions to improve influenza forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Kandula, Sasikiran; Yang, Wan; Karspeck, Alicia

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological evidence indicate that ambient humidity modulates the survival and transmission of influenza. Here we explore whether the inclusion of humidity forcing in mathematical models describing influenza transmission improves the accuracy of forecasts generated with those models. We generate retrospective forecasts for 95 cities over 10 seasons in the United States and assess both forecast accuracy and error. Overall, we find that humidity forcing improves forecast performance (at 1-4 lead weeks, 3.8% more peak week and 4.4% more peak intensity forecasts are accurate than with no forcing) and that forecasts generated using daily climatological humidity forcing generally outperform forecasts that utilize daily observed humidity forcing (4.4% and 2.6% respectively). These findings hold for predictions of outbreak peak intensity, peak timing, and incidence over 2- and 4-week horizons. The results indicate that use of climatological humidity forcing is warranted for current operational influenza forecast.

  2. Finite-temperature time-dependent variation with multiple Davydov states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    The Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational approach with Davydov Ansätze is a sophisticated, yet efficient technique to obtain an accurate solution to many-body Schrödinger equations for energy and charge transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates and light-harvesting complexes. We extend this variational approach to finite temperature dynamics of the spin-boson model by adopting a Monte Carlo importance sampling method. In order to demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we compare calculated real-time quantum dynamics of the spin-boson model with that from numerically exact iterative quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) technique. The comparison shows that our variational approach with the single Davydov Ansätze is in excellent agreement with the QUAPI method at high temperatures, while the two differ at low temperatures. Accuracy in dynamics calculations employing a multitude of Davydov trial states is found to improve substantially over the single Davydov Ansatz, especially at low temperatures. At a moderate computational cost, our variational approach with the multiple Davydov Ansatz is shown to provide accurate spin-boson dynamics over a wide range of temperatures and bath spectral densities.

  3. NIS two-pressure humidity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Galil Doaa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several techniques available to generate humidity references by using stream of saturated gas with well-known water vapor content. Two-pressure humidity generator (2-P is the most commonly used for the realization of temperature and relative humidity scales at National Institute for standards (NIS and for disseminating traceability. This generator has been shown to be highly reproducible when properly used. In order to obtain traceable measurements and best performance, the temperature sensors and pressure gauges of this generator should be calibrated. This paper explained the calibration of 2-P temperature sensors and pressure gauges and the analysis of their performance for the first time at NIS.

  4. Pattern and Variation in the Timing of Aksak Meter: Commentary on Goldberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Polak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Goldberg (2015, this issue explores relations between timing variations, grouping structure, and musical form in the percussive accompaniment of Balkan folk dance music. A chronometric re-analysis of one of the target article’s two audio samples finds a regular metric timing pattern to consistently underlie the variations Goldberg uncovered. Read together, the target article and this commentary demonstrate the complex interplay of a regular timing pattern with several levels of nuanced variation to be performed with fluency, flexibility, and accuracy. This might appear commonplace, but here it is observed in the context of an asymmetric rhythmic mode, non-isochronous beat sequence, and asymmetric metric hierarchy. This context evidently does not represent a constraint of any sort in respect to the rhythmic timing performance, which casts doubts on the deep-seated assumption that metric regularity depends on iso-periodicity and vertical symmetry. This assumption is sometimes explicitly and often implicitly taken as universal; this comment suggests that, on the contrary, it might well be culturally biased.

  5. Hybrid model for forecasting time series with trend, seasonal and salendar variation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono; Rahayu, S. P.; Prastyo, D. D.; Wijayanti, D. G. P.; Juliyanto

    2017-09-01

    Most of the monthly time series data in economics and business in Indonesia and other Moslem countries not only contain trend and seasonal, but also affected by two types of calendar variation effects, i.e. the effect of the number of working days or trading and holiday effects. The purpose of this research is to develop a hybrid model or a combination of several forecasting models to predict time series that contain trend, seasonal and calendar variation patterns. This hybrid model is a combination of classical models (namely time series regression and ARIMA model) and/or modern methods (artificial intelligence method, i.e. Artificial Neural Networks). A simulation study was used to show that the proposed procedure for building the hybrid model could work well for forecasting time series with trend, seasonal and calendar variation patterns. Furthermore, the proposed hybrid model is applied for forecasting real data, i.e. monthly data about inflow and outflow of currency at Bank Indonesia. The results show that the hybrid model tend to provide more accurate forecasts than individual forecasting models. Moreover, this result is also in line with the third results of the M3 competition, i.e. the hybrid model on average provides a more accurate forecast than the individual model.

  6. Time-dependent variational principle in matrix-product state manifolds: Pitfalls and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Benedikt; Lev, Yevgeny Bar; Reichman, David

    2018-01-01

    We study the applicability of the time-dependent variational principle in matrix-product state manifolds for the long time description of quantum interacting systems. By studying integrable and nonintegrable systems for which the long time dynamics are known we demonstrate that convergence of long time observables is subtle and needs to be examined carefully. Remarkably, for the disordered nonintegrable system we consider the long time dynamics are in good agreement with the rigorously obtained short time behavior and with previous obtained numerically exact results, suggesting that at least in this case, the apparent convergence of this approach is reliable. Our study indicates that, while great care must be exercised in establishing the convergence of the method, it may still be asymptotically accurate for a class of disordered nonintegrable quantum systems.

  7. A New Technique of Laplace Variational Iteration Method for Solving Space-Time Fractional Telegraph Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A. Alawad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the exact solutions of space-time fractional telegraph equations are given in terms of Mittage-Leffler functions via a combination of Laplace transform and variational iteration method. New techniques are used to overcome the difficulties arising in identifying the general Lagrange multiplier. As a special case, the obtained solutions reduce to the solutions of standard telegraph equations of the integer orders.

  8. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25–48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  9. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2017-05-01

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25-48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  10. Atmospheric CO2 variations on orbital time scale during the Paleocene and Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeebe, R. E.; Westerhold, T.; Littler, K.; Zachos, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-million-year proxy records (d13C, d18O, %CaCO3, Fe, etc.) show prominent variations on orbital time scale during the Paleocene and Eocene. The cycles have been identified at various sites across the globe and preferentially concentrate spectral power at eccentricity and precessional frequencies. It is almost certain that these cycles are an expression of changes in global climate and carbon cycling paced by orbital variations. However, little is currently known about (1) the driving mechanism linking orbital forcing to changes in climate and carbon cycling and (2) the amplitude of atmospheric CO2 variations associated with these cycles. We have used simple and complex carbon cycle models to explore the basic effect of different orbital forcing schemes and noise on the carbon cycle by forcing different carbon cycle parameters. For direct insolation forcing (opposed to eccentricity - tilt - precession), one major challenge is understanding how the system transfers spectral power from high to low frequencies. We will discuss feasible solutions to this problem, including insolation transformations analogous to electronic AC-DC conversion (DC'ing). Our results show that high-latitude mechanisms are unlikely drivers of orbitally paced changes in the Paleocene-Eocene Earth system. Based on a synthesis of modeling and proxy data analysis, we present the first estimates of orbital-scale variations in atmospheric CO2 during the Paleocene and Eocene.

  11. Nanostructure composite film for sensor controls of humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko K. L.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Received nanostructure of the composite film allows to create integrated sensor controls of humidity with high sensitivity, stable in time, with linear dependence of capacity from relative humidity practically in all range of its change (3 to 100% and keeping working capacity at low temperatures up to –35°С.

  12. Phase, microstructural analysis, and humidity-sensing properties of orange dye and cuprous-oxide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Khasan S.; Saleem, Muhammad; Iqbal, Yaseen; Fatima, Noshin; Gohar, Rashid

    2017-12-01

    The effect of humidity on the phase, microstructure, and electrical properties of an organic compound orange dye (C17H17N5O2) and cuprous-oxide (Cu2O) micro-composite thin film has been investigated. 5 wt% commercially available orange dye and 30-40 wt% Cu2O were used to prepare an aqueous solution. The solution was layered in the form of a thin film on a pre-deposited copper glass substrate using a drop-casting technique under normal gravity conditions. A gap was made in the middle of the surface to get ohmic type electrodes at the ends of the glass substrate. In this way, a Cu/Cu2O-OD/Cu humidity sensor was fabricated. A self-made setup was used to carry out the experiment. Impedance of these samples was observed to decrease by 57-84 times and capacitance increased by 20-26 times with an increase in humidity from 62 to 98% RH. These observations demonstrated that impedance was more sensitive to the variations in humidity as compared to capacitance.

  13. Relative Humidity Sensor Based on No-Core Fiber Coated by Agarose-Gel Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A relative humidity (RH sensor based on single-mode–no-core–single-mode fiber (SNCS structure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The agarose gel is coated on the no-core fiber (NCF as the cladding, and multimode interference (MMI occurs in the SNCS structure. The transmission spectrum of the sensor is modulated at different ambient relative humidities due to the tunable refractive index property of the agarose gel film. The relative humidity can be measured by the wavelength shift and intensity variation of the dip in the transmission spectra. The humidity response of the sensors, coated with different concentrations and coating numbers of the agarose solution, were experimentally investigated. The wavelength and intensity sensitivity is obtained as −149 pm/%RH and −0.075 dB/%RH in the range of 30% RH to 75% RH, respectively. The rise and fall time is tested to be 4.8 s and 7.1 s, respectively. The proposed sensor has a great potential in real-time RH monitoring.

  14. Relative Humidity Sensor Based on No-Core Fiber Coated by Agarose-Gel Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Shi, Jia; Yang, Xianchao; Xu, Degang; Rong, Feng; Zhao, Junfa; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-10-16

    A relative humidity (RH) sensor based on single-mode-no-core-single-mode fiber (SNCS) structure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The agarose gel is coated on the no-core fiber (NCF) as the cladding, and multimode interference (MMI) occurs in the SNCS structure. The transmission spectrum of the sensor is modulated at different ambient relative humidities due to the tunable refractive index property of the agarose gel film. The relative humidity can be measured by the wavelength shift and intensity variation of the dip in the transmission spectra. The humidity response of the sensors, coated with different concentrations and coating numbers of the agarose solution, were experimentally investigated. The wavelength and intensity sensitivity is obtained as -149 pm/%RH and -0.075 dB/%RH in the range of 30% RH to 75% RH, respectively. The rise and fall time is tested to be 4.8 s and 7.1 s, respectively. The proposed sensor has a great potential in real-time RH monitoring.

  15. Office workers' objectively assessed total and prolonged sitting time: Individual-level correlates and worksite variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyssa T. Hadgraft

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary behavior is highly prevalent in office-based workplaces; however, few studies have assessed the attributes associated with this health risk factor in the workplace setting. This study aimed to identify the correlates of office workers' objectively-assessed total and prolonged (≥30 min bouts workplace sitting time. Participants were 231 Australian office workers recruited from 14 sites of a single government employer in 2012–13. Potential socio-demographic, work-related, health-related and cognitive-social correlates were measured through a self-administered survey and anthropometric measurements. Associations with total and prolonged workplace sitting time (measured with the activPAL3 were tested using linear mixed models. Worksites varied significantly in total workplace sitting time (overall mean [SD]: 79% [10%] of work hours and prolonged workplace sitting time (42% [19%], after adjusting for socio-demographic and work-related characteristics. Organisational tenure of 3–5 years (compared to tenure >5 years was associated with more time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time, while having a BMI categorised as obese (compared to a healthy BMI was associated with less time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Significant variations in sitting time were observed across different worksites of the same employer and the variation remained after adjusting for individual-level factors. Only BMI and organisational tenure were identified as correlates of total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Additional studies are needed to confirm the present findings across diverse organisations and occupations.

  16. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it.

  17. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361

  18. Low-Cost Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laue, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    Electronic humidity sensor is simple, inexpensive, and produces output readily used by indicator or control circuits. Sensor operates at safe, low voltage and is relatively invulnerable to electrolysis effects. Sensor used to measure humidity in atmosphere, in soil, and industrial gases, for example.

  19. The Anticorrelated Nature of the Primary and Secondary Eclipse Timing Variations for the Kepler Contact Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, K.; Levine, A.; Rappaport, S.; Borkovits, T.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Kalomeni, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report a study of the eclipse timing variations in contact binary systems, using long-cadence lightcurves from the Kepler archive. As a first step, observed minus calculated (O - C) curves were produced for both the primary and secondary eclipses of some 2000 Kepler binaries. We find ~390 short-period binaries with O - C curves that exhibit (1) random walk-like variations or quasi-periodicities, with typical amplitudes of ±200-300 s, and (2) anticorrelations between the primary and secondary eclipse timing variations. We present a detailed analysis and results for 32 of these binaries with orbital periods in the range of 0.35 ± 0.05 days. The anticorrelations observed in their O - C curves cannot be explained by a model involving mass transfer, which, among other things, requires implausibly high rates of ~0.01 M ⊙ yr-1. We show that the anticorrelated behavior, the amplitude of the O - C delays, and the overall random walk-like behavior can be explained by the presence of a starspot that is continuously visible around the orbit and slowly changes its longitude on timescales of weeks to months. The quasi-periods of ~50-200 days observed in the O - C curves suggest values for k, the coefficient of the latitude dependence of the stellar differential rotation, of ~0.003-0.013.

  20. MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Specific Humidity, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPQDT or tavg3_3d_qdt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional moisture tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  1. Local Times of Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Maximum and Minimum in the Diurnal Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon Oh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Diurnal variation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR flux intensity observed by the ground Neutron Monitor (NM shows a sinusoidal pattern with the amplitude of 1sim 2 % of daily mean. We carried out a statistical study on tendencies of the local times of GCR intensity daily maximum and minimum. To test the influences of the solar activity and the location (cut-off rigidity on the distribution in the local times of maximum and minimum GCR intensity, we have examined the data of 1996 (solar minimum and 2000 (solar maximum at the low-latitude Haleakala (latitude: 20.72 N, cut-off rigidity: 12.91 GeV and the high-latitude Oulu (latitude: 65.05 N, cut-off rigidity: 0.81 GeV NM stations. The most frequent local times of the GCR intensity daily maximum and minimum come later about 2sim3 hours in the solar activity maximum year 2000 than in the solar activity minimum year 1996. Oulu NM station whose cut-off rigidity is smaller has the most frequent local times of the GCR intensity maximum and minimum later by 2sim3 hours from those of Haleakala station. This feature is more evident at the solar maximum. The phase of the daily variation in GCR is dependent upon the interplanetary magnetic field varying with the solar activity and the cut-off rigidity varying with the geographic latitude.

  2. Hardness improvement on low carbon steel using pack carbonitriding method with holding time variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspitasari Poppy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonitriding is a surface hardening process of steel by heating on critical temperature, quench and followed by tempering process. In this research, pack media in carbonitriding was used as a new method. Usually, this process has been obtained using gas and liquid carbonitriding methods. The specimen used in this research is low carbon steel (St. 41 consist of 0.1517% carbon, 0.1994% of silicon, 0.5631% of manganese, 0.0224% of phosphorus, and 0.047% of sulfur. Temperature for pack carbonitriding was at 700 °C, 750 °C and 800 °C and holding time variation 60 minutes and 120 minutes respectively. The result showed that carbonitriding temperature difference affect the mechanical properties of steel St. 41. Steel hardness was increased at lower holding time (60 minutes compared to 120 minutes. The result showed that at 700 °C and 750 °C with 60 minutes variation, the steel hardness increase from 85.7 HRB to 95.7 HRB and at 800 °C the hardness decrease to 93.1 HRB. Meanwhile, at holding time of 120 minutes, steel hardness decrease from 94.1 HRB to 92.7 HRB. This result caused by austenite phase produced at longer period of holding time.

  3. Lap time variation and executive function in older adults: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qu; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Resnick, Susan M; Shardell, Michelle D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2015-09-01

    poor cognitive and motor performance predicts neurological dysfunction. Variable performance may be a subclinical indicator of emerging neurological problems. examine the cross-sectional association between a clinically accessible measure of variable walking and executive function. older adults aged 60 or older from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (n = 811) with data on the 400-m walk test and cognition. Based on ten 40-m laps, we calculated mean lap time (MLT) and variation in time across ten 40-m laps (lap time variation, LTV). Executive function tests assessed attention and short-term memory (digit span forward and backward), psychomotor speed [Trail Making Test (TMT) part A] and multicomponent tasks requiring cognitive flexibility [TMT part B, part B-A (Delta TMT) and digit symbol substitution test (DSST)]. Multivariate linear regression analysis examined the cross-sectional association between LTV and executive function, adjusted for MLT, age, sex and education, as well as the LTV × MLT interaction. the LTV was univariately associated with all executive function tests except digit span (P < 0.001); after adjustment, the association with TMT part A remained (standardised β = 0.142, P = 0.002). There was an interaction between MLT and LTV; among fast walkers, greater LTV was associated with a greater Delta TMT (β for LTV × MLT = -1.121, P = 0.016) after adjustment. at any walking speed, greater LTV is associated with psychomotor slowing. Among persons with faster walking speed, variation is associated with worse performance on a complex measure of cognitive flexibility. A simple measure of variability in walking time is independently associated with psychomotor slowing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. High-performance humidity sensor based on a polyvinyl alcohol-coated photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Yuan, Qingchen; Fang, Liang; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a high-performance relative humidity (RH) sensor by coating a photonic crystal (PC) cavity with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Because a PC cavity's evanescent field strongly interacts with the coated moisture-sensitive PVA film, the resonant wavelength is modified remarkably under varying RH levels ranging from 30% to 90%. In a PC cavity coated with a 720 nm thick PVA, the sensor exhibits a linear spectrum sensitivity exceeding 129 pm/%RH over 40-90%RH, and the power interrogation presents a high sensitivity as 0.77 dB/%RH. The resolvable humidity variation could be much less than 0.1%RH. Relying on the sub-micron thick PVA, the sensor promises a response time less than 300 ms and good repeatability. The dependence of the sensor performances on the PVA thickness is studied as well, indicating a tradeoff between the sensing dynamic range and the response time.

  5. A naturally occurring InDel variation in BraA.FLC.b (BrFLC2 associated with flowering time variation in Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flowering time is an important trait in Brassica rapa crops. FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC is a MADS-box transcription factor that acts as a potent repressor of flowering. Expression of FLC is silenced when plants are exposed to low temperature, which activates flowering. There are four copies of FLC in B. rapa. Analyses of different segregating populations have suggested that BraA.FLC.a (BrFLC1 and BraA.FLC.b (BrFLC2 play major roles in controlling flowering time in B. rapa. Results We analyzed the BrFLC2 sequence in nine B. rapa accessions, and identified a 57-bp insertion/deletion (InDel across exon 4 and intron 4 resulting in a non-functional allele. In total, three types of transcripts were identified for this mutated BrFLC2 allele. The InDel was used to develop a PCR-based marker, which was used to screen a collection of 159 B. rapa accessions. The deletion genotype was present only in oil-type B. rapa, including ssp. oleifera and ssp. tricolaris, and not in other subspecies. The deletion genotype was significantly correlated with variation in flowering time. In contrast, the reported splicing site variation in BrFLC1, which also leads to a non-functional locus, was detected but not correlated with variation in flowering time in oil-type B. rapa, although it was correlated with variation in flowering time in vegetable-type B. rapa. Conclusions Our results suggest that the naturally occurring deletion mutation across exon 4 and intron 4 in BrFLC2 gene contributes greatly to variation in flowering time in oil-type B. rapa. The observed different relationship between BrFLC1 or BrFLC2 and flowering time variation indicates that the control of flowering time has evolved separately between oil-type and vegetable-type B. rapa groups.

  6. A naturally occurring InDel variation in BraA.FLC.b (BrFLC2) associated with flowering time variation in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Keyun; Cheng, Feng; Li, Shikai; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Jianjun; Bonnema, Guusje; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-08-28

    Flowering time is an important trait in Brassica rapa crops. FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a MADS-box transcription factor that acts as a potent repressor of flowering. Expression of FLC is silenced when plants are exposed to low temperature, which activates flowering. There are four copies of FLC in B. rapa. Analyses of different segregating populations have suggested that BraA.FLC.a (BrFLC1) and BraA.FLC.b (BrFLC2) play major roles in controlling flowering time in B. rapa. We analyzed the BrFLC2 sequence in nine B. rapa accessions, and identified a 57-bp insertion/deletion (InDel) across exon 4 and intron 4 resulting in a non-functional allele. In total, three types of transcripts were identified for this mutated BrFLC2 allele. The InDel was used to develop a PCR-based marker, which was used to screen a collection of 159 B. rapa accessions. The deletion genotype was present only in oil-type B. rapa, including ssp. oleifera and ssp. tricolaris, and not in other subspecies. The deletion genotype was significantly correlated with variation in flowering time. In contrast, the reported splicing site variation in BrFLC1, which also leads to a non-functional locus, was detected but not correlated with variation in flowering time in oil-type B. rapa, although it was correlated with variation in flowering time in vegetable-type B. rapa. Our results suggest that the naturally occurring deletion mutation across exon 4 and intron 4 in BrFLC2 gene contributes greatly to variation in flowering time in oil-type B. rapa. The observed different relationship between BrFLC1 or BrFLC2 and flowering time variation indicates that the control of flowering time has evolved separately between oil-type and vegetable-type B. rapa groups.

  7. Stage-specific effects of candidate heterochronic genes on variation in developmental time along an altitudinal cline of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Mensch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously, we have shown there is clinal variation for egg-to-adult developmental time along geographic gradients in Drosophila melanogaster. Further, we also have identified mutations in genes involved in metabolic and neurogenic pathways that affect development time (heterochronic genes. However, we do not know whether these loci affect variation in developmental time in natural populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we constructed second chromosome substitution lines from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster from an altitudinal cline, and measured egg-adult development time for each line. We found not only a large amount of genetic variation for developmental time, but also positive associations of the development time with thermal amplitude and altitude. We performed genetic complementation tests using substitution lines with the longest and shortest developmental times and heterochronic mutations. We identified segregating variation for neurogenic and metabolic genes that largely affected the duration of the larval stages but had no impact on the timing of metamorphosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altitudinal clinal variation in developmental time for natural chromosome substitution lines provides a unique opportunity to dissect the response of heterochronic genes to environmental gradients. Ontogenetic stage-specific variation in invected, mastermind, cricklet and CG14591 may affect natural variation in development time and thermal evolution.

  8. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    difference measurements were less than the minimum of 0.01 kPa required for BREB measurements when averaged over 20 min. Furthermore, the longer-term capacitive humidity measurements are more reliable and not dependent on a sensor bias adjustment as is the case for the dewpoint hygrometer. A field comparison of CS500 and HMP45C profile water vapour pressure differences yielded a slope of close to unity. However, the CS500 exhibited more variable water vapour pressure measurements mainly due to its increased variation in temperature measurements compared to the HMP45C. Comparisons between 20-min BREB sensible heat fluxes obtained using a HMP45C and a dewpoint hygrometer yielded a slope of almost unity. BREB sensible heat fluxes measured using a HMP45C were reasonably well correlated with those obtained using a surface-layer scintillometer and eddy covariance (slope of 0.9629 and 0.9198 respectively). This reasonable agreement showed that a combination capacitive humidity instrument, with similar relative humidity (RH) and temperature error magnitudes of at most 2% RH and 0.3 °C respectively, and similar measurement time response, would be an adequate and less expensive substitute for a dewpoint hygrometer. Furthermore, a combination capacitive humidity instrument requires no servicing compared to a dewpoint hygrometer which requires a bias adjustment and mirror cleaning each week. These findings make unattended BREB measurements of sensible heat flux and evaporation cheaper and more reliable with the system easier to assemble and service and with reduced instrument power.

  9. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under temperature variation. A newly developed Material Deformation Tester (MDT, which can simulate consecutive variation of atmospheric temperature, was used to collect the shrinkage strain of specimens and temperature data. A numerical model was established to describe the thermoelastic strain of a specimen. The results show that (1 there are several sharp shrinkages up to 600 μ for early age concrete in the first 3 days; (2 the absolute value of shrinkage strain is larger than thermal strain; and (3 the difference of shrinkage strain under temperature variation or constant temperature is up to 500 μ.

  10. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  11. Establishing a Set of Macroeconomic Factors Explaining Variation Over Time of Performance in Business Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Dzikevičius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With increasing competitiveness of companies and business sectors in the domestic markets of Lithuania, economic units are frequently confronted with the lack of methods for more detailed analysis of external factors explaining the variation over time of corporate financial indicators. The analysis or forecasting of financial indicators is usually linked with the development of a stock market or undertaken to estimate the probability of bankruptcy. However, there is a lack of studies aimed at identifying links between macroeconomic factors and financial performance indicators and explaining their variation over time. To serve that purpose, the factors of the macroeconomic environment that are most significant for certain economic activities have been identified and analysed to enable explaining the variation over time patterns of corporate financial indicators. The analysis covers economic performance, i.e. financial performance indicators and their links with macroeconomic factors, in 89 business sectors of Lithuania at a three-digit level of NACE 2 ed. The findings of the research indicate that the unemployment level in the country, the volume of export and import and the GDP are the most important macroeconomic factors that can be used to forecast different profitability, financial leverage, liquidity and other financial performance indicators of individual business sectors or companies. The research has not unfolded any significant differences between business sectors therefore the above factors are considered generic macroeconomic factors enabling to explain financial performance indicators of the 89 business sectors. Hence, special attention has to be paid to identifying and analysing specific factors and assessing the causal link. When established, the set of such factors provides a framework for building of a model to forecast business sector financial indicators.

  12. A Humidity Sensor Based on Nb-doped Nanoporous TiO2 Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Anbia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The humidity sensing properties of the sensor fabricated from Nb-doped nanoporous TiO2 by screen-printing on the alumina substrate with Ag-Pd interdigital electrodes have been investigated. The nanoporous thin film has been prepared by sol-gel technique. The product has been characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to analyze the structure and its morphology. It is found that the impedance of this sensor changes more than four orders of magnitude in the relative humidity (RH range of 11–95 % at 25 °C. The response and recovery time of the sensor are about 19 and 25 s, respectively, during the RH variation from 11 to 95 %. The sensor shows high humidity sensitivity, rapid response and recovery, prominent stability, good repeatability and narrow hysteresis loop. These results indicate that Nb-doped nanoporous TiO2 thin films have a great potential for humidity sensing applications in room temperature operations.

  13. Measurement of Planet Masses with Transit Timing Variations Due to Synodic “Chopping” Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic “chopping” contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally \\lt 10% error) for modest eccentricities e≲ 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy, which can appear for systems near first-order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems, which had been previously modeled with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the masses of both planets can be determined uniquely, in agreement with previous results, but without the need for numerical orbit integrations. This demonstrates how mass measurements from TTVs may primarily arise from an observable chopping signal. The formula for chopping can also be used to predict the number of transits and timing precision required for future observations, such as those made by TESS or PLATO, in order to infer planetary masses through analysis of TTVs.

  14. Seasonal time constraints reduce genetic variation in life-history traits along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniegula, Szymon; Golab, Maria J; Drobniak, Szymon M; Johansson, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Time constraints cause strong selection on life-history traits, because populations need to complete their life cycles within a shorter time. We therefore expect lower genetic variation in these traits in high- than in low-latitude populations, since the former are more time-constrained. The aim was to estimate life-history traits and their genetic variation in an obligately univoltine damselfly along a latitudinal gradient of 2730 km. Populations were grown in the laboratory at temperatures and photoperiods simulating those at their place of origin. In a complementary experiment, individuals from the same families were grown in constant temperature and photoperiod that mimicked average conditions across the latitude. Development time and size was faster and smaller, respectively, and growth rate was higher at northern latitudes. Additive genetic variance was very low for life-history traits, and estimates for egg development time and larval growth rate showed significant decreases towards northern latitudes. The expression of genetic effects in life-history traits differed considerably when individuals were grown in constant rather than simulated and naturally variable conditions. Our results support strong selection by time constraints. They also highlight the importance of growing organisms in their native environment for correct estimates of genetic variance at their place of origin. Our results also suggest that the evolutionary potential of life-history traits is very low at northern compared to southern latitudes, but that changes in climate could alter this pattern. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  15. A Linearity-Enhanced Time-Domain CMOS Thermostat with Process-Variation Calibration

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    Chun-Chi Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a linearity-enhanced time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS thermostat with process-variation calibration for improving the accuracy, expanding the operating temperature range, and reducing test costs. For sensing temperatures in the time domain, the large characteristic curve of a CMOS inverter markedly affects the accuracy, particularly when the operating temperature range is increased. To enhance the on-chip linearity, this study proposes a novel temperature-sensing cell comprising a simple buffer and a buffer with a thermal-compensation circuit to achieve a linearised delay. Thus, a linearity-enhanced oscillator consisting of these cells can generate an oscillation period with high linearity. To achieve one-point calibration support, an adjustable-gain time stretcher and calibration circuit were adopted for the process-variation calibration. The programmable temperature set point was determined using a reference clock and a second (identical adjustable-gain time stretcher. A delay-time comparator with a built-in customised hysteresis circuit was used to perform a time comparison to obtain an appropriate response. Based on the proposed design, a thermostat with a small area of 0.067 mm2 was fabricated using a TSMC 0.35-μm 2P4M CMOS process, and a robust resolution of 0.05 °C and dissipation of 25 μW were achieved at a sample rate of 10 samples/s. An inaccuracy of −0.35 °C to 1.35 °C was achieved after one-point calibration at temperatures ranging from −40 °C to 120 °C. Compared with existing thermostats, the proposed thermostat substantially improves the circuit area, accuracy, operating temperature range, and test costs.

  16. Fast solution of Cahn–Hilliard variational inequalities using implicit time discretization and finite elements

    KAUST Repository

    Bosch, Jessica

    2014-04-01

    We consider the efficient solution of the Cahn-Hilliard variational inequality using an implicit time discretization, which is formulated as an optimal control problem with pointwise constraints on the control. By applying a semi-smooth Newton method combined with a Moreau-Yosida regularization technique for handling the control constraints we show superlinear convergence in function space. At the heart of this method lies the solution of large and sparse linear systems for which we propose the use of preconditioned Krylov subspace solvers using an effective Schur complement approximation. Numerical results illustrate the competitiveness of this approach. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Low Energy Excitations of a Bose-Einstein Condensate: A Time-Dependent Variational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Garcia, V.M.; Michinel, H.; Cirac, J.; Lewenstein, M.; Zoller, P. [Departamento de Matematicas, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E. U. Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de CC. Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Comissariat a l`Energie Atomique, DSM/DRECAM/SPAM, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-12-01

    We solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation by a variational ansatz to calculate the excitation spectrum of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap. The trial wave function is a Gaussian which allows an essentially analytical treatment of the problem. Our results reproduce numerical calculations over the whole range from small to large particle numbers, and agree exactly with the Stringari results in the strong interaction limit. Excellent agreement is obtained with the recent JILA experiment and predictions for the negative scattering length case are also made. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Interpretation of engine cycle-to-cycle variation by chaotic time series analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.; Kahl, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we summarize preliminary results from applying a new mathematical technique -- chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) -- to cylinder pressure data from a spark-ignition (SI) four-stroke engine fueled with both methanol and iso-octane. Our objective is to look for the presence of deterministic chaos'' dynamics in peak pressure variations and to investigate the potential usefulness of CTSA as a diagnostic tool. Our results suggest that sequential peak cylinder pressures exhibit some characteristic features of deterministic chaos and that CTSA can extract previously unrecognized information from such data. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Time variations of fields in superconducting magnets and their effects on accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrup, D.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Lamm, M.J.; Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.D.

    1988-08-22

    A report on the time dependence of magnetic fields in the superconducting magnets of the Fermilab Tevatron has been published. A field variation of order 1 gauss at the aperture radius is observed. Studies on both full sized Tevatron, dipoles and prototype magnets have been used to elucidate these effects. Explanations based on eddy currents in the coil matrix or on flux creep in the superconducting filaments are explored with these tests. Measurement results and techniques for controlling the effect based on new laboratory tests and the latest accelerator operation are presented. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Biochars as Innovative Humidity Sensing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ziegler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biochar-based humidity sensors were prepared by drop-coating technique. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP was added as an organic binder to improve the adhesion of the sensing material onto ceramic substrates having platinum electrodes. Two biochars obtained from different precursors were used. The sensors were tested toward relative humidity (RH at room temperature and showed a response starting around 5 RH%, varying the impedance of 2 orders of magnitude after exposure to almost 100% relative humidity. In both cases, biochar materials are behaving as p-type semiconductors under low amounts of humidity. On the contrary, for higher RH values, the impedance decreased due to water molecules adsorption. When PVP is added to SWP700 biochar, n-p heterojunctions are formed between the two semiconductors, leading to a higher sensitivity at low RH values for the sensors SWP700-10% PVP and SWP700-20% PVP with respect to pure SWP700 sensor. Finally, response and recovery times were both reasonably fast (in the order of 1 min.

  1. Humidity sensor based on intracavity sensing of fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia; Xu, Wei; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Yan, Dexian; He, Yixin; Tang, Longhuang; Zhang, Weihong; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-10-01

    A humidity sensor based on the intracavity sensing of a fiber ring laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the fiber ring laser, a humidity-sensitive fiber-optic multimode interferometer (MMI), fabricated by the single-mode-no-core-single-mode (SNCS) fiber coated with Agarose, works as the wavelength-selective filter for intracavity wavelength-modulated humidity sensing. The experiment shows that the lasing wavelength of the fiber laser has a good linear response to ambient humidity from 35%RH to 95%RH. The humidity sensitivity of -68 pm/%RH is obtained with a narrow 3 dB bandwidth less than 0.09 nm and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)  ∼60 dB. The time response of the sensor has been measured to be as fast as 93 ms. The proposed sensor possesses a good stability and low temperature cross-sensitivity.

  2. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when a GW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal–GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  3. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.M.; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F.; Huang, K.M.; Gan, Q.; Gong, Y. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Y.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). College of Hydrometeorolgy

    2013-11-01

    Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs) in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when aGW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative) accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases) with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal-GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  4. Chronotype variation drives night-time sentinel-like behaviour in hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, David R; Crittenden, Alyssa N; Mabulla, Ibrahim A; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Nunn, Charles L

    2017-07-12

    Sleep is essential for survival, yet it also represents a time of extreme vulnerability to predation, hostile conspecifics and environmental dangers. To reduce the risks of sleeping, the sentinel hypothesis proposes that group-living animals share the task of vigilance during sleep, with some individuals sleeping while others are awake. To investigate sentinel-like behaviour in sleeping humans, we investigated activity patterns at night among Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. Using actigraphy, we discovered that all subjects were simultaneously scored as asleep for only 18 min in total over 20 days of observation, with a median of eight individuals awake throughout the night-time period; thus, one or more individuals was awake (or in light stages of sleep) during 99.8% of sampled epochs between when the first person went to sleep and the last person awoke. We show that this asynchrony in activity levels is produced by chronotype variation, and that chronotype covaries with age. Thus, asynchronous periods of wakefulness provide an opportunity for vigilance when sleeping in groups. We propose that throughout human evolution, sleeping groups composed of mixed age classes provided a form of vigilance. Chronotype variation and human sleep architecture (including nocturnal awakenings) in modern populations may therefore represent a legacy of natural selection acting in the past to reduce the dangers of sleep. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  6. A search for transit timing variations and orbital decay in WASP-46b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, R.; Jofré, E.; Ferrero, L. V.; Cúneo, V.; Saker, L.; Lovos, F.; Gómez, M.; Mauas, P.

    2018-02-01

    We present 12 new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-46b obtained with the 1.54-m telescope at Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA, Argentina) and the 0.40-m Horacio Ghielmetti and 2.15-m Jorge Sahade telescopes at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina). We analyse them together with 37 light curves from the literature to re-determine the physical parameters and search for additional planets via transit timing variations (TTVs). We consider the 31 transits with uncertainties in their mid-transit times (e_T0) 7 × 103 on the tidal quality factor and determine that an additional 6 yr baseline is required to rule out Q⋆ < 105.

  7. Real-time quantification of traces of biogenic volatile selenium compounds in humid air by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovová, Kristýna; Shestivska, Violetta; Španěl, Patrik

    2012-06-05

    Biological volatilization of selenium, Se, in a contaminated area is an economical and environmentally friendly approach to phytoremediation techniques, but analytical methods for monitoring and studying volatile compounds released in the process of phytovolatilization are currently limited in their performance. Thus, a new method for real time quantification of trace amounts of the vapors of hydrogen selenide (H(2)Se), methylselenol (CH(3)SeH), dimethylselenide ((CH(3))(2)Se), and dimethyldiselenide ((CH(3))(2)Se(2)) present in ambient air adjacent to living plants has been developed. This involves the characterization of the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction of H(3)O(+), NO(+), and O(2)(+•) reagent ions with molecules of these compounds and then use of the rate constants so obtained to determine their absolute concentrations in air by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS. The results of experiments demonstrating this method on emissions from maize (Zea mays) seedlings cultivated in Se rich medium are also presented.

  8. Time Variations In The Geomagnetic Secular Changes and The Electrical Conductivity of The Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotanova, N. M.; Bondar, T. N.; Ivanov, V. V.

    The time series of the geomagnetic field at European observatories and the time series of spherical harmonic coefficients are analyzed for studying the spatial- temporal structure, its features and nature of the 1969-70 and 1989 -90 jerks. The autoregression model of describing SV time series and not V-shaped model is proposed. In this case the jerk is interpreted by the field's additional perturbation against the background of its regular changes. Torsional oscillations and local sources are used for explaining the nature of jerks. The spatial field distribution charts during the jerk are mapped out. Comparison with charts of other variations of long duration is made and the conclusion is drawn about their generation by the same sources. The wavelet-transform of the time series has been done. It allowed to single out the peculiarities coinciding with the jerk epochs. The scalelograms calculated from wavelet-analysis gave the possibility to estimate the jerk duration, the characteris tic time of screening the mantle and the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle.

  9. Super high sensitive plate acoustic wave humidity sensor based on graphene oxide film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Iren E; Anisimkin, Vladimir I; Gubin, Sergei P; Tkachev, Sergei V; Kolesov, Vladimir V; Kashin, Vadim V; Zaitsev, Boris D; Shikhabudinov, Alexander M; Verona, Enrico; Sun, Shaorong

    2017-11-01

    The changes of density and elastic modules due to water vapor adsorption are measured for graphene oxide film at room temperature. Dominant mechanism for acoustic wave humidity sensing by the film is shown to be related with variation of its electric conductivity. Basing on the data, super high sensitive humidity sensor employing high-order Lamb wave with large coupling constant, standard lithium niobate plate, and graphene oxide sorbent film is developed. The minimal detectable level of the sensor is as low 0.03% RH, response times are 60/120s, and reproducibility is ±2.5%. The sensor is completely selective towards H2, CO, CH4, NO, O2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of humidity on surface acoustic wave propagation in vanadium pentoxide xerogel-lithium niobate structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereika, Raimundas; Bondarenka, Vladimiras; Rimeika, Romualdas; Sereika, Albertas; Čiplys, Daumantas

    2014-11-01

    The impact of ambient humidity on surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in the structure consisting of vanadium pentoxide xerogel (V2O5•nH2O) layer deposited on a piezoelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate has been studied. Thin V2O5•nH2O layers were synthesized using sol-gel method and employed as humidity sensing materials. Freshly prepared layer drastically reduced the transmitted SAW signal, which later increased with time reaching saturation after more than 120 h at the level well below the free-surface value. The experimental observations of SAW behaviour were discussed and found related to the variations in resistance and dielectric permittivity of the V2O5•nH2O.

  11. ANN Modeling of a Chemical Humidity Sensing Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhil KOUDA

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to achieve a modeling of a resistive-type humidity sensing mechanism (RHSM. This model takes into account the parameters of non-linearity, hysteresis, temperature, frequency, substrate type. Furthermore, we investigated the TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations effects on the humidity sensing properties in our model. Using neuronal networks and Matlab environment, we have done the training to realize an analytical model ANN and create a component, accurately express the above parameters variations, for our sensing mechanism model in the PSPICE simulator library. Simulation has been used to evaluate the effect of variations of non-linearity, hysteresis, temperature, frequency, substrate type and TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations effects, where the output of this model is identical to the output of the chemical humidity sensing mechanism used.

  12. Weight variation over time and its association with tuberculosis treatment outcome: a longitudinal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bernabe-Ortiz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Weight variation during therapy has been described as a useful marker to predict TB treatment outcome. No previous study has used longitudinal analysis to corroborate this finding. The goal of this study was to evaluate change and trends of patients' bodyweight over time depending on TB treatment outcome. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort study with all TB cases diagnosed from 2000 to 2006 was carried out. Information from 5 public tuberculosis treatment facilities at Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores, Lima, Peru was analyzed. Poor outcome was defined as failure or death during TB therapy, and compared to good outcome defined as cured. Longitudinal analysis with a pre-specified marginal model was fitted using Generalized Estimating Equations to compare weight trends for patients with good and poor outcome adjusting for potential confounders. A total of 460 patients (55.4% males, mean age: 31.6 years were included in the analysis: 42 (9.1% had a poor outcome (17 failed and 25 died. Weight at baseline was not different comparing outcome groups (p = 0.17. After adjusting for age, gender, type of TB, scheme of treatment, HIV status and sputum variation during follow-up, after the first month of treatment, patients with good outcome gained, on average, almost 1 kg compared to their baseline weight (p<0.001, whereas those with poor outcome lost 1 kg (p = 0.003. Similarly, after 4 months, a patient with good outcome increased 3 kg on average (p<0.001, while those with poor outcome only gained 0.2 kg (p = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Weight variation during tuberculosis therapy follow-up can predict treatment outcome. Patients losing weight during TB treatment, especially in the first month, should be more closely followed as they are at risk of failure or death.

  13. Variation in timing of ossification affects inferred heterochrony of cranial bones in Lissamphibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, Christopher A; Jorgensen, Michael; Tulenko, Frank; Harrington, Sean

    2014-09-01

    The evolutionary origin of Lissamphibia likely involved heterochrony, as demonstrated by the biphasic lifestyles of most extant orders, differences between Anura (with tadpole-to-froglet metamorphosis) and Urodela (which lack strongly defined metamorphosis), and the appearance of direct development among separate lineages of frogs. Patterns in the timing of appearance of skeletal elements (i.e., ossification sequence data) represent a possible source of information for understanding the origin of Lissamphibia, and with the advent of analytical methods to directly optimize these data onto known phylogenies, there has been a renewed interest in assessing the role of changes in these developmental events. However, little attention has been given to the potential impact of variation in ossification sequence data--this is particularly surprising given that different criteria for collecting these data have been employed. Herein, new and previously published ossification data are compiled and all pairs of data for same-species comparisons are selected. Analyses are run to assess the impact of using data that were collected by different methodologies: (1) wild- versus lab-raised animals; (2) different criteria for recognizing timing of ossification; and (3) randomly selecting ossification sequences for species from which multiple studies have been published, but for which the data were collected by different criteria. Parsimov-based genetic inference is utilized to map ossification sequence data onto an existing phylogeny to reconstruct ancestral sequences of ossification and infer instances of heterochrony. All analyses succeeded in optimizing sequence data on internal nodes and instances of heterochrony were identified. However, among all analyses little congruence was found in reconstructed ancestral sequences or among inferred instances of heterochrony. These results indicate a high degree of variation in timing of ossification, and suggest a cautionary note about use

  14. Variation in ultrasonic frequency and time as pre-treatments to air-drying of carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable drying is an alternative method to curb post harvest decay of vegetables and a process to produce dried vegetables, which can be directly consumed or used as ingredients for the preparation of soups, stews, baby foods, cakes, puddings, and many other foods. In this study, the effect of ultrasound frequency and sonication time as pre-treatment prior to air drying at 70°C at an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, on carrot drying kinetics, flavour, colour, and non-enzymatic browning was investigated using a 3-level factorial response surface method. The result showed that an increase in sonication frequency and time did not significantly increase moisture diffusivity but in comparison with the control, water diffusivity increased after ultrasound application and the overall drying time was reduced. Application of the ultrasound pre-treatment in distilled water resulted in water gain and sugar loss, indicating that the ultrasonic pre-treatment can be an important step to produce low sugar content dried products. The brightness and redness to yellowness values of the ultrasonically pre-treated dried carrots were better than those without ultrasound application. In comparison with the flavour of the control, the ultrasound pre-treated samples recorded higher flavour response signals, indicating that the application of ultrasound improved the flavour of the dried carrot. The variation in sonication frequency and time did not significantly affect the non-enzymatic browning index of the dried products but were better than the control.

  15. The Influence of Variation in Time and HCl Concentration to the Glucose Produced from Kepok Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo M, Rohman; Noviyanto, Denny; RM, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Kepok banana (Musa paradisiaca) is a plant that has many advantagesfrom its fruit, stems, leaves, flowers and cob. However, we just tend to take benefit from the fruit. We grow and harvest the fruit without taking advantages from other parts. So they would be a waste or detrimental to animal nest if not used. The idea to take the benefit from the banana crop yields, especially cob is rarely explored. This study is an introduction to the use of banana weevil especially from the glucose it contains. This study uses current methods of hydrolysis using HCl as a catalyst with the concentration variation of 0.4 N, 0.6 N and 0.8 N and hydrolysis times variation of 20 minutes, 25 minutes and 30 minutes. The stages in the hydrolysis include preparation of materials, the process of hydrolysis and analysis of test results using Fehling and titrate with standard glucose solution. HCl is used as a catalyst because it is cheaper than the enzyme that has the same function. NaOH 60% is used for neutralizing the pH of the filtrate result of hydrolysis. From the results of analysis, known thatthe biggest yield of glucose is at concentration 0.8 N and at 30 minutes reaction, it contains 6.25 gram glucose / 20 gram dry sampel, and the convertion is 27.22% at 20 gram dry sampel.

  16. Complex interactions between temperature and relative humidity on water balance of adult tsetse (Glossinidae, Diptera: implications for climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsje eKleynhans

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Insect water balance plays an important role in determining energy budgets, activity patterns, survival and population dynamics and, hence, geographic distribution. Tsetse (Glossina spp. are important vectors of human and animal disease occupying a wide range of habitats in Africa and are notable for their desiccation resistance in xeric environments. Here, we measure water balance traits (water loss rate, body water content and body lipid content in adult flies across a range of temperature (20 – 30 °C and relative humidity (0 – 99 % combinations in four tsetse species from both xeric and mesic habitats. Water loss rates were significantly affected by measurement under different temperature and relative humidity combinations, while body water content, body lipid content and mass were less affected. Different effects of temperature and relative humidity within and among experimental conditions and species suggests cuticular permeability and saturation deficit are likely to be key factors in forecasting tsetse water balance responses to climate variability. These results provide support for mass–independent inter– and intra–specific variation in water loss rates and survival times. Therefore, water balance responses to variation in temperature and relative humidity are complex in Glossina, and this response varies within and among species, sub–groups and ecotypes in terms of both magnitude of effects and the direction of change. This complicates potential forecasting of tsetse distribution in the face of climate change.

  17. Time Variations of Observed Hα Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the Hα and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The Hα spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI. Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the Hα intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the Hα emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  18. Variation in Patients' Travel Times among Imaging Examination Types at a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Liang, Yu; Duszak, Richard; Recht, Michael P

    2017-08-01

    Patients' willingness to travel farther distances for certain imaging services may reflect their perceptions of the degree of differentiation of such services. We compare patients' travel times for a range of imaging examinations performed across a large academic health system. We searched the NYU Langone Medical Center Enterprise Data Warehouse to identify 442,990 adult outpatient imaging examinations performed over a recent 3.5-year period. Geocoding software was used to estimate typical driving times from patients' residences to imaging facilities. Variation in travel times was assessed among examination types. The mean expected travel time was 29.2 ± 20.6 minutes, but this varied significantly (p travel times were shortest for ultrasound (26.8 ± 18.9) and longest for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (31.9 ± 21.5). For magnetic resonance imaging, travel times were shortest for musculoskeletal extremity (26.4 ± 19.2) and spine (28.6 ± 21.0) examinations and longest for prostate (35.9 ± 25.6) and breast (32.4 ± 22.3) examinations. For computed tomography, travel times were shortest for a range of screening examinations [colonography (25.5 ± 20.8), coronary artery calcium scoring (26.1 ± 19.2), and lung cancer screening (26.4 ± 14.9)] and longest for angiography (32.0 ± 22.6). For ultrasound, travel times were shortest for aortic aneurysm screening (22.3 ± 18.4) and longest for breast (30.1 ± 19.2) examinations. Overall, men (29.9 ± 21.6) had longer (p travel times than women (27.8 ± 20.3); this difference persisted for each modality individually (p ≤ 0.006). Patients' willingness to travel longer times for certain imaging examination types (particularly breast and prostate imaging) supports the role of specialized services in combating potential commoditization of imaging services. Disparities in travel times by gender warrant further investigation. Copyright

  19. Uncovering Gene Regulatory Networks from Time-Series Microarray Data with Variational Bayesian Structural Expectation Maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yufei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in this paper reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from time-series microarray data. We apply dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs for modeling cell cycle regulations. In developing a network inference algorithm, we focus on soft solutions that can provide a posteriori probability (APP of network topology. In particular, we propose a variational Bayesian structural expectation maximization algorithm that can learn the posterior distribution of the network model parameters and topology jointly. We also show how the obtained APPs of the network topology can be used in a Bayesian data integration strategy to integrate two different microarray data sets. The proposed VBSEM algorithm has been tested on yeast cell cycle data sets. To evaluate the confidence of the inferred networks, we apply a moving block bootstrap method. The inferred network is validated by comparing it to the KEGG pathway map.

  20. Revisiting the returns-volume relationship: Time variation, alternative measures and the financial crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Steve; Watson, Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Following its introduction in the seminal study of Osborne (1959), a voluminous literature has emerged examining the returns-volume relationship for financial assets. The present paper revisits this relationship in an examination of the FTSE100 which extends the existing literature in two ways. First, alternative daily measures of the FTSE100 index are used to create differing returns and absolute returns series to employ in an examination of returns-volume causality. Second, rolling regression analysis is utilised to explore potential time variation in the returns-volume relationship. The findings obtained depict a hitherto unconsidered complexity in this relationship with the type of returns series considered and financial crisis found to be significant underlying factors. The implications of the newly derived results for both the understanding of the nature of the returns-volume relationship and the development of theories in connection to it are discussed.

  1. [Radial variation and time lag of sap flow of Populus gansuensis in Minqin Oasis, Northwest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Zhang, You-Yan; Li, Chang-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sap flow of tree trunk is very important to reflect the dynamics of physiological activities, as well as to estimate the water consumption of individual plant. In the present study, we used the thermal dissipation technique to monitor the sap flow velocity (J) at four depth loci (i. e. 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm) of three Populus gansuensis trees (30 year-old) in Minqin Oasis for two consecutive growing seasons. The results showed that there were significant differences among J values at four depth loci under tree trunk cambium. J value at the 3 cm depth locus (J3) of the tree trunk was the highest, and then in sequences, were 2 cm, 5 cm and 8 cm depth loci (J2, J5 and J8). J value (J3) on typical sunny days in June with the highest atmospheric potential evapotranspiration (ET0) was up to 28.53 g · cm(-2) · h(-1), which was 1.42, 2.74 and 4.4 times of J2, J5 and J8, respectively. In the process of diurnal variation of sap flow velocity, the peak value time of J at the four depth loci of the tree trunk was different, but the differences among them were within 20 min. Furthermore, the peak value time of sap flow velocity was very different to that of solar radiation (Rs) and air vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The time lag between J and Rs was from 55 to 88 min on typical sunny days during the main growing seasons (from June to August), and, positively related to the depth of the locus under tree trunk cambium, while the time lag between J and VPD reached 60-96 min, and was negatively related to the depth of the locus. The seasonal variation patterns of J were consistent with ET0. With the increase of tree physiological activities, there was a trend that the major water transportation layer extended to the interior sapwood. The most important meteorological factor was the solar radiation, which primarily drove sap flow at different depths of tree trunk. However, the secondary factor changed along with the depth, and VPD became increasingly important with increasing the

  2. Menstrual variation of breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times in cyclical mastalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zainab [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zay@liverpool.ac.uk; Brooks, Jonathan [Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Percy, Dave [Centre for Operational Research and Applied Statistics, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: Hormonal activity causes breast volume to change during the menstrual cycle. One possible cause of this volume change is thought to be due to water retention or oedema within the tissues. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the variation in breast volume and {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to measure T{sub 2} relaxation times which are known to increase with increasing tissue water content. We hypothesised that an increase in breast volume will elevate T{sub 2} relaxation due to the presence of an increased water content within the breast. T{sub 2} Relaxation time and volume were studied in fifteen control subjects and in a cohort of eight patients with cyclical mastalgia in order to determine whether changes in breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times differed in controls and patients during menses, ovulation and premenses. Method: Breast volume was determined by the Cavalieri method in combination with point counting techniques on MR images and T{sub 2} relaxation times of the water and fat in a voxel of breast tissue were obtained using {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Results: Statistical analysis (ANOVA) demonstrated highly significant differences in breast volume between the three stages of the cycle (p < 0.0005) with breast volume being greatest premenstrually. Patients did not exhibit an increase in volume premenstrually, significantly above controls. T{sub 2} of fat or water did not depend on stage of cycle. T-tests demonstrated no significant differences in T{sub 2} of water or fat between patient and control groups. The average T{sub 2} relaxation time of water was lowest in the patient and control groups during ovulation and highest in the patient group during premenses. Conclusion: We have performed the first combined volumetric and spectroscopic study of women with cyclical mastalgia and demonstrated that the global changes in volumes and T{sub 2} were not significantly different from normal

  3. Prezygotic barriers to hybridization in marine broadcast spawners: reproductive timing and mating system variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A Monteiro

    Full Text Available Sympatric assemblages of congeners with incomplete reproductive barriers offer the opportunity to study the roles that ecological and non-ecological factors play in reproductive isolation. While interspecific asynchrony in gamete release and gametic incompatibility are known prezygotic barriers to hybridization, the role of mating system variation has been emphasized in plants. Reproductive isolation between the sibling brown algal species Fucus spiralis, Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphrodite and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious was studied because they form hybrids in parapatry in the rocky intertidal zone, maintain species integrity over a broad geographic range, and have contrasting mating systems. We compared reproductive synchrony (spawning overlap between the three species at several temporal scales (yearly/seasonal, semilunar/tidal, and hourly during single tides. Interspecific patterns of egg release were coincident at seasonal (single peak in spring to early summer to semilunar timescales. Synthesis of available data indicated that spawning is controlled by semidiurnal tidal and daily light-dark cues, and not directly by semilunar cycles. Importantly, interspecific shifts in timing detected at the hourly scale during single tides were consistent with a partial ecological prezygotic hybridization barrier. The species displayed patterns of gamete release consistent with a power law distribution, indicating a high degree of reproductive synchrony, while the hypothesis of weaker selective constraints for synchrony in selfing versus outcrossing species was supported by observed spawning in hermaphrodites over a broader range of tidal phase than in outcrossers. Synchronous gamete release is critical to the success of external fertilization, while high-energy intertidal environments may offer only limited windows of reproductive opportunity. Within these windows, however, subtle variations in reproductive timing have evolved with the potential to

  4. Prezygotic Barriers to Hybridization in Marine Broadcast Spawners: Reproductive Timing and Mating System Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Carla A.; Serrão, Ester A.; Pearson, Gareth A.

    2012-01-01

    Sympatric assemblages of congeners with incomplete reproductive barriers offer the opportunity to study the roles that ecological and non-ecological factors play in reproductive isolation. While interspecific asynchrony in gamete release and gametic incompatibility are known prezygotic barriers to hybridization, the role of mating system variation has been emphasized in plants. Reproductive isolation between the sibling brown algal species Fucus spiralis, Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphrodite) and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious) was studied because they form hybrids in parapatry in the rocky intertidal zone, maintain species integrity over a broad geographic range, and have contrasting mating systems. We compared reproductive synchrony (spawning overlap) between the three species at several temporal scales (yearly/seasonal, semilunar/tidal, and hourly during single tides). Interspecific patterns of egg release were coincident at seasonal (single peak in spring to early summer) to semilunar timescales. Synthesis of available data indicated that spawning is controlled by semidiurnal tidal and daily light-dark cues, and not directly by semilunar cycles. Importantly, interspecific shifts in timing detected at the hourly scale during single tides were consistent with a partial ecological prezygotic hybridization barrier. The species displayed patterns of gamete release consistent with a power law distribution, indicating a high degree of reproductive synchrony, while the hypothesis of weaker selective constraints for synchrony in selfing versus outcrossing species was supported by observed spawning in hermaphrodites over a broader range of tidal phase than in outcrossers. Synchronous gamete release is critical to the success of external fertilization, while high-energy intertidal environments may offer only limited windows of reproductive opportunity. Within these windows, however, subtle variations in reproductive timing have evolved with the potential to form ecological

  5. Prezygotic barriers to hybridization in marine broadcast spawners: reproductive timing and mating system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Carla A; Serrão, Ester A; Pearson, Gareth A

    2012-01-01

    Sympatric assemblages of congeners with incomplete reproductive barriers offer the opportunity to study the roles that ecological and non-ecological factors play in reproductive isolation. While interspecific asynchrony in gamete release and gametic incompatibility are known prezygotic barriers to hybridization, the role of mating system variation has been emphasized in plants. Reproductive isolation between the sibling brown algal species Fucus spiralis, Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphrodite) and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious) was studied because they form hybrids in parapatry in the rocky intertidal zone, maintain species integrity over a broad geographic range, and have contrasting mating systems. We compared reproductive synchrony (spawning overlap) between the three species at several temporal scales (yearly/seasonal, semilunar/tidal, and hourly during single tides). Interspecific patterns of egg release were coincident at seasonal (single peak in spring to early summer) to semilunar timescales. Synthesis of available data indicated that spawning is controlled by semidiurnal tidal and daily light-dark cues, and not directly by semilunar cycles. Importantly, interspecific shifts in timing detected at the hourly scale during single tides were consistent with a partial ecological prezygotic hybridization barrier. The species displayed patterns of gamete release consistent with a power law distribution, indicating a high degree of reproductive synchrony, while the hypothesis of weaker selective constraints for synchrony in selfing versus outcrossing species was supported by observed spawning in hermaphrodites over a broader range of tidal phase than in outcrossers. Synchronous gamete release is critical to the success of external fertilization, while high-energy intertidal environments may offer only limited windows of reproductive opportunity. Within these windows, however, subtle variations in reproductive timing have evolved with the potential to form ecological

  6. The effect of humidity and temperature on visual outcomes after myopic corneal laser refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hood CT

    2016-11-01

    room humidity was consistently associated with small improvements in CDVA after myopic LASIK over time, variations in room temperature and humidity were not associated with UDVA, the need for enhancement, the incidence of DLK, or refraction after myopic LASIK or LASEK. Keywords: LASIK, LASEK, refractive surgery, temperature, humidity

  7. A Humidity Sensing Organic-Inorganic Composite for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasan S. Karimov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the effect of varying humidity levels on the electrical parameters and the multi frequency response of the electrical parameters of an organic-inorganic composite (PEPC+NiPc+Cu2O-based humidity sensor. Silver thin films (thickness ~200 nm were primarily deposited on plasma cleaned glass substrates by the physical vapor deposition (PVD technique. A pair of rectangular silver electrodes was formed by patterning silver film through standard optical lithography technique. An active layer of organic-inorganic composite for humidity sensing was later spun coated to cover the separation between the silver electrodes. The electrical characterization of the sensor was performed as a function of relative humidity levels and frequency of the AC input signal. The sensor showed reversible changes in its capacitance with variations in humidity level. The maximum sensitivity ~31.6 pF/%RH at 100 Hz in capacitive mode of operation has been attained. The aim of this study was to increase the sensitivity of the previously reported humidity sensors using PEPC and NiPc, which has been successfully achieved.

  8. Effects of humidity on shear behavior of bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Askarinejad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is a naturally occurring biological composite, however its microstructure and hence its properties are very complex compared to the manmade composites. Due to optimization, it can be assumed that the variation in properties along the thickness of the culm be a smooth transition for better bonding strength between layers and to prevent non uniformity in stress concentration. As a consequence, biological structures are complicated and functionally graded. Hence, a realistic model that can capture the mechanical performance of bamboo is valuable in future design of robust multifunctional composites. This paper presents the results of experimental and numerical studies on the torsional (shear properties of bamboo. The hierarchical and multi-scale structure of bamboo and the distribution of micro-scale fibers are revealed via laser scanning and atomic force microscopy. This information was incorporated into a finite element model to analyze the mechanical behavior of bamboo under torsion and to estimate the shear modulus of bamboo along the fibers. Moreover, the effects of humidity and therefore water content on the mechanical properties of bamboo were evaluated by performing torsion tests on samples maintained in environments with different humidities. Increasing the humidity does not cause a drop in the shear modulus, however, a jump in the shear modulus did occur at around 60% humidity. Results of this study indicate that the highest strength values in samples occurred in environments with humidity levels between 60% and 80% and undergo a significant drop after that. In higher humidities, the samples behave more ductile.

  9. Space versus time variation in the population dynamics of three co-occurring perennial herbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongejans, E.; Kroon, de H.

    2005-01-01

    1 Many plant species are currently restricted to small and isolated populations as a result of habitat destruction and fragmentation. Lack of sufficient data often leads to spatial variation being substituted for temporal variation in models to evaluate management options, but variation in

  10. Batch leachate treatment using stirred electrocoagulation reactor with variation of residence time and stirring rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitorus, I. S.; Astono, W.; Iswanto, B.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to reduce pollutant levels of the leachate by electrocoagulation method using a stirred electrocoagulation reactor as the electrochemical water treatment. The release of active coagulants as metallic ions took place in the anode, while in the cathode, the electrolysis reaction in the form of hydrogen gas dischargeoccurred. The source of wastewater is Waste Water Treatment Plant inlet III of Bantar Gebang, Bekasi. Some parameters were analyzed in this research, i.e., Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), NH3, NO3 -, NO2 -, N-total, and organic substances as well as the microorganism growth before and after electrocoagulation, with variations of detention time (seconds) of 10, 20, 120, 600 and rapid mixing conditions (rpm) of 60, 100 and 200. The results show that the greater the rapid mixing speed and the detention time of electrolysis, the higher the removal of contaminants in liquid waste. The optimum condition of electrocoagulation was encountered at 200 rpm rapid mixing with 600 seconds of processing time. The removal efficiencies of electrocoagulation method for each parameter are TSS of 46.80%, BOD5 of 71.33%, COD of 73.77%, Pb of 62.5%,and NH3-N of 57.92%,whereas the pH value has been increased from 8.03 to 8.95. The electrocoagulation method can reduce levels of pollutants, complying with the environmental standards.

  11. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  12. Variations in automatically recorded rumination time as explained by variations in intake of dietary fractions and milk production, and between-cow variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Malene Vesterager; Nadeau, E.; Johansson, B. E. O.

    2015-01-01

    contained 761, 290, and 203 daily recordings of RT, milk yield, milk components, DMI, and intake of dietary fractions recorded on 29, 26, and 24 Holstein and Swedish Red cows from trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The dietary fractions included forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF), concentrate NDF, crude...... selected and simultaneously checked for multicollinearity between the dietary components; in step 2, a multivariate model, including the effect of repeated measurements, the main effect of the selected dietary fractions from step 1, random effects of cow(trial) and trial, and information on breed, days...... of different dietary fractions, the relationship between RT in minutes per kilogram of dry matter intake (DMI) and milk production, and to examine the variation in RT within and between mid-lactating dairy cows. Data from 3 production trials were used in which a total of 27 different diets were fed. The data...

  13. Leisure time physical activity in the Framingham Offspring Study. Description, seasonal variation, and risk factor correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, A L; Keller, J B; Wilson, P W; Castelli, W P

    1989-01-01

    Self-reported leisure time physical activity was analyzed for 1,598 men and 1,762 women aged 20-69 years in the Framingham Offspring Cycle 2 exam in 1979-1983. Walking for pleasure was generally the most common physical activity for both sexes throughout the year. Substantial seasonal variation was noted for the most common activities: gardening, carpentry, lawn mowing, golf, and running for men; and gardening, swimming, health club exercise, dancing, and bicycling for women. Both sexes expended more kilocalories in physical activities in summer than in winter (p less than 0.001). Frequency of participation in activities sufficient to induce perspiration was associated with frequency of participation in at least one hour of conditioning (greater than or equal to 7.5 kilocal/minute) activities per week (p less than 0.001). Based on age-adjusted mean levels, higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lower heart rate, lower body mass index and fewer cigarettes smoked per day were consistently observed across four quartiles of increasing physical activity levels (p less than 0.01). Men who participated in at least one hour of conditioning activities per week had significantly different mean levels for these four risk factors than men who reported less than one hour of such activities per week (p less than 0.001). Results substantiate previous reports of an inverse relation between physical activity levels and cardiovascular risk, and suggest seasonal variation in activity levels should be considered in future studies which explore the relation between physical activity and cardiovascular disease.

  14. Temperature and Humidity Effects on Hospital Morbidity in Darwin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, James; Sherwood, Steven C; Green, Donna; Alexander, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have explored the relationship between temperature and health in the context of a changing climate, but few have considered the effects of humidity, particularly in tropical locations, on human health and well-being. To investigate this potential relationship, this study assessed the main and interacting effects of daily temperature and humidity on hospital admission rates for selected heat-relevant diagnoses in Darwin, Australia. Univariate and bivariate Poisson generalized linear models were used to find statistically significant predictors and the admission rates within bins of predictors were compared to explore nonlinear effects. The analysis indicated that nighttime humidity was the most statistically significant predictor (P humidity (P humidity effect appeared to be strongly nonlinear: Hot days appeared to have higher admission rates when they were preceded by high nighttime humidity. From this analysis, we suggest that heat-health policies in tropical regions similar to Darwin need to accommodate the effects of temperature and humidity at different times of day. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reminiscence functions over time: consistency of self functions and variation of prosocial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Norm; King, David B; Cappeliez, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    The current study examines the temporal stability of the tripartite model of reminiscence functions in which eight separate reminiscence functions map onto three second-order factors which contribute significantly to measurement of an overarching reminiscence latent construct. We collected online responses from 411 adults 50+ years of age. Confirmatory factor analytic models were computed at three points of data collection over 16 months. Invariance analyses were next undertaken to simultaneously compare the measurement properties to assess within-person stability of reminiscence functions over time. The tripartite structure of reminiscence functions was replicated at each point of data collection. As hypothesised, self-positive and self-negative functions are consistent across points of data collection, whereas prosocial functions vary over time. The temporal stability of the self functions may be attributed to enduring characteristics of the individual such as personality traits and life attitudes, as well as their solitary nature. Previous research indicates that consistency of self-positive reminiscence functions has ensuing benefits for physical health and psychological well-being; the opposite is true for self-negative functions. The temporal variation of prosocial functions may be due to the varying availability of others to share memories and their responsiveness to the emotional context.

  16. Genetic variation in LIN28B is associated with the timing of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ken K; Elks, Cathy E; Li, Shengxu; Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Andersen, Lars B; Bingham, Sheila A; Brage, Soren; Smith, George Davey; Ekelund, Ulf; Gillson, Christopher J; Glaser, Beate; Golding, Jean; Hardy, Rebecca; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kuh, Diana; Luben, Robert; Marcus, Michele; McGeehin, Michael A; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M; Rubin, Carol; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Strachan, David P; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wong, Andrew; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Barroso, Inês; Mooser, Vincent; Loos, Ruth J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2009-06-01

    The timing of puberty is highly variable. We carried out a genome-wide association study for age at menarche in 4,714 women and report an association in LIN28B on chromosome 6 (rs314276, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.33, P = 1.5 × 10(-8)). In independent replication studies in 16,373 women, each major allele was associated with 0.12 years earlier menarche (95% CI = 0.08-0.16; P = 2.8 × 10(-10); combined P = 3.6 × 10(-16)). This allele was also associated with earlier breast development in girls (P = 0.001; N = 4,271); earlier voice breaking (P = 0.006, N = 1,026) and more advanced pubic hair development in boys (P = 0.01; N = 4,588); a faster tempo of height growth in girls (P = 0.00008; N = 4,271) and boys (P = 0.03; N = 4,588); and shorter adult height in women (P = 3.6 × 10(-7); N = 17,274) and men (P = 0.006; N = 9,840) in keeping with earlier growth cessation. These studies identify variation in LIN28B, a potent and specific regulator of microRNA processing, as the first genetic determinant regulating the timing of human pubertal growth and development.

  17. Excitation of Earth Rotation Variations "Observed" by Time-Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ben F.; Cox, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Time variable gravity measurements have been made over the past two decades using the space geodetic technique of satellite laser ranging, and more recently by the GRACE satellite mission with improved spatial resolutions. The degree-2 harmonic components of the time-variable gravity contain important information about the Earth s length-of-day and polar motion excitation functions, in a way independent to the traditional "direct" Earth rotation measurements made by, for example, the very-long-baseline interferometry and GPS. In particular, the (degree=2, order= 1) components give the mass term of the polar motion excitation; the (2,O) component, under certain mass conservation conditions, gives the mass term of the length-of-day excitation. Combining these with yet another independent source of angular momentum estimation calculated from global geophysical fluid models (for example the atmospheric angular momentum, in both mass and motion terms), in principle can lead to new insights into the dynamics, particularly the role or the lack thereof of the cores, in the excitation processes of the Earth rotation variations.

  18. The influence of humidity on accuracy length measurement on polymer parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madruga, Daniel González; Alexiou, A.; Dalla Costa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The work deals with an experimental study of the influence of humidity on accurate length measurements on ABS parts. Polymer parts absorb water from the ambient until they reach hygroscopic equilibrium. Water content causes an expansion of the polymer part. The relationship between the water...... the experiment ambient conditions. The invar fixture with the inductive probes, with a resolution of 0.1 μm, allows length measurement on 8 ABS parts at the same time. The scale was used to collect the water content variation during the experiment with a resolution of 0.1 mg. The length and weight of the ABS...

  19. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on the Characterization of C-4 Explosive Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2012-06-01

    Both the quantity and the amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the amount of explosive originally deposited on the surface, the adhesive forces, temperature and humidity, as well as other environmental factors. This laboratory study focused on evaluating RDX crystal morphology changes resulting from variations in temperature and humidity conditions of the sample. The temperature and humidity conditions were controlled using a Tenney THRJ environmental chamber and a Tenney T11RC-1.5 environmental chamber. These chambers allow the temperature and humidity to be held within ±3 °C and ±5 % RH. The temperature and humidity conditions used for this test series were: 4 °C/40 %RH, 21 °C/20 %RH (samples left on benchtop), 21 °C/70 %RH, 21 °C/95 %RH, 35 °C/40 %RH, 35 °C/70 %RH, and 35 °C/95 %RH. These temperature and humidity set points were chosen to represent a wide range of conditions that may be found in real world scenarios. C-4 (RDX crystals and binder material) was deposited on the surface of one of six substrates by placing a fingerprint from the explosive block onto the matrix surface. The substrates were chosen to provide a range of items that are commonly used. Six substrate types were used during these tests: 50 % cotton/50 % polyester as found in T-shirts, 100 % cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100 % cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, painted metal obtained from a car hood, and a computer diskette. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal: oil, dirt, scratches, and rust spots. The substrates were photographed at various stages of testing, using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera, to determine any changes in the crystalline morphology. Some of the samples

  20. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of <1 minute were discovered (see the poster by Kubo et al., Pa-13). We focused on an active region and investigated the short (<30 s) time variations and relation to the coronal structure observed by SDO/AIA. We compared the Ly(alpha) time variations at footpoints of coronal magnetic fields observed by AIA 211 Å (approx.2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (0.6 MK), and non-loop regions. As the result, we found the <30 s Ly(alpha) time variations had more in the footpoint regions. On the other hand, the <30 s time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  1. Using the Relaxation Test to Study Variation in the Time-Dependent Property of Rock and the Consequent Effect on Time-Dependent Roof Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuting; Mishra, Brijes; Gao, Danqing

    2017-09-01

    Field observations have demonstrated that roof failure occurs spatially in a mine from the time of excavation. It is suspected that time-dependent deformation propagates failure in the rock mass. In this paper, the relaxation test is used to study variation in the time-dependent property of rock and the consequent effect on time-dependent roof failure. This investigation uses a numerical simulation in 3DEC. The relaxation equation is developed from Burgers model. Variations in the time-dependent property in the post-failure region show negligible variation and, therefore, are averaged to represent the time-dependent property of the failed rock. Finally, these parameters are used in the numerical simulation of underground excavations. Two groups of parameters are used to represent the time-dependent property for pre- and post-failure conditions. FISH functions within 3DEC are used to monitor the state of each zone. Once failure is detected, the parameters are changed to the values corresponding to failed rock. The results show that the new relaxation model accurately predicts the time-dependent propagation of the failure zone. The variation of the time-dependent parameters significantly affects the rock mass behavior and roof convergence.

  2. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  3. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. Cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air in older homes in warm-humid climates. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long-off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  4. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A; George, Subi J; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2014-02-17

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration.

  5. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A.; George, Subi J.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration. PMID:24531132

  6. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  7. TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY REGINIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the suitability of water hyacinth as a bulk substrate for growing a newly domesticated local oyster mushroom, Pleurotus flabellatus. The performance of the mushroom was investigated under ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) regimes of 18-. 25/27-29 OC and 55-85/78-93%, respectively.

  8. Tack Measurements of Prepreg Tape at Variable Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher; Palmieri, Frank L.; Forghani, Alireza; Hickmott, Curtis; Bedayat, Houman; Coxon, Brian; Poursartip, Anoush; Grimsley, Brian

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s Advanced Composites Project has established the goal of achieving a 30 percent reduction in the timeline for certification of primary composite structures for application on commercial aircraft. Prepreg tack is one of several critical parameters affecting composite manufacturing by automated fiber placement (AFP). Tack plays a central role in the prevention of wrinkles and puckers that can occur during AFP, thus knowledge of tack variation arising from a myriad of manufacturing and environmental conditions is imperative for the prediction of defects during AFP. A full design of experiments was performed to experimentally characterize tack on 0.25-inch slit-tape tow IM7/8552-1 prepreg using probe tack testing. Several process parameters (contact force, contact time, retraction speed, and probe diameter) as well as environmental parameters (temperature and humidity) were varied such that the entire parameter space could be efficiently evaluated. Mid-point experimental conditions (i.e., parameters not at either extrema) were included to enable prediction of curvature in relationships and repeat measurements were performed to characterize experimental error. Collectively, these experiments enable determination of primary dependencies as well as multi-parameter relationships. Slit-tape tow samples were mounted to the bottom plate of a rheometer parallel plate fixture using a jig to prevent modification of the active area to be interrogated with the top plate, a polished stainless steel probe, during tack testing. The probe surface was slowly brought into contact with the pre-preg surface until a pre-determined normal force was achieved (2-30 newtons). After a specified dwell time (0.02-10 seconds), during which the probe substrate interaction was maintained under displacement control, the probe was retracted from the surface (0.1-50 millimeters per second). Initial results indicated a clear dependence of tack strength on several parameters, with a particularly

  9. Air humidity requirements for human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole

    1999-01-01

    Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards...... for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics and activity level. The respiratory model...... predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely the air temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity...

  10. Time variations of gaseous and reactive mercury in the industrial area of Puertollano (south-central Spain). Temporal cycles with marked variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Coronado, Alba; Esbrí, Jose Maria; Higueras, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    . The best GEM predictors were temperature, relative humidity and NO2, whereas the best predictors for RGM were GEM, temperature and ozone. RGM variations seem to be explained predominantly by photoxidation processes, with GEM availability and transport processes of secondary importance.

  11. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018{sub −0.004}{sup +0.005}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕}. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm{sup –3} × (R/3 R {sub ⊕}){sup –2.3} for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  12. Adaptive Real-Time Estimation on Road Disturbances Properties Considering Load Variation via Vehicle Vertical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuhui Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle dynamics are directly dependent on tire-road contact forces and torques which are themselves dependent on the wheels’ load and tire-road friction characteristics. An acquisition of the road disturbance property is essential for the enhancement of vehicle suspension control systems. This paper focuses on designing an adaptive real-time road profile estimation observer considering load variation via vehicle vertical dynamics. Firstly, a road profile estimator based on a linear Kalman filter is proposed, which has great advantages on vehicle online control. Secondly, to minimize the estimation errors, an online identification system based on the Recursive Least-Squares Estimation is applied to estimate sprung mass, which is used to refresh the system matrix of the adaptive observer to improve the road estimation efficiency. Last, for mining road category from the estimated various road profile sequencse, a road categorizer considering road frequency and amplitude simultaneously is approached and its efficiency is validated via numerical simulations, in which the road condition is categorized into six special ranges, and this road detection strategy can provide the suspension control system with a better compromise for the vehicle ride comfort, handling, and safety performance.

  13. Securing the Extremely Low-Densities of Low-Mass Planets Characterized by Transit Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) provide an excellent tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many at orbital periods beyond the reach of both Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified low-mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities (e.g., Kepler-79d, Jontof-Hutter et al. 2014; Kepler-51, Masuda 2014; Kepler-87c, Ofir et al. 2014). Additional low-density, low-mass planets will likely become public before ESS III (Jontof-Hutter et al. in prep). Collectively, these results suggest that very low density planets with masses of 2-6 MEarth are not uncommon in compact multiple planet systems. Some astronomers have questioned whether there could be an alternative interpretation of the TTV observations. Indeed, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. While the physics of TTVs is rock solid, the statistical analysis of Kepler observations can be challenging, due to the complex interactions between model parameters and high-dimensional parameter spaces that must be explored. We summarize recent advances in computational statistics that enable robust characterization of planetary systems using TTVs. We present updated analyses of a few particularly interesting systems and discuss the implications for the robustness of extremely low densities for low-mass planets. Such planets pose an interesting challenge for planet formation theory and are motivating detailed theoretical studies (e.g., Lee & Chiang 2015 and associated ESS III abstracts).

  14. The EDGE–CALIFA Survey: Variations in the Molecular Gas Depletion Time in Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Dyas; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wong, Tony; Ostriker, Eve C.; Blitz, Leo; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Colombo, Dario; Leroy, Adam K.; Cao, Yixian; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Garcia-Benito, Ruben; Husemann, Bernd; Kalinova, Veselina; Levy, Rebecca C.; Mast, Damian; Rosolowsky, Erik; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2017-11-01

    We present results from the EDGE survey, a spatially resolved CO(1‑0) follow-up to CALIFA, an optical Integral Field Unit survey of local galaxies. By combining the data products of EDGE and CALIFA, we study the variation in molecular gas depletion time (τ dep) on kiloparsec scales in 52 galaxies. We divide each galaxy into two parts: the center, defined as the region within 0.1 {R}25, and the disk, defined as the region between 0.1 and 0.7 {R}25. We find that 14 galaxies show a shorter τ dep (∼1 Gyr) in the center relative to that in the disk (τ dep ∼ 2.4 Gyr), which means the central region in those galaxies is more efficient at forming stars per unit molecular gas mass. This finding implies that the centers with shorter τ dep resemble the intermediate regime between galactic disks and starburst galaxies. Furthermore, the central drop in τ dep is correlated with a central increase in the stellar surface density, suggesting that a shorter τ dep is associated with molecular gas compression by the stellar gravitational potential. We argue that varying the CO-to-H2 conversion factor only exaggerates the central drop of τ dep.

  15. Time-dependent variation of POF Bragg grating reflectivity and wavelength submerged in different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Webb, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the time-dependent variation of both the reflectivity and resonance wavelength of microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors embedded in silicone rubber and polyurethane resin diaphragms in contact with water and aircraft fuel, respectively. The array sensors were inscribed using two different phase masks with pitches of 557.5 and 580 nm and the thermal annealing of the inscribed fiber was used to change the Bragg wavelengths. Both the reflection and the resonance wavelength shift were monitored over 90 days submerged in liquid and two studies were investigated. In the first study, in addition to the mPOFBGs coated with the diaphragm, also the rest of the fiber is totally protected between the sensors with the same material used for diaphragms. On the other hand, in the second study, the fiber between sensors is unprotected - in direct contact with liquid. PMMA and TOPAS fibers were used and this study suggests that TOPAS fiber should be a good option for long-term liquid monitoring applications.

  16. Tungsten disulfide (WS2) based all-fiber-optic humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunhan; Chen, Chaoying; Xia, Kai; Peng, Shuihua; Guan, Heyuan; Tang, Jieyuan; Lu, Huiui; Yu, Jianhui; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Zhe

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate a novel all-fiber-optic humidity sensor comprised of a WS2 film overlay on a side polished fiber (SPF). This sensor can achieve optical power variation of up to 6 dB in a relative humidity (RH) range of 35%-85%. In particular, this novel humidity fiber sensor has a linear correlation coefficient of 99.39%, sensitivity of 0.1213 dB/%RH, and a humidity resolution of 0.475%RH. Furthermore, this sensor shows good repeatability and reversibility, and fast response to breath stimulus. This WS2 based all-fiber optic humidity sensor is easy to fabricate, is compatible with pre-established fiber optic systems, and holds great potential in photonics applications such as in all-fiber optic humidity sensing networks.

  17. Alongshore Variation in the Depth of Activation: Implications of Oil Residence Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, P.; Houser, C.

    2016-12-01

    In 2010 the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill released approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico just as the nearshore and beach profile were recovering from winter storms. As a consequence, oil mats and tar balls were trapped at depth within the beach and nearshore profile. Excavation of this buried oil during subsequent storms creates the potential for the contamination of adjacent beaches and the degradation of marine ecosystems, which can in turn negatively impact local economies that depend on fisheries and tourism. The potential for oil burial and persistence is dependent on four things: the physio-chemical nature of the oil as it reaches the nearshore environment, the pre-existing morphology of the beach and nearshore, and the evolution of that morphology after the oil is deposited. The depth at which the oil is buried is also dependent on the beach profile during the time of the spill. The purpose of this study is to characterize the alongshore variation in depth of activation on a Deepwater Horizon impacted section of Pensacola Beach, Florida with regards to the implications of oil residence time. Ground- Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were conducted along two parallel 1-km transects adjacent to the swash zone and the dune. Additional cross- shore transects were completed every 150 m from the base of the dune to the top of the swash zone. Sediments cores were taken at the crossing points of the alongshore and cross-shore transects, to calibrate the GPR surveys and complete an elemental analysis for the identification of storm layers. The cores were also analyzed for the presence of buried oil.

  18. Daily variation of radon gas and its short-lived progeny concentration near ground level and estimation of aerosol residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Mohery; A, M. Abdallah; A, Ali; S, S. Baz

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of radon (222Rn) gas and its short-lived progenies 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Po were continuously monitored every four hours at the ground level in Jeddah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed three times every week, starting from November 2014 to October 2015. A method of electrostatic precipitation of positively charged 218Po and 214Po by a positive voltage was applied for determining 222Rn gas concentration. The short-lived 222Rn progeny concentration was determined by using a filter holder connected with the alpha-spectrometric technique. The meteorological parameters (relative air humidity, air temperature, and wind speed) were determined during the measurements of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. 222Rn gas as well as its short-lived progeny concentration display a daily and seasonal variation with high values in the night and early morning hours as compared to low values at noon and in the afternoon. The observed monthly atmospheric concentrations showed a seasonal trend with the highest values in the autumn/winter season and the lowest values in the spring/summer season. Moreover, and in parallel with alpha-spectrometric measurements, a single filter-holder was used to collect air samples. The deposited activities of 214Pb and the long-lived 222Rn daughter 210Pb on the filter were measured with the gamma spectrometric technique. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb by both techniques were found to be relatively equal largely. The highest mean seasonally activity concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn/winter season while the lowest mean were observed in the spring/summer season. The mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmospheric air could be estimated from the activity ratios of 210Pb/214Pb. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Grant No. 291/965/1434).

  19. Capturing sequence variation among flowering-time regulatory gene homologues in the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchiessl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Flowering, the transition from the vegetative to the generative phase, is a decisive time point in the lifecycle of a plant. Flowering is controlled by a complex network of transcription factors, photoreceptors, enzymes and miRNAs. In recent years, several studies gave rise to the hypothesis that this network is also strongly involved in the regulation of other important lifecycle processes ranging from germination and seed development through to fundamental developmental and yield-related traits. In the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus, (genome AACC, homoeologous copies of flowering time regulatory genes are implicated in major phenological variation within the species, however the extent and control of intraspecific and intergenomic variation among flowering-time regulators is still unclear. To investigate differences among B. napus morphotypes in relation to flowering-time gene variation, we performed targeted deep sequencing of 29 regulatory flowering-time genes in four genetically and phenologically diverse B. napus accessions. The genotype panel included a winter-type oilseed rape, a winter fodder rape, a spring-type oilseed rape (all B. napus ssp. napus and a swede (B. napus ssp. napobrassica, which show extreme differences in winter-hardiness, vernalization requirement and flowering behaviour. A broad range of genetic variation was detected in the targeted genes for the different morphotypes, including non-synonymous SNPs, copy number variation and presence-absence variation. The results suggest that this broad variation in vernalisation, clock and signaling genes could be a key driver of morphological differentiation for flowering-related traits in this recent allopolyploid crop species.

  20. Decadal variations in atmospheric water vapor time series estimated using GNSS, ERA-Interim, and synoptic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaf, Fadwa; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) have efficiently been used since the 1990s as a meteorological observing system. Recently scientists used GNSS time series of precipitable water vapor (PWV) for climate research although they may not be sufficiently long. In this work, we compare the trend estimated from GNSS time series with that estimated from European Center for Medium-RangeWeather Forecasts Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data and meteorological measurements.We aim at evaluating climate evolution in Central Europe by monitoring different atmospheric variables such as temperature and PWV. PWV time series were obtained by three methods: 1) estimated from ground-based GNSS observations using the method of precise point positioning, 2) inferred from ERA-Interim data, and 3) determined based on daily surface measurements of temperature and relative humidity. The other variables are available from surface meteorological stations or received from ERA-Interim. The PWV trend component estimated from GNSS data strongly correlates (>70%) with that estimated from the other data sets. The linear trend is estimated by straight line fitting over 30 years of seasonally-adjusted PWV time series obtained using the meteorological measurements. The results show a positive trend in the PWV time series with an increase of 0.2-0.7 mm/decade with a mean standard deviations of 0.016 mm/decade. In this paper, we present the results at three GNSS stations. The temporal increment of the PWV correlates with the temporal increase in the temperature levels.

  1. CLASP/SJ Observations of Rapid Time Variations in the Lyα Emission in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Bando, Takamasa; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Auchère, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    The Chromospheric Lyα SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on 2015 September 3 to investigate the solar chromosphere and transition region. The slit-jaw (SJ) optical system captured Lyα images with a high time cadence of 0.6 s. From the CLASP/SJ observations, many variations in the solar chromosphere and transition region emission with a timescale of SJ field of view and investigate the relationship between short (<30 s) temporal variations in the Lyα emission and the coronal structures observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). We compare the Lyα temporal variations at the coronal loop footpoints observed in the AIA 211 Å (≈2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (≈0.6 MK) channels with those in the regions with bright Lyα features without a clear association with the coronal loop footpoints. We find more short (<30 s) temporal variations in the Lyα intensity in the footpoint regions. Those variations did not depend on the temperature of the coronal loops. Therefore, the temporal variations in the Lyα intensity at this timescale range could be related to the heating of the coronal structures up to temperatures around the sensitivity peak of 171 Å. No signature was found to support the scenario that these Lyα intensity variations were related to the nanoflares. Waves or jets from the lower layers (lower chromosphere or photosphere) are possible causes for this phenomenon.

  2. Variation in Taxonomic Composition of the Fecal Microbiota in an Inbred Mouse Strain across Individuals and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Yana Emmy; Bik, Elisabeth M; Lawley, Trevor D; Holmes, Susan P; Monack, Denise M; Theriot, Julie A; Relman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Genetics, diet, and other environmental exposures are thought to be major factors in the development and composition of the intestinal microbiota of animals. However, the relative contributions of these factors in adult animals, as well as variation with time in a variety of important settings, are still not fully understood. We studied a population of inbred, female mice fed the same diet and housed under the same conditions. We collected fecal samples from 46 individual mice over two weeks, sampling four of these mice for periods as long as 236 days for a total of 190 samples, and determined the phylogenetic composition of their microbial communities after analyzing 1,849,990 high-quality pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region. Even under these controlled conditions, we found significant inter-individual variation in community composition, as well as variation within an individual over time, including increases in alpha diversity during the first 2 months of co-habitation. Some variation was explained by mouse membership in different cage and vendor shipment groups. The differences among individual mice from the same shipment group and cage were still significant. Overall, we found that 23% of the variation in intestinal microbiota composition was explained by changes within the fecal microbiota of a mouse over time, 12% was explained by persistent differences among individual mice, 14% by cage, and 18% by shipment group. Our findings suggest that the microbiota of controlled populations of inbred laboratory animals may not be as uniform as previously thought, that animal rearing and handling may account for some variation, and that as yet unidentified factors may explain additional components of variation in the composition of the microbiota within populations and individuals over time. These findings have implications for the design and interpretation of experiments involving laboratory animals.

  3. Reconstruction of temporal variations of evapotranspiration using instantaneous estimates at the time of satellite overpass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Delogu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration estimates can be derived from remote sensing data and ancillary, mostly meterorological, information. For this purpose, two types of methods are classically used: the first type estimates a potential evapotranspiration rate from vegetation indices, and adjusts this rate according to water availability derived from either a surface temperature index or a first guess obtained from a rough estimate of the water budget, while the second family of methods relies on the link between the surface temperature and the latent heat flux through the surface energy budget. The latter provides an instantaneous estimate at the time of satellite overpass. In order to compute daily evapotranspiration, one needs an extrapolation algorithm. Since no image is acquired during cloudy conditions, these methods can only be applied during clear sky days. In order to derive seasonal evapotranspiration, one needs an interpolation method. Two combined interpolation/extrapolation methods based on the self preservation of evaporative fraction and the stress factor are compared to reconstruct seasonal evapotranspiration from instantaneous measurements acquired in clear sky conditions. Those measurements are taken from instantaneous latent heat flux from 11 datasets in Southern France and Morocco. Results show that both methods have comparable performances with a clear advantage for the evaporative fraction for datasets with several water stress events. Both interpolation algorithms tend to underestimate evapotranspiration due to the energy limiting conditions that prevail during cloudy days. Taking into account the diurnal variations of the evaporative fraction according to an empirical relationship derived from a previous study improved the performance of the extrapolation algorithm and therefore the retrieval of the seasonal evapotranspiration for all but one datasets.

  4. Comparing models for IMF variation across cosmological time in Milky Way-like galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.; Ma, Xiangcheng

    2017-12-01

    One of the key observations regarding the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is its near-universality in the Milky Way (MW), which provides a powerful way to constrain different star formation models that predict the IMF. However, those models are almost universally `cloud-scale' or smaller - they take as input or simulate single molecular clouds (GMCs), clumps or cores, and predict the resulting IMF as a function of the cloud properties. Without a model for the progenitor properties of all clouds that formed the stars at different locations in the MW (including ancient stellar populations formed in high redshift, likely gas-rich dwarf progenitor galaxies that looked little like the Galaxy today), the predictions cannot be fully explored nor safely applied to `live' cosmological calculations of the IMF in different galaxies at different cosmological times. We therefore combine a suite of high-resolution cosmological simulations (from the Feedback In Realistic Environments project), which form MW-like galaxies with reasonable star formation properties and explicitly resolve massive GMCs, with various proposed cloud-scale IMF models. We apply the models independently to every star particle formed in the simulations to synthesize the predicted IMF in the present-day galaxy. We explore models where the IMF depends on Jeans mass, sonic or `turbulent Bonnor-Ebert' mass, fragmentation with a polytropic equation of state, or where it is self-regulated by protostellar feedback. We show that all of these models, except the feedback-regulated ones, predict far more variation (˜0.6-1 dex 1σ scatter in the IMF turnover mass) in the simulations than is observed in the MW.

  5. Genome-wide association analyses reveal complex genetic architecture underlying natural variation for flowering time in canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, H; Raman, R; Coombes, N; Song, J; Prangnell, R; Bandaranayake, C; Tahira, R; Sundaramoorthi, V; Killian, A; Meng, J; Dennis, E S; Balasubramanian, S

    2016-06-01

    Optimum flowering time is the key to maximize canola production in order to meet global demand of vegetable oil, biodiesel and canola-meal. We reveal extensive variation in flowering time across diverse genotypes of canola under field, glasshouse and controlled environmental conditions. We conduct a genome-wide association study and identify 69 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with flowering time, which are repeatedly detected across experiments. Several associated SNPs occur in clusters across the canola genome; seven of them were detected within 20 Kb regions of a priori candidate genes; FLOWERING LOCUS T, FRUITFUL, FLOWERING LOCUS C, CONSTANS, FRIGIDA, PHYTOCHROME B and an additional five SNPs were localized within 14 Kb of a previously identified quantitative trait loci for flowering time. Expression analyses showed that among FLC paralogs, BnFLC.A2 accounts for ~23% of natural variation in diverse accessions. Genome-wide association analysis for FLC expression levels mapped not only BnFLC.C2 but also other loci that contribute to variation in FLC expression. In addition to revealing the complex genetic architecture of flowering time variation, we demonstrate that the identified SNPs can be modelled to predict flowering time in diverse canola germplasm accurately and hence are suitable for genomic selection of adaptative traits in canola improvement programmes. ©2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Modified Fractional Variational Iteration Method for Solving the Generalized Time-Space Fractional Schrödinger Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojian Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on He’s variational iteration method idea, we modified the fractional variational iteration method and applied it to construct some approximate solutions of the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation (GFNLS. The fractional derivatives are described in the sense of Caputo. With the help of symbolic computation, some approximate solutions and their iterative structure of the GFNLS are investigated. Furthermore, the approximate iterative series and numerical results show that the modified fractional variational iteration method is powerful, reliable, and effective when compared with some classic traditional methods such as homotopy analysis method, homotopy perturbation method, adomian decomposition method, and variational iteration method in searching for approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equations.

  7. Modified fractional variational iteration method for solving the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Baojian; Lu, Dianchen

    2014-01-01

    Based on He's variational iteration method idea, we modified the fractional variational iteration method and applied it to construct some approximate solutions of the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation (GFNLS). The fractional derivatives are described in the sense of Caputo. With the help of symbolic computation, some approximate solutions and their iterative structure of the GFNLS are investigated. Furthermore, the approximate iterative series and numerical results show that the modified fractional variational iteration method is powerful, reliable, and effective when compared with some classic traditional methods such as homotopy analysis method, homotopy perturbation method, adomian decomposition method, and variational iteration method in searching for approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equations.

  8. Effect of damping on the time variation of fields produced by a small pole tip with a soft under layer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, K.Z.; Chantrell, R.W.; Boerner, E.D.

    2004-01-01

    The time variation of magnetostatic fields generated by space and time varying magnetization configurations in small perpendicular pole tips is studied. The magnetization configurations are a response to external fields driving the pole tip and soft under layer (SUL). When the system damping is sufficiently small the magnetization excitations persist for a long time after reversal. The effects of damping parameter, position in the media, and discretization cell size on the magnitude of the ti...

  9. Capture of electrons for acceleration in a betatron with time and spatial variation of the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V. V.; Chakhlov, V. L.

    1988-05-01

    It is shown that an additional pulsed magnetic field superimposed on the primary magnetic field of a betatron leads to time and spatial variation of the resulting magnetic field in the working gap of the accelerator. A mathematical model is developed for the capture of electrons for betatron acceleration with the additional pulsed magnetic field. It is shown that the time and spatial variation of the magnetic field in the working gap of the accelerator during electron injection leads to an increase in the efficiency of their capture for acceleration. The method of calculation permits a direct modeling of the capture of electrons for acceleration to obtain the highest efficiency.

  10. Towards Uniform Accelerometry Analysis: A Standardization Methodology to Minimize Measurement Bias Due to Systematic Accelerometer Wear-Time Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun R. Katapally, Nazeem Muhajarine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometers are predominantly used to objectively measure the entire range of activity intensities – sedentary behaviour (SED, light physical activity (LPA and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA. However, studies consistently report results without accounting for systematic accelerometer wear-time variation (within and between participants, jeopardizing the validity of these results. This study describes the development of a standardization methodology to understand and minimize measurement bias due to wear-time variation. Accelerometry is generally conducted over seven consecutive days, with participants' data being commonly considered 'valid' only if wear-time is at least 10 hours/day. However, even within ‘valid’ data, there could be systematic wear-time variation. To explore this variation, accelerometer data of Smart Cities, Healthy Kids study (www.smartcitieshealthykids.com were analyzed descriptively and with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA. Subsequently, a standardization method was developed, where case-specific observed wear-time is controlled to an analyst specified time period. Next, case-specific accelerometer data are interpolated to this controlled wear-time to produce standardized variables. To understand discrepancies owing to wear-time variation, all analyses were conducted pre- and post-standardization. Descriptive analyses revealed systematic wear-time variation, both between and within participants. Pre- and post-standardized descriptive analyses of SED, LPA and MVPA revealed a persistent and often significant trend of wear-time’s influence on activity. SED was consistently higher on weekdays before standardization; however, this trend was reversed post-standardization. Even though MVPA was significantly higher on weekdays both pre- and post-standardization, the magnitude of this difference decreased post-standardization. Multivariable analyses with standardized SED, LPA and

  11. Discovery of Time Variation of the Intensity of Molecular Lines in IRC+10216 in The Submillimeter and Far Infrared Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernicharo, J; Teyssier, D; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Daniel, F; Agúndez, M; Prieto, L Velilla; Decin, L; Guélin, M; Encrenaz, P; García-Lario, P; de Beck, E; Barlow, M J; Groenewegen, M A T; Neufeld, D; Pearson, J

    2014-10-20

    We report on the discovery of strong intensity variations in the high rotational lines of abundant molecular species towards the archetypical circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216. The observations have been carried out with the HIFI instrument on board Herschel and with the IRAM 30-m telescope. They cover several observing periods spreading over 3 years. The line intensity variations for molecules produced in the external layers of the envelope most probably result from time variations in the infrared pumping rates. We analyze the main implications this discovery has on the interpretation of molecular line emission in the envelopes of Mira-type stars. Radiative transfer calculations have to take into account both the time variability of infrared pumping and the possible variation of the dust and gas temperatures with stellar phase in order to reproduce the observation of molecular lines at different epochs. The effect of gas temperature variations with stellar phase could be particularly important for lines produced in the innermost regions of the envelope. Each layer of the circumstellar envelope sees the stellar light radiation with a different lag time (phase). Our results show that this effect must be included in the models. The sub-mm and FIR lines of AGB stars cannot anymore be considered as safe intensity calibrators.

  12. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  13. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  14. Urban Outdoor Thermal Comfort of The Hot-Humid Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on outdoor comfort is becoming popular due to the fact that the thermoregulatory model is seen as inadequate in explaining outdoor thermal comfort conditions. Hot-humid region can be said as experiencing a critical environmental condition because of its constantly high temperature and humidity throughout the year. Thus, this study focus on the assessment of thermal comfort of outdoor urban spaces in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (3° 9’N and 101° 44’E. Survey on human response towards outdoor thermal comfort in hot-humid climate of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was carried out during day time between 0900h to 1800h along with measurement of environmental parameters such as air temperature (°C, wind velocity (m/s, radiant temperature (°C, relative humidity (% and solar radiation (lux. A total of 123 samples were involved in this study which took place within four sites around Kuala Lumpur. Survey results were then correlated with the environmental parameters to further develop the comfort zone for hot-humid outdoor environment specifically for Kuala Lumpur and, generally, for hot-humid regions.

  15. Period variations in pulsating X-ray sources. I. Accretion flow parameters and neutron star structure from timing observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, F.K.; Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1978-09-15

    We show that valuable information about both accretion flows and neutron star structure can be obtained from X-ray timing observations of period variations in pulsating sources. Such variations can result from variations in the accretion flow, or from internal torque variations, associated with oscillations of the fluid core or the unpinning of vortices in the inner crust. We develop a statistical description of torque variations in terms of noise processes, indicate how the applicability of such a description may be tested observationally, and show how it may be used to determine from observation both the properties of accretion flows and the internal structure of neutron stars, including the relative inertial moments of the crust and superfluid neutron core, the crust-core coupling time, and the frequencies of any low-frequency internal collective modes. Particular attention is paid to the physical origin of spin-down episodes; it is shown that usyc episodes may result either from external torque reversals or from internal torque variations.With the aid of the statistical description, the response of the star to torque fluctuations is calculated for three stellar models: (i) a completely rigid star; (ii) a two-component star; and (iii) a two-component star with a finite-frequency internal mode, such as the Tkachenko mode of a rotating neutron superfluid. Our calculations show that fluctuating torques could account for the period the period variations and spin-down episodes observed in Her X-1 and Cen X-3, including the large spin-down event observed in the latter source during 1972 September-October. The torque noise strengths inferred from current timing observations using the simple two-component models are shown to be consistent with those to be expected from fluctuations in accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars.

  16. A Surface Micromachined CMOS MEMS Humidity Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Qiu Huang; Fei Li; Min Zhao; Kai Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a CMOS MEMS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor micro electromechanical system) piezoresistive humidity sensor fabricated by a surface micromachining process. Both pre-CMOS and post-CMOS technologies were used to fabricate the piezoresistive humidity sensor. Compared with a bulk micromachined humidity sensor, the machining precision and the sizes of the surface micromachined humidity sensor were both improved. The package and test systems of the sensor were designed. A...

  17. Percolated carbon nanotube networks for high-speed humidity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Jung, Kyung Hoon; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Myung Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2013-09-01

    Improving the response time for polyimide (PI)-based capacitive humidity sensors is critical for real-time sensing. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were used to form the upper electrode of humidity sensor to realize an extremely short response times. MWCNT films were spray-deposited on a moisture-sensitive PI layer and subsequently patterned by oxygen plasma. Random-network MWCNT electrodes have a well-entangled and open porous structure that is almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes. Compared with porous metal electrode-based sensors as an upper electrode, the fabricated capacitive humidity sensors with MWCNT electrodes showed an exceptionally short response time of less than 2.5 s and a good linearity of 0.998. An analysis of the long-term (100 days) stability data revealed that the MWCNT electrode humidity sensors showed little drift even after 100 days aging, indicating that they are suitable for practical and reliable humidity measurements. These improvements in performance may stem from their interconnected microscopic porous structure, which is more accessible to water molecules through the conductive electrode.

  18. Humidity and Buildings. Technical Paper No. 188.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Modified and controlled relative humidity in buildings for certain occupancies is discussed. New criteria are used in determining the needs, desirability and problems associated with humidities in a building. Severe winter climate requires that special attention be given to the problems associated with increased indoor humidities during cold…

  19. Time-Dependent Variational Inequality for an Oligopolistic Market Equilibrium Problem with Production and Demand Excesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Barbagallo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with the variational formulation of the oligopolistic market equilibrium problem in presence of both production and demand excesses. In particular, we generalize a previous model in which the authors, instead, considered only the problem with production excesses, by allowing also the presence of demand excesses. First we examine the equilibrium conditions in terms of the well-known dynamic Cournot-Nash principle. Next, the equilibrium conditions will be expressed in terms of Lagrange multipliers by means of the infinite dimensional duality theory. Then, we show the equivalence between the two conditions that are both expressed by an appropriate evolutionary variational inequality. Moreover, thanks to the variational formulation, some existence and regularity results for equilibrium solutions are proved. At last, a numerical example, which illustrates the features of the problem, is provided.

  20. Uncertainly Analysis of Two Types of Humidity Sensors by a Humidity Generator with a Divided-Flow System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Hsi; Chen, Chiachung

    2018-02-21

    Humidity measurement is an important technique for the agricultural, foods, pharmaceuticals, and chemical industries. For the sake of convenience, electrical relative humidity (RH) sensors have been widely used. These sensors need to be calibrated to ensure their accuracy and the uncertainty measurement of these sensors has become a major concern. In this study, a self-made divided-flow generator was established to calibrate two types of electrical humidity sensors. The standard reference humidity was calculated from dew-point temperature and air dry-bulb temperature measured by a chilled mirror monitor. This divided-flow generator could produce consistent result of RH measurement results. The uncertainty of the reference standard increased with the increase of RH values. The combined uncertainty with the adequate calibration equations were ranged from 0.82% to 1.45% RH for resistive humidity sensors and 0.63% to 1.4% for capacitive humidity sensors, respectively. This self-made, divided-flow generator, and calibration method are cheap, time-saving, and easy to be used. Thus, the proposed approach can easily be applied in research laboratories.

  1. Examining the influence of humidity on reference ionization chamber performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Malcolm R; Taank, Jaswinder

    2017-02-01

    International dosimetry protocols require measurements made with a vented ionization chamber to be corrected for the influence of air density by using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor. The effect of humidity, on the other hand, is generally ignored with the provision that the relative humidity (RH) is within certain limits (typically 20% to 80%). However, there is little experimental data in the published literature as to the true effect of humidity on modern reference-class ionization chambers. This investigation used two different radiation beams - a Co-60 irradiator and an Sr-90 check source - to examine the effect of humidity on several Farmer-type ionization chambers. An environmental cabinet controlled the humidity. For the Co-60 beam, the irradiation was external, whereas for the Sr-90 measurements, the source itself was placed within the cabinet. Extensive measurements were carried out to ensure that the experimental setup provided reproducible readings. Four chamber types were investigated: IBA FC65-G, IBA FC65-P, PTW 30013 and Exradin A19. The different wall materials provided potentially different mechanical responses (i.e., in terms of expansion/contraction) to the water content in the air. The relative humidity was varied between 8% and 98% and measurements were made with both increasing and decreasing humidity to investigate any possible hysteresis effects. Measurements in Co-60 were consistent with the published data obtained with primary standard cavity chambers in ICRU Report 31 (i.e., a very small variation 10%). The measurements in the Sr-90 field showed no dependence with the relative humidity, within the measurement uncertainties (0.05%, k = 1). Very good repeatability of the ionization current was obtained over successive wet/dry cycles, no hysteresis was observed, and there was no dependence on chamber type. These results indicate that humidity has no significant effect on these particular types of ionization chambers

  2. Monitoring temporal development of spatial soil water content variation: comparison of ground penetrating radar and time domain reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.A.; Snepvangers, J.J.J.C.; Bouten, W.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the capability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) to assess the temporal development of spatial variation of surface volumetric water content. In the case of GPR, we measured surface water content with the ground wave, which is a direct wave between the

  3. Some Effects of Variations in Response Time Latency on Speech Rate, Interruptions, and Fluency in Children's Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Linda L.; Smit, Ann B.

    1989-01-01

    The study examined adult-child interactions during conversation with respect to the effects of adult paralinguistic speech variations on the speech production of four four-year-old children. Analysis indicated that each child's response time latency (RTL) was significantly longer when the experimenter's RTL was longer. (Author/DB)

  4. Developmental plasticity in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): Analysis of Instar Variation in Number and Development Time under Different Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The variation in instar number and the pattern of sequential instar development time of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied under 4 different diet regimes. Addition of dietary supplements consisting of dry potato or a mix of dry potato and dry egg whites significantly reduced...

  5. Novel approach for evaluation of air change rate in naturally ventilated occupied spaces based on metabolic CO2 time variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Markov, Detelin G.

    2014-01-01

    , air-tight space, constant indoor pressure and temperature. The proposed approach for ACR evaluation can be applied to time intervals with any length, even with varying parameters of both indoor and outdoor air, in which metabolic CO2 generation rate is known and constant. This approach makes possible......IAQ in many residential buildings relies on non-organized natural ventilation. Accurate evaluation of air change rate (ACR) in this situation is difficult due to the nature of the phenomenon - intermittent infiltration-exfiltration periods of mass exchange between the room air and the outdoor air...... at low rate. This paper describes a new approach for ACR evaluation in naturally ventilated occupied spaces. Actual metabolic CO2 time variation record in an interval of time is compared with the computed variation of metabolic CO2 for the same time interval under reference conditions: sleeping occupants...

  6. Climate Variable is Time-Averaged: Dealing with Uncertainty of Paleoclimatic Record Caused by Smoothening of Noisy Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K.; Ebina, K.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is the average of weather over some time period and shows characteristic behavior in each time scale. In paleoclimatic research, values of climate variables are measured from proxies that give time series of time-averaged variables. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of time-averaged variable is important to investigate climate variations thorough different time scales. In our recent study, we formulated how stochastic dynamics changes corresponding to averaging time intervals using one dimensional first order stochastic differential equation which contains parametrically controlled terms of deterministic single-well or double-well potential force and random force. The dynamics of time-averaged variable is described by conditional probability density function. In the case of single-well, the function is analytically derived as normal distribution with scaling parameters. In the case of double-well potential, the function is obtained as skew generalized normal distribution function through numerical simulations. The mathematical framework of stochastic dynamics of time-averaged variable is general and applicable to analysis of many kinds of climate time series data. In this study, we apply the above framework to the analysis of proxy data from ice core and discuss about time scaling of the past climate variations. We test several models to infer the optimal model description for the data.

  7. Fast-time Variations of Supernova Neutrino Fluxes and Detection Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Hanke, F.; Müller, B.; Janka, H.T.; Raffelt, G.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the delayed explosion scenario of a core-collapse supernova, the accretion phase shows pronounced convective over-turns and a low-multipole hydrodynamic instability, the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI). Neutrino signal variations from the first full-scale three-dimensional

  8. Intensity and amplitudes of humidity during the past 900 ka at the SE Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Erwin; Hu, Shouyun; Rao Goddu, Srinivasa; Herb, Christian

    2014-05-01

    We investigate paleoclimate fluctuations during 900-30 ka at the SE Tibetan Plateau based on a high-resolution lacustrine record from Heqing basin in NW Yunnan (SW China). Multivariate statistical and time series analyses of multi-proxy data from a 168m-long drill core, mainly magnetic parameters and carbonate content, in combination with results from a catchment study, allow us to develop a scenario for explaining the parameter variation in terms of humidity changes. This scenario is based on carbonate weathering in the catchment (limestones are predominant), characteristics of soil formed on the bedrock, relative changes of sediment transport by wind and surface water, low-temperature oxidation of magnetite, and grain-size selective dissolution of ferrimagnetic particles, related to wetter and drier conditions. Cluster analysis reveals four different phases with transitions at 670-630 ka, 380-320 ka, and 80 ka. We further resolve amplitude and intensity variations of weathering by a humidity index (HI) obtained through convolution of carbonate content, the magnetic grain-size parameter ARM/SIRM, and a magnetite/hematite measure (S-ratio). Strong amplitude variations relate to 100 ka eccentricity cycles. We may explain these variations by relative stronger and weaker influence of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) that together with the East-Asian summer monsoon (EASM) affects the region of the SE Tibetan Plateau. Stronger orbital variations are likely in periods of stronger ISM because of its inter-hemispheric driving forces. During 630-380 ka we observe the strongest eccentricity amplitudes of the HI. When the influence of the ISM in the region weakens, not only orbital amplitudes will reduce but also moisture supply becomes less. A period of prevailing drier conditions is indicated in our HI record between 320-80 ka after which the HI suggests a quick return to clearly more humid conditions. Our study emphasizes the capability of magnetic parameters for

  9. Thermal Comfort and Optimum Humidity Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Jokl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal microclimate is the main component in indoor comfort. The optimum hydrothermal level can be ensured by suitable changes in the sources of heat and water vapor within the building, changes in the environment (the interior of the building and in the people exposed to the conditions inside the building. A change in the heat source and the source of water vapor involves improving the heat - insulating properties and the air permeability of the peripheral walls and especially of the windows. The change in the environment will bring human bodies into balance with the environment. This can be expressed in terms of an optimum or at least an acceptable globe temperature, an adequate proportion of radiant heat within the total amount of heat from the environment (defined by the difference between air and wall temperature, uniform cooling of the human body by the environment, defined a by the acceptable temperature difference between head and ankles, b by acceptable temperature variations during a shift (location unchanged, or during movement from one location to another without a change of clothing. Finally, a moisture balance between man and the environment is necessary (defined by acceptable relative air humidity. A change for human beings means a change of clothes which, of course, is limited by social acceptance in summer and by inconvenient heaviness in winter. The principles of optimum heating and cooling, humidification and dehumidification are presented in this paper.Hydrothermal comfort in an environment depends on heat and humidity flows (heat and water vapors, occurring in a given space in a building interior and affecting the total state of the human organism.

  10. Online Soft Sensor of Humidity in PEM Fuel Cell Based on Dynamic Partial Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Long

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results.

  11. Online soft sensor of humidity in PEM fuel cell based on dynamic partial least squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rong; Chen, Qihong; Zhang, Liyan; Ma, Longhua; Quan, Shuhai

    2013-01-01

    Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS) regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results.

  12. High Quality Real-Time Video with Scanning Electron Microscope Using Total Variation Algorithm on a Graphics Processing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouarti, Nizar; Sauvet, Bruno; Régnier, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is usually dedicated to taking a picture of micro-nanoscopic objects. In the present study, we wondered whether a SEM can be converted as a real-time video display. To this end, we designed a new methodology. We use the slow mode of the SEM to acquire a high quality reference image that can then be used to estimate the optimal parameters that regularize the signal for a given method. Here, we employ Total Variation, a method which minimizes the noise and regularizes the image. An optimal lagrangian multiplier can be computed that regularizes the image efficiently. We showed that a limited number of iterations for Total Variation algorithm can lead to an acceptable quality of regularization. This algorithm is parallel and deployed on a Graphics Processing Unit to obtain a real-time high quality video with a SEM. It opens the possibility of a real-time interaction at micro-nanoscales.

  13. A variational treatment for the time dependent Boltzmann equation as a basis for numerical solutions conserving neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackroyd, R.T.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    A maximum principle for the time-dependent first-order Boltzmann equation is established in two independent ways:- by a generalized least squares method and by a method based on the properties of an appropriate bi-linear form. The second derivation suggests a metric for a Hilbert space which provides a geometrical interpretation of the variational principle. This interpretation leads to a Petrov-Galerkin method of Martin for time dependent transport. The maximum principle is used to define a figure of merit for the global error of any numerical solution for time dependent transport. The principle is used also to demonstrate the neutron conservation property of optimized numerical solutions, and the convergence of finite element methods based on the variational principle. (Author).

  14. The effects of excessive humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  15. Differences in genetic and environmental variation in adult BMI by sex, age, time period, and region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    and women increased from young adulthood to old age. The heritability of BMI was largely similar between cultural-geographic regions and measurement years, despite large differences in mean BMI and variances in BMI. Our results show a strong influence of genetic factors on BMI, especially in early adulthood......Background: Genes and the environment contribute to variation in adult body mass index [BMI (in kg/m(2))], but factors modifying these variance components are poorly understood.Objective: We analyzed genetic and environmental variation in BMI between men and women from young adulthood to old age...... from the 1940s to the 2000s and between cultural-geographic regions representing high (North America and Australia), moderate (Europe), and low (East Asia) prevalence of obesity.Design: We used genetic structural equation modeling to analyze BMI in twins ≥20 y of age from 40 cohorts representing 20...

  16. On-line estimation and compensation scheme for dead time and inverter nonlinearity independent of parameter variations in PMSM drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong-Hwa

    2012-12-01

    A new on-line compensation scheme that can exactly estimate the dead time and inverter nonlinearity even under the parameter variations is proposed for a PWM inverter-fed permanent magnet synchronous motor drive. The proposed scheme is based on the fact that the sixth-order harmonic component in total disturbance estimated under the presence of various uncertainties is mainly caused by the dead time and inverter nonlinearity. The total disturbance due to the parameter variations as well as the dead time and inverter nonlinearity is estimated by the adaptive scheme. From this total disturbance, the sixth-order harmonic component is extracted through the harmonic analysis. The obtained sixth-order harmonic is processed by the PI controller to estimate the disturbance only caused by the dead time and inverter nonlinearity in the stationary reference frame. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is verified through the comparative simulations and experiments using DSP TMS320F28335. Without requiring an additional hardware, the proposed scheme can effectively compensate the dead time and inverter nonlinearity even under the parameter variations.

  17. Quiet time F2-layer disturbances: seasonal variations of the occurrence in the daytime sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier revealed seasonal/latitudinal variations of the occurrence for positive and negative F2-layer Q-disturbances have been interpreted in the framework of the present-day concept of the thermosphere-ionosphere interaction. The basic process is the solar-driven and storm-induced thermospheric circulation's interaction which varies with season and latitude. Such morphological features as clustering of negative Q-disturbances around winter solstice and the appearance of an additional occurrence of summer peak at lower latitudes, the equinoctial occurrence peaks for positive Q-disturbances and their merging to one summer peak at lower latitudes can be explained in the framework of this concept. Moreover, seasonal/latitudinal variations of the occurrence for usual storm-induced F2-layer disturbances, which exhibit quite different morphology, are also explained within this concept and this may be considered as its success. Although some types of F2-layer Q-disturbances are obviously related to the impact from below, the analyzed seasonal/latitudinal occurrence variations are shown to have their origin in the thermosphere itself.

  18. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, 0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1).

  19. TRANSIT MONITORING IN THE SOUTH (TraMoS) PROJECT: DISCARDING TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-5b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P. [Astronomy Department, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Lopez-Morales, M., E-mail: shoyer@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: pato@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: mercedes@dtm.ciw.edu [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5, parall, 2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-03-20

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M{sub Circled-Plus }, 1 M{sub Circled-Plus }, and 2 M{sub Circled-Plus} around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by {approx}5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  20. Effect of temperature and relative humidity during transportation on green coffee bean moisture content and ochratoxin A production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Cabrera, Hector A; Menezes, Hilary C; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Canepa, Frederico; Teixeira, Aldir A; Carvalhaes, Nelson; Santi, Domenico; Leme, Plinio T Z; Yotsuyanagi, Katumi; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2007-01-01

    Changes in temperature, relative humidity, and moisture content of green coffee beans were monitored during transportation of coffee from Brazil to Italy. Six containers (three conventional and three prototype) were stowed in three different places (hold, first floor, and deck) on the ship. Each prototype was located next to a conventional container. The moisture content of the coffee in the container located on the first floor was less affected by environmental variations (0.7%) than that in the hold and on the deck. Coffee located in the hold showed the highest variation in moisture content (3%); in addition, the container showed visible condensation. Coffee transported on the deck showed an intermediary variation in moisture (2%), and there was no visible condensation. The variation in coffee moisture content of the prototype containers was similar to that of the conventional ones, especially in the top layers of coffee bags (2 to 3%), while the increase in water activity was 0.70. This suggests that diffusion of moisture occurs very slowly inside the cargo and that there are thus sufficient time and conditions for fungal growth. The regions of the container near the wall and ceiling are susceptible to condensation since they are close to the headspace with its high relative humidity. Ochratoxin A production occurred in coffee located at the top of the container on the deck and in the wet bags from the hold (those found to be wet on opening the containers at the final destination).

  1. A Supramolecular Nanofiber-Based Passive Memory Device for Remembering Past Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Gedda, Murali; George, Subi J; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2017-09-20

    Memorizing the magnitude of a physical parameter such as relative humidity in a consignment may be useful for maintaining recommended conditions over a period of time. In relation to cost and energy considerations, it is important that the memorizing device works in the unpowered passive state. In this article, we report the fabrication of a humidity-responsive device that can memorize the humidity condition it had experienced while being unpowered. The device makes use of supramolecular nanofibers obtained from the self-assembly of donor-acceptor (D-A) molecules, coronene tetracarboxylate salt (CS) and dodecyl methyl viologen (DMV), respectively, from aqueous medium. The fibers, while being highly sensitive to humidity, tend to develop electrically induced disorder under constant voltage, leading to increased resistance with time. The conducting state can be regained via self-assembly by exposing the device to humidity in the absence of applied voltage, the extent of recovery depending on the magnitude of the humidity applied under no bias. This nature of the fibers has been exploited in reading the humidity memory state, which interestingly is independent of the lapsed time since the humidity exposure as well as the duration of exposure. Importantly, the device is capable of differentiating the profiles of varying humidity conditions from its memory. The device finds use in applications requiring stringent condition monitoring.

  2. Single-Way Fiber-Based Time Transfer with Active Detection of the Transfer Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Parker, 1996, “Two-Way Time Transfer through SDH and Sonet Systems,” in Proceedings of the 10 th European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 5- 7 March...and K. Imamura, 2001, “Two-Way Time Transfer through 2.4 Gb/s Optical SDH Systems,” IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, IM-50, 709

  3. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Price, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  4. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C G Smith

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  5. Relation between the variations of the solar wind and the noon-time equatorial ionospheric electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, C.; Maus, S.; Alken, P.; Gentile, L.; Burke, W.

    2007-12-01

    We compare the solar wind measurements from ACE satellite with the vertical plasma drift (observed by JULIA radar) and the EEJ magnetic signals (observed at HUA observatory) from the South American equatorial sector. The aim is to understand the effect of solar wind on the variations of the electric field in the noon time equatorial ionosphere. We restrict our study to local noon time conditions, geomagnetically active days and while interplanetary Bz is negative. The estimates of electric field intensities (E_VS) at equatorial plain of the magnetosphere were made from ACE data using a combination of Volland-Stern and Siscoe-Hill models (Burke et al, 2007). The JULIA and magnetometer data were high-pass filtered to remove the regular daily variations. The relation between the data set will be presented as a coherence spectrum. In addition, the use of the ACE measurements to improve the climatological models of EEJ during geomagnetically active days will be explored.

  6. Differences in genetic and environmental variation in adult BMI by sex, age, time period, and region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genes and the environment contribute to variation in adult body mass index [BMI (in kg/m2)], but factors modifying these variance components are poorly understood. Objective: We analyzed genetic and environmental variation in BMI between men and women from young adulthood to old age...... from the 1940s to the 2000s and between cultural-geographic regions representing high (North America and Australia), moderate (Europe), and low (East Asia) prevalence of obesity. Design: We used genetic structural equation modeling to analyze BMI in twins ≥20 y of age from 40 cohorts representing 20...... countries (140,379 complete twin pairs). Results: The heritability of BMI decreased from 0.77 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.78) and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.75) in men and women 20-29 y of age to 0.57 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.60) and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.65) in men 70-79 y of age and women 80 y of age, respectively. The relative...

  7. Morphology and time variation of the Jovian Far UV aurora: Hubble Space Telescope observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Jean-Claude; Dols, Vincent; Paresce, Francesco; Prange, Renee

    1993-01-01

    High spatial resolution images of the north polar region of Jupiter have been obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The first set of two images collected 87 min apart in February 1992 shows a bright (approximately or equal to 180 kR) emission superimposed on the background in rotation with the planet. Both Ly alpha images show common regions of enhanced emission but differences are also observed, possibly due to temporal variations. The second group of images obtained on June 23 and 26, 1992 isolates a spectral region near 153 nm dominated by the H2 Lyman bands and continuum. Both pictures exhibit a narrow arc structure fitting the L = 30 magnetotail field line footprint in the morning sector and a broader diffuse aurora in the afternoon. They show no indication of an evening twilight enhancement. Although the central meridian longitudes were similar, significant differences are seen in the two exposures, especially in the region of diffuse emission, and interpreted as signatures of temporal variations. The total power radiated in the H2 bands is approximately or equal to 2 x 10(exp 12) W, in agreement with previous UV spectrometer observations. The high local H2 emission rates (approximately 450 kR) imply a particle precipitation carrying an energy flux of about 5 x 10(exp -2) W/sq m.

  8. Time-dependent post-imperative negative variation indicates adaptation and problem solving in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Peter; Brecht, Ines-Beatrice; Niederberger, Uwe; Kowalski, Jens; Schröder, Dietmar; Thome, Johannes; Meyer, Wolfgang; Wallasch, Thomas-Martin; Hilgendorf, Inken; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2012-10-01

    According to the Seligman theory of learned helplessness, depression is caused by a repetitive experience of loss of control resulting in internal, stable and global attributional styles for negative events. In depressed patients and healthy controls experiencing such events, an increased amplitude of the post-imperative negative variation (PINV) has been described. The aim of the study was to investigate a possible correlation between migraine, depression, learned helplessness and PINV. 24 patients suffering from migraine without aura and 24 healthy controls were exposed to a situation of loss of control whilst the contingent negative variation (CNV) from C3, C4 and Cz were recorded. Before conducting the experiment, the subjects were asked to answer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the German attributional style questionnaire (GASQ). Amplitudes of total CNV, early and late component and PINV were calculated in eight blocks of four recordings each. The results confirm findings of a pronounced PINV in situations of loss of control, though high amplitudes were not correlated with low values in the GASQ and therefore with learned helplessness. High PINV in migraine patients correlated with high scores in the BDI and the list of the complaints questionnaire. However, this was not the case in healthy controls. In this experimental situation, PINV in migraine patients can be interpreted as an expectancy potential in order to avoid failure and helplessness.

  9. Fabrication of Porous Silicon Based Humidity Sensing Elements on Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Jalkanen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A roll-to-roll compatible fabrication process of porous silicon (pSi based sensing elements for a real-time humidity monitoring is described. The sensing elements, consisting of printed interdigitated silver electrodes and a spray-coated pSi layer, were fabricated on a coated paper substrate by a two-step process. Capacitive and resistive responses of the sensing elements were examined under different concentrations of humidity. More than a three orders of magnitude reproducible decrease in resistance was measured when the relative humidity (RH was increased from 0% to 90%. A relatively fast recovery without the need of any refreshing methods was observed with a change in RH. Humidity background signal and hysteresis arising from the paper substrate were dependent on the thickness of sensing pSi layer. Hysteresis in most optimal sensing element setup (a thick pSi layer was still noticeable but not detrimental for the sensing. In addition to electrical characterization of sensing elements, thermal degradation and moisture adsorption properties of the paper substrate were examined in connection to the fabrication process of the silver electrodes and the moisture sensitivity of the paper. The results pave the way towards the development of low-cost humidity sensors which could be utilized, for example, in smart packaging applications or in smart cities to monitor the environment.

  10. Analytical approximate solution of time-fractional Fornberg–Whitham equation by the fractional variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol İbiş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to obtain the analytical approximate solution of time-fractional Fornberg–Whitham, equation involving Jumarie’s modified Riemann–Liouville derivative by the fractional variational iteration method (FVIM. FVIM provides the solution in the form of a convergent series with easily calculable terms. The obtained approximate solutions are compared with the exact or existing numerical results in the literature to verify the applicability, efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  11. Development of La3+ Doped CeO2 Thick Film Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The humidity sensitive characteristics of the sensor fabricated from 10 mol% La2O3 doped CeO2 nanopowders with particle size 17.26 nm synthesized via hydrothermal method were investigated at different frequencies. It was found that the sensor shows high humidity sensitivity, rapid response-recovery characteristics, and narrow hysteresis loop at 100 Hz in the relative humidity range from 11% to 95%. The impedance of the sensor decreases by about five orders of magnitude as relative humidity increases. The maximum humidity hysteresis is about 6% RH, and the response and recovery time is 12 and 13 s, respectively. These results indicate that the nanosized La2O3 doped CeO2 powder has potential application as high-performance humidity sensor.

  12. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  13. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices. PMID:28362339

  14. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of trial-to-trial variations of reaction time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E. Adleman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intra-subject variation in reaction time (ISVRT is a developmentally-important phenomenon that decreases from childhood through young adulthood in parallel with the development of executive functions and networks. Prior work has shown a significant association between trial-by-trial variations in reaction time (RT and trial-by-trial variations in brain activity as measured by the blood-oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD response in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. It remains unclear, however, whether such “RT-BOLD” relationships vary with age. Here, we determined whether such trial-by-trial relationships vary with age in a cross-sectional design. We observed an association between age and RT-BOLD relationships in 11 clusters located in visual/occipital regions, frontal and parietal association cortex, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and thalamus. Some of these relationships were negative, reflecting increased BOLD associated with decreased RT, manifesting around the time of stimulus presentation and positive several seconds later. Critically for present purposes, all RT-BOLD relationships increased with age. Thus, RT-BOLD relationships may reflect robust, measurable changes in the brain-behavior relationship across development.

  15. Humidity distribution affected by freely exposed water surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models for the water vapor flux at a water-air interface are required in various scientific, reliability and civil engineering aspects. Here, a study of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed water is presented. A model predicting a spatial distribution and time...... evolution of relative humidity based on statistical rate theory and computational fluid dynamics is developed. In our approach we use short-term steady-state steps to simulate the slowly evolving evaporation in the system. Experiments demonstrate considerably good agreement with the computer modeling...

  16. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  17. Humidity and pressure sensor based on internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenegueti, J F M; Zilio, S C

    2014-03-10

    A low-cost humidity and pressure optical sensor, based on the internal reflection phenomenon, is presented. It takes advantage of the phase difference acquired by s- and p-polarized light undergoing internal reflection to generate an easily detectable minimum in the reflected profile, in a position corresponding to the critical angle. The apparatus presents good sensitivity to relative humidity changes above 70% and a response time below one second. The same device is also capable of measuring changes in pressure and can be used as a vacuum gauge between 1 and 1000 mbar.

  18. Humidity insensitive TOPAS polymer fiber Bragg grating sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Khan, Lutul; Webb, David J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a humidity insensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG), as well as the first FBG recorded in a TOPAS polymer optical fiber in the important low loss 850nm spectral region. For the demonstration we have fabricated FBGs with resonance...... wavelength around 850 nm and 1550 nm in single-mode microstructured polymer optical fibers made of TOPAS and the conventional poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Characterization of the FBGs shows that the TOPAS FBG is more than 50 times less sensitive to humidity than the conventional PMMA FBG in both...... wavelength regimes. This makes the TOPAS FBG very appealing for sensing applications as it appears to solve the humidity sensitivity problem suffered by the PMMA FBG....

  19. Humidity insensitive TOPAS polymer fiber Bragg grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu; Khan, Lutful; Webb, David J; Kalli, Kyriacos; Rasmussen, Henrik K; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2011-09-26

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a humidity insensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG), as well as the first FBG recorded in a TOPAS polymer optical fiber in the important low loss 850 nm spectral region. For the demonstration we have fabricated FBGs with resonance wavelength around 850 nm and 1550 nm in single-mode microstructured polymer optical fibers made of TOPAS and the conventional poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Characterization of the FBGs shows that the TOPAS FBG is more than 50 times less sensitive to humidity than the conventional PMMA FBG in both wavelength regimes. This makes the TOPAS FBG very appealing for sensing applications as it appears to solve the humidity sensitivity problem suffered by the PMMA FBG. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Study of Track Irregularity Time Series Calibration and Variation Pattern at Unit Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaolong Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on problems existing in track irregularity time series data quality, this paper first presents abnormal data identification, data offset correction algorithm, local outlier data identification, and noise cancellation algorithms. And then proposes track irregularity time series decomposition and reconstruction through the wavelet decomposition and reconstruction approach. Finally, the patterns and features of track irregularity standard deviation data sequence in unit sections are studied, and the changing trend of track irregularity time series is discovered and described.

  1. The mathematical theory of time-harmonic Maxwell's equations expansion-, integral-, and variational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a concise introduction to the basic techniques needed for the theoretical analysis of the Maxwell Equations, and filters in an elegant way the essential parts, e.g., concerning the various function spaces needed to rigorously investigate the boundary integral equations and variational equations. The book arose from lectures taught by the authors over many years and can be helpful in designing graduate courses for mathematically orientated students on electromagnetic wave propagation problems. The students should have some knowledge on vector analysis (curves, surfaces, divergence theorem) and functional analysis (normed spaces, Hilbert spaces, linear and bounded operators, dual space). Written in an accessible manner, topics are first approached with simpler scale Helmholtz Equations before turning to Maxwell Equations. There are examples and exercises throughout the book. It will be useful for graduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and engineers working in the theoretical ap...

  2. Time Trends and Variations in Electroconvulsive Treatment in Denmark 2008 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Eva; Osler, Merete; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2017-01-01

    between 2008 and 2014 were retrieved together with information on patient characteristics. Annual treated person rates were calculated for sex, age, admission diagnosis, and region. RESULTS: The overall ECT treatment rate was 36 (95% confidence interval, 34-38) per 100,000 resident population during...... the study period. The rate was highest in women and increased with age. There were modest, however, stable regional differences in rates (extremal quotient = 1.4). Electroconvulsive treatment was most commonly used in patients with depression with (19.4%) or without (54.9%) psychotic symptoms. The median......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine status and variations in the practice of electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) in Denmark in patient characteristics, indications, treatment patterns, and hospital region. METHOD: All 140,627 ECTs registered in the Danish National Patient Registry...

  3. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania: Examining for associations with weather variables over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Parker, Gordon

    2016-11-15

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a seasonal pattern with emerging evidence that weather conditions may trigger symptoms. Thus, our aims were to investigate if year-to-year variations in admissions with mania correlated with year-to-year variations in key meteorological variables, if there was a secular trend in light of climate change and if gender or admission status influenced the seasonal pattern. We undertook a Danish register-based nationwide historical cohort study. We included all adults hospitalized to psychiatric care from 1995 to 2012 with mania using the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The Danish Meteorological Institute provided the meteorological variables. The association between weather and admissions was tested using linear regression. Our database comprised 24,313 admissions with mania. There was a seasonal pattern with admission rates peaking in summer. Higher admission rates were associated with more sunshine, more ultraviolet radiation, higher temperature and less snow but were unassociated with rainfall. We did not find a secular trend in the seasonal pattern. Finally, neither gender nor admission status impacted on the overall seasonal pattern of admissions with mania. Only patients in psychiatric care were included. We could not subdivide by type of bipolar disorder. This cohort study based on more than 24,000 admissions identified a distinct seasonal pattern in hospital admissions for those with mania. We found no secular trend. This could indicate that the climate change is not impacting on seasonal patterns, that there is no link between the proposed variables or that change is currently not sufficiently distinctive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Consequences of variations in spatial turbulence characteristics for fatigue life time of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.C.

    1998-09-01

    The fatigue loading of turbines situated in complex terrain is investigated in order to determine the crucial parameters in the spatial structure of the turbulence in such situations. The parameter study is performed by means of numerical calculations, and it embraces three different wind turbine types, representing a pitch controlled concept, a stall controlled concept, and a stall controlled concept with an extremely flexible tower. For each of the turbine concepts, the fatigue load sensibility to the selected turbulence characteristics are investigated for three different mean wind speeds at hub height. The selected mean wind speeds represent the linear-, the stall-, and the post stall aerodynamic region for the stall controlled turbines and analogously the unregulated-, the partly regulated-, and the fully regulated regime for the pitch controlled turbine. Denoting the turbulence component in the mean wind direction by u, the lateral turbulence component by v, and the vertical turbulence component by w, the selected turbulence characteristics comprise the u-turbulence length scale, the ratio between the v- and w-turbulence intensities and the u-turbulence intensity, the uu-coherence decay factor, and finally the u-v and u-w cross-correlations. The turbulence length scale in the mean wind direction gives rise to significant modification of the fatigue loading on all the investigated wind turbine concepts, but for the other selected parameter variations, large individual differences exists between the turbines. With respect to sensitivity to the performed parameter variations, the Vestas V39 wind turbine is the most robust of the investigated turbines. The Nordtank 500/37 turbine, equipped with the (artificial) soft tower, is by far the most sensitive of the investigated turbine concepts - also much more sensitive than the conventional Nordtank 500/37 turbine equipped with a traditional tower. (au) 2 tabs., 43 ills., 7 refs.

  5. A Physically Based Spatial Expansion Algorithm for Surface Air Temperature and Humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Hongbo Su; Jing Tian; Renhua Zhang; Shaohui Chen; Yongmin Yang; Yuan Rong; Sujuan Mi; Jianwei Qi

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to expand the surface air temperature and air humidity to a larger spatial domain, based on the fact that the variation of surface air temperature and air humidity is controlled jointly by the local turbulence and the horizontal advection. This study proposed an algorithm which considers the advective driving force outside the thermal balance system and the turbulent driving force and radiant driving force inside the thermal balance system. The surface air temperatu...

  6. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  7. Variation in allocation of time, water and energy in Hoopoe Larks from the Arabian Desert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, BI; Williams, JB; Visser, GH

    2003-01-01

    1. Patterns of resource allocation in different times of the year can provide insights into the effects of simultaneous environmental constraints on reproduction and survival of desert birds. Field metabolic rate (FMR), water influx rate (WIR) and patterns of time allocation of Hoopoe Larks (Alaemon

  8. Pediatric acute liver failure : variations in referral timing are associated with disease subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Ekkehard; Lexmond, Willem S.; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric acute liver failure (PALF), rapid referral to a transplant center (TC) is advocated. Clinical variability of PALF may influence referral timing. We aimed to analyze early or late timing of referral in relation to clinical characteristics and outcome in PALF. We conducted a

  9. Measuring Time-Dynamics and Time-Stability of Journal Rankings in Mathematics and Physics by Means of Fractional p-Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Ferrer-Sapena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Journal rankings of specific research fields are often used for evaluation purposes, both of authors and institutions. These rankings can be defined by means of several methods, as expert assessment, scholarly-based agreements, or by the ordering induced by a numeric index associated to the prestige of the journals. In order to be efficient and accepted by the research community, it must preserve the ordering over time, at least up to a point. Otherwise, the procedure for defining the ranking must be revised to assure that it reflects the presumably stable characteristic “prestige” that it claims to be quantifying. A mathematical model based on fractional p-variations of the values of the order number of each journal in a time series of journal rankings is explained, and its main properties are shown. As an example, we study the evolution of two given ordered lists of journals through an eleven-year series. These journal ranks are defined by using the 2-year Impact Factor of Thomson-Reuters (nowadays Clarivate Analytics lists for MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS, APPLIED from 2002 to 2013. As an application of our model, we define an index that precludes the use of journal ranks for evaluation purposes when some minimal requirements on the associated fractional p-variations are not satisfied. The final conclusion is that the list of mathematics does not satisfy the requirements on the p-variations, while the list of applied physics does.

  10. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Copy-number variation genotyping of GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene deletions by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; Barton, Sheila J; Henderson, A John; Shaheen, Seif O; Holloway, John W

    2009-09-01

    Structural variation in the human genome is increasingly recognized as being highly prevalent and having relevance to common human diseases. Array-based comparative genome-hybridization technology can be used to determine copy-number variation (CNV) across entire genomes, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to validate de novo variation or assays of common CNV in disease-association studies. Analysis of large qPCR data sets can be complicated and time-consuming, however. We describe qPCR assays for GSTM1 (glutathione S-transferase mu 1) and GSTT1 (glutathione S-transferase theta 1) gene deletions that can genotype up to 192 samples in duplicate 5-microL reaction volumes in macro-driven Microsoft Excel(R) spreadsheet. As proof of principle, we used our software to analyze CNV data for 1478 DNA samples from a family-based cohort. With only 8 ng of DNA template, we assigned CNV genotypes (i.e., 2, 1, or 0 copies) to either 96% (GSTM1) or 91% (GSTT1) of all DNA samples in a single round of PCR amplification. Genotyping accuracy, as ascertained by familial inheritance, was >99.5%, and independent genotype assignments with replicate real-time PCR runs were 100% concordant. The genotyping assay for GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletion is suitable for large genetic epidemiologic studies and is a highly effective analysis system that is readily adaptable to analysis of other CNVs. .

  12. Variation of aerosol characteristics in the detail scale of time and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, S.; Nakata, M.; Sano, I.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we intend to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric aerosols around AERONET/Osaka site. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. It is well known that the aerosol distribution in Asia is complicated due to the increasing emissions of anthropogenic aerosols in association with economic growth and in addition behavior of natural dusts significantly varies with the seasons. Therefore local spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atmospheric particles in Asian urban city are meaningful. We equip various ground measurement devices of atmosphere in the campus of Kinki University (KU). The data supplied by the Cimel instrument are analyzed with a standard AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) processing system. It provides us with Aerosol optical thickness (AOT), the Ångström exponent and so on. We set up a PM sampler and a standard instrument of NIES/LIDAR network attached to our AERONET site. The PM sampler provides particle information about the concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and OBC separately. In addition to the simultaneous measurements, we make observation of the air quality at several locations in the neighbour-hood using portable sun-photometers (Solar-Light Company Microtops-2). The simultaneous measurements of aerosols and numerical model simulations indicate that the spatial and temporal factors influence the characterization of atmospheric particles especially in dust event. Then we observe the air quality at such several locations within a few 10 km area from KU, as Izumi and Nara, in ordinal days and dust days. Izumi site locates near industrial area and Nara is in the east of KU beyond the mountain-Ikoma. It is found from the simultaneous measurements at these three sites that AOT at Izumi in ordinal days is the highest and Nara's lowest. It indicates that the Ikoma-mountains block off the polluted air from the west. However in dust days, AOT at Nara is as large as that at Higashi

  13. Impact of Variation Orders on Time and Cost in Mega Hydropower Projects of Pakistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashim Hanif; Muhammad Bilal Khurshid; Søren Munch Lindhard; Zuhaib Aslam

    2016-01-01

    .... The results illustrate that errors and omissions in design, changes in scope and changes in design were among the three top contributing factors to VOs in hydropower projects that resulted in time and cost overruns...

  14. High variation of fluorescence protein maturation times in closely related Escherichia coli strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Hebisch

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins (FPs are widely used in biochemistry, biology and biophysics. For quantitative analysis of gene expression FPs are often used as marking molecules. Therefore, sufficient knowledge of maturation times and their affecting factors is of high interest. Here, we investigate the maturation process of the FPs GFP and mCherry expressed by the three closely related Escherichia coli strains of the Colicin E2 system, a model system for colicinogenic interaction. One strain, the C strain produces Colicin, a toxin to which the S strain is sensitive, and against which the R strain is resistant. Under the growth conditions used in this study, the S and R strain have similar growth rates, as opposed to the C strain whose growth rate is significantly reduced due to the toxin production. In combination with theoretical modelling we studied the maturation kinetics of the two FPs in these strains and could confirm an exponential and sigmoidal maturation kinetic for GFP and mCherry, respectively. Our subsequent quantitative experimental analysis revealed a high variance in maturation times independent of the strain studied. In addition, we determined strain dependent maturation times and maturation behaviour. Firstly, FPs expressed by the S and R strain mature on similar average time-scales as opposed to FPs expressed by the C strain. Secondly, dependencies of maturation time with growth conditions are most pronounced in the GFP expressing C strain: Doubling the growth rate of this C strain results in an increased maturation time by a factor of 1.4. As maturation times can vary even between closely related strains, our data emphasize the importance of profound knowledge of individual strains' maturation times for accurate interpretation of gene expression data.

  15. Estimation of time-dependent Hurst exponents with variational smoothing and application to forecasting foreign exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Hurst exponents depict the long memory of a time series. For human-dependent phenomena, as in finance, this feature may vary in the time. It justifies modelling dynamics by multifractional Brownian motions, which are consistent with time-dependent Hurst exponents. We improve the existing literature on estimating time-dependent Hurst exponents by proposing a smooth estimate obtained by variational calculus. This method is very general and not restricted to the sole Hurst framework. It is globally more accurate and easier than other existing non-parametric estimation techniques. Besides, in the field of Hurst exponents, it makes it possible to make forecasts based on the estimated multifractional Brownian motion. The application to high-frequency foreign exchange markets (GBP, CHF, SEK, USD, CAD, AUD, JPY, CNY and SGD, all against EUR) shows significantly good forecasts. When the Hurst exponent is higher than 0.5, what depicts a long-memory feature, the accuracy is higher.

  16. Climate variation alters the synchrony of host–parasitoid interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wetherington, Miles T; Jennings, David E; Shrewsbury, Paula M; Duan, Jian J

    2017-01-01

    .... Although some research has examined how parasitoids will respond to colder temperatures or experimental warming, we know relatively little about how increased variation in temperature and humidity...

  17. Clinical consequences of hospital variation in use of oral anticoagulant therapy after first-time admission for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M L; Gadsbøll, N; Rasmussen, S

    2009-01-01

    -Copenhagen University Hospital; Glostrup Hospital; Rigshospitalet-Copenhagen University Hospital; University of Copenhagen; Copenhagen, Denmark). Clinical consequences of hospital variation in use of oral anticoagulant therapy after first-time admission for atrial fibrillation. J Intern Med 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365......-2796.2008.02061.xObjective. To analyse how hospital factors influence the use of oral anticoagulants (OAC) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and address the clinical consequences of hospital variation in OAC use. Design and subjects. By linkage of nationwide Danish administrative registers we conducted...... use, respectively. Cardiology departments had the highest use of OAC, but neither tertiary university hospitals nor high volume hospitals had higher OAC use than local community hospitals and low volume hospitals. Risk of a thromboembolic event was significantly increased amongst patients from...

  18. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.

    2017-12-14

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  19. Volcanic signatures in time gravity variations during the volcanic unrest on El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Maza Aparicio, S.; Arnoso Sampedro, J.; Gonzalez Montesinos, F.; Martí Molist, J.

    2014-06-01

    Gravity changes occurring during the initial stage of the 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption are interpreted in terms of the preeruptive signatures during the episode of unrest. Continuous gravity measurements were made at two sites on the island using the relative spring gravimeter LaCoste and Romberg gPhone-054. On 15 September 2011, an observed gravity decrease of 45 μGal, associated with the southward migration of seismic epicenters, is consistent with a lateral magma migration that occurred beneath the volcanic edifice, an apparently clear precursor of the eruption that took place 25 days later on 10 October 2011. High-frequency gravity signals also appeared on 6-11 October 2011, pointing to an occurring interaction between a magmatic intrusion and the ocean floor. These important gravity changes, with amplitudes varying from 10 to -90 μGal, during the first 3 days following the onset of the eruption are consistent with the northward migration of the eruptive focus along an active eruptive fissure. An apparent correlation of gravity variations with body tide vertical strain was also noted, which could indicate that concurrent tidal triggering occurred during the initial stage of the eruption.

  20. Minimal variation in anti-A and -B titers among healthy volunteers over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Ulrik; Yazer, Mark; Rasmussen, Mads Hvidkjær

    2017-01-01

    measurements on the same donor are required to ensure that each donation produces a low titer product. METHODS: The anti-A and/or -B titers were measured on 56 healthy adult volunteers (47 blood donors; 9 blood center personnel) every three months for 12 consecutive months using an automated solid phase...... titer measurements from all 56 volunteers were combined as appropriate, the highest overall combined SD was 0.47 titer steps for IgG anti-A. This value corresponds to a 95% confidence interval for intra-individual variation in this antibody’s titer over 12 months of 0.96 titer steps. Thus, based on one...... measurement, an IgG anti-A with a titer step of, for example, 6 would be expected to be in the range of titer step 5 to titer step 7 over the course of one year with 95% probability. CONCLUSION: The titers of anti-A and/or -B among healthy adults are stable over at least one year. This suggests that repeated...

  1. Ultra-Sensitive Humidity Sensor Based on Optical Properties of Graphene Oxide and Nano-Anatase TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiry, Mahdiar; Gholami, Mehrdad; Lai, C K; Ahmad, Harith; Chong, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Generally, in a waveguide-based humidity sensors, increasing the relative humidity (RH) causes the cladding refractive index (RI) to increase due to cladding water absorption. However, if graphene oxide (GO) is used, a reverse phenomenon is seen due to a gap increase in graphene layers. In this paper, this interesting property is applied in order to fabricate differential humidity sensor using the difference between RI of reduced GO (rGO) and nano-anatase TiO2 in a chip. First, a new approach is proposed to prepare high quality nano-anatase TiO2 in solution form making the fabrication process simple and straightforward. Then, the resulted solutions (TiO2 and GO) are effortlessly drop casted and reduced on SU8 two channels waveguide and extensively examined against several humid conditions. Investigating the sensitivity and performance (response time) of the device, reveals a great linearity in a wide range of RH (35% to 98%) and a variation of more than 30 dB in transmitted optical power with a response time of only ~0.7 sec. The effect of coating concentration and UV treatment are studied on the performance and repeatability of the sensor and the attributed mechanisms explained. In addition, we report that using the current approach, devices with high sensitivity and very low response time of only 0.3 sec can be fabricated. Also, the proposed device was comprehensively compared with other state of the art proposed sensors in the literature and the results were promising. Since high sensitivity ~0.47dB/%RH and high dynamic performances were demonstrated, this sensor is a proper choice for biomedical applications.

  2. Ultra-Sensitive Humidity Sensor Based on Optical Properties of Graphene Oxide and Nano-Anatase TiO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiar Ghadiry

    Full Text Available Generally, in a waveguide-based humidity sensors, increasing the relative humidity (RH causes the cladding refractive index (RI to increase due to cladding water absorption. However, if graphene oxide (GO is used, a reverse phenomenon is seen due to a gap increase in graphene layers. In this paper, this interesting property is applied in order to fabricate differential humidity sensor using the difference between RI of reduced GO (rGO and nano-anatase TiO2 in a chip. First, a new approach is proposed to prepare high quality nano-anatase TiO2 in solution form making the fabrication process simple and straightforward. Then, the resulted solutions (TiO2 and GO are effortlessly drop casted and reduced on SU8 two channels waveguide and extensively examined against several humid conditions. Investigating the sensitivity and performance (response time of the device, reveals a great linearity in a wide range of RH (35% to 98% and a variation of more than 30 dB in transmitted optical power with a response time of only ~0.7 sec. The effect of coating concentration and UV treatment are studied on the performance and repeatability of the sensor and the attributed mechanisms explained. In addition, we report that using the current approach, devices with high sensitivity and very low response time of only 0.3 sec can be fabricated. Also, the proposed device was comprehensively compared with other state of the art proposed sensors in the literature and the results were promising. Since high sensitivity ~0.47dB/%RH and high dynamic performances were demonstrated, this sensor is a proper choice for biomedical applications.

  3. Cubic mesoporous Ag@CN: a high performance humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Vijay K; Thangaraj, Nishanthi; Gahlot, Sweta; Kailasam, Kamalakannan

    2016-12-01

    The fabrication of highly responsive, rapid response/recovery and durable relative humidity (%RH) sensors that can precisely monitor humidity levels still remains a considerable challenge for realizing the next generation humidity sensing applications. Herein, we report a remarkably sensitive and rapid %RH sensor having a reversible response using a nanocasting route for synthesizing mesoporous g-CN (commonly known as g-C3N4). The 3D replicated cubic mesostructure provides a high surface area thereby increasing the adsorption, transmission of charge carriers and desorption of water molecules across the sensor surfaces. Owing to its unique structure, the mesoporous g-CN functionalized with well dispersed catalytic Ag nanoparticles exhibits excellent sensitivity in the 11-98% RH range while retaining high stability, negligible hysteresis and superior real time %RH detection performances. Compared to conventional resistive sensors based on metal oxides, a rapid response time (3 s) and recovery time (1.4 s) were observed in the 11-98% RH range. Such impressive features originate from the planar morphology of g-CN as well as unique physical affinity and favourable electronic band positions of this material that facilitate water adsorption and charge transportation. Mesoporous g-CN with Ag nanoparticles is demonstrated to provide an effective strategy in designing high performance %RH sensors and show great promise for utilization of mesoporous 2D layered materials in the Internet of Things and next generation humidity sensing applications.

  4. Microstructure Changes in Polyester Polyurethane upon Thermal and Humid Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Tian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of compression molded Estane 5703 films exposed to 11%, 45%, and 80% relative humidity and 70 °C for 1 and 2 months has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Scattering data indicated increase of the interdomain distance and domain size with a higher humidity and longer aging time. GPC data showed a progressive shortening of polyurethane chains with increasing humidity and aging time. The shortening of the polyurethane chains caused a drop of the glass transition temperature of soft segments, and promoted crystallization of the soft segments during long-time storage of the aged samples at room temperature. FTIR showed a substantial increase in the number of inter-urethane H-bonds in the aged samples. This correlates with the increase of the hard domain size and the degree of phase separation as measured by SANS. The data collected reveals that the reduced steric hindrance caused by hydrolysis of ester links in polybutylene adipate residues promotes the organization of hard segments into domains, leading to the increase of domain size and distance, as well as phase segregation in aged Estane. These findings provide insight into the effects of humidity and thermal aging on the microstructure of aged polyester urethane from molecular to nanoscale level.

  5. Substantial variation in leaf senescence times among 1360 temperate woody plant species: implications for phenology and ecosystem processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchen, Zoe A; Primack, Richard B; Gallinat, Amanda S; Nordt, Birgit; Stevens, Albert-Dieter; Du, Yanjun; Fahey, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Autumn leaf senescence marks the end of the growing season in temperate ecosystems. Its timing influences a number of ecosystem processes, including carbon, water and nutrient cycling. Climate change is altering leaf senescence phenology and, as those changes continue, it will affect individual woody plants, species and ecosystems. In contrast to spring leaf out times, however, leaf senescence times remain relatively understudied. Variation in the phenology of leaf senescence among species and locations is still poorly understood. Leaf senescence phenology of 1360 deciduous plant species at six temperate botanical gardens in Asia, North America and Europe was recorded in 2012 and 2013. This large data set was used to explore ecological and phylogenetic factors associated with variation in leaf senescence. Leaf senescence dates among species varied by 3 months on average across the six locations. Plant species tended to undergo leaf senescence in the same order in the autumns of both years at each location, but the order of senescence was only weakly correlated across sites. Leaf senescence times were not related to spring leaf out times, were not evolutionarily conserved and were only minimally influenced by growth habit, wood anatomy and percentage colour change or leaf drop. These weak patterns of leaf senescence timing contrast with much stronger leaf out patterns from a previous study. The results suggest that, in contrast to the broader temperature effects that determine leaf out times, leaf senescence times are probably determined by a larger or different suite of local environmental effects, including temperature, soil moisture, frost and wind. Determining the importance of these factors for a wide range of species represents the next challenge for understanding how climate change is affecting the end of the growing season and associated ecosystem processes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company

  6. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  7. Humidity cycle at Gale crater through MSL/REMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Savijarvi, Hannu; McConnochie, Tim; De la Torre, Manuel; Martinez, German; Haberle, Robert; Polkko, Jouni; Paton, Mark; Newman, Claire; Makinen, Terhi; Vazquez, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Since early August 2012 the Mars Science laboratory (MSL) has been operating successfully with the REMS instrument providing extremely valuable atmospheric observations of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (REMS-H), and UV measurements. The REMS-H relative humidity device is based on polymeric capacitive humidity sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. and it makes use of three (3) humidity sensor heads. The humidity device is mounted on the REMS boom providing ventilation with the ambient atmosphere through a filter protecting the device from airborne dust. The REMS-H humidity instrument has created an unprecedented data record of more than two full Martian years. It has measured the relative humidity and temperature at 1.6 m height for a period of 5 minutes every hour as part of the MSL/REMS instrument package. We focus on describing the annual in situ water cycle with the new REMS-H instrument calibration for the period of two Martian years. The results will be constrained through comparison with independent indirect observations and through modeling efforts. We inferred the hourly atmospheric VMR from the REMS-H observations and compared these VMR measurements with predictions of VMR from our 1D column Martian atmospheric model and regolith to investigate the local water cycle, exchange processes and the local climate in Gale Crater. The strong diurnal variation suggests there are surface-atmosphere exchange processes at Gale Crater during all seasons, which depletes moisture to the ground in the evening and nighttime and release the moisture back to the atmosphere during the daytime. On the other hand, these processes do not result in significant water deposition on the ground, because frost has not been detected in Gale Crater by any of the MSL observations. Hence, our modelling results presumably indicate that adsorption processes take place during the nighttime and desorption during the

  8. Effect of land use on water discharge in humid regions: An example ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of land use on water discharge is one of the most important environmental problems of our times, particularly in the humid regions. However, there exists controversy over the hydrological effects of land use in the humid tropics. This paper therefore examines the effect of land use on water discharge in southern ...

  9. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  10. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Flushing Time in the Sumjin River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Chandra Shaha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flushing is a very complicated process in estuarine environments. In order to examine the effects of tidal amplitude, river discharge, and stratification on the spatially varying flushing time of the Sumjin River Estuary (SRE, 24 longitudinal salinity transects were obtained during spring and neap tides from August 2004 to April 2007. The widely accepted freshwater fraction method has been used to calculate the flushing time for multiple estuarine segments using a spatially varying freshwater fraction. The effects of tidal amplitude, river discharge, and stratification on estuarine flushing were identified reasonably well by the spatially varying time scale. The flushing time appears to be close to the semidiurnal (M2 tidal period during spring tide, but it is twice as long during a neap tide near the mouth. The flushing time increases in the central regions with a decrease in the tidal amplitudes and reduces in the inner-most regions owing to the strong influence of gravitational circulation. A linear function negatively relates estuarine flushing to the tidal amplitudes near the mouth of the estuary, whereas a power-law function relates estuarine flushing to the freshwater inflow near the head. In addition, strong stratification induced by freshwater discharge and small tidal amplitude exerts dominant control to reduce the estuarine flushing in the central and upper regions of the estuary during a neap tide.

  12. Development of a Photovoltaic Array Emulator System in Real Time Considering Climatic Conditions Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo E. Ardila-Franco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an emulator that has the ability to replicate, in real time, the behavior of photovoltaic panels (PV arrays considering different conditions of irradiation and temperature for each one. The emulator consists of a data acquisition card, a programmable source and a computer. It is based on the bypass diode model that provides a better approximation to real operating conditions. The solution is computed by a simplified equation that uses the Lambert W function, which reduces the computation time. After that, it generates a solution table of values of current as a function of voltage on terminals, temperature and irradiation. Real-time emulation is performed by means of a search algorithm in the solutions table of the closest value to the voltage imposed on the terminals.

  13. Pediatric acute liver failure: variations in referral timing are associated with disease subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Ekkehard; Lexmond, Willem S; Verkade, Henkjan J

    2015-02-01

    In pediatric acute liver failure (PALF), rapid referral to a transplant center (TC) is advocated. Clinical variability of PALF may influence referral timing. We aimed to analyze early or late timing of referral in relation to clinical characteristics and outcome in PALF. We conducted a retrospective, single-center, comparative analysis of clinical and liver function parameters in two PALF cohorts (n = 23 per cohort): cohort 1 (early referral, duration of in-patient care before referral (DCR) liver failure (SLF >7 days between disease onset and development of encephalopathy) was independently associated with late referral (relative risk 9.48; 95 % CI 1.37-64.85, p liver function patterns. Early recognition of prognostic indicators and of SLF may help to improve referral timing and thus PALF management.

  14. Influence of environment factors on humidity conditions of selected external wall solutions in a heated building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Contemporary single-family houses in Poland are often built during 3 quarters of a year (spring to autumn) are usually settled in a winter season. It is a special case when exploitation humidity coincides with technological one, causing unfavourable humidity conditions during the first years of exploitation. In consequence, thermal parameters of partitions differ from those assumed in the project. In construction stage the humidity state of a wall stabilizes as a result of water: associated with storage, entered technologically during wall construction and plastering, coming from rainfall. Thermo-insulation materials are built-in at dry state. During erection and exploitation of a building their thermal conductivity is changing depending on humidity conditions. According to building rules, construction humidity should be removed from a partition before the building transfer to usage, because it lowers the thermal partition insulation ability and increases air humidity of building interior. Walls are plastered and insulated in condition of simultaneous presence of atmospheric and technological humidity which cause special humidity condition during first years of exploitation. As a consequence, heating costs are substantially higher. In this article the results of simulation are shown performed with WUFI ®PRO 5 software, which was intended to define the time necessary for reaching the stabilised humidity in selected solutions of two-layer walls applied in a heated building. In the research performed, the partition orientation along geographic directions, short and long wave radiation, and environment humidity (air humidity, driving rain) coincidence with technological humidity in assumed wall solutions were taken into account.

  15. Black P/graphene hybrid: A fast response humidity sensor with good reversibility and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Duy-Thach; Park, Inyong; Park, Ah-Ram; Park, Cheol-Min; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2017-09-05

    Black phosphorus (BP) materials have attracted considerable attention owing to their ultra-sensitive humidity sensing characteristics because of the natural absorption of water (H2O) molecules on the BP surface caused by the specific 2D layer-crystalline structure. On the other hand, the BP-based humidity sensor is less repeatable due to the instability of BP with water molecules and the stability of the sensor is reduced. In this study, this limitation of the BP-based humidity sensor was overcome by preparing a BP/graphene hybrid as a novel humidity sensing nanostructure. The BP/graphene interface improved the stability of the humidity sensor after a few weeks with a linear response within the relative humidity (RH) range of 15-70%. The sensor's response/recovery speed of the humidity sensor was extremely fast within few seconds. The response (S) of the humidity sensor based on the BP/graphene hybrid is 43.4% at RH = 70%. The estimated response and recovery time of the sensor is only 9 and 30 seconds at RH = 70% at room temperature. The experimental investigation reveals that the BP/graphene hybrid not only improves the reversibility and hysteresis factors but also enhances the stability of the humidity sensor.

  16. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Effect of variation in signal amplitude and transit time on reliability analysis of ultrasonic time of flight diffraction characterization of vertical and inclined cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, S K

    2014-03-01

    The variation of amplitude and transit time of the diffracted signal from the crack-tip in complex geometry components and their resulting effect on the probability of detection (POD) and probability of sizing (POS) was studied. The diffracted signal amplitude has been evaluated from the standard expressions for diffraction coefficient, spatial attenuation and the transit time from the respective mathematical models for both vertical and inclined cracks. The same parameters namely the signal amplitude and the transit time have been measured through experiments conducted on simulated test specimens. It has been observed that the analytical and experimental results compare well with each other. Based on this result the trend and shape (width of the transition zone) of the POD/POS curves can be predicted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of time of concentration on variation of runoff from a small urbanized watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra Amatya; Agnieszka Cupak; Andrzej Walega

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to estimate the influence of time of concentration (TC) on maximum flow in an urbanized watershed. The calculations of maximum flow have been carried out using the Rational method, Technical Release 55 (TR55) procedure based on NRCS (National Resources Conservation Services) guidelines, and NRCS-UH rainfall-runoff model. Similarly,...

  19. The Effects Of Increase And Variations In Time Presentations For Second Language Vocabulary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radina Mohamad Deli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Barcroft (2007 found opportunities for word retrieval to be advantageous during second language vocabulary learning. This study extended such a finding and investigated the effect of increased time in target-word retrieval for learning new vocabulary in the L2, as well as the effect of presentation orders of different time conditions on word retrieval. The data were obtained from 17 native Arab speakers who attempted to learn 24 new English words by viewing 24 word-picture pairs. Each picture and its corresponding word were viewed with different time lags of 0, 6 and 12 seconds between them in different presentation orders. The results showed that, although the increased time does not positively affect word retrieval, the overall findings correspond to Barcroft’s (2007 view, at least in the case of 6 seconds lag. The results also showed that the production of target words in both the control and retrieval-oriented conditions depend on and vary according to the order of presentation, particularly in the case of 6 seconds lag in which word gain is found to be highest when the lag is presented first and second.

  20. Variation in the structure of a time-dependent SRS spectrum in microfiltered water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, V. A.; Bunkin, N. F.; Sychev, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The time-dependent stimulated Raman scattering of light in water subjected to structural transformation by track membrane microfiltration is investigated. It is shown that the probability of SRS at the frequency of the ice spectral component in the band of stretching OH vibrations of water molecules decreases as a result of water filtration.

  1. Submersion time, depth, substrate type and sampling method as variation sources of marine periphyton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, M.; Trottier, C.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Hussenot, J.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Periphyton is an additional food source in African and Asian brackish and freshwater fish ponds. The present study was a preliminary assessment of periphyton development on artificial substrates in temperate marine ponds. The effects of submersion time, substrate type, water depth, and total or

  2. A variational approach to determine the optimal power distribution for cycling in a time trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Fokkink, R.J.; Olsder, G.J.; Schwab, A.L.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Jansen, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The optimal pacing strategy of a cyclist in an individual time-trial depends on terrain, weather conditions and the cyclists endurance capacity. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have shown that a suboptimal pacing strategy may have a substantial negative effect. In this paper we

  3. Modelling regional variation of first-time births in Denmark 1980-1994 by an age-period-cohort model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, L. C.; Knudsen, Lisbeth B.; Keiding, N.

    2005-01-01

    variation an interaction parameter between age and county is necessary, which provides a surprisingly good description suggesting that the county-specific age-distributions of first-time fertility rates differ. Our results are in general agreement with the 'moral geography' concepts of Tonboe (2001).......Despite the small size of Denmark, there have traditionally been rather consistent regional differences in fertility rates. We apply the statistical age-period-cohort model to include the effect of these three time-related factors thereby concisely illuminating the regional differences of first-time...... births in Denmark. From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtain data on number of births by nulliparous women by year (1980-1994), age (15-45) and county of residence. We show that the APC-model describes the fertility rates of nulliparous women satisfactorily. To catch the regional...

  4. Incorporating temporal variation in seabird telemetry data: time variant kernel density models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew; Adams, Evan M.; Anderson, Carl; Berlin, Alicia; Bowman, Timothy D.; Connelly, Emily; Gilliland, Scott; Gray, Carrie E.; Lepage, Christine; Meattey, Dustin; Montevecchi, William; Osenkowski, Jason; Savoy, Lucas; Stenhouse, Iain; Williams, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    A key component of the Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies project was tracking the individual movements of focal marine bird species (Red-throated Loon [Gavia stellata], Northern Gannet [Morus bassanus], and Surf Scoter [Melanitta perspicillata]) through the use of satellite telemetry. This element of the project was a collaborative effort with the Department of Energy (DOE), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV), among other organizations. Satellite telemetry is an effective and informative tool for understanding individual animal movement patterns, allowing researchers to mark an individual once, and thereafter follow the movements of the animal in space and time. Aggregating telemetry data from multiple individuals can provide information about the spatial use and temporal movements of populations. Tracking data is three dimensional, with the first two dimensions, X and Y, ordered along the third dimension, time. GIS software has many capabilities to store, analyze and visualize the location information, but little or no support for visualizing the temporal data, and tools for processing temporal data are lacking. We explored several ways of analyzing the movement patterns using the spatiotemporal data provided by satellite tags. Here, we present the results of one promising method: time-variant kernel density analysis (Keating and Cherry, 2009). The goal of this chapter is to demonstrate new methods in spatial analysis to visualize and interpret tracking data for a large number of individual birds across time in the mid-Atlantic study area and beyond. In this chapter, we placed greater emphasis on analytical methods than on the behavior and ecology of the animals tracked. For more detailed examinations of the ecology and wintering habitat use of the focal species in the midAtlantic, see Chapters 20-22.

  5. Voice Onset Time Variations of Korean Stop Consonants in Aphasic Speakers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Rho; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Gi

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the voice onset time (VOT) differences of Korean stops in the initial and intervocalic positions between the aphasic patients with peculiarities of aspiration and a control group. Method We examined 15 aphasic patients (nine males, six females) who had suffered a stroke (average age 49.7 years) and 15 healthy controls (average age 47.4 years). An aphasia examination was made by an aphasia battery of three standard tests and VOT was analyzed instrumentally. Stop consonants...

  6. Geographical variations in sex ratio trends over time in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trojano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A female/male (F/M ratio increase over time in multiple sclerosis (MS patients was demonstrated in many countries around the world. So far, a direct comparison of sex ratio time-trends among MS populations from different geographical areas was not carried out. OBJECTIVE: In this paper we assessed and compared sex ratio trends, over a 60-year span, in MS populations belonging to different latitudinal areas. METHODS: Data of a cohort of 15,996 (F = 11,290; M = 4,706 definite MS with birth years ranging from 1930 to 1989 were extracted from the international MSBase registry and the New Zealand MS database. Gender ratios were calculated by six decades based on year of birth and were adjusted for the F/M born-alive ratio derived from the respective national registries of births. RESULTS: Adjusted sex ratios showed a significant increase from the first to the last decade in the whole MS sample (from 2.35 to 2.73; p = 0.03 and in the subgroups belonging to the areas between 83° N and 45° N (from 1.93 to 4.55; p<0.0001 and between 45° N to 35° N (from 1.46 to 2.30; p<0.05 latitude, while a sex ratio stability over time was found in the subgroup from areas between 12° S and 55° S latitude. The sex ratio increase mainly affected relapsing-remitting (RR MS. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm a general sex ratio increase over time in RRMS and also demonstrate a latitudinal gradient of this increase. These findings add useful information for planning case-control studies aimed to explore sex-related factors responsible for MS development.

  7. A Numerical Investigation on Tidal and Gravity Wave Contributions to the Summer Time Na Variations in the Midlatitude E Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xuguang; Yuan, Tao; Eccles, J. Vincent

    2017-10-01

    The Na density variations in the E region have been studied over the past few decades. Although considerable progress in understanding and in modeling the metal layer observations has been made, Na density features above 100 km have yet to be explained. Various studies have linked them to the Na+ variations, a major reservoir for Na in E region. But the lack of comprehensive modeling investigations and of wind and temperature observations prevents further understanding on this important ion-neutral coupling topic. In this study, we conduct a numerical simulation on the summer time Na density behavior in the midlatitude E region, where both the ion density and the neutral atmosphere are modulated by tidal and gravity waves. Simulation results show good agreement with Na lidar measurements and reveal that atmospheric waves can transport Na upward to generate Na layers and variations in E region considerably. The vertical wind component of the large amplitude tidal wave can extend the Na layer above 120 km into the thermosphere. The simulation also demonstrates that the modulation of large amplitude gravity (GW) wave can generate small-scale sporadic Na layers (Nas) in the E region. Finally, eddy diffusion enhancement in the GW saturation process can significantly alter the Nas spatial and temporal structures.

  8. Visualizing microvascular flow variation in OCTA using variable interscan time analysis (VISTA) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Eric M.; Ploner, Stefan A.; Choi, WooJhon; Lee, ByungKun; Husvogt, Lennart A.; Lu, Chen D.; Novais, Eduardo; Cole, Emily D.; Potsaid, Benjamin M.; Duker, Jay S.; Hornegger, Joachim; Meier, Andreas K.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2017-02-01

    OCT angiography (OCTA) has recently garnered immense interest in clinical ophthalmology, permitting ocular vasculature to be viewed in exquisite detail, in vivo, and without the injection of exogenous dyes. However, commercial OCTA systems provide little information about actual erythrocyte speeds; instead, OCTA is typically used to visualize the presence and/or absence of vasculature. This is an important limitation because in many ocular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), alterations in blood flow, but not necessarily only the presence or absence of vasculature, are thought to be important in understanding pathogenesis. To address this limitation, we have developed an algorithm, variable interscan time analysis (VISTA), which is capable of resolving different erythrocyte speeds. VISTA works by acquiring >2 repeated B-scans, and then computing multiple OCTA signals corresponding to different effective interscan times. The OCTA signals corresponding to different effective interscan times contain independent information about erythrocyte speed. In this study we provide a theoretical overview of VISTA, and investigate the utility of VISTA in studying blood flow alterations in ocular disease. OCTA-VISTA images of eyes with choroidal neovascularization, geographic atrophy, and diabetic retinopathy are presented.

  9. Variations in Sleep and Performance by Duty Start Time in Short Haul Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have confirmed that commercial airline pilots experience circadian phase shifts and short sleep duration following travel with layovers in different time zones. Few studies have examined the impact of early and late starts on the sleep and circadian phase of airline pilots who return to their domicile after each duty period. We recruited 44 pilots (4 female) from a short-haul commercial airline to participate in a study examining sleep and circadian phase over four duty schedules (baseline, early starts, mid-day starts, late starts). Each duty schedule was five days long, separated by three rest days. Participants completed the rosters in the same order. Sleep outcomes were estimated using wrist-borne actigraphy (Actiware Software, Respironics, Bend, OR) and daily sleep diaries. Thirteen participants volunteered to collect urine samples for the assessment of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s). Urine samples were collected in four-hourly bins during the day and eight-hourly bins during sleep episodes, for 24 hours immediately following each experimental duty schedule. The aMT6s results were fit to a cosine in order to obtain the acrophase to estimate circadian phase. Univariate statistics were calculated for acrophase changes, schedule start times and sleep times. All statistical analyses were computed using SAS software (Cary, IN).

  10. Cosmic rays intensity and atmosphere humidity at near earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskomov, V. V.; Sedov, A. N.; Saduyev, N. O.; Kalikulov, O. A.; Naurzbayeva, A. Zh; Alimgazinova, N. Sh; Kenzhina, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of estimation the mutual influence of humidity and flux of cosmic rays in first approximation were carried out. Normalized cross-correlation function of time series of neutron monitors count rate and level of relative atmosphere humidity near cosmic rays registration point is studied. Corrected and uncorrected on pressure minute and hour data of 6NM64 neutron monitor count rate were used for the study. Neutron monitor is located in Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, at an altitude of 850 m above sea level. Also, data from NM64 neutron monitor of Tien Shan mountain research station of Institute of Ionosphere, located at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level were used. Uncorrected on pressure cosmic rays intensity better reflects the changes in relative atmosphere humidity. Average and sometimes strong relationship is often observed by time changes of atmosphere humidity near the point of cosmic rays detection and their intensity: the value of normalized cross-correlation function of respective signals, even in case of their long duration and a large number of data (eg, for minute changes at intervals of up to several months) covers 0.5 - 0.75 range, sometimes falling to ∼⃒ 0.4.

  11. Space-Time Variations in Tidal Stress and Cascadia Tremor Amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, A. J.; Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Wech, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new analysis of the influence of tidal stresses on the amplitude of non-volcanic tremor in Washington State. Tremor counts (Thomas et al., 2009), tremor amplitude (Rubinstein et al., 2008), and strain (Hawthorne and Rubin, 2010) are modulated by tidal stresses in Cascadia as well as in California. However, tremor amplitudes have not yet been extensively studied in Cascadia. Furthermore, Hawthorne and Rubin's Cascadia-wide tidal stress model (2010) allows us to look at the tremor-tide relationship in more detail than ever before. The ability to look at the tidal modulation of tremor amplitude in space as well as time will increase our understanding of this phenomenon and may provide information about the frictional properties of the plate interface. We focus on the August 2010 episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event recorded by the Array of Arrays, a seismic experiment on the Olympic Peninsula. The instrument response is deconvolved, seismograms band-pass filtered at 1.5-5.5 Hz and envelopes are made in 5-minute windows. An inverse problem compensates for site corrections and source-receiver distances to produce, for any given time, a single amplitude measurement at the source. Source locations are determined using an envelope waveform cross-correlation method. Then, we compare the amplitudes, catalog of tremor locations, and the tidal stress at the desired location and time. Amplitudes during the August 2010 ETS event are clearly modulated by tidal stresses. Viewed in the frequency domain, there are clear peaks in the tremor amplitude spectrum at several tidal periods, most prominently the 12.4 and 24 hour periods. Comparison with Hawthorne and Rubin's tidal stress model shows that higher amplitudes are associated with positive shear stress in the downdip direction and, less strongly, with more compressional normal stress.

  12. Time-trend and variations in the proportion of second-eye cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal-Delgado Enrique

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recommendations for greater use of second-eye cataract surgery and the bilateral progression of the disease, there is a substantial proportion of unmet need for this treatment. Few studies have explored the factors associated with second-eye cataract surgery utilisation. The objective of our study was to estimate the proportion of second-eye cataract surgery, evaluate its time-trend, and explore differences in utilisation by patients' gender, age, and region of residence. Methods All senile cataract surgeries performed between 1999 and 2002 in the public health system of Catalonia (Spain were obtained from the Minimum Data Set. The proportion of second-eye surgery from November 2000 to December 2002 was calculated. The time-trend of this proportion was characterised through linear regression models with the logarithmic transformation of time. Results The proportion of second-eye surgery was 30.0% and showed an increasing trend from 24.8% (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 21.6; 26.1 in November 2000 to 31.8% (95% CI 31.4; 33.6 in December 2002. This proportion was 1.9% (95% CI 0.9; 2.9 higher in women (p Conclusion We predict greater utilization of second-eye surgery in patients aged 70 to 79 years and in women. A greater increase in the utilisation rates of second-eye surgery is expected in the regions with lower proportions and in older patients. The observed trend suggests that there will be a substantial proportion of unmet need for bilateral surgery.

  13. Variation in Soil-Catena Characteristics of Moraines with Time and Climate, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Peter W.

    1994-07-01

    Soil catenas on three moraines in each of two areas with different climate were studied to determine (a) downcatena soil differentiation with climate and time and (b) their usefulness in estimating the relative ages of the underlying deposits. In the dry area (mean annual precipitation (MAP), ca. 0.5 m) all soils have A/Bw/C profiles formed in loess/till. Their similarity in morphology and in most chemical characteristics with catena position and age suggests that the low MAP does not result in much redistribution of water, elements, or sediment downcatena. This similarity also suggests ages close to each other and correlation with the Otiran Glaciation (oxygen-isotope stages 2 and 4). In the wet area (MAP ca. 3 m) the soils also formed in loess/till and with time (a) soil morphology progresses from A/Bw/C to A/E/B/C, (h) reduced properties intensify, especially in the downcatena profiles, (c) citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite-extractable Fe displays accumulation in the youngest catena followed by loss in the older catenas, and (d) downcatena trends in total chemical data display marked losses of the more mobile elements. These data demonstrate that although catena development is rapid in a wet climate, the downcatena contrast can be muted with time due to a change from processes dominated by oxidation to those dominated by reduction. Soil catena properties in the wet area are sufficiently different to not refute age estimations suggested by Suggate (1990): youngest moraine, oxygen-isotope stage 2; intermediate moraine, isotope stage 4; and oldest moraine, isotope stage 10. An unresolved problem in both areas is the possibility of soil erosion to foul soil-age relations.

  14. Time-dependent Variation in Life Cycle Assessment of Microalgal Biorefinery Co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahdokht

    Microalgae can serve as a highly productive biological feedstock for fuels and chemicals. The lipid fraction of algal seeds has been the primary target of research for biofuel production. However, numerous assessments have found that valorization of co-products is essential to achieve economic and environmental goals. The relative proportion of co-products depends on the biomolecular composition of algae at the time of harvesting. In the present study the productivity of lipid, starch, and protein fractions were shown through growth experiments to vary widely with species, feeding regime, and harvesting time. Four algae species were cultivated under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions and analyzed at regular harvesting intervals. Dynamic growth results were then used for life cycle assessment using the U.S. Department of Energy's GREET model to determine optimal growth scenarios that minimize life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, eutrophication, and cumulative energy demand (CED), while aiming for an energy return on investment (EROI) greater than unity. Per kg of biodiesel produced, C. sorokiniana in N-replete conditions harvested at 12 days was most favorable for GHG emissions and CED, despite having a lipid content of <20%. N. oculata under the same conditions had the lowest life cycle eutrophication impacts, driven by efficient nutrient cycling and valorization of microalgal protein and anaerobic digester residue co-products. The results indicate that growth cycle times that maximize a single fraction do not necessarily result in the most favorable environmental performance on a life cycle basis, underscoring the importance of designing biorefinery systems that simultaneously optimize for lipid and non-lipid fractions.

  15. Real-time myocardium segmentation for the assessment of cardiac function variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoehrer, Fabian; Huellebrand, Markus; Chitiboi, Teodora; Oechtering, Thekla; Sieren, Malte; Frahm, Jens; Hahn, Horst K.; Hennemuth, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Recent developments in MRI enable the acquisition of image sequences with high spatio-temporal resolution. Cardiac motion can be captured without gating and triggering. Image size and contrast relations differ from conventional cardiac MRI cine sequences requiring new adapted analysis methods. We suggest a novel segmentation approach utilizing contrast invariant polar scanning techniques. It has been tested with 20 datasets of arrhythmia patients. The results do not differ significantly more between automatic and manual segmentations than between observers. This indicates that the presented solution could enable clinical applications of real-time MRI for the examination of arrhythmic cardiac motion in the future.

  16. Warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system design based on Kingview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yanghui; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Jingyun

    2017-04-01

    Storage is the key link of modern logistics. Warehouse environment monitoring is an important part of storage safety management. To meet the storage requirements of different materials, guarantee their quality in the greatest extent, which has great significance. In the warehouse environment monitoring, the most important parameters are air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, a design of warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system based on King view, which realizes the multipoint temperature and humidity data real-time acquisition, monitoring and storage in warehouse by using temperature and humidity sensor. Also, this paper will take the bulk grain warehouse as an example and based on the data collected in real-time monitoring, giving the corresponding expert advice that combined with the corresponding algorithm, providing theoretical guidance to control the temperature and humidity in grain warehouse.

  17. Bullet Optical Fiber Humidity Sensor Based on Ag Nanoparticles Dispersed in Leaf Extract of Alstonia Scholaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu VIJAYAN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical fiber with a clad of Ag nanoparticles dispersed in leaf extract of Alstonia Scholaris is used as an optical humidity sensor. The fabricated sensor showed response to humidity in the range of 40-95%. The specialty of this sensor is that it can be used when stored at room temperature (25 oC up to a maximum of 25 days with 90% retention of original sensitivity. These humidity sensing bio-films showed good operational efficiency for 5 cycles. The plastic optical fiber is versatile and can be used easily for humidity measurement with high sensitivity. The sensor exhibited a short response time of 4-5 sec. and recovery time of 45 sec with repeatability, reproducibility and low hysteresis effect. This Ag dispersed in leaf extract of Alstonia Scholaris showed higher humidity response compared to response shown by the leaf extract alone.

  18. Adjustment of web-building initiation to high humidity: a constraint by humidity-dependent thread stickiness in the spider Cyrtarachne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yuki G; Kusahara, Miki; Maezono, Yasunori; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Cyrtarachne is an orb-weaving spider belonging to the subfamily Cyrtarachninae (Araneidae) which includes triangular-web-building Pasilobus and bolas spiders. The Cyrtarachninae is a group of spiders specialized in catching moths, which is thought to have evolved from ordinary orb-weaving araneids. Although the web-building time of nocturnal spiders is in general related to the time of sunset, anecdotal evidence has suggested variability of web-building time in Cyrtarachne and its closely related genera. This study has examined the effects of temperature, humidity, moonlight intensity, and prey (moths) availability on web-building time of Cyrtarachne bufo, Cyrtarachne akirai, and Cyrtarachne nagasakiensis. Generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) have revealed that humidity, and not prey availability, was the essential variable that explained the daily variability of web-building time. Experiments measuring thread stickiness under different humidities showed that, although the thread of Cyrtarachne was found to have strong stickiness under high humidity, low humidity caused a marked decrease of thread stickiness. By contrast, no obvious change in stickiness was seen in an ordinary orb-weaving spider, Larinia argiopiformis. These findings suggest that Cyrtarachne adjusts its web-building time to favorable conditions of high humidity maintaining strong stickiness, which enables the threads to work efficiently for capturing prey.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler eclipse timing variation analyses (Borkovits+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkovits, T.; Rappaport, S.; Hajdu, T.; Sztakovics, J.

    2017-11-01

    The present version of the Kepler EB Catalog (http://keplerebs.villanova.edu/) (Conroy et al. 2014, J/AJ/147/45) contains 2645 EBs. We selected our systems from that sample. We started our search for the appropriate compact hierarchical triple stars (CHTs) with the construction of O-C ("observed minus calculated" eclipse times) curves for the primary and, when possible, the secondary, eclipses for all 2645 binaries. At the same time, we also produced folded light curves for each binary. In all, we found some 400 binary systems that have interesting (i.e. non-linear) O-C curves (see also Rappaport et al. 2013ApJ...768...33R; Conroy et al. 2014, J/AJ/147/45). However, most of these tend to be either parabolically shaped or have sinusoidal shapes with a period comparable to, or longer than, the Kepler mission. The majority of these are probably triple systems, as indicated by the presence of perturbations that are likely due to a third body in the system, but are otherwise not particularly interesting for this study. We then restricted our attention only to the subset of these systems. (27 data files).

  20. Time calibration of AMANDA three variations of a theme of T$_{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, K

    2002-01-01

    The AMANDA-II neutrino telescope currently operating at the South Pole is an array of 677 optical modules (OMs) deployed in the ice at depths between 1200 m and 2300 m beneath the surface. Calibration of the timing offsets of each OM is effected primarily by means of in- ice light pulses transmitted via optical fibers from a surface YAG laser. Discriminator walk, which is significant due to the transmission of electrical signals over 2 km distances, is also calibrated using the YAG laser. Another way to calibrate the timing offsets is to use downgoing cosmic ray muons. This method has the advantages of fuller coverage and year-round availability, i.e., it can be done anytime the detector is taking data. Finally, preliminary results of a technique used to calibrate, with nanosecond precision, the local clocks in "digital optical modules" (DOMs), which digitize and timestamp PMT signals in situ, are presented using DOMs in operation in AMANDA-II. The DOM is part of the baseline design for the planned IceCube de...

  1. A Bayesian framework to estimate diversification rates and their variation through time and space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestro Daniele

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of species diversity are the result of speciation and extinction processes, and molecular phylogenetic data can provide valuable information to derive their variability through time and across clades. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods offer a promising framework to incorporate phylogenetic uncertainty when estimating rates of diversification. Results We introduce a new approach to estimate diversification rates in a Bayesian framework over a distribution of trees under various constant and variable rate birth-death and pure-birth models, and test it on simulated phylogenies. Furthermore, speciation and extinction rates and their posterior credibility intervals can be estimated while accounting for non-random taxon sampling. The framework is particularly suitable for hypothesis testing using Bayes factors, as we demonstrate analyzing dated phylogenies of Chondrostoma (Cyprinidae and Lupinus (Fabaceae. In addition, we develop a model that extends the rate estimation to a meta-analysis framework in which different data sets are combined in a single analysis to detect general temporal and spatial trends in diversification. Conclusions Our approach provides a flexible framework for the estimation of diversification parameters and hypothesis testing while simultaneously accounting for uncertainties in the divergence times and incomplete taxon sampling.

  2. Effect of temperature, relative humidity and rainfall on dengue fever and leptospirosis infections in Manila, the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, A; Telan, E F O; Chagan-Yasutan, H; Piolo, M B; Hattori, T; Kobayashi, N

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and leptospirosis are serious public problems in tropical regions, especially in Manila, the Philippines. In attempting to understand the causes of DF and leptospirosis seasonality, meteorological factors have been suspected, but quantitative correlation between seasonality and meteorological factors has not been fully investigated. In this study, we investigated correlation of temporal patterns of reported numbers of laboratory-confirmed cases of both DF and leptospirosis with meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall) in Manila. We used time-series analysis combined with spectral analysis and the least squares method. A 1-year cycle explained underlying variations of DF, leptospirosis and meteorological data. There was a peak of the 1-year cycle in temperature during May, followed by maxima in rainfall, relative humidity and number of laboratory-confirmed DF and leptospirosis cases. This result suggests that DF and leptospirosis epidemics are correlated not only with rainfall but also relative humidity and temperature in the Philippines. Quantifying the correlation of DF and leptospirosis infections with meteorological conditions may prove useful in predicting DF and leptospirosis epidemics, and health services should plan accordingly.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Spider Dragline Silk: Humidity, Hysteresis, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehoff, T.; Glišović, A.; Schollmeyer, H.; Zippelius, A.; Salditt, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spider silk is well-known for its outstanding mechanical properties. However, there is a significant variation of these properties in literature and studies analyzing large numbers of silk samples to explain these variations are still lacking. To fill this gap, the following work examines the mechanical properties of major ampullate silk based on a large ensemble of threads from Nephila clavipes and Nephila senegalensis. In addition, the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the mechanical properties was quantified. The large effect of RH on the mechanical properties makes it plausible that the variation in the literature values can to a large extent be attributed to changes in RH. Spider silk's most remarkable property—its high tenacity—remains unchanged. In addition, this work also includes hysteresis as well as relaxation measurements. It is found that the relaxation process is well described by a stretched exponential decay. PMID:17766337

  4. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For this...

  5. Time variations of Mars' gravitational field using MGS, Mars Odyssey and MRO radio science data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S.; Zittersteijn, M.; Le Maistre, S.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2013-12-01

    Tracking of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odysey (ODY) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has been used to measure changes in the long-wavelength gravity field of Mars due to the seasonal cycle of the atmospheric carbon dioxyde that is deposited in the polar regions each fall and winter and sublimed back into the atmosphere every spring and summer. All available observations spanning from 1999 to 2012 have been analyzed. The seasonal signal observed in low degrees has been computed using each satellite separately and all together. Changes in amplitude can be observed depending on satellite and observation time (before 2002, 2002-2006, after 2006). The others solved parameters are orbital parameters, drag coefficient, solar pressure coefficient and acceleration for each of the momentum dumps performed by the spacecrafts. A new assessment of the degree 2 tidal Love number, k2, has also been performed.

  6. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, C.; Cellone, S.; Mallonn, M.

    2016-01-01

    , ground-based data acquired using small telescopes limit the technique to the follow-up of hot Jupiters. However, space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have already revealed that hot Jupiters are mainly found in single systems. Thus, it is natural to question ourselves if we are properly using...... the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground......-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional planets in already known planetary systems. To meet this goal, we simulated typical primary transit observations of a hot Jupiter mimicing an existing system, Qatar-1. To resemble ground-based observations...

  7. Resilience in the Offspring of Depressed Mothers: Variation Across Risk, Domains, and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, Julia D; Shaw, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    Considerable research has demonstrated that maternal depression is a significant risk factor for emotional and behavioral problems in children and adolescents (Goodman and Gotlib in Psychol Rev 106:458-490, 1999). It is important to note, however, that most children of depressed parents do not develop problems. This review will examine studies of resilience as they relate to the degree to which positive adjustment occurs across different levels of risk (i.e., severity and chronicity of depression as well as in context of multiple risk factors), domains of adjustment, and time. Understanding the phenomenon of resilience to depression is of critical importance to prevention and intervention experts because it may provide insight into processes that can be enhanced and targeted in prevention approaches among high-risk populations.

  8. Bacterial community variation in human body habitats across space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Elizabeth K; Lauber, Christian L; Hamady, Micah; Fierer, Noah; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Knight, Rob

    2009-12-18

    Elucidating the biogeography of bacterial communities on the human body is critical for establishing healthy baselines from which to detect differences associated with diseases. To obtain an integrated view of the spatial and temporal distribution of the human microbiota, we surveyed bacteria from up to 27 sites in seven to nine healthy adults on four occasions. We found that community composition was determined primarily by body habitat. Within habitats, interpersonal variability was high, whereas individuals exhibited minimal temporal variability. Several skin locations harbored more diverse communities than the gut and mouth, and skin locations differed in their community assembly patterns. These results indicate that our microbiota, although personalized, varies systematically across body habitats and time; such trends may ultimately reveal how microbiome changes cause or prevent disease.

  9. Sources of variation in hydrological classifications: Time scale, flow series origin and classification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Francisco J.; Barquín, José; Álvarez, César

    2016-07-01

    Classification of flow regimes in water management and hydroecological research has grown significantly in recent years. However, depending on available data and the procedures applied, there may be several credible classifications for a specific catchment. In this study, three inductive classifications derived from different initial flow data and one expert-driven classification were defined. The hydrological interpretation, statistical performance and spatial correspondence of these classifications were compared. Daily Gauged Classification (DC) was derived from daily flow data while Monthly Gauged Classification (MC) and Monthly Modeled Classification (MMC) were derived from monthly flow series, using gauged and modeled flow data, respectively. Expert-Driven Classification (EDC) was based on a Spanish nationwide hydrological classification, which is being used in the current River Basin Management Plans. The results showed that MC accounted for much of the critical hydrological information variability comprised within the DC. However, it also presented limitations regarding the inability to represent important hydroecological attributes, especially those related to droughts and high flow events. In addition, DC and MC presented an equivalent performance more than 60% of the time and obtained a mean ARI value of 0.4, indicating a similar classification structure. DC and MC outperformed MMC 100% and more than 50% of the times when they were compared by means of the classification strength and ANOVA, respectively. MMC also showed low correspondence with these classifications (ARI = 0.20). Thus, the use of modeled flow series should be limited to poorly gauged areas. Finally, the significantly reduced performance and the uneven distribution of classes found in EDC questions its application for different management objectives. This study shows that the selection of the most suitable approach according to the available data has significant implications for the

  10. [Evaluation of the influence of humidity and temperature on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ning; Sun, Hechun; Dai, Miaomiao

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature and humidity on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment, and to obtained the kinetic parameters. The effect of concentration error, drug degradation extent, humidity and temperature numbers, humidity and temperature range, and average humidity and temperature on the accuracy and precision of kinetic parameters in the initial average rate experiment was explored. The stability of vitamin C, as a solid state model, was investigated by an initial average rate experiment. Under the same experimental conditions, the kinetic parameters obtained from this proposed method were comparable to those from classical isothermal experiment at constant humidity. The estimates were more accurate and precise by controlling the extent of drug degradation, changing humidity and temperature range, or by setting the average temperature closer to room temperature. Compared with isothermal experiments at constant humidity, our proposed method saves time, labor, and materials.

  11. Time-varying cycle average and daily variation in ambient air pollution and fecundability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Carrie J; Schisterman, Enrique F; Ha, Sandie; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Sherman, Seth; Mendola, Pauline

    2018-01-01

    Does ambient air pollution affect fecundability? While cycle-average air pollution exposure was not associated with fecundability, we observed some associations for acute exposure around ovulation and implantation with fecundability. Ambient air pollution exposure has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and decrements in semen quality. The LIFE study (2005-2009), a prospective time-to-pregnancy study, enrolled 501 couples who were followed for up to one year of attempting pregnancy. Average air pollutant exposure was assessed for the menstrual cycle before and during the proliferative phase of each observed cycle (n = 500 couples; n = 2360 cycles) and daily acute exposure was assessed for sensitive windows of each observed cycle (n = 440 couples; n = 1897 cycles). Discrete-time survival analysis modeled the association between fecundability and an interquartile range increase in each pollutant, adjusting for co-pollutants, site, age, race/ethnicity, parity, body mass index, smoking, income and education. Cycle-average air pollutant exposure was not associated with fecundability. In acute models, fecundability was diminished with exposure to ozone the day before ovulation and nitrogen oxides 8 days post ovulation (fecundability odds ratio [FOR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72, 0.96 and FOR 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.99, respectively). However, particulate matter ≤10 microns 6 days post ovulation was associated with greater fecundability (FOR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.54). Although our study was unlikely to be biased due to confounding, misclassification of air pollution exposure and the moderate study size may have limited our ability to detect an association between ambient air pollution and fecundability. While no associations were observed for cycle-average ambient air pollution exposure, consistent with past research in the United States, exposure during critical windows of hormonal variability was associated with prospectively measured couple

  12. Real-time electrical impedimetric monitoring of blood coagulation process under temperature and hematocrit variations conducted in a microfluidic chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Fong Lei

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation is an extremely complicated and dynamic physiological process. Monitoring of blood coagulation is essential to predict the risk of hemorrhage and thrombosis during cardiac surgical procedures. In this study, a high throughput microfluidic chip has been developed for the investigation of the blood coagulation process under temperature and hematocrit variations. Electrical impedance of the whole blood was continuously recorded by on-chip electrodes in contact with the blood sample during coagulation. Analysis of the impedance change of the blood was conducted to investigate the characteristics of blood coagulation process and the starting time of blood coagulation was defined. The study of blood coagulation time under temperature and hematocrit variations was shown a good agreement with results in the previous clinical reports. The electrical impedance measurement for the definition of blood coagulation process provides a fast and easy measurement technique. The microfluidic chip was shown to be a sensitive and promising device for monitoring blood coagulation process even in a variety of conditions. It is found valuable for the development of point-of-care coagulation testing devices that utilizes whole blood sample in microliter quantity.

  13. Humid heat waves at different warming levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Simone; Sillmann, Jana; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-08-07

    The co-occurrence of consecutive hot and humid days during a heat wave can strongly affect human health. Here, we quantify humid heat wave hazard in the recent past and at different levels of global warming. We find that the magnitude and apparent temperature peak of heat waves, such as the ones observed in Chicago in 1995 and China in 2003, have been strongly amplified by humidity. Climate model projections suggest that the percentage of area where heat wave magnitude and peak are amplified by humidity increases with increasing warming levels. Considering the effect of humidity at 1.5° and 2° global warming, highly populated regions, such as the Eastern US and China, could experience heat waves with magnitude greater than the one in Russia in 2010 (the most severe of the present era). The apparent temperature peak during such humid-heat waves can be greater than 55 °C. According to the US Weather Service, at this temperature humans are very likely to suffer from heat strokes. Humid-heat waves with these conditions were never exceeded in the present climate, but are expected to occur every other year at 4° global warming. This calls for respective adaptation measures in some key regions of the world along with international climate change mitigation efforts.

  14. 3d noncontact humidity sensing technologies and methods of use thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-09-08

    Noncontact sensing components are provided herein, in an aspect, they can be for an electronic device. The noncontact sensing components can contain a semiconductor layer having a r-GO portion and a CNT portion. The noncontact sensing components can be used to detect the presence or movement of a humidity source in the vicinity of the noncontact sensing component. The resistance/humidity response of the component can be based on the combined contribution of carbon nanotube (positive resistance variation) and reduced-graphene oxide (negative resistance variation) behaviors.

  15. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digester performance under variations in solids retention time and feeding frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Nathan D; Mihelcic, James R; Ergas, Sarina J

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the effect of solids retention time (SRT) and feeding frequency on the performance of anaerobic digesters used to recover bioenergy from swine waste. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digesters were operated at varying SRTs and feeding frequencies. Performance metrics included biogas and methane production rates, biomass robustness and functionality and removals of volatile solids, soluble chemical oxygen demand, the fecal-indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, and the human pathogen Salmonella. Biochemical methane formation potential and specific methanogenic activity assays were used to demonstrate biomass robustness and functionality. Results indicated that anaerobic digesters fed weekly had higher average methane yields (0.20 vs. 0.18m(3)CH4/kg-VSadded), specific methanogenic activities (40 vs. 35ml/day), and fecal indicator bacteria destruction (99.9% vs. 99.4%) than those fed every-other day. Salmonella, soluble COD, and VS destruction did not change with varied feeding frequency; however, higher removals were observed with longer SRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variations in burn perfusion over time as measured by portable ICG fluorescence: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanaike, Sharmila; Abdul-Hamed, Senan; Griswold, John A

    2014-01-01

    The early determination of healing potential in indeterminate thickness burns may be difficult to establish by visual inspection alone, even for experienced burn practitioners. This case series explores the use of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence using portable bedside assessment as a potential tool for early determination of burn depth. Three subjects with indeterminate thickness burns had daily perfusion assessment using ICG fluorescence assessment using the SPY machine (SPY®, Lifecell Corp., NJ, USA) in addition to standard burn care. The fluorescence was quantified as a percentage of the perfusion of intact skin, and areas of hypo- and hyper-perfusion were indicated. The study was concluded when the burn surgeon, blinded to the ICG results, made a clinical determination of the need for skin grafting or discharge. The perfusion in areas of differing depth of burn were compared over the entire study period to determine both the magnitude of difference, and the point in the time course of healing when these changes became evident. Significant differences in perfusion were noted between burned areas of varying depth. These differences were evident as early as the first post-burn day, and persisted till the completion of the study. ICG fluorescence represents a potential adjunct in burn assessment in this first longitudinal study of its use; however much more systematic research will be required to judge the feasibility of clinical implementation.

  17. Time-dependent variations in ischemia-modified albumin levels in mesenteric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Abdulkadir; Turkmen, Suha; Turedi, Suleyman; Mentese, Ahmet; Yulug, Esin; Ulusoy, Hülya; Karahan, Suleyman Caner; Topbas, Murat

    2009-06-01

    The objective was to determine the value of ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) in the diagnosis of mesenteric embolism. The authors investigated whether or not plasma IMA levels rose in the acute period in a rat model of mesenteric ischemia and the related time-dependent changes. In this randomized, controlled, nonblinded trial, 36 mature female Wistar rats were divided into six groups: three control (Groups I, III, and V) and three ischemia (Groups II, IV, and VI). In the control groups, blood was sampled at 30 minutes (Group I), 2 hours (Group III), and 6 hours (Group V) following a simple laparotomy. In the ischemia groups, following laparotomy, the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was clamped using a bulldog clamp, and blood samples were taken at 30 minutes (Group II), 2 hours (Group IV), and 6 hours (Group VI). Plasma IMA levels in the ischemia groups were significantly higher compared to those of the control groups (p ischemia group than in the 2-hour and 30-minute samples (p ischemia group than in the 30-minute samples (p mesenteric ischemia and that further studies are necessary. (c) 2009 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Pathological variations in mummified feet between two near-distance/long-time populations in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, Albert; Huber, Beatrice; Malik, Aamer; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2015-01-01

    In ancient populations, a significant quantity of foot pathology was related either to the type of footwear they used or the underlying terrain they walked on. Our study was carried out to analyze these parameters with the foot pathologies the mummies presented. Between 2006 and 2012, more than 650 individuals were recovered from the Sharuna and Qarara necropolis (Middle Egypt) dating from the VIth Dynasty of the first Ptolemaic Period to the second Coptic Period. From among them, a total of 73 mummified feet (41 from Sharuna and 32 from Qarara) were studied. We took into account the differences existing between both sites in location (15 km apart) and in time (2500 years apart). Almost all feet from Sharuna were wrapped and impregnated with a preservative substance (anthropological mummification), while the mummification process in Qarara was quite natural. Pathologies were found in 36 of the 73 ft (20 from Sharuna and 16 from Qarara). The differences in foot pathologies between the two sites were analysed. The foot pathologies we found in both necropolises have led us to hypothesise that the majority of the diachronic differences could be related more to progressive changes in the type of the terrain brought out through droughts, than the changes in footwear habits.

  19. Time variation of radiation use efficiency of a semiarid grassland: consequences for remotely sensed estimation of primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvellon, Yann; Seen, Danny L.; Rambal, S.; Begue, Agnes; Moran, M. Susan; Kerr, Yann H.; Qi, Jiaguo

    1998-12-01

    A reliable estimation of primary production of terrestrial ecosystems is often a prerequisite for carrying out land management, while being important also in ecological and climatological studies. At a regional scale, grassland primary production estimates are increasingly being made using satellite data. In a currently used approach, regional Gross, Net and Above-ground Net Primary Productivity (GPP, NPP and ANPP) are derived from the parametric model of Monteith and are calculated as the product of the fraction of incident photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the canopy (fAPAR) and gross, net and above-ground net production (radiation-use) efficiencies ((epsilon) g, (epsilon) n, (epsilon) an); fAPAR being derived from indices calculated from satellite measured reflectances in the red and near infrared. The accuracy and realism of the primary production values estimated by this approach therefore largely depend on an accurate estimation of (epsilon) g, (epsilon) n and (epsilon) an. However, data are scarce for production efficiencies of semi-arid grasslands, and their time and spatial variations are poorly documented, leading to often large errors on the estimates. In this paper a modeling approach taking into account relevant ecosystem processes and based on extensive field data, is used to estimate sub- seasonal and inter-annual variations of (epsilon) g, (epsilon) n and (epsilon) an of a shortgrass site of Arizona, and to quantitatively explain these variations by these of plant water stress, temperature, leaf aging, and processes such as respiration and changes in allocation pattern. For example, over the 3 study years, the mean (epsilon) g, (epsilon) n, and (epsilon) an were found to be 1.92, 0.74 and 0.29 g DM (MJ APAR)-1 respectively. (epsilon) g and epsilonn exhibited very important inter- annual and seasonal variations mainly due to different water stress conditions during the growing season. Inter-annual variations of (epsilon) an were much

  20. Time-dependent variational approach in terms of squeezed coherent states: Implication to semi-classical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    A general framework for time-dependent variational approach in terms of squeezed coherent states is constructed with the aim of describing quantal systems by means of classical mechanics including higher order quantal effects with the aid of canonicity conditions developed in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. The Maslov phase occurring in a semi-classical quantization rule is investigated in this framework. In the limit of a semi-classical approximation in this approach, it is definitely shown that the Maslov phase has a geometric nature analogous to the Berry phase. It is also indicated that this squeezed coherent state approach is a possible way to go beyond the usual WKB approximation.

  1. Climatic variations of the Arctic front and the Barents sea ice cover in winter time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zolotokrylin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Climatologic Arctic front location at Atlantic-European section and changes in Barents sea ice coverage during periods of Arctic warming (1981–2010 and cooling (1948–1980 are studied 7by reanalysis data (UEA CRU and NCEP/NCAR. As we demonstrate, Arctic front structure is more complex than was considered before. Arctic front consists of two branches, main one over Atlantic ocean, Norwegian and Barents seas and secondary one over Northern Europe. Main front divides arctic and temperate air masses over Atlantics as well as arctic and subarctic (transformed temperate masses over Northern Europe masses over Arctic seas. Secondary (subarctic branch separates subarctic air masses from continental temperate masses. Main and secondary Arctic front branches remain quasi-stationary during observed periods. On climatic scale, Arctic front is conservative with respect to cyclonic activity change during periods of warming and cooling in Arctic. Cyclonic activity, which is determined by cyclone centres repeatability, increased synchronously in Arctic and Subarctic from cooling period (1948–1980 to actual warming. Evidences to meet hypothesis on positive feedback between warm Atlantic water masses inflow and Barents sea wintertime ice coverage. This hypothesis became particularly important in relation with model reproduction of turbulent warm heavy stream that cause convection and cyclonic turbulence in lower troposphere. In feedback forming, cyclone centres localization matters; their repeatability is calculated for climatic episodes 1991–2007 (small ice coverage and 1979–1990 (big ice coverage in Barents sea’s four sections. During climatic episode 1991–2007 cyclone centres repeatability increased mostly in western sections, while in eastern sections repeatability decreased. At the same time, cyclone localization increase mostly in north-west section, comparing with south-western one. Cyclone centres localization shift north cause ice coverage

  2. IN TIME VARIATION OF PATHERGY PHENOMENON IN BEHCET'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chams F. Davatchi

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathergy phenomenon (PP is one of the hallmarks of Behcet's Disease (BD. It has been reported to be positive from 17.5% to 83% of cases in different studies. PP is used as a diagnosis criterion in the Dilsen criteria, the Japan criteria, the International criteria, and the Iran criteria. It is therefore important to know wether PP is a fix manifestation of the disease or a cyclic manifestation like mucocutaneous disorders. To evaluate the charaterist'tc of P'P over a period of time, 77 patients were selected randomly (rcgaardless of their disease activity or their disease manifestations, to have a second pathergy test, lite pathcrgy test was performed by needle puncture on the skin of the forearm. Three methods were used: 1- needle prick with a 21 - gauge needle. 2- needle prick with a 25  gauge needle. 3- needle prick with a 25-guage needle and the injection of I drop of a sterile normal saline solution. Tlie result was evaluated 24 hours Liter. Tlie shortest interval between two tests-was one month and the longest 13 years. Die mean interval was 35.4 months, the standard deviation was 36.6 Tlurty-nine patients had a negative PI' at their first evaluation. At the second evaluation, 27 remained negative while 12 changed to positive. Thirty-eight patients had a positive PP at their first evaluation. At the second evaluation, 19 remained positive while 19 changed to negative. Although there is a difference between the two groups, it is not statistically significant (x=3.813 , p=0.05. Our data demonstrates that the pathergy phenomenon is waxing and waning, like the majority of other manifestations of Behcet's Disease. TJierefore, it may be repeated for diagnosis purposes.

  3. Impact of clinical urgency, physician supply and procedural capacity on regional variations in wait times for coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Madhu K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite universal health care, there continues to be regional access disparities to coronary angiography in Canada. Our objective was to evaluate the extent to which demand-side factors such as clinical urgency/need, and supply-side factors, as reflected by differences in physician and procedural supply account for these inequalities. Methods Our cohort consisted of 74,254 consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography in Ontario, Canada between April 1st 2005 and March 31st 2006, divided into three urgency strata based on a clinical urgency scale. Cox-proportional hazard models were developed, adjusting for age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES, region, and urgency score, with greater hazard ratios (HR indicating shorter wait times. To evaluate mediators of any residual wait-time differences, we examined the influence of the regional supply of cath lab facilities, invasive cardiologists and general practitioners (GP. Results We found that the urgency score was a significant predictor of wait time in all three strata (urgent patients: HR 1.61 for each unit increase in patient urgency (95% Confidence interval (CI 1.55-1.67; semi-urgent patients: HR 1.55 (95% CI 1.44-1.68; elective patients: HR 1.13 (95% CI 1.08-1.18. After accounting for clinical need/urgency, regional wait time differences persisted; these were most consistently associated with variation in cath lab supply. The impact of invasive cardiologist supply was restricted to urgent patients while that of GP supply was confined to semi-urgent and elective patients. Conclusion We found that there remained significant regional disparities in access to coronary angiography after accounting for clinical need. These disparities are partially explained by variations in supply of both procedural capacity and physician services, most notably in elective and semi-urgent patients.

  4. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Zhou, Yuan; Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  5. Microindentation Hardness of Protein Crystals under Controlled Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Kishi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vickers microindentation hardness of protein crystals was investigated on the (110 habit plane of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals containing intracrystalline water at controlled relative humidity. The time evolution of the hardness of the crystals exposed to air with different humidities exhibits three stages such as the incubation, transition, and saturation stages. The hardness in the incubation stage keeps a constant value of 16 MPa, which is independent of the humidity. The incubation hardness can correspond to the intrinsic one in the wet condition. The increase of the hardness in the transition and saturation stages is well fitted with the single exponential curve, and is correlated with the reduction of water content in the crystal by the evaporation. The saturated maximum hardness also strongly depends on the water content equilibrated with the humidity. The slip traces corresponding to the (11 ̅0[110] slip system around the indentation marks are observed in not only incubation but also saturation stages. It is suggested that the plastic deformation in protein crystals by the indentation can be attributed to dislocation multiplication and motion inducing the slip. The indentation hardness in protein crystals is discussed in light of dislocation mechanism with Peierls stress and intracrystalline water.

  6. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaẑ; Turk, Goran; Srpĉiĉ, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... a fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity......, it must therefore be taken into account. In order to include history dependency, a hysteresis model is used here. Results from numerical calculations for timber specimen exposed to combined daily and annually cyclic variation of outside humidity are presented. Copyright © (2012) by WCTE 2012 Committee....

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  8. Laboratory setup for temperature and humidity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eimre, Kristjan

    2015-01-01

    In active particle detectors, the temperature and humidity conditions must be under constant monitoring and control, as even small deviations from the norm cause changes to detector characteristics and result in a loss of precision. To monitor the temperature and humidity, different kinds of sensors are used, which must be calibrated beforehand to ensure their accuracy. To calibrate the large number of sensors that are needed for the particle detectors and other laboratory work, a calibration system is needed. The purpose of the current work was to develop a laboratory setup for temperature and humidity sensor measurements and calibration.

  9. Does help structures play a role in reducing the variation of dwell time in IPSA planning for gynaecological brachytherapy application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamema, Swamidas; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, Dd; Sharma, Smriti; Shrivastava, Sk

    2011-09-01

    To report our experience of dosimetric comparison of IPSA and manual plans, with a focus on the use of help structures (HS) during optimization. 33 patients who underwent MR image-based HDR intracavitary-brachytherapy for cervix cancer based on GYN-ESTRO recommendations were selected for evaluation. Tandem/ovoid (T/O) and Vienna applicators were used. HS of diameter of 5 mm were drawn around the tandem/needles/ovoid and ring. Three plans were generated: manual optimized plan (MOPT), IPSA without help structures (IPSA_woHS) and IPSA with help structures (IPSA_wHS). Dose-volume parameters and the loading pattern were evaluated. For T/O, the use of HS did not make significant impact in the dose-volume parameters and in the loading of tandem and ovoids, however steep variation was found in the individual dwell time. In case of Vienna applicator, inclusion of HS in the optimization made a significant impact in loading of needles. The percentage ratio of total time of needles to the tandem (T(N/T%)) was found to be 14±2.5, 53±9, 22±6 for MOPT, IPSA_woHS and IPSA_wHS, respectively, which implies that in IPSA_woHS the dwell time in needles were half of the dwell time in the tandem, while in MOPT the needles were loaded only in 14%, and in IPSA_wHS it was 22% of the dwell time of tandem. Inclusion of HS in the optimization has reduced the contribution of dwell time of needle in IPSA_wHS. The individual variation of dwell time was also reduced in IPSA_wHS, however drawing of HS is a time consuming procedure and may not be practical for a routine practice. The role of HS was evaluated for IPSA for T/O and Vienna-applicator, the use of HS may be beneficial in case of combined intracavitary - interstitial approach.

  10. Diurnal variation of aldosterone and plasma renin activity: timing relation to melatonin and cortisol and consistency after prolonged bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shelley; Cohen, Richard J; Williams, Gordon H

    2004-04-01

    Exposure to prolonged bed rest is known to induce changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by way of posture, sodium and potassium balance, and stress, which may have serious consequences for patients. We focused on the diurnal variation of the RAAS by investigating changes in the levels of plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone; for comparison to markers of the intrinsic pacemaker and to stress, we measured melatonin and cortisol. PRA, aldosterone, melatonin, and cortisol were measured hourly in 10 normal subjects with standardized sleep patterns, posture, and diet at baseline and after 11 days of prolonged bed rest conducted under a light-dark cycle. Circadian characteristics of hormone secretion patterns were estimated by multiple harmonic regression with excellent goodness-of-fit measures. Variability in the melatonin and cortisol patterns across subjects was minimal. Even for pulsatile hormones, this technique successfully estimated the acrophase, which was the salient feature. Baseline hormone peak times started with melatonin near the middle of the sleep period, followed by PRA, then aldosterone, and then cortisol around wake time. Prolonged bed rest did not induce significant changes in any timing characteristic of the secretion patterns. Baseline and prolonged bed rest peak times for melatonin and cortisol and amplitude characteristics for all hormones were highly correlated, indicating consistency within individuals. These data provide strong evidence that prolonged bed rest of 11 days' duration does not disrupt either the timing characteristics of the RAAS or the intrinsic pacemaker.

  11. Genome-wide estimation of firing efficiencies of origins of DNA replication from time-course copy number variation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jianhua

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA replication is a fundamental biological process during S phase of cell division. It is initiated from several hundreds of origins along whole chromosome with different firing efficiencies (or frequency of usage. Direct measurement of origin firing efficiency by techniques such as DNA combing are time-consuming and lack the ability to measure all origins. Recent genome-wide study of DNA replication approximated origin firing efficiency by indirectly measuring other quantities related to replication. However, these approximation methods do not reflect properties of origin firing and may lead to inappropriate estimations. Results In this paper, we develop a probabilistic model - Spanned Firing Time Model (SFTM to characterize DNA replication process. The proposed model reflects current understandings about DNA replication. Origins in an individual cell may initiate replication randomly within a time window, but the population average exhibits a temporal program with some origins replicated early and the others late. By estimating DNA origin firing time and fork moving velocity from genome-wide time-course S-phase copy number variation data, we could estimate firing efficiency of all origins. The estimated firing efficiency is correlated well with the previous studies in fission and budding yeasts. Conclusions The new probabilistic model enables sensitive identification of origins as well as genome-wide estimation of origin firing efficiency. We have successfully estimated firing efficiencies of all origins in S.cerevisiae, S.pombe and human chromosomes 21 and 22.

  12. Durable microfabricated high-speed humidity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Petr; Berg, Jordan M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2004-05-01

    We describe a durable microfabricated humidity sensor made of interdigitated rhodium electrodes on a silicon substrate covered with a sensing film of Nafion perfluorosulfonate ionomer. Rhodium electrodes are much less prone to oxidative degradation compared to previously described gold electrode-based sensors. Even with dc excitation, Rh electrode sensors exhibit excellent long-term response stability. It has been found that low-amplitude (+/-1 V) square wave excitation can prolong the usability of gold electrode-based sensors to at least several months; however, this mode of interrogation cannot provide subsecond response times. Rhodium deposition on the microsensors is much more difficult than that of gold. We were able to attain crack-free Rh deposits by adaptation of pulsed electroplating techniques. At excitation voltages of >2 V dc, the Rh sensors respond to moisture with 10 90% rise and fall times of 30-50 ms. These are the fastest microfabricated water vapor sensors reported to date. We demonstrate applications as a breath monitor. Such sensors should also be of utility in atmospheric eddy measurements. Short-term repeatability is better than 0.6% RSD (n = 7).

  13. A Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on an Electrospun PVDF/Graphene Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rivera, Daniel; Rodríguez-Roldán, Grissel; Mora-Martínez, Rodrigo; Suaste-Gómez, Ernesto

    2017-05-03

    Humidity sensors have been widely used in areas such as agriculture, environmental conservation, medicine, instrumentation and climatology. Hydrophobicity is one of the important factors in capacitive humidity sensors: recent research has shown that the inclusion of graphene (G) in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) improves its hydrophobicity. In this context, a methodology to fabricate electrospun membranes of PVDF blended with G was developed in order to improve the PVDF properties allowing the use of PVDF/G membrane as a capacitive humidity sensor. Micrographs of membranes were obtained by scanning electron microscopy to analyze the morphology of the fabricated samples. Subsequently, the capacitive response of the membrane, which showed an almost linear and directly proportional response to humidity, was tested. Results showed that the response time of PVDF/G membrane was faster than that of a commercial DHT11 sensor. In summary, PVDF/G membranes exhibit interesting properties as humidity sensors.

  14. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jingwen Qian; Zhijian Peng; Zhenguang Shen; Zengying Zhao; Guoliang Zhang; Xiuli Fu

    2016-01-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via sing...

  15. Effect of Air Relative Humidity Harvest on Soil Moisture Content under Moroccan Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Khadir Lakhal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to analyse the effect of the harvest of air relative humidity on soil water content. Some experiments were conducted on hilly areas with various hypsographic and microclimatic conditions greatly affecting daily fluctuations of air relative humidity. The metrological data’s were obtained by using a Campbell Scientific equipments station recorder on data loggers every half hour. Time Domain Reflectometers (TDR is used for calculating water content at different soil layers. The effect of many parameters such as: minimal and maximal air atmospheric humidity, potential of soil water and minimal temperature of air on harvesting air relative humidity is also discussed. The experimental results indicate that soil moisture content in the upper soil layer fluctuates with the same manner to diurnal fluctuation of relative air humidity. These fluctuations due to the harvest of relative air humidity decreased with increasing soil depth and daily amplitude of relative air humidity. The water adsorbed according to this phenomenon increased with increasing maximal relative and decreasing minimal temperature. The contribution of this soil water collected is about 40% of losses due to evaporation process. The correlation between principal climatic data and soil water adsorption by harvest relative air humidity is presented in this paper in order to incorporate it in the total water balance during water infiltration.

  16. Temperature and Humidity Control in Livestock Stables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Andersen, Palle; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes temperature and humidity control of a livestock stable. It is important to have a correct air flow pattern in the livestock stable in order to achieve proper temperature and humidity control as well as to avoid draught. In the investigated livestock stable the air flow...... is controlled using wall mounted ventilation flaps. In the paper an algorithm for air flow control is presented meeting the needs for temperature and humidity while taking the air flow pattern in consideration. To obtain simple and realisable controllers a model based control design method is applied....... In the design dynamic models for temperature and humidity are very important elements and effort is put into deriving and testing the models. It turns out that non-linearities are dominating in both models making feedback linearization the natural design method. The air controller as well as the temperature...

  17. Advancing Environmental Noise Pollution Analysis in Urban Areas by Considering the Variation of Population Exposure in Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, S.; Gomes, N.

    2013-05-01

    Ambient noise is a subtle form of pollution in large urban areas, degrading human health and well-being. In Europe, directives require that urban environmental noise be measured and mapped for the main periods of the daily cycle. Subsequent analyses of human exposure to noise in those periods is usually conducted using resident (i.e., nighttime) population from the census and assuming constant densities within the enumeration units. However, population distribution and densities vary considerably from night to day in metropolitan areas, and disregard for that process results in gross misestimation of exposure to ambient noise in the daytime period. This study considers the spatio-temporal variation of population distribution in assessing exposure to ambient noise in a major urban area, the city of Lisbon, Portugal. Detailed and compatible day- and nighttime population distribution maps were used, developed by means of "intelligent dasymetric mapping". After categorizing noise levels in existing maps in each period, classified according to current legislation, human exposure to ambient noise was assessed with temporally matching population surfaces. Population exposure to noise in 2000 and 2009 was compared and further analyzed in regards to main source of noise, i.e. road traffic vs. aircraft.. Results show that human exposure to noise shifts substantially in time and space, with a significant increase in exposed population from the nighttime to daytime period, especially in the higher noise levels. This is due to the combined effects of the daily variation of noise patterns and population distribution.

  18. Thermal conductivity at different humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Rode, Carsten

    1999-01-01

    The thermal conductivity (the l-value) of several alternative insulation products and a traditional product is determined under different humidity conditions in a specially constructed hot plate apparatus.The hot plate apparatus is constructed with an air gap on each side of the test specimen where...... of the thermal conductivity is 3-8% because of the hygroscopic uptake of humidity from the ambient air....

  19. Gouvernance communautaire des milieux humides du bassin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gouvernance communautaire des milieux humides du bassin versant de la Sand River (Afrique du Sud). La collectivité de Craigieburn, dans la province du KwaZulu-Natal, en Afrique du Sud, est située dans un milieu humide couvrant 1 200 ha et jouant un rôle de premier plan dans la régulation et le maintien de la Sand ...

  20. Upper limits for air humidity based on human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole; Jørgensen, Anette S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the hypothesis that insufficient respiratory cooling and a high level of skin humidity are two reasons for thermal discomfort at high air humidities, and to prescribe upper limits for humidity based on discomfort due to elevated skin humidity and insufficient...... respiratory cooling. Human subjects perceived the condition of their skin to be less acceptable with increasing skin humidity. Inhaled air was rated warmer, more stuffy and less acceptable with increasing air humidity and temperature. Based on the subjects' comfort responses, new upper limits for air humidity...... are proposed. The limits relating to respiratory requirements are much more stringent than those relating to skin humidity....

  1. How to Use the DHT22 Sensor for Measuring Temperature and Humidity with the Arduino Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to achieve a functional system in terms of hardware and software, to measure temperature and humidity. Also, this system will allow to monitoring the time. In this, we use an Arduino board with interfacing a sensor placed in local environment to measure temperature and humidity. The paper aims to achieve the following goals: achieving a functional system in terms of hardware and software that allows measuring and monitoring temperature, humidity and the time; using a development board for the communication with the sensor and clock; implementation a program that allows requirements.

  2. Study on the Correlation between Humidity and Material Strains in Separable Micro Humidity Sensor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yuan

    2017-05-08

    Incidents of injuries caused by tiles falling from building exterior walls are frequently reported in Taiwan. Humidity is an influential factor in tile deterioration but it is more difficult to measure the humidity inside a building structure than the humidity in an indoor environment. Therefore, a separable microsensor was developed in this study to measure the humidity of the cement mortar layer with a thickness of 1.5-2 cm inside the external wall of a building. 3D printing technology is used to produce an encapsulation box that can protect the sensor from damage caused by the concrete and cement mortar. The sensor is proven in this study to be capable of measuring temperature and humidity simultaneously and the measurement results are then used to analyze the influence of humidity on external wall tile deterioration.

  3. Study on the Correlation between Humidity and Material Strains in Separable Micro Humidity Sensor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Incidents of injuries caused by tiles falling from building exterior walls are frequently reported in Taiwan. Humidity is an influential factor in tile deterioration but it is more difficult to measure the humidity inside a building structure than the humidity in an indoor environment. Therefore, a separable microsensor was developed in this study to measure the humidity of the cement mortar layer with a thickness of 1.5–2 cm inside the external wall of a building. 3D printing technology is used to produce an encapsulation box that can protect the sensor from damage caused by the concrete and cement mortar. The sensor is proven in this study to be capable of measuring temperature and humidity simultaneously and the measurement results are then used to analyze the influence of humidity on external wall tile deterioration.

  4. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  5. Short-term variations of Icelandic ice cap mass inferred from cGPS coordinate time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compton, Kathleen; Bennett, Richard A.; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún

    2017-01-01

    -based observations of loading and melting within the 1 math formula confidence bounds of the inversion. We identify nonperiodic ice mass changes associated with interannual variability in precipitation and other processes such as increased melting due to reduced ice surface albedo or decreased melting due to ice cap......As the global climate changes, understanding short-term variations in water storage is increasingly important. Continuously operating Global Positioning System (cGPS) stations in Iceland record annual periodic motion—the elastic response to winter accumulation and spring melt seasons—with peak......-to-peak vertical amplitudes over 20 mm for those sites in the Central Highlands. Here for the first time for Iceland, we demonstrate the utility of these cGPS-measured displacements for estimating seasonal and shorter-term ice cap mass changes. We calculate unit responses to each of the five largest ice caps...

  6. A Finite-Time Thermal Cycle Variational Optimization with a Stefan–Boltzmann Law for Three Different Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Chimal-Eguía

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the power of the variational approach for studying the efficiency of thermal engines in the context of the Finite Time Thermodynamics (FTT. Using an endoreversible Curzon–Ahlborn (CA heat engine as a model for actual thermal engines, three different criteria for thermal efficiency were analyzed: maximum power output, ecological function, and maximum power density. By means of this procedure, the performance of the CA heat engine with a nonlinear heat transfer law (the Stefan–Boltzmann law was studied to describe the heat exchanges between the working substance and its thermal reservoirs. The specific case of the Müser engine for all the criteria was analyzed. The results confirmed some previous findings using other procedures and additionally new results for the Müser engine performance were obtained.

  7. Direct evaluation of boson dynamics via finite-temperature time-dependent variation with multiple Davydov states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Wang, Lu; Zhao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in quantum optics allow for exploration of boson dynamics in dissipative many-body systems. However, the traditional descriptions of quantum dissipation using reduced density matrices are unable to capture explicit information of bath dynamics. In this work, efficient evaluation of boson dynamics is demonstrated by combining the multiple Davydov Ansatz with finite-temperature time-dependent variation, going beyond what state-of-the-art density matrix approaches are capable to offer for coupled electron-boson systems. To this end, applications are made to excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems, singlet fission in organic thin films, and circuit quantum electrodynamics in superconducting devices. Thanks to the multiple Davydov Ansatz, our analysis of boson dynamics leads to clear revelation of boson modes strongly coupled to electronic states, as well as in-depth description of polaron creation and destruction in the presence of thermal fluctuations.

  8. Sexual Dimorphism of the Human Tibia through Time: Insights into Shape Variation Using a Surface-Based Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Brzobohatá

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a three-dimensional (3D morphometrical assessment of human tibia sexual dimorphism based on whole bone digital representation. To detect shape-size and shape differences between sexes, we used geometric morphometric tools and colour-coded surface deviation maps. The surface-based methodology enabled analysis of sexually dimorphic features throughout the shaft and articular ends of the tibia. The overall study dataset consisted of 183 3D models of adult tibiae from three Czech population subsets, dating to the early medieval (9-10th century (N = 65, early 20th century (N = 61 and 21st-century (N = 57. The time gap between the chronologically most distant and contemporary datasets was more than 1200 years. The results showed that, in all three datasets, sexual dimorphism was pronounced. There were some sex-dimorphic characteristics common to all three samples, such as tuberosity protrusion, anteriorly bowed shaft and relatively larger articular ends in males. Diachronic comparisons also revealed substantial shape variation related to the most dimorphic area. Male/female distinctions showed a consistent temporal trend regarding the location of dimorphic areas (shifting distally with time, while the maximal deviation between male and female digitized surfaces fluctuated and reached the lowest level in the 21st-century sample. Sex determination on a whole-surface basis yielded the lowest return of correct sex assignment in the 20th-century group, which represented the lowest socioeconomic status. The temporal variation could be attributed to changes in living conditions, the decreasing lower limb loading/labour division in the last 12 centuries having the greatest effect. Overall, the results showed that a surface-based approach is successful for analysing complex long bone geometry.

  9. Singing from North to South: Latitudinal variation in timing of dawn singing under natural and artificial light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Arnaud; Kempenaers, Bart

    2017-10-01

    Animals breeding at northern latitudes experience drastic changes in daily light conditions during the breeding season with decreasing periods of darkness, whereas those living at lower latitudes are exposed to naturally dark nights throughout the year. Nowadays, many animals are also exposed to artificial night lighting (often referred to as light pollution). Animals strongly rely on variation in light levels to time their daily and seasonal behaviour. Previous work on passerine birds showed that artificial night lighting leads to earlier onset of dawn song. However, these studies were carried out at intermediate latitudes with more limited seasonal changes in daylength, and we still lack an understanding of the impact of artificial night lighting in relation to variation in natural light conditions. We investigated the influence of natural and artificial light conditions on the timing of dawn singing in five common songbird species in each of three regions in Europe that differed in natural variation in daylength (northern Finland, 65°N; southern Germany, 48°N; southern Spain, 37°N). In each region, we selected five peri-urban forest sites with and five without street lighting, and we recorded dawn singing at the beginning of the local breeding season. Our results show that the earliest natural singers, that is, European robins (Erithacus rubecula) and common blackbirds (Turdus merula), started dawn singing earlier along with the natural increase in night brightness in Finland, with no additional effects of artificial night lighting. In contrast, the later singers, such as, great tits (Parus major), blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs), showed similar onsets of dawn song relative to sunrise across the season and similar effects of artificial night lighting at all latitudes. Artificial night lighting affected great tits, blue tits and chaffinches even in northern Finland where nights became very bright. Proximate factors such as

  10. Water Collection from Air Humidity in Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahman. Nidal A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kingdom of Bahrain falls geographically in one of the driest regions in the world. Conventional fresh surface water bodies, such as rivers and lakes, are nonexistent and for water consumption, Bahrain prominently relies on the desalination of sea water. This paper presents an ongoing project that is being pursued by a group of student and their advising professors to investigate the viability of extracting water from air humidity. Dehumidifiers have been utilized as water extraction devices. Those devices have been distributed on six areas that were selected based on a rigorous geospatial modeling of historical meteorological data. The areas fall in residential and industrial neighborhoods that are located in the main island and the island of Muharraq. Water samples have been collected three times every week since May of 2016 and the collection process will continue until May of 2017. The collected water samples have been analyzed against numerous variables individually and in combinations including: amount of water collected per hour versus geographical location, amount of water collected per hour versus meteorological factors, suitability of collected water for potable human consumption, detection of air pollution in the areas of collection and the economy of this method of water collection in comparison to other nonconventional methods. An overview of the completed analysis results is presented in this paper.

  11. Effect of relative humidity on the migration of benzophenone from paperboard into the food simulant Tenax and modelling hereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relative humidity on the migration of benzophenone from paperboard into the food simulant Tenax®. Kinetic migration investigations were carried out with three relative humidities in the interval between 39% and >73%. All investigations were...... carried out at a constant temperature of 34°C. It was found that the migration of benzophenone after more than 30 days was 4.8 times higher at a relative humidity of 64%-71%, and 7.3 times higher at a relative humidity of >73%, compared with that at a relative humidity of 39%-49%. Diffusion and partition...... coefficients were derived from the results by using a software for modelling migration in multilayer materials. Both the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient, between paperboard and Tenax®, decrease with increasing relative humidity. The experimental results were correctly modelled only when...

  12. Detecting Inter-Annual Variations in the Phenology of Evergreen Conifers Using Long-Term MODIS Vegetation Index Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsig, Laura; Nichol, Caroline J.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Landis, David R.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Mammarella, Ivan; Levula, Janne; Porcar-Castell, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Long-term observations of vegetation phenology can be used to monitor the response of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change. Satellite remote sensing provides the most efficient means to observe phenological events through time series analysis of vegetation indices such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). This study investigates the potential of a Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), which has been linked to vegetation light use efficiency, to improve the accuracy of MODIS-based estimates of phenology in an evergreen conifer forest. Timings of the start and end of the growing season (SGS and EGS) were derived from a 13-year-long time series of PRI and NDVI based on a MAIAC (multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction) processed MODIS dataset and standard MODIS NDVI product data. The derived dates were validated with phenology estimates from ground-based flux tower measurements of ecosystem productivity. Significant correlations were found between the MAIAC time series and ground-estimated SGS (R (sup 2) equals 0.36-0.8), which is remarkable since previous studies have found it difficult to observe inter-annual phenological variations in evergreen vegetation from satellite data. The considerably noisier NDVI product could not accurately predict SGS, and EGS could not be derived successfully from any of the time series. While the strongest relationship overall was found between SGS derived from the ground data and PRI, MAIAC NDVI exhibited high correlations with SGS more consistently (R (sup 2) is greater than 0.6 in all cases). The results suggest that PRI can serve as an effective indicator of spring seasonal transitions, however, additional work is necessary to confirm the relationships observed and to further explore the usefulness of MODIS PRI for detecting phenology.

  13. Effect of relative humidity on migration of BP from paperboard into a food simulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH).......In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH)....

  14. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

    2013-02-12

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes

  15. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-02-22

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of

  16. Effect of humidity and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, J; Verran, J

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium, with human disease and infection linked to dairy products, seafood, ready-to-eat meat and raw & undercooked meats. Stainless steel is the most common food preparation surface and therefore, it is important to understand how food storage conditions such as surface materials, temperature and relative humidity can affect survival of L. monocytogenes. In this study, survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel was investigated at three temperatures (4, 10 and 21°C), each approx. 11, 50 and 85% humidity. Results indicate that the lower the temperature, the more cells were recovered in all three humidity environments, while medium humidity enhances survival, irrespective of temperature. Lower humidity decreases recovery at all temperatures. These data support the guidance noted above that humidity control is important, and that lower humidity environments are less likely to support retention of viable L. monocytogenes on a stainless steel surface. Understanding survival of potential food-borne pathogens is essential for the safe production and preparation of food. While it has long been 'common knowledge' that relative humidity can affect the growth and survival of micro-organisms, this study systematically describes the survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel under varying humidity and temperatures for the first time. The outcomes from this paper will allow those involved with food manufacture and preparation to make informed judgement on environmental conditions relating to humidity control, which is lacking in the food standards guidelines. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Influence of Air Temperature and Humidity on Dehydration Equilibria and Kinetics of Theophylline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Touil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hygrothermal conditions (air temperature and relative humidity on the dehydration of theophylline monohydrate was investigated. Firstly, the equilibrium states of theophylline were investigated. The data from gravimetric analysis at constant temperature and humidity were reported as desorption isotherms. The PXRD analysis was used to identify the different polymorphic forms of theophylline: the monohydrate, the metastable anhydrate, and the stable anhydrate. Solid-solid phase diagrams for two processing times were proposed. Secondly, the dehydration kinetics were studied. The water content evolutions with time were recorded at several temperatures from 20°C to 80°C and several relative humidities from 4% to 50%. Different mathematical models were used to fit the experimental data. The spatially averaged solution of 2D Fickian transient diffusion equation best represented the water mass loss versus time experimental relationship. The dehydration rate constant was found to increase exponentially with air temperature and to decrease exponentially with air relative humidity.

  18. Cultivar Differences in the Stomatal Characteristics of Cut Roses Grown at High Relative Humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Tapia, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto De Carvalho, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH>85%) during cultivation is known to reduce the vase life of cut roses, but the magnitude of such effect is cultivar dependent. The reasons behind this genotypic variation are not yet known. In this study, the stomatal density and stomatal responses to two closing

  19. In vitro growth of four isolates of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc in the humid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Investigation was carried out on Sclerotium rolfsii isolated from four plant parts on PDA media for differences in the mycelia and sclerotia growth, in the tropical humid lowlands of Southeastern Nigeria. The result reveals that there were variation in the number and size (in diameter) of the sclerotia produced ...

  20. Community variations in population exposure to near-field tsunami hazards as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize population exposure to near-field tsunami threats typically focus on quantifying the number and type of people in tsunami-hazard zones. To develop and prioritize effective risk-reduction strategies, emergency managers also need information on the potential for successful evacuations and how this evacuation potential varies among communities. To improve efforts to properly characterize and differentiate near-field tsunami threats among multiple communities, we assess community variations in population exposure to tsunamis as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety. We focus our efforts on the multiple coastal communities in Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties (State of Washington, USA), where a substantial resident and visitor population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Anisotropic, path-distance modeling is conducted to estimate travel times to safety and results are merged with various population data, including residents, employees, public venues, and dependent-care facilities. Results suggest that there is substantial variability among communities in the number of people that may have insufficient time to evacuate. Successful evacuations may be possible in some communities assuming slow-walking speeds, are plausible in others if travel speeds are increased, and are unlikely in another set of communities given the large distances and short time horizon. Emergency managers can use these results to prioritize the location and determine the most appropriate type of tsunami risk-reduction strategies, such as education and training in areas where evacuations are plausible and vertical-evacuation structures in areas where they are not.

  1. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Jomolhari massif: Variations in timing of syn-collisional metamorphism across western Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Daniele; Warren, Clare J.; Young, David; Roberts, Nick M. W.

    2014-03-01

    Our current understanding of the rates and timescales of mountain-building processes is largely based on information recorded in U-bearing accessory minerals such as monazite, which is found in low abundance but which hosts the majority of the trace element budget. Monazite petrochronology was used to investigate the timing of crustal melting in migmatitic metasedimentary rocks from the Jomolhari massif (NW Bhutan). The samples were metamorphosed at upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions (~ 0.85 GPa, ~ 800 °C), after an earlier High-Pressure stage (P > 1.4 GPa), and underwent partial melting through dehydration melting reactions involving muscovite and biotite. In order to link the timing of monazite growth/dissolution to the pressure-temperature (P-T) evolution of the samples, we identified 'chemical fingerprints' in major and accessory phases that were used to back-trace specific metamorphic reactions. Variations in Eu anomaly and Ti in garnet were linked to the growth and dissolution of major phases (e.g. growth of K-feldspar and dehydration melting of muscovite/biotite). Differences in M/HREE and Y from garnet core to rim were instead related to apatite breakdown and monazite-forming reactions. Chemically zoned monazite crystals reacted multiple times during the metamorphic evolution suggesting that the Jomolhari massif experienced a prolonged high-temperature metamorphic evolution from 36 Ma to 18 Ma, significantly different from the P-T-time path recorded in other portions of the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in Bhutan. Our data demonstrate unequivocally that the GHS in Bhutan consists of units that experienced independent high-grade histories and that were juxtaposed across different tectonic structures during exhumation. The GHS may have been exhumed in response to (pulsed) mid-crustal flow but cannot be considered a coherent block.

  2. Seasonal variation in vegetation water content estimated from proximal sensing and MODIS time series in a Mediterranean Fluxnet site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguren, G.; Martín, M. P.; Nieto, H.; Pacheco-Labrador, J.; Jurdao, S.

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluates three different metrics of vegetation water content estimated from proximal sensing and MODIS satellite imagery: Fuel Moisture Content (FMC), Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT) and Canopy Water Content (CWC). Dry matter (Dm) and Leaf area Index (LAI) were also analyzed in order to connect FMC with EWT and EWT with CWC, respectively. This research took place in a Fluxnet site located in Mediterranean wooded grassland (dehesa) ecosystem in Las Majadas del Tietar (Spain). Results indicated that FMC and EWT showed lower spatial variation than CWC. The spatial variation within the MODIS pixel was not as critical as its temporal trend, so to capture better the variability, fewer plots should be sampled but more times. Due to the high seasonal Dm variability, a constant annual value would not work to predict EWT from FMC. Relative root mean square error (RRMSE) evaluated the performance of nine spectral indices to compute each variable. VARI provided the worst results in all cases. For proximal sensing, GEMI worked best for both FMC (RRMSE = 34.5%) and EWT (RRMSE = 27.43%) while NDII and GVMI performed best for CWC (RRMSE =30.27% and 31.58% respectively). For MODIS data, results were a bit better with EVI as the best predictor for FMC (RRMSE = 33.81%) and CWC (RRMSE = 27.56%) and GEMI for EWT (RRMSE = 24.6%). To explain these differences, proximal sensing measures only grasslands at nadir view angle, but MODIS includes also trees, their shades, and other artifacts at up to 20° view angle. CWC was better predicted than the other two water content variables, probably because CWC depends on LAI, which is highly correlated to the spectral indices. Finally, these empirical methods outperformed FMC and CWC products based on radiative transfer model inversion.

  3. Study of dew water collection in humid tropical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clus, O.; Ortega, P.; Muselli, M.; Milimouk, I.; Beysens, D.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryAn assessment of the potential for dew water to serve as a potable water source during a rainless season in a humid tropical climate was carried out in the Pacific islands of French Polynesia. The climate of these islands, in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations, wind and energy balance, is representative of the climate of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Measurements were obtained at two characteristic sites of this region; a mountainous island (Punaauia, Tahiti Island) and an atoll (Tikehau, Tuamotu Archipelago). Dew was measured daily on a 30° tilted, 1 m 2 plane collector equipped with a thermally insulated radiative foil. In addition, an electronic balance placed at 1 m above the ground with a horizontal 0.16 m 2 condensing plate made of PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (Teflon) was used in Tahiti. Dew volume data, taken during the dry season from 16/5/2005 to 14/10/2005, were correlated with air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and visible plus infrared radiometer measurements. The data were also fitted to a model. Dew formation in such a tropical climate is characterized by high absolute humidity, weak nocturnal temperature drop and strong Trade winds. These winds prevent dew from forming unless protected e.g. by natural vegetal windbreaks. In protected areas, dew can then form with winds as large as 7 m/s. Such strong winds also hamper at night the formation near the ground of a calm and cold air layer with high relative humidity. As the cooling power is lower than in the Mediterranean islands because of the high absolute humidity of the atmosphere, both effects combine to generate modest dew yields. However, dew events are frequent and provide accumulated amounts of water attractive for dew water harvesting. Slight modifications of existing rain collection devices on roofs can enhance dew formation and collection. Dew harvesting thus appears as an attractive possibility to provide the local population with a

  4. Fast-Response and Flexible Nanocrystal-Based Humidity Sensor for Monitoring Human Respiration and Water Evaporation on Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Shinya; Kim, Kwangsoo; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-06-23

    We develop a fast-response and flexible nanocrystal-based humidity sensor for real-time monitoring of human activity: respiration and water evaporation on skin. A silicon-nanocrystal film is formed on a polyimide film by spin-coating the colloidal solution and is used as a flexible and humidity-sensitive material in a humidity sensor. The flexible nanocrystal-based humidity sensor shows a high sensitivity; current through the nanocrystal film changes by 5 orders of magnitude in the relative humidity range of 8-83%. The response/recovery time of the sensor is 40 ms. Thanks to the fast response and recovery time, the sensor can monitor human respiration and water evaporation on skin in real time. Due to the flexibility and the fast response/recovery time, the sensor is promising for application in personal health monitoring as well as environmental monitoring.

  5. Chemistry and kinetics of I2 loss in urine distillate and humidity condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, James E.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Olivadoti, J. T.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved molecular absorption spectrophotometry of iodinated ersatz humidity condensates and iodinated ersatz urine distillates across the UV and visible spectral regions are used to investigate the chemistry and kinetics of I2 loss in urine distillate and humidity condensate. Single contaminant systems at equivalent concentrations are also employed to study rates of iodine. Pseudo-first order rate constants are identified for ersatz contaminant model mixtures and for individual reactive constituents. The second order bimolecular reaction of elemental iodine with formic acid, producing carbon dioxide and iodine anion, is identified as the primary mechanism underlying the decay of residual I2 in ersatz humidity concentrate.

  6. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity...

  7. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air...

  8. Time-of-night variations in the story-like organization of dream experience developed during rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolli, Carlo; Guazzelli, Mario; Bellucci, Claudia; Mazzetti, Michela; Palagini, Laura; Rosenlicht, Nicholas; Feinberg, Irwin

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cycles (2nd/4th) and duration-related (5/10 min) variations in the story-like organization of dream experience elaborated during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Dream reports were analysed using story grammar rules. Reports were provided by those subjects (14 of 22) capable of reporting a dream after each of the four awakenings provoked in 2 consecutive nights during REM sleep of the 2nd and 4th cycles, after periods of either 5 or 10 min, counterbalanced across the nights. Two researchers who were blind as to the sleep condition scored the dream reports independently. The values of the indicators of report length (measured as value of total word count) and of story-like organization of dream reports were matched taking time-of-night (2nd and 4th cycles) and REM duration (5 versus 10 min) as factors. Two-way analyses of variance showed that report length increased significantly in 4th-cycle REM sleep and nearly significantly for longer REM duration, whereas the number of dream-stories per report did not vary. The indices of sequential (number of statements describing the event structure developed in the story) and hierarchical (number of episodes per story) organization increased significantly only in dream-stories reported after 10 min of 4th-cycle REM sleep. These findings indicate that the characteristics of structural organization of dream-stories vary along with time of night, and suggest that the elaboration of a long and complex dream-story requires a fairly long time and the availability of a great amount of cognitive resources to maintain its continuity and coherence. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Total variation based DCE-MRI decomposition by separating lesion from background for time-intensity curve estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zheng, Yuanjie; Liang, Dong; Tang, Pinpin; Ren, Fuquan; Zhang, Lina; Zhao, Zuowei

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to obtain the accurate time intensity curve (TIC) of a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance image (DCE-MRI) by eliminating the normal tissue enhancement and obtaining pure lesion information. The TIC of DCE-MRI is sometimes distorted because of the influence of normal tissue. In this paper, a new tracer-kinetic modeling based on total variation (DC-TV) is proposed to address this problem by decomposing the DCE-MRI into the normal tissue image and the lesion image. As TIC generation is not standardized and a credible program is expected, an accurate TIC generation is presented in this paper. We propose a new tracer-kinetic model DC-TV to decompose the lesion region in breast DCE-MRIs. The original image is decomposed into a normal tissue image and a lesion image to obtain the pure lesion enhancement information. The acquired lesion images are smooth and correspond to the diffusion of the contrast agent in the lesion. The normal tissue image sequences are stable and correspond to the enhanced normal tissue. To speed up the computational process of our convergent algorithm, the split Bregman iteration algorithm is applied. To compare the algorithm results, images generated by decomposed methods without normal tissue constraint based on total variation are compared with those generated by our method. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by the correlation of normal tissue images with the lesion classification accuracy of lesion images. Ninety-eight lesions, including 40 benign and 58 malignant, are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ, tubular carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, hyperplasia, and fibroadenoma, among others. The area under the ROC for the pure lesion enhancement images acquired by DC-TV is greater than that acquired by the original DCE-MRIs. The pure enhancement information from the original breast DCE-MRI lesions can be

  10. Humidity Build-Up in a Typical Electronic Enclosure Exposed to Cycling Conditions and Effect on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    The design of electronic device enclosures plays a major role in determining the humidity build-up inside the device as a response to the varying external humidity. Therefore, the corrosion reliability of electronic devices has direct connection to the enclosure design. This paper describes...... the internal humidity build-up in a typical enclosure prescribed for electronic applications as a function of external humidity conditions and enclosure-related parameters. Investigated parameters include external temperature and humidity conditions, the temperature and time of the internal heating cycle......, thermal mass, and port/opening size. The effect of the internal humidity build-up on corrosion reliability has been evaluated by measuring the leakage current (LC) on interdigitated test comb patterns, which are precontaminated with sodium chloride and placed inside the enclosure. The results showed...

  11. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, James V [Hinsdale, IL; Williams, Clayton W [Chicago, IL

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  12. Silver nanoparticle polymer composite based humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Aoife C; Betts, Anthony J; Cassidy, John F

    2010-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesised by a chemical reduction process in order to produce an aqueous colloidal dispersion. The resulting colloids were then characterised by a combination of UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and the nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 20-22 nm. The Ag/polymer nanocomposites were then applied to platinum interdigital electrodes as sensor coatings and the capability of the resulting sensor as a humidity detector investigated. With the application of 1 V, a current developed which was found to be directly proportional to humidity levels. The sensor gives a reversible, selective and rapid response which is proportional to levels of humidity within the range of 10% RH to 60% RH. An investigation into the mechanism of the sensor's response was conducted and the response was found to correlate well with a second order Langmuir adsorption model.

  13. SYSTEMATIC CENTER-TO-LIMB VARIATION IN MEASURED HELIOSEISMIC TRAVEL TIMES AND ITS EFFECT ON INFERENCES OF SOLAR INTERIOR MERIDIONAL FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Junwei; Nagashima, Kaori; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, A. G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Duvall, T. L. Jr. [Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We report on a systematic center-to-limb variation in measured helioseismic travel times, which must be taken into account for an accurate determination of solar interior meridional flows. The systematic variation, found in time-distance helioseismology analysis using SDO/HMI and SDO/AIA observations, is different in both travel-time magnitude and variation trend for different observables. It is not clear what causes this systematic effect. Subtracting the longitude-dependent east-west travel times, obtained along the equatorial area, from the latitude-dependent north-south travel times, obtained along the central meridian area, gives remarkably similar results for different observables. We suggest this as an effective procedure for removing the systematic center-to-limb variation. The subsurface meridional flows obtained from inversion of the corrected travel times are approximately 10 m s{sup -1} slower than those obtained without removing the systematic effect. The detected center-to-limb variation may have important implications in the derivation of meridional flows in the deep interior and needs to be better understood.

  14. Systematic Center-To-Limb Variation in Measured Helioseismic Travel Times and Its Effect on Inferences of Solar Interior Meridional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junwei; Nagashima, Kaori; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, Alexander; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a systematic center-to-limb variation in measured helioseismic travel times, which must be taken into account for an accurate determination of solar interior meridional flows. The systematic variation, found in time-distance helioseismology analysis using SDO/HMI and SDO/AIA observations, is different in both travel-time magnitude and variation trend for different observables. It is not clear what causes this systematic effect. Subtracting the longitude-dependent east-west travel times, obtained along the equatorial area, from the latitude-dependent north-south travel times, obtained along the central meridian area, gives remarkably similar results for different observables. We suggest this as an effective procedure for removing the systematic center-to-limb variation. The subsurface meridional flows obtained from inversion of the corrected travel times are approximately 10 m s-1 slower than those obtained without removing the systematic effect. The detected center-to-limb variation may have important implications in the derivation of meridional flows in the deep interior and needs to be better understood.

  15. Heat or humidity, which triggers tree phenology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H.; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    An overwhelming number of studies confirm that temperature is the main driver for phenological events such as leafing, flowering or fruit ripening, which was first discovered by Réaumur in 1735. Since then, several additional factors which influence onset dates have been identified, such as length of the chilling period, photoperiod, temperature of the previous autumn, nutrient availability, precipitation, sunshine and genetics (local adaptations). Those are supposed to capture some of the remaining, unexplained variance. But our ability to predict onset dates remains imprecise, and our understanding of how plants sense temperature is vague. From a climate chamber experiment on cuttings of 9 tree species we present evidence that air humidity is an important, but previously overlooked, factor influencing the spring phenology of trees. The date of median leaf unfolding was 7 days earlier at 90% relative humidity compared to 40% relative humidity. A second experiment with cuttings shows that water uptake by above-ground tissue might be involved in the phenological development of trees. A third climate chamber experiment suggests that winter dormancy and chilling might be linked to dehydration processes. Analysis of climate data from several meteorological stations across Germany proves that the increase in air humidity after winter is a reliable signal of spring, i.e. less variable or susceptible to reversal compared to temperature. Finally, an analysis of long-term phenology data reveals that absolute air humidity can even be used as a reliable predictor of leafing dates. Current experimental work tries to elucidate the involved foliar uptake processes by using deuterium oxide marked water and Raman spectroscopy. We propose a new framework, wherein plants' chilling requirements and frost tolerance might be attributed to desiccation processes, while spring development is linked to re-humidification of plant tissue. The influence of air humidity on the spring

  16. The design of multi temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junyu; Xu, Peng; Peng, Zitao; Qiang, Haonan; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is only one monitor of the temperature and humidity in an incubator, which may cause inaccurate or unreliable data, and even endanger the life safety of the baby. In order to solve this problem,we designed a multi-point temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubators. The system uses the STC12C5A60S2 microcontrollers as the sender core chip which is connected to four AM2321 temperature and humidity sensors. We select STM32F103ZET6 core development board as the receiving end,cooperating with Zigbee wireless transmitting and receiving module to realize data acquisition and transmission. This design can realize remote real-time observation data on the computer by communicating with PC via Ethernet. Prototype tests show that the system can effectively collect and display the information of temperature and humidity of multiple incubators at the same time and there are four monitors in each incubator.

  17. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  18. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Graphene Oxide-Based Capacitive Humidity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinfeng; Kang, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Qingyun; Yuan, Chao; Wang, Weijun; Zhao, Yuhang; Zhu, Limin; Lu, Hanwei; Chen, Juying

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a CMOS compatible capacitive humidity sensor structure was designed and fabricated on a 200 mm CMOS BEOL Line. A top Al interconnect layer was used as an electrode with a comb/serpent structure, and graphene oxide (GO) was used as sensing material. XRD analysis was done which shows that GO sensing material has a strong and sharp (002) peak at about 10.278°, whereas graphite has (002) peak at about 26°. Device level CV and IV curves were measured in mini-environments at different relative humidity (RH) level, and saturated salt solutions were used to build these mini-environments. To evaluate the potential value of GO material in humidity sensor applications, a prototype humidity sensor was designed and fabricated by integrating the sensor with a dedicated readout ASIC and display/calibration module. Measurements in different mini-environments show that the GO-based humidity sensor has higher sensitivity, faster recovery time and good linearity performance. Compared with a standard humidity sensor, the measured RH data of our prototype humidity sensor can match well that of the standard product.

  19. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Graphene Oxide-Based Capacitive Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a CMOS compatible capacitive humidity sensor structure was designed and fabricated on a 200 mm CMOS BEOL Line. A top Al interconnect layer was used as an electrode with a comb/serpent structure, and graphene oxide (GO was used as sensing material. XRD analysis was done which shows that GO sensing material has a strong and sharp (002 peak at about 10.278°, whereas graphite has (002 peak at about 26°. Device level CV and IV curves were measured in mini-environments at different relative humidity (RH level, and saturated salt solutions were used to build these mini-environments. To evaluate the potential value of GO material in humidity sensor applications, a prototype humidity sensor was designed and fabricated by integrating the sensor with a dedicated readout ASIC and display/calibration module. Measurements in different mini-environments show that the GO-based humidity sensor has higher sensitivity, faster recovery time and good linearity performance. Compared with a standard humidity sensor, the measured RH data of our prototype humidity sensor can match well that of the standard product.

  20. Sensitive and Fast Humidity Sensor Based on A Redox Conducting Supramolecular Ionic Material for Respiration Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hailong; Zhang, Li; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2017-01-03

    Real-time monitoring of respiratory rate (RR) is highly important for human health, clinical diagnosis, and fundamental scientific research. Exhaled humidity-based RR monitoring has recently attracted increased attention because of its accuracy and portability. Here, we report a new design of an exhaled humidity sensor for the real-time monitoring of the RR based on a synthetic redox conducting supramolecular ionic material (SIM). The humidity-dependent conducting SIM is prepared by ionic self-assembly in aqueous solutions of electroactive 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,10-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl) decane (C10(mim)2). By taking full advantage of the high hygroscopicity and water stability arising from the ionic and hydrophobic interactions between two building blocks (i.e., ABTS and C10(mim)2), the SIM-based humidity sensor exhibits both high sensitivity (less than 0.1% relative humidity) and fast response time (∼37 ms). These excellent properties allow this humidity sensor to noninvasively monitor the RRs of not only humans but also rats that have a much faster RR and much smaller tidal volume than humans. Moreover, this sensor could also be efficiently used for the real-time monitoring of the recovery process of rats from anesthesia.

  1. Configuring calendar variation based on time series regression method for forecasting of monthly currency inflow and outflow in Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Suhartono, Ahmad, Imam Safawi; Rahmawati, Noorgam Ika

    2015-12-01

    Bank Indonesia (BI) as the central bank of Republic Indonesiahas a single overarching objective to establish and maintain rupiah stability. This objective could be achieved by monitoring traffic of inflow and outflow money currency. Inflow and outflow are related to stock and distribution of money currency around Indonesia territory. It will effect of economic activities. Economic activities of Indonesia,as one of Moslem country, absolutely related to Islamic Calendar (lunar calendar), that different with Gregorian calendar. This research aims to forecast the inflow and outflow money currency of Representative Office (RO) of BI Semarang Central Java region. The results of the analysis shows that the characteristics of inflow and outflow money currency influenced by the effects of the calendar variations, that is the day of Eid al-Fitr (moslem holyday) as well as seasonal patterns. In addition, the period of a certain week during Eid al-Fitr also affect the increase of inflow and outflow money currency. The best model based on the value of the smallestRoot Mean Square Error (RMSE) for inflow data is ARIMA model. While the best model for predicting the outflow data in RO of BI Semarang is ARIMAX model or Time Series Regression, because both of them have the same model. The results forecast in a period of 2015 shows an increase of inflow money currency happened in August, while the increase in outflow money currency happened in July.

  2. tavg3_3d_qdt_Cp: MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Specific Humidity, Time average 3-hourly 1.25 x 1.25 degree V5.2.0 (MAT3CPQDT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPQDT or tavg3_3d_qdt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional moisture tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  3. Humidity Detection Using Metal Organic Framework Coated on QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmoji Kosuru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coated with poly-4-vinylpyridine (PVP and metal organic framework HKUST-1 are investigated and compared for humidity sensing. Drop casting method is employed to coat the PVP and HKUST-1 solutions onto the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance. The resonance frequencies of these sensors with varying relative humidity (RH from 22% RH to 69% RH are measured using impedance analysis method. The sensitivity, humidity hysteresis, response, and recovery times of these sensors are studied. The sensitivities of uncoated, PVP, and HKUST-1 coated QCM sensors are 7 Hz, 48 Hz, and 720 Hz, respectively, in the range of 22% RH–69% RH. The extraction of desorption rate and adsorption energy associated with the adsorption and desorption of water molecules on these surfaces reveals that HKUST-1 has better sensing properties than PVP and uncoated QCM sensors. In this work, the HKUST-1 coated QCM is shown to be a promising material for moisture detection.

  4. Application of Humidity Data for Predictions of Influenza Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J.; Thrastarson, H. T.; Yeo, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal influenza outbreaks infect millions of people, cause hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide, and leave an immense economic footprint. Potential forecasting of the timing and intensity of these outbreaks can help mitigation and response efforts (e.g., the management and organization of vaccines, drugs and other resources). Absolute (or specific) humidity has been identified as an important driver of the seasonal behavior of influenza outbreaks in temperate regions. Building upon this result, we incorporate humidity data from both NASA's AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder) instrument and ERA-Interim re-analysis into a SIRS (Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) type numerical epidemiological model, comprising a prediction system for influenza outbreaks. Data for influenza activity is obtained from sources such as Google Flu Trends and the CDC (Center for Disease Control) and used for comparison and assimilation. The accuracy and limitations of the prediction system are tested with hindcasts of outbreaks in the United States for the years 2005-2015. Our results give support to the hypothesis that local weather conditions drive the seasonality of influenza in temperate regions. The implementation of influenza forecasts that make use of NCEP humidity forecasts is also discussed.

  5. Humidity Detection Using Metal Organic Framework Coated on QCM

    KAUST Repository

    Kosuru, Lakshmoji

    2016-06-28

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) coated with poly-4-vinylpyridine (PVP) and metal organic framework HKUST-1 are investigated and compared for humidity sensing. Drop casting method is employed to coat the PVP and HKUST-1 solutions onto the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance. The resonance frequencies of these sensors with varying relative humidity (RH) from 22% RH to 69% RH are measured using impedance analysis method. The sensitivity, humidity hysteresis, response, and recovery times of these sensors are studied. The sensitivities of uncoated, PVP, and HKUST-1 coated QCM sensors are 7 Hz, 48 Hz, and 720 Hz, respectively, in the range of 22% RH–69% RH. The extraction of desorption rate and adsorption energy associated with the adsorption and desorption of water molecules on these surfaces reveals that HKUST-1 has better sensing properties than PVP and uncoated QCM sensors. In this work, the HKUST-1 coated QCM is shown to be a promising material for moisture detection.

  6. Overview and sample applications of SMILES and Odin-SMR retrievals of upper tropospheric humidity and cloud ice mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrievals of cloud ice mass and humidity from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES and the Odin-SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer limb sounder are presented and example applications of the data are given. SMILES data give an unprecedented view of the diurnal variation of cloud ice mass. Mean regional diurnal cycles are reported and compared to some global climate models. Some improvements in the models regarding diurnal timing and relative amplitude were noted, but the models' mean ice mass around 250 hPa is still low compared to the observations. The influence of the ENSO (El Niño–Southern Oscillation state on the upper troposphere is demonstrated using 12 years of Odin-SMR data. The same retrieval scheme is applied for both sensors, and gives low systematic differences between the two data sets. A special feature of this Bayesian retrieval scheme, of Monte Carlo integration type, is that values are produced for all measurements but for some atmospheric states retrieved values only reflect a priori assumptions. However, this "all-weather" capability allows a direct statistical comparison to model data, in contrast to many other satellite data sets. Another strength of the retrievals is the detailed treatment of "beam filling" that otherwise would cause large systematic biases for these passive cloud ice mass retrievals. The main retrieval inputs are spectra around 635/525 GHz from tangent altitudes below 8/9 km for SMILES/Odin-SMR, respectively. For both sensors, the data cover the upper troposphere between 30° S and 30° N. Humidity is reported as both relative humidity and volume mixing ratio. The vertical coverage of SMILES is restricted to a single layer, while Odin-SMR gives some profiling capability between 300 and 150 hPa. Ice mass is given as the partial ice water path above 260 hPa, but for Odin-SMR ice water content, estimates are also provided. Besides a smaller contrast between most dry and wet

  7. The influence of humidity, temperature, and oral contraceptive in tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Raul A. R. C.; Ribeiro, Tânia L. C.; Moreira, Sandra M. B.; Baptista, António M. G.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain whether the quantity and quality of tear and eye subjective comfort are influenced by the temperature, humidity and oral Contraceptives Taking or Non-taking (CTNT). Forty-one students, females, from the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, aged (mean+/-1standard deviation) of 21.51+/-1.85 years, ranging from 20 to 30 years, participated in this study. The McMonnies Questionnaire (MMQ), Break Up Time (BUT) and Phenol Red Test (PRT) were accessed between 14-17 hours in four sets of visits throughout the year: Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4. The PRT and BUT values (mean+/-1standard deviation) for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 were respectively 23.88+/-6.50mm, 22.29+/-8.00mm, 23.61+/-6.75mm, 22.88+/-7.00mm and 6.02+/-1.58s, 5.62+/-1.22s, 5.23+/-0.88s, 5.53+/-1. 42s. The MMQ scores for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 ranged from 2-13, 2-15, 1-14 and 2-14 with medians of 6, 7, 6 and 6, respectively. The influence of temperature, humidity and CTNT on PRT, BUT and MMQ were evaluated using generalized linear mixed model. For BUT and MMQ statistical significant effects were found regarding temperature and humidity. The temperature and humidity influenced the tear quality and subjective comfort but did not influence the tear quantity. The CTNT did not influence tear quantity, quality or subjective eye comfort.

  8. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Online Decorrelation of Humidity and Temperature in Chemical Sensors for Continuous Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, Ramon; Fonollosa, Jordi; Rulkov, Nikolai F; Rodriguez-Lujan, Irene

    2016-01-01

    A method for online decorrelation of chemical sensor readings from the effects of environmental humidity and temperature variations is proposed. The goal is to improve the accuracy of electronic nose measurements for continuous monitoring by processing data from simultaneous readings of environmental humidity and temperature. The electronic nose setup built for this study included eight different metal-oxide sensors, temperature and humidity sensors with a wireless communication link to PC. This wireless electronic nose was used to monitor air for two years in the residence of one of the authors and collected data continuously during 510 full days with a sampling rate of 2 samples per second. To estimate the effects of variations in air humidity and temperature on the chemical sensors readings, we used a standard energy band model for an n-type metal-oxide sensor. The main assumption of the model is that variations in sensor conductivity can be expressed as a nonlinear function of changes in the semiconductor...

  10. PSYCRODATA: a software which calculates the air humidity characteristics and relate its with the variations of the gamma environmental bottom; PSYCRODATA: software que calcula las caracteristicas de la humedad del aire y las relaciona con las variaciones del fondo gamma ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso A, D.; Dominguez L, O.; Ramos V, O.; Caveda R, C.A.; Capote F, E. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa, C.P. 11300, A.P. 6195, C.P. 10600 La Habana (Cuba); Dominguez G, A.; Valdes S, E. [Instituto Superior de Ciencias y Tecnicas Aplicadas (INSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Rodriguez V, E. [Instituto de Meteorologia (INSMET), La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: lola@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The computer tool 'Psycrodata', able to calculate the values of those characteristics of the humidity of the air starting from the measurements carried out of humidity and temperature in the post of occident of the National Net of Environmental Radiological Surveillance was obtained. Among the facilities that 'Psycrodata' toasts it is the keeping the obtained information in a database facilitating the making of reports. For another part the possibility of selection of different approaches for the calculation and the introduction of the psicrometric coefficient to use, its make that each station can have the suitable psicrometric chart keeping in mind the instrumentation and the characteristics of the area of location of the same one. Also, can have facilities to import text files for later on to be plotted, it allowed to correlate the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation, besides of the temperature and the humidity, with the tension of the water steam, the temperature of the dew point and the saturation deficit. (Author)

  11. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  12. Recent Developments in Fiber Optics Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbe, Joaquin; Corres, Jesus M.; Arregui, Francisco J.; Matias, Ignacio R.

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of applications such as health, human comfort, agriculture, food processing and storage, and electronic manufacturing, among others, require fast and accurate measurement of humidity. Sensors based on optical fibers present several advantages over electronic sensors and great research efforts have been made in recent years in this field. The present paper reports the current trends of optical fiber humidity sensors. The evolution of optical structures developed towards humidity sensing, as well as the novel materials used for this purpose, will be analyzed. Well-known optical structures, such as long-period fiber gratings or fiber Bragg gratings, are still being studied towards an enhancement of their sensitivity. Sensors based on lossy mode resonances constitute a platform that combines high sensitivity with low complexity, both in terms of their fabrication process and the equipment required. Novel structures, such as resonators, are being studied in order to improve the resolution of humidity sensors. Moreover, recent research on polymer optical fibers suggests that the sensitivity of this kind of sensor has not yet reached its limit. Therefore, there is still room for improvement in terms of sensitivity and resolution. PMID:28422074

  13. Recent Developments in Fiber Optics Humidity Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbe, Joaquin; Corres, Jesus M; Arregui, Francisco J; Matias, Ignacio R

    2017-04-19

    A wide range of applications such as health, human comfort, agriculture, food processing and storage, and electronic manufacturing, among others, require fast and accurate measurement of humidity. Sensors based on optical fibers present several advantages over electronic sensors and great research efforts have been made in recent years in this field. The present paper reports the current trends of optical fiber humidity sensors. The evolution of optical structures developed towards humidity sensing, as well as the novel materials used for this purpose, will be analyzed. Well-known optical structures, such as long-period fiber gratings or fiber Bragg gratings, are still being studied towards an enhancement of their sensitivity. Sensors based on lossy mode resonances constitute a platform that combines high sensitivity with low complexity, both in terms of their fabrication process and the equipment required. Novel structures, such as resonators, are being studied in order to improve the resolution of humidity sensors. Moreover, recent research on polymer optical fibers suggests that the sensitivity of this kind of sensor has not yet reached its limit. Therefore, there is still room for improvement in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  14. Characterization and humidity sensing properties of the sensor based on Na2Ti3O7 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shenping

    2014-06-01

    Na2Ti3O7 nanotubes was synthesized by a hydrothermal method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Then the material was coated on Al2O3 ceramic substrate to fabricate humidity sensors using Ag-Pd as interdigitated electrodes. The sensor shows high humidity sensitivity and quick response-recovery time. The impedance changes about five orders of magnitude within humidity range from 11% to 95% relative humidity (RH). At the frequency of 100 Hz, the response time is 2 s and recovery time is 4 s, and the maximum hysteresis is less than 3% RH. Moreover, complex impedance property at different RH was investigated to study sensing mechanism. The results indicate the potential applications of Na2Ti3O7 nanotubes for fabricating high-performance humidity sensors.

  15. Ambient humidity and the skin: the impact of air humidity in healthy and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, N; Gawkrodger, D J

    2016-08-01

    Humidity, along with other climatic factors such as temperature and ultraviolet radiation, can have an important impact on the skin. Limited data suggest that external humidity influences the water content of the stratum corneum. An online literature search was conducted through Pub-Med using combinations of the following keywords: skin, skin disease, humidity, dermatoses, dermatitis, eczema, and mist. Publications included in this review were limited to (i) studies in humans or animals, (ii) publications showing relevance to the field of dermatology, (iii) studies published in English and (iv) publications discussing humidity as an independent influence on skin function. Studies examining environmental factors as composite influences on skin health are only included where the impact of humidity on the skin is also explored in isolation of other environmental factors. A formal systematic review was not feasible for this topic due to the heterogeneity of the available research. Epidemiological studies indicated an increase in eczema with low internal (indoors) humidity and an increase in eczema with external high humidity. Other studies suggest that symptoms of dry skin appear with low humidity internal air-conditioned environments. Murine studies determined that low humidity caused a number of changes in the skin, including the impairment of the desquamation process. Studies in humans demonstrated a reduction in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) (a measure of the integrity of the skin's barrier function) with low humidity, alterations in the water content in the stratum corneum, decreased skin elasticity and increased roughness. Intervention with a humidifying mist increased the water content of the stratum corneum. Conversely, there is some evidence that low humidity conditions can actually improve the barrier function of the skin. Ambient relative humidity has an impact on a range of parameters involved in skin health but the literature is inconclusive. Further

  16. Sticky gecko feet: the role of temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Lopez, Stephanie; Ge, Liehui; Hagan, Emily; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-05-14

    Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12 degrees C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32 degrees C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics.

  17. Sticky gecko feet: the role of temperature and humidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Niewiarowski

    Full Text Available Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12 degrees C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32 degrees C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics.

  18. Sticky Gecko Feet: The Role of Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Lopez, Stephanie; Ge, Liehui; Hagan, Emily; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12°C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32°C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics. PMID:18478106

  19. A Radiosonde Using a Humidity Sensor Array with a Platinum Resistance Heater and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and implementation of a radiosonde which can measure the meteorological temperature, humidity, pressure, and other atmospheric data. The system is composed of a CPU, microwave module, temperature sensor, pressure sensor and humidity sensor array. In order to effectively solve the humidity sensor condensation problem due to the low temperatures in the high altitude environment, a capacitive humidity sensor including four humidity sensors to collect meteorological humidity and a platinum resistance heater was developed using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS technology. A platinum resistance wire with 99.999% purity and 0.023 mm in diameter was used to obtain the meteorological temperature. A multi-sensor data fusion technique was applied to process the atmospheric data. Static and dynamic experimental results show that the designed humidity sensor with platinum resistance heater can effectively tackle the sensor condensation problem, shorten response times and enhance sensitivity. The humidity sensor array can improve measurement accuracy and obtain a reliable initial meteorological humidity data, while the multi-sensor data fusion technique eliminates the uncertainty in the measurement. The radiosonde can accurately reflect the meteorological changes.

  20. A radiosonde using a humidity sensor array with a platinum resistance heater and multi-sensor data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunbo; Luo, Yi; Zhao, Wenjie; Shang, Chunxue; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Yinsheng

    2013-07-12

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a radiosonde which can measure the meteorological temperature, humidity, pressure, and other atmospheric data. The system is composed of a CPU, microwave module, temperature sensor, pressure sensor and humidity sensor array. In order to effectively solve the humidity sensor condensation problem due to the low temperatures in the high altitude environment, a capacitive humidity sensor including four humidity sensors to collect meteorological humidity and a platinum resistance heater was developed using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) technology. A platinum resistance wire with 99.999% purity and 0.023 mm in diameter was used to obtain the meteorological temperature. A multi-sensor data fusion technique was applied to process the atmospheric data. Static and dynamic experimental results show that the designed humidity sensor with platinum resistance heater can effectively tackle the sensor condensation problem, shorten response times and enhance sensitivity. The humidity sensor array can improve measurement accuracy and obtain a reliable initial meteorological humidity data, while the multi-sensor data fusion technique eliminates the uncertainty in the measurement. The radiosonde can accurately reflect the meteorological changes.

  1. Paleosecular variation and time-averaged field analysis over the last 10 Ma from a new global dataset (PSV10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, G.; Johnson, C. L.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jarboe, N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous paleosecular variation (PSV) and time-averaged field (TAF) models draw on compilations of paleodirectional data that lack equatorial and high latitude sites and use latitudinal virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) cutoffs designed to remove transitional field directions. We present a new selected global dataset (PSV10) of paleodirectional data spanning the last 10 Ma. We include all results calculated with modern laboratory methods, regardless of site VGP colatitude, that meet statistically derived selection criteria. We exclude studies that target transitional field states or identify significant tectonic effects, and correct for any bias from serial correlation by averaging directions from sequential lava flows. PSV10 has an improved global distribution compared with previous compilations, comprising 1519 sites from 71 studies. VGP dispersion in PSV10 varies with latitude, exhibiting substantially higher values in the southern hemisphere than at corresponding northern latitudes. Inclination anomaly estimates at many latitudes are within error of an expected GAD field, but significant negative anomalies are found at equatorial and mid-northern latitudes. Current PSV models Model G and TK03 do not fit observed PSV or TAF latitudinal behavior in PSV10, or subsets of normal and reverse polarity data, particularly for southern hemisphere sites. Attempts to fit these observations with simple modifications to TK03 showed slight statistical improvements, but still exceed acceptable errors. The root-mean-square misfit of TK03 (and subsequent iterations) is substantially lower for the normal polarity subset of PSV10, compared to reverse polarity data. Two-thirds of data in PSV10 are normal polarity, most which are from the last 5 Ma, so we develop a new TAF model using this subset of data. We use the resulting TAF model to explore whether new statistical PSV models can better describe our new global compilation.

  2. Determination of safe mud window considering time-dependent variations of temperature and pore pressure: Analytical and numerical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Gholilou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wellbore stability is a key to have a successful drilling operation. Induced stresses are the main factors affecting wellbore instability and associated problems in drilling operations. These stresses are significantly impacted by pore pressure variation and thermal stresses in the field. In order to address wellbore instability problems, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of rock–fluid interaction with respect to thermal and mechanical aspects. In order to understand the induced stresses, different mathematical models have been developed. In this study, the field equations governing the problem have been derived based on the thermo-poroelastic theory and solved analytically in Laplace domain. The results are transferred to time domain using Fourier inverse method. Finite difference method is also utilized to validate the results. Pore pressure and temperature distributions around the wellbore have been focused and simulated. Next, induced radial and tangential stresses for different cases of cooling and heating of formation are compared. In addition, the differences between thermo-poroelastic and poroelastic models in situation of permeable and impermeable wellbores are described. It is observed that cooling and pore pressure distribution reinforce the induced radial stress. Whereas cooling can be a tool to control and reduce tangential stress induced due to invasion of drilling fluid. In the next step, safe mud window is obtained using Mohr-Coulomb, Mogi-Coulomb, and modified Lade failure criteria for different inclinations. Temperature and pore pressure distributions do not change the minimum allowable wellbore pressure significantly. However, upper limit of mud window is sensitive to induced stresses and it seems vital to consider changes in temperature and pore pressure to avoid any failures. The widest and narrowest mud windows are proposed by modified Lade and Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, respectively.

  3. Paper as Active Layer in Inkjet-Printed Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cristina; Olkkonen, Juuso; Passoja, Soile; Smolander, Maria

    2017-01-01

    An inkjet-printed relative humidity sensor based on capacitive changes which responds to different humidity levels in the environment is presented in this work. The inkjet-printed silver interdigitated electrodes configuration on the paper substrate allowed for the fabrication of a functional proof-of-concept of the relative humidity sensor, by using the paper itself as a sensing material. The sensor sensitivity in terms of relative humidity changes was calculated to be around 2 pF/RH %. The response time against different temperature steps from 3 to 85 °C was fairly constant (about 4–5 min), and it was considered fast for the aimed application, a smart label. PMID:28640182

  4. Variation in mode of physical activity by ethnicity and time since immigration: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardern Chris I

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity (PA levels are known to be significantly lower in ethnic minority and immigrant groups living in North America and Europe compared to the general population. While there has been an increase in the number of interventions targeting these groups, little is known about their preferred modes of PA. Methods Using three cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycles 1.1, 2.1, 3.1; 2000-2005, n = 400,055 this investigation determined PA preferences by self-ascribed ethnicity (White, South Asian, South-East Asian, Blacks, Latin American, West Asian, Aboriginal persons and Other and explored variation in PA preference across time since immigration categories (non-immigrant, established immigrant [> 10 years], and recent immigrant [≤ 10 years]. PA preferences over the past three months were collapsed into eight categories: walking, endurance, recreation, sports, conventional exercise, active commuting, and no PA. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of participating in each PA across ethnicity and time since immigration compared to Whites and non-immigrants, respectively. Results Compared to Whites, all other ethnic groups were more likely to report no PA and were less likely to engage in walking, with the exception of Aboriginal persons (OR: 1.25, CI: 1.16-1.34. Further, all ethnic groups including Aboriginal persons were less likely to engage in endurance, recreation, and sport activities, but more likely to have an active commute compared to Whites. Recent and established immigrants were more likely to have an active commute and no PA, but a lower likelihood of walking, sports, endurance, and recreation activities than non-immigrants. Conclusion Ethnic minority groups and immigrants in Canada tend to participate in conventional forms of exercise compared to Whites and non-immigrants and are less likely to engage in endurance exercise, recreation activities, and sports. Health

  5. Variation in mode of physical activity by ethnicity and time since immigration: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Shilpa; Meisner, Brad A; Ardern, Chris I

    2010-10-14

    Physical activity (PA) levels are known to be significantly lower in ethnic minority and immigrant groups living in North America and Europe compared to the general population. While there has been an increase in the number of interventions targeting these groups, little is known about their preferred modes of PA. Using three cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycles 1.1, 2.1, 3.1; 2000-2005, n = 400,055) this investigation determined PA preferences by self-ascribed ethnicity (White, South Asian, South-East Asian, Blacks, Latin American, West Asian, Aboriginal persons and Other) and explored variation in PA preference across time since immigration categories (non-immigrant, established immigrant [> 10 years], and recent immigrant [≤ 10 years]). PA preferences over the past three months were collapsed into eight categories: walking, endurance, recreation, sports, conventional exercise, active commuting, and no PA. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of participating in each PA across ethnicity and time since immigration compared to Whites and non-immigrants, respectively. Compared to Whites, all other ethnic groups were more likely to report no PA and were less likely to engage in walking, with the exception of Aboriginal persons (OR: 1.25, CI: 1.16-1.34). Further, all ethnic groups including Aboriginal persons were less likely to engage in endurance, recreation, and sport activities, but more likely to have an active commute compared to Whites. Recent and established immigrants were more likely to have an active commute and no PA, but a lower likelihood of walking, sports, endurance, and recreation activities than non-immigrants. Ethnic minority groups and immigrants in Canada tend to participate in conventional forms of exercise compared to Whites and non-immigrants and are less likely to engage in endurance exercise, recreation activities, and sports. Health promotion initiatives targeting ethnic and immigrant groups at high

  6. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...... than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes....

  7. A geochemical examination of humidity cell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maest, Ann; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Humidity cell tests (HCTs) are long-term (20 to >300 weeks) leach tests that are considered by some to be the among the most reliable geochemical characterization methods for estimating the leachate quality of mined materials. A number of modifications have been added to the original HCT method, but the interpretation of test results varies widely. We suggest that the HCTs represent an underutilized source of geochemical data, with a year-long test generating approximately 2500 individual chemical data points. The HCT concentration peaks and valleys can be thought of as a “chromatogram” of reactions that may occur in the field, whereby peaks in concentrations are associated with different geochemical processes, including sulfate salt dissolution, sulfide oxidation, and dissolution of rock-forming minerals, some of which can neutralize acid. Some of these reactions occur simultaneously, some do not, and geochemical modeling can be used to help distinguish the dominant processes. Our detailed examination, including speciation and inverse modeling, of HCTs from three projects with different geology and mineralization shows that rapid sulfide oxidation dominates over a limited period of time that starts between 40 and 200 weeks of testing. The applicability of laboratory tests results to predicting field leachate concentrations, loads, or rates of reaction has not been adequately demonstrated, although early flush releases and rapid sulfide oxidation rates in HCTs should have some relevance to field conditions. Knowledge of possible maximum solute concentrations is needed to design effective treatment and mitigation approaches. Early flush and maximum sulfide oxidation results from HCTs should be retained and used in environmental models. Factors that complicate the use of HCTs include: sample representation, time for microbial oxidizers to grow, sample storage before testing, geochemical reactions that add or remove constituents, and the HCT results chosen for use

  8. Influence of Ambient Humidity on the Voltage Response of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kruusamäe, Karl; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-03-31

    Electrical potential based on ion migration exists not only in natural systems but also in ionic polymer materials. In order to investigate the influence of ambient humidity on voltage response, classical Au-Nafion IPMC was chosen as the reference sample. Voltage response under a bending deformation was measured in two ways: first, continuous measurement of voltage response in the process of absorption and desorption of water to study the tendency of voltage variation at all water states; second, measurements at multiple fixed ambient humidity levels to characterize the process of voltage response quantitatively. Ambient humidity influences the voltage response mainly by varying water content in ionic polymer. Under a step bending, the amplitude of initial voltage peak first increases and then decreases as the ambient humidity and the inherent water content decrease. This tendency is explained semiquantitatively by mass storage capacity related to the stretchable state of the Nafion polymer network. Following the initial peak, the voltage shows a slow decay to a steady state, which is first characterized in this paper. The relative voltage decay during the steady state always decreases as the ambient humidity is lowered. It is ascribed to progressive increase of the ratio between the water molecules in the cation hydration shell to the free water. Under sinusoidal mechanical bending excitation in the range of 0.1-10 Hz, the voltage magnitude increases with frequency at high ambient humidity but decreases with frequency at low ambient humidity. The relationship is mainly controlled by the voltage decay effect and the response speed.

  9. Inspired gas humidity and temperature during mechanical ventilation with the Stephanie ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preo, Bianca L; Shadbolt, Bruce; Todd, David A

    2013-11-01

    To measure inspired gas humidity and temperature delivered by a Stephanie neonatal ventilator with variations in (i) circuit length; (ii) circuit insulation; (iii) proximal airway temperature probe (pATP) position; (iv) inspiratory temperature (offset); and (v) incubator temperatures. Using the Stephanie neonatal ventilator, inspired gas humidity and temperature were measured during mechanical ventilation at the distal inspiratory limb and 3 cm down the endotracheal tube. Measurements were made with a long or short circuit; with or without insulation of the inspiratory limb; proximal ATP (pATP) either within or external to the incubator; at two different inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5) and 39(-2.0)°C; and at three different incubator temperatures of 32, 34.5, and 37°C. Long circuits produced significantly higher inspired humidity than short circuits at all incubator settings, while only at 32°C was the inspired temperature higher. In the long circuits, insulation further improved the inspired humidity especially at 39(-2.0)°C, while only at incubator temperatures of 32 and 37°C did insulation significantly improve inspired temperature. Positioning the pATP outside the incubator did not result in higher inspired humidity but did significantly improve inspired temperature. An inspiratory temperature (offset) of 39(-2.0)°C delivered significantly higher inspired humidity and temperature than the 37(-0.5)°C especially when insulated. Long insulated Stephanie circuits should be used for neonatal ventilation when the infant is nursed in an incubator. The recommended inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5)°C produced inspired humidity and temperature below international standards, and we suggest an increase to 39(-2.0)°C. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions.

  11. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium relative humidity values for a number of the most commonly used precipitants in biological macromolecule crystallisation have been measured using a new humidity control device. A simple argument in statistical mechanics demonstrates that the saturated vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution (Raoult's Law). The same argument can be extended to the case where solvent and solute molecules are of different size.

  12. Influence of temperature and humidity on the detection of benzene vapor by piezoelectric crystal sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Chan-Hyon; Yun, Jong-Ho; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The effects of temperature and humidity on the estimation of air pollution by benzene by using the piezoelectric crystal gas sensor were studied. Polyvinylchloride films were used as substrate for the immobilization of polymethylphenylsiloxane onto the electrode surface of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer consisting of polymethylphenylsiloxane and polyvinylchloride was used for real-time monitoring of benzene, one of the atmospheric pollutants. According to the humidity from 35% to 75%, the upper limit of detection by this sensor was decreased and the response time and frequency recovery time for detecting benzene were long. On the other hand, as increasing the temperature, the response time and the frequency recovery time of the sensor were short, but its sensitivity got worse. The models for the correlation between the benzene concentration and temperature (or humidity) were presented.

  13. Temperature Effect on Capacitive Humidity Sensors and its Compensation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the study of the effect of temperature on different capacitive humidity sensors used in practice. Capacitance of the humidity sensor, which is a function of concentration of water vapor, also depends on ambient temperature. This variation of ambient temperature causes error in the performance of sensor outputs and its compensation is essential. In this paper, we have used an artificial neural network to compensate the effect of ambient temperature error. The proposed artificial neural network technique is based on inverse model of the sensor. The technique is applicable for compensation of linear or nonlinear temperature effect of humidity sensor. It can also compensate the nonlinearity of the capacitive humidity response which is an issue for all most all types of humidity sensor. Our simulation studies show the sensor output and artificial neural network model output matches closely. Even though sensor characteristics change with temperature, the proposed model performs well irrespective of any change in temperature. It can be extended for the temperature compensation of other sensors. The maximum error for nonlinearity using the ANN technique are 0.2 % and temperature error of 0.08 % for temperature range between 10 0C to 60 0C of Sensor 3 and 0.01 % for temperature range between 25 0C to 85 0C of Sensor 4 respectively.

  14. Does inter-plant variation in sprouting time affect the growth/reproduction trade-off and herbivory in a tropical tree species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilio Fagundes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The timing of phenological events varies within and among populations, affecting the performance of individual plants differently. We evaluated the effects of relative variation in sprouting time on the display of reproductive events, vegetative growth and herbivory in Copaifera langsdorffii (Fabaceae. A total of 93 trees of C. langsdorffii was monitored daily to determine their sprouting time. We collected ten terminal branches of each plant to evaluate vegetative growth, production of defense compounds and insect herbivore damage. The sprouting time for the studied population lasted 67 days. Variation in sprouting time did not affect the probability of plants to enter the reproductive stage. Plants that entered the reproductive stage showed greater vegetative biomass. Variation in sprouting time had a negative relationship with branch growth and a positive relationship with the number of leaflets. Leaf phenol concentration did not vary in relation to sprouting time or plant phenology, but herbivory was higher in plants that sprouted later. The relationships among plant sprouting time, vegetative development and display of reproductive stage in C. langsdorffii are discussed. The results of this study also suggest that early sprouting prior to the rainy season is a strategy used by C. langsdorffii to escape herbivores attacks.

  15. Self-powered humidity sensor based on graphene oxide composite film intercalated by poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Taewoo; Bae, Kyoung Min; Seo, Sung Min; Kim, Jong-Man; Kang, Tae June; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2014-06-11

    This Research Article reports self-powered humidity sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-intercalated GO composite films used as the humidity-responsive dielectrics. A hydrophilic and electrically-insulating PSS polymer was used as an intercalant between the individual GO platelets to enhance the water permeation characteristics. Capacitive-type humidity sensors fabricated by forming metal electrodes on both sides of the GO and GO-PSS films were installed into the charge pumping system, which can produce a voltage output as a response to humidity sensing. While both sensors based on GO and GO-PSS dielectrics responded stably and reversibly to the changes in RH, the GO-PSS sensor showed enhanced sensing responses compared to the GO sensor, providing ∼5.6 times higher voltage output and 3 times faster responses in humidity sensing.

  16. Weekly variation in health-care quality by day and time of admission: a nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study of acute stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Cloud, Geoffrey C; James, Martin A; Hemingway, Harry; Paley, Lizz; Stewart, Kevin; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2016-07-09

    Studies in many health systems have shown evidence of poorer quality health care for patients admitted on weekends or overnight than for those admitted during the week (the so-called weekend effect). We postulated that variation in quality was dependent on not only day, but also time, of admission, and aimed to describe the pattern and magnitude of variation in the quality of acute stroke care across the entire week. We did this nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study using data from the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme. We included all adult patients (aged >16 years) admitted to hospital with acute stroke (ischaemic or primary intracerebral haemorrhage) in England and Wales between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Our outcome measure was 30 day post-admission survival. We estimated adjusted odds ratios for 13 indicators of acute stroke-care quality by fitting multilevel multivariable regression models across 42 4-h time periods per week. The study cohort comprised 74,307 patients with acute stroke admitted to 199 hospitals. Care quality varied across the entire week, not only between weekends and weekdays, with different quality measures showing different patterns and magnitudes of temporal variation. We identified four patterns of variation: a diurnal pattern (thrombolysis, brain scan within 12 h, brain scan within 1 h, dysphagia screening), a day of the week pattern (stroke physician assessment, nurse assessment, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and assessment of communication and swallowing by a speech and language therapist), an off-hours pattern (door-to-needle time for thrombolysis), and a flow pattern whereby quality changed sequentially across days (stroke-unit admission within 4 h). The largest magnitude of variation was for door-to-needle time within 60 min (range in quality 35-66% [16/46-232/350]; coefficient of variation 18·2). There was no difference in 30 day survival between weekends and weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1

  17. Variation in ventilation time after coronary artery bypass grafting: an analysis from the society of thoracic surgeons adult cardiac surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; O'Brien, Sean M; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Ferraris, Victor A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M

    2013-09-01

    Short postoperative ventilation times are accepted as a marker of quality. This analysis assesses center level variation in postoperative ventilation time in a subset of patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 2009 and 2010, 325,129 patients in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database underwent isolated CABG. Patients were excluded if they were intubated before entering the operating room, required ventilation for greater than 24 hours, or had missing data on key covariates. The final study cohort was 274,231 isolated CABG patients from 1,008 centers. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to assess between-center variation in ventilation time and to explore the effect of center-level covariates. Analyses were performed with and without adjusting for case mix. After adjusting for case mix, the ratio of median ventilator time at the 90th percentile of the center-level distribution compared with the tenth percentile was 9.0:5.0=1.8 (95% credible interval: 1.79 to 1.85). This ratio illustrates the scale of between-center differences: centers above the 90th percentile have a ventilation time of at least 1.8 times that of centers below the tenth percentile. Smaller hospital volume, presence of a residency program, and some census regions were associated with longer ventilation times. After adjustment for severity of illness, substantial inter-center variation exists in postoperative ventilation time in this subset of patients undergoing isolated CABG. This finding represents an opportunity for multi-institutional quality improvement initiatives designed to limit variations in ventilator management and achieve the shortest possible ventilation times for all patients, thus benefiting both clinical outcomes and resource utilization. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A quantitative reconstruction of changes in relative humidity during the Younger Dryas in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, O.; Kahmen, A.; Brauer, A.; Sachse, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroclimatic changes have a profound effect on terrestrial ecosystems from regional to continental scales. However, past hydrological changes linked to abrupt climate shifts and their effect on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood due to the lack of direct quantitative hydrological reconstructions. In addition, most paleoclimate proxies record the environmental response to hydrological variations, such as vegetation changes inferred by changes in pollen abundance, rather than hydroclimatic change itself. Over the last decade hydrogen isotope ratios (δD value) of lipid biomarkers have emerged as a novel and direct hydrological proxy, since it aims to reconstruct the δD values of the water source used by photosynthetic organisms. However, the hydrogen isotope ratio of source water (such as precipitation) is an integrated signal of condensation temperature, moisture pathway, precipitation amount and evaporation. As such, it is difficult to separate a single parameter, for example relative humidity, required for a true quantitative interpretation. Here we present a novel approach to quantify changes in relative humidity (Δrh) based on the hydrogen isotope composition of terrestrial and aquatic n-alkanes. In this proof-of-concept study we generate a high-resolution Δrh record for the Younger Dryas period (YD) of Western Europe from Lake Meerfelder Maar, (MFM, Germany). We use aquatic macrophyte biomarker δD values as a recorder of lake water δD (aq), which represents an integrated annual precipitation signal, and terrestrial leaf wax n-alkane δD values (terr) as a record of leaf-water evapotranspiration. Therefore we consider the isotopic difference between δDterr and δDaq (ɛterr-aq) as a measure of mean leaf water enrichment (ΔL), which is mainly controlled by relative humidity and temperature. By employing a modified and parameterized Craig-Gordon leaf-water model we are able to extract past changes in relative humidity from a sedimentary record

  19. Variation in the Slope Coefficient of the Fama Regression for Testing Uncovered Interest Rate Parity: Evidence from Fixed and Time-varying Coefficient Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Koning (Camiel); S. Straetmans

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the potential presence of time variation in the coefficients of the ''Fama regression'' for Uncovered Interest Rate Parity. We implement coefficient constancy tests, rolling regression techniques, and stochastic coefficient models based on state space modelling. Among six

  20. Standard practice for conducting cyclic humidity exposures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting cyclic humidity tests with a corrosive dip. It sets forth the conditions required in cyclic humidity testing. 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of test specimen or exposure periods nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Highly sensitive humidity sensor based on graphene oxide foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Lun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Bao-Xun; Zhao, Quan-Liang

    2017-10-01

    Since sensitive humidity sensing is strongly desired, we present a highly sensitive humidity sensor fabricated from graphene oxide (GO) foam based on low-frequency dielectric properties. The GO foam shows humidity- and compression-dependent dielectric. Upon applying compression on GO foam, the humidity sensitivity increases and the maximum humidity sensitivity of dielectric loss is more than 12-fold higher than that of direct-current electrical conductivity. The highly sensitive humidity response originates from the generation of local conductive networks, which is the result of the connected isolated conductive regions by water cluster. Additionally, the dielectric properties of fabricated GO foam show a stable and repeatable humidity response, suggesting a carbon prototype with great potential in humidity sensors.

  2. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  3. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  4. High humidity leads to loss of infectious influenza virus from simulated coughs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Noti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of relative humidity in the aerosol transmission of influenza was examined in a simulated examination room containing coughing and breathing manikins. METHODS: Nebulized influenza was coughed into the examination room and Bioaerosol samplers collected size-fractionated aerosols (4 µM aerodynamic diameters adjacent to the breathing manikin's mouth and also at other locations within the room. At constant temperature, the RH was varied from 7-73% and infectivity was assessed by the viral plaque assay. RESULTS: Total virus collected for 60 minutes retained 70.6-77.3% infectivity at relative humidity ≤23% but only 14.6-22.2% at relative humidity ≥43%. Analysis of the individual aerosol fractions showed a similar loss in infectivity among the fractions. Time interval analysis showed that most of the loss in infectivity within each aerosol fraction occurred 0-15 minutes after coughing. Thereafter, losses in infectivity continued up to 5 hours after coughing, however, the rate of decline at 45% relative humidity was not statistically different than that at 20% regardless of the aerosol fraction analyzed. CONCLUSION: At low relative humidity, influenza retains maximal infectivity and inactivation of the virus at higher relative humidity occurs rapidly after coughing. Although virus carried on aerosol particles 40% will significantly reduce the infectivity of aerosolized virus.

  5. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Shapardanis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10−5 cm2/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  6. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapardanis, Steven [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Hudpeth, Mathew [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Kaya, Tolga, E-mail: kaya2t@cmich.edu [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  7. A Passive Harmonic Tag for Humidity Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lazaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a passive harmonic tag for radio frequency identification (RFID and wireless sensor applications. The tag uses a dual polarized UHF patch antenna as an input antenna. One of the outputs is connected to a frequency doubler, which consists of a Schottky diode with its output connected to a patch tuned at twice the input frequency. The other output of the input antenna feeds a DC power harvested converter that drives an oscillator which modulates its output signal by controlling the bias point of the Schottky diode. The antenna’s output is also used as a humidity sensor. To achieve this, the antenna is loaded with an interdigital capacitor with humidity-dependent capacitance. The antenna is consequently detuned when humidity varies, and therefore the second harmonic power is received. The tag is manufactured using standard fiberglass substrate. The basic theory of harmonic tag operation is described and compared with the standard backscattering approach. Experimental results with a proof of concept using commercial components are presented.

  8. Lead Oxide- PbO Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk. Khadeer Pasha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol thermal route has been used to synthesize nanocrystalline PbO at a low temperature of 75 oC using lead acetate. The synthesized PbO (P75 was annealed in the temperatures ranging from 200-500 oC for 2 h to study the effect of crystal structure and phase changes and were labeled as P200, P300, P400 and P500, respectively. X-Ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy were carried out to identify the structural phases and vibrational stretching frequencies respectively. The TEM images revealed the porous nature of P75 sample which is an important criterion for the humidity sensor. The dc resistance measurements were carried out in the relative humidity (RH range 5-98 %. Among the different prepared, P75 possessed the highest humidity sensitivity of 6250, while the heat treated sample P500 have a low sensitivity of 330. The response and recovery characteristics of the maximum sensitivity sample P75 were 170 s and 40 s respectively.

  9. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70° F. ...

  10. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Nizhnik; Kazusuke Maenaka; Kohei Higuchi

    2011-01-01

    A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  11. Fibre-optic sensor technologies for humidity and moisture measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, T. L.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2008-01-01

    A review of the use of fibre-optic sensor technologies for humidity sensing is presented. The paper first provides a brief overview on the basic concept of what is meant by humidity and on conventional detection methods. This is followed by an extensive review on the various fibre-optic techniques reported for humidity sensing, covering both intrinsic and extrinsic sensor configurations.

  12. 40 CFR 86.344-79 - Humidity calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Humidity calculations. 86.344-79... Humidity calculations. (a) The following abbreviations (and units) are used in this section: BARO = barometric pressure (Pa) H = specific humidity, (gm H2O/gm of dry air) K = 0.6220 gm H2O/gm dry air M air...

  13. Experimental setup and commissioning baseline study in search of time-variations in beta-decay half-lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Braden, E-mail: goddard.braden@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hitt, George W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Solodov, Alexander A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Bridi, Dorian; Isakovic, A.F. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); El-Khazali, Reyad [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Abulail, Ayman, E-mail: aabulail@pi.ac.ae [Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-03-11

    Recently there have been a number of investigations into whether the decay constant of a radioactive isotope can be influenced by external factors, such as the Earth–Sun distance or Solar flare activity. Positive claims suggest that annual oscillations of ~0.1% and accelerations of ~0.4% in the relative activity of beta-emitters coincide with the Earth–Sun distance and solar flare activity, respectively. Results from replication experiments have so far been conflicting. The main criticism of the measurements used to trace and quantify these effects is that the data is of poor quality or limited in scope. Data have often been collected as part of short duration weekly calibration measurements, measured with a single type of low precision detector, only using one isotope, and having no environmental conditions information (temperature, pressure, humidity) accompanying the radiation measurements. This paper describes the setup of a series of counting experiments commissioned for addressing these criticisms. Six dedicated detector systems (four different types) measuring six different isotopes ({sup 14}C, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 204}Tl, and {sup 226}Ra) have been continuously collecting source activity synchronously with environmental data for a period of one month (April 2014). The results of this baseline commissioning study show that there are correlations between activity and environmental conditions for some detector types which are then quantified. The results also show that the one sigma counting uncertainties in all the detectors are less than 0.024% for a given 24 h period. After accounting for propagated uncertainties from corrections against correlations with environmental data, the ability to resolve 0.1% activity changes varies, from 8 min to 1.6 days, depending on the specific detector. All six experiments therefore, will have sufficient precision over the upcoming year to scrutinize claims of both annual activity oscillations and

  14. Evaluation of humidity sensing properties of TMBHPET thin film embedded with spinel cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Qayyum; Azmer, Mohamad Izzat; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Al-Assiri, Mohammad S.; Kalam, Abul; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the enhanced sensing parameters of previously reported TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Significant improved sensing performance has been demonstrated by coupling of TMBHPET moisture sensing thin film with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (synthesized by eco-benign ultrasonic method). The mean size of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles has been estimated to be 6.5 nm. It is assumed that the thin film of organic-ceramic hybrid matrix (TMBHPET:CoFe2O4) is a potential candidate for humidity sensing utility by virtue of its high specific surface area and porous surface morphology (as evident from TEM, FESEM, and AFM images). The hybrid suspension has been drop-cast onto the glass substrate with preliminary deposited coplanar aluminum electrodes separated by 40 µm distance. The influence of humidity on the capacitance of the hybrid humidity sensor (Al/TMBHPET:CoFe2O4/Al) has been investigated at three different frequencies of the AC applied voltage ( V rms 1 V): 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz. It has been observed that at 100 Hz, under a humidity of 99 % RH, the capacitance of the sensor increased by 2.61 times, with respect to 30 % RH condition. The proposed sensor exhibits significantly improved sensitivity 560 fF/ % RH at 100 Hz, which is nearly 7.5 times as high as that of pristine TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Further, the capacitive sensor exhibits improved dynamic range (30-99 % RH), small hysteresis ( 2.3 %), and relatively quicker response and recovery times ( 12 s, 14 s, respectively). It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensor is associated with the diffusion kinetics of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  15. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-31

    Graphical abstract: Direct and humidity independent mass spectrometry analysis of gas phase chemicals could be achieved via ambient proton transfer ionization, ion intensity was found to be stable with humidity ranged from ∼10% to ∼100%. - Highlights: • A humidity independent mass spectrometric method for gas phase samples analysis. • A universal and good sensitivity method. • The method can real time identify plant released raw chemicals. - Abstract: In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m{sup −3}, ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  16. Morphological variation in the Common Fiscal Lanius collaris along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common Fiscals were largest in cooler, less humid, more arid areas and smallest in warmer, wetter, more humid localities, supporting Bergmann's Rule. Patterns of variation in morphology, anatomy and skeletal trends were significantly correlated with 11 climatic trends. Cardiopulmonary organ mass and blood haematocrit ...

  17. A surface acoustic wave humidity sensor with high sensitivity based on electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lei; Dajing, Chen; Yuquan, Chen

    2011-07-01

    Humidity detection has been widely used in a variety of fields. A humidity sensor with high sensitivity is reported in this paper. A surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) with high resonance frequency was fabricated as a basic sensitive component. Various nanotechnologies were used to improve the sensor's performance. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/Nafion (MWCNT/Nafion) composite material was prepared as humidity-sensitive films, deposited on the surface of an SAWR by the electrospinning method. The electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films showed a three-dimensional (3D) porous structure, which was profitable for improving the sensor's performance. The new nano-water-channel model of Nafion was also applied in the humidity sensing process. Compared to other research, the present sensor showed excellent sensitivity (above 400 kHz/% relative humidity (RH) in the range from 10% RH to 80% RH), good linearity (R2 > 0.98) and a short response time (~3 s@63%).

  18. Electrically conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate)/polyacrylonitrile fabrics for humidity sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panapoy, Manop; Singsang, Witawat; Ksapabutr, Bussarin, E-mail: mpanapoy@hotmail.co, E-mail: kbussarin@yahoo.co [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

    2010-05-01

    Humidity sensors based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber fabric were fabricated by a dip coating of nonwoven PAN nanofiber mat, which was prepared via an electrospinning method, in PEDOT-PSS solution. The influence of PAN solution concentration on their responsiveness to humidity on dynamic testing was monitored as the device was exposed to humidity. With the relative humidity (RH) changing from 0 to 100%, a resistance device response over 110% was achieved, and the curve of the resistance response with RH is of high linearity at the humidity working range of 0-100% RH. The high device reproducibility was demonstrated by carrying out vapor adsorption-desorption dynamic cycles, and the response and recovery times were determined to be of the order of 2-46 and 7-34 s, respectively. These hybrid polymer sensors can be used as disposable handheld instruments due to low cost and light weight.

  19. A surface acoustic wave humidity sensor with high sensitivity based on electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lei; Dajing, Chen; Yuquan, Chen

    2011-07-01

    Humidity detection has been widely used in a variety of fields. A humidity sensor with high sensitivity is reported in this paper. A surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) with high resonance frequency was fabricated as a basic sensitive component. Various nanotechnologies were used to improve the sensor's performance. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/Nafion (MWCNT/Nafion) composite material was prepared as humidity-sensitive films, deposited on the surface of an SAWR by the electrospinning method. The electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films showed a three-dimensional (3D) porous structure, which was profitable for improving the sensor's performance. The new nano-water-channel model of Nafion was also applied in the humidity sensing process. Compared to other research, the present sensor showed excellent sensitivity (above 400 kHz/% relative humidity (RH) in the range from 10% RH to 80% RH), good linearity (R(2) > 0.98) and a short response time (∼3 s@63%).

  20. On the Time Variation of Dust Extinction and Gas Absorption for Type Ia Supernovae Observed Through Non-uniform Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Aldering, Gregory; Biederman, Moriah; Herger, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed through a non-uniform interstellar medium (ISM) in its host galaxy, we investigate whether the non-uniformity can cause observable time variations in dust extinction and in gas absorption due to the expansion of the SN photosphere with time. We show that, owing to the steep spectral index of the ISM density power spectrum, sizable density fluctuation amplitudes at the length scale of typical ISM structures (>~ 10 pc) will translate to much smaller fluctuations on the scales of a SN photosphere. Therefore the typical amplitude of time variation due to non-uniform ISM, of absorption equivalent widths and of extinction, would be small. As a result, we conclude that non-uniform ISM density should not impact cosmology measurements based on SNe Ia. We apply our predictions based on the ISM density power law power spectrum to the observations of two highly reddened SNe Ia, SN 2012cu and SN 2014J.