WorldWideScience

Sample records for humid tropic soils

  1. Pedotransfer functions to predict water retention for soils of the humid tropics: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves-Dady Botula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, pedotransfer functions (PTFs have been widely used by soil scientists to estimate soils properties in temperate regions in response to the lack of soil data for these regions. Several authors indicated that little effort has been dedicated to the prediction of soil properties in the humid tropics, where the need for soil property information is of even greater priority. The aim of this paper is to provide an up-to-date repository of past and recently published articles as well as papers from proceedings of events dealing with water-retention PTFs for soils of the humid tropics. Of the 35 publications found in the literature on PTFs for prediction of water retention of soils of the humid tropics, 91 % of the PTFs are based on an empirical approach, and only 9 % are based on a semi-physical approach. Of the empirical PTFs, 97 % are continuous, and 3 % (one is a class PTF; of the empirical PTFs, 97 % are based on multiple linear and polynomial regression of n th order techniques, and 3 % (one is based on the k-Nearest Neighbor approach; 84 % of the continuous PTFs are point-based, and 16 % are parameter-based; 97 % of the continuous PTFs are equation-based PTFs, and 3 % (one is based on pattern recognition. Additionally, it was found that 26 % of the tropical water-retention PTFs were developed for soils in Brazil, 26 % for soils in India, 11 % for soils in other countries in America, and 11 % for soils in other countries in Africa.

  2. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    OpenAIRE

    PETRONE, A.; Preti, F.

    2009-01-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua.


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  3. Soil bioengineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    OpenAIRE

    PETRONE, A.; Preti, F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on the autochthonal plants suitable for these kinds of interventions and on the economic efficiency of the interventions is essential for the dissemination of such techniques. The present paper is focused on these two issues as related to the realization of various typologies of soil bioengineering works in the humid tropics ...

  4. Improving Farming Practices for Sustainable Soil Use in the Humid Tropics and Rainforest Ecosystem Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoel Gomes de Moura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Unsustainable farming practices such as shifting cultivation and slash-and-burn agriculture in the humid tropics threaten the preservation of the rainforest and the health of the local and global environment. In weathered soils prone to cohesion in humid tropic due to low Fe and carbon content and the enormous amounts of P that can be adsorbed, sustainable soil use is heavily dependent on the availability and efficient use of nutrients. This paper reviews the literature in the field and provides some insights about sustainable soil use in the humid tropics, mainly for the Brazilian Amazonia region. Careful management of organic matter and physical and chemical indicators is necessary to enhance root growth and nutrient uptake. To improve the rootability of the arable layer, a combination of gypsum with continuous mulching to increase the labile organic matter fraction responsible for the formation of a short-lived structure important for root growth is recommended, rather than tillage. Unlike mulching, mechanical disturbance via ploughing of Amazonian soils causes very rapid and permanent soil organic matter losses and often results in permanent recompaction and land degradation or anthropic savannization; thus, it should be avoided. Unlike in other regions, like southeast Brazil, saturating the soil solely with inorganic potassium and nitrogen soluble fertilizers is not recommended. Nutrient retention in the root zone can be enhanced if nutrients are added in a slow-release form and if biologically mediated processes are used for nutrient release, as occurs in green manure. Therefore, an alternative that favors using local resources to increase the supply of nutrients and offset processes that impair the efficiency of nutrient use must be pursued.

  5. The soil carbon dilemma in the humid tropics: cannot hoard it!?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Rolf; Paul, Birthe; Kihara, Job

    2017-04-01

    As Albrecht (1938) wrote some 70 years ago: "[Soil] Organic matter functions mainly as it is decayed and destroyed. Its value lies in its dynamic nature." Thus, by merely hoarding rather than using soil organic matter (SOM; compare also Janzen, 2006) with the aim to sequester carbon (C) in soils, we risk neglecting the crucial aspect that decomposing SOM and the release of nutrients (and concurrently CO2) is the basis for a healthy crop, decent yields and thus food security. This is even more true so in the tropics, where the majority of soils have low intrinsic fertility. In the absence of sufficient nutrient inputs through fertilizers in smallholder subsistence agriculture predominating e.g. in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), SOM turnover is the key driver of crop productivity. On the other hand, humid tropical conditions - high temperatures and long periods of moist conditions - are very conducive to SOM decay. Therefore, maintaining SOM levels requires the constant input of significant amounts of organic matter; material that is often in low supply while then first of all used as animal feed in SSA mixed-crop livestock systems. In this context it is not surprising that for SSA very few studies so far have been published that showcased viable agronomic management systems that did also sequester notable C in the soil. The two long-term trials of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in Western Kenya are no exception. Neither Conservation Agriculture (CA) nor Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM) management practices over a period of 12 years could prevent the topsoil from losing C. But, these two practices could significantly slow down C losses in comparison to treatments representing common farmer practice. Also in comparison to the latter, yields of CA and ISFM plots were 2-4 time higher. This example shows that hoarding SOM in soils under humid tropical conditions is a challenge, and to attain amounts required to come even close to the 4p

  6. Calibration of time domain reflectometry technique using undisturbed soil samples from humid tropical soils of volcanic origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, A. M.; Grauel, W. T.; Keller, M.; Veldkamp, E.

    1997-06-01

    Time domain reflectrometry (TDR) is used to measure the apparent dielectric number (Ka) in soils. We studied two soil types (Humitropept and Hapludand) of low bulk density (about 0.7 Mg m-3 at 0.05 m to 0.8 Mg m-3 at 0.3 m depth) and high organic matter content (about 7% at 0.05 m to 4% at 0.3 m depth). Soils are located in a humid tropical environment (average annual soil water content is 0.51 to 0.58 m3 m-3). For calibration, undisturbed soil blocks, with a TDR probe installed in the center, were saturated and then allowed to dry by evaporation. Volumetric water content was calculated from measured Ka values and from gravimetric measurements. Because we used undisturbed soil samples, our calibration accounts for the natural heterogeneity in soils. We tested the suitability of various calibration functions relating Ka to soil water content for our soils. TDR technique underestimated the actual soil water content by 0.05-0.15 m3m-3, when using the widely applied Topp calibration function. A three-phase mixing model with a geometry parameter, α=0.47, fit our data best. We consider mixing models to be a robust approach for calibration of TDR technique on various soils.

  7. Biological effects of plant residues with contrasting chemical compositions on plant and soil under humid tropical conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, G.

    1992-01-01

    A study on plant residues with contrasting chemical compositions was conducted under laboratory, growth chamber and humid tropical field conditions to understand the function of the soil fauna in the breakdown of plant residues, the cycling of nutrients, in particular nitrogen, and the performance o

  8. Iron: A Biogeochemical Engine That Drives Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycling in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Hall, S. J.; Thompson, A.; Yang, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    rapidly immobilized into biological pools (Liptzin and Silver 2009). Data suggest that Fe-redox cycling may decrease P limitation to NPP, and help maintain forest nutrient stocks. In summary, our results highlight the biogeochemical significance of Fe cycling in upland soils environments and its important role in the dynamics of humid tropical forests.

  9. A Review of Soil Erosion Models with Special Reference to the needs of Humid Tropical Mountainous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Avwunudiogba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Humid tropical mountainous environments (HTMEs are generally considered sensitive ecological regions because anthropogenic disturbance often accelerate hillslope processes such as runoff, erosion, and sediment flux. Reducing accelerated erosion is necessary for the maintenance of the integrity, stability and sustainability of HTMEs. Soil erosion models (SOMs are potential tools for predicting soil erosion, sediment flux, and thedesign and assessment of effectiveness of conservation management practices in HTMEs. Within this context, this study provides a critical review of the available SOMs with afocus on their applicability in HTMEs. The review indicates that because most SOMs have been developed for “flat agricultural lands” in temperate regions, to be useful inconservation planning in HTMEs models should be calibrated for local conditions. For humid tropical mountainous regions, lumped parameter models (LPMs linked toGeographical Information Systems (GIS are more practicable for conservation planning than sophisticated distributed parameter models (DPMs. This is due to the less stringent data requirements and ease to which land managers can implement LPMs, an essential consideration within the physical and socioeconomic context of HTMEs.Keywords:Soil erosion models; Humid tropics, Mountainous environments; Conservation planning

  10. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petrone

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua.



    In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bio-engineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in the works, monitorings were performed, one in the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, collecting survival rate and morphological parameters data. Concerning the economic efficiency we proceed to a financial analysis of the works and once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount in EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the Italian one.



    Among the used species we found that Madero negro (Gliricidia sepium and Roble macuelizo (Tabebuia rosea are adequate for soil-bioengineering measure on slopes while Helequeme (Erythrina fusca reported a successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection.



    In the comparison of the costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for the Central American country ranges between 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering and almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress if it's used the EPP dollar exchange

  11. Soil bioengineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petrone

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on the autochthonal plants suitable for these kinds of interventions and on the economic efficiency of the interventions is essential for the dissemination of such techniques. The present paper is focused on these two issues as related to the realization of various typologies of soil bioengineering works in the humid tropics of Nicaragua.

    In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bioengineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in these works, monitoring was performed, one on the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, by collecting data on survival rate and morphological parameters. Concerning economic efficiency, we proceeded to a financial analysis of the works. Once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount into EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the European one.

    Among the species used we found that Gliricidia sepium (local common name: Madero negro and Tabebuia rosea (local common name: Roble macuelizo are adequate for soil bioengineering measures on slopes, while Erythrina fusca (local common name: Helequeme resulted in successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection.

    In comparing costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for Nicaragua ranges from 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering to almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress

  12. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, A.; Preti, F.

    2009-07-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua. In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bio-engineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in the works, monitorings were performed, one in the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, collecting survival rate and morphological parameters data. Concerning the economic efficiency we proceed to a financial analysis of the works and once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount in EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power) in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the Italian one. Among the used species we found that Madero negro (Gliricidia sepium) and Roble macuelizo (Tabebuia rosea) are adequate for soil-bioengineering measure on slopes while Helequeme (Erythrina fusca) reported a successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection. In the comparison of the costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for the Central American country ranges between 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering) and almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress) if it's used the EPP dollar exchange rate. Conclusions are reached with regard to hydrological-risk mitigating actions performed on a

  13. Soil bioengineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, A.; Preti, F.

    2010-02-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on the autochthonal plants suitable for these kinds of interventions and on the economic efficiency of the interventions is essential for the dissemination of such techniques. The present paper is focused on these two issues as related to the realization of various typologies of soil bioengineering works in the humid tropics of Nicaragua. In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bioengineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in these works, monitoring was performed, one on the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, by collecting data on survival rate and morphological parameters. Concerning economic efficiency, we proceeded to a financial analysis of the works. Once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount into EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power) in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the European one. Among the species used we found that Gliricidia sepium (local common name: Madero negro) and Tabebuia rosea (local common name: Roble macuelizo) are adequate for soil bioengineering measures on slopes, while Erythrina fusca (local common name: Helequeme) resulted in successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection. In comparing costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for Nicaragua ranges from 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering) to almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress), using the EPP dollar exchange rate. Our conclusions with

  14. Controls on diurnal variation in labile soil phosphorus of a humid tropical forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T. E.; Vandecar, K. L.; Matthews, D.; Lawrence, D.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical forests are typically considered phosphorous (P) limited. Variability in nutrient availability has been shown to affect forest productivity and foliar nutrient concentrations, as well as the rate of soil carbon (C) loss via effects on decomposition and soil respiration rates. It follows that the C efflux and long-term stability of C stocks in tropical soils is likely to depend on nutrient availability. We quantified short-term variability (hours to days) in labile P in a Puerto Rican wet tropical forest and investigated potential environmental and biotic controls such as soil moisture, soil temperature, light and soil respiration. We measured hourly changes in labile P from sunrise to sunset on five separate days in July of 2008. Labile P varied significantly both within and among days. Concentrations of labile P ranged from 2.75-3.75 μg/g. Labile P was positively related to volumetric soil moisture (R2= 0.3, p<0.05). These results suggest that the labile P pool is highly dynamic on short timescales, even in relatively a-seasonal tropical forest.

  15. Sensitivity of soil respiration to variability in soil moisture and temperature in a humid tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana Wood; M. Detto; W.L. Silver

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and temperature are important drivers of soil respiration. The role of moisture and temperature are generally explored at seasonal or inter-annual timescales; however, significant variability also occurs on hourly to daily time-scales. We used small (1.54 m2), throughfall exclusion shelters to evaluate the role soil moisture and temperature as temporal...

  16. Soil Phosphorus Dynamics as Influenced by Land Use Changes in Humid Tropical, Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-Cheng; HUANG Jian-Hui; PAN Qing-Min; TANG Jian-Wei; HAN Xing-Guo

    2005-01-01

    Land use changes can greatly influence soil phosphorus (P) dynamics, especially when converting native forests to agricultural land. Soils in Xishuangbanna, which is one of southwest China's tropical areas that maintain fragments of primary forests, were studied to a) evaluate the effect of two common land use changes, conversion of forests to agricultural land or rubber tree plantation, on the dynamics of available P and total P in bulk soils as well as total P in particle size fractions; b) assess the relationship between soil P dynamics and soil organic carbon (SOC); and c)elucidate the relationship between soil P content and soil properties such as pH and texture. Clearing secondary forests with subsequent shifting cultivation and establishment of rubber tree plantation caused significant decreases (P < 0.05)in available P at 0-20 cm soil depths, whereas for total P there was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) when converting to shifting cultivation, rubber tree plantation, or fallow field at both 0-20 and 20-40 cm depths. Abandonment of fields used for shifting cultivation led to significant increases (P < 0.05) in available P at 20-40 cm depth. In addition, there was a significant positive relationship between soil organic carbon and soil P content. Compared to secondary forests, the ratio of organic carbon to total P in surface soils (0-20 cm) of shifting cultivation and rubber tree plantation was significantly lower (P < 0.05).

  17. Pedotransfer functions to predict water retention for soils of the humid tropics: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botula, Yves-Dady; Van Ranst, Eric; Cornelis, Wim M

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades, pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used by soil scientists to estimate soils properties in temperate regions in response to the lack of soil data for these regions...

  18. Impact of Restoration of Soil in a Humid Tropical Region on Storage of Organic Carbon in a Recalcitrant Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Nath, Arun; Brahma, Biplab; Lal, Rattan; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) changes through restoration of degraded lands is important to assessing the changes in soil properties. However, SOC measures all C fractions and its assessment is not adequate to distinguish between the more dynamic or active C (AC) fractions and the recalcitrant or passive C (PC) form. SOC fractions comprising of the recalcitrant pools have been suggested as a driver for long term soil C sink management. Therefore, the present study was undertaken at a site within the North Eastern India (NEI) region with an objective to explore whether or not SOC fractions change with restoration of degraded lands under humid tropical climate. An age-chronosequence study was established comprising of four different aged rubber plantations (6, 15, 27 and 34 yr. old) planted on Imperata grasslands. The site was selected to study changes in the different fractions of SOC and total SOC stock, and the data were compared with that of a native forest. The data indicated that the SOC stock increased from 106 Mg ha-1 under 6 yr. to 130 Mg ha-1 under 34 yr. old plantations. The SOC stock after 34 yr. of plantation was 20% higher than that under Imperata grassland, but was 34% lower than that under the native forest soil. With respect to lability of C fractions, proportion of AC pool decreased linearly with increase in plantation age from 59 % under 6 yr to 33 % under 34 yr. old plantations. In contrast, proportion of PC pool increased from 41 % of SOC stock under 6 yr. to 67 % of SOC under 34 yr. old plantations, suggesting the significant role of old aged plantation in C sink management.

  19. Soil organic carbon dynamics in pastures established after deforestation in the humid tropics of Costa Rica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, E.

    1993-01-01

    Currently, rates of deforestation in the tropics are probably higher than ever before in the past. As a consequence, changes in the earth's physical and chemical environments are proceeding at unprecedented rates. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 , N

  20. Landscape formation and soil genesis in volcanic parent materials in humid tropical lowlands of Costa Rica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuyse, A.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of volcanism on landscape genesis, and formation of soils on volcanic parent material was studied in the Atlantic lowland of Costs Rica. This lowland is a subduction basin of tectonic origin, in which thick alluvial and marine sediments are accumulated. At its southwestern side it is b

  1. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and Im

  2. Nutrient stocks of short-term fallows on high base status soils in the humid tropics of Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand nutrient dynamics in tropical farming systems with fallows, it is necessary to assess changes in nutrient stocks in plants, litter and soils. Nutrient stocks (soil, above ground biomass, litter) were assessed of one-year old fallows with Piper aduncum, Gliricidia sepium and

  3. Exclusion of soil macrofauna did not affect soil quality but increases crop yields in a sub-humid tropical maize-based system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, B.K.; Vanlauwe, B.; Hoogmoed, M.; Hurisso, T.T.; Ndabamenye, T.; Terano, Y.; Ayuke, F.O.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil macrofauna such as earthworms and termites are involved in key ecosystem functions and thus considered important for sustainable intensification of crop production. However, their contribution to tropical soil and crop performance, as well as relations with agricultural management (e.g. Conserv

  4. Tropical Atmospheric Circulations with Humidity Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hsia, Chun-Hsiung; Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to study the effect of the moisture on the planetary scale atmospheric circulation over the tropics. The modeling we adopt is the Boussinesq equations coupled with a diffusive equation of humidity and the humidity dependent heat source is modeled by a linear approximation of the humidity. The rigorous mathematical analysis is carried out using the dynamic transition theory. In particular, we obtain the same types of transitions and hence the scenario of the El Ni\\~no mechanism as described in \\cite{MW2,MW3}. The effect of the moisture only lowers slightly the magnitude of the critical thermal Rayleigh number.

  5. Tropical Soil Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.

    and environmental protection. Tropical Soil Chemistry by Ole K. Borggaard provides an overview of the composition, occurrence, properties, processes, formation, and environmental vulnerability of various tropical soil types (using American Soil Taxonomy for classification). The processes and the external factors......A new book that is particularly relevant as tropical countries experience increased pressure on land resources to improve agricultural production. To ensure sustainable land use, the potentials and limitations of different kinds of tropical soils must be known in relation to crop production...... soil chemical issues are also presented to assess when, why, and how tropical soils differ from soils in other regions. This knowledge can help agricultural specialists in the tropics establish sustainable crop production. Readers are assumed to be familiar with basic chemistry, physics...

  6. Doing hydrology backwards in tropical humid catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real Rangel, R.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches in hydrology offer the possibility to predict water fluxes at the catchment scale based on the interpretation of the observed hydrological response at the catchment itself. Doing hydrology backwards (inferring precipitation and evapotranspiration rates at the catchment scale from streamflow measurements, see Kirchner (2009)) can be a useful methodology for estimating water fluxes at the catchment and regional scales. Previous studies using this inverse modeling approach have been performed in regions (UK, Switzerland, France, Eastern US) where energy-limited (in winter and early spring) and water-limited conditions (in summer) prevail during a large period of the year. However, such approach has not been tested in regions characterized by a quasi-constant supply of water and energy (e.g. humid tropics). The objective of this work is to infer annual rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the last decade in 10 catchments located in Mexico's tropical humid regions. Hourly discharge measurements during recession periods were analyzed and parameters for the nonlinear storage-discharge relationship of each catchment were derived. Results showed large variability in both catchment-scale precipitation and evapotranspiration rates among the selected study sites. Finally, a comparison was done between such estimates and those obtained from remotely-sensed data (TRMM for precipitation and MOD16 for evapotranspiration).

  7. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  8. Abiotic Controls on Macroscale Variations of Humid Tropical Forest Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation of tropical forest tree height is a key indicator of ecological processes associated with forest growth and carbon dynamics. Here we examine the macroscale variations of tree height of humid tropical forests across three continents and quantify the climate and edaphic controls on these variations. Forest tree heights are systematically sampled across global humid tropical forests with more than 2.5 million measurements from Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS satellite observations (2004–2008. We used top canopy height (TCH of GLAS footprints to grid the statistical mean and variance and the 90 percentile height of samples at 0.5 degrees to capture the regional variability of average and large trees globally. We used the spatial regression method (spatial eigenvector mapping-SEVM to evaluate the contributions of climate, soil and topography in explaining and predicting the regional variations of forest height. Statistical models suggest that climate, soil, topography, and spatial contextual information together can explain more than 60% of the observed forest height variation, while climate and soil jointly explain 30% of the height variations. Soil basics, including physical compositions such as clay and sand contents, chemical properties such as PH values and cation-exchange capacity, as well as biological variables such as the depth of organic matter, all present independent but statistically significant relationships to forest height across three continents. We found significant relations between the precipitation and tree height with shorter trees on the average in areas of higher annual water stress, and large trees occurring in areas with low stress and higher annual precipitation but with significant differences across the continents. Our results confirm other landscape and regional studies by showing that soil fertility, topography and climate may jointly control a significant variation of forest height and

  9. A contemporary assessment of change in humid tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Rudel, Thomas K; Aide, T Mitchell; Defries, Ruth; Emerson, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    In recent decades the rate and geographic extent of land-use and land-cover change has increased throughout the world's humid tropical forests. The pan-tropical geography of forest change is a challenge to assess, and improved estimates of the human footprint in the tropics are critical to understanding potential changes in biodiversity. We combined recently published and new satellite observations, along with images from Google Earth and a literature review, to estimate the contemporary global extent of deforestation, selective logging, and secondary regrowth in humid tropical forests. Roughly 1.4% of the biome was deforested between 2000 and 2005. As of 2005, about half of the humid tropical forest biome contained 50% or less tree cover. Although not directly comparable to deforestation, geographic estimates of selective logging indicate that at least 20% of the humid tropical forest biome was undergoing some level of timber harvesting between 2000 and 2005. Forest recovery estimates are even less certain, but a compilation of available reports suggests that at least 1.2% of the humid tropical forest biome was in some stage of long-term secondary regrowth in 2000. Nearly 70% of the regrowth reports indicate forest regeneration in hilly, upland, and mountainous environments considered marginal for large-scale agriculture and ranching. Our estimates of the human footprint are conservative because they do not resolve very small-scale deforestation, low-intensity logging, and unreported secondary regrowth, nor do they incorporate other impacts on tropical forest ecosystems, such as fire and hunting. Our results highlight the enormous geographic extent of forest change throughout the humid tropics and the considerable limitations of the science and technology available for such a synthesis.

  10. Zinc corrosion runoff process induced by humid tropical climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleva, L. [Center for Investigation and Advanced Study (CINVESTAV-Merida), Applied Physics Department, Carr. Ant. a Progreso, Km.6, C.P. 97310, Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Meraz, E. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico); Acosta, M. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ciencias Basicas, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Zinc and hot dip galvanized steel are frequently used metals in building application. They have relatively good atmospheric resistance to corrosion, due to its oxidation in air and formation of protective rust on its surface, which acts as barrier between the metal and environment. However, some part of the rust can be dissolved by pluvial precipitations and water condensed on the metal surface. This process, called metal runoff, contributes for zinc dispersion in soils and waters. In order to make accurate estimation of zinc runoff induced by atmosphere in humid tropical climate, samples of pure Zn and hot dip galvanized steel have been exposed in the Gulf of Mexico. The data reveal that this process is strongly influenced by factors which determine the aggressivity of the environment (pluvial precipitations, cycles of dry and rainy periods, atmospheric pollutants, air humidity). High annual rates of zinc runoff (6.5 - 8.5 {+-} 0.30 g Zn m{sup -2}yr{sup -1}) were released, being the runoff 63 - 87% of the zinc corrosion rust. The zinc mass loss has been related to several independent parameters, presenting linear equation, which indicates the air contaminant SO{sub 2} as the major factor controlling the runoff of zinc. The reported results show higher runoff of zinc samples, compared to that of hot dip galvanized steel. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Mycorrhizas and tropical soil fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, I.M.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Major factors that constrain tropical soil fertility and sustainable agriculture are low nutrient capital, moisture stress, erosion, high P fixation, high acidity with aluminium toxicity, and low soil biodiversity. The fragility of many tropical soils limits food production in annual cropping system

  12. Mycorrhizas and tropical soil fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, I.M.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Major factors that constrain tropical soil fertility and sustainable agriculture are low nutrient capital, moisture stress, erosion, high P fixation, high acidity with aluminium toxicity, and low soil biodiversity. The fragility of many tropical soils limits food production in annual cropping system

  13. Diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Isaac; Arkin, Philip; Ferraro, Ralph; Eriksson, Patrick; Fetzer, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of water vapor especially in the tropical region, the diurnal variations of water vapor have not been completely investigated in the past due to the lack of adequate observations. Measurements from Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropicale par Radiométrie (SAPHIR) onboard the low inclination Megha-Tropiques satellite with frequent daily revisits provide a valuable dataset for investigating the diurnal and spatial variation of tropospheric relative humidity in the tropical region. In this study, we first transformed SAPHIR observations into layer-averaged relative humidity, then partitioned the data based on local observation time into 24 bins with a grid resolution of one degree. Afterwards, we fitted Fourier series to the binned data. Finally, the mean, amplitude, and diurnal peak time of relative humidity in tropical regions were calculated for each grid point using either the measurements or Fourier series. The results were separately investigated for different SAPHIR channels as well as for relative humidity with respect to both liquid and ice phases. The results showed that the wet and dry regions are, respectively, associated with convective and subsidence regions which is consistent with the previous studies. The mean tropospheric humidity values reported in this study are generally 10 to 15 % higher than those reported using infrared observations which is because of strict cloud screening for infrared measurements. The results showed a large inhomogeneity in diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical region. The diurnal amplitude was larger over land than over ocean and the oceanic amplitude was larger over convective regions than over subsidence regions. The results showed that the diurnal amplitude is less than 10 % in middle and upper troposphere, but it is up to 30 % in lower troposphere over land. Although the peak of RH generally occurs over night or in early morning, there are several

  14. Mechanized farming in the humid tropics with special reference to soil tillage, workability and timeliness of farm operations. A case study for the Zanderij area of Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goense, D.

    1987-01-01

    The reported investigations concern aspects of mechanized farming for the production of rainfed crops on the loamy soils of the Zanderij formation in Suriname and in particular, the effect of tillage on crop yield and soil properties, workability of field operations and timeliness of field operation

  15. Study of dew water collection in humid tropical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clus, O.; Ortega, P.; Muselli, M.; Milimouk, I.; Beysens, D.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryAn assessment of the potential for dew water to serve as a potable water source during a rainless season in a humid tropical climate was carried out in the Pacific islands of French Polynesia. The climate of these islands, in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations, wind and energy balance, is representative of the climate of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Measurements were obtained at two characteristic sites of this region; a mountainous island (Punaauia, Tahiti Island) and an atoll (Tikehau, Tuamotu Archipelago). Dew was measured daily on a 30° tilted, 1 m 2 plane collector equipped with a thermally insulated radiative foil. In addition, an electronic balance placed at 1 m above the ground with a horizontal 0.16 m 2 condensing plate made of PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (Teflon) was used in Tahiti. Dew volume data, taken during the dry season from 16/5/2005 to 14/10/2005, were correlated with air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and visible plus infrared radiometer measurements. The data were also fitted to a model. Dew formation in such a tropical climate is characterized by high absolute humidity, weak nocturnal temperature drop and strong Trade winds. These winds prevent dew from forming unless protected e.g. by natural vegetal windbreaks. In protected areas, dew can then form with winds as large as 7 m/s. Such strong winds also hamper at night the formation near the ground of a calm and cold air layer with high relative humidity. As the cooling power is lower than in the Mediterranean islands because of the high absolute humidity of the atmosphere, both effects combine to generate modest dew yields. However, dew events are frequent and provide accumulated amounts of water attractive for dew water harvesting. Slight modifications of existing rain collection devices on roofs can enhance dew formation and collection. Dew harvesting thus appears as an attractive possibility to provide the local population with a

  16. Adaptive thermal comfort standards in the hot-humid tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, F. [Oxford Brookes University, Oxford (United Kingdom). Oxford Centre for Sustainable Development

    2004-07-01

    Field studies conducted in tropical climates have found that the International standard for indoor climate, IS07730 based on Fanger's predicted mean vote (PMV/PPD) equations, does not adequately describe comfortable conditions. This paper presents some of the evidence and suggests ways in which International standards are failing and how they might be complemented using adaptive comfort standards derived from the results of local comfort surveys. In particular the implications of air movement and humidity for adaptive comfort standards are considered. (author)

  17. Breed differences in calving interval in the humid Mexican tropic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Medina, Aída Lorena; Córdova-Izquierdo, Alejandro; Soriano Robles, Ramón; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Castillo-Juárez, Héctor

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of breed, breed and sex of the calf, farm, calving number (CN), type of calving, and their interactions on CI using records from four different beef breeds performing in the humid tropical environment of Mexico. The influence of these factors on CN was also evaluated. CI and CN varied with farm, breed of the dam, and with breed of the dam by calf breed interaction (PAngus cows, although with an apparent unexpected negative impact on CN.

  18. Climate and Edaphic Controls on Humid Tropical Forest Tree Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Saatchi, S. S.; Xu, L.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the magnitude and spatial variations of forest carbon density in tropical regions is due to under sampling of forest structure from inventory plots and the lack of regional allometry to estimate the carbon density from structure. Here we quantify the variation of tropical forest structure by using more than 2.5 million measurements of canopy height from systematic sampling of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite observations between 2004 to 2008 and examine the climate and edaphic variables influencing the variations. We used top canopy height of GLAS footprints (~ 0.25 ha) to grid the statistical mean and 90 percentile of samples at 0.5 degrees to capture the regional variability of large trees in tropics. GLAS heights were also aggregated based on a stratification of tropical regions using soil, elevation, and forest types. Both approaches provided consistent patterns of statistically dominant large trees and the least heterogeneity, both as strong drivers of distribution of high biomass forests. Statistical models accounting for spatial autocorrelation suggest that climate, soil and spatial features together can explain more than 60% of the variations in observed tree height information, while climate-only variables explains about one third of the first-order changes in tree height. Soil basics, including physical compositions such as clay and sand contents, chemical properties such as PH values and cation-exchange capacity, as well as biological variables such as organic matters, all present independent but statistically significant relationships to tree height variations. The results confirm other landscape and regional studies that soil fertility, geology and climate may jointly control a majority of the regional variations of forest structure in pan-tropics and influencing both biomass stocks and dynamics. Consequently, other factors such as biotic and disturbance regimes, not included in this study, may have less influence on

  19. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...

  20. Tropical Volcanic Soils From Flores Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmatullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils that are developed intropical region with volcanic parent materials have many unique properties, and high potential for agricultural use.The purpose of this study is to characterize the soils developed on volcanic materials from Flores Island, Indonesia,and to examine if the soils meet the requirements for andic soil properties. Selected five soils profiles developed fromandesitic volcanic materials from Flores Island were studied to determine their properties. They were compared intheir physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics according to their parent material, and climatic characteristicdifferent. The soils were developed under humid tropical climate with ustic to udic soil moisture regimes withdifferent annual rainfall. The soils developed from volcanic ash parent materials in Flores Island showed differentproperties compared to the soils derived from volcanic tuff, even though they were developed from the sameintermediary volcanic materials. The silica contents, clay mineralogy and sand fractions, were shown as the differences.The different in climatic conditions developed similar properties such as deep solum, dark color, medium texture, andvery friable soil consistency. The soils have high organic materials, slightly acid to acid, low to medium cationexchange capacity (CEC. The soils in western region have higher clay content and showing more developed than ofthe eastern region. All the profiles meet the requirements for andic soil properties, and classified as Andisols order.The composition of sand mineral was dominated by hornblende, augite, and hypersthenes with high weatherablemineral reserves, while the clay fraction was dominated by disordered kaolinite, and hydrated halloysite. The soilswere classified into subgroup as Thaptic Hapludands, Typic Hapludands, and Dystric Haplustands

  1. Estimating the consequences of fire exclusion for food crop production, soil fertility, and fallow recovery in shifting cultivation landscapes in the humid tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgrove, Lindsey; Hauser, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    In the Congo Basin, smallholder farmers practice slash-and-burn shifting cultivation. Yet, deliberate burning might no longer be sustainable under reduced fallow scenarios. We synthesized data from the Forest Margins Benchmark Area (FMBA), comprising 1.54 million hectares (ha), in southern Cameroon and assessed the impact of fire exclusion on yield, labor inputs, soil fertility, ecosystem carbon stocks, and fallow recovery indicators in two common field types (plantain and maize) under both current and reduced fallow scenarios. While we could not distinguish between impacts of standard farmer burning practice and fire exclusion treatments for the current fallow scenario, we concluded that fire exclusion would lead to higher yields, higher ecosystem carbon stocks as well as potentially faster fallow recovery under the reduced fallow scenario. While its implementation would increase labor requirements, we estimated increased revenues of 421 and 388 US$ ha(-1) for plantain and maize, respectively. Applied to the FMBA, and assuming a 6-year reduced fallow scenario, fire exclusion in plantain fields would potentially retain 240,464 Mg more ecosystem carbon, comprising topsoil carbon plus tree biomass carbon, than standard farmer practice. Results demonstrate a potential "win-win scenario" where yield benefits, albeit modest, and conservation benefits can be obtained simultaneously. This could be considered as a transitional phase towards higher input use and thus higher yielding systems.

  2. Tropical upper tropospheric humidity variations due to potential vorticity intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, M.; Sridharan, S.; Indira Devi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Four cases (March 2009, May 2009, April 2010 and February 2012) are presented in which the ERA-interim relative humidity (RH) shows consistent increase by more than 50 % in the upper troposphere (200-250 hPa) over tropics at the eastward side of the potential vorticity (PV) intrusion region. The increase in RH is confirmed with the spaceborne microwave limb sounder observations and radiosonde observations over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and is observed irrespective of whether the PV intrusions are accompanied by deep convection or not. It is demonstrated that the increase in RH is due to poleward advection induced by the PV intrusions in their eastward side at the upper tropospheric heights. It is suggested that the low-latitude convection, which is not necessarily triggered by the PV intrusion, might have transported water vapour to the upper tropospheric heights.

  3. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  4. Towards a universal sampling protocol for soil biotas in the humid tropics Em direção a um protocolo universal de amostragem de biotas do solo nos trópicos úmidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Edward Bignell

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the methods for the inventory of below-ground biotas in the humid tropics, to document the (hypothesized loss of soil biodiversity associated with deforestation and agricultural intensification at forest margins. The biotas were grouped into eight categories, each of which corresponded to a major functional group considered important or essential to soil function. An accurate inventory of soil organisms can assist in ecosystem management and help sustain agricultural production. The advantages and disadvantages of transect-based and grid-based sampling methods are discussed, illustrated by published protocols ranging from the original "TSBF transect", through versions developed for the alternatives to Slash-and-Burn Project (ASB to the final schemes (with variants adopted by the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Below-ground Biodiversity Project (CSM-BGBD. Consideration is given to the place and importance of replication in below-ground biological sampling and it is argued that the new sampling protocols are inclusive, i.e. designed to sample all eight biotic groups in the same field exercise; spatially scaled, i.e. provide biodiversity data at site, locality, landscape and regional levels, and link the data to land use and land cover; and statistically robust, as shown by a partial randomization of plot locations for sampling.Este trabalho faz uma revisão dos métodos de inventariado da biota edáfica nos trópicos úmidos para documentar a (hipotética perda de biodiversidade do solo associada ao desmatamento e à intensificação agrícola nas margens de florestas. A biota foi agrupada em oito categorias, cada uma correspondente a um grande grupo funcional considerado importante ou essencial para a função do solo. Um inventário cuidadoso dos organismos do solo pode auxiliar a gestão de ecossistemas e a sustentabilidade da produção agrícola. As vantagens e desvantagens de métodos de amostragem baseados em

  5. Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templer, P.; Silver, W.; Pett-Ridge, J.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-09-15

    Humid tropical forests are generally characterized by the lack of nitrogen (N) limitation to net primary productivity, yet paradoxically have high potential for N loss. We conducted an intensive field experiment with {sup 15}NH{sub 4} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} additions to highly weathered tropical forest soils to determine the relative importance of N retention and loss mechanisms. Over half of all the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced from gross mineralization was rapidly converted to NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the process of gross nitrification. During the first 24 h plant roots took up 28 % of the N mineralized, dominantly as NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and were a greater sink for N than soil microbial biomass. Soil microbes were not a significant sink for added {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} or {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the first 24 hr, and only for {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} after 7 d. Patterns of microbial community composition, as determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, were weakly, but significantly correlated with nitrification and denitrification to N{sub 2}O. Rates of dissimilatory NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction to NH{sub 4}{sup +} (DNRA) were high in this forest, accounting for up to 25 % of gross mineralization and 35 % of gross nitrification. DNRA was a major sink for NO{sub 3}{sup -} which may have contributed to the lower rates of N{sub 2}O and leaching losses. Despite considerable N conservation via DNRA and plant NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake, the fate of approximately 45% of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} produced and 22% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced were not measured in our fluxes, suggesting that other important pathways for N retention and loss (e.g., denitrification to N{sub 2}) are important in this system. The high proportion of mineralized N that was rapidly nitrified and the fates of that NO{sub 3}{sup -} highlight the key role of gross nitrification as a proximate control on N retention and loss in humid tropical forest soils. Furthermore, our

  6. Nitrogen deposition contributes to soil acidification in tropical ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiankai; Mao, Qinggong; Gilliam, Frank S; Luo, Yiqi; Mo, Jiangming

    2014-12-01

    Elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition has greatly altered terrestrial ecosystem functioning, threatening ecosystem health via acidification and eutrophication in temperate and boreal forests across the northern hemisphere. However, response of forest soil acidification to N deposition has been less studied in humid tropics compared to other forest types. This study was designed to explore impacts of long-term N deposition on soil acidification processes in tropical forests. We have established a long-term N-deposition experiment in an N-rich lowland tropical forest of Southern China since 2002 with N addition as NH4 NO3 of 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . We measured soil acidification status and element leaching in soil drainage solution after 6-year N addition. Results showed that our study site has been experiencing serious soil acidification and was quite acid-sensitive showing high acidification (pH(H2O) soil profiles. Long-term N addition significantly accelerated soil acidification, leading to depleted base cations and decreased BS, and further lowered ANC. However, N addition did not alter exchangeable Al(3+) , but increased cation exchange capacity (CEC). Nitrogen addition-induced increase in SOC is suggested to contribute to both higher CEC and lower pH. We further found that increased N addition greatly decreased soil solution pH at 20 cm depth, but not at 40 cm. Furthermore, there was no evidence that Al(3+) was leaching out from the deeper soils. These unique responses in tropical climate likely resulted from: exchangeable H(+) dominating changes of soil cation pool, an exhausted base cation pool, N-addition stimulating SOC production, and N saturation. Our results suggest that long-term N addition can contribute measurably to soil acidification, and that shortage of Ca and Mg should receive more attention than soil exchangeable Al in tropical forests with elevated N deposition in the future.

  7. Decision support system for peatland management in the humid tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzema, H.P.; Grobbe, T.; Chong, T.; Wösten, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Large areas of globally important tropical peatland in Southeast Asia are threatened by land clearance, degradation and fire, jeopardising their natural functions as reservoirs of biodiversity, carbon stores and hydrological buffers. Many development projects on tropical peatlands have failed

  8. Decision support system for peatland management in the humid tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzema, H.P.; Grobbe, T.; Chong, T.; Wösten, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Large areas of globally important tropical peatland in Southeast Asia are threatened by land clearance, degradation and fire, jeopardising their natural functions as reservoirs of biodiversity, carbon stores and hydrological buffers. Many development projects on tropical peatlands have failed becaus

  9. Retrievals on Tropical small scale humidity variability from multi-channel microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhao; Zuidema, Paquita; Turner, David

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale atmospheric humidity structure is important to many atmospheric process studies. In the Tropics especially, convection is sensitive to small variations in humidity. High temporal-resolution humidity profiles and spatially-resolved humidity fields are valuable for understanding the relationship of convection to tropical humidity, such as at convectively-induced cold pools and as part of the shallow-to-deep cloud transition. Radiosondes can provide high resolution vertical profiles of temperature and humidity, but are relatively infrequent. Microwave radiometers (MWR) are able to profile and scan autonomously and output measurements frequently (~1 Hz). To date, few assessments of microwave humidity profiling in the Tropics have been undertaken. Löhnert et al. (2009) provide one evaluation for Darwin, Australia. We build on this using four months of data from the equatorial Indian Ocean, at Gan Island, collected from University of Miami's (UM) multi-channel radiometer during the Dynamics of Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. Liquid Water Path (LWP) and Water Vapor Path (WVP) are physically retrieved using the MWR RETrieval (MWRRET) algorithm (Turner et al., 2007b), and humidity profiles in the tropics are retrieved using the Integrated Profiling Technique (Löhnert et al., 2004). Tropical temperature variability is weak and a climatological temperature profile is assumed, with humidity information drawn from five channels between 22 to 30 GHz. Scanning measurements were coordinated with the scanning pattern of NCAR's S-Pol-Ka radar. An analysis of the humidity information content gathered from both the profiling and scanning measurements will be presented.

  10. Nitrogen oxide emissions from a banana plantation in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Edzo; Keller, Michael

    1997-07-01

    Use of nitrogen fertilizer is thought to contribute significantly to the increase of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO). While the current increase of fertilizer use is concentrated in tropical areas, nearly all studies of nitrogen oxide emissions have been conducted in agricultural systems in temperate areas. We measured N2O and NO fluxes from a fertilized banana plantation in the humid tropics of Costa Rica, where 360 kg N ha-1 yr-1 is applied. Using chamber techniques, we sampled an Andisol and an Inceptisol on a monthly basis. Twice on each soil type, we sampled intensively in time following fertilizer applications. There is a strong spatial and temporal dependence of nitrogen oxide emissions on place and time of fertilizer application. We find greater mean N2O and NO emissions from the Andisol (31.4 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 55.6 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) than from the Inceptisol (9.3 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 41.1 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) under the plants where fertilizer is typically applied. The percentages of applied fertilizer-N that are converted into nitrogen oxide ("yield") are between 1.26 and 2.91% for N2O and between 5.09 and 5.66% for NO depending on soil type. We consistently calculate higher nitrogen oxide yields based on intensive sampling versus monthly sampling. Temporal variation in nitrogen oxide emissions probably causes monthly sampling to underestimate mean annual fluxes. Our results suggest that in some tropical systems a higher percentage of applied nitrogen may be lost in gaseous form than in temperate agriculture. Current global estimates of N2O and NO sources from tropical agriculture are based on information from temperate areas and may cause an underestimate of the contribution of tropical agriculture to the budgets of these trace gases.

  11. Water repellency of soils; the influence of ambient relative humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerr, S.H.; Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Shakesby, R.A.; Bryant, R.

    2002-01-01

    Adverse effects of soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) are of concern during or following rainfall or irrigation, and are often preceded by conditions of high atmospheric relative humidity (RH). Assessments of repellency are, however, commonly conducted on air-dried samples at ambient laboratory

  12. Predicting soil properties in the tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; Hartemink, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    It is practically impossible to measure soil properties continuously at each location across the globe. Therefore, it is necessary to have robust systems that can predict soil properties at a given location. That is needed in many tropical countries where the dearth of soil property measurements is

  13. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karen A Garrett

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  14. Selection and breeding for acid-soil tolerance in crops: Upland rice and tropical forages as case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, R. (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, Cali (Colombia)); Zeigler, R.S.; Sarkarung, S. (International Rice Research Institute, Manila (Philippines)); Rao, I.M.

    Soil acidity and associated infertility and mineral toxicities are major constraints to agricultural production in extensive areas of the humid tropics and subtropics. The natural process of soil acidification is often intensified by agricultural practices, particularly nitrogen fertilization, and acid precipitation. This paper briefly discusses the factors contributing to acid-soil infertility, effects on plant growth, and acid-soil treatments in temperate climates particularly liming. However, these treatments are not easily adaptable to tropical regions. However, the development of cultivars adapted to the acid soil complex is a promising alternative. The paper goes on to present several topics related to cultivar development: acid soils of tropical America; identification of germplasm adapted to acid soils; plant adaptation mechanisms for acid soils; improvement of acid-soil adaptation in crops; case study of upland rice by the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical; tropical foages for livestock; and contribution of adapted plants to sustainable production systems. 50 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Research on Monitoring of Soil Humidity Based on AMSR-E Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to establish AMSR-E soil humidity monitoring model to realize the real-time monitoring of soil humidity.[Method] By dint of evaporation(small type) in Guangxi,daily precipitation,daily average maximum temperature,daily minimum relative humidity,≤ 5 mm precipitation day,as well as AMSR-E soil humidity data,with Stepwise regression method,soil humidity real-time monitoring was studied based on GIS technology,and monitoring result.[Result] The low soil humidity in Guangxi on September 2...

  16. Retrieval and Validation of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from SAPHIR aboard Megha-Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Nizy; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Raju C, Suresh; Pillai Renju, Ramachandran; Oommen John, Viju

    Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) has been derived from brightness temperature of SAPHIR payload aboard Megha-Tropiques (MT) mission. The channels of SAPHIR are very close to the water vapor absorption peak at 183.31GHz. First three channels at 183.31±0.2 GHz, 183.31±1.1 GHz and 183.31±2.8 are used for upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) studies. The channel at 183.31±0.2 GHz enables retrieval of humidity up to the highest altitude possible with the present nadir looking microwave humidity sounders. Transformation coefficients for the first three channels for all the incidence angles have been derived using the simulated brightness temperatures and Jocobians with Chevellier data set as input to the radiative transfer model ARTS. These coefficients are used to convert brightness temperatures to upper tropospheric humidity from different channels. A stringent deep convective cloud screeing has been done using the brightness temperatures of SAPHIR itself. The retrieved UTH has been validated with the Jacobian weighted UTH derived from collocated radiosonde observations and also with the humidity profiles derived from ground based microwave radiometer data. UTH variation over the inter-tropical region on global basis has been studied for one year, taking the advantage of the first humidity product with high spatial and temporal resolution over the tropical belt, unbiased with specific local times of the satellite pass. These data set have been used to adress the seasonal and spatial variability of humidity in the tropical upper tropospheric region and humidity variability during Indian monsoon. The details of the MT-SAPHIR characteristics, methodology and results will be presented. begin{enumerate} begin{center}

  17. New Equation for Estimating Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Humid-Tropical Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sangkertadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research focusing on thermal comfort at outdoor spaces in humid tropical climate. The study was conducted in the city of Manado, Indonesia inthe years 2011 and 2012, by way of field-experimentation and measurements of microclimate.From the results of measurements and questionnaires, it was carried out development of regression equations. Through statistical analysis it has been generated three thermal comfort equations for outdoor, which each for normal walking, briskwalking, and sitting with doing a moderate activity. Equations are functions of Ta(air temperature, Tg(globe temperature, v(wind velocity, RH(Relative humidity and Adu(body surface area. The output of the equations is scale of thermal comfort level referring to PMV (Predicted Mean Vote, where 0 is comfortable or neutral, +3 is very hot, -2 is cold, .etc. The equations are uniquely for the people wearing tropical clothing type (about 0.5 to 0.7 clo. The validation of the equations was done through comparison with other equations that originated from the studies of non-tropical humid climates. Simulations using the equations were also be done in order to know effect of micro climate on outdoor thermal comfort.Keywords: thermal comfort, tropical-humid, micro-climate, Manado

  18. Taxonomy and remote sensing of leaf mass per area (LMA) in humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory P. Asner; Roberta E. Martin; Raul Tupayachi; Ruth Emerson; Paola Martinez; Felipe Sinca; George V.N. Powell; S. Joseph Wright; Ariel E. Lugo

    2011-01-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a trait of central importance to plant physiology and ecosystem function, but LMA patterns in the upper canopies of humid tropical forests have proved elusive due to tall species and high diversity. We collected top-of-canopy leaf samples from 2873 individuals in 57 sites spread across the Neotropics, Australasia, and Caribbean and Pacific...

  19. How important is tropospheric humidity for coastal rainfall in the tropics?

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has community have shown that tropical convection and rainfall is sensitive to mid-tropospheric humidity. Therefore it has been suggested to improve the representation of moist convection by making cumulus parameterizations more sensitive to mid-tropospheric moisture. Climate models show considerable rainfall biases in coastal tropical areas, where approx. 33 % of the overall rainfall received is associated with coastal land-sea interaction. Building on an algorithm to objectively identify rainfall that is associated with land-sea interaction we investigate whether the relationship between rainfall in coastal regions and atmospheric humidity differs from that over the open ocean or over inland areas. We combine 3-hourly satellite estimates of rainfall with humidity estimates from reanalyses and investigate if coastal rainfall reveals the well known relationship between area-averaged precipitation and column integrated moisture. We find that rainfall that is associated with coastal land-sea eff...

  20. Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen Compounds in Humid Tropical Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Cuesta-Santos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid deposition, a direct effect of gaseous air pollutants, is causing widespread damage to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Further, these pollutants are responsible for the corrosion of building materials and cultural objects, as well as having an impact on human health. In Cuba, main atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds varies from approximately 12.0 to 65.0 kg N ha�1 year�1 in rural areas. Ammonia and ammonium are the most important elements in Cuba�s tropical conditions.

  1. Multi-decadal carbon and water relations of African tropical humid forests: a tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufkens, Koen; Helle, Gerd; Beeckman, Hans; de Haulleville, Thales; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Boeckx, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the temporal dynamics of the carbon sequestering capacity and dynamics of African tropical humid forest ecosystems in response to various environmental drivers. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the absence of ecosystem scale flux measurements of gas exchange. However, tree growth often displays itself as alternating pattern of visible rings due to the seasonally varying growth speed of the vascular cambium. Consequently, analysis of tree growth through tree-ring analysis provides us with insights into past responses of the carbon sequestering capacity of key species to abrupt ecosystem disturbances and, while slower, a changing climate. Not only does the width and density of growth rings reflect annual growth but their isotopic composition of 13C/12C and 18O/16O isotopes also reveal the environmental conditions in which the trees were growing. In particular, stable isotope ratios in tree-rings of carbon are influenced by fractionation through carboxylation during photosynthesis and changes in leaf stomatal conductance. Similarly, fractionation of oxygen isotopes of soil water occurs at the leaf level through evapo-transipiration. As a consequence, 18O/16O (δ18O) values in wood cores will reflect both the signal of the source water as well as that of for example summer humidity. Therefore, both C and O stable isotopes might not only be valuable as proxy data for past climatic conditions but they also serve as an important tool in understanding carbon and water relations within a tropical forest ecosystems. To this end we correlate long term climate records (1961 - present) with tree ring measurement of incremental growth and high resolution analysis of tree-core stable isotope composition(δ13C , δ18O) at a tropical humid forests in the DR Congo. The Yangambi Man And Biosphere (MAB) reserve is located in the north-eastern part of DR Congo, with a distinct tropical rainforest climate. In addition to the tree-core data records and

  2. Contradictory hydrological impacts of afforestation in the humid tropics evidenced by long-term field monitoring and simulation modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Guillaume; Ribolzi, Olivier; de Rouw, Anneke; Pierret, Alain; Latsachak, Keoudone; Silvera, Norbert; Pham Dinh, Rinh; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Robain, Henri; Taccoen, Adrien; Sengphaathith, Phouthamaly; Mouche, Emmanuel; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Tran Duc, Toan; Valentin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The humid tropics are exposed to an unprecedented modernisation of agriculture involving rapid and mixed land-use changes with contrasted environmental impacts. Afforestation is often mentioned as an unambiguous solution for restoring ecosystem services and enhancing biodiversity. One consequence of afforestation is the alteration of streamflow variability which controls habitats, water resources, and flood risks. We demonstrate that afforestation by tree planting or by natural forest regeneration can induce opposite hydrological changes. An observatory including long-term field measurements of fine-scale land-use mosaics and of hydrometeorological variables has been operating in several headwater catchments in tropical southeast Asia since 2000. The GR2M water balance model, repeatedly calibrated over successive 1-year periods and used in simulation mode with the same year of rainfall input, allowed the hydrological effect of land-use change to be isolated from that of rainfall variability in two of these catchments in Laos and Vietnam. Visual inspection of hydrographs, correlation analyses, and trend detection tests allowed causality between land-use changes and changes in seasonal streamflow to be ascertained. In Laos, the combination of shifting cultivation system (alternation of rice and fallow) and the gradual increase of teak tree plantations replacing fallow led to intricate streamflow patterns: pluri-annual streamflow cycles induced by the shifting system, on top of a gradual streamflow increase over years caused by the spread of the plantations. In Vietnam, the abandonment of continuously cropped areas combined with patches of mix-trees plantations led to the natural re-growth of forest communities followed by a gradual drop in streamflow. Soil infiltrability controlled by surface crusting is the predominant process explaining why two modes of afforestation (natural regeneration vs. planting) led to opposite changes in streamflow regime. Given that

  3. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these three satellite instruments are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hPa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is in the order of 6 %RHi for humidity and 50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass is for these regions found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maximum in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (below the 1-σ uncertainty. The models show also clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to a varying degree.

  4. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these two satellite combinations are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hpa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is ~7 RHi for humidity and ~50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass for these regions is found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maxima in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (outside the 1-σ uncertainty. The models also show clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to varying degrees.

  5. Mycosphere Essay 8: A review of genus Agaricus in tropical and humid subtropical regions of Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Karunarathna, Samantha Chandranath; Chen, J.; Mortimer, P.E.; Xu, J.C.; Zhao, R.L.; Callac, Philippe; Hyde, K.D.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Agaricus includes both edible and poisonous species, with more than 400 species worldwide. This genus includes many species, which are enormously important as sources of food and medicine, such as the button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and the almond mushroom (Agaricus subrufescens). This paper reviews the genus Agaricus in tropical and humid subtropical regions of Asia, including the history, characteristics, pertinent morphological and organoleptic taxonomic traits, molecular phy...

  6. How important is tropospheric humidity for coastal rainfall in the tropics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Martin; Jakob, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Climate models show considerable rainfall biases in coastal tropical areas, where approximately 33% of the overall rainfall received is associated with coastal land-sea interaction. Building on an algorithm to objectively identify rainfall that is associated with land-sea interaction we investigate whether the relationship between rainfall in coastal regions and atmospheric humidity differs from that over the open ocean or over inland areas. We combine 3-hourly satellite estimates of rainfall with humidity estimates from reanalyses and investigate if coastal rainfall reveals the well-known relationship between area-averaged precipitation and column-integrated moisture. We find that rainfall that is associated with coastal land-sea effects occurs under much drier midtropospheric conditions than that over the ocean and does not exhibit a pronounced critical value of humidity. In addition, the dependence of the amount of rainfall on midtropospheric moisture is significantly weaker when the rainfall is coastally influenced.

  7. Changes in Blood Constituents of Rabbits Subjected to Transportation under Hot, Humid Tropical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyinsige, K.; Sazili, A. Q.; Aghwan, Z. A.; Zulkifli, I.; Goh, Y. M.; Fatimah, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike Europe (particularly, Italy and Spain), where a number of studies have been conducted on the stressful effects of transport on rabbit welfare, few studies have been conducted on transportation of rabbits under hot, humid tropical conditions experienced in countries like Malaysia. We studied the effects of transportation in hot humid tropical conditions of Malaysia on physiometabolic changes in New Zealand white rabbits. Eighty experimental animals were divided into two groups of 40 bucks each and transported for either 3 or 1 h. Transportation caused a significant upsurge of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase activities (p<0.001) though did not significantly affect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (p = 0.0706). Both transportation periods caused elevation in plasma glucose levels, lactic acidosis and dehydration as evidenced through elevated packed cell volume and plasma protein concentration. It was concluded that regardless of the duration, transport of rabbits under hot humid tropical conditions, resulted in heat distress since the rabbits showed hyperglycemia, hypercalcemia, lactacidemia, lymphocytopenia, dehydration and increase in blood enzyme activities. PMID:25049862

  8. Land use change effects on runoff generation in a humid tropical montane cloud forest region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Muñoz-Villers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF provide critical hydrological services to downstream regions throughout much of the humid tropics, catchment hydrology and impacts associated with forest conversion in these ecosystems remain poorly understood. Here, we compare the annual, seasonal and event-scale streamflow patterns and runoff generation processes of three neighbouring headwater catchments in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico with similar pedological and geological characteristics, but different land cover: old-growth TMCF (MAT, 20 yr-old naturally regenerating TMCF (SEC and a heavily grazed pasture (PAS. We used a 2 yr record of high resolution rainfall and stream flow data (2008–2010 in combination with stable isotope and chemical tracer data collected for a series of storms during a 6-week period of increasing antecedent wetness (wetting-up cycle. Our results showed that annual and seasonal streamflow patterns of the MAT and SEC were similar. In contrast, the PAS showed a 10% higher mean annual streamflow, most likely because of a lower rainfall interception. During the wetting-up cycle, storm runoff ratios increased at all three catchments (from 11 to 54% for the MAT, 7 to 52% for the SEC and 3 to 59% for the PAS. With the increasing antecedent wetness, hydrograph separation analysis showed progressive increases of pre-event water contributions to total stormflow (from 35 to 99% in the MAT, 26 to 92% in the SEC and 64 to 97% in the PAS. At all three sites, rainfall-runoff responses were dominated by subsurface flow generation processes for the majority of storms. However, for the largest and most intense storm (typically occurring once every 2 yr, sampled under wet antecedent conditions, the event water contribution in the PAS (34% on average was much higher than in the forests (5% on average, indicating that rainfall infiltration capacity of the PAS was exceeded. This result suggests that despite the high permeability of the

  9. Environmental and agricultural benefits of a management system designed for sandy loam soils of the humid tropics Benefícios ambientais e agronômicos de um agrossistema definido para solos de textura franco arenosa do trópico úmido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana das Chagas Ferreira Aguiar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable management of soils with low natural fertility on family farms in the humid tropics is a great challenge and overcoming it would be an enormous benefit for the environment and the farmers. The objective of this study was to assess the environmental and agronomic benefits of alley cropping, based on the evaluation of C sequestration, soil quality indicators, and corn yields. Combinations of four legumes were used in alley cropping systems in the following treatments: Clitoria fairchildiana + Cajanus cajan; Acacia mangium + Cajanus cajan; Leucaena leucocephala + Cajanus cajan; Clitoria fairchildiana + Leucaena leucocephala; Leucaena leucocephala + Acacia mangium and a control. Corn was used as a cash crop. The C content was determined in the different compartments of soil organic matter, CEC, available P, base saturation, percentage of water saturation, the period of the root hospitality factor below the critical level and corn yield. It was concluded that alley cropping could substitute the slash and burn system in the humid tropics. The main environmental benefit of alley cropping is the maintenance of a dynamic equilibrium between C input and output that could sustain up to 10 Mg ha-1 of C in the litter layer, decreasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Alley cropping is also beneficial from the agricultural point of view, because it increases base saturation and decreases physical resistance to root penetration in the soil layer 0 - 10 cm, which ensures the increase and sustainability of corn yield.O manejo sustentável dos solos de baixa fertilidade natural na agricultura familiar do trópico tem sido um grande desafio, que, se vencido, resultará em vantagens para o ambiente e para os agricultores. Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar os benefícios ambiental e agronômico de um cultivo em aleias, por meio da determinação do C sequestrado, dos indicadores da qualidade do solo e da produtividade da cultura do milho

  10. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of trace metals in humid subtropical soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, several physicochemical properties of sub-tropical soil (up to 20 cm depth) like water holding capacity, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, texture, pH, and electrical conductivity were determined along with the trace metals, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, in order to evaluate inter-relations among the trace metals and the soil properties. The contribution of the trace metals to ecotoxicological risk was assessed using various tools. Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn contents were found to be lower than the world average, but Co, Ni, and Pb had higher contents. The trace metal concentrations were utilized to obtain the pollution index and the potential ecotoxicological aspects. The trace metals were shown to have come from similar origin and their retention in the soil was contributed by properties like organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, clay content and water holding capacity of the soil. The pollution index showed that the trace metals had the sequence of Pb (considerably polluted) > Co, Ni (moderately polluted) > Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn (unpolluted). The composite ecological risk index was the highest in agricultural land with irrigation and fertilizer use, and was the lowest in the forest land.

  11. Global change effects on humid tropical forests: Evidence for biogeochemical and biodiversity shifts at an ecosystem scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Daniela F.; Karpman, Jason; Ashdown, Daniel; Cao, Qian; Ciochina, Mark; Halterman, Sarah; Lydon, Scott; Neupane, Avishesh

    2016-09-01

    Government and international agencies have highlighted the need to focus global change research efforts on tropical ecosystems. However, no recent comprehensive review exists synthesizing humid tropical forest responses across global change factors, including warming, decreased precipitation, carbon dioxide fertilization, nitrogen deposition, and land use/land cover changes. This paper assesses research across spatial and temporal scales for the tropics, including modeling, field, and controlled laboratory studies. The review aims to (1) provide a broad understanding of how a suite of global change factors are altering humid tropical forest ecosystem properties and biogeochemical processes; (2) assess spatial variability in responses to global change factors among humid tropical regions; (3) synthesize results from across humid tropical regions to identify emergent trends in ecosystem responses; (4) identify research and management priorities for the humid tropics in the context of global change. Ecosystem responses covered here include plant growth, carbon storage, nutrient cycling, biodiversity, and disturbance regime shifts. The review demonstrates overall negative effects of global change on all ecosystem properties, with the greatest uncertainty and variability in nutrient cycling responses. Generally, all global change factors reviewed, except for carbon dioxide fertilization, demonstrate great potential to trigger positive feedbacks to global warming via greenhouse gas emissions and biogeophysical changes that cause regional warming. This assessment demonstrates that effects of decreased rainfall and deforestation on tropical forests are relatively well understood, whereas the potential effects of warming, carbon dioxide fertilization, nitrogen deposition, and plant species invasions require more cross-site, mechanistic research to predict tropical forest responses at regional and global scales.

  12. Interactive effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on soil microbial communities in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Tao; Gilliam, Frank S; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition in humid tropical regions may exacerbate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests on highly weathered soils. However, it is not clear how P availability affects soil microbes and soil carbon (C), or how P processes interact with N deposition in tropical forests. We examined the effects of N and P additions on soil microbes and soil C pools in a N-saturated old-growth tropical forest in southern China to test the hypotheses that (1) N and P addition will have opposing effects on soil microbial biomass and activity, (2) N and P addition will alter the composition of the microbial community, (3) the addition of N and P will have interactive effects on soil microbes and (4) addition-mediated changes in microbial communities would feed back on soil C pools. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used to quantify the soil microbial community following four treatments: Control, N addition (15 g N m(-2) yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2) yr(-1)), and N&P addition (15 g N m(-2) yr(-1) plus 15 g P m(-2) yr(-1)). These were applied from 2007 to 2011. Whereas additions of P increased soil microbial biomass, additions of N reduced soil microbial biomass. These effects, however, were transient, disappearing over longer periods. Moreover, N additions significantly increased relative abundance of fungal PLFAs and P additions significantly increased relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi PLFAs. Nitrogen addition had a negative effect on light fraction C, but no effect on heavy fraction C and total soil C. In contrast, P addition significantly decreased both light fraction C and total soil C. However, there were no interactions between N addition and P addition on soil microbes. Our results suggest that these nutrients are not co-limiting, and that P rather than N is limiting in this tropical forest.

  13. Interactive effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on soil microbial communities in a tropical forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen (N deposition in humid tropical regions may exacerbate phosphorus (P deficiency in forests on highly weathered soils. However, it is not clear how P availability affects soil microbes and soil carbon (C, or how P processes interact with N deposition in tropical forests. We examined the effects of N and P additions on soil microbes and soil C pools in a N-saturated old-growth tropical forest in southern China to test the hypotheses that (1 N and P addition will have opposing effects on soil microbial biomass and activity, (2 N and P addition will alter the composition of the microbial community, (3 the addition of N and P will have interactive effects on soil microbes and (4 addition-mediated changes in microbial communities would feed back on soil C pools. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used to quantify the soil microbial community following four treatments: Control, N addition (15 g N m(-2 yr(-1, P addition (15 g P m(-2 yr(-1, and N&P addition (15 g N m(-2 yr(-1 plus 15 g P m(-2 yr(-1. These were applied from 2007 to 2011. Whereas additions of P increased soil microbial biomass, additions of N reduced soil microbial biomass. These effects, however, were transient, disappearing over longer periods. Moreover, N additions significantly increased relative abundance of fungal PLFAs and P additions significantly increased relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi PLFAs. Nitrogen addition had a negative effect on light fraction C, but no effect on heavy fraction C and total soil C. In contrast, P addition significantly decreased both light fraction C and total soil C. However, there were no interactions between N addition and P addition on soil microbes. Our results suggest that these nutrients are not co-limiting, and that P rather than N is limiting in this tropical forest.

  14. Hydroclimatic controls on non-stationary stream water ages in humid tropical catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkel, Christian; Geris, Josie; Molina, Maria Jose; Mendez, Carlos; Arce, Rafael; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Streams in humid tropical countries provide a wide range of ecosystem services, yet a good understanding of their hydrological functioning is severely limited by lack of data. The transit time of water is a fundamental characteristic of catchment functioning and can often be related to water quality dynamics, thus providing potentially important information for water managers in these environments. In this study, we applied the widely used lumped convolution integral model in a moving window approach to acknowledge the time-variance of transit time distributions (TTD) and resulting moments such as the mean transit time (MTT). We show that for a two-year (2012-2014) rainfall-runoff stable isotope record from almost daily sampling in a humid tropical 30 km2 catchment in southern Costa Rica, the MTTs are generally short ( 3m/year) and events occurring throughout the year, the seasonality of rainfall and distinct moisture origin (Pacific, Atlantic and land surface), the likely dominance of quick near-surface flow paths and relatively low subsurface storage of the underlying volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The moisture origin of rainfall was found to be the most dominant driver of time-variable TTDs as indicated by the changing average wind directions following the transition from the dry into the wet season. This isotope study revealed a highly dynamic system that is likely to be sensitive to environmental change.

  15. Hydroclimatic controls on non-stationary stream water ages in humid tropical catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkel, Christian; Geris, Josie; Molina, Maria José; Mendez, Carlos; Arce, Rafael; Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Streams in humid tropical countries provide a wide range of ecosystem services, yet a good understanding of their hydrological functioning is severely limited by lack of data. The transit time of water is a fundamental characteristic of catchment functioning and can often be related to water quality dynamics, thus providing potentially important information for water managers in these environments. In this study, we applied the widely used lumped convolution integral model in a moving window approach to acknowledge the time-variance of transit time distributions (TTD) and resulting moments such as the mean transit time (MTT). We show that for a two-year (2012-2014) rainfall-runoff stable isotope record from almost daily sampling in a humid tropical 30 km2 catchment in southern Costa Rica, the MTTs are generally short (3 m/year) and events occurring throughout the year, the seasonality of rainfall and distinct moisture origin (Pacific, Atlantic and land surface), the likely dominance of quick near-surface flow paths and relatively low subsurface storage of the underlying volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The moisture origin of rainfall was found to be the most dominant driver of time-variable TTDs as indicated by the changing average wind directions following the transition from the dry into the wet season. This isotope study revealed a highly dynamic system that is likely to be sensitive to environmental change.

  16. Amplification of wildfire area burnt by hydrological drought in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Muh; Torfs, Paul J. J. F.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Jones, Philip D.; Murdiyarso, Daniel; van Lanen, Henny A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Borneo's diverse ecosystems, which are typical humid tropical conditions, are deteriorating rapidly, as the area is experiencing recurrent large-scale wildfires, affecting atmospheric composition and influencing regional climate processes. Studies suggest that climate-driven drought regulates wildfires, but these overlook subsurface processes leading to hydrological drought, an important driver. Here, we show that models which include hydrological processes better predict area burnt than those solely based on climate data. We report that the Borneo landscape has experienced a substantial hydrological drying trend since the early twentieth century, leading to progressive tree mortality, more severe than in other tropical regions. This has caused massive wildfires in lowland Borneo during the past two decades, which we show are clustered in years with large areas of hydrological drought coinciding with strong El Niño events. Statistical modelling evidence shows amplifying wildfires and greater area burnt in response to El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) strength, when hydrology is considered. These results highlight the importance of considering hydrological drought for wildfire prediction, and we recommend that hydrology should be considered in future studies of the impact of projected ENSO strength, including effects on tropical ecosystems, and biodiversity conservation.

  17. Aerosol influenza transmission risk contours: A study of humid tropics versus winter temperate zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borup Birthe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, much attention has been given to the spread of influenza around the world. With the continuing human outbreak of H5N1 beginning in 2003 and the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, focus on influenza and other respiratory viruses has been increased. It has been accepted for decades that international travel via jet aircraft is a major vector for global spread of influenza, and epidemiological differences between tropical and temperate regions observed. Thus we wanted to study how indoor environmental conditions (enclosed locations in the tropics and winter temperate zones contribute to the aerosol spread of influenza by travelers. To this end, a survey consisting of 632 readings of temperature (T versus relative humidity (RH in 389 different enclosed locations air travelers are likely to visit in 8 tropical nations were compared to 102 such readings in 2 Australian cities, including ground transport, hotels, shops, offices and other publicly accessible locations, along with 586 time course readings from aircraft. Results An influenza transmission risk contour map was developed for T versus RH. Empirical equations were created for estimating: 1. risk relative to temperature and RH, and 2. time parameterized influenza transmission risk. Using the transmission risk contours and equations, transmission risk for each country's locations was compared with influenza reports from the countries. Higher risk enclosed locations in the tropics included new automobile transport, luxury buses, luxury hotels, and bank branches. Most temperate locations were high risk. Conclusion Environmental control is recommended for public health mitigation focused on higher risk enclosed locations. Public health can make use of the methods developed to track potential vulnerability to aerosol influenza. The methods presented can also be used in influenza modeling. Accounting for differential aerosol transmission using T and RH can potentially explain

  18. The role of soil air composition for noble gas tracer applications in tropical groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese; Peregovich, Bernhard; Machado, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved noble gases (NGs) in groundwater provide a well-established tool for paleo temperature reconstruction. However, reliable noble gas temperature (NGT) determination needs appropriate assumptions or rather an exact knowledge of soil air composition. Deviations of soil air NG partial pressures from atmospheric values have already been found in mid latitudes during summer time as a consequence of subsurface oxygen depletion. This effect depends on ambient temperature and humidity and is thus expected to be especially strong in humid tropical soils, which was not investigated so far. We therefore studied NGs in soil air and shallow groundwater near Santarém (Pará, Brazil) at the end of the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Soil air data confirms a correlation between NG partial pressures, the sum value of O2+CO2 and soil moisture contents. During the rainy season, we find significant NG enhancements in soil air by up to 7% with respect to the atmosphere. This is twice as much as observed during the dry season. Groundwater samples show neon excess values between 15% and 120%. Nearly all wells show no seasonal variations of excess air, even though the local river level seasonally fluctuates by about 8 m. Assuming atmospheric NG contents in soil air, fitted NGTs underestimate the measured groundwater temperature by about 1-2° C. However, including enhanced soil air NG contents as observed during the rainy season, resulting NGTs are in good agreement with local groundwater temperatures. Our presented data allows for a better understanding of subsurface NG variations. This is essential with regard to NG tracer applications in humid tropical areas, for which reliable paleoclimate data is of major importance for modern climate research.

  19. Effect of Stocking Density on Performance of Growing Rabbits in Semi-Humid Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyeghe-Erakpotobor Grace, T.

    2005-01-01

    rabbits as stocking density increases in week 1-2 and 3-4. Feed conversion ratio was poorer at higher densities (16.7, 20 rabbits/m2 than at lower densities (6.7, 10, 13.3 rabbits/m2. There was no definite relationship between stocking density and mortality rate of rabbits. Rabbits stocked at 6.7 to 13.3 rabbits/m2 had significantly higher body condition score and fur condition compared with those stocked at 16.7 and 20 rabbits/m2. There were no differences in fighty bites for all the stocking densities. It is concluded from this study that the optimum stocking density for rabbits in the semi-humid tropics is 13.3 rabbits/m2.

  20. Measuring Thermal Stress of Dairy Cattle Based on Temperature Humidity Index (THI in Tropical Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort for workers is very important factor to increase their performance, as well as the comfort level of dairy cattle will influence in milk productivity. The purposes of the paper is to measure the level of heat stress and then use the information to design the dairy cattle house for increasing thermal comfort. The research is started with literature review of heat stress and early survey of environment condition e.g. temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. The next step is using the information to determine the temperature humidity index (THI level for dairy cattle with maximum THI = 86 and 84 (moderate stress. The 3D CAD model and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulation are employed to looking for solution for reducing the discomfort thermal of dairy cattle. A scenario (fan air conditioning to get better condition of thermal comfort have been successfully presented with final THI index = 76 and 78 (mild stress. Finally, the paper shows how to reduce heat stress of cattle house by installation 3 exhaust fans in tropical climate.

  1. Soil resistivity over root area ratio, soil humidity, and bulk density: laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastini, Enrico; Giambastiani, Yamuna; Preti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about root system distribution covers an important role in slope shallow stability stud-ies, as this factor grants an increase in soil geotechnical properties (soil cohesion and friction an-gle) and determines a different underground water circulation. Published studies (Amato et al., 2008 and 2011; Censini et al., 2014) about in situ application of ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomo-graphy) analysis show how the root presence affects the measurable soil resistivity values, confirm-ing the suitability to investigate the application of such technique, aiming to estimate root density in soil with an indirect and non-invasive method. This study, laboratory-based and led on reconstructed samples in controlled condition, aim to find a correlation between the resistivity variations and the various factors that can affect them (humid-ity, bulk density, presence of foreign bodies, temperature). The tests involved a clay-loam soil (USDA classification) taken from Quaracchi (Florence, Italy), in an experimental fir-wood (Picea abies) owned by the Department of Agricultural, Food and For-estry System, Florence University, a previously chosen site for field ERT applications. The row ma-terial has been dried out in a lab stove, grounded and sieved at 2 mm, and then placed in a lexan box (30 x 20 x 20 cm) without compaction. Inside the sample have been inserted 3 series of 4 iron electrodes, insulated along the shaft and with the conductive end placed at three different depth: 2 cm from surface, in the middle of the sample and in contact with the bottom of the box; resistivity measures are conducted on the three levels using a Syscal R2 with electrodes connected in a dipole-dipole configuration. Root presence is simulated inserting bamboo spits (simple geometry, replicable "R.A.R.") in varying number from 0 to 16 in every area between two contiguous electrodes. The tests are repeated in time, monitoring the natural variations in humidity (evapotranspiration) and bulk

  2. Effects of soil water depletion on the water relations in tropical kudzu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaucto Bellarmino de Pereira-Netto

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropical kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb. Benth., Leguminosae: Faboideae is native to the humid Southeastern Asia. Tropical kudzu has potential as a cover crop in regions subjected to dryness. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effect of soil water depletion on leaflet relative water content (RWC, stomatal conductance (g and temperature (T L in tropical kudzu. RWC of waterstressed plants dropped from 96 to 78%, following a reduction in SWC from 0.25 to 0.17 g (H2O.g (dry soil-1.Stomatal conductance of stressed plants decreased from 221 to 98 mmol.m-2.s-1, following the reduction in soil water content (SWC. The day after re-irrigation, g of water stressed plants was 15% lower than g of unstressed plants. Differences in T L between waterstressed and unstressed plants (deltaT L rose linearly from 0.1 to 2.2ºC following progressive water deficit. RWC and T L of waterstressed plants paralled RWC and T L of unstressed plants the day after reirrigation. The strong decrease in SWC found in this study only induced moderate water stress in tropical kudzu. In addition, tropical kudzu recover rapidly from the induced water stress after the re-irrigation.

  3. Morphological, physico-chemical and geochemical characterization of two weathering profiles developed on limestone from the Mintom Formation in the tropical humid zone of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engon, Thierry Constant; Abane, Monique Abessolo-Angue; Zo'o Zame, Philémon; Ekomane, Emile; Bekoa, Etienne; Mvogo, Kisito; Bitom, Dieudonné

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the morphology, physico-chemistry and geochemistry of two weathering profiles developed on limestone using observations area, basic analysis, and X-ray Fluorescence. The results showed that these soils have three main sets from the bottom to the top: the alteritic set (isalteritic and alloteritic horizons), the glaebular set (exclusively on profile TCR) with a more or less hardened duricrust, and the loose set (loose clayey and humiferous horizons). The soils were acid, with moderate cation exchange capacity, low to moderate sum of bases (0.96-8.24 meq/100 g). The base saturation, organic carbon and C/N ratio (˂15) were low. The geochemical signatures of the bedrock along the whole profile are not preserved, with SiO2 (∼45.26 wt%) being the dominant oxide followed by Al2O3 (∼13.37 wt%) and Fe2O3 (∼09.36 wt%). Also, the Si/Al ratio is always higher than 1 (2.17-4.43). The other major oxides such as MgO, K2O and Na2O show negligible contents in the profiles, while CaO is well represented at the top of the isalteritic horizon reaching 14.25 wt%. Weathering indices show that CaO, MgO, Na2O, and K2O are rapidly lost during chemical weathering and the amount of these elements lost is proportional to the degree of weathering. Humid tropical soils show pedological evolution mainly dominated by the behaviour of silicon and aluminium, with an intensive release of carbonates during the early stage of weathering. However, contrary to soils in temperate climates, in which bisiallitisation is the predominant process, soils of the humid tropical zone, characterized by high evacuation of silica concomitantly to notable accumulations of aluminium, allitisation and monosiallitisation predominate.

  4. Humid tropical forest clearing from 2000 to 2005 quantified by using multitemporal and multiresolution remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M.C.; Stehman, S.V.; Potapov, P.V.; Loveland, T.R.; Townshend, J.R.G.; DeFries, R.S.; Pittman, K.W.; Arunarwati, B.; Stolle, F.; Steininger, M.K.; Carroll, M.; DiMiceli, C.

    2008-01-01

    Forest cover is an important input variable for assessing changes to carbon stocks, climate and hydrological systems, biodiversity richness, and other sustainability science disciplines. Despite incremental improvements in our ability to quantify rates of forest clearing, there is still no definitive understanding on global trends. Without timely and accurate forest monitoring methods, policy responses will be uninformed concerning the most basic facts of forest cover change. Results of a feasible and cost-effective monitoring strategy are presented that enable timely, precise, and internally consistent estimates of forest clearing within the humid tropics. A probability-based sampling approach that synergistically employs low and high spatial resolution satellite datasets was used to quantify humid tropical forest clearing from 2000 to 2005. Forest clearing is estimated to be 1.39% (SE 0.084%) of the total biome area. This translates to an estimated forest area cleared of 27.2 million hectares (SE 2.28 million hectares), and represents a 2.36% reduction in area of humid tropical forest. Fifty-five percent of total biome clearing occurs within only 6% of the biome area, emphasizing the presence of forest clearing 'hotspots.' Forest loss in Brazil accounts for 47.8% of total biome clearing, nearly four times that of the next highest country, Indonesia, which accounts for 12.8%. Over three-fifths of clearing occurs in Latin America and over one-third in Asia. Africa contributes 5.4% to the estimated loss of humid tropical forest cover, reflecting the absence of current agro-industrial scale clearing in humid tropical Africa. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  5. Humid tropical forest clearing from 2000 to 2005 quantified by using multitemporal and multiresolution remotely sensed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew C; Stehman, Stephen V; Potapov, Peter V; Loveland, Thomas R; Townshend, John R G; DeFries, Ruth S; Pittman, Kyle W; Arunarwati, Belinda; Stolle, Fred; Steininger, Marc K; Carroll, Mark; Dimiceli, Charlene

    2008-07-08

    Forest cover is an important input variable for assessing changes to carbon stocks, climate and hydrological systems, biodiversity richness, and other sustainability science disciplines. Despite incremental improvements in our ability to quantify rates of forest clearing, there is still no definitive understanding on global trends. Without timely and accurate forest monitoring methods, policy responses will be uninformed concerning the most basic facts of forest cover change. Results of a feasible and cost-effective monitoring strategy are presented that enable timely, precise, and internally consistent estimates of forest clearing within the humid tropics. A probability-based sampling approach that synergistically employs low and high spatial resolution satellite datasets was used to quantify humid tropical forest clearing from 2000 to 2005. Forest clearing is estimated to be 1.39% (SE 0.084%) of the total biome area. This translates to an estimated forest area cleared of 27.2 million hectares (SE 2.28 million hectares), and represents a 2.36% reduction in area of humid tropical forest. Fifty-five percent of total biome clearing occurs within only 6% of the biome area, emphasizing the presence of forest clearing "hotspots." Forest loss in Brazil accounts for 47.8% of total biome clearing, nearly four times that of the next highest country, Indonesia, which accounts for 12.8%. Over three-fifths of clearing occurs in Latin America and over one-third in Asia. Africa contributes 5.4% to the estimated loss of humid tropical forest cover, reflecting the absence of current agro-industrial scale clearing in humid tropical Africa.

  6. Agriculture at the Edge: Landscape Variability of Soil C Stocks and Fluxes in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Peña, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paramos, or tropical alpine grasslands occurring right above the forest tree-line (2,800 - 4,700 m), are among the most transformed landscapes in the humid tropics. In the Tropical Andes, Paramos form an archipelago-like pattern from Northern Colombia to Central Peru that effectively captures atmospheric moisture originated in the Amazon-Orinoco basins, while marking the highest altitude capable of sustaining vegetation growth (i.e., 'the edge'). This study investigates the role of land management on mediating soil carbon stocks and fluxes in Paramo ecosystems of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Observations were collected at a Paramo site strongly modified by land use change, including active potato plantations, pasture, tillage, and land abandonment. Results show that undisturbed Paramos soils have high total organic carbon (TOC), high soil water content (SWC), and low soil CO2 efflux (RS) rates. However, Paramo soils that experience human intervention show lower TOC, higher and more variable RS rates, and lower SWC. This study demonstrates that changes in land use in Paramos affect differentially the accumulation and exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and offers implications for management and protection strategies of what has been deemed the fastest evolving biodiversity ecosystem in the world.

  7. The formation of fire residues associated with hunter-gatherers in humid tropical environments: A geo-ethnoarchaeological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesem, David E.; Lavi, Noa; Madella, Marco; Boaretto, Elisabetta; Ajithparsad, P.; French, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Tropical forests have been an important human habitat and played a significant role in early human dispersal and evolution. Likewise, the use of fire, besides being one of the exceptional characteristics of humans, serves as a marker for human evolution. While the use of fire by prehistoric hunter-gatherers is relatively well documented in arid and temperate environments, the archaeological evidence in humid tropical environment is to date very limited. We first review the archaeological evidence for hunter-gatherer use of fire in humid tropical environments and suggest that better understanding of formation processes is required. We present a geo-ethnoarchaeological study from South India, involving ethnography, excavations and laboratory-based analyses in order to build a new framework to study fire residues in humid tropical forests associated with hunter-gatherer's use of fire. Ethnographic observations point to a dynamic and ephemeral use of hearths. Hearths location were dictated by the social and ever-changing social dynamics of the site. The hearths deposited small amount of residues which were later swept on a daily basis, re-depositing ash and charcoal in waste areas and leaving only a microscopic signal in the original location. Particular acidic conditions and intensive biological activity within tropical sediments result in the complete dissolution of ash and bones while favouring the preservation of charcoal and phytoliths. Consequently, the identification of fire residues in humid tropical forests and the reconstruction of the human use of fire must involve multi-proxy microscopic analysis to detect its micro-signatures.

  8. Groundwater circulations within a tropical humid andesitic volcanic watershed using the temperature as a tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles, Adrien; Violette, Sophie; Hendrayana, Heru

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater flow within volcano-detritic environment, is of prime importance to many human needs and activities, from the supply of clean drinking water to the extraction of hydrocarbons or geothermal energy. However, the heterogeneity of the geological formations makes difficult to quantify the groundwater spatial distribution. Moreover, its temporal variation in tropical humid regions is sometimes poorly known. For instance, the surronding of the Merapi volcano, in Central Java, Indonesia, is an area of high but seasonal rainfall, and extensive crop irrigation. It has a large population and a need to increase food and potable water supplies depending upon exploiting groundwater ressources. The stress on these resources increases with the intensification of the demography, the agricultural practices and the industrial exploitations. In order to implement a sustainable management of the water resources, the description of the groundwater circulations and the quantification of the resources is needed. A mutidisciplinary approach has been performed at the watershed scale, including geology, hydrogeochemistry and long term hydrogeological monitoring. The data synthesis and constisency have been confirm with a numerical model of physical processes. Based on a geological and geomorphological study, the hydrogeological watershed on the Eastern flank of the Merapi volcano is composed by an alternation of aquitards (mainly ashes, tuffs and clay) and aquifers (sand, gravel and boulders). The deep aquifers are agenced in conduit following the burried channel of the paleo-rivers. The eastern flank of Merapi provides excellent example of a volcanic-sedimentary environment. From 20 cold springs of 3 spring zones, sampled on 2 hydrological years (2011 to 2013), the study of the transfer into the saturated zone from upstream to downstream, given the geological context and topography, allows to estimate the role of supply from high and low altitudes to the recharge processes. The

  9. Perceived Thermal Discomfort and Stress Behaviours Affecting Students’ Learning in Lecture Theatres in the Humid Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaraukuro Tammy Amasuomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between students’ perceived thermal discomfort and stress behaviours affecting their learning in lecture theatres in the humid tropics. Two lecture theatres, LTH-2 and 3, at the Niger Delta University, Nigeria, were used for the study. Two groups of students from the Faculties of Agriculture and Engineering and the Department of Technology Education constituted the population. The sample size selected through random sampling for Groups A and B was 210 and 370 students, respectively. Objective and self-report instruments were used for data collection. The objective instrument involved physical measurement of the two lecture theatres and of the indoor temperature, relative humidity and air movement. The self-report instrument was a questionnaire that asked for the students perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and the effect of indoor thermal comfort level on perceived stress behaviours affecting their learning. The objective indoor environmental data indicated thermal discomfort with an average temperature of 29–32 °C and relative humidity of 78% exceeding the ASHARE [1] and Olgyay [2].The students’ experienced a considerable level of thermal discomfort and also perceived that stress behaviours due to thermal discomfort affected their learning. Further, there were no significant differences in the perceived thermal discomfort levels of the two groups of students in LTH-2 and 3. Furthermore, stress behaviours affecting learning as perceived by the two groups of students did not differ significantly. In addition, no correlation existed between the perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and stress behaviour levels affecting learning for students in LTH-2, because the arousal level of the students in the thermal environment was likely higher than the arousal level for optimal performance [3,4]. However, a correlation existed in the case of students in LTH-3, which was expected because it only

  10. Urban heat island and bioclimatological conditions in a hot-humid tropical city: the example of Akure, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogun, Ifeoluwa A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of weather on human health has become an issue of increased significance in recent times, considering the increasing rate of urbanisation and the much associated heat island phenomenon. This study examines the urbanisation influence on human bioclimatic conditions in Akure, a medium sized hot-humid tropical city in Nigeria, utilising data from measurements at urban and rural sites in the city. Differences in the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variation of human bioclimatic characteristics between both environments were evaluated and tested for statistical significance. Higher frequencies of high temperatures observed in the city centre suggest a significant heat stress and health risk in this hot-humid city.

  11. Afforestation by natural regeneration or by tree planting: examples of opposite hydrological impacts evidenced by long-term field monitoring in the humid tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lacombe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The humid tropics are exposed to an unprecedented modernization of agriculture involving rapid and highly-mixed land-use changes with contrasted environmental impacts. Afforestation is often mentioned as an unambiguous solution for restoring ecosystem services and enhancing biodiversity. One consequence of afforestation is the alteration of streamflow variability controlling habitats, water resources and flood risks. We demonstrate that afforestation by tree planting or by natural forest regeneration can induce opposite hydrological changes. An observatory including long-term field measurements of fine-scale land-use mosaics and of hydro-meteorological variables has been operating in several headwater catchments in tropical Southeast Asia since 2001. The GR2M water balance model repeatedly calibrated over successive 1 year periods, and used in simulation mode with specific rainfall input, allowed the hydrological effect of land-use change to be isolated from that of rainfall variability in two of these catchments in Laos and Vietnam. Visual inspection of hydrographs, correlation analyses and trend detection tests allowed causality between land-use changes and changes in seasonal flows to be ascertained. In Laos, the combination of shifting cultivation system (alternation of rice and fallow and the gradual increase of teak tree plantations replacing fallow, led to intricate flow patterns: pluri-annual flow cycles induced by the shifting system, on top of a gradual flow increase over years caused by the spread of the plantation. In Vietnam, the abandonment of continuously cropped areas mixed with patches of tree plantations led to the natural re-growth of forest communities followed by a gradual drop in streamflow. Soil infiltrability controlled by surface crusting is the predominant process explaining why two modes of afforestation (natural regeneration or planting led to opposite changes in flow regime. Given that commercial tree plantations

  12. Flood moderation by large reservoirs in the humid tropics of Western ghat region of Kerala, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, George [Centre for Water Resources Development and Management, Sub Centre, Kottayam South P.O, Kottayam-686 039, Kerala (India); James, E.J. [Water Institute and Dean (Research), Karunya University, Coimbatore-641 114, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-07-01

    Kerala State located in the humid tropics receives an average rainfall of 2810 mm. On an average 85% of this rainfall is received during the two monsoons spread from June to November. Midland and lowland regions of several of the river basins of Kerala experience severe flood events during the monsoons. Idamalayar hydro-electric project (1987) in Periyar River basin envisages flood control apart from power generation. This paper analyzes the flood moderation by Idamalayar reservoir considering the storage regime (inflow and outflow) which is subjected to a strong inter annual variability. The role of Idamalayar reservoir in controlling the monsoon floods is analyzed using daily data (1987-2010). The results of analysis show that the flood moderation by the reservoir is 92% when water storage is less than 50%. The reduction is 87% when reservoir storage is between 50 to 90% and moderation reduces to 62% when the reservoir storage is above 90%. Non-parametric trend analysis of fifty years of hydrologic data shows a reducing trend in inflow and storage during south-west monsoon which reduced spill and subsequent flood events during north-east monsoon.

  13. Flood moderation by large reservoirs in the humid tropics of Western ghat region of Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Abe, E. J. James

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kerala State located in the humid tropics receives an average rainfall of 2810 mm. On an average 85% of this rainfall is received during the two monsoons spread from June to November. Midland and lowland regions of several of the river basins of Kerala experience severe flood events during the monsoons. Idamalayar hydro-electric project (1987 in Periyar River basin envisages flood control apart from power generation. This paper analyzes the flood moderation by Idamalayar reservoir considering the storage regime (inflow and outflow which is subjected to a strong inter annual variability. The role of Idamalayar reservoir in controlling the monsoon floods is analyzed using daily data (1987-2010. The results of analysis show that the flood moderation by the reservoir is 92% when water storage is less than 50%. The reduction is 87% when reservoir storage is between 50 to 90% and moderation reduces to 62 % when the reservoir storage is above 90%. Non-parametric trend analysis of fifty years of hydrologic data shows a reducing trend in inflow and storage during south-west monsoon which reduced spill and subsequent flood events during north-east monsoon.

  14. Suitability of multipurpose trees, shrubs and grasses to rehabilitate gullies in the sub-humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talema, Ayalew; Muys, Bart; Poesen, Jean; Padro, Roc; Dibaba, Hirko; Diels, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation plays a vital role for sustainable rehabilitation of degraded lands. However, the selection of suitable and effective plant species remains a long-lasting challenge in most parts of the sub-humid tropics. To address this challenge 18 multipurpose plant species (6 trees, 3 shrubs and 9 grasses), preselected from the regional species pool in Southwest Ethiopia were planted in severely degraded gullies and monitored from July 2011 to June 2014. The experiment had a split-plot design with farmyard manure (FYM) application, as main plot and plant species as sub-plot factors repeated in three blocks. The study revealed that grasses were the most successful to rehabilitate the gully within the monitoring period, compared to trees and shrubs. The survival rate of the four most successful grass species, Chrysopogon zizanioides, Pennisetum macrourum, Pennisetum polystachion and Pennisetum purpureum ranged from 61 to 90% with FYM application and from 20 to 85% without FYM, while most of the well-known indigenous and exotic trees and shrubs failed to survive. For the grass Pennisetum purpureum, shoot height, shoot and root dry biomass increased by 300%, 342% and 578% respectively due to FYM application, with a remarkably higher response to FYM compared to all the other studied species. The overall results demonstrate that severely degraded lands can be effectively restored by using early successional species such as locally adapted and selected grasses before the plantation of trees and shrubs.

  15. Taxonomy and remote sensing of leaf mass per area (LMA) in humid tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Emerson, Ruth; Martinez, Paola; Sinca, Felipe; Powell, George V N; Wright, S Joseph; Lugo, Ariel E

    2011-01-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a trait of central importance to plant physiology and ecosystem function, but LMA patterns in the upper canopies of humid tropical forests have proved elusive due to tall species and high diversity. We collected top-of-canopy leaf samples from 2873 individuals in 57 sites spread across the Neotropics, Australasia, and Caribbean and Pacific Islands to quantify environmental and taxonomic drivers of LMA variation, and to advance remote-sensing measures of LMA. We uncovered strong taxonomic organization of LMA, with species accounting for 70% of the global variance and up to 62% of the variation within a forest stand. Climate, growth habit, and site conditions are secondary contributors (1-23%) to the observed LMA patterns. Intraspecific variation in LMA averages 16%, which is a fraction of the variation observed between species. We then used spectroscopic remote sensing (400-2500 nm) to estimate LMA with an absolute uncertainty of 14-15 g/m2 (r2 = 0.85), or approximately 10% of the global mean. With radiative transfer modeling, we demonstrated the scalability of spectroscopic remote sensing of LMA to the canopy level. Our study indicates that remotely sensed patterns of LMA will be driven by taxonomic variation against a backdrop of environmental controls expressed at site and regional levels.

  16. Investigation on Hourly and Monthly Thermal Comfort in the Humid Tropics of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harimi Djamila

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on hourly and monthly indoor neutral temperature variations in the humid tropics are limited in literature. In Malaysia, the variation of hourly outdoor mean temperature is slightly higher than the monthly mean temperature. Consequently, this leads to the hypothesis that the variation of hourly neutral temperatures might be higher than the monthly neutral temperatures. Understanding the impact of hourly and monthly temperature variation on thermal comfort will certainly provide the design direction of future indoor environments. In this study, extensive measurements from residential buildings were used to investigate the observed variation. Linear regression and Griffiths methods were explored for analyzing the results. There was almost no variation on hourly and monthly neutral temperatures within the range under study. Further research is highly recommended due to the limited data collection and the limitations of the employed methods. It is highly advised to further investigate the hourly temperature variation on thermal comfort during nighttime and early morning. This is for an accurate interpretation of the results.

  17. Hygroscopical behaviour of basic electrodes in a tropical humid climate. Comportamiento microscopico de ciertos electrodos revistidos de caracter basico en clima tropical humedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, E.; Galeano, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the wetting kynetics of basic electrodes in a tropical humid climate is very important since the water contained in them is the main source for the atomic hydrogen absorbed by the fused metal during electric arc welding. It is also the origin of multiple defects in the added metal. A calculating method is established for evaluating the kynetics of wetness incorporation to the coating of basic electrodes exposed to a humid tropical climate. The method is based on the Fick's diffusion equation for both adequate system geometry and boundary conditions, which allows the evaluation of the effective diffusion coefficient and critical times of exposure to the different environments, along with the packing and storage conditions of electrodes. (Author)

  18. Tropical soils cultivated with tomato: fractionation and speciation of Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueirol, Roberta Corrêa; Monteiro, Francisco Antonio; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2015-04-01

    Soil acidity and the associated problems of aluminum (Al) toxicity and scarce exchangeable bases are typically the most important limiting factors of agricultural yield in wet tropical regions. The goals of this study were to test how soil lime rates affect the forms and distribution of Al in the soil fractions and how different levels of bioavailable Al affect two tomato genotypes grown in wet tropical soils. The tomato genotypes CNPH 0082 and Calabash Rouge were grown in two wet tropical soils in a greenhouse. Soil lime rates of 0, 560, and 2240 mg kg(-1) soil (clay soil) and 0, 280, and 1120 mg kg(-1) soil (sandy soil) were applied to modify Al concentrations. Dry mass production and Al concentrations were determined in shoots and roots. Al was fractionated in the soil, and the soil solution was speciated after cultivation. The Calabash Rouge genotype possesses mechanisms to tolerate Al3+, absorbed less Al, exhibited smaller reduction in growth, and lower Al concentrations in plant parts than the CNPH 0082. Increased soil pH reduced the exchangeable Al fraction and increased the fraction mainly linked to organic matter. Al in the soil in the form of complexes with organic compounds and Al(SO4)+ (at the highest lime rate) did not affect plant development. Soil acidity can be easily neutralized by liming the soil, which transforms toxic Al3+ in the soil into forms that do not harm tomato plants, thereby avoiding oxidative stress in the plants. Al-induced stress in tomatoes varies with genotypes and soil type.

  19. Agroecology and healthy food systems in semi-humid tropical Africa: Participatory research with vulnerable farming households in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyantakyi-Frimpong, Hanson; Kangmennaang, Joseph; Bezner Kerr, Rachel; Luginaah, Isaac; Dakishoni, Laifolo; Lupafya, Esther; Shumba, Lizzie; Katundu, Mangani

    2016-10-29

    This paper assesses the relationship between agroecology, food security, and human health. Specifically, we ask if agroecology can lead to improved food security and human health among vulnerable smallholder farmers in semi-humid tropical Africa. The empirical evidence comes from a cross-sectional household survey (n=1000) in two districts in Malawi, a small country in semi-humid, tropical Africa. The survey consisted of 571 agroecology-adoption and 429 non-agroecology-adoption households. Ordered logistics regression and average treatment effects models were used to determine the effect of agroecology adoption on self-reported health. Our results show that agroecology-adoption households (OR=1.37, p=0.05) were more likely to report optimal health status, and the average treatment effect shows that adopters were 12% more likely to be in optimal health. Furthermore, being moderately food insecure (OR=0.59, p=0.05) and severely food insecure (OR=0.89, p=0.10) were associated with less likelihood of reporting optimal health status. The paper concludes that with the adoption of agroecology in the semi-humid tropics, it is possible for households to diversify their crops and diets, a condition that has strong implications for improved food security, good nutrition and human health.

  20. PAIR INFLUENCE OF WIND SPEED AND MEAN RADIANT TEMPERATURE ON OUTDOOR THERMAL COMFORT OF HUMID TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkertadi Sangkertadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article is to explore knowledge of outdoor thermal comfort in humid tropical environment for urban activities especially for people in walking activity, and those who stationary/seated with moderate action. It will be characterized the pair influence of wind speed and radiant temperature on the outdoor thermal comfort. Many of researchers stated that those two microclimate variables give significant role on outdoor thermal comfort in tropical humid area. Outdoor Tropical Comfort (OTC model was used for simulation in this study. The model output is comfort scale that refers on ASHRAE definition. The model consists of two regression equations with variables of air temperature, globe temperature, wind speed, humidity and body posture, for two types of activity: walking and seated. From the results it can be stated that there is significant role of wind speed to reduce mean radiant temperature and globe temperature, when the velocity is elevated from 0.5 m/s to 2 m/s. However, the wind has not play significant role when the speed is changed from 2 m/s to 3.5 m/s. The results of the study may inspire us to implement effectiveness of electrical-fan equipment for outdoor space in order to get optimum wind speed, coupled with optimum design of shading devices to minimize radiant temperature for thermal comfort.

  1. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    within the sediment, decreasing the accuracy of the wormholes identification. To sum up, the images show that the investigation of small tropical marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments is possible by this X-ray image technique. The final 3D images were performed in two different pixel sizes (23.83 μm and 30.08 μm), which allow the identification/quantification of galleries and, therefore, supporting the improvement of knowledge on bioturbation processes in marine benthic systems. (author)

  2. Soil physical quality changes under different management systems after 10 years in Argentinian Humid Pampa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J. L.; Aparicio, V. C.; Cerda, A.

    2014-08-01

    The Argentinian Humid Pampa extends over about 60 million ha, 90% of which are agricultural lands. The southeast of the Buenos Aires Province is part of the Humid Pampa (1 206 162 ha). The main crops are wheat, sunflower, corn and soybean. The management systems used in the area are: moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow (CP) and no-till (NT). Excessive soil cultivation under MP causes decreases in the soil organic carbon content (SOC). Adopting NT may reduce the effects of intensive agriculture, through the maintenance and accumulation of SOC. However, the soil compaction under NT causes degradation of the soil structure, reduces the soil water availability and reduces the soil hydraulic conductivity. We evaluated the evolution of the soil physical parameters in three management systems. After 10 years of experiments in four farmers' fields, we found that: soil bulk density was significantly higher under NT. The change in mean weight diameter (CMWD) of aggregates increased as the management system became more intensive. We did not find significant differences in time and management systems in hydraulic conductivity at tension (h)0 cm and h=20 cm. The reduction in total porosity under NT is mainly a product of a reduction in the percentage of mesopores in the soil. Time had no statistically significant effect on the SOC content. The management system did not affect the yields of crop. In this work, the results indicate a modification of some soil physical parameters (porosity, near-saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil structure) due to uninterrupted agricultural production.

  3. The impact of forest regeneration on streamflow in 12 meso-scale humid tropical catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Beck

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although regenerating forests make up an increasingly large portion of humid tropical landscapes, comparatively little is known of their water use and effects on streamflow (Q. Since the 1950s the island of Puerto Rico has experienced widespread abandonment of pastures and agricultural lands, followed by forest regeneration. This paper examines the possible impacts of forest regeneration on several Q metrics for 12 meso-scale catchments (23–346 km2; mean precipitation 1720–3422 mm yr−1 with long (33–51 yr and simultaneous records for Q, precipitation (P, potential evapotranspiration (PET, and land cover. A simple spatially-lumped, conceptual rainfall-runoff model that uses daily P and PET time series as inputs (HBV-light was used to simulate Q for each catchment. Annual time series of observed and simulated values of four Q metrics were calculated. A least-squares trend was fitted through annual time series of the residual difference between observed and simulated time series of each Q metric. From this the total cumulative change  was calculated, representing the change in each metric after controlling for climate variability and water storage carry-over effects between years. Negative values of  were found for most catchments and Q metrics, suggesting enhanced actual evapotranspiration overall following forest regeneration. However, correlations between changes in urban or forest area and values of  were insignificant (p ≥ 0.389 for all Q metrics. This suggests there is no convincing evidence that changes in the chosen Q metrics in these Puerto Rican catchments can be ascribed to changes in urban or forest area. The present results are in line with previous studies of meso- and macro-scale (sub-tropical catchments, which generally found no significant change in Q that can be attributed to changes in forest cover. Possible explanations for the apparent lack of a clear signal may include: errors in the land-cover, climate, Q

  4. Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C.; Wieder, William R.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Climate models predict precipitation changes for much of the humid tropics, yet few studies have investigated the potential consequences of drought on soil carbon (C) cycling in this important biome. In wet tropical forests, drought could stimulate soil respiration via overall reductions in soil anoxia, but previous research suggests that litter decomposition is positively correlated with high rainfall fluxes that move large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the litter layer to the soil surface. Thus, reduced rainfall could also limit C delivery to the soil surface, reducing respiration rates. We conducted a throughfall manipulation experiment to investigate how 25% and 50% reductions in rainfall altered both C movement into soils and the effects of those DOM fluxes on soil respiration rates. In response to the experimental drought, soil respiration rates increased in both the -25% and -50% treatments. Throughfall fluxes were reduced by 26% and 55% in the -25% and -50% treatments, respectively. However, total DOM fluxes leached from the litter did not vary between treatments, because the concentrations of leached DOM reaching the soil surface increased in response to the simulated drought. Annual DOM concentrations averaged 7.7 ± 0.8, 11.2 ± 0.9, and 15.8 ± 1.2 mg C/L in the control, -25%, and -50% plots, respectively, and DOM concentrations were positively correlated with soil respiration rates. A laboratory incubation experiment confirmed the potential importance of DOM concentration on soil respiration rates, suggesting that this mechanism could contribute to the increase in CO2 fluxes observed in the reduced rainfall plots. Across all plots, the data suggested that soil CO2 fluxes were partially regulated by the magnitude and concentration of soluble C delivered to the soil, but also by soil moisture and soil oxygen availability. Together, our data suggest that declines in precipitation in tropical rain forests could drive higher CO2 fluxes

  5. The role of temperature and humidity on seasonal influenza in tropical areas: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama, 2008-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radina P Soebiyanto

    Full Text Available The role of meteorological factors on influenza transmission in the tropics is less defined than in the temperate regions. We assessed the association between influenza activity and temperature, specific humidity and rainfall in 6 study areas that included 11 departments or provinces within 3 tropical Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama.Logistic regression was used to model the weekly proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza positive samples during 2008 to 2013 (excluding pandemic year 2009. Meteorological data was obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and the Global Land Data Assimilation System. We found that specific humidity was positively associated with influenza activity in El Salvador (Odds Ratio (OR and 95% Confidence Interval of 1.18 (1.07-1.31 and 1.32 (1.08-1.63 and Panama (OR = 1.44 (1.08-1.93 and 1.97 (1.34-2.93, but negatively associated with influenza activity in Guatemala (OR = 0.72 (0.6-0.86 and 0.79 (0.69-0.91. Temperature was negatively associated with influenza in El Salvador's west-central departments (OR = 0.80 (0.7-0.91 whilst rainfall was positively associated with influenza in Guatemala's central departments (OR = 1.05 (1.01-1.09 and Panama province (OR = 1.10 (1.05-1.14. In 4 out of the 6 locations, specific humidity had the highest contribution to the model as compared to temperature and rainfall. The model performed best in estimating 2013 influenza activity in Panama and west-central El Salvador departments (correlation coefficients: 0.5-0.9.The findings highlighted the association between influenza activity and specific humidity in these 3 tropical countries. Positive association with humidity was found in El Salvador and Panama. Negative association was found in the more subtropical Guatemala, similar to temperate regions. Of all the study locations, Guatemala had annual mean temperature and specific humidity that were lower than the

  6. The Role of Temperature and Humidity on Seasonal Influenza in Tropical Areas: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama, 2008-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soebiyanto, Radina P.; Clara, Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Castillo, Leticia; Sorto, Oscar Rene; Marinero, Sidia; Antinori, Maria E. Barnett de; McCracken, John P.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Kiang, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of meteorological factors on influenza transmission in the tropics is less defined than in the temperate regions. We assessed the association between influenza activity and temperature, specific humidity and rainfall in 6 study areas that included 11 departments or provinces within 3 tropical Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama. Method/ Findings: Logistic regression was used to model the weekly proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza positive samples during 2008 to 2013 (excluding pandemic year 2009). Meteorological data was obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and the Global Land Data Assimilation System. We found that specific humidity was positively associated with influenza activity in El Salvador (Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Interval of 1.18 (1.07-1.31) and 1.32 (1.08-1.63)) and Panama (OR = 1.44 (1.08-1.93) and 1.97 (1.34-2.93)), but negatively associated with influenza activity in Guatemala (OR = 0.72 (0.6-0.86) and 0.79 (0.69-0.91)). Temperature was negatively associated with influenza in El Salvador's west-central departments (OR = 0.80 (0.7-0.91)) whilst rainfall was positively associated with influenza in Guatemala's central departments (OR = 1.05 (1.01-1.09)) and Panama province (OR = 1.10 (1.05-1.14)). In 4 out of the 6 locations, specific humidity had the highest contribution to the model as compared to temperature and rainfall. The model performed best in estimating 2013 influenza activity in Panama and west-central El Salvador departments (correlation coefficients: 0.5-0.9). Conclusions/Significance: The findings highlighted the association between influenza activity and specific humidity in these 3 tropical countries. Positive association with humidity was found in El Salvador and Panama. Negative association was found in the more subtropical Guatemala, similar to temperate regions. Of all the study locations, Guatemala had annual mean temperature and specific

  7. Characterization of degraded soils in the humid Ethiopian highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tebebu, Tigist Y.; Bayabil, Haimanote K.; Stoof, C.R.; Giri, Shree K.; Gessess, A.A.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2016-01-01

    Hard pan is a major cause of land degradation that affects agricultural productivity in developing countries. However, relatively little is known about the interaction of land degradation and hardpans. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate soil degradation and the formation of h

  8. Humidity, Radiative and Surface-Flux Feedbacks on the Multiscale Organization of CRM-Simulated Tropical Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, C. S.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2015-12-01

    Positive feedbacks between column humidity, reduced radiative cooling and enhanced surface fluxes promote convective self-aggregation in limited area cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations over uniform sea-surface temperature (SST). Near-global aquaplanet simulations with 4 km horizontal resolution and no cumulus or boundary-layer parameterization are used to test the importance of these feedbacks to realistically organized tropical convection. A 20480x10240 km equatorially centered channel with latitudinally varying SST is used. Realistic midlatitude and tropical cloud structures develop (see attached image). The natural zonal variability of humidity and convection are studied in a 30 day control simulation. A small white-noise humidity perturbation is then added to explore temporal perturbation growth. Atmospheric column budgets of moist static energy (MSE) quantify its covariability with precipitation, surface heat flux and radiative energy loss. Zonal Fourier analysis partitions these budgets by length scale. Radiative feedbacks on MSE natural variability and perturbation growth are found to be positive, broadly similar across scales, and comparable to limited-area CRMs, capable of e-folding a column MSE perturbation in 10 days. In contrast, in the presence of horizontal SST gradients, synoptic-scale dry intrusions with enhanced surface latent heat fluxes damp tropical MSE perturbations and inhibit aggregation. Over sub-10-day timescales, dynamically-driven feedbacks dominate. The tropics and midlatitudes have similar timescales for loss of large-scale deterministic predictability. This work is under review: Bretherton, C. S., and M. Khairoutdinov, 2015: Convective self-aggregation feedbacks in near-global cloud-resolving simulations of an aquaplanet. J. Adv. Model. Earth Sys., submitted 6/2015.

  9. Retrieval of Layer Averaged Relative Humidity Profiles from MHS Observations over Tropical Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Gangwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the retrieval of the atmospheric layer averaged relative humidity profiles using data from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS onboard the MetOp satellite. The retrieval has been innovatively performed by firstly retrieving humidity for pairs of thick overlapping layers (TOLs used subsequently to derive humidity for associated thin isolated layer (TIL. A water vapour dependent (WVD algorithm has been developed and applied to infer the humidity of TOLs. Thus, the retrieved profiles have been finally compared with standard algorithm (NORM. These algorithms have been developed based on radiative transfer simulations and study of sensitivities of MHS channels on humidity of various types of layers (TOL, TIL. The algorithm has been tested with MHS data and validated using concurrent radiosonde as well as NCEP reanalysis data indicating profile errors of ~15% and ~19%, respectively.

  10. Tropical soil bacterial communities in Malaysia: pH dominates in the equatorial tropics too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Singh, Dharmesh; Lee-Cruz, Larisa; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Ainuddin, A N; Go, Rusea; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Husni, M H A; Chun, Jongsik; Adams, Jonathan M

    2012-08-01

    The dominant factors controlling soil bacterial community variation within the tropics are poorly known. We sampled soils across a range of land use types--primary (unlogged) and logged forests and crop and pasture lands in Malaysia. PCR-amplified soil DNA for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene targeting the V1-V3 region was pyrosequenced using the 454 Roche machine. We found that land use in itself has a weak but significant effect on the bacterial community composition. However, bacterial community composition and diversity was strongly correlated with soil properties, especially soil pH, total carbon, and C/N ratio. Soil pH was the best predictor of bacterial community composition and diversity across the various land use types, with the highest diversity close to neutral pH values. In addition, variation in phylogenetic structure of dominant lineages (Alphaproteobacteria, Beta/Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria) is also significantly correlated with soil pH. Together, these results confirm the importance of soil pH in structuring soil bacterial communities in Southeast Asia. Our results also suggest that unlike the general diversity pattern found for larger organisms, primary tropical forest is no richer in operational taxonomic units of soil bacteria than logged forest, and agricultural land (crop and pasture) is actually richer than primary forest, partly due to selection of more fertile soils that have higher pH for agriculture and the effects of soil liming raising pH.

  11. Soil phosphorus and the ecology of lowland tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ben

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation I will explore the extent to which phosphorus influences the productivity, diversity, and distribution of plant species in tropical forests. I will highlight the range of soils that occur in tropical forests and will argue that pedogenesis and associated phosphorus depletion is a primary driver of forest diversity over long timescales. I will draw on data from a regional-scale network of forest dynamics plots in Panama to show that tree species distributions are determined predominantly as a function of dry season intensity and soil phosphorus availability, and will suggest potential mechanistic explanations for this pattern in relation to phosphorus acquisition. Finally, I will present observational and experimental evidence from Panama to show how phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium, limit plant productivity and microbial communities on strongly-weathered soils in the lowland tropics.

  12. Effect of fluctuating soil humidity on in situ bioavailability and degradation of atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngigi, Anastasiah; Dörfler, Ulrike; Scherb, Hagen; Getenga, Zachary; Boga, Hamadi; Schroll, Reiner

    2011-07-01

    This study elucidates the effect of fluctuating soil moisture on the co-metabolic degradation of atrazine (6-chloro-N(2)-ethyl-N(4)-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) in soil. Degradation experiments with (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine were carried out at (i) constant (CH) and (ii) fluctuating soil humidity (FH). Temperature was kept constant in all experiments. Experiments under constant soil moisture conditions were conducted at a water potential of -15 kPa and the sets which were run under fluctuating soil moisture conditions were subjected to eight drying-rewetting cycles where they were dried to a water potential of around -200 kPa and rewetted to -15 kPa. Mineralization was monitored continuously over a period of 56d. Every two weeks the pesticide residues in soil pore water (PW), the methanol-extractable pesticide residues, the non-extractable residues (NER), and the total cell counts were determined. In the soil with FH conditions, mineralization of atrazine as well as the formation of the intermediate product deisopropyl-2-hydroxyatrazine was increased compared to the soil with constant humidity. In general, we found a significant correlation between the formation of this metabolite and atrazine mineralization. The cell counts were not different in the two experimental variants. These results indicate that the microbial activity was not a limiting factor but the mineralization of atrazine was essentially controlled by the bioavailability of the parent compound and the degradation product deisopropyl-2-hydroxyatrazine.

  13. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea.

  14. Soil Resources and Land Use in Tropical Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Tropical Asia is a region comprising South and Southeast Asia and under strong influence of the Asianmonsoon climate. It is characterized by an extremely high population density and by high land use intensity.Paddy rice cultivation is the most important form of agriculture in the greater part of the region. Soilresources of tropical Asia have a specific feature in comparison with tropical Africa and America. Ultisolsdominate in uplands, and lowland soils like Inceptisols and Histosols are relatively abundant. The latterpoint is made clearer if we take the landforms of the region with a vast extent of lowlands into consideration.Geologically, tropical Asia with the Himalayan orogeny and active volcanism exhibits a conspicuous contrastto tropical Africa and America with the dominance of the shield structure. This along with the monsoonclimate should have determined the basic features of landforms and soil, and accordingly all the agriculturaland social characteristics of tropical Asia today. Although paddy rice cultivation in the lowland is highlysustainable, upland cultivation in extensive Ultisol areas tends to be handicapped by low fertility and higherodibility of the soil, resulting in low sustainability. Land shortage is compelling people to exploit slopelandsin hills and mountains, on the one hand, and thus far unutilized coastal lowlands, on the other. Both ofthese new reclamations are facing to serious land degradation problems today. Tropical Asia will continueto be the most densely populated region of the world with ever-increasing population. In order to meet theincreasing food demand lowland rice cultivation should be intensified by the infrastructure development toease the stresses on slopelands and vulnerable coastal lowlands. At the same time, upland crop productionin Ultisol areas should be stabilized and enhanced, providing integrated nutrient management and measuresfor soil conservation.

  15. Soil nutrient-landscape relationships in a lowland tropical rainforest in Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthold, F.K.; Stallard, R.F.; Elsenbeer, H.

    2008-01-01

    Soils play a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles as spatially distributed sources and sinks of nutrients. Any spatial patterns depend on soil forming processes, our understanding of which is still limited, especially in regards to tropical rainforests. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of landscape properties, with an emphasis on the geometry of the land surface, on the spatial heterogeneity of soil chemical properties, and to test the suitability of soil-landscape modeling as an appropriate technique to predict the spatial variability of exchangeable K and Mg in a humid tropical forest in Panama. We used a design-based, stratified sampling scheme to collect soil samples at 108 sites on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Stratifying variables are lithology, vegetation and topography. Topographic variables were generated from high-resolution digital elevation models with a grid size of 5 m. We took samples from five depths down to 1 m, and analyzed for total and exchangeable K and Mg. We used simple explorative data analysis techniques to elucidate the importance of lithology for soil total and exchangeable K and Mg. Classification and Regression Trees (CART) were adopted to investigate importance of topography, lithology and vegetation for the spatial distribution of exchangeable K and Mg and with the intention to develop models that regionalize the point observations using digital terrain data as explanatory variables. Our results suggest that topography and vegetation do not control the spatial distribution of the selected soil chemical properties at a landscape scale and lithology is important to some degree. Exchangeable K is distributed equally across the study area indicating that other than landscape processes, e.g. biogeochemical processes, are responsible for its spatial distribution. Lithology contributes to the spatial variation of exchangeable Mg but controlling variables could not be detected. The spatial variation of soil total K

  16. Validation of SMOS Satellite Soil Moisture Products over Tropical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi; Siang, Kang Chuen

    2016-07-01

    Calibration and validation (cal/val) activities on Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite derived soil moisture products has been conducted worldwide since the data has become available but not over the tropical region . This study focuses on the installation of a soil moisture data collection network over an agricultural site in a tropical region in Peninsular Malaysia, and the validation of SMOS soil moisture products. The in-situ data over one year period was analysed and validation of SMOS Soil Moisture products with these in-situ data was conducted.Bias and root mean square errors (RMSE) were computed between SMOS soil moisture products and the in-situ surface soil moisture collected at the satellite passing time (6 am and 6 pm local time). Due to the known limitations of SMOS soil moisture retrieval over vegetated areas with vegetation water content higher than 5 kgm-2, overestimation of SMOS soil moisture products to in-situ data was noticed in this study. The bias is ranging from 0.064 to 0.119 m3m-3 and the RMSE is from 0.090 to 0.158 m3m-3, when both ascending and descending data were validated. This RMSE was found to be similar to a number of studies conducted previously at different regions. However a wet bias was found during the validation, while previous validation activities at other regions showed dry biases. The result of this study is useful to support the continuous development and improvement of SMOS soil moisture retrieval model, aims to produce soil moisture products with higher accuracy, especially in the tropical region.

  17. Effects of phosphorus addition on soil microbial biomass and community composition in three forest types in tropical China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Tao;

    2012-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition in humid tropical regions may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forest on old weathered soil found in these regions. From January 2007 to August 2009, we studied the responses of soil microbial biomass and community composition to P addition (in two monthly...... portions at level of 15 g P m-2 yr-1) in three tropical forests in southern China. The forests were an old-growth forest and two disturbed forests (mixed species and pine dominated). The objective was to test the hypothesis that P addition would increase microbial biomass and change the composition...... of the microbial community, and that the old-growth forests would be more sensitive to P addition due to its higher soil N availability. Microbial biomass C (MBC) was estimated twice a year and the microbial community structure was quantified by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis at the end of the experiment...

  18. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  19. Predicting and Monitoring Drought for a Rice Cultivation Season in the Humid Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, D. N.; Robinson, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The study presents an operational tool for predicting and monitoring drought applicable to the humid tropics. Using Sri Lanka as a case example, it examines the operational predictability of drought and investigates how moisture stress could be monitored as a season unfurls. Drought occurs frequently in Sri Lanka when rainfall associated with the main cultivation season - the Maha (October to March) - fails. During the period 1951-2008, there were 4 extreme [Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) seasonal droughts can be predicted on an operational basis by predicting the failure of the two rainfall regimes that supply moisture during the season. The contemporaneous westerly zonal wind at 850hPa (U850) over the domain 60°E-105°E and 5°S-15°N controls the strength of the October-November convective rainfall season - with failure of the season associated with anomalously strong U850. The contemporaneous northerly vertical shear of the mean meridional wind (Vs) in the domain 80°E-90°E and 0°N-20°N controls the strength of the December-February northeast monsoon season - with failure of the season associated with an anomalously weak Vs. Drought forecast skill was assessed for the period 1981-2002 using predicted fields of U850 issued in September, and Vs, issued in November from three Global Climate Model ensembles - i.e. the fully coupled Climate Forecast System of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP_CFS); the ECHAM4.5 forced with persisted sea surface temperature anomalies (ECHAM4.5_PSST) and the ECMAM4.5 forced with constructed analogues of sea surface temperature anomalies (ECHAM4.5_CA). The failure of October-November rainfall can be predicted with good skill over the rice cultivation regions in the central and southeastern parts of Sri Lanka using predicted fields of U850 generated from the two versions of the ECHAM4.5. The failure of December-February rainfall can be predicted with good skill in the rice cultivation regions in the

  20. Geomorphic and Geologic Influences in a Tropical Semi-Humid Climate Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, C. R.; Rodrigues, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Direct influences of geology and landforms in ecosystems are not always easy to identify. This influence seems to occur in the development of the Veredas, an ecosystem belonging to the Cerrado, the second biggest biome in Brazil. The Veredas ecosystem which can also be considered as a river system is one of the most striking and still not very well understood landscape feature of this biome. It occurs along a swamp type of shallow depressions that function as hydrological channels with permanent water flow but no terraces that could indicate depositional processes. They are characterized by a linear specific vegetation cover of hydrophytes including different types of palm wetlands (Melastomataceae), the most representative of which is the Mauritia flexuosa. The objective is to study these hydrological systems with the help of GIS techniques and field data in order to understand the main factors affecting their spatial distribution. The studied eco-fluvial systems comprise nine drainage basins distributed in 33,448.13 km2 in the Minas Gerais State, Brazil (1508'/180 S and 4805'/5105' W), located in a tropical semi-humid climate. Images of TM/Landsat 5 and geologic maps were used as well as an Elevation Digital SRTM-NASA-2001 Model processed using ArcGIS 10 and SPRING-INPE 4.3. Various morphometric indicators and longitudinal river profiles were also obtained complemented by field data. Results show that the Veredas present mostly slow flows what seems to be an important factor for maintaining the ecosystem as such. As a specific ecosystem as well as drainage systems they change characteristics along the geologic and geomorphic domains. They present a more representative cover of wetland palm trees accompanying shallow incised channels while running over two platos sequences elaborated on Cretaceous sandstones. In the higher portions of the Urucuia Plato (+600m) the river systems are less dense and geological control influences the occurrence of parallel patterns of

  1. Influence of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds on soil nutrient contents in a temperate humid climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Ehlers-Koch, Camilla; Gregersen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    conductivity and content of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium and potassium in a reference area and in two cormorant sub-colonies. In general, the soils exposed to cormorant guano had lower pH and higher contents of plant available phosphorus, calcium and potassium compared to the control reference soil......, but the bird’s influence on the soil conditions has only in few cases been studied in detail. In this study the influence of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds on soil nutrient contents and accumulation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in a humid climate has been determined by measuring pH, electric......During the last decades, the number of perennial colonies of piscivorous birds especially cormorant colonies in North-western Europe has grown rapidly due to protection. Their impact on vegetation has been recognized, as many trees containing perennial colonies of piscivorous birds have collapsed...

  2. Strontium-Doped Hematite as a Possible Humidity Sensing Material for Soil Water Content Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Grignani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the sensing behavior of Sr-doped hematite for soil water content measurement. The material was prepared by solid state reaction from commercial hematite and strontium carbonate heat treated at 900 °C. X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for microstructural characterization of the synthesized powder. Sensors were then prepared by uniaxially pressing and by screen-printing, on an alumina substrate, the prepared powder and subsequent firing in the 800–1,000 °C range. These sensors were first tested in a laboratory apparatus under humid air and then in an homogenized soil and finally in field. The results evidenced that the screen printed film was able to give a response for a soil matric potential from about 570 kPa, that is to say well below the wilting point in the used soil.

  3. Spatial variability of soils in a seasonally dry tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, Hebbalalu; Dattaraja, Handanakere; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Soil structures communities of plants and soil organisms in tropical forests. Understanding the controls of soil spatial variability can therefore potentially inform efforts towards forest restoration. We studied the relationship between soils and lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in a seasonally dry tropical forest in southern India. We extensively sampled soil (available nutrients, Al, pH, and moisture), rocks, relief, woody vegetation, and spatial variation in fire burn frequency in a permanent 50-ha plot. Lower elevation soils tended to be less moist and were depleted in several nutrients and clay. The availability of several nutrients was, in turn, linked to whole-rock chemical composition differences since some lithologies were associated with higher elevations, while the others tended to dominate lower elevations. We suggest that local-scale topography in this region has been shaped by the spatial distribution of lithologies, which differ in their susceptibility to weathering. Nitrogen availability was uncorrelated with the presence of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species. No effect of burning on soil parameters could be discerned at this scale.

  4. Agriculturization in the Argentinean Northern Humid Pampas: the Impact on Soil Structure and Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasal, M. C.; Léonard, J.; Andriulo, A.; Wilson, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    Argentina is among the countries with the largest cropped area under no-tillage (NT). No tillage was adopted in the northern Humid Pampas to reduce the widespread soil degradation by water erosion. With the advent of genetically modified soybean varieties, NT has developed exponentially. This evolution, combined with the influence of the international market trend, has resulted in large changes in crop sequence composition toward the disappearance of pastures and the expansion of soybean monoculture. The aim of this work was to evaluate the long-term consequences of these changes on the topsoil structure and the way in which the evolution of soil structure relates to the simplification of the crop sequence and to runoff at a regional scale. We analyzed the topsoil structure of 25 sites with Argiudolls having 4 to 29 consecutive years of NT using the cultural profile approach. An intensification sequence index (ISI) was calculated as the ratio between the length of the growth period and the length of the year. Fifteen natural-rainfall runoff plots (100 m2) with 3.5% slope were used to analyze the relationship between soil structural state, crop sequence and runoff for four years. Four types of soil structures were identified and a general pattern of vertical soil structure organization was revealed. The top centimeters of 72% of the sites were dominated by a granular structure. Platy soil structure development was omnipresent: all sites exhibited a horizontal platy structure (cropping systems under NT favors the extension of platy soil structure and increases runoff. More than 70% of the agricultural area of the northern Humid Pampas region is currently covered by soybean cultivation, mostly as a single annual crop (ISI=0.38). Our results thus suggest that promoting management practices such as the expansion of wheat/soybean double crop (ISI=0.83) could limit soil structure degradation and reduce runoff and the associated environmental risks.

  5. Study on the spatiotemporal variability and affecting factors in soil moisture at a humid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Yu, Z.

    2008-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture and its affecting factors in a humid area were examined based on the field measuring date in the Tai lake drainage basin, China. 24 sensors near the soil surface and 12 sensors in 2 profiles (6 in each) were set up for collecting hourly soil moisture data with the Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) sensors in 2006. Coefficient of variation (CV) and semi-variogram were calculated to evaluate the temporal variability in different locations and the spatial variability in different periods. The surface soil moisture appears middle or weak variability, and most of the CV values are in the range of 0.13-0.26. Soil characteristics, topography, vegetation, meteorological factors and human activities influenced the soil moisture spatiotemporal variability significantly. The factors appear having different affecting abilities on the spatiotemporal variability, and the domain factors are different in four seasons. Soil characteristics mainly influence the temporal variability in the scale of hill slope. Coarser texture on the upper part of the slope results in a larger variability. Topography and micro-topography affects the spatial variability in all 3 dimensions. The variability is larger at upper locations and chine of the slope. The effect of vegetation on the soil moisture variability is stronger in spring, summer, and autumn than in winter, according to the different growth activities and water demand. The trees on the slope influence the CV values along the slope. Meteorological factors are the forcing factors of the soil water variation. Higher rainfall and evaporation variations produce higher variability in soil moisture while the rainfall has more influence in the summer and the evaporation has more in the fall. The results provide better understanding of soil moisture variation and base for further study on how the soil moisture variation could affect the rainfall runoff partitioning.

  6. Assessing soil fertility decline in the tropics using soil chemical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Soil fertility decline is perceived to be widespread in the upland soils of the tropics, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies have used nutrient balances to assess the degree and extent of nutrient depletion; these have created awareness but suffer methodological problems as several of t

  7. Assessing soil fertility decline in the tropics using soil chemical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Soil fertility decline is perceived to be widespread in the upland soils of the tropics, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies have used nutrient balances to assess the degree and extent of nutrient depletion; these have created awareness but suffer methodological problems as several of

  8. Conceptual differences between the bioclimatic urbanism for Europe and for the tropical humid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, O.D.; Magalhaes, M.A.A.A. [Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-05-15

    This article makes part of a series of conceptual papers to continue the discussion about how architecture and urbanism interact with climate, in tropical regions. Students engaged in normal courses of architecture in tropical regions, particularly in South America, develop their knowledge based on concepts generated in the developed countries - usually related to cold environments. Consequently, these students acquire wrong ideas about urban design of open spaces. Integrating urbanism and climate in tropical countries is still very incipient as an approach and many lecturers reject it, since they prefer to continue with a more formal one, dictated by most of the dominant countries. The herein paper underlines several different concepts and perspectives that separate the two conceptions, leading to a reflection about the subject. (author)

  9. Ecotoxicology of mercury in tropical forest soils: Impact on earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Brown, George Gardner; Correia, Maria Elizabeth Fernandes; Lourençato, Lúcio Fábio; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2017-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic nonessential trace metals in the environment, with high persistence and bioaccumulation potential, and hence of serious concern to environmental quality and public health. Emitted to the atmosphere, this element can travel long distances, far from emission sources. Hg speciation can lead to Hg contamination of different ecosystem components, as well as biomagnification in trophic food webs. To evaluate the effects of atmospheric Hg deposition in tropical forests, we investigated Hg concentrations in earthworm tissues and soils of two Forest Conservation Units in State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Next, we performed a laboratory study of the biological responses (cast analysis and behavioral, acute, chronic and bioaccumulation ecotoxicological tests) of two earthworms species (Pontoscolex corethrurus and Eisenia andrei) to Hg contamination in tropical artificial soil (TAS) and two natural forest soils (NS) spiked with increasing concentration of HgCl2. Field results showed Hg concentrations up to 13 times higher in earthworm tissues than in forest soils, while in the laboratory Hg accumulation after 91-days of exposure was 25 times greater in spiked-soils with 128mgHgkg(-1) (dry wt) than in control (unspiked) soils. In all the toxicity tests P. corethrurus showed a higher adaptability or resistance to mercury than E. andrei. The role of earthworms as environmental bioremediators was confirmed in this study, showing their ability to greatly bioaccumulate trace metals while reducing Hg availability in feces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial population changes in tropical agricultural soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... well as recovery rates of an abandoned farmland was monitored for seven ... process in the in situ decontamination of oil-polluted ... depth knowledge about the physico-chemical properties ... application of data generated at the laboratory level are .... nated soil varied very significantly (t-test) from those.

  11. Heterogeneous uptake of NO2 on soils under variable temperature and relative humidity conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Weigang Wang; Maofa Ge

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on soils collected from Dalian (S1) and Changsha (S2) were investigated over the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-80% and temperature range of 278-328 K using a horizontal coated-wall flow tube.The initial uptake coefficients of NO2 on S2 exhibited a decreasing trend from (10 ± 1.3) × 10-8 to (3.1 ± 0.5) × 10-8 with the relative humidity increasing from 5% to 80%.In the temperature effect studies,the initial uptake coefficients of S1 and S2 decreased from (10 ± 1.2) ×10-8 to (3.8 ± 0.5) × 10-8 and from (16 ± 2.2) × 10-8 to (3.8 ± 0.4) × 10-8 when temperature increased from 278 to 288 K for S1 and from 278 to 308 K for S2,respectively.As the temperature continued to increase,the initial uptake coefficients of S1 and S2 returned to (7.9 ± 1.1) × 10-8 and (20 ± 3.1) × 10-8 at 313 and 328 K,respectively.This study shows that relative humidity could influence the uptake kinetics of NO2 on soil and temperature would impact the heterogeneous chemistry of NO2.

  12. ASSESSING SOIL FERTILITY STATUS OF REHABILITATED DEGRADED TROPICAL RAINFOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiza Shaliha Jamaluddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of forest rehabilitation program in relation to soil fertility status by using soil indices could provide fundamental information on soil suitability for species preferences and improve the effective technique for future rehabilitation program in tropical rainforests. This study was conducted in order to characterize the soil properties and identifying the soil fertility status of rehabilitated and secondary forests. Soil samples were collected in year 2009 at rehabilitation forests (20 years after planting and secondary forest of Nirwana Forest Reserve, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM Bintulu Campus, Sarawak, Malaysia. The rehabilitation plots were planted with mixed dipterocarp and non-dipterocarp species since 1991. Prior to conversion of the areas into various land use types, the rehabilitation and secondary forests areas were considered as natural forests and subsequently subjected to forest logging with Selective Management System (SMS in 1980s.The plot size for each site was 20×20 m for 18 experimental sites (at different ages after planting were established, followed by soil sampling at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depth randomly using soil auger. Standard soil analysis for physical and chemical properties was used to analyze the soil samples. The soil fertility status was evaluated using two indices, namely Soil Fertility Index (SFI and Soil Evaluation Factor (SEF for both rehabilitated and secondary forests. The results showed that there were significant differences (p<0.05 in pH (water and KCl, exchangeable Mg, Na, Al and ammonium and granule composition (clay, silt and sand between depths. The PCA result of 70% total variability (OM, TOC, TC and CEC score in PC1 shows positive relationship, explaining nutrients in the soil stored in the organic matter in the surface soils. The correlation analysis indicated that there were positive relationship (p<0.05 between OM and TC, CEC and exchangeable Al for surface soils. We found

  13. Effect of mulch quality on earthworm activity and nutrient supply in the humid tropics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, G.; Kang, B.T.; Brussaard, L.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in 1990 and 1991 at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria to study the role of earthworms in the decomposition of plant residue mulches with different qualities. Five mulches of Dactyladenia barteri, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucoc

  14. Measuring Thermal Stress of Dairy Cattle Based on Temperature Humidity Index (THI) in Tropical Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiono; Dewi Hardiningtyas; Rudy Soenoko

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort for workers is very important factor to increase their performance, as well as the comfort level of dairy cattle will influence in milk productivity. The purposes of the paper is to measure the level of heat stress and then use the information to design the dairy cattle house for increasing thermal comfort. The research is started with literature review of heat stress and early survey of environment condition e.g. temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. The next step is...

  15. Molybdenum limitation of asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Alexander R.; Wurzburger, Nina; Bellenger, Jean Phillipe; Wright, S. Joseph; Kraepiel, Anne M. L.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the biological conversion of di-nitrogen to plant-available ammonium, is the primary natural input of nitrogen to ecosystems, and influences plant growth and carbon exchange at local to global scales. The role of this process in tropical forests is of particular concern, as these ecosystems harbour abundant nitrogen-fixing organisms and represent one third of terrestrial primary production. Here we show that the micronutrient molybdenum, a cofactor in the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase, limits nitrogen fixation by free-living heterotrophic bacteria in soils of lowland Panamanian forests. We measured the fixation response to long-term nutrient manipulations in intact forests, and to short-term manipulations in soil microcosms. Nitrogen fixation increased sharply in treatments of molybdenum alone, in micronutrient treatments that included molybdenum by design and in treatments with commercial phosphorus fertilizer, in which molybdenum was a `hidden' contaminant. Fixation did not respond to additions of phosphorus that were not contaminated by molybdenum. Our findings show that molybdenum alone can limit asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forests and raise new questions about the role of molybdenum and phosphorus in the tropical nitrogen cycle. We suggest that molybdenum limitation may be common in highly weathered acidic soils, and may constrain the ability of some forests to acquire new nitrogen in response to CO2 fertilization.

  16. Variation in wood nutrients along a tropical soil fertility gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Katherine D; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains the majority of the nutrients in tropical trees, yet controls over wood nutrient concentrations and their function are poorly understood. We measured wood nutrient concentrations in 106 tree species in 10 forest plots spanning a regional fertility gradient in Panama. For a subset of species, we quantified foliar nutrients and wood density to test whether wood nutrients scale with foliar nutrients at the species level, or wood nutrient storage increases with wood density as predicted by the wood economics spectrum. Wood nutrient concentrations varied enormously among species from fourfold in nitrogen (N) to > 30-fold in calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). Community-weighted mean wood nutrient concentrations correlated positively with soil Ca, K, Mg and P concentrations. Wood nutrients scaled positively with leaf nutrients, supporting the hypothesis that nutrient allocation is conserved across plant organs. Wood P was most sensitive to variation in soil nutrient availability, and significant radial declines in wood P indicated that tropical trees retranslocate P as sapwood transitions to heartwood. Wood P decreased with increasing wood density, suggesting that low wood P and dense wood are traits associated with tree species persistence on low fertility soils. Substantial variation among species and communities in wood nutrient concentrations suggests that allocation of nutrients to wood, especially P, influences species distributions and nutrient dynamics in tropical forests.

  17. Estimation of exterior vertical daylight for the humid tropic of Kota Kinabalu city in East Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djamila, Harimi; Ming, Chu Chi; Kumaresan, Sivakumar [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Locked Bag No. 2073, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    In tropical regions natural daylight has been a fundamental factor in building design. It is the most efficient way of lighting a building in the daytime and has a great potential for energy conservation in buildings. In Malaysia there are a limited available data of measured illuminance which is the case of several regions in the tropics. Using established models it is possible to predict the luminous efficacy and then estimate the monthly mean hourly exterior illuminance. In this study two different models were chosen. The Perez and Du Mortier-Perraudeau-Page-Littlefair models were selected for the prediction of hourly exterior horizontal illuminance for the city of Kota Kinabalu in East Malaysia. Comparison between the two models were made. The vertical hourly illuminance was predicted also using Perez approach. The potentiality of daylight in four orientations was discussed. This study highlights the importance of Sunpath diagram on daylight illuminance during the conceptual design stage. The results in this study is hoped to contribute further insight into the potentiality of daylighting of tropical sky. (author)

  18. Maize Storage in Termite Mound Clay, Concrete, and Steel Silos in the Humid Tropics: Comparison and Effect on Bacterial and Fungal Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the functional suitability of using the readily-available termite mound clay (TMC) for grain silo construction in comparison to conventional reinforced concrete (RC) and galvanized steel (GS) silos for maize storage in the humid tropics. The extent to which temperature and r...

  19. Tropical cyclone activity enhanced by Sahara greening and reduced dust emissions during the African Humid Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Chiacchio, Marc; Diro, Gulilat T.; Zhang, Qiong; Sushama, Laxmi; Stager, J. Curt; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.

    2017-06-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have devastating socioeconomic impacts. Understanding the nature and causes of their variability is of paramount importance for society. However, historical records of TCs are too short to fully characterize such changes and paleo-sediment archives of Holocene TC activity are temporally and geographically sparse. Thus, it is of interest to apply physical modeling to understanding TC variability under different climate conditions. Here we investigate global TC activity during a warm climate state (mid-Holocene, 6,000 yBP) characterized by increased boreal summer insolation, a vegetated Sahara, and reduced dust emissions. We analyze a set of sensitivity experiments in which not only solar insolation changes are varied but also vegetation and dust concentrations. Our results show that the greening of the Sahara and reduced dust loadings lead to more favorable conditions for tropical cyclone development compared with the orbital forcing alone. In particular, the strengthening of the West African Monsoon induced by the Sahara greening triggers a change in atmospheric circulation that affects the entire tropics. Furthermore, whereas previous studies suggest lower TC activity despite stronger summer insolation and warmer sea surface temperature in the Northern Hemisphere, accounting for the Sahara greening and reduced dust concentrations leads instead to an increase of TC activity in both hemispheres, particularly over the Caribbean basin and East Coast of North America. Our study highlights the importance of regional changes in land cover and dust concentrations in affecting the potential intensity and genesis of past TCs and suggests that both factors may have appreciable influence on TC activity in a future warmer climate.

  20. Nitrogen saturation in humid tropical forests after 6 years of nitrogen and phosphorus addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Gurmesa, Geshere A.; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) saturation hypothesis suggests that when an ecosystem reaches N-saturation, continued N input will cause increased N leaching, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, and N mineralization and nitrification rates. It also suggests that a different element will become the main limiting......O emission rate and nitrate (NO3-) leaching rate were measured in an N-saturated old-growth tropical forest in southern China, after 6 years of N and P addition. We hypothesized that N addition would stimulate further N saturation, but P addition might alleviate N saturation. As expected, our...

  1. Effect of Harvest of Air Relative Humidity on Water and Heat Transfer in Soil With Crops Under Arid Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Khadir LAKHAL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the main objective is to analyze the effect of the harvest of air relative humidity on soil temperature, soil water storage and evaporation. An experiment work was conducted in order to evaluate the quantity of soil water adsorbed by harvesting of relative air humidity. This experimental work was conducted on hilly areas with various hypsographic and microclimatic conditions greatly affecting daily fluctuations of air humidity and soil characteristics. The metrological data needed by SISPAT model were obtained by using a Campbell Scientific equipments Station recorder on data loggers every half hour. A numerical model based on SiSPAT (Système d’Interaction Sol Plante Atmosphère formulation is adopted. The general equations of the proposed model are based on heat and mass transfer in the soil, atmosphere and plant system. This study shows that Soil Water Adsorption (SWA induce an increasing in the total evaporation and in soil water storage especially on the upper layers. The effect of Soil Water Adsorption on soil temperature appears for the first layers of soil and become absent in the profound zone because the vapour condensation phenomenon is very important at night for the first layers.

  2. Corrosion study of steels exposed over five years to the humid tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaén, Juan A., E-mail: juan.jaen@up.ac.pa [Departamento de Química Física, Edificio de Laboratorios Científicos-VIP (Panama); Iglesias, Josefina [Laboratorio de Análisis Industriales y Ciencias Ambientales (Panama)

    2017-11-15

    The results of assessing five-year corrosion of low-carbon and conventional weathering steels exposed to the Panamanian tropical atmosphere is presented. Two different test sites, one in Panama City: 5 km from the shoreline of the Pacific Ocean, and another in the marine environment of Fort Sherman, Caribbean coast of Panama; namely, Fort Sherman Coastal site: 100 m from coastline. The corrosion products, formed in the skyward and earthward faces in the studied tropical environment, were mainly identified using room temperature and low temperature (15 K) Mössbauer spectroscopy, and ATR-FTIR. In all samples, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the main constituents. Some maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), was also identified in Tocumen by Mössbauer spectroscopy and traces of feroxyhyte (δ-FeOOH) using ATR-FTIR. The corrosion rate values obtained are discussed in light of the atmospheric exposure conditions and atmospheric pollutants.

  3. Altitude effect on leaf wax carbon isotopic composition in humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mong Sin; Feakins, Sarah J.; Martin, Roberta E.; Shenkin, Alexander; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Blonder, Benjamin; Salinas, Norma; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2017-06-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of plant leaf wax biomarkers is commonly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. Adding to the limited calibration information available for modern tropical forests, we analyzed plant leaf and leaf wax carbon isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3.3 km elevation gradient on the eastern flank of the Andes Mountains. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in each tree community. In total, 405 sunlit canopy leaves were sampled across 129 species and nine forest plots along the elevation profile for bulk leaf and leaf wax n-alkane (C27-C33) concentration and carbon isotopic analyses (δ13C); a subset (76 individuals, 29 species, five forest plots) were additionally analyzed for n-alkanoic acid (C22-C32) concentrations and δ13C. δ13C values display trends of +0.87 ± 0.16‰ km-1 (95% CI, r2 = 0.96, p families, suggesting the biochemical response to environment is robust to taxonomic turnover. We calculate fractionations and compare to adiabatic gradients, environmental variables, leaf wax n-alkane concentrations, and sun/shade position to assess factors influencing foliar chemical response. For the 4 km forested elevation range of the Andes, 4-6‰ higher δ13C values are expected for upland versus lowland C3 plant bulk leaves and their n-alkyl lipids, and we expect this pattern to be a systematic feature of very wet tropical montane environments. This elevation dependency of δ13C values should inform interpretations of sedimentary archives, as 13C-enriched values may derive from C4 grasses, petrogenic inputs or upland C3 plants. Finally, we outline the potential for leaf wax carbon isotopes to trace biomarker sourcing within catchments and for paleoaltimetry.

  4. Microbial surfactant activities from a petrochemical landfarm in a humid tropical region of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, B.M.; Dias, J.C.T.; Santos, A.C.F.; Argolo-Filho, R.C.; Fontana, R.; Loguercio, L.L.; Rezende, R.P. [Univ. Estadual de Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas

    2007-08-15

    Studies have suggested that biosurfactants can enhance the biodegradation of almost insoluble organics by increasing cell uptake availability. In this study, micro-organisms were isolated from a soil sample from a Brazilian petrochemical waste landfarm and grown in petroleum as a carbon source in order to assess their surfactant potential. Isolated colonies were inoculated into tubes, and a drop-collapse method was used to select micro-organisms with surfactant activity. Surfactant activity of the isolates was assessed when the activity was detected for the first time in each culture. The supernatant of each micro-organism was then diluted. The surfactant activity of each dilution was then observed via micelles formation. DNA was then extracted from the samples. A total of 60 microbial strains were selected. Results showed that a variety of petroleum-grown micro-organisms obtained from the landfarm soil showed surfactant activity. Results showed that the micro-organisms were able to use petroleum as a sole carbon source. The production of surfactant compounds occurred during the declining stages of microbial culture curves, which suggested that the nutritional stress achieved on the fourth day of the culture induced the synthesis and secretion of biosurfactants by the isolates. It was concluded that micro-organisms derived from soils polluted with hydrocarbons can be used in bioremediation processes. 21 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  5. Tropical Soil Fertility Changes Under Monocultures and Successional Communities of Different Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewel, John J; Mazzarino, Maria J; Berish, Cory W

    1991-08-01

    For 5 yr we monitored the fertility of a volcanic-ash derived Inceptisol at a site in the humid tropics of Costa Rica. After forest felling and burning, we established four treatments in a randomized block design with six blocks: a sequence of monocultures (two crops of maize [Zea mays] followed by cassava [Manihot esculenta], then the tree species Cordia alliodora), successional vegetation, a mimic of successional vegetation that was physiognomically similar to the model but shared no species with it, and a species-enriched version of successional vegetation. In addition, one plot was maintained free of vegetation. Species-rich successional vegetation was effective at maintaining soil fertility, although we observed general trends of soil-nutrient decline beneath all treatments, presumably because of plant uptake. It proved possible to imitate the fertility-maintaining characteristics of successional vegetation by creating an equally species-rich community of different floristic composition, but the maintenance of fertility was not enhanced by further species enrichment. Successive peaks of nitrate-nitrogen in soil solution, extractable phosphorus, and extractable potassium occurred during the 1st yr, perhaps driven by an early increment of organic matter from postburn debris and roots. Organic matter, total nitrogen, and extractable sulfur were remarkably stable during the 5-yr period. Depletions of cations, decreases in effective cation exchange capacity (CECe ), and increases in acid saturation were related to treatment in the following order: bare soil > monocultures > the three diverse, successional communities. In the bare-soil plot, fertility decreased dramatically: there was a net loss of exchangeable cations and inorganic nitrogen, the phosphorus-fixation capacity increased, and acid saturation reached a potentially toxic 86%. At the start of the study, three of the blocks had soil with lower pH, lower CECe , and higher acid saturation. During the study

  6. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef B. Salam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonassp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg, 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg, 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments.

  7. Iron Availability in Tropical Soils and Iron Uptake by Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Furlan Mielki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Given the increase in crop yields and the expansion of agriculture in low fertility soils, deficiency of micronutrients, such as iron, in plants grown in tropical soils has been observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fe availability and Fe uptake by corn (Zea mays L. plants in 13 different soils, at two depths. Iron was extracted by Mehlich-1, Mehlich-3, and CaCl2 (Fe-CC and was fractionated in forms related to low (Feo and high (Fed crystallinity pedogenic oxyhydroxides, and organic matter (Fep using ammonium oxalate, dithionite-citrate, and sodium pyrophosphate, respectively. In order to relate Fe availability to soil properties and plant growth, an experiment was carried out in a semi-hydroponic system in which part of the roots developed in a nutrient solution (without Fe and part in the soil (the only source of Fe. Forty-five days after seeding, we quantified shoot dry matter and leaf Fe concentration and content. Fed levels were high, from 5 to 132 g kg-1, and Feo and Fe-CC levels were low, indicating the predominance of Fe as crystalline oxyhydroxides and a low content of Fe readily available to plants. The extraction solutions showed significant correlations with various soil properties, many common to both, indicating that they act similarly. The correlation between the Mehlich-1 and Mehlich-3 extraction solutions was highly significant. However, these two extraction methods were inefficient in predicting Fe availability to plants. There was a positive correlation between dry matter and Fe levels in plant shoots, even within the ranges considered adequate in the soil and in the plant. Dry matter production and leaf Fe concentration and content were positively correlated with Fep concentration, indicating that the Fe fraction related to soil organic matter most contributes to Fe availability to plants.

  8. Plant Diversity in Live Fences and Pastures, Two Examples from the Mexican Humid Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Guerra, Betsabé; Rosas, Noé Velázquez; López-Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential uses of live fences and pastures as reservoirs of plant diversity for two regions with different management histories, Los Tuxtlas (LT) and Uxpanapa (UX), Veracruz, México. We studied two habitats, live fences and pastures, analyzed their species richness, diversity, structure and plant composition and classified species according to plant regeneration modes (light-demanding and shade tolerant), seed dispersal syndrome and their local uses. We recorded 62 species of trees at LT and 48 at UX. Live fences were more diverse than pastures in both regions. The LT site showed to analyze the relationship a higher diversity of plants in regeneration stages than the one at UX. However, UX had higher diversity of adult plants in the pastures than LT. Composition and structure of live fences were different between regions, as well as within live fences and pastures, 53 % of species were light-demanding and 40 % were shade tolerant; 70 % of the species were dispersed by birds. Differences between sites are associated with the modifications in live fences structure, which changed according to managerial practices and the use of local species; this may influence plant regeneration modes as well as the visits of avian dispersal agents. In LT, all species found in live fences were useful to humans, whereas in UX, less than half were used by the local population. Our results underline the importance of live fences and isolated trees in pasture habitats as potential sites to host native and useful species from tropical rain forests in livestock landscapes.

  9. Does the Establishment of Sustainable Use Reserves Affect Fire Management in the Humid Tropics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Carmenta

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are experiencing a growing fire problem driven by climatic change, agricultural expansion and forest degradation. Protected areas are an important feature of forest protection strategies, and sustainable use reserves (SURs may be reducing fire prevalence since they promote sustainable livelihoods and resource management. However, the use of fire in swidden agriculture, and other forms of land management, may be undermining the effectiveness of SURs in meeting their conservation and sustainable development goals. We analyse MODIS derived hot pixels, TRMM rainfall data, Terra-Class land cover data, socio-ecological data from the Brazilian agro-census and the spatial extent of rivers and roads to evaluate whether the designation of SURs reduces fire occurrence in the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, we ask (1 a. Is SUR location (i.e., de facto or (1 b. designation (i.e. de jure the driving factor affecting performance in terms of the spatial density of fires?, and (2, Does SUR creation affect fire management (i.e., the timing of fires in relation to previous rainfall? We demonstrate that pre-protection baselines are crucial for understanding reserve performance. We show that reserve creation had no discernible impact on fire density, and that fires were less prevalent in SURs due to their characteristics of sparser human settlement and remoteness, rather than their status de jure. In addition, the timing of fires in relation to rainfall, indicative of local fire management and adherence to environmental law, did not improve following SUR creation. These results challenge the notion that SURs promote environmentally sensitive fire-management, and suggest that SURs in Amazonia will require special attention if they are to curtail future accidental wildfires, particularly as plans to expand the road infrastructure throughout the region are realised. Greater investment to support improved fire management by farmers living in reserves

  10. Plant diversity in live fences and pastures, two examples from the Mexican humid tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Guerra, Betsabé; Rosas, Noé Velázquez; López-Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential uses of live fences and pastures as reservoirs of plant diversity for two regions with different management histories, Los Tuxtlas (LT) and Uxpanapa (UX), Veracruz, México. We studied two habitats, live fences and pastures, analyzed their species richness, diversity, structure and plant composition and classified species according to plant regeneration modes (light-demanding and shade tolerant), seed dispersal syndrome and their local uses. We recorded 62 species of trees at LT and 48 at UX. Live fences were more diverse than pastures in both regions. The LT site showed to analyze the relationship a higher diversity of plants in regeneration stages than the one at UX. However, UX had higher diversity of adult plants in the pastures than LT. Composition and structure of live fences were different between regions, as well as within live fences and pastures, 53 % of species were light-demanding and 40 % were shade tolerant; 70 % of the species were dispersed by birds. Differences between sites are associated with the modifications in live fences structure, which changed according to managerial practices and the use of local species; this may influence plant regeneration modes as well as the visits of avian dispersal agents. In LT, all species found in live fences were useful to humans, whereas in UX, less than half were used by the local population. Our results underline the importance of live fences and isolated trees in pasture habitats as potential sites to host native and useful species from tropical rain forests in livestock landscapes.

  11. Irrigation water consumption modelling of a soilless cucumber crop under specific greenhouse conditions in a humid tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo Alberto Salcedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The irrigation water consumption of a soilless cucumber crop under greenhouse conditions in a humid tropical climate has been evaluated in this paper in order to improve the irrigation water and fertilizers management in these specific conditions. For this purpose, a field experiment was conducted. Two trials were carried out during the years 2011 and 2014 in an experimental farm located in Vinces (Ecuador. In each trial, the complete growing cycle of a cucumber crop grown under a greenhouse was evaluated. Crop development was monitored and a good fit to a sigmoidal Gompertz type growth function was reported. The daily water uptake of the crop was measured and related to the most relevant indoor climate variables. Two different combination methods, namely the Penman-Monteith equation and the Baille equation, were applied. However, the results obtained with these combination methods were not satisfactory due to the poor correlation between the climatic variables, especially the incoming radiation, and the crop's water uptake (WU. On contrary, a good correlation was reported between the crop's water uptake and the leaf area index (LAI, especially in the initial crop stages. However, when the crop is fully developed, the WU stabilizes and becomes independent from the LAI. A preliminary model to simulate the water uptake of the crop was adjusted using the data obtained in the first experiment and then validated with the data of the second experiment.

  12. The effects of redox fluctuation on iron-organic matter interactions in wet tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Campbell, A.; Lin, Y.; Nico, P. S.; Silver, W. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2016-12-01

    Two-thirds of the C in the terrestrial biosphere is stored as soil organic C, and much of this is stabilized via iron (Fe) mineral-organic matter (OM) associations that are susceptible to redox effects. The rapid C cycling typical of wet tropical ecosystems- driven by ample moisture and temperature- may also be fueled by a characteristically dynamic redox environment. Yet the net result of altered tropical soil climate and fluctuating soil redox regimes on Fe-organic matter associations is poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of redox transitions (frequency of O2 introduction and ferrous iron (Fe2+) generation) will lead to differences in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide mineral crystallinity and C degradation rates and alter the proportion of organic C associated with iron minerals. Surface soils from a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico were incubated for 44 days under four redox regimes: (1) static anoxic, (2) static oxic, (3) 4 days anoxic, 4 days oxic, and (4) 4 days anoxic, 8 days oxic. Replicate microcosms were harvested at multiple time points, including before and after a redox switch (oxic to anoxic or vice versa). Selective chemical extractions, bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS and STXM/NEXAFS spectromicroscopy were used to comprehensively probe treatment effects on Fe and C speciation. Static redox conditions had a significant effect on Fe2+ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, and prolonged anoxia promoted reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides and an increase in amorphous or short-range ordered (SRO) Fe oxides. Preferential dissolution of this less-crystalline Fe pool was more prominent during rapid redox switches from oxic to anoxic conditions, and coincided with increased DOC. Bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy identified Fe3+ as the dominant Fe species in all treatments and indicated O/N atoms in the first Fe co-ordination sphere and features similar to SRO Fe-oxide phases (e.g. ferrihydrite or nano-goethite) in the second co

  13. Measurements of rain splash on bench terraces in a humid tropical steepland environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.; Wiegman, S. E.

    2003-02-01

    Soil loss continues to threaten Java's predominantly bench-terraced volcanic uplands. Sediment transport processes on back-sloping terraces with well-aggregated clay-rich oxisols in West Java were studied using two different techniques. Splash on bare, cropped, or mulched sub-horizontal (2-3°) terrace beds was studied using splash cups of different sizes, whereas transport of sediment on the predominantly bare and steep (30-40/deg ) terrace risers was measured using a novel device combining a Gerlach-type trough with a splash box to enable the separate measurement of transport by wash and splash processes. Measurements were made during two consecutive rainy seasons. The results were interpreted using a recently developed splash distribution theory and related to effective rainfall erosive energy. Splash transportability (i.e. transport per unit contour length and unit erosive energy) on the terrace risers was more than an order of magnitude greater than on bare terrace beds (0·39-0·57 versus 0·013-0·016 g m J-1). This was caused primarily by a greater average splash distance on the short, steep risers (>11 cm versus c. 1 cm on the beds). Splashed amounts were reduced by the gradual formation of a protective pavement of coarser aggregates, in particular on the terrace beds. Soil aggregate size exhibited an inverse relationship with detachability (i.e. detachment per unit area and unit erosive energy) and average splash length, and therefore also with transportability, as did the degree of canopy and mulch cover. On the terrace risers, splash-creep and gravitational processes transported an additional 6-50% of measured rain splash, whereas transport by wash played a marginal role.

  14. Soil and biomass carbon pools in model communities of tropical plants under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, J A; Körner, Ch

    1995-09-01

    The experimental data presented here relate to the question of whether terrestrial ecosystems will sequester more C in their soils, litter and biomass as atmospheric CO2 concentrations rise. Similar to our previous study with relatively fertile growth conditions (Körner and Arnone 1992), we constructed four rather nutrient-limited model communities of moist tropical plant species in greenhouses (approximately 7 m(2) each). Plant communities were composed of seven species (77 individuals per community) representing major taxonomic groups and various life forms found in the moist tropics. Two ecosystems were exposed to 340 μl CO2 l(-1) and two to 610 μl l(-1) for 530 days of humid tropical growth conditions. In order to permit precise determination of C deposition in the soil, plant communities were initially established in C-free unwashed quartz sand. Soils were then amended with known amounts of organic matter (containing C and nutrients). Mineral nutrients were also supplied over the course of the experiment as timed-release full-balance fertilizer pellets. Soils represented by far the largest repositories for fixed C in all ecosystems. Almost 5 times more C (ca. 80% of net C fixation) was sequestered in the soil than in the biomass, but this did not differ between CO2 treatments. In addition, at the whole-ecosystem level we found a remarkably small and statistically non-significant increase in C sequestration (+4%; the sum of C accretion in the soil, biomass, litter and necromass). Total community biomass more than quadrupled during the experiment, but at harvest was, on average, only 8% greater (i.e. 6% per year; n.s.) under elevated CO2, mainly due to increased root biomass (+15%, P=0.12). Time courses of leaf area index of all ecosystems suggested that canopy expansion was approaching steady state by the time systems were harvested. Net primary productivity (NPP) of all ecosystems-i.e. annual accumulation of biomass, necromass, and leaf litter (but not

  15. Records of human activity during the late-Holocene in the soils of the African dense humid forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Rivat, Julie; Bentaleb, Ilham; Biwolé, Achille; Bourland, Nils; Bremond, Laurent; Daïnou, Kasso; Fayolle, Adeline; Gillet, Jean-François; Gorel, Anaïs; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Hardy, Olivier; Livingstone Smith, Alexandre; Oslisly, Richard; Vleminckx, Jason; Beeckman, Hans; Doucet, Jean-Louis

    2014-05-01

    Recently, several authors gathered data about the presence of past human populations in tropical regions covered by dense forest nowadays. In Central Africa, there is a growing body of evidence for past human settlements along the Atlantic coast, but very little information is available further inland. In the perspective, soil records seem to be the most appropriated so as to appraise the spatial and temporal extent of human activity in the African dense humid forest. In this paper, we thus aimed to present a synthesis of the archaeological and archaeobotanical data obtained during several fieldwork campaigns in an archaeologically unexplored area of 200,000 km² located in southern Cameroon and the northern Republic of Congo. A total of 275 test pits, among them 30 pedological pits up to 150 cm deep, were excavated in the study area. So as to get a long temporal scale as well as a fine resolution spatial scale, we quantified wood charcoal and charred endocarps in soil samples by layers of 10 cm taken for 100 pits located along transects of systematic sampling. Spatial projections were performed using statistics together with multivariate analyses. AMS radiocarbon dating allowed interpreting the temporal framework. Evidence of past human activities through either artifacts or charred botanical remains was observed in all pits, in particular with the ubiquitous presence of charcoal at each site. Main charcoal peaks were interpreted as fields (slash-and-burn agriculture) in the vicinity of ancient villages, the later marked by the presence of both potsherds and oil palm endocarps. The dichotomy of these kinds of activities may have impacted differentially the environment during the past. The set of 73 radiocarbon dates extending from 15,000 BP to the present time provided more dates in the late-Holocene showing a bimodal distribution which was interpreted as two phases of human expansion with an intermediate phase of population crash. The 2300-1300 BP phase is

  16. Hydrology and human behavior: two key factors of diarrhea incidence in montane tropical humid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boithias, Laurie; Choisy, Marc; Souliyaseng, Noy; Jourdren, Marine; Quet, Fabrice; Buisson, Yves; Thammahacksa, Chanthamousone; Silvera, Norbert; Latsachack, Keooudone; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Pierret, Alain; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Becerra, Sylvia; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The global burden of diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In montane areas of South-East Asia such as northern Laos, recent changes in land use have induced increased runoff, soil erosion and in-stream suspended sediment loads, and potential pathogen dissemination. In this study we hypothesized that climate factors combined with human behavior control diarrhea incidence, either because higher rainfall, leading to higher stream discharges, suspended sediment loads and Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) counts, are associated with higher numbers of reported diarrhea cases during the rainy season, or because water shortage leads to the use of less safe water sources during the dry season. For this mixed methods approach, we conducted a retrospective time series analysis of meteorological variables (rainfall, air temperature), hydrological variables (discharge, suspended sediments, FIB counts, water temperature) at the outlet of 2 catchments in Northern Lao PDR, and the number of diarrheal disease cases reported in 6 health centers located in the Luang Prabang Province. We also examined the socio-behavioral factors potentially affecting vulnerability to the effect of the climate factors, such as drinking water sources and hygiene habits. We found the FIB Escherichia coli to be present all year long (100-1,000 MPN 100 mL-1) indicating that fecal contamination is ubiquitous and constant. We found that populations switch their water supply from wells to surface water during drought periods, the latter of which appear to be at higher risk of bacterial contamination than municipal water fountains. We thus found that water shortage in the Luang Prabang area triggers diarrhea peaks during the dry and hot season and that rainfall and aquifer refill ends the epidemic during the wet season. We thus found that anthropogenic drivers, such as hygiene practices, were at least as important as environmental drivers in determining the seasonal pattern of a

  17. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Neena; Biju, V.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76°59'E longitude and 8°29'N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  18. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neena Sugathan; V Biju; G Renuka

    2014-07-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76° 59’E longitude and 8°29’N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  19. Investigating soil water retention characteristics at high suctions using relative humidity control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantikos Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for controlling relative humidity (RH is presented, which involves supplying a sealed chamber with a continuous flow of air at a computer-regulated RH. The desired value of RH is achieved by mixing dry and wet air at appropriate volumes and is measured for servo-control at three locations in the chamber with capacitive RH sensors and checked with a sensitive VAISALA sensor. The setup is capable of controlling RH steadily and continuously with a deviation of less than 0.2% RH. The technique was adopted to determine wetting soil-water retention curves (SWRC of statically compacted London Clay, under both free-swelling and constant volume conditions. The RH within the chamber was increased in a step-wise fashion, with each step maintained until vapour equilibrium between the chamber atmosphere and the soil samples was established. Independent filter paper measurements further validate the method, while the obtained retention curves complement those available in the literature for lower ranges of suction.

  20. Effects of tropical ecosystem engineers on soil quality and crop performance under different tillage and residue management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulleman, Mirjam; Paul, Birthe; Fredrick, Ayuke; Hoogmoed, Marianne; Hurisso, Tunsisa; Ndabamenye, Telesphore; Saidou, Koala; Terano, Yusuke; Six, Johan; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Feeding a future global population of 9 billion will require a 70-100% increase in food production, resulting in unprecedented challenges for agriculture and natural resources, especially in Sub-saharan Africa (SSA). Agricultural practices that contribute to sustainable intensification build on beneficial biological interactions and ecosystem services. Termites are the dominant soil ecosystem engineers in arid to sub-humid tropical agro-ecosystems. Various studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of termites for rehabilitation of degraded and crusted soils and plant growth in semi-arid and arid natural ecosystems. However, the contribution of termites to agricultural productivity has hardly been experimentally investigated, and their role in Conservation Agriculture (CA) systems remains especially unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify the effects of termites and ants on soil physical quality and crop productivity under different tillage and residue management systems in the medium term. A randomized block trial was set up in sub-humid Western Kenya in 2003. Treatments included a factorial combination of residue retention and removal (+R/-R) and conventional and reduced tillage (+T/-T) under a maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glyxine max. L.) rotation. A macrofauna exclusion experiment was superimposed in 2005 as a split-plot factor (exclusion +ins; inclusion -ins) by regular applications of pesticides (Dursban and Endosulfan) in half of the plots. Macrofauna abundance and diversity, soil aggregate fractions, soil carbon contents and crop yields were measured between 2005 and 2012 at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm soil depths. Termites were the most important macrofauna species, constituting between 48-63% of all soil biota, while ants were 13-34%, whereas earthworms were present in very low numbers. Insecticide application was effective in reducing termites (85-56% exclusion efficacy) and earthworms (87%), and less so ants (49-81%) at 0-15 cm soil depth

  1. A soil burn severity index for understanding soil-fire relations in tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, T.B.; Gould, W.A.; Graham, R.T.; Pilliod, D.S.; Lentile, L.B.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-01-01

    Methods for evaluating the impact of fires within tropical forests are needed as fires become more frequent and human populations and demands on forests increase. Short- and long-term fire effects on soils are determined by the prefire, fire, and postfire environments. We placed these components within a fire-disturbance continuum to guide our literature synthesis and develop an integrated soil burn severity index. The soil burn severity index provides a set of indicators that reflect the range of conditions present after a fire. The index consists of seven levels, an unburned level and six other levels that describe a range of postfire soil conditions. We view this index as a tool for understanding the effects of fires on the forest floor, with the realization that as new information is gained, the index may be modified as warranted. ?? Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2008.

  2. Projected impacts of climate change on groundwater and stormflow in a humid, tropical catchment in the Ugandan Upper Nile Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The changing availability of freshwater resources is likely to be one of the most important consequences of projected 21st century climate change for both human and natural systems. However, substantial uncertainty remains regarding the precise impacts of climate change on water resources, due in part to uncertainty in GCM projections of climate change. Here we explore the potential impacts of climate change on water resources in a humid, tropical catchment (the River Mitano in the Upper Nile Basin of Uganda. Uncertainty associated with GCM structure and climate sensitivity is explored, as well as from parameter specification within hydrological models. This is achieved by running pattern-scaled GCM output through a semi-distributed hydrological model (developed using SWAT of the catchment. Importantly, use of pattern-scaled GCM output allows investigation of specific thresholds of global climate change including the purported 2 °C threshold of "dangerous" climate change. In-depth analysis of results based on HadCM3 climate scenarios shows that annual river discharge first increases, then declines with rising global mean air temperature. A coincidental shift from a bimodal to unimodal discharge regime also results from a projected reduction in baseflow (groundwater discharge. Both of these changes occur after a 4 °C rise in global mean air temperature. These results are, however, highly GCM dependent in both the magnitude and direction of change. This dependence stems primarily from projected differences in GCM scenario precipitation rather than temperature. GCM-related uncertainty is far greater than that associated with climate sensitivity or hydrological model parameterisation.

  3. Effects of humidity and soil organic matter on the sorption of chlorinated methanes in synthetic humic-clay complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canan Cabbar, H

    1999-09-10

    Vapor-phase sorption is the most influential process governing the transport and the fate of volatile organic compounds in soil. To understand the influence of both soil organic content and the humidity of soil on the vapor sorption is an important process for degradation processes. The single-pellet moment technique was used to investigate sorption and diffusion of trichloromethane (TCM) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC) at varying relative humidities (0-80%) of synthetic humic-clay complex pellets consisting of clay (montmorillonite) and different amounts of organic matter (humic acid). The effective diffusivities of TCM and CTC did not show a noticeable change with moisture and humic acid content. On the other hand, with increasing humic acid content of clay at 0% relative humidity, an appreciable decrease of the equilibrium sorption constants of the tracers (TCM, CTC) was found because of the blockage of some sites of the mineral surfaces and especially micropores by the humic acid. The presence of water also reduced dramatically the sorption of TCM and CTC on synthetic humic-clay complexes. Above 20% relative humidity, the sorption coefficient of TCM and CTC varied only slightly with humic acid content. It was concluded that the sorption of TCM and CTC in synthetic humic-clay complexes was strongly effected by the moisture and humic acid content.

  4. Effects of agricultural intensification in the tropics on soil carbon losses and soil fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Thomas; Buttler, Alexandre; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forest conversion to agricultural land leads to strong decrease of soil organic carbon (SOC). Nonetheless, the impacts of SOC losses on soil fertility remain unclear. We quantified SOC losses in forest, oil palm plantations, extensive rubber plantations and rubber monocultures on Sumatra Island (Indonesia). Furthermore, we assessed the response of biological (basal respiration, microbial biomass, acid phosphatase) and chemical fertility indicators (light fraction of OM, DOC, total N, available P) to SOC losses. We used a new approach based on (non-)linear regressions between SOC losses and the indicators, normalized to natural ecosystem values, to assess the sensitivity or resistance of fertility indicators to SOC losses. Carbon contents in the Ah horizon under oil palm and intensive rubber plantations were strongly reduced: up to 70% and 62%, respectively. The decrease was lower under extensive rubber (41%). The negative impact of land-use changes on all measured indicators increased in the following sequence: extensive rubber oil palm. Basal respiration, microbial biomass and nutrients were comparatively resistant to SOC losses, whereas the light fraction of OM was lost faster than the SOC. The resistance of the microbial activity to SOC losses is an indication that microbial-mediated soil functions sustain SOC losses. However, responses of basal respiration and microbial biomass to SOC losses were non-linear. Below 2.7% C content, the relationship was reversed. The basal respiration decreased faster than the SOC, resulting in a stronger drop of microbial activity under oil palm compared to rubber, despite small difference in C content. We conclude that the new approach allows a quantitative assessment of the sensitivity and threshold of various soil functions to land-use changes and consequently, can be used to assess their resistance to agricultural intensification. Therefore, this method is appropriate to evaluate the environmental impacts associated

  5. Soil-Water Repellency and Critical Humidity as Cleanup Criteria for Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Adams, Randy H.

    2010-05-01

    The majority of soil remediation programs focus mainly on reducing the hydrocarbon concentration, based on the assumption that the primary impact is toxicity and/or leachates and that these are directly proportional to concentration. None-the-less, interference with natural soil-water interactions are frequently more damaging, especially for sites contaminated with very viscous, weathered hydrocarbons. Therefore, the kind of hydrocarbons present in the soil and their interactions with soil surfaces may be more important than the overall hydrocarbon concentration in terms of soil restoration. One recently patented technology, the Chemical-Biological Stabilization process, focuses specifically on restoring soil fertility as the main objective for remediation of sites with agricultural use. This method was recently validated at an industrial scale by the treatment of 150 cubic meters of bentonitic drilling muds (70,5% fines) from an old sulphur mine, which were contaminated with very weathered oil (4° API), consisting of 31% asphaltenes. This material was treated by adding 4% (w/w, dry) of calcium hydroxide, followed by 4% (w/w, dry) of sugar cane cachasse (a fine fibered agricultural waste), thoroughly mixing between additions using an excavator. After the soil had dried sufficiently and the pH was soil water repellency. MED was measured on air dried soil and WDPT values were calculated from the extrapolation of penetration time vs. ethanol molarity functions (Rx=0,99). Additionally, water penetration times were measured at different humidities to determine critical moisture levels for absorption in soil humic substances while a vigorous vegetative growth was established. During two years of treatment the MED values were reduced 30% from 5,13 to 3,58M, and WDPT values were reduced over 25 times (from 10 exp5,6 s to 10 exp4,2 s). Critical humidity values varied from ~16,9 - 19,5%H for penetration in soil humidity was 20,3%, and thus values below the critical levels

  6. The groundwater recharge response and hydrologic services of tropical humid forest ecosystems to use and reforestation: Support for the “infiltration-evapotranspiration trade-off hypothesis”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Jagdish; Bonell, Michael; Venkatesh, Basappa; Purandara, Bekal K.; Rakesh, K. N.; Lele, Sharachchandra; Kiran, M. C.; Reddy, Veerabasawant; Badiger, Shrinivas

    2013-08-01

    The hydrologic effects of forest use and reforestation of degraded lands in the humid tropics has implications for local and regional hydrologic services but such issues have been relatively less studied when compared to the impacts of forest conversion. In particular, the “infiltration-evapotranspiration trade-off” hypothesis which predicts a net gain or loss to baseflow and dry-season flow under both, forest degradation or reforestation depending on conditions has not been tested adequately. In the Western Ghats of India, we examined the hydrologic responses and groundwater recharge and hydrologic services linked with three ecosystems, (1) remnant tropical evergreen forest (NF), (2) heavily-used former evergreen forest which now has been converted to tree savanna, known as degraded forest(DF), and (3) exotic Acacia plantations (AC, Acacia auriculiformis) on degraded former forest land. Instrumented catchments ranging from 7 to 23 ha representing these three land-covers (3 NF, 4 AC and 4 DF, in total 11 basins), were established and maintained between 2003 and 2005 at three sites in two geomorphological zones, Coastal and Up-Ghat (Malnaad). Four larger (1-2 km2) catchments downstream of the head-water catchments in the Malnaad with varying proportions of different land-cover and providing irrigation water for areca-nut and paddy rice were also measured for post-monsoon baseflow. Daily hydrological and climate data was available at all the sites. In addition, 36 min data was available at the Coastal site for 41 days as part of the opening phase of the summer monsoon, June-July 2005. Low potential and actual evapotranspiration rates during the monsoon that are similar across all land-cover ensures that the main control on the extent of groundwater recharge during the south-west monsoon is the proportion of rainfall that is converted into quick flow rather than differences in evapotranspiration between the different land cover types. The Flow duration curves

  7. Sorption and desorption of organophosphate pesticides, parathion and cadusafos, on tropical agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Olvera-Velona, Angeluz; Benoit, Pierre; Barriuso, Enrique; Ortiz-Hernandez, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Ecotoxicological impacts of organic pesticides on soil and aquatic ecosystems depend primarily on their behavior in soils. Actual pesticide knowledge is mostly restricted to soils from temperate climates, whereas knowledge of pesticide behavior in tropical soils is scarce. Here, the sorption behavior of two organophosphorous insecticides, parathion and cadusafos, was studied in three agricultural soil samples from central Mexico, Vertisols and Andosols. Using 14C-labeled substances, we assess...

  8. Different responses of MODIS-derived NDVI to root-zone soil moisture in semi-arid and humid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Xie, Hongjie; Guan, Huade; Zhou, Xiaobing

    2007-06-01

    SummarySurface representation of the root-zone soil moisture is investigated so that feasibility of using optical remote sensing techniques to indirectly map root-zone soil moisture is assessed. Specifically, covariation of root-zone soil moisture with the normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is studied at three sites (New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas) selected from the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN). The three sites represent two types of vegetation (shrub and grass) and two types of climate conditions: semi-arid (New Mexico and Arizona) and humid (Texas). Collocated deseasonalized time series of soil moistures at five depths (5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, 50 cm, and 100 cm) and NDVI (8-day composite in 250 m resolution) during the period of February 2000 through April 2004 were used for correlation analysis. Similar analysis was also conducted for the raw time series for comparison purposes. The linear regression of both the deseasonalized time series and the raw time series was used to estimate root-zone soil moisture. Results show that (1) the deseasonalized time series results in consistent and significant correlation (0.46-0.55) between NDVI and root-zone soil moisture at the three sites; (2) vegetation (NDVI) at the humid site needs longer time (10 days) to respond to soil moisture change than that at the semi-arid sites (5 days or less); (3) the time-series of root-zone soil moisture estimated by a linear regression model based on deseasonalized time series accounts for 42-71% of the observed soil moisture variations for the three sites; and (4) in the semi-arid region, root-zone soil moisture of shrub-vegetated area can be better estimated using NDVI than that of grass-vegetated area.

  9. Seasonal variation in soil and plant water potentials in a Bolivian tropical moist and dry forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.; Iraipi, J.; Bongers, F.; Poorter, L.

    2010-01-01

    We determined seasonal variation in soil matric potentials (¿soil) along a topographical gradient and with soil depth in a Bolivian tropical dry (1160 mm y-1 rain) and moist forest (1580 mm y-1). In each forest we analysed the effect of drought on predawn leaf water potentials (¿pd) and drought resp

  10. Soil Effects on Forest Structure and Diversity in a Moist and a Dry Tropical Forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peña-Claros, M.; Poorter, L.; Alarcon, A.; Blate, G.; Choque, U.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Justiniano, J.; Leaño, C.; Licona, J.C.; Pariona, W.; Putz, F.E.; Quevedo, L.; Toledo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil characteristics are important drivers of variation in wet tropical forest structure and diversity, but few studies have evaluated these relationships in drier forest types. Using tree and soil data from 48 and 32 1 ha plots, respectively, in a Bolivian moist and dry forest, we asked how soil co

  11. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation in a Tropical Soil-Plant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfergelt, S.; Delstanche, S.; Cardinal, D.; Andre, L.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    Silica fluxes to soil solutions and water streams are controlled by both abiotic and biotic processes occurring in a Si soil-plant cycle that can be significant in comparison with Si weathering input and hydrological output. The quantification of Si-isotopic fractionation by these processes is highly promising to study the Si soil-plant cycle. Therein, the fate of aqueous monosilicic acid H4SiO4, as produced by silicate weathering, may take four paths: (1) uptake by plants and recycling through falling litter, (2) formation of clay minerals, (3) specific adsorption onto Al and Fe oxides, (4) leaching in drainage waters and export from watersheds. Here we report on detailed Si-isotopic compositions of various Si pools in a tropical soil-plant system involving old stands of banana (Musa acuminata Colla, cv Grande Naine) cropped on a weathering sequence of soils derived from andesitic volcanic ash and pumice deposits in Cameroon, West Africa. Si-isotopic compositions were measured by MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode with external Mg doping with a reproducibility of 0.08 permil (2stdev). Results were expressed as delta29Si vs NBS28. The compositions were determined in plant parts, bulk soils, clay fractions (less than 2um) and stream waters used for crop irrigation. Of the weathering sequence, we selected young (Y) and old (O) volcanic soils (vs). Yvs are rich in weatherable minerals, and contain large amounts of pumice gravels; their clay fraction (10-35 percent) contains allophane, halloysite and ferrihydrite. Oppositely, Ovs are strongly weathered and fine clayey soils (75-96 percent clay) rich in halloysite, kaolinite, gibbsite and goethite. Intra-plant fractionation between roots and shoots and within shoots confirmed our previous data measured on banana plants grown in hydroponics. The bulk plant isotopic composition was heavier at Ovs than at Yvs giving a fractionation factor per atomic mass unit between plants and their irrigation water Si source (+0.61 permil) of

  12. Bioremediation of a tropical clay soil contaminated with diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Spinelli, Alessandra C O; Kato, Mario T; de Lima, Edmilson S; Gavazza, Savia

    2012-12-30

    The removal of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in tropical clay soil contaminated with diesel oil was evaluated. Three bioremediation treatments were used: landfarming (LF), biostimulation (BS) and biostimulation with bioaugmentation (BSBA). The treatment removal efficiency for the total PAHs differed from the efficiencies for the removal of individual PAH compounds. In the case of total PAHs, the removal values obtained at the end of the 129-day experimental period were 87%, 89% and 87% for LF, BS and BSBA, respectively. Thus, the efficiency was not improved by the addition of nutrients and microorganisms. Typically, two distinct phases were observed. A higher removal rate occurred in the first 17 days (P-I) and a lower rate occurred in the last 112 days (P-II). In phase P-I, the zero-order kinetic parameter (μg PAH g(-1) soil d(-1)) values were similar (about 4.6) for all the three treatments. In P-II, values were also similar but much lower (about 0.14). P-I was characterized by a sharp pH decrease to less than 5.0 for the BS and BSBA treatments, while the pH remained near 6.5 for LF. Concerning the 16 individual priority PAH compounds, the results varied depending on the bioremediation treatment used and on the PAH species of interest. In general, compounds with fewer aromatic rings were better removed by BS or BSBA, while those with 4 or more rings were most effectively removed by LF. The biphasic removal behavior was observed only for some compounds. In the case of naphthalene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[k]fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene, removal occurred mostly in the P-I phase. Therefore, the best degradation process for total or individual PAHs should be selected considering the target compounds and the local conditions, such as native microbiota and soil type.

  13. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  14. Implementation monitoring temperature, humidity and mositure soil based on wireless sensor network for e-agriculture technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarudin, A.; Ghozali, A. L.; Hasyim, A.; Effendi, A.

    2016-04-01

    Indonesian agriculture has great potensial for development. Agriculture a lot yet based on data collection for soil or plant, data soil can use for analys soil fertility. We propose e-agriculture system for monitoring soil. This system can monitoring soil status. Monitoring system based on wireless sensor mote that sensing soil status. Sensor monitoring utilize soil moisture, humidity and temperature. System monitoring design with mote based on microcontroler and xbee connection. Data sensing send to gateway with star topology with one gateway. Gateway utilize with mini personal computer and connect to xbee cordinator mode. On gateway, gateway include apache server for store data based on My-SQL. System web base with YII framework. System done implementation and can show soil status real time. Result the system can connection other mote 40 meters and mote lifetime 7 hours and minimum voltage 7 volt. The system can help famer for monitoring soil and farmer can making decision for treatment soil based on data. It can improve the quality in agricultural production and would decrease the management and farming costs.

  15. Potential of indirect evaporative passive cooling with embedded tubes in a humid tropical climate : applications in a typical hot humid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Chavez, J.R. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Medio Ambiente, Laboratorio de Investigaciones en Arquitectura Bioclimatica; Givoni, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); BGU, Beer Sheva (Israel); Viveros, O. [Cristobal Colon Univ., Veracruz (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The use of passive cooling techniques in buildings in hot and humid regions can reduce energy consumption while increasing thermal comfort for occupants. A study was conducted in the City of Veracruz, Mexico to investigate the performance of tubes embedded in the roof of the Gulf Meteorological Prevision Centre. Two identical insulated experimental cells were used, one serving as the control and the other one as the test unit, where the technique of embedded tubes in the roof was implemented and investigated during a typical overheating season. Results showed that this indirect evaporative cooling system is an effective strategy to reduce indoor temperatures without increasing the indoor humidity in buildings. The indoor maximum temperature was lowered by 2.72 K in the experimental test cell relative to the control unit. In addition, the resulting reduction of radiant temperatures in the test unit improved the thermal comfort of the occupants. It is expected that the implementation of this passive cooling technique will eventually contribute to reduced energy consumption and less use of air-conditioning systems in buildings, and thereby prevent emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. 9 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  16. Light and soil humidity influencing oak seedling growth and physiology in mixed hardwood gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raddi S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In “S. Rossore, Migliarino, Massaciuccoli” Natural Park (Pisa, I six-month-old pedunculate oak seedlings (Quercus robur L. were transplanted within natural gaps of a mixed oak forest. Micro-environmental variability for radiation and water soil content were measured for 145 seedlings during the year. Irradiation relative to the open field (IR ranged from 5% to 57%. Seven classes of IR each with 20 seedlings were selected. Leaf mass per area was strongly influenced by IR. In the first 3 years survival was high (95, 76 and 75%, respectively and seedling reached 14±6 cm, 27±13 cm and 39±19 (sd cm of height. Even if IR and soil water content (SWC were negatively associated, indicating a lower SWC at the centre of the gaps, height and its relative growth rate increased with IR (explored range: 8-40% with a significant interaction with SWC in the 1st year, indicating the positive effect of soil moisture. In the 3rd year dimensional traits were higher in L+W+ (high light and humidity followed by L-W+ (low light and high humidity, L+W- and finally by L-W-. Summer drought typical of the Mediterranean climate was evaluated by chlorophyll fluorescence of PSII on apical leaves of seedlings and mature trees at the beginning (21 June and in mid-summer (20 July. While in June physiological traits did not differ between low and high IR, in mid-summer (at the peak of water-stress seedlings of the two highest light classes showed chronic photoinhibition (Fv/Fm<0.75 and an increase in thermal dissipation (D by constitutive term (Dc=1-Fv/Fm and by regulated mechanisms of dissipation through xanthophyll-cycle term (Dx. Moreover, in July seedling leaf physiology largely differed with IR: leaves acclimated to high IR have higher photosynthetic potentialities, as shown by electron transport rate (ETR and quantum yield (P at saturating light maintained by an increase of the fraction of open reaction centres (qP, counterbalancing the efficiency decrease of the

  17. Long-term evaluation of the fate of sulfur mustard on dry and humid soils, asphalt, and concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Dana M; Goldvaser, Michael; Columbus, Ishay

    2011-04-15

    The long-term fate of the blister agent sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) was determined in a variety of commercial and natural matrices. HD was found to be extremely stable in dry matrices for over a year. The addition of 5% water to the matrices induced slow degradation of HD, which lasted several months. The major degradation product in sands and asphalt was found to be a sulfonium salt, S[CH(2)CH(2)S(+)(CH(2)CH(2)OH)(2)](2) (H-2TG). Red loam soil, which has not been examined before, exhibited strong interaction with HD, both in dry form and in the presence of water. Humid red loam soil gave rise to unique oxidative degradation products. On humid concrete HD degraded to a complex mixture of products, including vinyls. This may be attributed to the basic sites incorporated in concrete.

  18. Evaporation from Pinus caribaea plantations on former grassland soils under maritime tropical conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterloo, M.J.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Vugts, H.F.; Rawaqa, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    Wet canopy and dry canopy evaporation from young and mature plantations of Pinus caribaea on former grassland soils under maritime tropical conditions in southwestern Viti Levu, Fiji, were determined using micrometeorological and hydrological techniques. Modeled annual evaporation totals (ET) of

  19. The Vertical Structure of Relative Humidity and Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere: Intercomparisons Among In Situ Observations, A-Train Measurements and Large-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke; Pawson, Steven; Ott, Lesley; Benson, Craig; Stolarski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements in the tropics have shown that in regions of active convection, relative humidity with respect to ice in the upper troposphere is typically close to saturation on average, and supersaturations greater than 20% are not uncommon. Balloon soundings with the cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH) at Costa Rica during northern summer, for example, show this tendency to be strongest between 11 and 15.5 km (345-360 K potential temperature, or approximately 250-120 hPa). this is the altitude range of deep convective detrainment. Additionally, simultaneous ozonesonde measurements show that stratospheric air (O3 greater than 150 ppbv) can be found as low as approximately 14 km (350 K/150 hPa). In contrast, results from northern winter show a much drier upper troposphere and little penetration of stratospheric air below the tropopause at 17.5 km (approximately 383 K). We show that these results are consistent with in situ measurements from the Measurement of Ozone and water vapor by Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC) program which samples a wider, though still limited, range of tropical locations. To generalize to the tropics as a whole, we compare our insitu results to data from two A-Train satellite instruments, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aqua and Aura satellites respectively. Finally, we examine the vertical structure of water vapor, relative humidity and ozone in the NASA Goddard MERRA analysis, an assimilation dataset, and a new version of the GEOS CCM, a free-running chemistry-climate model. We demonstrate that conditional probability distributions of relative humidity and ozone are a sensitive diagnostic for assessing the representation of deep convection and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere mixing processes in large-scale analyses and climate models.

  20. Rice straw biochar affects water retention and air movement in a sand-textured tropical soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Ahmed, Fauziatu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the current global attention on biochar (BC) as a soil amendment, knowledge is limited on how BC impacts the physical properties of coarse-textured soils (sand > 95%), particularly in tropical regions. A two-season field-study was conducted to investigate the effect of rice straw BC (3% w....../w) on water retention, gas transport and structure of a sand-textured tropical soil. We sampled 3 months and 15 months after BC application and measured wet- and dry-region soil water retention, air permeability and gas diffusivity at selected matric potentials. At all measured potentials and for both...... and over time provide better structure for agricultural purposes....

  1. The microbial perspective of organic matter turnover and nutrient cycling in tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank

    2017-04-01

    A primary goal of low-input small-holder farming systems in the tropics is the appropriate management of organic matter (OM) turnover and nutrient cycling via adapted agricultural practices. These emphasize the promotion of soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and carbon (C) sequestration, nutrient use efficiency and soil microbial activity. Since soil microbial communities are acknowledged as key players in the terrestrial C and nutrient (e.g., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P)) cycles, they may respond sensitively to agricultural management with shifts in their community structure as well as functional traits (i.e., decomposition, mineralization). This may be in particular evident for tropical, agricultural soils which show an accelerated microbial decomposition activity induced by favourable climatic and unique physico-chemical soil conditions. While modern molecular techniques advanced primarily the understanding about the microbiome and their functional traits interacting closely with SOM dynamics in temperate soils, tropical soils under agricultural use have been still neglected to a great extent. The majority of available studies revealed mainly descriptive data on the structural composition of microbial communities rather than questioning if detected structural alterations of the soil microbiome influenced key processes in N and P cycling which actually maintain ecosystem functioning and soil productivity. This talk highlights latest efforts in deploying molecular techniques to study the compositional status of soil microbial decomposer communities and their functional attributes in response to land use change and OM management in tropical agro-ecosystems.

  2. ESTIMATES OF BREED DIRECT, MATERNAL AND HETEROSIS EFFECTS FOR WEANING AND YEARLING WEIGHTS OF BEEF CATTLE IN THE HUMID TROPICS OF MEXICO

    OpenAIRE

    Mario M. Osorio-Arce; Segura-Correa, José C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the breed-direct, breed-maternal and heterosis effects for weaning and yearling weights of Brahman cattle and its crosses with Charolais, Simmental and Brown Swiss breeds in a beef cattle system in Tabasco, Mexico. The climate of the region is tropical humid. Data were obtained on 1217 calves born from 1995 to 2007; among the 16 breed-group combinations one was purebred mating (Brahman), 3 two-breed static crosses, 7 three-breed static crosses and ...

  3. Soil changes induced by rubber and tea plantation establishment: comparison with tropical rain forest soil in Xishuangbanna, SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Ma, Youxin; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-11-01

    Over the past thirty years, Xishuangbanna in Southwestern China has seen dramatic changes in land use where large areas of tropical forest and fallow land have been converted to rubber and tea plantations. In this study we evaluated the effects of land use and slope on soil properties in seven common disturbed and undisturbed land-types. Results indicated that all soils were acidic, with pH values significantly higher in the 3- and 28-year-old rubber plantations. The tropical forests had the lowest bulk densities, especially significantly lower from the top 10 cm of soil, and highest soil organic matter concentrations. Soil moisture content at topsoil was highest in the mature rubber plantation. Soils in the tropical forests and abandoned cultivated land had inorganic N (IN) concentrations approximately equal in NH(4) (+)-N and NO(3) (-)-N. However, soil IN pools were dominated by NH(4) (+)-N in the rubber and tea plantations. This trend suggests that conversion of tropical forest to rubber and tea plantations increases NH(4) (+)-N concentration and decreases NO(3) (-)-N concentration, with the most pronounced effect in plantations that are more frequently fertilized. Soil moisture content, IN, NH(4) (+)-N and NO(3) (-)-N concentrations within all sites were higher in the rainy season than in the dry season. Significant differences in the soil moisture content, and IN, NH(4) (+)-N and NO(3) (-)-N concentration was detected for both land uses and sampling season effects, as well as interactions. Higher concentrations of NH(4) (+)-N were measured at the upper slopes of all sites, but NO(3) (-)-N concentrations were highest at the lower slope in the rubber plantations and lowest at the lower slopes at all other. Thus, the conversion of tropical forests to rubber and tea plantations can have a profound effect on soil NH(4) (+)-N and NO(3) (-)-N concentrations. Options for improved soil management in plantations are discussed.

  4. Interactions between nematodes and microbial communities in a tropical soil following manipulation of the soil food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villenave, C.; Ekschmitt, K.; Nazaret, S.; Bongers, A.M.T.

    2004-01-01

    The carrying capacity for microflora and nematofauna was manipulated (using a bactericide, a fungicide, manure or a growing millet plant) in a poor tropical soil, in order to identify relationships between the soil microbes and nematodes and to assess the influences of these organisms on nitrogen

  5. Biodegradation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in a typical tropical soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelo de Moura Carrara, Silvia Marta; Morita, Dione Mari [Polytechnic School, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Boscov, Maria Eugenia Gimenez, E-mail: meboscov@usp.br [Polytechnic School, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scarce literature on contamination of tropical soils by phthalates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of mobility of DEHP in a tropical soil by infiltration tests showed that DEHP is retained in the upper layer of the soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low air and water permeability indicate that in situ bioremediation is not feasible for this soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Respirometric tests were inadequate to investigate biodegradation because tropical soils are acidic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slurry-phase reactor with cement mixer provided significant biodegradation (99% in 49 days). - Abstract: The aim of this research was to evaluate the possibility of biodegradation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), widely used as an industrial plasticizer and considered an endocrine-disrupting chemical included in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority list, in a Brazilian tropical soil, which has not been previously reported in the literature, despite the geographic importance of tropical soils. Preliminary laboratory testing comprised respirometric, air and water permeability, and pilot scale infiltration tests. Standard respirometric tests were found inadequate for studying biodegradation in tropical contaminated soils, due to the effect of the addition of significant amounts of calcium carbonate, necessary to adjust soil pH. Pilot scale infiltration tests performed for 5 months indicated that DEHP was retained in the superficial layer of the soil, barely migrating downwards, whereas air and water permeability tests discarded in situ bioremediation. However, ex situ bioremediation was possible, using a slurry-phase reactor with acclimated microorganisms, in pilot scale tests conducted to remediate a total mass of 150 kg of contaminated soil with 100 mg DEHP/kg. The removal of DEHP in the slurry-phase reactor achieved the percentage of 99% in 49 days, with biodegradation following a first

  6. Movimento do herbicida imazapyr no perfil de solos tropicais Imazapyr mobility in tropical soil profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Firmino

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, no presente trabalho, avaliar a movimentação ascendente e descendente do imazapyr no perfil de três solos tropicais. Utilizaram-se colunas de PVC, formadas pela junção de seis anéis de 5 cm, perfazendo altura total de 30 cm, as quais foram preenchidas com solos muito argiloso, franco-argilo-arenoso e areia-franca. Após aplicação do imazapyr, na dose de 1 kg ha-1, na superfície das colunas, estas foram submetidas a três condições: simulação de chuva de 14 mm/35 min, seguida de repouso por 48 horas; simulação de chuva de 14 mm/35 min, seguida por repouso de 30 dias; e inversão das colunas após aplicação de imazapyr na superfície, com subirrigação por 20 dias e repouso de 10 dias. Após essa etapa, fez-se o seccionamento das colunas a cada 5 cm de profundidade. Nos solos provenientes de cada profundidade, semeou-se sorgo como bioindicador, sendo avaliada a massa seca da parte aérea das plantas aos 21 dias após a semeadura. A maior movimentação descendente do imazapyr foi observada no solo areia-franca (até 25 cm, seguido pelos solos franco-argilo-arenoso (até 20 cm e muito argiloso (até 15 cm. A movimentação ascendente desse herbicida ocorreu junto com a água, ocasionando sua distribuição em toda a extensão da coluna (30 cm nos solos franco-argilo-arenoso e areia-franca. No solo muito argiloso, o herbicida movimentou-se cerca de 25 cm na vertical ascendente. O imazapyr apresentou alta mobilidade nos três solos, junto com o movimento da água no perfil, tanto no sentido ascendente como no descendente. Essa alta mobilidade pode levar à contaminação de corpos d'água, bem como ocasionar ciclos de permanência do produto nas camadas mais superficiais, de acordo com a disponibilidade de umidade no solo.The experiment was carried out in columns filled with three different tropical soils, (very clayey soil, sand loam soil and sand clay loam soil to evaluate ascending and descending movement of

  7. Hydrologically transported dissolved organic carbon influences soil respiration in a tropical rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Schaefer, Douglas Allen; Song, Qing-Hai; Deng, Yun; Deng, Xiao-Bao

    2016-10-01

    To better understand the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported by hydrological processes (rainfall, throughfall, litter leachate, and surface soil water; 0-20 cm) on soil respiration in tropical rainforests, we detected the DOC flux in rainfall, throughfall, litter leachate, and surface soil water (0-20 cm), compared the seasonality of δ13CDOC in each hydrological process, and δ13C in leaves, litter, and surface soil, and analysed the throughfall, litter leachate, and surface soil water (0-20 cm) effect on soil respiration in a tropical rainforest in Xishuangbanna, south-west China. Results showed that the surface soil intercepted 94.4 ± 1.2 % of the annual litter leachate DOC flux and is a sink for DOC. The throughfall and litter leachate DOC fluxes amounted to 6.81 and 7.23 % of the net ecosystem exchange respectively, indicating that the DOC flux through hydrological processes is an important component of the carbon budget, and may be an important link between hydrological processes and soil respiration in a tropical rainforest. Even the variability in soil respiration is more dependent on the hydrologically transported water than DOC flux insignificantly, soil temperature, and soil-water content (at 0-20 cm). The difference in δ13C between the soil, soil water (at 0-20 cm), throughfall, and litter leachate indicated that DOC is transformed in the surface soil and decreased the sensitivity indices of soil respiration of DOC flux to water flux, which suggests that soil respiration is more sensitive to the DOC flux in hydrological processes, especially the soil-water DOC flux, than to soil temperature or soil moisture.

  8. Evaluation, Selection and Assessment of Guidelines for Chemical Stabilization of Tropical Residual Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujang B.K. Huat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lacking of suitable materials on site. Guidelines and standards have been developed to assist practitioners in designing structures such as road by mean of stabilization. This paper presents the results of an investigation aimed at evaluating and assessing the suitable guidelines for the stabilization of tropical residual soils. Two types of tropical residual soils namely granite residual and sedimentary residual soil were tested by using conventional methods practiced in Malaysiaand two guidelines, namely the TRL and PWD were evaluated. From the results of this study, it appeared that the TRL gave a simplified and satisfactory route in selection of suitable binder for the stabilization processes of tropical residual soils.

  9. pH dominates variation in tropical soil archaeal diversity and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Shukor, Nor A A; Rahim, Raha A; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    Little is known of the factors influencing soil archaeal community diversity and composition in the tropics. We sampled soils across a range of forest and nonforest environments in the equatorial tropics of Malaysia, covering a wide range of pH values. DNA was PCR-amplified for the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454-pyrosequenced. Soil pH was the best predictor of diversity and community composition of Archaea, being a stronger predictor than land use. Archaeal OTU richness was highest in the most acidic soils. Overall archaeal abundance in tropical soils (determined by qPCR) also decreased at higher pH. This contrasts with the opposite trend previously found in temperate soils. Thaumarcheota group 1.1b was more abundant in alkaline soils, whereas group 1.1c was only detected in acidic soils. These results parallel those found in previous studies in cooler climates, emphasizing niche conservatism among broad archaeal groups. Among the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), there was clear evidence of niche partitioning by pH. No individual OTU occurred across the entire range of pH values. Overall, the results of this study show that pH plays a major role in structuring tropical soil archaeal communities.

  10. Into the Deep: Variability in Soil Microbial Communities and Carbon Turnover Along a Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Wood, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored within deeper soil layers, but we know exceedingly little about the fate of this C or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. From the data that do exist, most organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization due to organo-metal co-precipitation and mineral-surface interactions. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, the turnover times of deep soil C, and sensitivity of this C to global environmental change. To address this critical research need, we quantified C pools, microbial communities and soil radiocarbon turnover times in bulk soils and soil fractions [free light (unprotected), dense (mineral-associated)] from 0-140 cm in replicate soil pits in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Unsurprisingly, we found soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C stocks dropped from 5.5 % at the surface to mineral associated fraction was much older than the free light fraction C, which reflected modern 14C at all depths. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C, and OM decomposition that highly favors free light C pools, even at depth. While previous work suggests these low C tropical subsoils contain small but metabolically active microbial communities at depths of ~100cm, these organisms appear highly OM limited, and preferentially degrade recent inputs. In the coming half century, tropical forests are predicted to see a 2 - 5 ° C temperature increase and substantial differences in rainfall amount and timing. The data described here represent baseline data for a site now undergoing a 4°C warming experiment; upcoming

  11. Soil Hydrologic Response and Nutrient Movement in Three Small Tropical Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, N. H.; Hamann, H. B.; Stallard, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    The movement of water over and through soils by storm-generated flowpaths in tropical forests not only mediates nutrient movement and physical weathering, but also potentially influences vegetation growth and dynamics with seasonally dry or saturated soil conditions. However, few small-scale catchment studies (10-1000ha) have produced a comprehensive, standardized dataset on soil hydrologic properties among tropical forest catchments, due in part to complexities within tropical systems, and to inconsistencies in methods, data collection, and/or analyses. In response, this study has utilized the global, standardized network of forest dynamics plots of the Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) for the rapid assessment of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and the water chemistry from storm-generated flowpaths. Ks measurements at varying depths help in testing Elsenbeer's (2001) functional classification continuum of tropical forest soilscapes and resulting hydrologic flowpaths. In Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Ks decreased rapidly with soil depth where horizontal surface and near-surface flowpaths were most prevalent. Ks measurements in Yasuni National Park, Ecuador indicated limited vertical movement of water at depths >15cm due to an impermeable soil layer. Ks measurements from Lambir Hills National Park, Malaysia, represented both ends of the continuum due to variability in soil type and lithology. In relation to soil hydrology and hydrological flowpaths, runoff chemistry at Yasuni reveals a general pattern of increased nutrient export as water moves through the canopy and over the soil surface, with concentrations of K+ increasing significantly in throughfall, and concentrations of both K+, and NO3- remaining high in overland flow. The results from the composite overland flow samples may indicate a more open nutrient cycle in tropical forest environments than has been suggested from earlier studies using radioactively labeled isotopes.

  12. Assessment of bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by organic acid extraction and phosphatase hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, Tegan; Blackwell, Martin S A; Chadwick, David; Haygarth, Philip M; Hawkins, Jane M B; Turner, Benjamin L

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic phosphorus contributes to the nutrition of tropical trees, but is not accounted for in standard soil phosphorus tests. Plants and microbes can release organic anions to solubilize organic phosphorus from soil surfaces, and synthesize phosphatases to release inorganic phosphate from the solubilized compounds. We developed a procedure to estimate bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by simulating the secretion processes of organic acids and phosphatases. Five lowland tropical forest soils with contrasting properties (pH 4.4-6.1, total P 86-429 mg P kg(- 1)) were extracted with 2 mM citric acid (i.e., 10 μmol g(- 1), approximating rhizosphere concentrations) adjusted to soil pH in a 4:1 solution to soil ratio for 1 h. Three phosphatase enzymes were then added to the soil extract to determine the forms of hydrolysable organic phosphorus. Total phosphorus extracted by the procedure ranged between 3.22 and 8.06 mg P kg(- 1) (mean 5.55 ± 0.42 mg P kg(- 1)), of which on average three quarters was unreactive phosphorus (i.e., organic phosphorus plus inorganic polyphosphate). Of the enzyme-hydrolysable unreactive phosphorus, 28% was simple phosphomonoesters hydrolyzed by phosphomonoesterase from bovine intestinal mucosa, a further 18% was phosphodiesters hydrolyzed by a combination of nuclease from Penicillium citrinum and phosphomonoesterase, and the remaining 51% was hydrolyzed by a broad-spectrum phytase from wheat. We conclude that soil organic phosphorus can be solubilized and hydrolyzed by a combination of organic acids and phosphatase enzymes in lowland tropical forest soils, indicating that this pathway could make a significant contribution to biological phosphorus acquisition in tropical forests. Furthermore, we have developed a method that can be used to assess the bioavailability of this soil organic phosphorus.

  13. Soil and water pollution in a banana production region in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Que Ramos, F.; Bastidas-Bastidas, de P.J.; Díaz-González, G.; Bello-Mendoza, R.; Huerta-Lwanga, E.; Ruiz-Suárez, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of abundant Mancozeb (Mn, Zn— bisdithiocarbamate) applications (2.5 kg ha-1week-1 for 10 years) on soil and surface-, subsurface- and groundwater pollution were monitored in a banana production region of tropical Mexico. In soils, severe manganese accumulation was observed, wheras the

  14. Distribution and diversity of rhizobia nodulating agroforestry legumes in soils from three continents in the tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, A.; Murphy, P.; Giller, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    The natural rhizobial populations of Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Sesbania sesban were assessed in soils from nine sites across tropical areas of three continents. The rhizobial population size varied from undetectable numbers to 1.8 x 104 cells/g of soil depe

  15. Rice straw biochar affects water retention and air movement in a sand-textured tropical soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Ahmed, Fauziatu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the current global attention on biochar (BC) as a soil amendment, knowledge is limited on how BC impacts the physical properties of coarse-textured soils (sand > 95%), particularly in tropical regions. A two-season field-study was conducted to investigate the effect of rice straw BC (3% w...

  16. Upland soil charcoal in the wet tropical forests of central Guyana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, D.S.; ter Steege, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075217120; van der Borg, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067895298

    2007-01-01

    A soil charcoal survey was undertaken across 60,000 ha of closed-canopy tropical forest in central Guyana to determine the occurrence, ubiquity, and age of past forest fires across a range of terra firme soil types. Samples were clustered around six centers consisting of spatially nested sample stat

  17. Soil and water pollution in a banana production region in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Que Ramos, F.; Bastidas-Bastidas, de P.J.; Díaz-González, G.; Bello-Mendoza, R.; Huerta-Lwanga, E.; Ruiz-Suárez, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of abundant Mancozeb (Mn, Zn— bisdithiocarbamate) applications (2.5 kg ha-1week-1 for 10 years) on soil and surface-, subsurface- and groundwater pollution were monitored in a banana production region of tropical Mexico. In soils, severe manganese accumulation was observed, wheras the ma

  18. Nodulation of tree legumes and the ecology of their native rhizobial populations in tropical soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, A.; Murphy, P.J.; Osunde, A.O.; Giller, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    A legume introduced into a new area will only form nodules and fix nitrogen if compatible rhizobia are present in the soil. Using 25 (60 in the case of Sesbania sesban) soils sampled from tropical areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America, we examined the nodulation of four agroforestry tree species (

  19. Field studies to assess the workable range of soils in the tropical zone of Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadena Zapata, M.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Perdok, U.D.

    2002-01-01

    In the tropical area of Veracruz (Mexico) the decision of when and how to carry out tillage operations is based on qualitative criteria. It often results in excessive and unnecessary work, energy waste, operational delay, soil exposure to water erosion and soil structural damage. Objective criteria

  20. Soil and water pollution in a banana production region in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Que Ramos, F.; Bastidas-Bastidas, de P.J.; Díaz-González, G.; Bello-Mendoza, R.; Huerta-Lwanga, E.; Ruiz-Suárez, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of abundant Mancozeb (Mn, Zn— bisdithiocarbamate) applications (2.5 kg ha-1week-1 for 10 years) on soil and surface-, subsurface- and groundwater pollution were monitored in a banana production region of tropical Mexico. In soils, severe manganese accumulation was observed, wheras the ma

  1. Advancing the quantification of humid tropical forest cover loss with multi-resolution optical remote sensing data: Sampling & wall-to-wall mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broich, Mark

    Humid tropical forest cover loss is threatening the sustainability of ecosystem goods and services as vast forest areas are rapidly cleared for industrial scale agriculture and tree plantations. Despite the importance of humid tropical forest in the provision of ecosystem services and economic development opportunities, the spatial and temporal distribution of forest cover loss across large areas is not well quantified. Here I improve the quantification of humid tropical forest cover loss using two remote sensing-based methods: sampling and wall-to-wall mapping. In all of the presented studies, the integration of coarse spatial, high temporal resolution data with moderate spatial, low temporal resolution data enable advances in quantifying forest cover loss in the humid tropics. Imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are used as the source of coarse spatial resolution, high temporal resolution data and imagery from the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor are used as the source of moderate spatial, low temporal resolution data. In a first study, I compare the precision of different sampling designs for the Brazilian Amazon using the annual deforestation maps derived by the Brazilian Space Agency for reference. I show that sampling designs can provide reliable deforestation estimates; furthermore, sampling designs guided by MODIS data can provide more efficient estimates than the systematic design used for the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization Forest Resource Assessment 2010. Sampling approaches, such as the one demonstrated, are viable in regions where data limitations, such as cloud contamination, limit exhaustive mapping methods. Cloud-contaminated regions experiencing high rates of change include Insular Southeast Asia, specifically Indonesia and Malaysia. Due to persistent cloud cover, forest cover loss in Indonesia has only been mapped at a 5-10 year interval using photo interpretation of single

  2. Effect of Converting Secondary Tropical Peat Swamp Forest into Oil Palm Plantation on Selected Peat Soil Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd S. Firdaus; Seca Gandaseca; Ahmed, Osumanu H.; Nik M.A. Majid

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The conversion of forest land into oil palm plantation is considered to be one of the causes of soil degradation and loss of tropical land forest in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to compare selected peat soil physical properties of secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation to determine the effect of forest conversion. Approach: Peat soil samples were collected from secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm pla...

  3. Effect of Skidding Operations on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Anton E. Satrio; Seca Gandaseca; Osumanu H. Ahmed; Nik M.A. Majid

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: There is still lack of a study that compares the soil carbon storage of kuda-kuda skidding system and excavator skidding system in tropical peat swamp forests. The objective of this study was to determine whether skidding operations affects soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted on two different plots (0.3 ha each plot) to a depth of 15 cm under different skidding systems at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. Plots were in the same ...

  4. Changes in bacterial diversity associated with bioremediation of used lubricating oil in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeboon, Naruemon; Leewis, Mary-Cathrine; Kaewsuwan, Sireewan; Maneerat, Suppasil; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2017-08-01

    Used lubricating oil (ULO) is a widespread contaminant, particularly throughout tropical regions, and may be a candidate for bioremediation. However, little is known about the biodegradation potential or basic microbial ecology of ULO-contaminated soils. This study aims to determine the effects of used ULO on bacterial community structure and diversity. Using a combination of culture-based (agar plate counts) and molecular techniques (16S rRNA gene sequencing and DGGE), we investigated changes in soil bacterial communities from three different ULO-contaminated soils collected from motorcycle mechanical workshops (soil A, B, and C). We further explored the relationship between bacterial community structure, physiochemical soil parameters, and ULO composition in three ULO-contaminated soils. Results indicated that the three investigated soils had different community structures, which may be a result of the different ULO characteristics and physiochemical soil parameters of each site. Soil C had the highest ULO concentration and also the greatest diversity and richness of bacteria, which may be a result of higher nutrient retention, organic matter and cation exchange capacity, as well as freshness of oil compared to the other soils. In soils A and B, Proteobacteria (esp. Gammaproteobacteria) dominated the bacterial community, and in soil C, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes dominated. The genus Enterobacter, a member of the class Gammaproteobacteria, is known to include ULO-degraders, and this genus was the only one found in all three soils, suggesting that it could play a key role in the in situ degradation of ULO-contaminated tropical Thai soils. This study provides insights into our understanding of soil microbial richness, diversity, composition, and structure in tropical ULO-contaminated soils, and may be useful for the development of strategies to improve bioremediation.

  5. Daily changes of radon concentration in soil gas under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: evelise.lara@gmail.com, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Rios, Francisco Javier, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at relating the daily change in the radon concentration in soil gas in a Red Yellow Acrisol (SiBCS) under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, U content and permeability were also performed. The measurements of radon soil gas were carried out by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The {sup 226}Ra activity concentration was made by Gamma Spectrometry (HPGe); the permeability was carried out using the RADON-JOK permeameter and ICP-MS analysis to {sup 232}Th and U content. The soil permeability is 5.0 x 10{sup -12}, which is considered average. The {sup 226}Ra (22.2 ± 0.3 Bq.m{sup -3}); U content (73.4 ± 3.6 Bq.kg{sup -1}) and {sup 232}Th content (55.3 ± 4.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) were considered above of average concentrations, according to mean values for soils typical (~ 35.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) by UNSCEAR. The results showed a difference of 26.0% between the highest and the lowest concentration of radon in soil gas: at midnight (15.5 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}) and 3:00 pm, the highest mean radon concentration (21.0 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}). The room temperature and surface soil temperature showed equivalent behavior and the surface soil temperature slightly below room temperature during the entire monitoring time. Nevertheless, the relative humidity showed the highest cyclical behavior, showing a higher relationship with the radon concentration in soil gas. (author)

  6. Accuracy of the cosmic-ray soil water content probe in humid forest ecosystems: The worst case scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-09-01

    Soil water content is one of the key state variables in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum due to its important role in the exchange of water and energy at the soil surface. A new promising method to measure integral soil water content at the field or small catchment scale is the cosmic-ray probe (CRP). Recent studies of CRP measurements have mainly presented results from test sites located in very dry areas and from agricultural fields with sandy soils. In this study, distributed continuous soil water content measurements from a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) were used to investigate the accuracy of CRP measurements for soil water content determination in a humid forest ecosystem. Such ecosystems are less favorable for CRP applications due to the presence of a litter layer. In addition, lattice water and carbohydrates of soil organic matter and belowground biomass reduce the effective sensor depth and thus were accounted for in the calibration of the CRP. The hydrogen located in the biomass decreased the level of neutron count rates and thus also decreased the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray probe, which in turn resulted in an increase of the measurement uncertainty. This uncertainty was compensated by using longer integration times (e.g., 24 h). For the Wüstebach forest site, the cosmic-ray probe enabled the assessment of integral daily soil water content dynamics with a RMSE of about 0.03 cm3/cm3 without explicitly considering the litter layer. By including simulated water contents of the litter layer in the calibration, a better accuracy could be achieved.

  7. Geomorphometric tool associated with soil types and properties spatial variability at watersheds under tropical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Henrique Godinho Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The application of quantitative methods to digital soil and geomorphological mapping is becoming an increasing trend. One of these methods, Geomorphons, was developed to identify the ten most common landforms based on digital elevation models. This study aimed to make a quantitative assessment of the relationships between Geomorphons units, determined at three spatial resolutions and nine radii, and soil types and properties of two watersheds with different soil-landscape relationships in Brazil to help soil surveying and mapping under tropical conditions. The study was conducted at Lavrinha Creek (LCW and Marcela Creek (MCW watersheds, located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Spatial resolutions of 10, 20 and 30 m were the basis for generating Geomorphons at 9 radii of calculation for the watersheds. They were overlapped to detailed soil maps of the watersheds and a chi-square test was carried out to assess their relationship with soil types. Observation points were compared with the most highly correlated Geomorphons to also assess relationships with soil properties. Geomorphons with resolution of 30-m and radii of 20 and 50 cells, respectively for LCW and MCW, were more highly correlated with the variability of soil types, in accordance with the terrain features of these watersheds. The majority of observation points for each soil type was located in the same Geomorphon unit that was dominant when analyzing soil maps. There was less variability in soil properties between Geomorphon units, which was probably due to the highly weathered-leached stage of soils. Geomorphons can help to improve soil maps in tropical conditions when assessing soil variability due to its high correlation with tropical soil types variability.

  8. Genotypic Diversity of Escherichia coli in the Water and Soil of Tropical Watersheds in Hawaii ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Dustin K.; Yan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    High levels of Escherichia coli were frequently detected in tropical soils in Hawaii, which present important environmental sources of E. coli to water bodies. This study systematically examined E. coli isolates from water and soil of several watersheds in Hawaii and observed high overall genotypic diversity (35.5% unique genotypes). In the Manoa watershed, fewer than 9.3% of the observed E. coli genotypes in water and 6.6% in soil were shared between different sampling sites, suggesting the ...

  9. Root and arbuscular mycorrhizal mycelial interactions with soil microorganisms in lowland tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Andrew T; Turner, Benjamin L; Winter, Klaus; Chamberlain, Paul M; Stott, Andrew; Tanner, Edmund V J

    2013-07-01

    Tropical forests have high rates of soil carbon cycling, but little information is available on how roots, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and free-living microorganisms interact and influence organic matter mineralization in these ecosystems. We used mesh ingrowth cores and isotopic tracers in phospholipid fatty acid biomarkers to investigate the effects of roots and AMF mycelia on (1) microbial community composition, microbial carbon utilization, and hydrolytic enzyme activities for large, potted tropical trees and (2) enzyme activities and litter mass loss in a lowland tropical forest. Under the tropical tree, plant-derived carbon was incorporated predominantly into bacterial groups in both rhizosphere and AMF-only soils. Gram-positive bacteria incorporated additional soil-derived carbon in rhizosphere soils, which also contained the highest microbial biomass. For hydrolytic enzymes, β-glucosidase and N-acetyl β-glucosaminidase activities were highest in rhizosphere soils, while phosphomonoesterase activity was highest in AMF-only soil. In the forest, leaf litter mass loss was increased by the presence of roots, but not by the presence of AMF mycelia only. Root-microbial interactions influenced organic matter cycling, with evidence for rhizosphere priming and accelerated leaf litter decomposition in the presence of roots. Although AMF mycelia alone did not stimulate organic matter mineralization, they were a conduit of carbon to other soil microorganisms. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m-2·yr-1), P addition (15 g P m-2·yr-1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m-2·yr-1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  11. Modelling soil moisture under different land covers in a sub-humid environment of Western Ghats, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Venkatesh; Lakshman Nandagiri; B K Purandara; V B Reddy

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study is to apply and test a simple parametric water balance model for prediction of soil moisture regime in the presence of vegetation. The intention was to evaluate the differences in model parameterization and performance when applied to small watersheds under three different types of land covers (Acacia, degraded forest and natural forest). The watersheds selected for this purpose are located in the sub-humid climate within the Western Ghats, Karnataka, India. Model calibration and validation were performed using a dataset comprising depth-averaged soil moisture content measurements made at weekly time steps from October 2004 to December 2008. In addition to this, a sensitivity analysis was carried out with respect to the water-holding capacity of the soils with the aim of explaining the suitability and adaptation of exotic vegetation types under the prevailing climatic conditions. Results indicated reasonably good performance of the model in simulating the pattern and magnitude of weekly average soil moisture content in 150 cm deep soil layer under all three land covers. This study demonstrates that a simple, robust and parametrically parsimonious model is capable of simulating the temporal dynamics of soil moisture content under distinctly different land covers. Also, results of sensitivity analysis revealed that exotic plant species such as Acacia have adapted themselves effectively to the local climate.

  12. IMPACT OF TROPICAL CONDITIONS ON THIN-LAYER CHROMATOGRAPHY IN ANALYTICAL TOXICOLOGY - HIGH-TEMPERATURES AND MODERATE HUMIDITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEZEEUW, RA; FRANKE, JP; DIK, E; TENDOLLE, W; KAM, BL

    1992-01-01

    The impact of high temperatures (24 to 39-degrees-C) and low to moderately high humidities (20 to 70%) on the applicability of TLC systems for drug identification was studied during a 6 month climatologic cycle in Burkina Faso (West Africa). In general, the Rf values as observed on the plates were f

  13. The Effect of Biochar and Its Interaction with the Earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus on Soil Microbial Community Structure in Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Liang, Chenfei; Fu, Shenglei; Mendez, Ana; Gasco, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Biochar effects on soil microbial abundance and community structure are keys for understanding the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and organic matter turnover, but are poorly understood, in particular in tropical areas. We conducted a greenhouse experiment in which we added biochars produced from four different feedstocks [sewage sludge (B1), deinking sewage sludge (B2), Miscanthus (B3) and pine wood (B4)] at a rate of 3% (w/w) to two tropical soils (an Acrisol and a Ferralsol) planted with proso millet (Panicum milliaceum L.). The interactive effect of the addition of earthworms was also addressed. For this purpose we utilized soil samples from pots with or without the earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus, which is a ubiquitous earthworm in tropical soils. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) measurements showed that biochar type, soil type and the presence of earthworms significantly affected soil microbial community size and structure. In general, biochar addition affected fungal but not bacterial populations. Overall, biochars rich in ash (B1 and B2) resulted in a marked increase in the fungi to bacteria ratio, while this ratio was unaltered after addition of biochars with a high fixed carbon content (B3 and B4). Our study remarked the contrasting effect that both, biochar prepared from different materials and macrofauna, can have on soil microbial community. Such changes might end up with ecosystem-level effects. PMID:25898344

  14. The effect of biochar and its interaction with the earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus on soil microbial community structure in tropical soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Paz-Ferreiro

    Full Text Available Biochar effects on soil microbial abundance and community structure are keys for understanding the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and organic matter turnover, but are poorly understood, in particular in tropical areas. We conducted a greenhouse experiment in which we added biochars produced from four different feedstocks [sewage sludge (B1, deinking sewage sludge (B2, Miscanthus (B3 and pine wood (B4] at a rate of 3% (w/w to two tropical soils (an Acrisol and a Ferralsol planted with proso millet (Panicum milliaceum L.. The interactive effect of the addition of earthworms was also addressed. For this purpose we utilized soil samples from pots with or without the earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus, which is a ubiquitous earthworm in tropical soils. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA measurements showed that biochar type, soil type and the presence of earthworms significantly affected soil microbial community size and structure. In general, biochar addition affected fungal but not bacterial populations. Overall, biochars rich in ash (B1 and B2 resulted in a marked increase in the fungi to bacteria ratio, while this ratio was unaltered after addition of biochars with a high fixed carbon content (B3 and B4. Our study remarked the contrasting effect that both, biochar prepared from different materials and macrofauna, can have on soil microbial community. Such changes might end up with ecosystem-level effects.

  15. The effect of biochar and its interaction with the earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus on soil microbial community structure in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Liang, Chenfei; Fu, Shenglei; Mendez, Ana; Gasco, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Biochar effects on soil microbial abundance and community structure are keys for understanding the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and organic matter turnover, but are poorly understood, in particular in tropical areas. We conducted a greenhouse experiment in which we added biochars produced from four different feedstocks [sewage sludge (B1), deinking sewage sludge (B2), Miscanthus (B3) and pine wood (B4)] at a rate of 3% (w/w) to two tropical soils (an Acrisol and a Ferralsol) planted with proso millet (Panicum milliaceum L.). The interactive effect of the addition of earthworms was also addressed. For this purpose we utilized soil samples from pots with or without the earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus, which is a ubiquitous earthworm in tropical soils. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) measurements showed that biochar type, soil type and the presence of earthworms significantly affected soil microbial community size and structure. In general, biochar addition affected fungal but not bacterial populations. Overall, biochars rich in ash (B1 and B2) resulted in a marked increase in the fungi to bacteria ratio, while this ratio was unaltered after addition of biochars with a high fixed carbon content (B3 and B4). Our study remarked the contrasting effect that both, biochar prepared from different materials and macrofauna, can have on soil microbial community. Such changes might end up with ecosystem-level effects.

  16. Changes in microbial community characteristics and soil organic matter with nitrogen additions in two tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Daniela F; Silver, Whendee L; Torn, Margaret S; Burton, Sarah D; Firestone, Mary K

    2011-03-01

    Microbial communities and their associated enzyme activities affect the amount and chemical quality of carbon (C) in soils. Increasing nitrogen (N) deposition, particularly in N-rich tropical forests, is likely to change the composition and behavior of microbial communities and feed back on ecosystem structure and function. This study presents a novel assessment of mechanistic links between microbial responses to N deposition and shifts in soil organic matter (SOM) quality and quantity. We used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and microbial enzyme assays in soils to assess microbial community responses to long-term N additions in two distinct tropical rain forests. We used soil density fractionation and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to measure related changes in SOM pool sizes and chemical quality. Microbial biomass increased in response to N fertilization in both tropical forests and corresponded to declines in pools of low-density SOM. The chemical quality of this soil C pool reflected ecosystem-specific changes in microbial community composition. In the lower-elevation forest, there was an increase in gram-negative bacteria PLFA biomass, and there were significant losses of labile C chemical groups (O-alkyls). In contrast, the upper-elevation tropical forest had an increase in fungal PLFAs with N additions and declines in C groups associated with increased soil C storage (alkyls). The dynamics of microbial enzymatic activities with N addition provided a functional link between changes in microbial community structure and SOM chemistry. Ecosystem-specific changes in microbial community composition are likely to have far-reaching effects on soil carbon storage and cycling. This study indicates that microbial communities in N-rich tropical forests can be sensitive to added N, but we can expect significant variability in how ecosystem structure and function respond to N deposition among tropical forest types.

  17. Composition and fate of mine- and smelter-derived particulates in soils from humid subtropical and semiarid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Kribek, Bohdan; Mihaljevic, Martin; Vanek, Ales; Penizek, Vit; Sracek, Ondra; Mapani, Ben; Kamona, Fred; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2017-04-01

    Soils in the vicinity of non-ferrous metal smelters are often highly polluted by inorganic contaminants released from particulate emissions, which undergo weathering processes and release contaminants when deposited in soils. We studied the heavy mineral fraction, separated from mining- and smelter-affected topsoils, from both a humid subtropical area in the Zambian Copperbelt and a hot semi-arid area in the northern Namibia. High concentrations of metal(loid)s were detected in the studied soils: up to 1450 ppm As, 8980 ppm Cu, 4640 ppm Pb, 2620 ppm Zn. A combination of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) helped to identify the phases forming individual metal(loid)-bearing particles. Whereas spherical particles originate from the smelting and flue gas cleaning processes, angular particles either have geogenic origins or they are windblown from the mining operations and mine waste disposal sites. Sulphides from ores and mine tailings often exhibit weathering rims in contrast to smelter-derived high-temperature sulphides (chalcocite [Cu2S], digenite [Cu9S5], covellite [CuS], non-stoichiometric quenched Cu-Fe-S phases). Soils from humid subtropical areas exhibit higher available concentrations of metal(loids), and higher frequencies of weathering features (especially for copper-bearing oxides such as delafossite [CuFeO2]) are observed. In contrast, metal(loid)s are efficiently retained in semi-arid soils, where a high proportion of non-weathered smelter slag particles and low-solubility Ca-Cu-Pb arsenates occur. Our results indicate that compared to semi-arid areas (where inorganic contaminants were rather immobile in soils despite their high concentrations) a higher potential risk exists for agriculture in mine- and smelter-affected humid subtropical areas (where metal(loid) contaminants can be highly available for the uptake by crops). This study was supported by the Czech Science

  18. Impact of tropical land use change on soil organic carbon stocks - a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Don, Axel; Schumacher, Jens; Freibauer, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Land use changes are the second largest source of human induced greenhouse gas emission, mainly due to deforestation in the tropics and sub-tropics. CO2 emissions result from biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) losses and may be offset with afforestation programs. However, the effect of land use changes on SOC is poorly quantified due to insufficient data quality (only SOC concentrations and no SOC stocks, shallow sampling depth) and representativeness. In a global meta-...

  19. On the comparisons of tropical relative humidity in the lower and middle troposphere among COSMIC radio occultations, MERRA and ECMWF data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of the tropical tropospheric relative humidity (RH throughout the vertical extent of the troposphere is examined using Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPSRO observations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC mission. These high vertical resolution observations capture the detailed structure and moisture budget of the Hadley Cell circulation. We compare the COSMIC observations with the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecast (ECMWF Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA climatologies. Qualitatively, the spatial pattern of RH in all data sets matches up remarkably well, capturing distinct features of the general circulation. However, RH discrepancies exist between ERA-Interim and COSMIC data sets, which are noticeable across the tropical boundary layer. Specifically, ERA-Interim shows a drier Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ by 15–20% compared both to COSMIC and MERRA data sets, but this difference decreases with altitude. Unlike ECMWF, MERRA shows an excellent agreement with the COSMIC observations except above 400 hPa, where GPSRO observations capture drier air by 5–10%. RH climatologies were also used to evaluate intraseasonal variability. The results indicate that the tropical middle troposphere at ±5–25° is most sensitive to seasonal variations. COSMIC and MERRA data sets capture the same magnitude of the seasonal variability, but ERA-Interim shows a weaker seasonal fluctuation up to 10% in the middle troposphere inside the dry air subsidence regions of the Hadley Cell. Over the ITCZ, RH varies by maximum 9% between winter and summer.

  20. Soil piping in a temperate humid climate. The Flemish Ardennes (Belgium).

    OpenAIRE

    Verachtert, Els

    2011-01-01

    Collapsible loess-derived soils are prone to subsurface soil erosion (piping), whereenlargement of macropores may lead to a subsurface pipe network and eventuallyto soil collapse. This PhD aimed at understanding the factors controlling theoccurrence of collapsed pipes in the Flemish Ardennes. In total, 137 parcelswith 560 collapsed pipes were mapped, indicating significant soil losses in aland use –pasture– that is typically considered to be non-susceptible to surfaceerosion. Logistic regress...

  1. Soil respiration in tropical seasonal rain forest in Xishuangbanna, SW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA; Liqing; ZHENG; Zheng; TANG; Jianwei; WANG; Yinghong

    2005-01-01

    With the static opaque chamber and gas chromatography technique, from January 2003 to January 2004 soil respiration was investigated in a tropical seasonal rain forest in Xishuangbanna, SW China. In this study three treatments were applied, each with three replicates: A (bare soil), B (soil+litter), and C (soil+litter+seedling). The results showed that soil respiration varied seasonally, low from December 2003 to February 2004, and high from June to July 2004. The annual average values of CO2 efflux from soil respiration differed among the treatments at 1% level, with the rank of C (14642 mgCO2· m-2. h-1)>B (12807 mgCO2· m-2. h-1)>A (9532 mgCO2· m-2. h-1). Diurnal variation in soil respiration was not apparent due to little diurnal temperate change in Xishuangbanna. There was a parabola relationship between soil respiration and soil moisture at 1% level. Soil respiration rates were higher when soil moisture ranged from 35% to 45%. There was an exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature (at a depth of 5cm in mineral soil) at 1% level. The calculated Q1o values in this study,ranging from 2.03 to 2.36, were very near to those of tropical soil reported. The CO2 efflux in 2003was 5.34 kgCO2· m-2. a-1 from soil plus litter plus seedling, of them 3.48 kgCO2· m-2. a-1 from soil (accounting for 62.5%), 1.19 kgCO2· m-2. a-1 from litter (22.3%) and 0.67 kgCO2·m-2. a-1 from seedling (12.5%).

  2. Overall assessment of soil quality on humid sandy loams: Effects of location, rotation and tillage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Hansen, Elly Møller; Rickson, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    for each rotation: mouldboard ploughing to a depth of 20 cm (MP); harrowing to a depth of 8–10 cm (H); and direct drilling (D) at two experimental sites with a sandy loam soil and different water budgets in Denmark. The Muencheberg soil quality rating (M-SQR) method and simpler soil quality indices (i...

  3. High-resolution hydraulic parameter maps for surface soils in tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthews, T. R.; Quesada, C. A.; Galbraith, D. R.; Malhi, Y.; Mullins, C. E.; Hodnett, M. G.; Dharssi, I.

    2014-05-01

    Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking, especially in the tropics. We present much-improved gridded data sets of hydraulic parameters for surface soil for the critical area of tropical South America, describing soil profile water movement across the region to 30 cm depth. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey, Campbell, van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine soil hydraulic models, which are widely used hydraulic sub-models in land surface models. This has been possible through interpolating soil measurements from several sources through the SOTERLAC soil and terrain data base and using the most recent pedotransfer functions (PTFs) derived for South American soils. All soil parameter data layers are provided at 15 arcsec resolution and available for download, this being 20x higher resolution than the best comparable parameter maps available to date. Specific examples are given of the use of PTFs and the importance highlighted of using PTFs that have been locally parameterised and that are not just based on soil texture. We discuss current developments in soil hydraulic modelling and how high-resolution parameter maps such as these can improve the simulation of vegetation development and productivity in land surface models.

  4. Relationships between Plant Biodiversity and Soil Fertility in a Mature Tropical Forest, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin B. Nadeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to study relationships between plant biodiversity and soil chemical fertility in a mature tropical forest of Costa Rica. Soil samples were collected in nine sampling plots (5 m by 25 m in order to identify P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al and total N contents, soil fertility index, CEC, pH, and C/N ratio. Furthermore, species richness, Shannon-Wiener and Simpson’s species diversities, structural richness, and structural diversity were calculated for each plot. Simple linear regression analyses were conducted. Tree species richness was inversely related to concentration levels of K, Ca, and P, CEC, and soil fertility index. Therefore, higher tree species richness tended to be found on sites with lower soil fertility, which is the complete opposite of temperate forests. As a result, tropical and temperate forest ecology should be considered separately. Shannon-Wiener tree species diversity was positively correlated to C/N ratio. Herb structural richness was positively correlated with soil fertility index and P concentration. Therefore, herb structural richness may be a good indicator of soil fertility. This study gives important insights on ecological relationships between plant biodiversity and soil chemical fertility in a primary tropical forest.

  5. Retention of available P in acid soils of tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jianhui; ZOU Xiaoming; YANG Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation of mineral phosphate is often recognized as a factor of limiting the availability of P in acidic soils of tropical and subtropical forests.For this paper,we studied the extractable P pools and their transformation rates in soils of a tropical evergreen forest at Xishuangbanna and a subtropical montane wet forest at the Ailao Mountains in order to understand the biogeochemical processes regulating P availability in acidic soils.The two forests differ in forest humus layer;it is deep in the Ailao forest while little is present in the Xishuangbanna forest.The extractable P pools by resin and sodium-bicarbonate decreased when soil organic carbon content was reduced.The lowest levels of extractable P pools occurred in the surface (0-10 era) mineral soils of the Xishuangbanna forest.However,microbial P in the mineral soil of the Xishuangbauna forest was twice that in the Ailao forest.Potential rates of microbial P immobilization were greater than those of organic P mineralization in mineral soils for both forests.We suggest that microbial P immobilization plays an essential role in avoiding mineral P precipitation and retaining available P of plant in tropical acidic soils,whereas both floor mass accumulation and microbial P immobilization function benefit retaining plant available P in subtropical montane wet forests.

  6. Tropical organic soils ecosystems in relation to regional water resources in southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Tropical organic soils have functioned as natural sinks for carbon, nitrogen, slfur and other nutrients for the past 4000 years or more. Topographic evolution in peat swamp forests towards greater oligotrophy has concentrated storage of the limited nutrient stock in surface soils and biota. Tropical peat systems thus share common ecosystem characteristics with northern peat bogs and certain tropical oligotrophic forests. Organic matter accumulation and high cation-exchange-capacity limit nutrient exports from undisturbed organic soils, although nutrient retention declines with increasing eutrophy and wetland productivity. Peat swamps are subject to irreversible degradation if severely altered because disturbance of vegetation, surface peats and detritus can disrupt nuttrient cycles and reduce forest recovery capacity. Drainage also greatly increases exports of nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients and leads to downstream eutrophication and water quality degradation. Regional planning for clean water supplies must recognize the benefits provided by natural peatlands in balancing water supplies and regulating water chemistry.

  7. Genotype-environment interaction of maternal influence characteristics in Nellore cattle bred in the Brazilian humid tropical regions by reaction norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luís Ferreira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Reaction Norm (RN is the study of genotype-environment interaction (GxE that complies with alternative ways of genotypes within different environments. This study was carried out to verify GxE by a reaction norm model of weights at 120 (W120 and 210 (W210 days of age in Nellore cattle raised in the Humid Tropical Regions of Brazil. Environmental gradients were obtained by solutions of contemporary groups which were fitted as co-variables in the random regression model via reaction norms. Mean weight at 120 days of age was 127.97 kg, and environmental gradients ranged between -27 and +26 kg. Average was 185.60 kg at 210 days of age and gradients ranged from -54 to +55 kg. Scale changes in the breeding values and heritability estimates occurred along the gradients for the two weights; the genetic correlations between breeding value breeding values were also similar for both weights. These correlations were high between the close gradients, and low to even negative between extreme environments. Slopes representing the environmental sensitivity were high, with changes of scale and changes in classification of ten bulls with a great numbers of calves for the two traits. When regression slopes of the ten bulls with the highest breeding value breeding values were evaluated, these values were different in W120 from those in W210, perhaps due to the greater influence of maternal effect on W120. These results characterize the influence of GxE on the pre-weaning weights of animals in the humid tropical regions of Brazil. Due to this, it is possible to get greater precision on the predictions of the animals breeding values breeding value. A less biased selection and a greater genetic progress occurred.

  8. Application of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST in FTAI protocols and its effect on estrus detection and pregnancy rates in dairy cattle in a humid tropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez-Reinoso MA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the application of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST in different FTAI protocols to determine its influence on estrus detection and pregnancy rates in dairy cattle (Bos taurus mantained under humid tropical conditions in order to apply a differentiated FTAI protocol that optimises fertility in this environment. Different fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI protocols were applied by including rbST in three groups of Brown Swiss breed cows: T1 (Control, no rbST, T2 (rbST application on Day-7, at P4 implant removal and T3 (rbST application on Day-9, 48 h after P4 implant removal. Estrus detection rates were significantly higher when compared T2 (100 % with T1/T3 (62.5 % and 75 %, respectively, being a 37.5% higher when compared to T1 and a 25% higher when compared to T3 (p<0.05. With regard to pregnancy rate, statistically significant differences were observed among T2 (62.5 % and T1/T3 (50 % treatments, being a 12.5% higher in T2 (p<0.05. In conclusion, the application of rbST in different FTAI protocols had a positive influence on estrus detection and pregnancy rates which were significantly higher when applying rbST on Day-7 (at P4 implant removal, being possible to develop efficient estrus synchronization and FTAI protocols and optimize fertility in dairy cattle (Bos taurus in humid tropical environments

  9. Appropriate farm management practices for alleviating N and P deficiencies in low-nutrient soils of the tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smithson, P.C.; Giller, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    Tropical upland regions have both the world's highest population growth rates and a preponderance of soils less suitable for agriculture. Nitrogen deficiency is almost universal, while acid infertility and the related problem of P deficiency affect more than 40 f tropical soils. Nutrient depletion,

  10. Seedling growth responses to soil resources in the understory of a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Ellen K; Kobe, Richard K; Vriesendorp, Corine F

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth responses to resources may be an important mechanism that influences species' distributions, coexistence, and community structure. Irradiance is considered the most important resource for seedling growth in the understory of wet tropical forests, but multiple soil nutrients and species have yet to be examined simultaneously with irradiance under field conditions. To identify potentially limiting resources, we modeled tree seedling growth as a function of irradiance and soil nutrients across five sites, spanning a soil fertility gradient in old-growth, wet tropical forests at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We measured an array of soil nutrients including total nitrogen (total N), inorganic N (nitrate [NO3-] and ammonium [NH4+]), phosphate (PO4-), and sum of base cations (SBC; potassium, magnesium, and calcium). Shade in the forest understory did not preclude seedling growth correlations with soil nutrients. Irradiance was a significant predictor of growth in 52% of the species, inorganic N in 54% (NO3- in 32%; NH4+ in 34%), total N in 47%, SBC in 39%, and PO4- in 29%. Overall, growth was correlated with both irradiance and soil nutrients in 45% of species and with soil nutrients only in an additional 48%; rarely was irradiance alone correlated with growth. Contrary to expectations, the magnitudes of growth effects, assessed as the maximum growth response to significant resources for each species, were similar for irradiance and most soil nutrients. Among species whose growth correlated with soil nutrients, the rank importance of nutrient effects was SBC, followed by N (total N, NO3-, and/or NH4+) and PO4-. Species' growth responsiveness (i.e., magnitudes of effect) to irradiance and soil nutrients was negatively correlated with species' shade tolerance (survival under 1% full sun). In this broad survey of species and resources, the nearly ubiquitous effects of soil nutrients on seedling growth challenge the idea that soil nutrients are less

  11. Atrazine degradation and residues distribution in two acid soils from temperate humid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahía, J; Díaz-Raviña, M

    2007-01-01

    Mineralization of atrazine and formation of extractable and non-extractable "bound" residues were followed under laboratory conditions in two contrasting soils (organic C, texture, and atrazine application history) from northern Spain. The soils, a Humic Cambisol (MP) and a Gleyic Cambisol (G) were incubated with labeled atrazine (ring-13C atrazine) at field application dose and measurements were made at different time intervals during 3 mo. Fate and behavior of atrazine along the incubation showed different patterns between the two soils, the time taken for degradation of 50% (DT50) being 9 and 44 d for MP and G soils, respectively. In MP soil, with 40 yr of atrazine application and lower organic C and clay content, more than 89% of U-13C-atrazine added was mineralized after 12 wk, with most mineralization occurring within the first 2 wk. G soil, with 10 yr of atrazine application, exhibited a more progressive U-13C-atrazine mineralization, reaching 54% of initially added atrazine at 12 wk. Hydroxyatrazine and deisopropylatrazine were the metabolites founded in the extractable fraction, demonstrating that both chemical and biological processes are involved in atrazine degradation. Soil G showed during all the incubation times an extractable residues fraction greater than that in MP soil, indicating a high potential risk of soil and water contamination. Rapid microbial degradation through s-triazine ring cleavage was proposed to be the main decomposition pathway of atrazine for the two soils studied. Bound residues pool also differed notably between soils accounting for 9 and 41% of initially added atrazine, the higher values shown by soil with higher organic matter and clay content (G soil).

  12. Responses of soil fungi to logging and oil palm agriculture in Southeast Asian tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K L; D'Angelo, H; Brearley, F Q; Gedallovich, S M; Babar, N; Yang, N; Gillikin, C M; Gradoville, R; Bateman, C; Turner, B L; Mansor, P; Leff, J W; Fierer, N

    2015-05-01

    Human land use alters soil microbial composition and function in a variety of systems, although few comparable studies have been done in tropical forests and tropical agricultural production areas. Logging and the expansion of oil palm agriculture are two of the most significant drivers of tropical deforestation, and the latter is most prevalent in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to compare soil fungal communities from three sites in Malaysia that represent three of the most dominant land-use types in the Southeast Asia tropics: a primary forest, a regenerating forest that had been selectively logged 50 years previously, and a 25-year-old oil palm plantation. Soil cores were collected from three replicate plots at each site, and fungal communities were sequenced using the Illumina platform. Extracellular enzyme assays were assessed as a proxy for soil microbial function. We found that fungal communities were distinct across all sites, although fungal composition in the regenerating forest was more similar to the primary forest than either forest community was to the oil palm site. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are important associates of the dominant Dipterocarpaceae tree family in this region, were compositionally distinct across forests, but were nearly absent from oil palm soils. Extracellular enzyme assays indicated that the soil ecosystem in oil palm plantations experienced altered nutrient cycling dynamics, but there were few differences between regenerating and primary forest soils. Together, these results show that logging and the replacement of primary forest with oil palm plantations alter fungal community and function, although forests regenerating from logging had more similarities with primary forests in terms of fungal composition and nutrient cycling potential. Since oil palm agriculture is currently the mostly rapidly expanding equatorial crop and logging is pervasive across tropical ecosystems, these findings may have broad applicability.

  13. Phosphate addition enhanced soil inorganic nutrients to a large extent in three tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feifei; Lu, Xiankai; Liu, Lei; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-21

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may constrain soil phosphorus (P) and base cation availability in tropical forests, for which limited evidence have yet been available. In this study, we reported responses of soil inorganic nutrients to full factorial N and P treatments in three tropical forests different in initial soil N status (N-saturated old-growth forest and two less-N-rich younger forests). Responses of microbial biomass, annual litterfall production and nutrient input were also monitored. Results showed that N treatments decreased soil inorganic nutrients (except N) in all three forests, but the underlying mechanisms varied depending on forests: through inhibition on litter decomposition in the old-growth forest and through Al(3+) replacement of Ca(2+) in the two younger forests. In contrast, besides great elevation in soil available P, P treatments induced 60%, 50%, 26% increases in sum of exchangeable (K(+)+Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)) in the old-growth and the two younger forests, respectively. These positive effects of P were closely related to P-stimulated microbial biomass and litter nutrient input, implying possible stimulation of nutrient return. Our results suggest that N deposition may result in decreases in soil inorganic nutrients (except N) and that P addition can enhance soil inorganic nutrients to support ecosystem processes in these tropical forests.

  14. Quantitative physical and chemical variables used to assess erosion and fertility loss in tropical Dominican and Haitian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J.; Alexis, S.; Vizcayno, C.; Hernández, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    mines (bauxite and limestone), crops and livestock. The hypothesis that heavy metals liberated by geochemical actions in some of these tropical ecosystems could be related both to productivity and to human and animal health, led us also to assess metal bioavailability in the area's main crops as the primary source of food or fodder. To establish the context of the heavy metal pollution, we characterized the geoedaphic features of the region. The predominant rocks are sedimentary limestones: with limestone colluvial deposits dominant in the tropical conifer forest and rain forest of the Sierra de Bahoruco; crystalline limestones in the tropical latifoliated forest; and Quaternary detritic rocks and reefs (carbonates overlying alterites) in the dry tropical forest. Across the territory, there is a marked predominance of soils that range from surface soils to shallow, poorly developed stony soils of low natural fertility. Most can be classified as entisols. Soils of recent alluvial origin lack pedogenetic horizons and are subjected to diverse humidity and temperature regimens. Slopes are pronounced and relief and altitudes vary. Their profiles include A-R horizons characterised by displaying an ochre epipedon over a fractured rock bed whose depth is shallow and A-C horizons of a sandy to clayey soil and subsoil texture, whose colours range from dark brown to grey and depths from very shallow to deep. Soils occur from the mountains to landscapes including rivers or sandy coasts. The ecosystems examined occur from an altitude of 1300-1200 m to sea level and the cultivated soils have the main food sources for human and animal consumption: bean, corn, sorghum, coffee, Guinea banana, fruit trees and tubers. We present these data for 79 soil samples according to the corresponding landscape units (forests) along with their dominant lithologies (crystalline limestones, carbonated limestones on alterites and coral limestones). Our study describes edaphic processes linked to

  15. Measurements of soil respiration and simple models dependent on moisture and temperature for an Amazonian southwest tropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanchi, F.B.; Rocha, Da H.R.; Freitas, De H.C.; Kruijt, B.; Waterloo, M.J.; Manzi, A.O.

    2009-01-01

    Soil respiration plays a significant role in the carbon cycle of Amazonian tropical forests, although in situ measurements have only been poorly reported and the dependence of soil moisture and soil temperature also weakly understood. This work investigates the temporal variability of soil respirati

  16. Quantifying the impacts of land use change on soil organic carbon losses in tropical peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J.; Smith, J.; Smith, P.; Matthews, R.

    2012-04-01

    The challenge of collecting field measurements of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux and soil carbon (C) in tropical peatlands creates an opportunity for the use of SOC models for predicting local and regional impacts of land use and climate change on these soils, offering a way of translating this limited data into tangible results. Previously, no soil C model existed for use in non-steady state sites such as those found on tropical peats- in particular peat swamp forests which accumulate C, and oil palm plantations which are grown for 20-25 years between re-plantings. A simple, user friendly model has been created for use by scientists, policy makers and plantation managers. This model uses only limited inputs to predict the changes to soil C from land use and climate change. The model runs on the assumption that plant inputs can be related to yield, and that this can be used to derive the decomposition of SOM. It uses a simple decomposition response to determine the changes to the soil C. The model can run in a basic form if data is very limited, or a more complex form with modifiers for temperature, pH, salinity and soil moisture if this data is available. Using measured CO2 efflux and soil C values from peat cores, combined with literature values, we demonstrate the efficacy of the model, showing how we have identified and addressed some of the issues related to modelling soil C losses from tropical peat soils under land use change. Key challenges addressed included quantifying the effects of drainage when peat swamp forests are converted to oil palm plantations, and comparing field results between sites because in oil palm plantations the original soil conditions prior to conversion from peat swamp forest were largely unknown.

  17. The impacts of shifting cultivation on tropical forest soil: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Antunes Ribeiro Filho

    Full Text Available The sustainability of shifting cultivation is presently a topic of debate in scientific and institutional communities; however, there is no current consensus. To address this debate, we performed a search of the pertinent literature that was published during the last 30 years on the impact of shifting agriculture on tropical soils. This search revealed that the nature of the impact depends on the shifting cultivation system (SCS phase (conversion, cultivation, or fallow and on the soil properties (physical, chemical, and biological. We also suggest soil quality indicators for evaluating this agricultural practice in tropical forests, which may be used as a basis for analyses on the tendencies of conservation and degradation of impacted soils. Future research should improve the choices of these indicators, relying mostly on practical criteria, so they can be used by shifting cultivators.

  18. The Role of Biochar in Ameliorating Disturbed Soils and Sequestering Soil Carbon in Tropical Agricultural Production Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolde Mekuria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soils in the tropics have undergone significant declines in their native carbon stock through the long-term use of extractive farming practices. However, these soils have significant capacity to sequester CO2 through the implementation of improved land management practices. This paper reviews the published and grey literature related to the influence of improved land management practices on soil carbon stock in the tropics. The review suggests that the implementation of improved land management practices such as crop rotation, no-till, cover crops, mulches, compost, or manure can be effective in enhancing soil organic carbon pool and agricultural productivity in the tropics. The benefits of such amendments were, however, often short-lived, and the added organic matters were usually mineralized to CO2 within a few cropping seasons leading to large-scale leakage. We found that management of black carbon (C, increasingly referred to as biochar, may overcome some of those limitations and provide an additional soil management option. Under present circumstances, recommended crop and land management practices are inappropriate for the vast majority of resource constrained smallholder farmers and farming systems. We argue that expanding the use of biochar in agricultural lands would be important for sequestering atmospheric CO2 and mitigating climate change, while implementing the recommended crop and land management practices in selected areas where the smallholder farmers are not resource constrained.

  19. Geotechnical Properties of Soils as Influenced by Land Use in a Humid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Idigbor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated some geotechnical properties of soils of Port Harcourt in 2009 under three land use types, namely mechanically cleared land, on-going building constructions and fallow land. A combination of target and random soil survey techniques guided field studies. Five soil samples were collected in each land use, giving a total of 15 soil samples which were air-dried and sieved. These soil samples were subjected to routine laboratory analysis and resulting data were analyzed statistically using means and correlation analysis. Soils were sandy, of slight to neutral acidity (pH = 5.9-7.6. Disturbed soils were older (silt-clay ratio= 0.13- water 0.50 when compared with fallow having a mean value of 2.1. Plasticity index values were low (< 35% and differed due to the land use: 11.63% (building site, 12.29% (mechanically cleared land and 14.57% (fallow. There was low colloidal activity: 0.36 (building site, 0.40 (fallow and 0.41 (mechanically cleared land. Highest recorded maximum dry density was found in building site (2.03 Mg mG3, while 24.87% optimum moisture content was obtained in fallow soils. Plasticity index showed good relationships with moisture, clay and colloidal activity in the study sites.

  20. Humidity contribution to C_n^2 over a 600m pathlength in a tropical marine environment

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, M P J L; Gilbreath, G C; Oh, E; Chang, Mark P. J. L.; Font, Carlos O.; Oh, Eun

    2007-01-01

    We present new optical turbulence structure parameter measurements, C_n^2, over sea water between La Parguera and Magueyes Island (17.6N 67W) on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. The 600 meter horizontal paths were located approximately 1.5 m and 10 m above sea level. No data of this type has ever been made available in the literature. Based on the data, we show that the C_n^2 measurements are about 7 times less compared to equivalent land data. This strong evidence reinforces our previous argument that humidity must be accounted for to better ascertain the near surface atmospheric turbulence effects, which current visible / near infrared C_n^2 bulk models fail to do. We also explore the generalised fractal dimension of this littoral data and compare it to our reference land data. We find cases that exhibit monofractal characteristics, that is to say, the effect of rising temperatures during the daylight hours upon turbulence are counterbalanced by humidity, leading to a single characteristic scale for the ...

  1. Cirrus clouds, humidity, and dehydration in the tropical tropopause layer observed at Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8°N, 55.2°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immler, Franz; Krüger, Kirstin; Tegtmeier, Susann; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Fortuin, Paul; Verver, Gé; Schrems, Otto

    2007-02-01

    In the framework of the European Project STAR the Mobile Aerosol Raman Lidar (MARL) of the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) was operated in Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8°N, 55.2°W), and carried out extensive observations of tropical cirrus clouds during the local dry season from 28 September 2004 to 16 November 2004. The coverage with ice clouds was very high with 81% in the upper troposphere (above 12 km). The frequency of occurrence of subvisual clouds was found to be clearly enhanced compared to similar observations performed with the same instrument at a station in the midlatitudes. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio of thin tropical cirrus is with 26 ± 7 sr significantly higher than that of midlatitude cirrus (16 ± 9 sr). Subvisual cirrus clouds often occur in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above an upper tropospheric inversion. Our observations show that the ice-forming ability of the TTL is very high. The transport of air in this layer was investigated by means of a newly developed trajectory model. We found that the occurrence of clouds is highly correlated with the temperature and humidity history of the corresponding air parcel. Air that experienced a temperature minimum before the measurement took place was generally cloud free, while air that was at its temperature minimum during the observation and thus was saturated contained ice. We also detected extremely thin cloud layers slightly above the temperature minimum in subsaturated air. The solid particles of such clouds are likely to consist of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) rather than ice.

  2. Hot moments of N2O transformation and emission in tropical soils from the Pantanal and the Amazon (Brazil)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liengaard, Lars; Figueiredo, Viviane; Markfoged, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    Tropical wetland soils emit large amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O), especially following wetting of drained soil. We investigated seasonally drained wetland soils from the Pantanal and the Amazon, both with a natural high nitrate content and low pH. Here we report the effect of wetting on the produ......Tropical wetland soils emit large amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O), especially following wetting of drained soil. We investigated seasonally drained wetland soils from the Pantanal and the Amazon, both with a natural high nitrate content and low pH. Here we report the effect of wetting...

  3. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette eWhitaker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g. ‘positive priming effects’ that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding 13C labelled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from an elevation gradient of tropical lowland and montane forests. We hypothesised that priming effects would increase with elevation due to increasing microbial nitrogen limitation, and that microbial community composition would strongly influence the magnitude of priming effects. Quantifying the sources of respired C (substrate or soil organic matter in response to substrate addition revealed no consistent patterns in priming effects with elevation. Instead we found that substrate quality (complexity and nitrogen content was the dominant factor controlling priming effects. For example a nitrogenous substrate induced a large increase in soil organic matter mineralization whilst a complex C substrate caused negligible change. Differences in the functional capacity of specific microbial groups, rather than microbial community composition per se, were responsible for these substrate-driven differences in priming effects. Our findings suggest that the microbial pathways by which plant inputs and soil organic matter are mineralized are determined primarily by the quality of plant inputs and the functional capacity of microbial taxa, rather than the abiotic properties of the soil. Changes in the complexity and stoichiometry of plant inputs to soil in response to climate change may therefore be important in regulating soil C dynamics in tropical forest soils.

  4. PRECIPITATION EFFECTS ON SOIL CHARACTERISTICS IN TROPICAL RAIN FORESTS OF THE CHOCO BIOGEOGRAPHICAL REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harley Quinto Mosquera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Average annual precipitation (AAP is one of the principal environmental factors that regulates processes in terrestrial ecosystems. The effect of AAP on the availability of edaphic nutrients is poorly understood, especially in tropical zones with high rainfall. In order to evaluate the effects of high AAP on the availability of soil N, P, and K, physicochemical parameters were measured in soils of three tropical rainforests in the Chocó biogeographical region with different AAPs (7,500, 8,000, and 10,000 mm yr-1. Furthermore, a bibliographical review was carried out that including studies for distinct tropical Ultisols and AAP ranging from 1,800 to 10,000 mm yr-1. The evaluated soils presented extreme acidity with high contents of Al, organic matter (OM and total N, and low quantities of P, Mg, and Ca. The K concentrations were intermediate and the effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC was low. On the other hand, in the evaluation of the influence of the AAP on the availability of N, P, and K in the soil, contrasting tendencies were observed. On one side, a positive curvilinear relationship was found between the availability of N and the increase in the AAP. On the other side, the available P content significantly decreased with increasing AAP. In conclusion, the excessive AAP resulted in increases in total N and low availability of P, thereby altering the dynamics of the nutrients and the carbon balance of the tropical forest

  5. Ecology of Nitrogen Fixing, Nitrifying, and Denitrifying Microorganisms in Tropical Forest Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2016-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play important roles in nitrogen cycling within forest ecosystems. Current research has revealed that a wider variety of microorganisms, with unexpected diversity in their functions and phylogenies, are involved in the nitrogen cycle than previously thought, including nitrogen-fixing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, heterotrophic nitrifying microorganisms, and anammox bacteria, as well as denitrifying bacteria, archaea, and fungi. However, the vast majority of this research has been focused in temperate regions, and relatively little is known regarding the ecology of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms within tropical and subtropical ecosystems. Tropical forests are characterized by relatively high precipitation, low annual temperature fluctuation, high heterogeneity in plant diversity, large amounts of plant litter, and unique soil chemistry. For these reasons, regulation of the nitrogen cycle in tropical forests may be very different from that of temperate ecosystems. This is of great importance because of growing concerns regarding the effect of land use change and chronic-elevated nitrogen deposition on nitrogen-cycling processes in tropical forests. In the context of global change, it is crucial to understand how environmental factors and land use changes in tropical ecosystems influence the composition, abundance and activity of key players in the nitrogen cycle. In this review, we synthesize the limited currently available information regarding the microbial communities involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification, to provide deeper insight into the mechanisms regulating nitrogen cycling in tropical forest ecosystems. We also highlight the large gaps in our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen processes in tropical forest soils and identify important areas for future research.

  6. Ecology of Nitrogen Fixing, Nitrifying, and Denitrifying Microorganisms in Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play important roles in nitrogen cycling within forest ecosystems. Current research has revealed that a wider variety of microorganisms, with unexpected diversity in their functions and phylogenies, are involved in the nitrogen cycle than previously thought, including nitrogen-fixing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, heterotrophic nitrifying microorganisms, and anammox bacteria, as well as denitrifying bacteria, archaea, and fungi. However, the vast majority of this research has been focused in temperate regions, and relatively little is known regarding the ecology of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms within tropical and subtropical ecosystems. Tropical forests are characterized by relatively high precipitation, low annual temperature fluctuation, high heterogeneity in plant diversity, large amounts of plant litter, and unique soil chemistry. For these reasons, regulation of the nitrogen cycle in tropical forests may be very different from that of temperate ecosystems. This is of great importance because of growing concerns regarding the effect of land use change and chronic-elevated nitrogen deposition on nitrogen-cycling processes in tropical forests. In the context of global change, it is crucial to understand how environmental factors and land use changes in tropical ecosystems influence the composition, abundance and activity of key players in the nitrogen cycle. In this review, we synthesize the limited currently available information regarding the microbial communities involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification, to provide deeper insight into the mechanisms regulating nitrogen cycling in tropical forest ecosystems. We also highlight the large gaps in our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen processes in tropical forest soils and identify important areas for future research. PMID:27468277

  7. Effect of typhoon disturbance on soil respiration dynamic in a tropical broadleaves plantation in southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Yu, Jui-Chu; Lai, Yen-Jen

    2017-04-01

    Global forests contain 69% of total carbon stored in forest soil and litter. But the carbon storage ability and release rate of warming gases of forest soil also affect global climate change. Reforestation is one of the best solutions to mitigate warming gases release and to store in soil. Typhoon is one of the most hazards to disturb forest ecosystem and change carbon cycle. Typhoon disturbance is also affect soil carbon cycle such as soil respiration, carbon storage. Therefore, the objective of this study is to clarify the effect of typhoon disturbance on soil respiration dynamic in a tropical broadleaves plantation in southern Taiwan. Fourteen broadleaved tree species were planted in 2002-2005. Twelves continuous soil respiration chambers was divided two treatments (trench and non-trench) and observed since 2011 to 2014. The soil belongs to Entisol with over 60% of sandstone. The soil pH is 5.5 with low base cations because of high sand percentage. Forest biometric such as tree high, DBH, litterfall was measured in 2011-2014. Data showed that the accumulation amount of litterfall was highest in December to February and lowest in June. Soil respiration was related with season variation in research site. Soil temperature showed significantly exponential related with soil respiration in research site (pnegative relationship with total amount of litterfall (p<0.001), suggesting that the tree was still young and did not reach crown closure.

  8. Changes in Fire-Derived Soil Black Carbon Storage in a Sub-humid Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. D.; Yao, J.; Murray, D. B.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fire-derived black carbon (BC) in soil, including charcoal, represents a potentially important fraction of terrestrial carbon cycling due to its presumed long persistence in soil. Interpretation of site BC retention is important for assessing feedbacks to ecosystem processes including nutrient and water cycling. However, interaction between vegetation disturbance, BC formation, and off site transport may exist that complicate interpretation of BC addition to soils from wildfire or prescribed burns directly. To investigate the relationship between disturbance and site retention on soil BC, we determined BC concentrations for a woodland in central Texas, USA, from study plots in hilly terrain with a fire scar dendrochronology spanning 100 years. BC values were determined from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Estimated values showed mean BC concentration of 2.73 ± 3.06 g BC kg-1 (0.91 ± 0.51 kg BC m-2) for sites with fire occurrence within the last 40 years compared with BC values of1.21 ± 1.70 g BC kg-1 soil (0.18 ± 0.14 kg BC m-2) for sites with fire 40 - 100 years ago. Sites with no tree ring evidence of fire during the last 100 years had the lowest mean soil BC concentration of 0.05 ± 0.11 g BC kg-1 (0.02 ± 0.03 kg BC m-2). Molecular proxies of stability (lignin/N) and decomposition (Alkyl C/O-Alky C) showed no differences across the sites, indicating that low potential for BC mineralization. Modeled soil erosion and time since fire from fire scar data showed that soil BC concentrations were inversely correlated. A modified the ecosystem process model, Biome-BGC, was also used simulate the effects of fire disturbance with different severities and seasonality on C cycling related to the BC production, effect on soil water availability, and off-site transport. Results showed that BC impacts on ecosystem processes, including net ecosystem exchange and leaf area development, were predominantly related to fire frequency. Site BC loss rates were

  9. Evaluation of Biological and Enzymatic Activity of Soil in a Tropical Dry Forest: Desierto de la Tatacoa (Colombia) with Potential in Mars Terraforming and Other Similar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Moreno, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    Desierto de la Tatacoa has been determined to be a tropical dry forest bioma, which is located at 3° 13" N 75° 13" W. It has a hot thermal floor with 440 msnm of altitude; it has a daily average of 28° C, and a maximum of 40° C, Its annual rainfall total can be upwards of 1250 mm. Its solar sheen has a daily average of 5.8 hours and its relative humidity is between 60% and 65%. Therefore, the life forms presents are very scant, and in certain places, almost void. It was realized a completely random sampling of soil from its surface down to 6 inches deep, of zones without vegetation and with soils highly loaded by oxides of iron in order to determine the number of microorganisms per gram and its subsequent identification. It was measured the soil basal respiration. Besides, it was determined enzymatic activity (catalase, dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease). Starting with the obtained results, it is developes an alternative towards the study of soil genesis in Mars in particular, and recommendations for same process in other planets. Although the information found in the experiments already realized in Martian soil they demonstrate that doesnt exist any enzymatic activity, the knowledge of the same topic in the soil is proposed as an alternative to problems like carbonic fixing of the dense Martian atmosphere of CO2, the degradation of inorganic compounds amongst other in order to prepare the substratum for later colonization by some life form.

  10. Soil type and texture impacts on soil organic carbon accumulation in a sub-tropical agro-ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, Daniel Ruiz Potma; Sa, Joao Carlos de Moraes; Mishra, Umakant; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Ferreira, Lucimara Aparecida; Furlan, Flavia Juliana Ferreira

    2016-11-02

    Soil organic carbon (C) plays a fundamental role in tropical and subtropical soil fertility, agronomic productivity, and soil health. As a tool for understand ecosystems dynamics, mathematical models such as Century have been used to assess soil's capacity to store C in different environments. However, as Century was initially developed for temperate ecosystems, several authors have hypothesized that C storage may be underestimated by Century in Oxisols. We tested the hypothesis that Century model can be parameterized for tropical soils and used to reliably estimate soil organic carbon (SOC) storage. The aim of this study was to investigate SOC storage under two soil types and three textural classes and quantify the sources and magnitude of uncertainty using the Century model. The simulation for SOC storage was efficient and the mean residue was 10 Mg C ha-1 (13%) for n = 91. However, a different simulation bias was observed for soil with <600 g kg-1 of clay was 16.3 Mg C ha-1 (18%) for n = 30, and at >600 g kg-1 of clay, was 4 Mg C ha-1 (5%) for n = 50, respectively. The results suggest a non-linear effect of clay and silt contents on C storage in Oxisols. All types of soil contain nearly 70% of Fe and Al oxides in the clay fraction and a regression analysis showed an increase in model bias with increase in oxides content. Consequently, inclusion of mineralogical control of SOC stabilization by Fe and Al (hydro) oxides may improve results of Century model simulations in soils with high oxides contents

  11. Spatial distribution and development of soils in tropical karst areas from the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Francisco; Palacio-Aponte, Gerardo; Quintana, Patricia; Zinck, Joseph Alfred

    2011-12-01

    Better understanding of soil formation requires knowing the spatial distribution of the soils that allows constructing models of soil sequences in multiple directions along various types of gradients. This approach was applied to comprehend the soil formation from the soil distribution in the tropical karst areas of the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico. For soil mapping, a two-step methodology was followed. First, a geomorphic analysis was performed; subsequently, 382 soil profiles were reclassified and integrated into a geopedologic map. Additional soil survey was carried out in areas where soil information was lacking (123 soil profiles). Satellite images were used to identify flooded areas. After conducting numerous field verifications and analyses, landforms and soils were combined to make a soilscape map. Based on field observations and the soilscape map, soil development was analyzed on soil sequences. Four geomorphic environments were identified, karstic plains and hills with Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, and Vertisols; coastal plains with Arenosols, Regosols, Solonchacks, and Histosols; fluvio-paludal plains with Gleysols, Histosols, Leptosols and Solonchacks; and tectono-karstic plains and hills with Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, and Vertisols. Relevant soil forming factors in the Peninsula of Yucatan include time of emersion of the limestone platforms, climate, rock type, and macro- and micro-relief. Other factors such as groundwater level, fractures, also have an influence on soil formation. Karst development can be considered as a complex soil and relief forming factor. Terra Rossa soils as Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, Nitisols and Vertisols in the Peninsula of Yucatan may be polygenic. In some cases, the theory of residual origin fits better the data than the theory of allochthonous origin; in other cases, it is the other way around.

  12. Chemical characterization of iron-mediated soil organic matter stabilization in tropical subsoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, E.; Plante, A. F.; Thompson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils contribute disproportionately to the poorly-characterized and persistent deep soil carbon (C) pool. Highly-weathered and often extending one to two meters deep, these soils also contain an abundance of semicrystalline, Fe- and Al-containing short-range-order (SRO) minerals, metastable derivatives of framework silicate and ferromagnesian parent materials. SRO minerals are capable of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization through sorption or co-precipitation, a faculty enhanced by their high specific surface area (SSA). As such, SRO-mediated organomineral associations may prove a critical, yet matrix-selective, driver of SOM stabilization capacity in tropical soils, particularly at depth. Surface (0-20 cm) and subsoil (50-80 cm) samples were taken from 20 quantitative soil pits dug in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, located in northeast Puerto Rico. Soils were stratified across granodiorite and volcaniclastic parent materials, spanning primary mineral contents of 5 to 40%. Selective dissolution procedures were used to isolate distinct forms of Fe-C interactions: (1) sodium pyrophosphate to isolate organo-mineral complexes, (2) hydroxylamine and (3) oxalate to isolate SRO phases, and (4) inorganic dithionite to isolate crystalline Fe oxides. Extracts were analysed for dissolved organic C (DOC) and Fe and Al concentrations to estimate SOM associated with each mineral phase. Soils were also subjected to SSA analysis, 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction before and after extraction to determine the contribution of extracted mineral phases to SOM stabilization capacity. Preliminary results indicate a dominance of secondary (hydr)oxides and kaolin minerals in surface soils, strongly driven by parent material. With depth, however, we observe a marked shift towards SRO mineral phases across both parent materials, suggesting that SRO-mediated organomineral associations are significant contributors to observed C storage in tropical

  13. Improving a native pasture with the legume Arachis pintoi in the humid tropics of México

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo Gallegos, E.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of introducing the legume Arachis pintoi CIAT 17434 into a native pasture where native grasses dominated the botanical composition, on establishment, persistence, standing dry matter, botanical composition, soil variables, animal performance, h

  14. Determinants of Flemingia congesta and Dactyladenia barteri mulch decomposition in alley-cropping systems in the humid tropics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrot, J.; Brussaard, L.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of soil macrofauna, micro-environment and mulch quantity were investigated on an acid Ultisol in a high-rainfall area in S.E. Nigeria, using litterbags or littertubes with leaves from the trees of an alley cropping system with t Flemingia congesta or t Dactyladenia barteri as hedgerow specie

  15. Bringing simulation to implementation: Presentation of a global approach in the design of passive solar buildings under humid tropical climates

    CERN Document Server

    Garde, François; Celaire, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In early 1995, a DSM pilot initiative has been launched in the French islands of Guadeloupe and Reunion through a partnership between several public and private partners (the French Public Utility EDF, the University of Reunion Island, low cost housing companies, architects, energy consultants, etc...) to set up standards to improve thermal design of new residential buildings in tropical climates. This partnership led to defining optimized bio-climatic urban planning and architectural designs featuring the use of passive cooling architectural principles (solar shading, natural ventilation) and components, as well as energy efficient systems and technologies. The design and sizing of each architectural component on internal thermal comfort in building has been assessed with a validated thermal and airflow building simulation software (CODYRUN). These technical specifications have been edited in a reference document which has been used to build over 300 new pilot dwellings through the years 1996-1998 in Reunion...

  16. Plant diversity at Chilapatta Reserve Forest of Terai Duars in sub-humid tropical foothills of Indian Eastern Himalayas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gopal Shukla; Rajib Biswas; A. P. Das; Sumit Chakravarty

    2014-01-01

    From March 2007 to March 2009 we quantified plant diversity at Chilapatta Reserve Forest in Terai Duars in the Indian eastern Himala-yas. We sampled stratified random nested quadrats. Species richness was 311, representing 167 genera and 81 families. The species diversity index and concentration of dominance of the forest were 2.20 and 0.0072, respectively. Shannon-Wiener index and evenness indices were 4.77 and 1.44, respectively. The Importance Value Index (IVI) of species ranged from 0.13 to 37.94. The estimated diversity indices indicated heterogene-ity of the forest in its composition, structure, function and dynamics. Rich forest plant diversity supports the need for continued conservation of tropical forests.

  17. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  18. How do soil organic carbon stocks change after cropland abandonment in Mediterranean humid mountain areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal-Romero, E; Cammeraat, E; Pérez-Cardiel, E; Lasanta, T

    2016-10-01

    The effects of land use changes on soil carbon stocks are a matter of concern stated in international policy agendas on the mitigation of greenhouse emissions. Afforestation is increasingly viewed as an environmental restorative land use change prescription and is considered one of the most efficient carbon sequestration strategies currently available. Given the large quantity of CO2 that soils release annually, it is important to understand disturbances in vegetation and soil resulting from land use changes. The main objective of this study is to assess the effects of land abandonment, land use change and afforestation practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. For this aim, five different land covers (bare soil, permanent pastureland, secondary succession, Pinus sylvestris (PS) and Pinus nigra (PN) afforestation), in the Central Spanish Pyrenees, were analysed. SOC dynamics have been studied in the bulk soil, and in the fractions separated according to two methodologies: (i) aggregate size distribution, and (ii) density fractionation, and rates of carbon mineralization have been determined by measuring CO2 evolution using an automated respirometer. The results showed that: (i) SOC contents were higher in the PN sites in the topsoil (10cm), (ii) when all the profiles were considered no significant differences were observed between pastureland and PN, (iii) SOC accumulation under secondary succession is a slow process, and (iv) pastureland should also be considered due to the relative importance in SOC stocks. The first step of SOC stabilization after afforestation is the formation of macro-aggregates promoted by large inputs of SOC, with a high contribution of labile organic matter. However, our respiration experiments did not show evidence of SOC stabilization. SOC mineralization was higher in the top layers and values decreased with depth. These results gain insights into which type of land management is most appropriate after land abandonment for SOC.

  19. Land-use intensification impact on phosphorus fractions in highly weathered tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranguit, Deejay; Guillaume, Thomas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Deforestation and land-use intensification in tropics have increased over the past decades, driven by the demand for agricultural products. Despite the fact that phosphorus (P) is one of the main limiting nutrients for agricultural productivity in the tropics, the effect of land-use intensification on P availability remains unclear. The objective was to assess the impacts of land-use intensification on soil inorganic and organic P fractions of different availability (Hedley sequential fractionation) and P stocks in highly weathered tropical soils. We compared the P availability under extensive land-use (rubber agroforest) and intensive land-use with moderate fertilization (rubber monoculture plantations) or high fertilization (oil palm monoculture plantations) in Indonesia. The phosphorus stock was dominated by inorganic forms (60 to 85%) in all land-use types. Fertilizer application increased easily-available inorganic P (i.e., H2O-Pi, NaHCO3-Pi) in intensive rubber and oil palm plantations compared to agroforest. However, the easily-available organic P (NaHCO3-extractable Po) was reduced by half under oil palm and rubber. The decrease of moderately available and non-available P by land-use intensification means that fertilization maintains only short-term soil fertility that is not sustainable in the long run due to the depletion of P reserves. The mechanisms of this P reserve depletion are: soil erosion (here assessed by C/P ratio), mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and export of P with yield products. Easily-available P fractions (i.e., H2O-Pi, NaHCO3-Pi and Po) and total organic P were strongly positively correlated with carbon content suggesting that SOM plays a critical role in maintaining P availability. Therefore, the ecologically based management is necessary in mitigating SOM losses to increase the sustainability of agricultural production in P limited highly weathered tropical soils.

  20. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison;

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation...... in protected sites in humid tropical forests could be valued at USD 6,200-7,400 million depending on the land use after clearance. This is >1.5 times the estimated spending on protected area management in these regions. Improving management of protected areas to retain forest cover better may be an important...

  1. Coherent monsoonal changes in the northern tropics revealed by Chadian lakes (L. Chad and Yoa) sedimentary archives during the African Humid Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvestre, Florence; Kroepelin, Stefan; Pierre, Deschamps; Christine, Cocquyt; Nicolas, Waldmann; Kazuyo, Tachikawa; Amaral Paula, Do; Doriane, Delanghe; Guillaume, Jouve; Edouard, Bard; Camille, Bouchez; Jean-Claude, Doumnang; Jean-Charles, Mazur; Martin, Melles; Guillemette, Menot; Frauke, Rostek; Nicolas, Thouveny; Volkner, Wennrich

    2016-04-01

    In northern African tropics, it is now well established that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was extremely dry followed by a wetter Holocene. Numerous palaeolake records reveal a fairly consistent pattern of a moister early Holocene resulting in a green Sahara followed by the onset of aridification about 4000 years ago. These palaeoenvironmental conditions are deciphered from several continental records distributed over the sub-Saharan zone and including diverse environments. However, pronounced differences in the timing and amplitude of these moisture changes inferred from sedimentary records point to both regional climatic variability change and site-specific influences of local topographic-hydrogeological factors which biased the evolution of water balance reconstructed from individual lacustrine archives. Here we present hydrological reconstructions from Chadian lakes, i.e. Lake Chad (c. 13°N) and Lake Yoa (19°N). Because of their location, both records allow to reconstruct lake level fluctuations and environmental changes according to a gradient from Sahelian to Saharan latitudes. Whereas Lake Chad is considered as a good sensor of climatic changes because of its large drainage basin covering 610,000 km2 in the Sudanian belt, Lake Yoa logs the northern precipitation changes in the Sahara. Combining sedimentological (laser diffraction grain size) and geochemical (XRF analysis) data associated with bio-indicators proxies (diatoms, pollen), we compare lake-level fluctuations and environmental changes during the last 12,000 years. After the hyperarid Last Glacial Maximum period during which dunes covered the Lake Chad basin, both lake records indicate an onset of more humid conditions between 12.5-11 ka cal BP. These resulted in lacustrine transgressions approaching their maximum extension at c. 10.5 ka cal BP. The lacustrine phase was probably interrupted by a relatively short drying event occurring around 8.2 ka cal BP which is well-defined in Lake Yoa by

  2. Impact of secondary vegetation succession on soil quality in a humid Mediterranean landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, van R.L.; Cammeraat, L.H.; Keesstra, S.D.; Zorn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Former agricultural fields are increasingly abandoned in several regions in Southern Europe. In many cases this leads to vegetation succession which may have a direct impact on soil quality, biodiversity and hydrological connectivity. The aim of this study is to provide insights on the role of ve

  3. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Rogério D.; da Rocha, Humberto R.; de Freitas, Helber C.; Goulden, Michael L.; Miller, Scott D.

    2006-08-01

    We used frequency-domain reflectometry to make continuous, high-resolution measurements for 22 months of the soil moisture to a depth of 10 m in an Amazonian rain forest. We then used these data to determine how soil moisture varies on diel, seasonal and multi-year timescales, and to better understand the quantitative and mechanistic relationships between soil moisture and forest evapotranspiration. The mean annual precipitation at the site was over 1900 mm. The field capacity was approximately 0.53 m3 m-3 and was nearly uniform with soil depth. Soil moisture decreased at all levels during the dry season, with the minimum of 0.38 m3 m-3 at 3 m beneath the surface. The moisture in the upper 1 m showed a strong diel cycle with daytime depletion due to evapotranspiration. The moisture beneath 1 m declined during both day and night due to the combined effects of evapotranspiration, drainage and a nighttime upward movement of water. The depth of active water withdrawal changed markedly over the year. The upper 2 m of soil supplied 56% of the water used for evapotranspiration in the wet season and 28% of the water used in the dry season. The zone of active water withdrawal extended to a depth of at least 10 m. The day-to-day rates of moisture withdrawal from the upper 10 m of soil during rain-free periods agreed well with simultaneous measurements of whole-forest evapotranspiration made by the eddy covariance technique. The forest at the site was well adapted to the normal cycle of wet and dry seasons, and the dry season had only a small effect on the rates of land-atmosphere water vapour exchange.

  4. Carbon stocks and soil sequestration rates of tropical riverine wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, M. F.; Santini, N. S.; Tovilla, C.; Vázquez-Lule, A.; Castro, L.; Guevara, M.

    2015-06-01

    Riverine wetlands are created and transformed by geomorphological processes that determine their vegetation composition, primary production and soil accretion, all of which are likely to influence C stocks. Here, we compared ecosystem C stocks (trees, soil and downed wood) and soil N stocks of different types of riverine wetlands (marsh, peat swamp forest and mangroves) whose distribution spans from an environment dominated by river forces to an estuarine environment dominated by coastal processes. We also estimated soil C sequestration rates of mangroves on the basis of soil C accumulation. We predicted that C stocks in mangroves and peat swamps would be larger than marshes, and that C, N stocks and C sequestration rates would be larger in the upper compared to the lower estuary. Mean C stocks in mangroves and peat swamps (784.5 ± 73.5 and 722.2 ± 63.6 MgC ha-1, respectively) were higher than those of marshes (336.5 ± 38.3 MgC ha-1). Soil C and N stocks of mangroves were highest in the upper estuary and decreased towards the lower estuary. C stock variability within mangroves was much lower in the upper estuary (range 744-912 MgC ha-1) compared to the intermediate and lower estuary (range 537-1115 MgC ha-1) probably as a result of a highly dynamic coastline. Soil C sequestration values were 1.3 ± 0.2 MgC ha-1 yr-1 and were similar across sites. Estimations of C stocks within large areas need to include spatial variability related to vegetation composition and geomorphological setting to accurately reflect variability within riverine wetlands.

  5. Insecticide dissipation from soil and plant surfaces in tropical horticulture of southern Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Atcha-Ahowé, Cyrien; James, Braima; Amelung, Wulf

    2009-06-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, horticulture provides livelihood opportunities for millions of people, especially in urban and peri-urban areas. Although the vegetable agroecosystems are often characterized by intensive pesticide use, risks resulting therefrom are largely unknown under tropical horticultural conditions. The objective of this study therefore was to study the fate of pesticides in two representative horticultural soils (Acrisol and Arenosol) and plants (Solanum macrocarpon L.) after field application and thus to gain first insight on environmental persistence and dispersion of typical insecticides used in vegetable horticulture in Benin, West Africa. On plant surfaces, dissipation was rapid with half lives ranging from 2 to 87 h (alpha-endosulfan tropical environments.

  6. Unexprected Changes in Soil Phosphorus Dynamics Following Tropical Deforestation to Cattle Pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lefer, Margaret E.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is widely believed to limit plant growth and organic matter storage in a large fraction of the world's lowland tropical rainforests. We investigated how the most common land use change in such forests, conversion to cattle pasture, affects soil P fractions along forest to pasture chronosequences in the central Brazilian Amazon and in southwestern Costa Rica. Our sites represent a broad range in rainfall, soil type, management strategies, and total soil P (45.2 - 1228.0 microng P / g soil), yet we found some unexpected and at times strikingly similar changes in soil P in all sites. In the Brazilian sites, where rainfall is relatively low and pasture management is more intense than in the Costa Rican sites, significant losses in total soil P and soil organic carbon (SOC) were seen with pasture age on both fine-textured oxisol and highly sandy entisol soils. However, P losses were largely from occluded, inorganic soil P fractions, while organic forms of soil P remained constant or increased with pasture age, despite the declines in SOC. In Costa Rica, SOC remained constant across the oxisol sites and increased from forest to pasture on the mollisols, while total soil P increased with pasture age in both sequences. The increases in total soil P were largely due to changes in organic P; occluded soil P increased only slightly in the mollisols, and remained unchanged in the older oxisols. We suggest that changes in the composition and/or the primary limiting resources of the soil microbial community may drive the changes in organic P. We also present a new conceptual model for changes in soil P following deforestation to cattle pasture.

  7. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) as a proxy for GPP: Complications derived from studies on the impact of CO2, soil humidity and sterilization on the OCS exchange between soils and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide is discussed to be used as a proxy for gross primary productivity (GPP) of forest ecosystems. However, soils may interfere. Soils play an important role in budgeting global and local carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes, yet the available data on the uptake and emission behavior of soils in conjunction with environmental factors is limited. The work of many authors has shown that the OCS exchange of soils depends on various factors, such as soil type, atmospheric OCS concentrations, temperature or soil water content (Kesselmeier et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, No. D9, 11577-11584, 1999; Van Diest & Kesselmeier, Biogeosciences, 5, 475-483, 2008; Masyek et al., PNAS, 111, No 25, 9064-9069, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319132111, 2014; Whelan and Rhew, J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosciences., 120, 54-62, doi: 10.1002/2014JG002661, 2015) and the light dependent and obviously abiotic OCS production as reported by Whelan and Rhew (2015). To get a better constraint on the impact of some environmental factors on the OCS exchange of soils we used a new laser based integrated cavity output spectroscopy instrument (LGR COS/CO Analyzer Model 907-0028, Los Gatos, Mountain View, California, USA) in conjunction with an automated soil chamber system (as described in Behrendt et al, Biogeosciences, 11, 5463-5492, doi: 10.5194/bg-11-5463-2014, 2014). The OCS exchange of various soils under the full range of possible soil humidity and various CO2 mixing ratios was examined. Additionally OCS exchange of chloroform sterilized subsamples was compared to their live counterparts to illuminate the influence of microorganisms. Results were quite heterogeneous between different soils. With few exceptions, all examined soils show dependence between OCS exchange and soil humidity, usually with strongest uptake at a certain humidity range and less uptake or even emission at higher and lower humidity. Differences in CO2 mixing ratio also clearly impacts on OCS exchange, but trends for different soils

  8. EFECTO DEL CLIMA SOBRE LAS CARACTERÍSTICAS SEMINALES DE PORCINOS EN UNA ZONA DE BOSQUE HÚMEDO TROPICAL EFFECT OF CLIMATE ON THE SEMINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF BOARS IN A REGION OF HUMID TROPICAL FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Henao Restrepo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En una zona de bosque húmedo tropical se seleccionaron diez reproductores porcinos con edades entre 12 y 24 meses, con el fin evaluar el efecto de las variables climáticas presentes el día de la recolección de semen y en cada uno de los 45 días anteriores a ella, sobre las características seminales. Se descompuso la variabilidad de cada característica en una componente intraindividual y en otra interindividual, usando estimadores de máxima verosimilitud (PROC VARCOMP de SAS®. Para relacionar las características seminales con las variables climáticas se agruparon las anormalidades morfológicas, según la región espermática afectada, en anormalidades de cabeza, de pieza intermedia y de pieza principal; las demás características fueron relacionadas sin ninguna modificación o agrupamiento. Se evaluaron posibles correlaciones entre las características seminales y las variables climáticas. En un total de 298 eyaculados recolectados semanalmente durante un período de 30 semanas, con excepción del volumen y de anormalidades morfológicas, las características seminales presentaron baja o moderada variación intra e interindividual y fueron semejantes a las que se producen en otras latitudes, con tendencia a presentar mayor volumen seminal y mayor concentración de espermatozoides. La temperatura máxima, la temperatura mínima, el rango entre las temperaturas, la humedad relativa y la precipitación que se presentaron el día de la recolección de semen y en cada uno de los 45 días anteriores a ella, tuvieron muy bajo efecto sobre las características seminales. Es posible que los reproductores porcinos en zona tropical cálida húmeda desarrollen un alto grado de adaptación que permite una adecuada termorregulación testicular que favorece la función espermatogénica en los túbulos seminíferos, de manera que no se afecta sensiblemente la producción y la calidad del semen.In an region of humid tropical forest, ten boars of

  9. Occurrence, prediction and hydrological effects of water repellency amongst major soil and land-use types in a humid temperate climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerr, S.H.; Shakesby, R.A.; Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of soil water repellency distribution, of factors affecting its occurrence and of its hydrological effects stems primarily from regions with a distinct dry season, whereas comparatively little is known about its occurrence in humid temperate regions such as typified by the UK. To address

  10. Geochemical evidence for active tropical serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica: An analog of a humid early Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Gazel, Esteban; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Schrenk, Matthew O.; Boll, Jan; Gill, Ben C.

    2014-05-01

    is a planetary process that has important consequences on geochemical cycles, supporting microbial activity through the formation of H2 and CH4 and having the potential to sequester atmospheric CO2. We present geochemical evidence of active serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica which is sustained by peridotites with a degree of serpentinization less than 50% with no evidence of an internal heat source. Average spring water temperatures are 29.1°C. Two hyperalkaline spring systems were discovered, with a spring fluid pH up to 11.18. The fluids are characterized by low Mg (1.0-5.9 mg/L) and K (1.0-5.5 mg/L) and relative high Ca (29-167 mg/L), Na (16-27 mg/L), Cl (26-29 mg/L), hydroxide (41-63 mg/L), and carbonate (31-49 mg/L). Active CH4 (24.3% v/v) vents coupled with carbonate deposits (δ13CCO2 =-27 to -14‰; δ18OCO2 =-17 to - 6‰) also provide evidence for active serpentinization and carbonation. Isotope ratios of the alkaline fluids (δ18O = -7.9‰, δ2H = -51.4‰) and groundwater (δ18O = -7.6‰; δ2H = -48.0‰) suggests that, during base flow recession, springs are fed by groundwater circulation. Methanogenic Archaea, which comprises a relatively high percentage of the 16S rRNA gene tag sequences, suggests that biological methanogenesis may play a significant role in the system. Santa Elena's extreme varying weather results in a scenario that could be of significant importance for (a) improving the knowledge of conditions on a humid early Earth or Mars that had periodic changes in water supply, (b) revealing new insights on serpentinizing solute transport, and (c) modeling hydrogeochemical responses as a function of recharge.

  11. Climate-based statistical regression models for crop yield forecasting of coffee in humid tropical Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, M.; Rajavel, M.; Surendran, U.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the variability of coffee yield of both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora as influenced by climate parameters (rainfall (RF), maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), and mean relative humidity (RH)) was undertaken at Regional Coffee Research Station, Chundale, Wayanad, Kerala State, India. The result on the coffee yield data of 30 years (1980 to 2009) revealed that the yield of coffee is fluctuating with the variations in climatic parameters. Among the species, productivity was higher for C. canephora coffee than C. arabica in most of the years. Maximum yield of C. canephora (2040 kg ha-1) was recorded in 2003-2004 and there was declining trend of yield noticed in the recent years. Similarly, the maximum yield of C. arabica (1745 kg ha-1) was recorded in 1988-1989 and decreased yield was noticed in the subsequent years till 1997-1998 due to year to year variability in climate. The highest correlation coefficient was found between the yield of C. arabica coffee and maximum temperature during January (0.7) and between C. arabica coffee yield and RH during July (0.4). Yield of C. canephora coffee had highest correlation with maximum temperature, RH and rainfall during February. Statistical regression model between selected climatic parameters and yield of C. arabica and C. canephora coffee was developed to forecast the yield of coffee in Wayanad district in Kerala. The model was validated for years 2010, 2011, and 2012 with the coffee yield data obtained during the years and the prediction was found to be good.

  12. Climate-based statistical regression models for crop yield forecasting of coffee in humid tropical Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, M.; Rajavel, M.; Surendran, U.

    2016-12-01

    A study on the variability of coffee yield of both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora as influenced by climate parameters (rainfall (RF), maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), and mean relative humidity (RH)) was undertaken at Regional Coffee Research Station, Chundale, Wayanad, Kerala State, India. The result on the coffee yield data of 30 years (1980 to 2009) revealed that the yield of coffee is fluctuating with the variations in climatic parameters. Among the species, productivity was higher for C. canephora coffee than C. arabica in most of the years. Maximum yield of C. canephora (2040 kg ha-1) was recorded in 2003-2004 and there was declining trend of yield noticed in the recent years. Similarly, the maximum yield of C. arabica (1745 kg ha-1) was recorded in 1988-1989 and decreased yield was noticed in the subsequent years till 1997-1998 due to year to year variability in climate. The highest correlation coefficient was found between the yield of C. arabica coffee and maximum temperature during January (0.7) and between C. arabica coffee yield and RH during July (0.4). Yield of C. canephora coffee had highest correlation with maximum temperature, RH and rainfall during February. Statistical regression model between selected climatic parameters and yield of C. arabica and C. canephora coffee was developed to forecast the yield of coffee in Wayanad district in Kerala. The model was validated for years 2010, 2011, and 2012 with the coffee yield data obtained during the years and the prediction was found to be good.

  13. Geotechnical behavior of a tropical residual soil contaminated with gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Echeverri-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La infraestructura para transporte de hidrocarburos ha crecido de manera importante debido a la necesidad de abastecer la mayo r cantidad de poblaciones; sin embargo por pro blemas en las redes de sumin istro, se presentan derrames accidentales que contaminan los su elos bajo los cuales se apoyan estas estructuras. Los suelos contaminados , en este caso particular con gasolina, son la motivación del p resente artículo, el cual pretende analizar los cambios que ocurren en un suelo d e origen residual tropical al ser contaminado con éste; mediant e pruebas de laboratorio específicos para caracterizar este tipo de suelos (Clasificación Miniatura Compactado Tropical, Succión, Pinhole Test, Índice de Colapso, Difracción de rayos “X”, Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido, determinación de pH y de ensayos tradicionales (hume dad natural, gravedad específica, granulometría, límites de Atterbe rg, corte directo, etc, tanto con muestras en estado natural c omo contaminadas que permitan percibir las posibles variaciones en las características mecánicas del material.

  14. Methane emissions and uptake in temperate and tropical forest trees on free-draining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bertie; Sayer, Emma; Siegenthaler, Andy; Gauci, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Forests play an important role in the exchange of radiatively important gases with the atmosphere. Previous studies have shown that in both temperate and tropical wetland forests tree stems are significant sources of methane (CH4), yet little is known about trace greenhouse gas dynamics in free-draining soils that dominate global forested areas. We examined trace gas (CH4 and N2O) fluxes from both soils and tree stems in a lowland tropical forest on free-draining soils in Panama, Central America and from a deciduous woodland in the United Kingdom. The tropical field site was a long-term experimental litter manipulation experiment in the Barro Colorado Nature Monument within the Panama Canal Zone, fluxes were sampled over the dry to wet season transition (March-August) in 2014 and November 2015. Temperate fluxes were sampled at Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire, over 12 months from February 2015 to January 2016. Tree stem samples were collected via syringe from temporary chambers strapped to the trees (as per Siegenthaler et al. (2015)) and the soil fluxes were sampled from permanently installed collars inserted to a 3cm depth. We found that seasonality (precipitation) is a significant driver of changing soil exchange from methane uptake to emission at the Panama sites. Experimental changes to litter quantity only become significant when coupled with seasonal change. Seasonal variability is an important control of the fluxes at out temperate forest site with changes in temperature and soil water content leading to changes in soil and tree stem trace gas fluxes from Wytham Woods. Siegenthaler, A., Welch, B., Pangala, S. R., Peacock, M., and Gauci, V.: Technical Note: Semi-rigid chambers for methane gas flux measurements on tree-stems, Biogeosciences Discuss., 12, 16019-16048, doi:10.5194/bgd-12-16019-2015, 2015.

  15. Chemical evolution of soil profile from humid regions: The role of the rare elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.N. Vodyanitskii

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eluvial-illuvial distribution of rare metals in forest soils is expressed more vividly than the distribution of Fe and Al the more. This is applies primarily to lanthanides: Y, La, Ce. In particular, this difference is noticeable in light Al–Fe-humus podzols, where highly differentiated elements of platinum group. The type of metals exposed to eluvial-illuvial distribution depends on the mineralogical composition of the parent rock and has a pronounced regional dimension.

  16. Securing tropical forest carbon: the contribution of protected areas to REDD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, J.P.W.; Kapos, V.; Campbell, A.;

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate tha...

  17. Evaluation on the decomposability of tropical forest peat soils after conversion to an oil palm plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangok, Faustina E; Maie, Nagamitsu; Melling, Lulie; Watanabe, Akira

    2017-06-01

    To understand the variations in the decomposability of tropical peat soil following deforestation for an oil palm plantation, a field incubation experiment was conducted in Sarawak, Malaysia. Peat soils collected from three types of primary forest, namely Mixed Peat Swamp (MPS; Gonystylus-Dactylocladus-Neoscrotechinia association), Alan Batu (ABt; Shorea albida-Gonstylus-Strenonurus association), and Alan Bunga (ABg; Shorea albida association), were packed in polyvinyl chloride pipes and installed in an oil palm plantation. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from soil were monthly measured for 3years. Environmental variables including soil temperature, soil moisture content, and groundwater table were also monitored. The pH, loss on ignition, and total carbon (C) content were similar among the three soils, while total N content was larger in the MPS than in the ABg soils. Based on (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, C composition of the MPS and ABg soils was characterized by the largest proportion of C present as alkyl C and O-alkyl C, respectively. The C composition of the ABt soil was intermediate between the MPS and ABg soils. The CO2 fluxes from the three soils ranged from 78 to 625mgCm(-2)h(-1) with a negative correlation to groundwater level. The CH4 fluxes ranged from -67 to 653μgCm(-2)h(-1). Both total CO2 and CH4 fluxes were larger in the order ABg>ABt>MPS (P<0.05). Annual rate of peat decomposition as was estimated from cumulative C loss differed up to 2 times, and the rate constant in exponential decay model was 0.033y(-1) for the MPS soil and 0.066y(-1) for the ABg soil. The field incubation results of the three forest peat soils seem to reflect the difference in the labile organic matter content, represented by polysaccharides.

  18. Soil-atmosphere carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange in a tropical rainforest at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K. S.; Juarez, S.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U. H.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently been proposed as a promising tracer for partitioning ecosystem carbon assimilation due to the close analogy between leaf uptake processes of COS and CO2. This emerging framework requires accurate characterization of the source and sink components of COS, including soil fluxes. Here we present the first direct, continuous observations of soil COS fluxes for 4 months at a tropical rainforest, La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Three soil plots with contrasting water content were selected for chamber measurements. Our observations confirmed that soils are principally COS sinks, with daily mean COS fluxes averaged across all chambers ranging from -3 to 0 pmol m-2 s-1. When compared with net ecosystem COS uptake which peaks around -30 pmol m-2 s-1, their contributions should be considered in ecosystem COS balance. We did not find a temperature optimum, but soil COS uptake slightly increased with soil temperature, indicating biotic control on soil COS fluxes. Diurnal cycles of COS fluxes were observed during drying out periods after rain. The diel periodicity of COS fluxes was probably obscured by frequent raining at the site. Diffusional control of soil COS fluxes is shown from increasing soil COS uptake at lower soil water-filled pore space. These confirm that soil COS fluxes are mediated both by soil physical and biological factors. Using a depth-resolved diffusion-reaction model with data-driven enzyme activity parameterization, we simulated the COS fluxes from measured soil environmental variables, consistent with observations. This modeling scheme is useful for separating soil COS fluxes from net ecosystem COS fluxes, which lends support to the emergent COS-based approach of carbon flux partitioning.

  19. Tropical soils with high aluminum concentrations cause oxidative stress in two tomato genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueirol, Roberta Corrêa; Monteiro, Francisco Antonio; Gratão, Priscila Lupino; Borgo, Lucélia; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2015-03-01

    Tropical and subtropical soils are usually acidic and have high concentrations of aluminum (Al). Aluminum toxicity in plants is caused by the high affinity of the Al cation for cell walls, membranes, and metabolites. In this study, the response of the antioxidant-enzymatic system to Al was examined in two tomato genotypes: Solanum lycopersicum var. esculentum (Calabash Rouge) and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme (CNPH 0082) grown in tropical soils with varying levels of Al. Plant growth; activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX), and glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes; stress-indicating compounds (malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide); and morphology (root length and surface area) were analyzed. Increased levels of Al in soils were correlated with reduced shoot and root biomass and with reduced root length and surface area. Calabash Rouge exhibited low Al concentrations and increased growth in soils with the highest levels of Al. Plants grown in soils with high availability of Al exhibited higher levels of stress indicators (MDA and hydrogen peroxide) and higher enzyme activity (CAT, APX, GPOX, and GR). Calabash Rouge absorbed less Al from soils than CNPH 0082, which suggests that the genotype may possess mechanisms for Al tolerance.

  20. Elevated mobility of persistent organic pollutants in the soil of a tropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qian; Nizzetto, Luca; Liu, Xiang; Borgå, Katrine; Starrfelt, Jostein; Li, Jun; Jiang, Yishan; Liu, Xin; Jones, Kevin C; Zhang, Gan

    2015-04-07

    Semivolatile persistent organic pollutants (POP) are bioaccumulative and toxic contaminants. Their global distribution depends on source distribution, atmospheric transport, degradation, and the exchange with ocean and land surfaces. Forests are crucial terrestrial reservoirs due to the commonly envisaged high capacity of their surface soils to store and immobilize airborne contaminants bound to soil organic matter. Our results show that POPs can be unexpectedly mobile in the soil of a tropical rainforest due to fast litter turnover (leading to rapid POP transfer to the subsoil) and leaching rates exceeding degradation rates especially for more hydrophobic congeners. Co-transport in association with leaching fine particulate and dissolved organic matter appears as a relevant driver of this PCB export. A markedly different distribution pattern is displayed in this soil in comparison to soils of colder environments with lower overall storage capacity. These findings show that biogeochemistry of organic matter degradation and weathering can influence POP soil fate. Because tropical forests represent 60% of the global terrestrial productivity, the highlighted dynamics might have an implication for the general distribution of these contaminants.

  1. Trace element differentiation in ferruginous accumulation soil patterns under tropical rainforest of southern Cameroon, the role of climatic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, Emile; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf; Bitom, Dieudonné

    2003-03-01

    Regions under tropical rainforest cover, such as central Africa and Brazil are characterised by degradation and dismantling of old ferricrete structures. In southern Cameroon, these processes are relayed by present-day ferruginous accumulation soil facies, situated on the middle and the lower part of hill slopes. These facies become progressively harder towards the surface, containing from bottom to top, mainly kaolinite, kaolinite-goethite and Al-rich goethite-hematite, and are discontinuous to the relictic hematite-dominated ferricrete that exist in the upper part of the hill slope. These features were investigated in terms of geochemical differentiation of trace elements. It appears that, in contrast to the old ferricrete facies, the current ferruginous accumulations are enriched in transitional trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Y, Sc) and Pb, while alkali-earth elements are less differentiated. This recent chemical accumulation is controlled both by intense weathering of the granodiorite bedrock and by mobilisation of elements previously accumulated in the old ferricrete. The observed processes are clearly linked to the present-day humid climate with rising groundwater tables. They slowly replace the old ferricretes formed during Cretaceous time under more seasonal climatic conditions, representing an instructive case of continuos global change.

  2. A new species from tropical soils, Eupenicillium tropicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuthill, D.E.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    Forty-three strains of Eupenicillium tropicum sp. nov . were isolated from soils collected in India , Costa Rica and Galapagos , Ecuador . The species is characterized by biverticillate penicilli, slightly rough, subglobose to ovate conidia, brownish cleistothecia that become brown-gray with age,...

  3. Phytoremediation Potential of Lead-Contaminated Soil Using Tropical Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The global problem concerning contamination of the environment because of human activities is increasing. Most of the environmental contaminants are chemical by-products and heavy metals such as lead (Pb). Lead released into the environment makes its way into the air, soil and water. Lead contribute...

  4. Using earthworms to test the efficiency of remediation of oil-polluted soil in tropical Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, Violette; Gomez-Rivera, Petrona; Lwanga, Esperanza Huerta; Mendoza, Ricardo Bello; Narcías, Antonio Trujillo; Marcías, Everardo Barba

    2008-11-01

    This study focuses on the medium-term effects of soil bioremediation on mortality and reproduction rates of Eisenia fetida (laboratory experiment) and of the tropical earthworm Polypheretima elongata (field experiment). We compared soils restored with the two bioremediation technologies landfarming (LF) and compost-bioremediation (BI) with control soils and with soils contaminated with 1% and 2% of petroleum. Control and restored soils both were fertile and showed low hydrocarbon contents. The mortality of E. fetida was not influenced by soil restoration and by contamination with 1% petroleum; it only increased in soils contaminated with 2% petroleum. However, the reproduction rate of E. fetida was significantly lower in the soils restored with LF and in those contaminated with 1% crude oil and significantly higher in the soils restored with BI. P. elongata showed the same reaction as E. fetida. We conclude that it is important to include reproduction or other sub-lethal tests for earthworms when estimating the efficiency of restoration techniques.

  5. Butachlor inhibits production and oxidation of methane in tropical rice soils under flooded condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S R; Nayak, D R; Babu, Y J; Adhya, T K

    2004-01-01

    In laboratory incubation experiments, application of a commercial formulation of the herbicide butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl acetanilide) to three tropical rice soils, widely differing in their physicochemical characteristics, under flooded condition inhibited methane (CH4) production. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and most remarkable in the alluvial soil. Thus, following application of butachlor at 5, 10, 50 and 100 microg g(-1) soil, respectively, cumulative CH4 production in the alluvial soil was inhibited by 15%, 31%, 91% and 98% over unamended control. Since CH4 production was less pronounced in the sandy loam and acid sulfate soil, the impact of amendment with butchalor, albeit inhibitory, was less extensive than the alluvial soil. Inhibition of CH4 production in butachlor-amended alluvial soil was related to the prevention in the drop in redox potential as well as low methanogenic bacterial population especially at high concentrations of butachlor. CH4 oxidation was also inhibited in butachlor-amended alluvial soil with the inhibitory effect being more prevalent under flooded condition. Inhibition in CH4 oxidation was related to a reduction in the population of soluble methane monooxygenase producing methanotrophs. Results demonstrate that butachlor, a commonly used herbicide in rice cultivation, even at very low concentrations can affect CH4 production and its oxidation, thereby influencing the biogeochemical cycle of CH4 in flooded rice soils.

  6. Growth of four tropical tree species in petroleum-contaminated soil and effects of crude oil contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Hernández, I.; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Adams, R.H.; Rivera-Cruz, M.C.; Pérez-Hernández, V.; Jarquín-Sánchez, A.; Geissen, V.; Martínez-Zurimendi, P.

    2017-01-01

    Under greenhouse conditions, we evaluated establishment of four tree species and their capacity to degrade crude oil recently incorporated into the soil; the species were as follows: Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia macrophylla (mahogany), and

  7. Deficiencies and toxicities of trace elements and micronutrients in tropical soils: Limitations of knowledge and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, B.E. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews present knowledge concerning deficiencies and toxicities of trace elements and micronutrients in tropical soils. The myth that all tropical soils are highly leached and nutrient-poor is challenged. Continuing use of the term laterite by ecologists and geologists is criticized and adoption of plinthite is urged. The trace element content of plinthite and its possible influence on micronutrient availability are described. Micronutrient limitations of tropical agriculture are related to soil type and formation, and the special problem of aluminum toxicity in acid soils is discussed in both agricultural and ecological contexts. Studies of micronutrient cycling in tropical forests or savannas are needed to supplement the emerging picture of the complexities of major element cycles in these ecosystems.

  8. Soil nitrogen levels are linked to decomposition enzyme activities along an urban-remote tropical forest gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. F. Cusack

    2013-01-01

    Urban areas in tropical regions are expanding rapidly, with significant potential to affect local ecosystem dynamics. In particular, nitrogen (N) availability may increase in urban-proximate forests because of atmospheric N deposition. Unlike temperate forests, many tropical forests on highly weathered soils have high background N availability, so plant growth is...

  9. Growth, yield and yield components of dry bean as influenced by phosphorus in a tropical acid soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus deficiency is one of the most yield limiting factors for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in tropical acid soils. Dry beans are invariably grown as mono crops or as inter crops under the perennial tropical crops. Information is limited regarding the influence of phosphorus fertili...

  10. Fe-C interactions and soil organic matter stability in two tropical soils of contrasting parent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, E.; Thompson, A.; Plante, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The long residence time of soil organic matter (SOM) is a dynamic property, reflecting the diversity of stabilization mechanisms active within the soil matrix. Climate and ecosystem properties act at the broadest scale, while biochemical recalcitrance, physical occlusion and mineral association drive stability at the microscale. Increasing evidence suggests that the stability of SOM is dominated by organo-mineral interactions. However, the 2:1 clays that provide much of the stabilization capacity in temperate soils are typically absent in tropical soils due to weathering. In contrast, these soils may contain an abundance of iron and aluminium oxides and oxyhydroxides, known as short-range-order (SRO) minerals. These SRO minerals are capable of SOM stabilization through adsorption or co-precipitation, a faculty largely enabled by their high specific surface area (SSA). As such, despite their relatively small mass, SRO minerals may contribute substantially to the SOM stabilization capacity of tropical soils. The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify these Fe-C interactions. Surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were taken from 20 quantitative soil pits dug within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico. Soils were stratified across granodiorite and volcaniclastic parent materials. Four extraction procedures were used to isolate three different forms of Fe-C interactions: sodium pyrophosphate to isolate organo-metallic complexes, hydroxylamine and oxalate to isolate SRO Fe- and Al-hydroxides, and dithionite to isolate crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides. Extracts were analysed for DOC and Fe and Al concentrations to estimate the amount of SOM associated with each mineral type. Soils were subjected to SSA and solid-phase C analyses before and after extraction to determine the contribution of the various Fe mineral types to soil SSA, and therefore to potential stabilization capacity through organo-mineral complexation. Preliminary results

  11. Effects of Nonnative Ungulate Removal on Plant Communities and Soil Biogeochemistry in Tropical Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, R. J.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Non-native ungulates have substantial impacts on native ecosystems globally, altering both plant communities and soil biogeochemistry. Across tropical and temperate ecosystems, land managers fence and remove non-native ungulates to conserve native biodiversity, a costly management action, yet long-term outcomes are not well quantified. Specifically, knowledge gaps include: (i) the magnitude and time frame of plant community recovery; (ii) the response of non-native invasive plants; and (iii) changes to soil biogeochemistry. In 2010, we established a series of paired ungulate presence vs. removal plots that span a 20 yr. chronosequence in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii to quantify the impacts and temporal legacy of feral pig removal on plant communities and soil biogeochemistry. We also compared soil biogeochemistry in targeted areas of low and high feral pig impact. Our work shows that both native and non-native vegetation respond positively to release from top-down control following removal of feral pigs, but species of high conservation concern recover only if initially present at the time of non-native ungulate removal. Feral pig impacts on soil biogeochemistry appear to last for at least 20 years following ungulate removal. We observed that both soil physical and chemical properties changed with feral pig removal. Soil bulk density and volumetric water content decreased while extractable base cations and inorganic N increased in low vs. high feral pig impact areas. We hypothesize that altered soil biogeochemistry facilitates continued invasions by non-native plants, even decades after non-native ungulate removal. Future work will concentrate on comparisons between wet and dry forest ecosystems and test whether manipulation of soil nutrients can be used to favor native vs. non-native plant establishment.

  12. Climatic controls on the isotopic composition and availability of soil nitrogen in mountainous tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, S. R.; Cole, R. J.; Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests in mountainous regions are often assumed to be nitrogen (N) limited, yet N dynamics across rugged terrain can be complex due to gradients in climate and topography. Elucidating patterns of N availability and loss across such gradients is necessary to predict and manage tropical forest response to environmental changes such as increasing N deposition and rising temperatures. However, such data is currently lacking, particularly in remote locations that are of high conservation value. To address this gap, a research expedition organized by the American Climber Science Program recently made a coast-to-coast journey across a remote region of Costa Rica, travelling over the Cordillera Talamanca and through La Amistad International Park. Numerous biological, chemical and hydrologic measurements were made en-route across montane to premontane wet tropical forests, spanning nearly 2,000 m in elevation and 200 km. Surface soil samples collected at regular intervals along this transect illuminate environmental drivers of N dynamics across the region. The dataset reveals strong links between soil natural abundance N isotopic composition (δ15N) and elevation and temperature parameters, and weaker links to precipitation and topography. This is in general agreement with global scale observations, but divergence from some previously published works is apparent and will be discussed. δ15N mass balance models suggest that N isotope patterns reflect differences in forms of N loss and the relative importance of fractionating and non-fractionating pathways. When combined with data on several other edaphic properties, especially C:N stoichiometry, the results points toward notable variation in soil N availability and N constraints across the transect. This study illustrates large, but predictable, variation in key N cycle traits across the premontane to montane wet tropical forest transition. These findings have management-relevant implications for tropical regions.

  13. Exotic grasses and nitrate enrichment alter soil carbon cycling along an urban-rural tropical forest gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Daniela F; Lee, Joseph K; McCleery, Taylor L; LeCroy, Chase S

    2015-12-01

    Urban areas are expanding rapidly in tropical regions, with potential to alter ecosystem dynamics. In particular, exotic grasses and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition simultaneously affect tropical urbanized landscapes, with unknown effects on properties like soil carbon (C) storage. We hypothesized that (H1) soil nitrate (NO3 (-) ) is elevated nearer to the urban core, reflecting N deposition gradients. (H2) Exotic grasslands have elevated soil NO3 (-) and decreased soil C relative to secondary forests, with higher N promoting decomposer activity. (H3) Exotic grasslands have greater seasonality in soil NO3 (-) vs. secondary forests, due to higher sensitivity of grassland soil moisture to rainfall. We predicted that NO3 (-) would be positively related to dissolved organic C (DOC) production via changes in decomposer activity. We measured six paired grassland/secondary forest sites along a tropical urban-to-rural gradient during the three dominant seasons (hurricane, dry, and early wet). We found that (1) soil NO3 (-) was generally elevated nearer to the urban core, with particularly clear spatial trends for grasslands. (2) Exotic grasslands had lower soil C than secondary forests, which was related to elevated decomposer enzyme activities and soil respiration. Unexpectedly, soil NO3 (-) was negatively related to enzyme activities, and was lower in grasslands than forests. (3) Grasslands had greater soil NO3 (-) seasonality vs. forests, but this was not strongly linked to shifts in soil moisture or DOC. Our results suggest that exotic grasses in tropical regions are likely to drastically reduce soil C storage, but that N deposition may have an opposite effect via suppression of enzyme activities. However, soil NO3 (-) accumulation here was higher in urban forests than grasslands, potentially related to of aboveground N interception. Net urban effects on C storage across tropical landscapes will likely vary depending on the mosaic of grass cover, rates of N

  14. Ultraweak Photon Emission from the Seed Coat in Response to Temperature and Humidity-A Potential Mechanism for Environmental Signal Transduction in the Soil Seed Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footitt, Steven; Palleschi, Simonetta; Fazio, Eugenio; Palomba, Raffaele; Finch-Savage, William E; Silvestroni, Leopoldo

    2016-09-01

    Seeds beneath the soil sense the changing environment to time germination and seedling emergence with the optimum time of year for survival. Environmental signals first impact with the seed at the seed coat. To investigate whether seed coats have a role in environmental sensing we investigated their ultraweak photon emission (UPE) under the variable temperature, relative humidity and oxygen conditions they could experience in the soil seed bank. Using a custom-built luminometer we measured UPE intensity and spectra (300-700 nm) from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds, seed coats and cotyledons. UPE was greatest from the internal surface of the seed coat. Seed coat UPE increased concomitantly with both increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity. Emission was oxygen dependent and it was abolished by treatment with dinitrophenylhydrazine, demonstrating the key role of seed coat carbonyls in the phenomenon. We hypothesize that beneath the soil surface the attenuation of light (virtual darkness: low background noise) enables seeds to exploit UPE for transducing key environmental variables in the soil (temperature, humidity and oxygen) to inform them of seasonal and local temperature patterns. Overall, seed coats were found to have potential as effective transducers of key fluctuating environmental variables in the soil.

  15. Ohcratoxin producing Aspergillus spp. Isolated from tropical soils in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.S. Seelan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus strains isolated from tropical soils were selected for additional characterization and for ochratoxin analysis, which was determined by ELISA method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC profiles. Because of its great morphological variability and mycotoxin production availability, 18 isolates of Aspergillus species were selected for this study. Only two isolates of these tropical soils, A. sulphureus and A. carbonarius, showed positive results for ohcratoxin (OA in lower concentration (0.05-0.10 µg/ml. Ochratoxin production by these species was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography. HPLC analysis for ochratoxin producing A. sulphureus and A. carbonarius showed retention time, Rt value = 4.417 and Rt value = 4.081 respectively.

  16. Tropical Land Use Conversion Effects on Soil Microbial Community Structure and Function: Emerging Patterns and Knowledge Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, M.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2016-12-01

    Modifications in vegetation due to land use conversions (LUC) between primary forests, pasture, cropping systems, tree plantations, and secondary forests drive shifts in soil microbial communities. These microbial community alterations affect carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, aboveground biomass, and numerous other soil processes. Despite their importance, little is known about soil microbial organisms' response to LUC, especially in tropical regions where LUC rates are greatest. This project identifies current trends and uncertainties in tropical soil microbiology by comparing 56 published studies on LUC in tropical regions. This review indicates that microbial biomass and functional groups shifted in response to LUC, supporting demonstrated trends in changing soil carbon stocks due to LUC. Microbial biomass was greatest in primary forests when compared to secondary forests and in all forests when compared to both cropping systems and tree plantations. No trend existed when comparing pasture systems and forests, likely due to variations in pasture fertilizer use. Cropping system soils had greater gram positive and less gram negative bacteria than forest soils, potentially resulting in greater respiration of older carbon stocks in agricultural soils. Bacteria dominated primary forests while fungal populations were greatest in secondary forests. To characterize changes in microbial communities resulting from land use change, research must reflect the biophysical variation across the tropics. A chi-squared test revealed that the literature sites represented mean annual temperature variation across the tropics (p-value=0.66).

  17. Effect of land use and hydrological processes on Escherichia coli concentrations in streams of tropical, humid headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle-Newall, Emma J.; Ribolzi, Olivier; Viguier, Marion; Thammahacksa, Chanthamousone; Silvera, Norbert; Latsachack, Keooudone; Dinh, Rinh Pham; Naporn, Piyapong; Sy, Hai Tran; Soulileuth, Bounsamay; Hmaimum, Nikom; Sisouvanh, Pem; Robain, Henri; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Valentin, Christian; Boithias, Laurie; Pierret, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Lack of access to clean water and adequate sanitation continues to be a major brake on development. Here we present the results of a 12-month investigation into the dynamics of Escherichia coli, a commonly used indicator of faecal contamination in water supplies, in three small, rural catchments in Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. We show that land use and hydrology are major controlling factors of E. coli concentrations in streamwater and that the relative importance of these two factors varies between the dry and wet seasons. In all three catchments, the highest concentrations were observed during the wet season when storm events and overland flow were highest. However, smaller peaks of E. coli concentration were also observed during the dry season. These latter correspond to periods of intense farming activities and small, episodic rain events. Furthermore, vegetation type, through land use and soil surface crusting, combined with mammalian presence play an important role in determining E. coli loads in the streams. Finally, sampling during stormflow revealed the importance of having appropriate sampling protocols if information on maximum contamination levels is required as grab sampling at a fixed time step may miss important peaks in E. coli numbers.

  18. The role of leaf cutter ants on soil organic carbon dynamics in a wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendenmann, L.; Meredyth-Young, M.; Dierick, D.; Allen, M. F.; Harmon, T. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Rundel, P.; Trahan, N. A.; Zelikova, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle. Neotropical forests are significantly influenced by leaf cutter ants (LCA) which are the most important herbivore in these systems. LCA cut fresh leaves and bring large amounts of plant biomass into their nests to grow their fungus gardens. The excavation and continual maintenance of their large nests modifies soil characteristics and biogeochemistry with direct and indirect impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of LCA (Atta cephalotes) on soil C mineralization, carbon degrading enzymes (β-glucosidase and α-glucosidase), and labile soil C (hot water extractable carbon) across a 1 m soil depth profile and comparing between two different soils (residual and alluvial) and forest types (primary and secondary) in a wet tropical rainforest in Costa Rica. We hypothesized that C mineralization rates will be higher inside LCA nests due to continual input of fresh organic matter, as evidenced by higher microbial biomass and carbon degrading enzymes. Similarly, we expected more labile C inside nests. All soil C parameters were highly variable among sites and between nests and controls. Carbon mineralization rates ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 µmol C h-1 g soil-1 during the initial decay phase which lasted approximately 6 days during soil incubation. The highest respiration rates were measured in the top 20 cm of the primary forest residual soil. Contrary to our expectations, C mineralization rates were higher in control soils, where C degrading enzymes were in higher concentrations (around 250 µmol). The labile soil C concentrations were variable across sites (2-25 mg C g soil-1) and higher in the upper soil profiles, but no significant differences were found between controls and nests. Our results indicate greater heterogeneity inside the nests than previously expected. We explain our findings in terms of the removal of leaf and organic

  19. Extreme emission of N2O from tropical wetland soil (Pantanal, South America)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Liengård; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter;

    2013-01-01

    the first study of soil N(2)O emission from the Pantanal indicating that this South American wetland may be a significant natural source of N(2)O. At three sites, we repeatedly measured in situ fluxes of N(2)O and sampled porewater nitrate [Formula: see text] during the low water season in 2008 and 2009...... these wetland soils is generally representative to the Pantanal, we suggest that this undisturbed tropical wetland potentially contributes ~1.7% to the global N(2)O emission budget, a significant single source of N(2)O....

  20. Morphological, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of dry tropical shallow reservoirs in the Southern Mexican Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis ARREDONDO-FIGUEROA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of eleven dry tropical shallow reservoirs situated in Southern Mexican Highlands were studied. The reservoirs are located at 1104 to 1183 meters above sea level in a sedimentary area. Seventeen morphometric and eight sediment and soil chemical parameters were measured. The results of the morphometric parameters showed that these reservoirs presented a soft and roughness bottom, with an ellipsoid form and a concave depression that permit the mix up of water and sediments, causing turbidity and broken thermal gradients; their slight slopes allowed the colonization of submerged macrophyte and halophyte plants and improved the incidence of sunlight on water surface increasing evaporation and primary productivity. Dry tropical shallow reservoirs have fluctuations in area, and volume according to the amount of rainfall, the effect of evaporation, temperature, lost volume for irrigation, and other causes. The sand-clay was the most important sediment texture and their values fluctuated with the flooded periods. The concentration-dilution cycle showed a direct relationship in the percentage of organic matter in the soil as well as with pH, soil nitrogen and phosphorus. El Tilzate, El Candelero and El Movil were related by the shore development and high concentrations of organic matter and nitrogen in the soil. Finally, we emphasize the importance of this study, in relation to possible future changes in morphometrical parameters as a consequence of human impact.

  1. APPRAISAL OF THE SNAP MODEL FOR PREDICTING NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN TROPICAL SOILS UNDER EUCALYPTUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip James Smethurst

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Nitrogen Availability Predictor (SNAP model predicts daily and annual rates of net N mineralization (NNM based on daily weather measurements, daily predictions of soil water and soil temperature, and on temperature and moisture modifiers obtained during aerobic incubation (basal rate. The model was based on in situ measurements of NNM in Australian soils under temperate climate. The purpose of this study was to assess this model for use in tropical soils under eucalyptus plantations in São Paulo State, Brazil. Based on field incubations for one month in three, NNM rates were measured at 11 sites (0-20 cm layer for 21 months. The basal rate was determined in in situ incubations during moist and warm periods (January to March. Annual rates of 150-350 kg ha-1 yr-1 NNM predicted by the SNAP model were reasonably accurate (R2 = 0.84. In other periods, at lower moisture and temperature, NNM rates were overestimated. Therefore, if used carefully, the model can provide adequate predictions of annual NNM and may be useful in practical applications. For NNM predictions for shorter periods than a year or under suboptimal incubation conditions, the temperature and moisture modifiers need to be recalibrated for tropical conditions.

  2. Indications of nitrogen-limited methane uptake in tropical forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Veldkamp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that tropical forest soils contribute 6.2 Tg yr−1 (28% to global methane (CH4 uptake, which is large enough to alter CH4 accumulation in the atmosphere if significant changes would occur to this sink. Elevated deposition of inorganic nitrogen (N to temperate forest ecosystems has been shown to reduce CH4 uptake in forest soils, but almost no information exists from tropical forest soils even though projections show that N deposition will increase substantially in tropical regions. Here we report the results from two long-term, ecosystem-scale experiments in which we assessed the impact of chronic N addition on soil CH4 fluxes from two old-growth forests in Panama: (1 a lowland, moist (2.7 m yr−1 rainfall forest on clayey Cambisol and Nitisol soils with controls and N-addition plots for 9–12 yr, and (2 a montane, wet (5.5 m yr−1 rainfall forest on a sandy loam Andosol soil with controls and N-addition plots for 1–4 yr. We measured soil CH4 fluxes for 4 yr (2006–2009 in four replicate plots (40 m × 40 m each per treatment using vented static chambers (four chambers per plot. CH4 fluxes from the lowland control plots and the montane control plots did not differ from their respective N-addition plots. In the lowland forest, chronic N addition did not lead to inhibition of CH4 uptake; instead, a negative correlation of CH4 fluxes with nitrate (NO3– concentrations in the mineral soil suggests that increased NO3– levels in N-addition plots had stimulated CH4 consumption and/or reduced CH4 production. In the montane forest, chronic N addition also showed negative correlation of CH4 fluxes with ammonium concentrations in the organic layer, which suggests that CH4 consumption was N limited. We propose the following reasons why such N-stimulated CH4 consumption did not lead to statistically significant CH4 uptake: (1 for the lowland forest, this was caused by limitation of CH4 diffusion from the atmosphere into the clayey

  3. Indications of nitrogen-limited methane uptake in tropical forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Veldkamp

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forest soils contribute 6.2 Tg yr−1 (28% to global methane (CH4 uptake, which is large enough to alter CH4 accumulation in the atmosphere if significant changes would occur to this sink. Elevated deposition of inorganic nitrogen (N to temperate forest ecosystems has been shown to reduce CH4 uptake in forest soils, but almost no information exists from tropical forest soils even though projections show that N deposition will increase substantially in tropical regions. Here we report the results from long-term, ecosystem-scale experiments in which we assessed the impact of chronic N addition on soil CH4 fluxes from two old-growth forests in Panama: (1 a lowland, moist (2.7 m yr−1 rainfall forest on clayey Cambisol and Nitisol soils with controls and N-addition plots for 9–12 yr, and (2 a montane, wet (5.5 m yr−1 rainfall forest on a sandy loam Andosol soil with controls and N-addition plots for 1–4 yr. We measured soil CH4 fluxes for 4 yr (2006–2009 in 4 replicate plots (40 m × 40 m each per treatment using vented static chambers (4 chambers per plot. CH4 fluxes from the lowland control plots and the montane control plots did not differ from their respective N-addition plots. In the lowland forest, chronic N addition did not lead to inhibition of CH4 uptake; instead, a negative correlation of CH4 fluxes with nitrate (NO3− concentrations in the mineral soil suggests that increased NO3− levels in N-addition plots had stimulated CH4 consumption and/or reduced CH4 production. In the montane forest, chronic N addition also showed negative correlation of CH4 fluxes with ammonium concentrations in the organic layer, which suggests that CH4 consumption was N limited. We propose the following reasons why such N-stimulated CH4 consumption did not lead to statistically significant CH4 uptake: (1 for the lowland forest, this was caused by limitation of CH4 diffusion from the atmosphere into the clayey soils, particularly during the

  4. Volumetric humidity timely variation, at different depths, in soils of a toposequence of the Reconcavo Baiano - Brazil; Variacao da umidade volumetrica ao longo do tempo, em diferentes profundidades, em solos de uma topossequencia do Reconcavo Baiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos; Costa, Liovando Marciano da [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Paiva, Arlicelio de Queiroz [UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Agrarias e Ambientais. E-mail: aqpaiva@jacaranda.uescba.com.br; Souza, Luciano da Silva [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura. E-mail: lsouza@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Santana, Marlete Bastos [Bahia Univ., Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia

    1997-07-01

    Aiming the time basis volumetric humidity evaluation, at different depths, the present work has been developed in a Reconcavo Baiano toposequence consisting of three different soils, in accordance with the distances from the toposequence begin. A neutron probe has been used for determination of the soil water contents. The relative counting of the neutron probe has been converted to gravimetric humidity by using regression equation for each type of soil.

  5. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying pulse dynamics of soil respiration in tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Bonnie G.; Powers, Jennifer S.

    2016-10-01

    Tropical dry forests are already undergoing changes in the quantity and timing of rainfall, but there is great uncertainty over how these shifts will affect belowground carbon (C) cycling. While it has long been known that dry soils quickly release carbon dioxide (CO2) upon rewetting, the mechanisms underlying the so-called ‘Birch effect’ are still debated. Here, we quantified soil respiration pulses and their biotic predictors in response to simulated precipitation events in a regenerating tropical dry forest in Costa Rica. We also simulated the observed rewetting CO2 pulses with two soil carbon models: a conventional model assuming first-order decay rates of soil organic matter, and an enzyme-catalyzed model with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. We found that rewetting of dry soils produced an immediate and dramatic pulse of CO2, accompanied by rapid immobilization of nitrogen into the microbial biomass. However, the magnitude of the rewetting CO2 pulse was highly variable at fine spatial scales, and was well correlated with the size of the dissolved organic C pool prior to rewetting. Both the enzyme-catalyzed and conventional models were able to reproduce the Birch effect when respiration was coupled directly to microbial C uptake, although models differed in their ability to yield realistic estimates of SOC and microbial biomass pool sizes and dynamics. Our results suggest that changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall events in tropical dry forests will exert strong influence on ecosystem C balance by affecting the dynamics of microbial biomass growth.

  6. Soil biogeochemical and fungal patterns across a precipitation gradient in the lowland tropical rainforests of French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, J.; Verbruggen, E.; Janssens, I.

    2016-12-01

    The Guyafor network contains over 12 pristine tropical rainforest long-term research sites throughout French Guiana, with a focus on vegetation and environmental monitoring at regular intervals. However, biogeochemical and belowground insights are needed to complete the picture of ecosystem functioning in these lowland tropical rainforests, which are critical to Earth's water and energy balance. Improving our biogeochemical understanding of these ecosystems is needed to improve Earth System Models, which poorly represent tropical systems. In July 2015 we sampled soils and litter from 12 of the Guyafor permanent plots in French Guiana spanning a mean annual precipitation gradient of over 2000 mm per year. We measured soil texture, pH, C, N and available P stocks in the top 30 cm, and fungal biodiversity using ITS DNA sequencing and characterized soil organic matter (SOM) C, N and P distribution among physically defined SOM fractions. We also measured litter layer standing stocks and CNP stoichiometry. We found significant stocks of SOM in the top 30 cm of the soil varying by a factor of 4 in the top 30 cm of soil with a negative correlation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil C and N with available P. Available P was also a strong predictor of fungal community composition. Furthermore there is evidence for precipitation and mineralogical influences on leaf litter and SOM dynamics highlighting the importance of heterogeneity in tropical soil substrates and sub-climates in better understanding the biogeochemistry of tropical ecosystems.

  7. Persistence of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in Various Tropical Agricultural Soils of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganandhini, S; Kennedy, Z John; Uyttendaele, M; Balachandar, D

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC) strains in the agricultural soil creates serious threat to human health through fresh vegetables growing on them. However, the survival of STEC strains in Indian tropical soils is not yet understood thoroughly. Additionally how the survival of STEC strain in soil diverges with non-pathogenic and genetically modified E. coli strains is also not yet assessed. Hence in the present study, the survival pattern of STEC strain (O157-TNAU) was compared with non-pathogenic (MTCC433) and genetically modified (DH5α) strains on different tropical agricultural soils and on a vegetable growing medium, cocopeat under controlled condition. The survival pattern clearly discriminated DH5α from MTCC433 and O157-TNAU, which had shorter life (40 days) than those compared (60 days). Similarly, among the soils assessed, the red laterite and tropical latosol supported longer survival of O157-TNAU and MTCC433 as compared to wetland and black cotton soils. In cocopeat, O157 recorded significantly longer survival than other two strains. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double-Weibull model and the modeling parameters were correlated with soil physico-chemical and biological properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA of all the three strains revealed that pH, microbial biomass carbon, dehydrogenase activity and available N and P contents of the soil decided the survival of E. coli strains in those soils and cocopeat. The present research work suggests that the survival of O157 differs in tropical Indian soils due to varied physico-chemical and biological properties and the survival is much shorter than those reported in temperate soils. As the survival pattern of non-pathogenic strain, MTCC433 is similar to O157-TNAU in tropical soils, the former can be used as safe model organism for open field studies.

  8. Persistence of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in Various Tropical Agricultural Soils of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naganandhini

    Full Text Available The persistence of Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC strains in the agricultural soil creates serious threat to human health through fresh vegetables growing on them. However, the survival of STEC strains in Indian tropical soils is not yet understood thoroughly. Additionally how the survival of STEC strain in soil diverges with non-pathogenic and genetically modified E. coli strains is also not yet assessed. Hence in the present study, the survival pattern of STEC strain (O157-TNAU was compared with non-pathogenic (MTCC433 and genetically modified (DH5α strains on different tropical agricultural soils and on a vegetable growing medium, cocopeat under controlled condition. The survival pattern clearly discriminated DH5α from MTCC433 and O157-TNAU, which had shorter life (40 days than those compared (60 days. Similarly, among the soils assessed, the red laterite and tropical latosol supported longer survival of O157-TNAU and MTCC433 as compared to wetland and black cotton soils. In cocopeat, O157 recorded significantly longer survival than other two strains. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double-Weibull model and the modeling parameters were correlated with soil physico-chemical and biological properties using principal component analysis (PCA. The PCA of all the three strains revealed that pH, microbial biomass carbon, dehydrogenase activity and available N and P contents of the soil decided the survival of E. coli strains in those soils and cocopeat. The present research work suggests that the survival of O157 differs in tropical Indian soils due to varied physico-chemical and biological properties and the survival is much shorter than those reported in temperate soils. As the survival pattern of non-pathogenic strain, MTCC433 is similar to O157-TNAU in tropical soils, the former can be used as safe model organism for open field studies.

  9. MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI INCREASED EARLY GROWTH OF TROPICAL TREE SEEDLINGS IN ADVERSE SOIL

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    Maman Turjaman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The rate of reforestation  has increased throughout the countries in Southeast Asia region during the last 20 years.  At the same time, inconvenient situations such as forest destruction, forest exploitation, illegal logging, clear-cut forest areas, old agricultural lands, post-wildfire areas, conversion  of natural  forests into  plantations, resettlement areas, mine  lands,  and amended adverse soils have also been increasing  significantly. Mycorrhizas, hovewer,  play important role  to increase  plant  growth,  enrich  nutrient content  and enhance  survival rates of forest tree species in temperate  and sub-tropical  regions.  Unfortunately, a little information so far is available  regarding  the effect of mycorrhizas on growth  of tree species growing  in tropical  forests. In relevant,  several experiments  were carried  out to determine whether  ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi and arbuscular  mycorrhizal (AM fungi can enhance mycorrhizal colonization, nutrient content, and plant growth of some tropical rain forest tree species in Indonesia under nursery  and field conditions.   The families of tropical  tree species used in the experiment were  Thymelaeaceae (Aquilaria crassna, Leguminosae  (Sesbania grandifolia, Guttiferae (Ploiarium alternifolium and Calophyllum hosei, Apocynaceae (Dyera polyphylla and Alstonia scholaris, and Dipterocarpaceae (Shorea belangeran. These families are important as they provide timber  and non-timber  forest products (NTFPs.   This paper discusses the role of mycorrhizal fungi in increasing  early  growth  of tropical  tree seedlings in adverse soil.

  10. BIODEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM BY FUNGI ISOLATED FROM UNPOLLUTED TROPICAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisa, D

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation studies on the capabilities of Aspergillus niger A1, Candida sp C10 and Rhizopus stolonifer R7 isolated from unpolluted soil in Minna, Niger State Nigeria was investigated and rate of degradation measured by weight loss. Aspergillus niger A1, exhibited the highest ability in degrading the crude oil than Candida sp C10, and Rhizopus stolonifer R7. Aspergillus niger A1 degraded 53.7% of the crude oil after 16 days period of incubation while Candida sp C10 and Rhizopus stolonifer R7 degraded 45.0% and 35.0% respectively over the same period of incubation.. The result obtained demonstrated that the three fungi isolates are competent petroleum degrading organisms and may be used as best approaches to restoring oil contaminated environments through bioremediation process.

  11. Response to dietary supplementation of L-glutamine and L-glutamate in broiler chickens reared at different stocking densities under hot, humid tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, M; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; O'Reilly, E L; Eckersall, P D; Anna, A A; Kumari, S; Abdullah, F F J

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether supplementing AminoGut (a commercial dietary supplement containing a mixture of l-glutamine and l-glutamic acid) to broiler chickens stocked at 2 different densities affected performance, physiological stress responses, foot pad dermatitis incidence, and intestinal morphology and microflora. A randomized design in a factorial arrangement with 4 diets [basal diet, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 21, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 42, and basal diet + virginiamycin (0.02%) for d 1 to 42] and 2 stocking densities [0.100 m(2)/bird (23 birds/pen; LD) or 0.067 m(2)/bird (35 birds/pen; HD)]. Results showed that villi length and crypt depth were not changed by different dietary treatments. However, birds in the HD group had smaller villi (P = 0.03) compared with those of the LD group. Regardless of diet, HD consistently increased the serum concentrations of ceruloplasmin, α-1 acid glycoprotein, ovotransferin, and corticosterone (P = 0.0007), and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (0.0005). Neither AminoGut supplementation nor stocking density affected cecal microflora counts. In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, dietary supplementation of AminoGut, irrespective of stocking density, had no beneficial effect on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and physiological adaptive responses of broiler chickens raised under hot and humid tropical conditions. However, AminoGut supplementation from d 1 to 42 was beneficial in reducing mortality rate. Also, the increased serum concentrations of a wide range of acute phase proteins together with elevated corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte ratio suggested that high stocking density induced an acute phase response either indirectly as a result of increased incidence of inflammatory diseases such as foot pad dermatitis or possibly as a direct physiological response to the stress of high stocking density.

  12. Adsorption properties of subtropical and tropical variable charge soils: Implications from climate change and biochar amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Qafoku, Nikolla; Van Ranst, Eric; Li, Jiu-yu; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-25

    This review paper attempts to summarize the progress made in research efforts conducted over the last years to study the surface chemical properties of the tropical and subtropical soils, usually called variable charge soils, and the way they response to different management practices. The paper is composed of an introductory section that provides a brief discussion on the surface chemical properties of these soils, and five other review sections. The focus of these sections is on the evolution of surface chemical properties during the development of the variable charge properties (second section), interactions between oppositely charged particles and the resulting effects on the soil properties and especially on soil acidity (third section), the surface effects of low molecular weight organic acids sorbed to mineral surfaces and the chemical behavior of aluminum (fourth section), and the crop straw derived biochar induced changes of the surface chemical properties of these soils (fifth section). A discussion on the effect of climate change variables on the properties of the variable charge soils is included at the end of this review paper (sixth section).

  13. Earthworms and Plant Residues Modify Nematodes in Tropical Cropping Soils (Madagascar: A Mesocosm Experiment

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    Cécile Villenave

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Free-living nematodes present several characteristics that have led to their use as bioindicators of soil quality. Analyzing the structure of nematofauna is a pertinent way to understand soil biological processes. Earthworms play an important role in soil biological functioning and organic matter dynamics. Their effects on soil nematofauna have seldom been studied. We studied the effect of the tropical endogeic earthworm, Pontoscolex corethrurus, on nematode community structure in a 5-month field mesocosm experiment conducted in Madagascar. Ten different treatments with or without earthworms and with or without organic residues (rice, soybean were compared. Organic residues were applied on the soil surface or mixed with the soil. The abundance of nematodes (bacterial and fungal feeders was higher in presence of P. corethrurus than in their absence. The type of plant residues as well as their localisation had significant effects on the abundance and composition of soil nematodes. The analysis of nematode community structure showed that earthworm activity led to an overall activation of the microbial compartment without specific stimulation of the bacterial or fungal compartment.

  14. Accelerated biodegradation of selected nematicides in tropical crop soils from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Pampillo, Juan Salvador; Carazo-Rojas, Elizabeth; Pérez-Rojas, Greivin; Castro-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Degradation and mineralization behavior of selected nematicides was studied in soil samples from fields cultivated with banana, potato, and coffee. Degradation assays in most of the studied soils revealed shorter half-lives for carbofuran (CBF) and ethoprophos (ETP) in samples with a history of treatment with these compounds, which may have been caused by enhanced biodegradation. A short half-life value for CBF degradation was also observed in a banana field with no previous exposure to this pesticide, but with a recent application of the carbamate insecticide oxamyl, which supports the hypothesis that preexposure to oxamyl may cause microbial adaptation towards degradation of CBF, an observation of a phenomenon not yet tested according to the literature reviewed. Mineralization assays for CBF and terbufos (TBF) revealed that history of treatment with these nematicides did not cause higher mineralization rates in preexposed soils when compared to unexposed ones, except in the case of soils from coffee fields. Mineralization half-lives for soils unexposed to these pesticides were significantly shorter than most reports in the literature in the same conditions. Mineralization rates for soils with a previous exposure to these pesticides were also obtained, adding to the very few reports found. This paper contributes valuable data to the low number of reports dealing with pesticide fate in soils from tropical origin.

  15. Linking watershed terrain and hydrology to soil chemical properties, microbial communities and impacts on soil organic C in a humid mid-latitude forested watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Schadt, C. W.; Tang, G.; Collier, N.; Earles, J. E.; Mehlhorn, T. L.; Lowe, K. A.; Brandt, C. C.; koo Yang, Z.; Phillips, D.; Li, P.; Yuan, F.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the response of humid mid-latitude forests to changes in precipitation, temperature, nutrient cycling, and disturbance is critical to improving our predictive understanding of changes in the surface-subsurface energy balance due to climate change. Mechanistic understanding of the effects of long-term and transient moisture conditions are needed to quantify linkages between changing redox conditions, microbial activity, and soil mineral and nutrient interactions on C cycling and greenhouse gas releases. To illuminate relationships between the soil chemistry, microbial communities and organic C we established transects across hydraulic and topographic gradients in a small watershed with transient moisture conditions. Valley bottoms tend to be more frequently saturated than ridge tops and side slopes which generally are only saturated when shallow storm flow zones are active. Fifty shallow (~36") soil cores were collected during timeframes representative of low CO2, soil winter conditions and high CO2, soil summer conditions. Cores were subdivided into 240 samples based on pedology and analyses of the geochemical (moisture content, metals, pH, Fe species, N, C, CEC, AEC) and microbial (16S rRNA gene amplification with Illumina MiSeq sequencing) characteristics were conducted and correlated to watershed terrain and hydrology. To associate microbial metabolic activity with greenhouse gas emissions we installed 17 soil gas probes, collected gas samples for 16 months and analyzed them for CO2 and other fixed and greenhouse gasses. Parallel to the experimental efforts our data is being used to support hydrobiogeochemical process modeling by coupling the Community Land Model (CLM) with a subsurface process model (PFLOTRAN) to simulate processes and interactions from the molecular to watershed scales. Including above ground processes (biogeophysics, hydrology, and vegetation dynamics), CLM provides mechanistic water, energy, and organic matter inputs to the

  16. Land use and soil type determine the presence of the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in tropical rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Dittrich, Sabine; Auda, Yves; Newton, Paul N; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Knappik, Michael; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Dance, David A B; Pierret, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium that causes melioidosis in humans. While B. pseudomallei is known to be endemic in South East Asia (SEA), the occurrence of the disease in other parts of the tropics points towards a potentially large global distribution. We investigated the environmental factors that influence the presence (and absence) of B. pseudomallei in a tropical watershed in SEA. Our main objective was to determine whether there is a link between the presence of the organism in the hydrographic network and the upstream soil and land-use type. The presence of B. pseudomallei was determined using a specific quantitative real-time PCR assay following enrichment culture. Land use, soil, geomorphology, and environmental data were then analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) to compare the B. pseudomallei positive and negative sites. Soil type in the surrounding catchment and turbidity had a strong positive influence on the presence (acrisols and luvisols) or absence (ferralsols) of B. pseudomallei. Given the strong apparent links between soil characteristics, water turbidity, and the presence/absence of B. pseudomallei, actions to raise public awareness about factors increasing the risk of exposure should be undertaken in order to reduce the incidence of melioidosis in regions of endemicity.

  17. Soil Erosion from Agriculture and Mining: A Threat to Tropical Stream Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Mol

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In tropical countries soil erosion is often increased due to high erodibility of geologically old and weathered soils; intensive rainfall; inappropriate soil management; removal of forest vegetation cover; and mining activities. Stream ecosystems draining agricultural or mining areas are often severely impacted by the high loads of eroded material entering the stream channel; increasing turbidity; covering instream habitat and affecting the riparian zone; and thereby modifying habitat and food web structures. The biodiversity is severely threatened by these negative effects as the aquatic and riparian fauna and flora are not adapted to cope with excessive rates of erosion and sedimentation. Eroded material may also be polluted by pesticides or heavy metals that have an aggravating effect on functions and ecosystem services. Loss of superficial material and deepening of erosion gullies impoverish the nutrient and carbon contents of the soils; and lower the water tables; causing a “lose-lose” situation for agricultural productivity and environmental integrity. Several examples show how to interrupt this vicious cycle by integrated catchment management and by combining “green” and “hard” engineering for habitat restoration. In this review; we summarize current findings on this issue from tropical countries with a focus on case studies from Suriname and Brazil.

  18. Soil resources and topography shape local tree community structure in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeck, Claire A; Harms, Kyle E; Yavitt, Joseph B; John, Robert; Turner, Benjamin L; Valencia, Renato; Navarrete, Hugo; Davies, Stuart J; Chuyong, George B; Kenfack, David; Thomas, Duncan W; Madawala, Sumedha; Gunatilleke, Nimal; Gunatilleke, Savitri; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Kiratiprayoon, Somboon; Yaacob, Adzmi; Supardi, Mohd N Nur; Dalling, James W

    2013-02-22

    Both habitat filtering and dispersal limitation influence the compositional structure of forest communities, but previous studies examining the relative contributions of these processes with variation partitioning have primarily used topography to represent the influence of the environment. Here, we bring together data on both topography and soil resource variation within eight large (24-50 ha) tropical forest plots, and use variation partitioning to decompose community compositional variation into fractions explained by spatial, soil resource and topographic variables. Both soil resources and topography account for significant and approximately equal variation in tree community composition (9-34% and 5-29%, respectively), and all environmental variables together explain 13-39% of compositional variation within a plot. A large fraction of variation (19-37%) was spatially structured, yet unexplained by the environment, suggesting an important role for dispersal processes and unmeasured environmental variables. For the majority of sites, adding soil resource variables to topography nearly doubled the inferred role of habitat filtering, accounting for variation in compositional structure that would previously have been attributable to dispersal. Our results, illustrated using a new graphical depiction of community structure within these plots, demonstrate the importance of small-scale environmental variation in shaping local community structure in diverse tropical forests around the globe.

  19. Changes in Carbon Chemistry and Stability Along Deep Tropical Soil Profiles at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M.; Hockaday, W. C.; Plante, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are the largest terrestrial carbon (C) sink, and tropical forest soils contribute disproportionately to the poorly-characterized deep soil C pool. The goal of this study was to evaluate how carbon chemistry and stability change with depth in tropical forest soils formed on two contrasting parent materials. We used soils from pits excavated to 140 cm depth that were stratified across two soil types (Oxisols and Inceptisols) at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico. We used 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize soil C chemistry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) coupled with evolved gas analysis (CO2-EGA) to evaluate the thermal stability of soil C during ramped combustion. Thirty-four samples with an initial C concentration ≥1% were chosen from discrete depth intervals (0, 30, 60, 90 & 140 cm) for 13C NMR analysis, while DSC was performed on 122 samples that included the NMR sample set and additional samples at 20, 50, 80 and 110 cm depth. Preliminary 13C NMR results indicate higher alkyl : O-alkyl ratios and an enrichment of aliphatic and proteinaceous C with depth, compared with greater aromatic and carbohydrate signals in surface soils. The energy density of soil C (J mg-1 C) also declined significantly with depth. In Oxisols, most CO2 evolution from combustion occurred around 300ºC, while most CO2 evolution occurred at higher temperatures (400-500ºC) in Inceptisols. Our findings suggest soil C is derived primarily of plant biomolecules in surface soils and becomes increasingly microbial with depth. Soil matrix-mediated differences in C transport and preservation may result in differences in C chemistry between the two soil types and a more thermally labile C pool in the Oxisols. We suggest that energy-poor substrates, combined with potentially stronger organo-mineral interactions in subsoils, may explain the long-term stability of deep C in highly weathered tropical soils.

  20. Effects of different land-uses on soil organic carbon pools in the Peruvian tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, V.; Kala, J.; Lever, R.; Teh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical soils are a large carbon reservoir, acting as both a source and a sink of CO2. Changes to these soil environments have major implications for long term carbon storage and rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Enhanced CO2 emissions originate, in large part, from the decomposition and loss of soil organic matter (SOM) following anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation or agricultural conversion. Therefore, quantitative knowledge of the stabilisation and decomposition of SOM is necessary in order to understand, assess and predict the impact of land use change in the tropics. In particular, labile SOM is an early and sensitive indicator of how SOM responds to changes in land use and management practices. The main focus of this study is to explore the relationship between soil respiration, decomposition and soil C pools in order to estimate the turnover times of soil C on a suite of different land uses in the Peruvian tropical forests. Three major C pools (light fractions, occluded light fractions and heavy fractions) were separated using sodium polytungstate in a density fraction technique, soil CO2 flux was measured bimonthly over a year using a closed-chamber technique and decomposition rates were estimated using buried birch wood sticks acting as a common substrate across the sites. Our results showed that CO2 flux ranged from 0.237-7.676 μmol m-2s-1 for the banana plantation, 2.773-11.1 μmol m-2s-1 for the mature forest, 1.718-17.005 μmol m-2s-1 for pasture and 2.931-5.216 μmol m-2s-1 for the secondary forest. On an annual basis, the soil CO2 flux was highest in the pasture ecosystem with an estimated production of 2.3 kg C m-2yr-1 followed by the banana plantation with 1.3 kg C m-2yr-1 and the mature forest site with 1.0 kg C m-2yr-1. Land use affected soil temperature and bulk density, which also showed positive correlations with CO2 flux. The stick decomposition rate was significantly faster on the pasture site in comparison to the forest

  1. How deep does disturbance go? The legacy of hurricanes on tropical forest soil biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.; Silver, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and droughts, are periodic events with the capacity to cycle vast amounts of energy and matter. Such is the case of hurricanes in wet tropical forests, where intense winds defoliate the forest canopy and deposit large quantities of debris on the forest floor. These disturbances strongly affect soil biogeochemistry by altering soil moisture and temperature regimes, as well as litterfall, decomposition rates, and ultimately soil carbon (C) pools. Although these impacts are mostly concentrated near the soil surface, it is critical to consider the long-term effects on hurricanes on the deep soil profile, given the potential for soil C sequestration to occur at depth. Our study was conducted in the Canopy Trimming Experiment, an ongoing experiment within the Luquillo LTER in Puerto Rico. Ten years prior to our study, treatments including canopy trimming and debris deposition, independently and in combination, were imposed on 30 x 30 m plots within Tabonuco forests. We sampled 12 soil profiles (4 treatments, n=3) from 0 to 100 cm, at 10 cm intervals, and measured a suite of biogeochemical properties to explore treatment effects, as well as changes with depth. After a decade of recovery from the imposed treatments, there were no significant differences in soil moisture or soil pH among treatments at any depth, although significant changes with depth occurred for both variables. Iron concentrations, despite showing no treatment effects, decreased markedly with depth, highlighting the biogeochemical thresholds that occur along the soil profile. Notably, debris deposition resulted in significantly higher soil C, nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) concentrations in bulk soils, with effects being detected even at depths >50 cm. Moreover, density fractionation analyses of surface and deep soils revealed potential pathways for the measured increases in C, N, and P, including the accumulation of organic matter in the light fraction

  2. Increases in mean annual temperature do not alter soil bacterial community structure in tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Selmants; Karen L. Adair; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Egbert Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a key role in regulating terrestrial biogeochemical cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere continuum. Despite their importance to ecosystem functioning, we lack a general understanding of how bacterial communities respond to climate change, especially in relatively understudied ecosystems like tropical montane wet...

  3. Effect of Logging Operation on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton E. Satrio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Since heavy machinery are used in the logging operation activity for extracting the logs on sensitive forest site with peat soil, environment destruction should be the other concern during its processes especially on its important function as soil carbon storage. The objective of this study was to determine whether logging operation affect soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted before and after logging operation in a 0.3 ha plot to a depth of 15 cm. The soil samples were analyzed for acidity, organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The humic acid extraction was also done and soil carbon storage values were obtained by calculation. Paired t-test was used to compare variables under the two treatments (before and after logging and correlation analysis was used to correlate variables such as soil pH, soil organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, C/N ratio, C/P ratio, humic acid yield, unstable carbon and stable carbon. Results: The availability of unstable carbon and stable carbon controlled by soil acidity on undisturbed peat swamp forest as a result, the accumulation of unstable carbon as well as stable carbon occurred even if the soil pH declines and vice versa. However, stable carbon associated well with soil acidity. It was found that the C/P ratio positively correlated with humic acid and stable carbon of both before and after logging conditions. Nevertheless, that association was prominent on logged peat swamp forest. An indication that even though this peat swamp forest had been logged, humification was strongly maintained. However, the similarity of stable carbon of the logged peat swamp forest with stable carbon of undisturbed peat swamp forest indicate an ineffectiveness humification of logged peat swamp forest. Conclusion: Logging operation on sensitive forest with peat soil using heavy machinery increased the

  4. Butachlor degradation in tropical soils: effect of application rate, biotic-abiotic interactions and soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, R; Das, P; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A; Chowdhury, A

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor (N-Butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyla- cetanilide) were studied under controlled laboratory conditions in clay loam alluvial (AL) soil (Typic udifluvent) and coastal saline (CS) soil (Typic endoaquept) from rice cultivated fields. The application rates included field rate (FR), 2-times FR (2FR) and 10-times FR (10FR). The incubation study was carried out at 30 degrees C with and without decomposed cow manure (DCM) at 60% of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) and waterlogged soil condition. The half-life values depended on the soil types and initial concentrations of butachlor. Butachlor degraded faster in AL soil and in soil amended with DCM under waterlogged condition. Microbial degradation is the major avenue of butachlor degradation from soils.

  5. Effects of land use change on soil organic carbon: a pan-tropic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, O.; Veldkamp, E.; Wolf, K.; Corre, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Tropical forest deforestation is recognized as one of the major contributors to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In contrast to aboveground carbon stocks, comparatively little is known on deforestation's effect on the magnitude and the factors affecting soil organic carbon (SOC). In this regional scale study, we focused on tropical sites with deeply weathered, low-activity clays soils in three countries: Indonesia, Cameroon and Peru. Using a clustered sampling design we compared soil carbon stocks in the top 3 m of soil in undisturbed forests (the reference) with converted land uses that had been deforested. The most predominant land use trajectories relevant for each region were investigated. These included (a) conversions from forest to cash-crop plantations (rubber, oil palm, cacoa), (b) conversions from forest to cattle grazing pastures and (c) conversion from forest to shifting cultivation. Preliminary results from the Indonesian case study, found that the conversion of forests to oil palm plantation caused a loss of 20.1 ± 4.4 Mg C ha-1 within 20 years from the top 3 m of soil, while deforestation followed by the establishment of rubber plantations caused a release of 7.2 ± 4.2 Mg C ha-1 for the same time period and depth. SOC losses were most pronounced in the top 30 cm, and less so below. Additionally, regional scale constraints such as soil physical and chemical characteristics (texture, CEC, pH) and climate (precipitation, temperature) effect on SOC emissions have been identified using multivariate statistical methods. The results from the Cameroon and Peru case studies are expected imminently.

  6. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Composition of Soil Solution: Comparison of Solution Samplers in Tropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil solution samplers may have the same working principle, but they differ in relation to chemical and physical characteristics, cost and handling, and these aspects exert influence on the chemical composition of the soil solution obtained. This study was carried out to evaluate, over time, the chemical composition of solutions extracted by Suolo Acqua, with the hydrophilic membrane (HM as a standard, using soils with contrasting characteristics, and to determine the relationship between electrical conductivity (EC and concentration of ions and pH of soil solution samples. This study was carried out under laboratory conditions, using three soils samples with different clay and organic matter (OM contents. Soil solution contents of F−, Cl−, NO−3, Br−, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, were analyzed, as well as inorganic, organic, and total C contents, pH, and EC, in four successive sampling times. Soil solution chemical composition extracted by the Suolo Acqua sampler is similar to that collected by the HM, but the Suolo Acqua extracted more Na+ and soluble organic C than the HM solution. Solution EC, cation and anion concentrations, and soluble C levels are higher in the soil with greater clay and OM contents (Latossolo and Cambissolo in this case. Soil solution composition varied over time, with considerable changes in pH, EC, and nutrient concentrations, especially associated with soil OM. Thus, single and isolated sampling of the soil solution must be avoided, otherwise composition of the soil solution may not be correctly evaluated. Soil solution EC was regulated by pH, as well as the sum of cation and anion concentrations, and the C contents determined in the soil liquid phase.

  7. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Warren

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of soil carbon stocks in tropical wetlands requires costly laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple yet robust analytical tools to assess soil carbon stocks where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (gC cm−3; Cd as a function of bulk density (g dry soil cm−3; Bd, which can be used to estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 0.49 + 4.61, R2 = 0.96, n = 94 for soils with an organic C content >40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted soil C stocks to within 0.39% to 7.20% of observed values. When original data were included in the analysis, the revised equation: Cd = Bd × 0.48 + 4.28, R2 = 0.96, n = 678 was well within the 95% confidence intervals of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates slightly. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well developed peat soils where C content >40%.

  8. Isolation and 16S DNA characterization of soil microorganisms from tropical soils capable of utilizing the herbicides hexazinone and tebuthiuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Fadwa I Y; Helling, Charles S

    2003-11-01

    Six non-fermentative bacteria were isolated from Colombian (South America) and Hawaiian (USA) soils after enrichment with minimal medium supplemented with two herbicides, hexazinone (Hex) and tebuthiuron (Teb). Microscopic examination and physiological tests were followed by partial 16S DNA sequence analysis, using the first 527 bp of the 16S rRNA gene for bacterial identification. The isolated microorganisms (and in brackets, the herbicide that each degraded) were identified as: from Colombia. Methylobacterium organophilum [Teb], Paenibacillus pabuli [Teb], and Micrmbacterium foliorum [Hex]; and from Hawaii, Methylobacterium radiotolerans [Teb], Paenibacillus illinoisensis [Hex], and Rhodococcus equi [Hex]. The findings further explain how these herbicides, which have potential for illicit coca (Erythroxylum sp.) control, dissipate following their application to tropical soils.

  9. Microbial Biomass C,N and P in Disturbed Dry Tropical Forest Soils, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.SINGH; D.P.SINGH; A.K.KASHYAP

    2010-01-01

    Variations in microbial biomass C(MB-C),N(MB-N)and P(MB-P)along a gradient of different dominant vegetation covers(natural forest,mixed deciduous forest,disturbed savanna and grassland ecosystems)in dry tropical soils of Vindhyan Plateau,India were studied from January 2005 to December 2005.The water holding capacity,organic C,total N,total P and soil moisture content were comparatively higher in forest soils than in the savanna and grassland sites.Across different study sites the mean annual MB-C,MB-N and MB-P at 0-15 cm soil depth varied from 312.05 ± 4.22to 653.40 ± 3.17,32.16 ± 6.25 to 75.66 ± 7.21 and 18.94 ± 2.94 to 30.83 ± 23.08 μg g-1 dry soil,respectively.At all the investigated sites,the maximum MB-C,MB-N and MB-P occurred during the dry period(summer season)and the minimum in wet period(rainy season).In the present study,soil MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were higher at the forest sites compared to savanna and grassland sites.The differences in MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were significant(P mixed deciduous forest > savanna > grassland.The results suggested that deforestation and land use practices(conversion of forest into savanna and grassland)caused the alterations in soil properties,which as a consequence,led to reduction in soil nutrients and MB-C,MB-N and MB-P in the soil of disturbed sites(grassland and savanna)compared to undisturbed forest ecosystems.

  10. Effect of Converting Secondary Tropical Peat Swamp Forest into Oil Palm Plantation on Selected Peat Soil Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd S. Firdaus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The conversion of forest land into oil palm plantation is considered to be one of the causes of soil degradation and loss of tropical land forest in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to compare selected peat soil physical properties of secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation to determine the effect of forest conversion. Approach: Peat soil samples were collected from secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation at Batang Igan, Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. Experimental plots of 300 m3 were set up in both sites and thirty peat soil samples were collected randomly in both sites at 0-15 cm depth using a peat auger. Undisturbed cores and bulk samples were collected for analysis of bulk density and moisture content. Fiber content of the total mass of organic materials was determined by wet sieving method. Soil bulk density, moisture content, organic matter, mineral content, soil porosity and particle density were determined by standard procedures. Hydraulic conductivity was measured in the field using Model 2800K1 Guelph Permeameter and soil strength was determined using Hand Operated Cone Penetrometer Eijkelkemp. Unpaired T-test was used to compare the variables of the two sites. Results: Both sites had similar degree of decomposition classified as hemic peat. No significant differences in fiber content, moisture content and particle density. Bulk density, mineral content and soil strength were significantly higher in the oil palm plantation while organic matter content, porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were significantly higher in the secondary tropical peat swamp forest. Conclusion: Conversion of secondary tropical peat swamp forest to oil palm plantation has significantly increased soil bulk density, mineral content and soil strength but significantly decreased organic matter content, porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity. However, degree of

  11. Changes in the Diversity of Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi after Cultivation for Biofuel Production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) Tropical System

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soi...

  12. Geographic bias of field observations of soil carbon stocks with tropical land-use changes precludes spatial extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer S; Corre, Marife D; Twine, Tracy E; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2011-04-12

    Accurately quantifying changes in soil carbon (C) stocks with land-use change is important for estimating the anthropogenic fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and for implementing policies such as REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) that provide financial incentives to reduce carbon dioxide fluxes from deforestation and land degradation. Despite hundreds of field studies and at least a dozen literature reviews, there is still considerable disagreement on the direction and magnitude of changes in soil C stocks with land-use change. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies that quantified changes in soil C stocks with land use in the tropics. Conversion from one land use to another caused significant increases or decreases in soil C stocks for 8 of the 14 transitions examined. For the three land-use transitions with sufficient observations, both the direction and magnitude of the change in soil C pools depended strongly on biophysical factors of mean annual precipitation and dominant soil clay mineralogy. When we compared the distribution of biophysical conditions of the field observations to the area-weighted distribution of those factors in the tropics as a whole or the tropical lands that have undergone conversion, we found that field observations are highly unrepresentative of most tropical landscapes. Because of this geographic bias we strongly caution against extrapolating average values of land-cover change effects on soil C stocks, such as those generated through meta-analysis and literature reviews, to regions that differ in biophysical conditions.

  13. Long-term persistence of pioneer species in tropical forest soil seed banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalling, J W; Brown, T A

    2008-10-05

    In tropical forests, pioneer species regenerate from seeds dispersed directly into canopy gaps, and from seeds that persisted in soil seed banks before gap formation. However, life-history models suggest that selection for long-term persistence of seeds in soil should be weak, as persistence incurs a fitness cost resulting from prolonged generation time. We use a carbon dating technique to provide the first direct measurements of seed persistence in undisturbed tropical forest seed banks. We show that seeds germinate successfully from surface soil microsites up to 38 years after dispersal. Decades-long persistence may be common in pioneers with relatively large mass, and appears to be unrelated to specific regeneration requirements. In Croton billbergianus, a sub-canopy tree that recruits in abundant small gaps, long-term persistence is associated with short-distance ballistic seed dispersal. In Trema micrantha, a canopy tree with widespread dispersal, persistence is associated with a requirement for large gaps that form infrequently in old-growth forest.

  14. Soil water retention, air flow and pore structure characteristics after corn cob biochar application to a tropical sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Frimpong, Kwame Agyei; Okae-Anti, D

    2017-01-01

    Soil structure is a key soil physical property that affects soil water balance, gas transport, plant growth and development, and ultimately plant yield. Biochar has received global recognition as a soil amendment with the potential to ameliorate the structure of degraded soils. We investigated how...... corn cob biochar contributed to changes in soil water retention, air flow by convection and diffusion, and derived soil structure indices in a tropical sandy loam. Intact soil cores were taken from a field experiment that had plots without biochar (CT), and plots each with 10 t ha− 1 (BC-10), 20 t ha...... to significant increase in soil water retention compared to the CT and BC-10 as a result of increased microporosity (pores biochar had minimal impact. No significant influence of biochar was observed for ka and Dp/D0 for the BC treatments compared to the CT despite...

  15. Tree species effects on pathogen-suppressive capacities of soil bacteria across two tropical dry forests in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklund, Kristen; Powers, Jennifer; Kinkel, Linda

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic-producing bacteria in the genus Streptomyces can inhibit soil-borne plant pathogens, and have the potential to mediate the impacts of disease on plant communities. Little is known about how antibiotic production varies among soil communities in tropical forests, despite a long history of interest in the role of soil-borne pathogens in these ecosystems. Our objective was to determine how tree species and soils influence variation in antibiotic-mediated pathogen suppression among Streptomyces communities in two tropical dry forest sites (Santa Rosa and Palo Verde). We targeted tree species that co-occur in both sites and used a culture-based functional assay to quantify pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities beneath 50 focal trees. We also measured host-associated litter and soil element concentrations as potential mechanisms by which trees may influence soil microbes. Pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities varied within and among tree species, and inhibitory phenotypes were significantly related to soil and litter element concentrations. Average proportions of inhibitory Streptomyces in soils from the same tree species varied between 1.6 and 3.3-fold between sites. Densities and proportions of pathogen-suppressive bacteria were always higher in Santa Rosa than Palo Verde. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in the potential for antibiotic-mediated disease suppression is shaped by tree species, site, and soil characteristics, which could have significant implications for understanding plant community composition and diversity in tropical dry forests.

  16. Modelling the water balance of irrigated fields in tropical floodplain soils using Hydrus-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Abebech; Frankl, Amaury; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Tilahun, Seifu; Alamirew, Tena; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimation of evaporation, transpiration and deep percolation is crucial in irrigated agriculture and the sustainable management of water resources. Here, the Hydrus-1D process-based numerical model was used to estimate the actual transpiration, soil evaporation and deep percolation from irrigated fields of floodplain soils. Field experiments were conducted from Dec 2015 to May 2016 in a small irrigation scheme (50 ha) called 'Shina' located in the Lake Tana floodplains of Ethiopia. Six experimental plots (three for onion and three for maize) were selected along a topographic transect to account for soil and groundwater variability. Irrigation amount (400 to 550 mm during the growing period) was measured using V-notches installed at each plot boundary and daily groundwater levels were measured manually from piezometers. There was no surface runoff observed in the growing period and rainfall was measured using a manual rain gauge. All daily weather data required for the evapotranspiration calculation using Pen Man Monteith equation were collected from a nearby metrological station. The soil profiles were described for each field to include the vertical soil heterogeneity in the soil water balance simulations. The soil texture, organic matter, bulk density, field capacity, wilting point and saturated moisture content were measured for all the soil horizons. Soil moisture monitoring at 30 and 60 cm depths was performed. The soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon was estimated using KNN pedotransfer functions for tropical soils and were effectively fitted using the RETC program (R2= 0.98±0.011) for initial prediction. A local sensitivity analysis was performed to select and optimize the most important hydraulic parameters for soil water flow in the unsaturated zone. The most sensitive parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), saturated moisture content (θs) and pore size distribution (n). Inverse modelling using Hydrus-1D further optimized

  17. Extreme emission of n(2)o from tropical wetland soil (pantanal, South america).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liengaard, Lars; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Kühl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleter, but the global budget of N(2)O remains unbalanced. Currently, ∼25% of the global N(2)O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. Here we present the first study of soil N(2)O emission from the Pantanal indicating that this South American wetland may be a significant natural source of N(2)O. At three sites, we repeatedly measured in situ fluxes of N(2)O and sampled porewater nitrate [Formula: see text] during the low water season in 2008 and 2009. In 2010, 10 sites were screened for in situ fluxes of N(2)O and soil [Formula: see text] content. The in situ fluxes of N(2)O were comparable to fluxes from heavily fertilized forests or agricultural soils. An important parameter affecting N(2)O emission rate was precipitation, inducing peak emissions of >3 mmol N(2)O m(-2) day(-1), while the mean daily flux was 0.43 ± 0.03 mmol N(2)O m(-2) day(-1). Over 170 days of the drained period, we estimated non-wetted drained soil to contribute 70.0 mmol N(2)O m(-2), while rain-induced peak events contributed 9.2 mmol N(2)O m(-2), resulting in a total N(2)O emission of 79.2 mmol N(2)O m(-2). At the sites of repeated sampling, the pool of porewater nitrate varied [Formula: see text] with higher concentrations of [Formula: see text] (p Pantanal, we suggest that this undisturbed tropical wetland potentially contributes ∼1.7% to the global N(2)O emission budget, a significant single source of N(2)O.

  18. Forest structure, diversity and soil properties in a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Nirmal Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Structure, species composition, and soil properties of a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan Western India, were examined by establishment of 25 plots. The forest was characterized by a relatively low canopy and a large number of small-diameter trees. Mean canopy height for this forest was 10 m and stands contained an average of 995 stems ha-1 (= 3.0 cm DBH; 52% of those stems were smaller than 10 cm DBH. The total basal area was 46.35 m2ha-1, of which Tectona grandis L. contributed 48%. The forest showed high species diversity of trees. 50 tree species (= 3.0 cm DBH from 29 families were identified in the 25 sampling plots. T. grandis (20.81% and Butea monosperma (9% were the dominant and subdominant species in terms of importance value. The mean tree species diversity indices for the plots were 1.08 for Shannon diversity index (H´, 0.71 for equitability index (J´ and 5.57 for species richness index (S´, all of which strongly declined with the increase of importance value of the dominant, T. grandis. Measures of soil nutrients indicated low fertility, extreme heterogeneity. Regression analysis showed that stem density and the dominant tree height were significantly correlated with soil pH. There was a significant positive relationship between species diversity index and soil available P, exchangeable K+, Ca2+ (all p values < 0.001 and a negative relationship with N, C, C:N and C:P ratio. The results suggest that soil properties are major factors influencing forest composition and structure within the dry tropical forest in Rajasthan.

  19. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  20. Relations of microbiome characteristics to edaphic properties of tropical soils from Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how community structure of Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi varies as a function of edaphic characteristics is key to elucidating associations between soil ecosystem function and the microbiome that sustains it. In this study, non-managed tropical soils were examined that represented a range of edaphic characteristics, and a comprehensive soil microbiome analysis was done by Illumina sequencing of amplicon libraries that targeted Bacteria (universal prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene primers, Archaea (primers selective for archaeal 16S rRNA genes or Fungi (internal transcribed spacer region. Microbiome diversity decreased in the order: Bacteria > Archaea > Fungi. Bacterial community composition had a strong relationship to edaphic factors while that of Archaea and Fungi was comparatively weak. All communities were significantly more similar within soils, than they were between soils (ANOSIM p < 0.001; bacterial communities were 70-80% alike, while communities of Fungi and Archaea had 40-50% similarity. Communities differed in species turnover patterns, such that two soils with relatively similar bacterial communities could not be predicted to be similar in composition of Archaea or Fungi. Bacterial and archaeal diversity had significant (negative correlations to pH, whereas fungal diversity was not correlated to pH. Edaphic characteristics that best explained variation between soils in bacterial community structure were: total carbon, sodium, magnesium and zinc. For fungi, the best variables were: sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, boron and C/N. Archaeal communities had two sets of edaphic factors of equal strength, one contained sulphur, sodium, and ammonium-N and the other was composed of clay, potassium, ammonium-N, and nitrate-N. Collectively, the data indicate that Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi did not closely parallel one another in community structure development, and thus microbiomes in each soil acquired unique identities. This divergence

  1. Biodegradation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in three tropical soils using radio labelled PEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, A.L. [Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo (CENA/USP), Piracicaba SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: abdalla@cena.usp.br; Regitano, J.B.; Tornisielo, V.L.; Marchese, L. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Piracicaba SP (Brazil); Pecanha, M.R.S.R.; Vitti, D.M.S.S. [Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo (CENA/USP), Piracicaba SP (Brazil); Smith, T. [School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-19

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) may be added to forage based diets rich in tannins for ruminant feeding because it binds to tannins and thus prevent the formation of potentially indigestible tannin-protein complexes. The objective of this work was to determine the in vitro biodegradation (mineralization, i.e., complete breakdown of PEG to CO{sub 2}) rate of PEG. {sup 14}C-Polyethylene glycol ({sup 14}C-PEG) was added to three different tropical soils (a sandy clay loam soil, SaCL; a sandy clay soil, SaC; and a sandy loam soil, SaL) and was incubated in Bartha flasks. Free PEG and PEG bound to tannins from a tannin rich local shrub were incubated under aerobic conditions for up to 70 days. The biodegradation assay monitored the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved after degradation of the labelled PEG in the soils. After incubation, the amount of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the {sup 14}C-PEG application was low. Higher PEG mineralization values were found for the soils with higher organic matter contents (20.1 and 18.6 g organic matter/kg for SaCL and SaC, respectively) than for the SaL soil (11.9 g organic matter/kg) (P < 0.05). The extent of mineralization of PEG after 70 days of incubation in the soil was significantly lower (P < 0.05) when it was added as bound to the browse tannin than in the free form (0.040 and 0.079, respectively). (author)

  2. Modeling Soil Water in the Caatinga Tropical Dry Forest of Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C.; Wilcox, B.; Souza, E.; Lima, J. R. D. S.; West, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Caatinga is a tropical dry forest unique to northeastern Brazil. It has a relatively high degree of endism and supports a population of about 20 million subsistence farmers. However, it is poorly understood, under-researched and often over-looked in regards to other Brazilian ecosystems. It is a highly perturbed system that suffers from deforestation, land use change, and may be threatened by climate change. How these perturbations affect hydrology is unknown, but may have implications for biodiversity and ecosystem services and resiliency. Therefore, understanding key hydrological processes is critical, particularly as related to deforestation. In this study, Hydrus 1D, which is based on van Genuchten parameters to describe the soil water curve and Richard's Equation to describe flow in the vadose zone, was used to model soil moisture in the Caatinga ecosystem. The aim was 1) to compare hydraulic characterization between a forested Caatinga site and a deforested pasture site, 2) to analyze inter-annual variability, and 3) to compare with observed soil moisture data. Hydraulic characterization included hydraulic conductivity, infiltration, water content and pressure head trends. Van Genuchten parameters were derived using the Beerkan method, which is based on soil texture, particle distribution, as well as in-situ small-scale infiltration experiments. Observational data included soil moisture and precipitation logged every half-hour from September 2013 to April 2014 to include the dry season and rainy season. It is expected that the forested Caatinga site will have a higher hydraulic conductivity as well as retain higher soil moisture values. These differences may be amplified during the dry season, as water resources become scarce. Deviations between modeled data and observed data will allow for further hypothesis to be proposed, especially those related to soil water repellency. Hence, these results may indicate difference in soil water dynamics between a

  3. Towards an ecological index for tropical soil quality based on soil macrofauna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huerta, E.; Kampichler, C.; Geissen, V.; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Jong, de B.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to construct a simple index based on the presence/absence of different groups of soil macrofauna to determine the ecological quality of soils. The index was tested with data from 20 sites in South and Central Tabasco, Mexico, and a positive relation between the model a

  4. Conversion of lowland tropical forests to tree cash crop plantations loses up to one-half of stored soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, Oliver; Corre, Marife D; Wolf, Katrin; Tchienkoua, Martin; Cuellar, Eloy; Matthews, Robin B; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-08-11

    Tropical deforestation for the establishment of tree cash crop plantations causes significant alterations to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. Despite this recognition, the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) tier 1 method has a SOC change factor of 1 (no SOC loss) for conversion of forests to perennial tree crops, because of scarcity of SOC data. In this pantropic study, conducted in active deforestation regions of Indonesia, Cameroon, and Peru, we quantified the impact of forest conversion to oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), rubber (Hevea brasiliensis), and cacao (Theobroma cacao) agroforestry plantations on SOC stocks within 3-m depth in deeply weathered mineral soils. We also investigated the underlying biophysical controls regulating SOC stock changes. Using a space-for-time substitution approach, we compared SOC stocks from paired forests (n = 32) and adjacent plantations (n = 54). Our study showed that deforestation for tree plantations decreased SOC stocks by up to 50%. The key variable that predicted SOC changes across plantations was the amount of SOC present in the forest before conversion--the higher the initial SOC, the higher the loss. Decreases in SOC stocks were most pronounced in the topsoil, although older plantations showed considerable SOC losses below 1-m depth. Our results suggest that (i) the IPCC tier 1 method should be revised from its current SOC change factor of 1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 for oil palm and cacao agroforestry plantations and 0.8 ± 0.3 for rubber plantations in the humid tropics; and (ii) land use management policies should protect natural forests on carbon-rich mineral soils to minimize SOC losses.

  5. Transformation functions of soil color and climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨胜利; 方小敏; 李吉均; 安芷生; 陈诗越; HitoshiFukusawa

    2001-01-01

    Measurements on modern soil color suggest well functional relationships between the soil formation process and the present climatic factors. The redness and yellowness of soil are chiefly caused by the contents of hematite and fullonite, and their correlations to climate are the best in humid regions in tropic and warm temperate regions. The lightness of soil mainly correlates to the organic accumulation, humification and carbonatization processes, and its correlation to climate can only be found in the humid-arid extratropical belt. The humidity and surface roughness of soil have so strong influence on soil color that there are great errors on the measurement of colorness in the field. The study on soil colors of typical loess sections shows that soil color can record the characteristics of Asia monsoon and the global climatic fluctuations well at millennial and ten-thousand-year scales. It can also indicate the pedogenesis and the climatic characteristics which magnetic susceptibility could not be refl

  6. Reproductive and productive performances of Santa Inês ewes submitted to breeding in different periods of the Amazonian humid tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Felipe Nogueira; Oliveira, Maria Emilia Franco; Padilha-Nakaghi, Luciana Cristina; de Oliveira, Luís Guilherme; Feliciano, Marcus Antônio Rossi; de Oliveira, Felipe Brener Bezerra; Teixeira, Pedro Paulo Maia; Vicente, Wilter Ricardo Russiano; Faturi, Cristian; Rodrigues, Luiz Fernando de Souza

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reproductive and productive performance of Santa Inês ewes bred at different times of the year in humid tropical climate. One hundred and forty-eight Santa Inês ewes were grouped according to the time of the year of their breeding season (i.e., mating period) (dry/wet, wet, wet/dry, and dry season). The service type was natural mating and the ewes and rams were kept together every night for 45 days. Reproductive efficiency was assessed by service, pregnancy, lambing, prolificacy, twinning, pregnancy loss, weaning, and lamb mortality rates. Ewes were weighed at the beginning and at the end of the breeding season and before and after parturition, and sequential weighing of the lambs was performed (at birth, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days). Reproductive efficiency index (number of lambs weaned/total of served ewes) and productive efficiency (kg of weaned lamb/kg of served or lambed ewes) were calculated. All ewes expressed estrus early in the breeding season; however, a higher percentage (53.5 and 7.1 % at 30 and 45 days, respectively) of ewes returned to estrus during the wet/dry period. The lower rates (13.9 %) of return to estrus at 30 days were during the wet season (P  0.05) effects of breeding seasons on the remaining reproductive rates. Ewes that lambed during the wet/dry transition period weighted less, before (40.5 ± 2.5 kg) and after (38.6 ± 1.6 kg) parturition, than those of other groups (P breeding season took place during the dry/wet period (P breeding seasons took place, allowing for four breeding seasons a year in the Amazon region. Variations between periods in return to estrus rates, weight of ewes close to parturition and lamb weight at weaning indicate that climate changes can also affect reproductive rates.

  7. The impact of tropical forest logging and oil palm agriculture on the soil microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Edwards, David P; Mendes, Lucas William; Kim, Mincheol; Dong, Ke; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Selective logging and forest conversion to oil palm agriculture are rapidly altering tropical forests. However, functional responses of the soil microbiome to these land-use changes are poorly understood. Using 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we compared composition and functional attributes of soil biota between unlogged, once-logged and twice-logged rainforest, and areas converted to oil palm plantations in Sabah, Borneo. Although there was no significant effect of logging history, we found a significant difference between the taxonomic and functional composition of both primary and logged forests and oil palm. Oil palm had greater abundances of genes associated with DNA, RNA, protein metabolism and other core metabolic functions, but conversely, lower abundance of genes associated with secondary metabolism and cell-cell interactions, indicating less importance of antagonism or mutualism in the more oligotrophic oil palm environment. Overall, these results show a striking difference in taxonomic composition and functional gene diversity of soil microorganisms between oil palm and forest, but no significant difference between primary forest and forest areas with differing logging history. This reinforces the view that logged forest retains most features and functions of the original soil community. However, networks based on strong correlations between taxonomy and functions showed that network complexity is unexpectedly increased due to both logging and oil palm agriculture, which suggests a pervasive effect of both land-use changes on the interaction of soil microbes.

  8. Comparative Bioremediation of Crude Oil-Amended Tropical Soil Microcosms by Natural Attenuation, Bioaugmentation, or Bioenrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Marques Alvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is an efficient strategy for cleaning up sites contaminated with organic pollutants. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of monitored natural attenuation, bioenrichment, and bioaugmentation using a consortium of three actinomycetes strains in remediating two distinct typical Brazilian soils from the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes that were contaminated with crude oil, with or without the addition of NaCl. Microcosms were used to simulate bioremediation treatments over a 120-day period. During this period, we monitored total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs and n-alkanes degradation and changes in bacterial communities. Over time, we found the degradation rate of n-alkanes was higher than TPH in both soils, independent of the treatment used. In fact, our data show that the total bacterial community in the soils was mainly affected by the experimental period of time, while the type of bioremediation treatment used was the main factor influencing the actinomycetes populations in both soils. Based on these data, we conclude that monitored natural attenuation is the best strategy for remediation of the two tropical soils studied, with or without salt addition.

  9. Cadmium phytoextraction from loam soil in tropical southern China by Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Chen, Can; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-06-03

    The cadmium (Cd) uptake characteristics by Sorghum bicolor cv. Nengsi 2# and Cowley from the acidic sandy loam soil (pH = 6.1) during the entire growth period (100 days) were investigated in pot outdoors in a tropical district of southern China, Hainan Island. The Cd-spiked levels in soil were set as 3 and 15 mg/kg. Correspondingly, the available Cd levels in soil extracted by Mehlich III solution were 2.71 and 9.41 mg/kg, respectively. Basically, two varieties in a full growth period (100 days) did not show a significant difference in their growth and Cd uptake. Under high Cd stress, the plant growth was inhibited and its biomass weight and height decreased by 38.7-51.5% and 27.6-28.5%, respectively. However, S. bicolor showed higher bioaccumulation capability of Cd from soil to plant [bioconcentration factor (BCF)>4], and higher transfer capability of Cd from roots to shoots [translocation factor (TF)>1] under high Cd stress; Cd contents in the roots, stems, and leaves of S. bicolor reached 43.79-46.07, 63.28-70.60, and 63.10-66.06 mg/kg, respectively. S. bicolor exhibited the potential phytoextraction capability for low or moderate Cd-contamination in acidic sandy loam soil.

  10. Chlordecone fate and mineralisation in a tropical soil (andosol) microcosm under aerobic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Bayo, Jesus D., E-mail: fernanje@supagro.inra.fr [IRD, UMR LISAH Bât 24, 2 Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier cedex 1 (France); INRA, UMR LISAH Bât 24, 2 Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier cedex 1 (France); Saison, Carine [IRD, UMR LISAH Bât 24, 2 Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier cedex 1 (France); Voltz, Marc [INRA, UMR LISAH Bât 24, 2 Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier cedex 1 (France); Disko, Ulrich; Hofmann, Diana; Berns, Anne E. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IBG 3, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Chlordecone is a persistent organochlorine insecticide that, even decades after its ban, poses a threat to the environment and human health. Nevertheless, its environmental fate in soils has scarcely been investigated, and elementary data on its degradation and behaviour in soil are lacking. The mineralisation and sorption of chlordecone and the formation of possible metabolites were evaluated in a tropical agricultural andosol. Soil microcosms with two different soil horizons (S-A and S-B) were incubated for 215 days with {sup 14}C-chlordecone. At five different times (1, 33, 88, 150 and 215 days) the extractability of {sup 14}C-chlordecone was analysed. Mineralisation was monitored using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} traps of NaOH. The appearance of metabolites was studied using thin layer and gas chromatography techniques. At the end of the experiment, the water soluble {sup 14}C-activity was 2% of the remaining {sup 14}C-chlordecone for S-A and 8% for S-B. Only 12% of the remaining activity was non extractable and more than 80% remained extractable with organic solvents. For the first time to our knowledge, a significant mineralisation of chlordecone was measured in a microcosm under aerobic conditions (4.9% for S-A and 3.2% for S-B of the initial {sup 14}C-activity). The drastically lower emission of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in sterilised microcosms indicated the biological origin of chlordecone mineralisation in the non-sterilised microcosms. No metabolites could be detected in the soil extracts. The mineralisation rate of chlordecone decreased by one order of magnitude throughout the incubation period. Thus, the chlordecone content in the soil remained large. This study confirms the existence of chlordecone degrading organisms in a tropical andosol. The reasons why their activity is restricted should be elucidated to allow the development of bioremediation approaches. Possible reasons are a heterogeneous distribution a chlordecone between sub-compartments with different

  11. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities.

  12. Soil and water pollution in a banana production region in tropical Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, Violette; Ramos, Franzisco Que; de J Bastidas-Bastidas, Pedro; Díaz-González, Gilberto; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Huerta-Lwanga, Esperanza; Ruiz-Suárez, Luz E

    2010-10-01

    The effects of abundant Mancozeb (Mn, Zn-bisdithiocarbamate) applications (2.5 kg ha⁻¹week⁻¹ for 10 years) on soil and surface-, subsurface- and groundwater pollution were monitored in a banana production region of tropical Mexico. In soils, severe manganese accumulation was observed, wheras the main metabolite ethylenethiourea was near the detection limit. Surface and subsurface water was highly polluted with ethylenethiourea, the main metabolite of Mancozeb (22.5 and 4.3 μg L⁻¹, respectively), but not with manganese. In deep ground water, no ethylenethiourea was detected. The level of pollution in the region presents a worrisome risk for aquatic life and for human health.

  13. Aromatic compound degradation by iron reducing bacteria isolated from irrigated tropical paddy soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wenjing; WANG Hongtao; HUANG Changyong; W. Reichardt

    2008-01-01

    Forty-six candidate phenol/benzoate degrading-iron reducing bacteria were isolated from long term irrigated tropical paddy soils by enrichment procedures. Pure cultures and some prepared mixed cultures were examined for ferric oxide reduction and phenol/benzoate degradation. All the isolates were iron reducers, but only 56.5% could couple iron reduction to phenol and/or benzoate degradation, as evidenced by depletion of phenol and benzoate after one week incubation. Analysis of degradative capability using Biolog MT plates revealed that most of them could degrade other aromatic compounds such as ferulic acid, vanillic acid, and hydroxybenzoate. Mixed-cultures and soft samples displayed greater capacity for aromatic degradation and iron reduction than pure bacterial isolates, suggesting that these reactions may be coupled via a consortia-based mechanism in paddy soils.

  14. Intensity of African Humid Periods Estimated from Saharan Dust Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Werner; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Beuscher, Sarah; Krüger, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    North Africa experienced dramatic changes in hydrology and vegetation during the late Quaternary driven by insolation-induced shifts of the tropical rain belt and further modulated by millennial-scale droughts and vegetation-climate feedbacks. While most past proxy and modelling studies concentrated on the temporal and spatial dynamics of the last African humid period, little is known about the intensities and characteristics of pre-Holocene humid periods. Here we present a high-resolution record of fine-grained eastern Saharan dust from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea spanning the last 180 kyr, which is based on the clay mineral composition of the marine sediments, especially the kaolinite/chlorite ratio. Minimum aeolian kaolinite transport occurred during the African Humid Periods because kaolinite deflation was hampered by increased humidity and vegetation cover. Instead, kaolinite weathering from kaolinite-bearing Cenozoic rocks was stored in lake basins, river beds and soils during these periods. During the subsequent dry phases, fine-grained dust was mobilised from the desiccated lakes, rivers and soils resulting in maximum aeolian uptake and transport of kaolinite. The kaolinite transport decreased again when these sediment sources exhausted. We conclude that the amount of clay-sized dust blown out of the Sahara into the Eastern Mediterranean Sea is proportional to the intensity of the kaolinite weathering and accumulation in soils and lake sediments, and thus to the strength of the preceding humid period. These humid periods provided the windows for the migration of modern humans out of Africa, as postulated previously. The strongest humid period occurred during the Eemian and was followed by two weaker phases centred at ca. 100 ka and ca. 80 ka. PMID:28129378

  15. Pervasive Local-Scale Tree-Soil Habitat Association in a Tropical Forest Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Allié

    Full Text Available We examined tree-soil habitat associations in lowland forest communities at Paracou, French Guiana. We analyzed a large dataset assembling six permanent plots totaling 37.5 ha, in which extensive LIDAR-derived topographical data and soil chemical and physical data have been integrated with precise botanical determinations. Map of relative elevation from the nearest stream summarized both soil fertility and hydromorphic characteristics, with seasonally inundated bottomlands having higher soil phosphate content and base saturation, and plateaus having higher soil carbon, nitrogen and aluminum contents. We employed a statistical test of correlations between tree species density and environmental maps, by generating Monte Carlo simulations of random raster images that preserve autocorrelation of the original maps. Nearly three fourths of the 94 taxa with at least one stem per ha showed a significant correlation between tree density and relative elevation, revealing contrasted species-habitat associations in term of abundance, with seasonally inundated bottomlands (24.5% of species and well-drained plateaus (48.9% of species. We also observed species preferences for environments with or without steep slopes (13.8% and 10.6%, respectively. We observed that closely-related species were frequently associated with different soil habitats in this region (70% of the 14 genera with congeneric species that have a significant association test suggesting species-habitat associations have arisen multiple times in this tree community. We also tested if species with similar habitat preferences shared functional strategies. We found that seasonally inundated forest specialists tended to have smaller stature (maximum diameter than species found on plateaus. Our results underline the importance of tree-soil habitat associations in structuring diverse communities at fine spatial scales and suggest that additional studies are needed to disentangle community assembly

  16. Pervasive Local-Scale Tree-Soil Habitat Association in a Tropical Forest Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allié, Elodie; Pélissier, Raphaël; Engel, Julien; Petronelli, Pascal; Freycon, Vincent; Deblauwe, Vincent; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Weigel, Jean; Baraloto, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We examined tree-soil habitat associations in lowland forest communities at Paracou, French Guiana. We analyzed a large dataset assembling six permanent plots totaling 37.5 ha, in which extensive LIDAR-derived topographical data and soil chemical and physical data have been integrated with precise botanical determinations. Map of relative elevation from the nearest stream summarized both soil fertility and hydromorphic characteristics, with seasonally inundated bottomlands having higher soil phosphate content and base saturation, and plateaus having higher soil carbon, nitrogen and aluminum contents. We employed a statistical test of correlations between tree species density and environmental maps, by generating Monte Carlo simulations of random raster images that preserve autocorrelation of the original maps. Nearly three fourths of the 94 taxa with at least one stem per ha showed a significant correlation between tree density and relative elevation, revealing contrasted species-habitat associations in term of abundance, with seasonally inundated bottomlands (24.5% of species) and well-drained plateaus (48.9% of species). We also observed species preferences for environments with or without steep slopes (13.8% and 10.6%, respectively). We observed that closely-related species were frequently associated with different soil habitats in this region (70% of the 14 genera with congeneric species that have a significant association test) suggesting species-habitat associations have arisen multiple times in this tree community. We also tested if species with similar habitat preferences shared functional strategies. We found that seasonally inundated forest specialists tended to have smaller stature (maximum diameter) than species found on plateaus. Our results underline the importance of tree-soil habitat associations in structuring diverse communities at fine spatial scales and suggest that additional studies are needed to disentangle community assembly mechanisms

  17. Pore space connectivity and porosity using CT scans of tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previatello da Silva, Livia; de Jong Van Lier, Quirijn

    2015-04-01

    Microtomography has been used in soil physics for characterization and allows non-destructive analysis with high-resolution, yielding a three-dimensional representation of pore space and fluid distribution. It also allows quantitative characterization of pore space, including pore size distribution, shape, connectivity, porosity, tortuosity, orientation, preferential pathways and is also possible predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity using Darcy's equation and a modified Poiseuille's equation. Connectivity of pore space is an important topological property of soil. Together with porosity and pore-size distribution, it governs transport of water, solutes and gases. In order to quantify and analyze pore space (quantifying connectivity of pores and porosity) of four tropical soils from Brazil with different texture and land use, undisturbed samples were collected in São Paulo State, Brazil, with PVC ring with 7.5 cm in height and diameter of 7.5 cm, depth of 10 - 30 cm from soil surface. Image acquisition was performed with a CT system Nikon XT H 225, with technical specifications of dual reflection-transmission target system including a 225 kV, 225 W high performance Xray source equipped with a reflection target with pot size of 3 μm combined with a nano-focus transmission module with a spot size of 1 μm. The images were acquired at specific energy level for each soil type, according to soil texture, and external copper filters were used in order to allow the attenuation of low frequency X-ray photons and passage of one monoenergetic beam. This step was performed aiming minimize artifacts such as beam hardening that may occur during the attenuation in the material interface with different densities within the same sample. Images were processed and analyzed using ImageJ/Fiji software. Retention curve (tension table and the pressure chamber methods), saturated hydraulic conductivity (constant head permeameter), granulometry, soil density and particle density

  18. Chlorpyrifos causes decreased organic matter decomposition by suppressing earthworm and termite communities in tropical soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, P. Mangala C.S., E-mail: msilva@falw.vu.n [Department of Animal Ecology, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Ruhuna, Matara (Sri Lanka); Pathiratne, Asoka [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya (Sri Lanka); Straalen, Nico M. van; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van [Department of Animal Ecology, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Effects of pesticides on structural and functional properties of ecosystems are rarely studied under tropical conditions. In this study litterbag and earthworm field tests were performed simultaneously at the same tropical field site sprayed with chlorpyrifos (CPF). The recommended dose of CPF (0.6 kg a.i. ha{sup -1}) and two higher doses (4.4-8.8 kg a.i. ha{sup -1}) significantly decreased litter decomposition during the first 3 months after application, which could be explained from lower earthworm and termite abundances during this period. Species-specific effects of CPF on organism abundance and biomass were observed, with termites being mostly affected followed by the earthworm Perionyx excavatus; the earthworm Megascolex sp. was least affected. Recovery was completed within 6 months. Decomposition in the controls and lowest two treatments was completed within 4 months, which suggests the need for modification of standard test guidelines to comply with faster litter degradation under tropical conditions. - Effects of chlorpyrifos on functional and structural endpoints in soil.

  19. Negative plant-soil feedback predicts tree-species relative abundance in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Scott A; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Herre, Edward A; Mack, Keenan M L; Valencia, Mariana C; Sanchez, Evelyn I; Bever, James D

    2010-08-05

    The accumulation of species-specific enemies around adults is hypothesized to maintain plant diversity by limiting the recruitment of conspecific seedlings relative to heterospecific seedlings. Although previous studies in forested ecosystems have documented patterns consistent with the process of negative feedback, these studies are unable to address which classes of enemies (for example, pathogens, invertebrates, mammals) exhibit species-specific effects strong enough to generate negative feedback, and whether negative feedback at the level of the individual tree is sufficient to influence community-wide forest composition. Here we use fully reciprocal shade-house and field experiments to test whether the performance of conspecific tree seedlings (relative to heterospecific seedlings) is reduced when grown in the presence of enemies associated with adult trees. Both experiments provide strong evidence for negative plant-soil feedback mediated by soil biota. In contrast, above-ground enemies (mammals, foliar herbivores and foliar pathogens) contributed little to negative feedback observed in the field. In both experiments, we found that tree species that showed stronger negative feedback were less common as adults in the forest community, indicating that susceptibility to soil biota may determine species relative abundance in these tropical forests. Finally, our simulation models confirm that the strength of local negative feedback that we measured is sufficient to produce the observed community-wide patterns in tree-species relative abundance. Our findings indicate that plant-soil feedback is an important mechanism that can maintain species diversity and explain patterns of tree-species relative abundance in tropical forests.

  20. Fertilization practices and soil variations control nitrogen oxide emissions from tropical sugar cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, P. A.; Billow, C.; Hall, S.; Zachariassen, J.

    1996-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization of agricultural systems is thought to be a major source of the increase in atmospheric N2O; NO emissions from soils have also been shown to increase due to N fertilization. While N fertilizer use is increasing rapidly in the developing world and in the tropics, nearly all of our information on gas emissions is derived from studies of temperate zone agriculture. Using chambers, we measured fluxes of N2O and NO following urea fertilization in tropical sugar cane systems growing on several soil types in the Hawaiian Islands, United States. On the island of Maui, where urea is applied in irrigation lines and soils are mollisols and inceptisols, N2O fluxes were elevated for a week or less after fertilization; maximum average fluxes were typically less than 30 ng cm-2 h-1. NO fluxes were often an order of magnitude less than N2O. Together, N2O and NO represented from 0.03 to 0.5% of the applied N. In fields on the island of Hawaii, where urea is broadcast on the surface and soils are andisols, N2O fluxes were similar in magnitude to Maui but remained elevated for much longer periods after fertilization. NO emissions were 2-5 times higher than N2O through most of the sampling periods. Together the gas losses represented approximately 1.1-2.5% of the applied N. Laboratory studies indicate that denitrification is a critical source of N2O in Maui, but that nitrification is more important in Hawaii. Experimental studies suggest that differences in the pattern of N2O/NO and the processes producing them are a result of both carbon availability and placement of fertilizer and that the more information-intensive fertilizer management practice results in lower emissions.

  1. Sorption of Atrazine in Tropical Soil by Biochar Prepared from Cassava Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Deng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biochar (BC is a carbonaceous and porous product generated from the incomplete combustion of biomass and has been recognized as an efficient adsorbent. This study evaluated the ability of BC to sorb atrazine pesticide in tropical soil, and explored potential environmental values of BC on mitigating organic micro-pollutants. BC was produced from cassava waste via pyrolyzation under oxygen-limiting conditions at 350, 550, and 750 °C (MS350, MS550, and MS750, respectively. Three biochars were characterized and investigated as sorbents for the removal atrazine from tropical soil. BC pyrolyzed at higher temperatures more quickly reached equilibrium. The pseudo-second-order model perfectly simulated the sorption kinetics for atrazine with the coefficients R2 above 0.996, and the sorption amount at equilibrium (qe was 0.016 mg/g for MS350, 0.025 mg/g for MS550 and 0.050 mg/g for MS750. The isotherms of MS350 displayed relatively linear behavior, whereas the sorption of atrazine on MS550 and MS750 followed a nonlinear isotherm. The sorption data were well described by the Freundlich model with logKF of 0.476 for MS350, 0.771 for MS550, 1.865 for MS750. A thermodynamic study indicated that the sorption of atrazine in BC-added soil was a spontaneous and endothermic process and was primarily controlled by physisorption. In addition, lower pH was conducive to the sorption of atrazine in BC-added soil.

  2. Mechanisms Controlling Carbon Turnover from Diverse Microbial Groups in Temperate and Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, H.; Dane, L.; Bird, J. A.; Firestone, M. K.; Horwath, W. R.

    2010-12-01

    Microorganisms represent an important intermediate along the pathway of plant litter decomposition to the formation of soil organic matter (SOM); yet little is known of the fate and stability of microbial C in soils and the importance of microbial biochemistry as a factor influencing SOM dynamics. This research investigates mechanisms controlling microbial C stabilization in a temperate forest in the Sierra Nevada of California (CA) and a tropical forest in Puerto Rico (PR). Biochemically diverse microbial groups (fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria gram (+), and bacteria gram (-)) were isolated from both sites, grown in the laboratory with C13 media, killed, and nonliving residues were added back to soils as a reciprocal transplant of microbial groups. The native microbial community in CA is dominated by fungi and in PR is dominated by bacteria, which provides an opportunity to asses the metabolic response of distinct microbial communities to the diverse microbial additions. CA and PR soils were sampled five times over a 3 and 2 year period, respectively. In CA there was no significant difference in the mean residence time (MRT) of diverse C13 microbial treatments; whereas in PR there were significant differences, whereby temperate fungi, temperate Gram (+) bacteria, and tropical actinomycetes exhibited a significantly longer MRT as compared with tropical fungi and temperate Gram (-). These results suggest that a bacterial dominated microbial community discriminates more amongst diverse substrates than a fungal-dominated community. MRT for labeled-C in CA was 5.21 ± 1.11 years, and in PR was 2.22 ± 0.45. Despite substantial differences in MRT between sites, physical fractionation of soils into light (LF), aggregated-occluded (OF), and mineral-associated (MF) fractions provided evidence that accelerated decomposition in PR (presumably due to climate) operated primarily on labeled-C unassociated with the mineral matrix (LF); labeled-C occluded within aggregates (OF) or

  3. Runoff and soil erosion for an undisturbed tropical woodland in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo Tarso S.; Nearing, Mark; Wendland, Edson

    2015-04-01

    The Brazilian Cerrado is a large and important economic and environmental region that is experiencing major loss of its natural landscapes due to pressures of food and energy production, which has caused large increases in soil erosion. However the magnitude of the soil erosion increases in this region is not well understood, in part because scientific studies of surface runoff and soil erosion are scarce or nonexistent in undisturbed Cerrado vegetation. In this study we measured natural rainfall-driven rates of runoff and soil erosion for an undisturbed tropical woodland classified as "cerrado sensu stricto denso" and bare soil to compute the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) cover and management factor (C-factor) to help evaluate the likely effects of land use change on soil erosion rates. Replicated data on precipitation, runoff, and soil loss on plots (5 x 20 m) under bare soil and cerrado were collected for 55 erosive storms occurring in 2012 and 2013. The measured annual precipitation was 1247.4 mm and 1113.0 mm for 2012 and 2013, resulting in a rainfall erosivity index of 4337.1 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 and 3546.2 MJ mm ha-1 h-1, for each year respectively. The erosive rainfall represented 80concentrated in the wet season, which generally runs from October through March. In the plots on bare soil, the runoff coefficient for individual rainfall events (total runoff divided by total rainfall) ranged from 0.003 to 0.860 with an average value and standard deviation of 0.212 ± 0.187. Moreover, the runoff coefficient found for the bare soil plots (~20infiltration capacity. In forest areas the leaf litter and the more porous soil tend to promote the increase of infiltration and water storage, rather than rapid overland flow. Indeed, runoff coefficients ranged from 0.001 to 0.030 with an average of less than 1under undisturbed cerrado. The soil losses measured under bare soil and cerrado were 15.68 t ha-1yr-1 and 0.24 t ha-1 yr-1 in 2012, and 14.82 t ha-1 yr-1, 0.11 t ha-1

  4. Composition and fate of mine- and smelter-derived particles in soils of humid subtropical and hot semi-arid areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettler, Vojtěch; Johan, Zdenek; Kříbek, Bohdan; Veselovský, František; Mihaljevič, Martin; Vaněk, Aleš; Penížek, Vít; Majer, Vladimír; Sracek, Ondra; Mapani, Ben; Kamona, Fred; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2016-09-01

    We studied the heavy mineral fraction, separated from mining- and smelter-affected topsoils, from both a humid subtropical area (Mufulira, Zambian Copperbelt) and a hot semi-arid area (Tsumeb, Namibia). High concentrations of metal(loid)s were detected in the studied soils: up to 1450mgAskg(-1), 8980mgCukg(-1), 4640mgPbkg(-1), 2620mgZnkg(-1). A combination of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) helped to identify the phases forming individual metal(loid)-bearing particles. Whereas spherical particles originate from the smelting and flue gas cleaning processes, angular particles have either geogenic origins or they are windblown from the mining operations and mine waste disposal sites. Sulphides from ores and mine tailings often exhibit weathering rims in contrast to smelter-derived high-temperature sulphides (chalcocite [Cu2S], digenite [Cu9S5], covellite [CuS], non-stoichiometric quenched Cu-Fe-S phases). Soils from humid subtropical areas exhibit higher available concentrations of metal(loids), and higher frequencies of weathering features (especially for copper-bearing oxides such as delafossite [Cu(1+)Fe(3+)O2]) are observed. In contrast, metal(loid)s are efficiently retained in semi-arid soils, where a high proportion of non-weathered smelter slag particles and low-solubility Ca-Cu-Pb arsenates occur. Our results indicate that compared to semi-arid areas (where inorganic contaminants were rather immobile in soils despite their high concentrations) a higher potential risk exists for agriculture in mine- and smelter-affected humid subtropical areas (where metal(loid) contaminants can be highly available for the uptake by crops). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential effects of earthworm activity on C and N dynamics in tropical paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Katharina; Zaitsev, Andrey S.; Wolters, Volkmar

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms are involved in key ecosystem processes and are generally considered important for sustainable crop production. However, their provision of essential ecosystem services and contribution to tropical soil carbon and nitrogen balance in rice-based agroecosystems are not yet completely understood. We carried out two microcosm experiments to quantify the impact of a tropical earthworm Pheretima sp. from the Philippines on C and N turnover in rice paddy soils. First one was conducted to understand the modulation impact of soil water saturation level and nitrogen fertilizer input intensity on C and N cycles. The second one focused on the importance of additional organic matter (rice straw) amendment on the earthworm modulation of mineralization in non-flooded conditions. We measured CO2, CH4 (Experiments 1 and 2) and N2O evolution (Experiment 2) from rice paddy soil collected at the fields of the International Rice Research Institute (Philippines). Further we analysed changes in soil C and N content as well as nutrient loss via leaching induced by earthworms (Experiment 2). Addition of earthworms resulted in the strong increase of CH4 release under flooded conditions as well as after rice straw amendment. Compared to flooded conditions, earthworms suppressed the distinct CO2 respiration maximum at intermediate soil water saturation levels. In the first few days after the experiment establishment (Experiment 1) intensive nitrogen application resulted in the suppression of CO2 emission by earthworms at non-flooded soil conditions. However, at the longer term perspective addressed in the second experiment (30 days) earthworm activity rather increased average soil respiration under intensive fertilization or rice straw amendment. The lowest N2O release rates were revealed in the microcosms with earthworm and straw treatments. The combined effect of N fertilizer and straw addition to microcosms resulted in the increased leachate volume due to earthworm bioturbation

  6. Study of the transport of cadusafos in two tropical undisturbed soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus; Crevoisier, David; Saison, Carine; Geniez, Chantal; Huttel, Olivier; Samouelian, Anatja; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The use of pesticides to control agriculture pests is a common practice on most tropical plantations whose vulnerability to pesticide pollution is very important due to the frequent heavy rains that wash pesticides from target areas. Tropical volcanic soils have been scarcely investigated in this sense and monitoring the dynamic of pesticide at column scale is of great interest for a better understanding at catchment scale and risk modelling. The objective was to study and model the transport of cadusafos (CDS) in two undisturbed soil columns from a nitisol and an andosol, representative of the major soils in agricultural areas of the FWI. Undisturbed soil columns from andosol (sandy-loam soil) and nitisol (clay soil) from Guadeloupe Island were spiked with 14C-CDS along with 10 g of granulate Rugby®. To each soil column, 10 rain events of different intensities (20 and 40 mm/h during 4 and 2 hours, respectively) were applied with 4-7 days delay between two subsequent rain events. For the nitisol columns, the cumulated rain was halved (by decreasing duration of each rain event) since these soils occur in drier areas of Guadeloupe and because the imposed rain intensities led to the accumulation of water at the surface of the column. At the end of the leaching experiment the extractable and non-extractable remaining pesticide residues were determined along the soil profile. The andosol presented a very high permeability attributed to the preferential flow expected in this type of soil with high macroporosity due to the allophane materials. The maximum concentration of CDS was attained during the first rainfall event while the cumulated infiltrated volume of water was much less than the pore volume of the column soil. The peak concentration levels of CDS were almost constant during the first 5 rain events and they decreased during the subsequent rain events, probably due to degradation and/or ageing processes of CDS. The nitisol showed lower permeability reflected in

  7. Magnetic viscosity of tropical soils: classification and prediction as an aid for landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, J.; Preetz, H.; Altfelder, S.

    2012-08-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI)-based metal detectors are the most widely used sensing techniques in landmine clearance operations; however, they are negatively influenced by frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility. A total of 466 rock and soil samples collected from across the tropics are investigated in this study. The data show that frequency-dependent susceptibility depends on the parent material as well as on the degree of weathering. Ultramafic and mafic rocks and their derivatives have higher susceptibility and absolute frequency dependence than material originating from intermediate, felsic and sedimentary rocks. Within each parent material group, absolute frequency dependence increases steadily with increasing alteration from unweathered rock to topsoil. This effect is likely due to either the residual enrichment of weathering resistant ferrimagnetic minerals including superparamagnetic (SP) grains, the comminution of larger ferrimagnetic minerals or the neoformation of SP minerals during soil formation. Relative frequency dependence is generally lower than 15 per cent for the investigated samples with a few exceptions. It increases with alteration for igneous rocks but remains at the initially high level for sediments. This finding indicates that the relative concentration of SP minerals changes with respect to the total magnetic fraction for igneous rocks but remains constant for sediments. Soils derived from ultramafic, mafic and intermediate rocks show low relative frequency dependence, and their magnetic susceptibility is mainly the result of multidomain lithogenic minerals. In contrast, soils derived from felsic rocks and sediments show the highest values, and their susceptibility is due to SP minerals that are either formed during pedogenesis or residually enriched. The average and extreme values of the absolute frequency dependence within each subgroup, based on parent material and alteration grade, are used to design a prognosis system for

  8. The Effect of Soil Warming on Decomposition of Biochar, Wood, and Bulk Soil Organic Carbon in Contrasting Temperate and Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, Margaret; Tas, Neslihan; Reichl, Ken; Castanha, Cristina; Fischer, Marc; Abiven, Samuel; Schmidt, Michael; Brodie, Eoin; Jansson, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Biochar and wood are known to decay at different rates in soil, but the longterm effect of char versus unaltered wood inputs on soil carbon dynamics may vary by soil ecosystem and by their sensitivity to warming. We conducted an incubation experiment to explore three questions: (1) How do decomposition rates of char and wood vary with soil type and depth? (2) How vulnerable to warming are these slowly decomposing inputs? And (3) Do char or wood additions increase loss of native soil organic carbon (priming)? Soils from a Mediterranean grassland (Hopland Experimental Research Station, California) and a moist tropical forest (Tabunoco Forest, Puerto Rico) were collected from two soil depths and incubated at ambient temperature (14°C, 20°C for Hopland and Tabonuco respectively) and ambient +6°C. We added 13C-labeled wood and char (made from the wood at 450oC) to the soils and quantified CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes with continuous online carbon isotope measurements using a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer (Picarro, Inc) for one year. As expected, in all treatments the wood decomposed much (about 50 times) more quickly than did the char amendment. With few exceptions, amendments placed in the surface soil decomposed more quickly than those in deeper soil, and in forest soil faster than that placed in grassland soil, at the same temperature. The two substrates were not very temperature sensitive. Both had Q10 less than 2 and char decomposition in particular was relatively insensitive to warming. Finally, the addition of wood caused a significant increase of roughly 30% in decomposition losses of the native soil organic carbon in the grassland and slightly less in forest. Char had only a slight positive priming effect but had a significant effect on microbial community. These results show that conversion of wood inputs to char through wildfire or intentional management will alter not only the persistence of the carbon in soil but also its temperature response and effect on

  9. Carbon leaching from tropical peat soils and consequences for carbon balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Wit, Francisca; Samiaji, Joko

    2016-07-01

    Drainage and deforestation turned Southeast (SE) Asian peat soils into a globally important CO2 source, because both processes accelerate peat decomposition. Carbon losses through soil leaching have so far not been quantified and the underlying processes have hardly been studied. In this study, we use results derived from nine expeditions to six Sumatran rivers and a mixing model to determine leaching processes in tropical peat soils, which are heavily disturbed by drainage and deforestation. Here we show that a reduced evapotranspiration and the resulting increased freshwater discharge in addition to the supply of labile leaf litter produced by re-growing secondary forests increase leaching of carbon by ~200%. Enhanced freshwater fluxes and leaching of labile leaf litter from secondary vegetation appear to contribute 38% and 62% to the total increase, respectively. Decomposition of leached labile DOC can lead to hypoxic conditions in rivers draining disturbed peatlands. Leaching of the more refractory DOC from peat is an irrecoverable loss of soil that threatens the stability of peat-fringed coasts in SE Asia.

  10. Assessing risk to human health from tropical leafy vegetables grown on contaminated urban soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabulo, G.; Young, S.D.; Black, C.R., E-mail: colin.black@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Fifteen tropical leafy vegetable types were sampled from farmers' gardens situated on nine contaminated sites used to grow vegetables for commercial or subsistence consumption in and around Kampala City, Uganda. Trace metal concentrations in soils were highly variable and originated from irrigation with wastewater, effluent discharge from industry and dumping of solid waste. Metal concentrations in the edible shoots of vegetables also differed greatly between, and within, sites. Gynandropsis gynandra consistently accumulated the highest Cd, Pb and Cu concentrations, while Amaranthus dubius accumulated the highest Zn concentration. Cadmium uptake from soils with contrasting sources and severity of contamination was consistently lowest in Cucurbita maxima and Vigna unguiculata, suggesting these species were most able to restrict Cd uptake from contaminated soil. Concentrations of Pb and Cr were consistently greater in unwashed, than in washed, vegetables, in marked contrast to Cd, Ni and Zn. The risk to human health, expressed as a 'hazard quotient' (HQ{sub M}), was generally greatest for Cd, followed successively by Pb, Zn, Ni and Cu. Nevertheless, it was apparent that urban cultivation of leafy vegetables could be safely pursued on most sites, subject to site-specific assessment of soil metal burden, judicious choice of vegetable types and adoption of washing in clean water prior to cooking.

  11. Quantification and Remediation of Soil Chemical Degradation in Tropical Australia,China and Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Soil and land degradation in the tropics can be identified and described in terms of physical, chemical,and biological changes from its pristine state brought about by natural and anthropogenic influences. Acharacteristic of these ecosystems is their capacity to recycle nutrients through soil organic matter (SOM).Following disturbance through changed land management, SOM is rapidly mineralized and there is a cor-responding decline in fertility and the variable charge component of the cation exchange capacity. As theseecosystems are strongly dependent on SOM for their functionality, changed land use can have irreversible im-pacts on the productivity of these systems. The paper focuses on quantifying chemical degradation throughprinting. Using values taken from the fingerprint of an undisturbed soil, an index of chemical degradationimprove poor quality soils in their natural condition are discussed, such as the addition of natural clays andsilicated materials. Results are present to show the effect of each of the aforementioned strategies on surfacecharge characteristics and associated increases in plant productivity.

  12. Short and Long-Term Soil Moisture Effects of Liana Removal in a Seasonally Moist Tropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pignatello Reid

    Full Text Available Lianas (woody vines are particularly abundant in tropical forests, and their abundance is increasing in the neotropics. Lianas can compete intensely with trees for above- and belowground resources, including water. As tropical forests experience longer and more intense dry seasons, competition for water is likely to intensify. However, we lack an understanding of how liana abundance affects soil moisture and hence competition with trees for water in tropical forests. To address this critical knowledge gap, we conducted a large-scale liana removal experiment in a seasonal tropical moist forest in central Panama. We monitored shallow and deep soil moisture over the course of three years to assess the effects of lianas in eight 0.64 ha removal plots and eight control plots. Liana removal caused short-term effects in surface soils. Surface soils (10 cm depth in removal plots dried more slowly during dry periods and accumulated water more slowly after rainfall events. These effects disappeared within four months of the removal treatment. In deeper soils (40 cm depth, liana removal resulted in a multi-year trend towards 5-25% higher soil moisture during the dry seasons with the largest significant effects occurring in the dry season of the third year following treatment. Liana removal did not affect surface soil temperature. Multiple and mutually occurring mechanisms may be responsible for the effects of liana removal on soil moisture, including competition with trees, and altered microclimate, and soil structure. These results indicate that lianas influence hydrologic processes, which may affect tree community dynamics and forest carbon cycling.

  13. Nitrogen and phosphorus addition impact soil N₂O emission in a secondary tropical forest of South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Bi; Neher, Deborah A; Li, Zhian

    2014-07-08

    Nutrient availability greatly regulates ecosystem processes and functions of tropical forests. However, few studies have explored impacts of N addition (aN), P addition (aP) and N × P interaction on tropical forests N₂O fluxes. We established an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest to test whether: (1) N addition would increase N₂O emission and nitrification, and (2) P addition would increase N₂O emission and N transformations. Nitrogen and P addition had no effect on N mineralization and nitrification. Soil microbial biomass was increased following P addition in wet seasons. aN increased 39% N₂O emission as compared to control (43.3 μgN₂O-N m(-2)h(-1)). aP did not increase N₂O emission. Overall, N₂O emission was 60% greater for aNP relative to the control, but significant difference was observed only in wet seasons, when N₂O emission was 78% greater for aNP relative to the control. Our results suggested that increasing N deposition will enhance soil N₂O emission, and there would be N × P interaction on N₂O emission in wet seasons. Given elevated N deposition in future, P addition in this tropical soil will stimulate soil microbial activities in wet seasons, which will further enhance soil N₂O emission.

  14. Soil microbial nutrient constraints along a tropical forest elevation gradient: a belowground test of a biogeochemical paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Nottingham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground primary productivity is widely considered to be limited by phosphorus (P availability in lowland tropical forests and by nitrogen (N availability in montane tropical forests. However, the extent to which this paradigm applies to belowground processes remains unresolved. We measured indices of soil microbial nutrient status in lowland, sub-montane and montane tropical forests along a natural gradient spanning 3400 m in elevation in the Peruvian Andes. With increasing elevation there were marked increases in soil concentrations of total N, total P, and readily-extractable P, but a decrease in N mineralization determined by in situ resin bags. Microbial carbon (C and N increased with increasing elevation, but microbial C:N:P ratios were relatively constant, suggesting homeostasis. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes, which are rich in N, decreased with increasing elevation, while the ratios of enzymes involved in the acquisition of N and P increased with increasing elevation, further indicating a shift in the relative demand for N and P by microbial biomass. We conclude that soil microorganisms shift investment in nutrient acquisition from P to N between lowland and montane tropical forests, suggesting that different nutrients regulate soil microbial metabolism and the soil carbon balance in these ecosystems.

  15. Occurrence of culturable soil fungi in a tropical moist deciduous forest Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Santanu K.; Tayung, Kumanand; Rath, Chandi C.; Parida, Debraj

    2015-01-01

    Similipal Biosphere Reserve (SBR) is a tropical moist deciduous forest dominated by the species Shorea robusta . To the best of our knowledge their rich biodiversity has not been explored in term of its microbial wealth. In the present investigation, soil samples were collected from ten selected sites inside SBR and studied for their physicochemical parameters and culturable soil fungal diversity. The soil samples were found to be acidic in nature with a pH ranging from of 5.1–6.0. Highest percentage of organic carbon and moisture content were observed in the samples collected from the sites, Chahala-1 and Chahala-2. The plate count revealed that fungal population ranged from 3.6 × 10 4 –2.1 × 10 5 and 5.1 × 10 4 –4.7 × 10 5 cfu/gm of soil in summer and winter seasons respectively. The soil fungus, Aspergillus niger was found to be the most dominant species and Species Important Values Index (SIVI) was 43.4 and 28.6 in summer and winter seasons respectively. Among the sites studied, highest fungal diversity indices were observed during summer in the sites, Natto-2 and Natto-1. The Shannon-Wiener and Simpson indices in these two sites were found to be 3.12 and 3.022 and 0.9425 and 0.9373 respectively. However, the highest Fisher’s alpha was observed during winter in the sites Joranda, Natto-2, Chahala-1 and Natto-1 and the values were 3.780, 3.683, 3.575 and 3.418 respectively. Our investigation revealed that, fungal population was dependent on moisture and organic carbon (%) of the soil but its diversity was found to be regulated by sporulating species like Aspergillus and Penicillium . PMID:26221092

  16. Occurrence of culturable soil fungi in a tropical moist deciduous forest Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Santanu K; Tayung, Kumanand; Rath, Chandi C; Parida, Debraj

    2015-03-01

    Similipal Biosphere Reserve (SBR) is a tropical moist deciduous forest dominated by the species Shorea robusta . To the best of our knowledge their rich biodiversity has not been explored in term of its microbial wealth. In the present investigation, soil samples were collected from ten selected sites inside SBR and studied for their physicochemical parameters and culturable soil fungal diversity. The soil samples were found to be acidic in nature with a pH ranging from of 5.1-6.0. Highest percentage of organic carbon and moisture content were observed in the samples collected from the sites, Chahala-1 and Chahala-2. The plate count revealed that fungal population ranged from 3.6 × 10 (4) -2.1 × 10 (5) and 5.1 × 10 (4) -4.7 × 10 (5) cfu/gm of soil in summer and winter seasons respectively. The soil fungus, Aspergillus niger was found to be the most dominant species and Species Important Values Index (SIVI) was 43.4 and 28.6 in summer and winter seasons respectively. Among the sites studied, highest fungal diversity indices were observed during summer in the sites, Natto-2 and Natto-1. The Shannon-Wiener and Simpson indices in these two sites were found to be 3.12 and 3.022 and 0.9425 and 0.9373 respectively. However, the highest Fisher's alpha was observed during winter in the sites Joranda, Natto-2, Chahala-1 and Natto-1 and the values were 3.780, 3.683, 3.575 and 3.418 respectively. Our investigation revealed that, fungal population was dependent on moisture and organic carbon (%) of the soil but its diversity was found to be regulated by sporulating species like Aspergillus and Penicillium.

  17. Occurrence of culturable soil fungi in a tropical moist deciduous forest Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu K. Jena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Similipal Biosphere Reserve (SBR is a tropical moist deciduous forest dominated by the species Shorea robusta. To the best of our knowledge their rich biodiversity has not been explored in term of its microbial wealth. In the present investigation, soil samples were collected from ten selected sites inside SBR and studied for their physicochemical parameters and culturable soil fungal diversity. The soil samples were found to be acidic in nature with a pH ranging from of 5.1–6.0. Highest percentage of organic carbon and moisture content were observed in the samples collected from the sites, Chahala-1 and Chahala-2. The plate count revealed that fungal population ranged from 3.6 × 104–2.1 × 105 and 5.1 × 104–4.7 × 105 cfu/gm of soil in summer and winter seasons respectively. The soil fungus, Aspergillus niger was found to be the most dominant species and Species Important Values Index (SIVI was 43.4 and 28.6 in summer and winter seasons respectively. Among the sites studied, highest fungal diversity indices were observed during summer in the sites, Natto-2 and Natto-1. The Shannon-Wiener and Simpson indices in these two sites were found to be 3.12 and 3.022 and 0.9425 and 0.9373 respectively. However, the highest Fisher’s alpha was observed during winter in the sites Joranda, Natto-2, Chahala-1 and Natto-1 and the values were 3.780, 3.683, 3.575 and 3.418 respectively. Our investigation revealed that, fungal population was dependent on moisture and organic carbon (% of the soil but its diversity was found to be regulated by sporulating species like Aspergillus and Penicillium.

  18. Composition and fate of mine- and smelter-derived particles in soils of humid subtropical and hot semi-arid areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettler, Vojtěch, E-mail: ettler@natur.cuni.cz [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Johan, Zdenek [BRGM, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45082 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Kříbek, Bohdan; Veselovský, František [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Praha 5 (Czech Republic); Mihaljevič, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Vaněk, Aleš; Penížek, Vít [Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Majer, Vladimír [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Praha 5 (Czech Republic); Sracek, Ondra [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University in Olomouc, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Mapani, Ben; Kamona, Fred [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Namibia, Private Bag 13301, Windhoek (Namibia); Nyambe, Imasiku [University of Zambia, School of Mines, P. O. Box 32 379, Lusaka (Zambia)

    2016-09-01

    We studied the heavy mineral fraction, separated from mining- and smelter-affected topsoils, from both a humid subtropical area (Mufulira, Zambian Copperbelt) and a hot semi-arid area (Tsumeb, Namibia). High concentrations of metal(loid)s were detected in the studied soils: up to 1450 mg As kg{sup −1}, 8980 mg Cu kg{sup −1}, 4640 mg Pb kg{sup −1}, 2620 mg Zn kg{sup −1}. A combination of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) helped to identify the phases forming individual metal(loid)-bearing particles. Whereas spherical particles originate from the smelting and flue gas cleaning processes, angular particles have either geogenic origins or they are windblown from the mining operations and mine waste disposal sites. Sulphides from ores and mine tailings often exhibit weathering rims in contrast to smelter-derived high-temperature sulphides (chalcocite [Cu{sub 2}S], digenite [Cu{sub 9}S{sub 5}], covellite [CuS], non-stoichiometric quenched Cu–Fe–S phases). Soils from humid subtropical areas exhibit higher available concentrations of metal(loids), and higher frequencies of weathering features (especially for copper-bearing oxides such as delafossite [Cu{sup 1+} Fe{sup 3+} O{sub 2}]) are observed. In contrast, metal(loid)s are efficiently retained in semi-arid soils, where a high proportion of non-weathered smelter slag particles and low-solubility Ca–Cu–Pb arsenates occur. Our results indicate that compared to semi-arid areas (where inorganic contaminants were rather immobile in soils despite their high concentrations) a higher potential risk exists for agriculture in mine- and smelter-affected humid subtropical areas (where metal(loid) contaminants can be highly available for the uptake by crops). - Highlights: • Mining- and smelter-derived particles identified in subtropical and semi-arid soils • Sulphides, oxides, and metal-bearing arsenates most frequently encountered

  19. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

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    M. W. Warren

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of belowground carbon stocks in tropical wetland forests requires funding for laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple analytical tools to assist belowground carbon estimation where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (kgC m−3; Cd as a function of bulk density (gC cm−3; Bd, which can be used to rapidly estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 495.14 + 5.41, R2 = 0.93, n = 151 for soils with organic C content > 40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted belowground C stocks to within 0.92% to 9.57% of observed values. Average bulk density of collected peat samples was 0.127 g cm−3, which is in the upper range of previous reports for Southeast Asian peatlands. When original data were included, the revised equation Cd = Bd × 468.76 + 5.82, with R2 = 0.95 and n = 712, was slightly below the lower 95% confidence interval of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well-developed peat soils where C content > 40%.

  20. Topography and vegetation alter soil nitrogen availability and loss in tropical and temperate ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A dominant paradigm in ecosystem ecology holds that nitrogen (N) cycles as an excess nutrient in old tropical landscapes but is a scarce, limiting resource in young, temperate ecosystems. However, recent work suggests that both biotic and abiotic state factors can promote unexpected patterns of N cycling across complex landscapes. Here, I present two case studies demonstrating how topography and vegetation shape patterns of N cycling and loss in heterogeneous terrain. In a geomorphically dynamic, high-diversity tropical rainforest, flat ridge tops display open N cycling, yet eroding hillslopes are surprisingly N-poor with multiple indicators implying conservative N cycling. Soil mineralogy indicates slope soils are less developed than adjacent flat ridge counterparts, and the accumulation of cosmogenic 10Be in surface soil suggests residence times are only half as long. Together, these observations suggest erosion resets soil development, with constant N-removal promoting tight N-cycling. Further, soil δ15N is negatively correlated with slope angle across the landscape, and mass balance modeling supports an increasing role for erosive N loss in steep regions. In a temperate montane landscape with lower physical erosion rates, vegetation interacts with hydro-topographic position to mediate local N dynamics. Upslope, forests display conservative N-cycling, yet in adjacent herbaceous areas, multiple indicators point toward an open N cycle. Downslope, both vegetation types show an increase in N-richness. In downslope forests, this is confined to the near-surface, stemming from higher foliar N content due to lateral N transport and uptake. In herbaceous sites, deeper vadose-zone N transport occurs but with no change in foliar N, implying differences in the degree of N limitation between vegetation types. In this landscape, soil nitrate leaching rates track N availability, though δ15N-NO3- does not suggest a similar pattern for gaseous losses, instead reflecting

  1. Effect of Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Clearing on Soil Carbon Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S.M. Nuri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Forest clearing in Tropical Peat Swamp Forest (TPSF will affect forest soil carbon storage. Thus this study is essential to determine whether the effect of clearing of forest does to the nature of soil forest concentrating on soil carbon storage. The objectives of this study were to analyze carbon storage values in logged and clear cut TPSF and to compare these values to see whether clearing of forest will affect its soil in terms of carbon storage. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted in July 2009 on two different plots at Batang Igan, Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. The plots are secondary TPSF where this area has been logged but not been cleared while another plot is the clear cut area where the forest has been cut down and cleared for other land use. Soil samples were taken in each plot in the depth of 0-15 cm. Every sample was taken randomly by peat auger using bulking method. The soils were air dried, pounded using mortar and sieved. The bulk densities were determined by coring method. Total Carbon (TC, total Organic Matter (OM, Total Nitrogen (TN and stable C estimation per hectare were determined from bulk density. The soil pH was determined using pH meter by using water and KCl. SOM, TC and stable C in Humic Acid (HA were determined by loss-on ignition method. TN was determined using Micro-Kjeldahl method followed by steam distillation and titration. HA was extracted and purified using distilled water. Then, the HA were oven dried in 40oC. The E4/E6 ratio by using spectrometer was used. Total acidity of HA which consists of carboxylic (-COOH and phenolic (-OH functional group were analyzed. The statistical analysis and comparison was using t-test to compare between two means. Results: The variables that showing the significant differences between two plots were pH water and KCl, soil OM, total C and HA yield. The insignificant differences were bulk density, total N, C/N ratio, E4/E6, phenol, carboxyl

  2. Transfer of cadmium and barium from soil to crops grown in tropical soils

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    Leônidas Carrijo Azevedo Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytotoxicity and transfer of potentially toxic elements, such as cadmium (Cd or barium (Ba, depend on the availability of these elements in soils and on the plant species exposed to them. With this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of Cd and Ba application rates on yields of pea (Pisum sativum L., sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., soybean (Glycine max L., and maize (Zea mays L. grown under greenhouse conditions in an Oxisol and an Entisol with contrasting physical and chemical properties, and to correlate the amount taken up by plants with extractants commonly used in routine soil analysis, along with transfer coefficients (Bioconcentration Factor and Transfer Factor in different parts of the plants. Plants were harvested at flowering stage and measured for yield and Cd or Ba concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots. The amount of Cd accumulated in the plants was satisfactorily evaluated by both DTPA and Mehlich-3 (M-3. Mehlich-3 did not relate to Ba accumulated in plants, suggesting it should not be used to predict Ba availability. The transfer coefficients were specific to soils and plants and are therefore not recommended for direct use in risk assessment models without taking soil properties and group of plants into account.

  3. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Joy Eykelbosh

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w. were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w. raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w. in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions.

  4. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  5. DIVERSIDAD FLORÍSTICA DE DOS ZONAS DE BOSQUE TROPICAL HÚMEDO EN EL MUNICIPIO DE ALTO BAUDÓ, CHOCÓ COLOMBIA Floristic Diversity of Two Zones of Humid Tropical Forest at Alto Baudó, Chocó, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS JAVIER MOSQUERA RAMOS

    Full Text Available Entre junio y agosto de 2005 se determinó la composición florística de las plantas ≥1 cm de DAP en un área de 0,2 ha de bosque húmedo tropical en los corregimientos de Pie de Pató (05º 30' 56" N y 76º 58' 26" W y Nauca (5º 41' 6" N y 77º 00' 36" W, Alto Baudó, Chocó Colombia. En cada sitio se muestreó un área de 0,1 ha, la cual se dividió en diez transecto de 2 x 50 m cada uno. Se registraron 1.618 individuos, representados en 257 especies, 156 géneros y 56 familias botánicas de los cuales 842 individuos, 161 especies, 108 géneros y 46 familias fueron encontrados en Pie de Pató, y 776 individuos, 161 especies, 98 géneros y 45 familias en Nauca. En Pie de Pató las familias mejor representadas en lo que se refiere a géneros y especies fueron: Rubiaceae (doce géneros y 27 especies, Arecaceae (ocho géneros y ocho especies y Bombacaceae (siete géneros y diez especies. En Nauca fueron Rubiaceae (once géneros y 25 especies, Moraceae (ocho géneros y trece especies y Arecaceae (ocho géneros y ocho especies. El índice de riqueza arrojó valores de 23,75 y 24,05 para Pie de Pató y Nauca, en cambio la diversidad fue de 4,43 para ambos sitios. Los resultados indican que los bosques del Alto Baudó son muy diversos y de gran importancia para estudios de la diversidad florística, debido a su ubicación estratégica en el departamento del Chocó.Between June and August of 2005 the floristic composition ≥1 cm of DAP was determined in an area of ? 0.2 ha of humid tropical forest at the localities of Pie de >Pató (05º 30' 56" N and 76º 58' 26" W and Nauca (5º 41' 6" N and 77º 00' 36" W, Alto Baudó, Chocó Colombia . En each locality an area of 0.1 ha was sampled which was divided into smaller areas of 2 x 50 cm each. A total of 1618 inidivduals were recorded represented by 257 species, 156 genres and 56 botanical families from which 842 individuals, 161 species, 108 genres and 46 families where found at Pie de Pató, and

  6. Impacts of Dust on Tropical Volcanic Soil Formation: Insights from Strontium and Uranium-Series Isotopes in Soils from Basse-Terre Island, French Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Y.; Ma, L.; Sak, P. B.; Gaillardet, J.; Buss, H. L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dust inputs play an important role in soil formation, especially for thick soils developed on tropical volcanic islands. In these regions, soils are highly depleted due to intensive chemical weathering, and mineral nutrients from dusts have been known to be important in sustaining soil fertility and productivity. Tropical volcanic soils are an ideal system to study the impacts of dust inputs on the ecosystem. Sr and U-series isotopes are excellent tracers to identify sources of materials in an open system if the end-members have distinctive isotope signatures. These two isotope systems are particularly useful to trace the origin of atmospheric inputs into soils and to determine rates and timescales of soil formation. This study analyzes major elemental concentrations, Sr and U-series isotope ratios in highly depleted soils in the tropical volcanic island of Basse-Terre in French Guadeloupe to determine atmospheric input sources and identify key soil formation processes. We focus on three soil profiles (8 to 12 m thick) from the Bras-David, Moustique Petit-Bourg, and Deshaies watersheds; and on the adjacent rivers to these sites. Results have shown a significant depletion of U, Sr, and major elements in the deep profile (12 to 4 m) attributed to rapid chemical weathering. The top soil profiles (4 m to the surface) all show addition of elements such as Ca, Mg, U, and Sr due to atmospheric dust. More importantly, the topsoil profiles have distinct Sr and U-series isotope compositions from the deep soils. Sr and U-series isotope ratios of the top soils and sequential extraction fractions confirm that the sources of the dust are from the Saharan dessert, through long distance transport from Africa to the Caribbean region across the Atlantic Ocean. During the transport, some dust isotope signatures may also have been modified by local volcanic ashes and marine aerosols. Our study highlights that dusts and marine aerosols play important roles in element cycles and

  7. Silicate fertilization of tropical soils: silicon availability and recovery index of sugarcane

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    Mônica Sartori de Camargo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is considered a Si-accumulating plant, but in Brazil, where several soil types are used for cultivation, there is little information about silicon (Si fertilization. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the silicon availability, uptake and recovery index of Si from the applied silicate on tropical soils with and without silicate fertilization, in three crops. The experiments in pots (100 L were performed with specific Si rates (0, 185, 370 and 555 kg ha-1 Si, three soils (Quartzipsamment-Q, 6 % clay; Rhodic Hapludox-RH, 22 % clay; and Rhodic Acrudox-RA, 68 % clay, with four replications. The silicon source was Ca-Mg silicate. The same Ca and Mg quantities were applied to all pots, with lime and/or MgCl2, when necessary. Sugarcane was harvested in the plant cane and first- and second-ratoon crops. The silicon rates increased soil Si availability and Si uptake by sugarcane and had a strong residual effect. The contents of soluble Si were reduced by harvesting and increased with silicate application in the following decreasing order: Q>RH>RA. The silicate rates promoted an increase in soluble Si-acetic acid at harvest for all crops and in all soils, except RA. The amounts of Si-CaCl2 were not influenced by silicate in the ratoon crops. The plant Si uptake increased according to the Si rates and was highest in RA at all harvests. The recovery index of applied Si (RI of sugarcane increased over time, and was highest in RA.

  8. Distinctive tropical forest variants have unique soil microbial communities, but not always low microbial diversity

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    Binu M Tripathi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been little study of whether different variants of tropical rainforest have distinct soil microbial communities and levels of diversity. We compared bacterial and fungal community composition and diversity between primary mixed dipterocarp, secondary mixed dipterocarp, white sand heath, inland heath, and peat swamp forests in Brunei Darussalam, northwest Borneo by analyzing Illumina Miseq sequence data of 16S rRNA gene and ITS1 region. We hypothesized that white sand heath, inland heath and peat swamp forests would show lower microbial diversity and relatively distinct microbial communities (compared to MDF primary and secondary forests due to their distinctive environments. We found that soil properties together with bacterial and fungal communities varied significantly between forest types. Alpha and beta-diversity of bacteria was highest in secondary dipterocarp and white sand heath forests. Also, bacterial alpha diversity was strongly structured by pH, adding another instance of this widespread pattern in nature. The alpha diversity of fungi was equally high in all forest types except peat swamp forest, although fungal beta-diversity was highest in primary and secondary mixed dipterocarp forests. The relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungi varied significantly between forest types, with highest relative abundance observed in MDF primary forest. Overall, our results suggest that the soil bacterial and fungal communities in these forest types are to a certain extent predictable and structured by soil properties, but that diversity is not determined by how distinctive the conditions are. This contrasts with the diversity patterns seen in rainforest trees, where distinctive soil conditions have consistently lower tree diversity.

  9. Toxicity of four veterinary pharmaceuticals on the survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortéa, Talyta; Segat, Julia C; Maccari, Ana Paula; Sousa, José Paulo; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Baretta, Dilmar

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of veterinary pharmaceuticals (VPs) used to control endo- and ectoparasites in ruminants, on the survival and reproduction of the collembolan species Folsomia candida. Standard ecotoxicological tests were conducted in Tropical Artificial Soil and the treatments consisted of increasing dosages of four commercial products with different active ingredients: ivermectin, fipronil, fluazuron and closantel. Ecotoxicological effects were related to the class and mode of action of the different compounds. Fipronil and ivermectin were the most toxic compounds causing a significant reduction in the number of juveniles at the lowest doses tested (LOECreprod values of 0.3 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) of dry soil, respectively) and similar low EC50 values (fipronil: 0.19 mg kg(-1) dry soil, CL95% 0.16-0.22; ivermectin: 0.43 mg kg(-1) dry soil, CL95% 0.09-0.77), although the effects observed in the former compound were possibly related to a low adult survival (LC50 of 0.62 mg kg(-1) dry soil; CL95%: 0.25-1.06). For the latter compound no significant lethal effects were observed. Fluazuron caused an intermediate toxicity (EC50 of 3.07 mg kg(-1) dry soil, CL95%: 2.26-3.87), and also here a decrease in adult survival could explain the effects observed at reproduction. Closantel, despite showing a significant reduction on the number of juveniles produced, no dose-response relationship nor effects higher than 50% were observed. Overall, all tested compounds, especially ivermectin, when present in soil even at sub-lethal concentrations, can impair the reproduction of collembolans and possibly other arthropods. However, the actual risk to arthropod communities should be further investigated performing tests under a more realistic exposure (e.g., by testing the dung itself as the contaminated matrix) and by deriving ecotoxicologically relevant exposure concentration in soil derived from the presence of cattle dung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Water source partitioning among trees growing on shallow karst soils in a seasonally dry tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta, José Ignacio; Estrada-Medina, Héctor; Allen, Michael F; Jiménez-Osornio, Juan José

    2007-05-01

    The sources of water used by woody vegetation growing on karst soils in seasonally dry tropical regions are little known. In northern Yucatan (Mexico), trees withstand 4-6 months of annual drought in spite of the small water storage capacity of the shallow karst soil. We hypothesized that adult evergreen trees in Yucatan tap the aquifer for a reliable supply of water during the prolonged dry season. The naturally occurring concentration gradients in oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes in soil, bedrock, groundwater and plant stem water were used to determine the sources of water used by native evergreen and drought-deciduous tree species. While the trees studied grew over a permanent water table (9-20 m depth), pit excavation showed that roots were largely restricted to the upper 2 m of the soil/bedrock profile. At the peak of the dry season, the delta(18)O signatures of potential water sources for the vegetation ranged from 4.1 +/- 1.1 per thousand in topsoil to -4.3 +/- 0.1 per thousand in groundwater. The delta(18)O values of tree stem water ranged from -2.8 +/- 0.3 per thousand in Talisia olivaeformis to 0.8 +/- 1 per thousand in Ficus cotinifolia, demonstrating vertical partitioning of soil/bedrock water among tree species. Stem water delta(18)O values were significantly different from that of groundwater for all the tree species investigated. Stem water samples plotted to the right of the meteoric water line, indicating utilization of water sources subject to evaporative isotopic enrichment. Foliar delta(13)C in adult trees varied widely among species, ranging from -25.3 +/- 0.3 per thousand in Enterolobium cyclocarpum to -28.7 +/- 0.4 per thousand in T. olivaeformis. Contrary to initial expectations, data indicate that native trees growing on shallow karst soils in northern Yucatan use little or no groundwater and depend mostly on water stored within the upper 2-3 m of the soil/bedrock profile. Water storage in subsurface soil-filled cavities and in the

  11. Effects of land use-change on some properties of tropical soils - An example from Southeast Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Kampichler, C.; Ramos-Reyes, R.; Sepulveda-Lozada, A.; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Jong, de B.H.J.; Huerta-Lwanga, E.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effects of land-use and land-cover changes on physical and chemical properties of soil in tropical South-East Mexico. In the study area of about 5500 km2, the dominant land use is pastureland (Pa seasonal agriculture (TA), fruit plantations (FP), sugarcane, (SC) secondary (SF) and pri

  12. Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. I. Changes in Microbial Functional Potential and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. Bouskill; Tana E. Wood; Richard Baran; Zaw Ye; Benjamin P. Bowen; HsiaoChien Lim; Jizhong Zhou; Joy D. Van Nostrand; Peter Nico; Trent R. Northen; Whendee L. Silver; Eoin L. Brodie

    2016-01-01

    Global climate models predict a future of increased severity of drought in many tropical forests. Soil microbes are central to the balance of these systems as sources or sinks of atmospheric carbon (C), yet how they respond metabolically to drought is not well-understood. We simulated...

  13. Effects of different land use on soil chemical properties, decomposition rate and earthworm communities in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Peña-Peña, K.; Huerta, E.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of land use on soil chemical properties were evaluated, and earthworm communities and the decomposition rate of three typical land use systems in tropical Mexico, namely banana plantations (B), agroforestry systems (AF) and a successional forest (S) were compared. The study was carried o

  14. Non-target effects of pretilachlor on microbial properties in tropical rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Subhashree; Adak, Totan; Bagchi, Torit B; Kumar, Upendra; Munda, Sushmita; Saha, Sanjoy; Berliner, J; Jena, Mayabini; Mishra, B B

    2016-04-01

    The use of herbicides has been questioned in recent past for their non-target effects. Therefore, we planned to study the effect of pretilachlor on growth and activities of microbes in tropical rice soil under controlled condition at National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, India. Three pretilachlor treatments, namely, recommended dose at 600 g a.i. ha(-1) (RD), double the recommended dose at 1200 g a.i. ha(-1) (2RD), and ten times of the recommended dose at 6000 g a.i. ha(-1) (10RD) along with control, were imposed. The initial residue (after 2 h of spray) deposits in soil were 0.174, 0.968, and 3.35 μg g(-1) for recommended, double the recommended, and ten times of the recommended doses, respectively. No residue in soil was detected in RD treatment on day 45. The half life values were 16.90, 17.76, and 36.47 days for RD, 2RD, and 10RD treatments, respectively. Application of pretilachlor at 10RD, in general, had significantly reduced the number of bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, nitrogen fixers, and microbial biomass carbon. Pretilachlor at RD did not record any significant changes in microbial properties compared to control. The results of the present study thus indicated that pretilachlor at RD can be safely used for controlling grassy weeds in rice fields.

  15. Soil macroinvertebrates' abundance and diversity in home gardens in Tabasco, Mexico, vary with soil texture, organic matter and vegetation cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huerta, E.; Wal, van der J.C.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the composition of soil invertebrate communities and vegetation in 50 home gardens in the humid tropical lowlands of Tabasco, Mexico, located in five geomorphological regions. Five monoliths were made in each home garden and soil invertebrates were hand sorted, weighed and classified to m

  16. The relative importance of vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity, and mean and depth-specific soil nutrient availabilities for tree species richness in tropical forests and woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirima, Deo D; Totland, Ørjan; Moe, Stein R

    2016-11-01

    The relative importance of resource heterogeneity and quantity on plant diversity is an ongoing debate among ecologists, but we have limited knowledge on relationships between tree diversity and heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability in tropical forests. We expected tree species richness to be: (1) positively related to vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity; (2) negatively related to mean soil nutrient availability; and (3) more influenced by nutrient availability in the upper than lower soil horizons. Using a data set from 60, 20 × 40-m plots in a moist forest, and 126 plots in miombo woodlands in Tanzania, we regressed tree species richness against vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity, both depth-specific (0-15, 15-30, and 30-60 cm) and mean soil nutrient availability, and soil physical properties, with elevation and measures of anthropogenic disturbance as co-variables. Overall, vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity was the best predictor of tree species richness in miombo but, contrary to our prediction, the relationships between tree species richness and soil nutrient heterogeneity were negative. In the moist forest, mean soil nutrient availability explained considerable variations in tree species richness, and in line with our expectations, these relationships were mainly negative. Soil nutrient availability in the top soil layer explained more of the variation in tree species richness than that in the middle and lower layers in both vegetation types. Our study shows that vertical soil nutrient heterogeneity and mean availability can influence tree species richness at different magnitudes in intensively utilized tropical vegetation types.

  17. Nutrient acquisition, soil phosphorus partitioning and competition among trees in a lowland tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasto, Megan K; Osborne, Brooke B; Lekberg, Ylva; Asner, Gregory P; Balzotti, Christopher S; Porder, Stephen; Taylor, Philip G; Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C

    2017-03-06

    We hypothesized that dinitrogen (N2 )- and non-N2 -fixing tropical trees would have distinct phosphorus (P) acquisition strategies allowing them to exploit different P sources, reducing competition. We measured root phosphatase activity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization among two N2 - and two non-N2 -fixing seedlings, and grew them alone and in competition with different inorganic and organic P forms to assess potential P partitioning. We found an inverse relationship between root phosphatase activity and AM colonization in field-collected seedlings, indicative of a trade-off in P acquisition strategies. This correlated with the predominantly exploited P sources in the seedling experiment: the N2 fixer with high N2 fixation and root phosphatase activity grew best on organic P, whereas the poor N2 fixer and the two non-N2 fixers with high AM colonization grew best on inorganic P. When grown in competition, however, AM colonization, root phosphatase activity and N2 fixation increased in the N2 fixers, allowing them to outcompete the non-N2 fixers regardless of P source. Our results indicate that some tropical trees have the capacity to partition soil P, but this does not eliminate interspecific competition. Rather, enhanced P and N acquisition strategies may increase the competitive ability of N2 fixers relative to non-N2 fixers.

  18. Short-term biochar application induced variations in C and N mineralization in a compost-amended tropical soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jien, Shih-Hao; Chen, Wen-Chi; Ok, Yong Sik; Awad, Yasser Mahmoud; Liao, Chien-Sen

    2017-06-01

    To mitigate food shortage due to global warming, developing sustainable management practices to stabilize soil organic matter (SOM) and sequester more carbon (C) in the cultivated soils is necessary, particularly in subtropical and tropical areas. A short-term (56 days) incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the influences of rice husk biochar (RHB) and manure compost (MC) application on C mineralization and nitrogen (N) immobilization in a sandy loam soil. The RHB was separately incorporated into the soil at application rates of 2 and 4% (w/w) either with or without 1% (w/w) compost. Our results displayed that macroaggregates (≥2 mm) were obviously increased by 11% in soil amended with RHB + MC at the end of incubation. In addition, the experimental results presented that the C mineralization of the soil rapidly increased during the first week of incubation. However, the co-application of compost with biochar (RHB + MC) revealed that CO2 emission was significantly decreased by 13-20% compared to the soil with only MC. In addition, the mineralized N in the soil was lower in RHB + MC-amended soil simultaneously than only MC-amended soil, indicating that biochar addition induced N immobilization. The physical protection of compost by its occlusion into aggregates or adsorption on surface of RHB as proved by the micromorphological observation was the main reason for lower C and N mineralization in soil amended with RHB + MC. Overall results revealed that RHB + MC treatment can decrease the decomposition of compost and sequester more C in the tropical agricultural soils.

  19. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  20. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  1. Towards the field-scale experiments and numerical modeling of pesticides in tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Ray, C.; Sanda, M.; Vogel, T.; Green, R.; Loo, B.

    2004-12-01

    Intensive use of pesticides in agriculture inevitably poses an increased threat to groundwater. Recent findings of pesticide residues in selected drinking water wells in Hawaii brings further attention to this problem since the primary source for potable water in Hawaii is groundwater from basal or dike-confined aquifers. A challenging research project was carried out at the University of Hawaii to elucidate potential impacts of selected pesticides on groundwater and to understand pesticide behavior in tropical soils. The major outcome of the project will be a recommendation to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture whether to restrict or approve these pesticide products entering Hawaii's agricultural market. Three sites on Oahu, one on Maui, and one on Kauai were selected for field evaluation of leaching. The soil types on Oahu are Wahiawa Oxisol (Poamoho), Molokai Oxisol (Kunia), and Waialua Vertisol (Waimanalo). The soil at Kula, Maui is an andisol (loam of Kula series) and that at Mana, Kauai is a Vertisol of Malama series. Three herbicides (S-metolachlor, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl), one fungicide (trifloxystrobin), and one insecticide (imidacloprid) were used in our study. In addition, a commonly used herbicide (atrazine) and potassium bromide tracer were applied as reference chemicals. After spraying, the plots were covered with straw to decrease evaporation from bare soil surface and irrigated with aerial sprinklers for a period of 16 weeks. Disturbed soil samples from various depths were taken at regular intervals for pesticide analysis. Water flow dynamics was monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers installed at three depths. Weather data were acquired simultaneously. In-situ measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were done using a tension disc infiltrometer. Laboratory experiments of soil-water retention, as well as degradation, sorption, and column displacement experiments for the selected pesticides were conducted. Hence, comprehensive

  2. Subsoil C dynamics in tropical soils under different crop management on Jawa, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Organic carbon (OC) in the subsoil is a key in anthropogenic CO2 discussions considering its relation to the potential of carbon stabilization and sequestration in soils. In the frame of the DFG Research Unit FOR995, "Biogeochemistry of paddy soil evolution" we studied subsoil organic carbon dynamics down to ca. 1 m depth, using the natural 13C and 14C signal together with total organic carbon (TOC) measurements, in three different tropical soil types with paired paddy and non-paddy sites on Jawa, Indonesia. Soil types consisted of Andosols, Alisols, and Vertisols. The sites have different climatic conditions, soil processes, and hydrology. Organic (roots, seeds, leaves) and mineral remains (concretions) were collected on a 0.37 mm sieve by wet-sieving. Acid-alkali-acid treatments were employed to separate alkali-soluble humic acids, and insoluble humin fractions. Generally, OC distribution patterns highly correspond with abundant plant remains. OC values range from 0.30 to 3.69% in the Andosol, 0.50 to 2.24% in the Alisol, and 0.20 to 0.90% in the Vertisol. Typically, OC values decrease along the depth with a concentration gap at ca. 0.15 to 0.30 m and at ca. 0.75 to 1 m. The extent of this gap is following the order Andosol>Alisol>Vertisol, implying less transported/accumulated OC in the upper layer (0.15 to 0.30 m) of Andosol than in the other two. C/N ratio has been always higher at the upper layer than at lower layers of subsoil, which indicates more stable OC at the deeper profile. In addition, the irregularity of OC distribution is high in Andosol, as expressed by coefficient of variation (CV) of ca. 80%. Conversely, CV values in Alisol and Vertisol are lower at ca. 39 and 40%. OC values were higher under non-paddy management than paddy management except for upper ca. 0.25 m of Andosol. The organic carbon concentration in the subsoil relates to existing plant remains (seeds, roots, leaves) in particular layers. The extent of their dynamics much depends on

  3. Experimental Air Warming of a Stylosanthes capitata, Vogel Dominated Tropical Pasture Affects Soil Respiration and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Silva, Lais B. C.; Dias-De-Oliveira, Eduardo; Flower, Charles E.; Martinez, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Warming due to global climate change is predicted to reach 2°C in tropical latitudes. There is an alarming paucity of information regarding the effects of air temperature on tropical agroecosystems, including foraging pastures. Here, we investigated the effects of a 2°C increase in air temperature over ambient for 30 days on an established tropical pasture (Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil) dominated by the legume Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, using a T-FACE (temperature free-air controlled enhancement) system. We tested the effects of air warming on soil properties [carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and their stable isotopic levels (δ13C and δ15N), as well as soil respiration and soil enzymatic activity] and aboveground characteristics (foliar C, N, δ13C, δ15N, leaf area index, and aboveground biomass) under field conditions. Results show that experimental air warming moderately increased soil respiration rates compared to ambient temperature. Soil respiration was positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture during mid-day (when soil respiration was at its highest) but not at dusk. Foliar δ13C were not different between control and elevated temperature treatments, indicating that plants grown in warmed plots did not show the obvious signs of water stress often seen in warming experiments. The 15N isotopic composition of leaves from plants grown at elevated temperature was lower than in ambient plants, suggesting perhaps a higher proportion of N-fixation contributing to tissue N in warmed plants when compared to ambient ones. Soil microbial enzymatic activity decreased in response to the air warming treatment, suggesting a slower decomposition of organic matter under elevated air temperature conditions. Decreased soil enzyme capacity and increases in soil respiration and plant biomass in plots exposed to high temperature suggest that increased root activity may have caused the increase seen in soil respiration in this tropical pasture. This response

  4. Extreme emission of N2O from tropical wetland soil (Pantanal, South America)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Liengård; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleter, but the global budget of N(2)O remains unbalanced. Currently, ~25% of the global N(2)O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. Here we present....... In the field, O(2) penetrated the upper 60¿cm of drained soil, but was depleted in response to precipitation. Upon experimental wetting the soil showed rapid O(2) depletion followed by N(2)O accumulation and a peak emission of N(2)O [Formula: see text] Assuming that the observed emission of N(2)O from...

  5. Rare earth elements in tropical surface water,soil and sediments of the Terengganu River Basin,Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar; Sultan; Noor; Azhar; Shazili

    2009-01-01

    The 14 stable rare earth element(REE) concentrations and distribution patterns were investigated for surface waters(n=51),soils(n=52) and sediments(n=42) from the tropical Terengganu River basin,Malaysia.The chondrite normalized REE patterns of soils developed on four geological units showed enrichment of LREE,a pronounced negative Eu,and depletion of HREE with an enrichment order granite>>metasedimentary>alluvium>volcanic.The REE patterns in sediments reflected the soil REE patterns with an overall order o...

  6. A simple daily soil-water balance model for estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge in temperate humid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dripps, W.R.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal distribution of natural groundwater recharge is usually a prerequisite for effective groundwater modeling and management. As flow models become increasingly utilized for management decisions, there is an increased need for simple, practical methods to delineate recharge zones and quantify recharge rates. Existing models for estimating recharge distributions are data intensive, require extensive parameterization, and take a significant investment of time in order to establish. The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) has developed a simple daily soil-water balance (SWB) model that uses readily available soil, land cover, topographic, and climatic data in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of groundwater recharge at the watershed scale for temperate humid areas. To demonstrate the methodology and the applicability and performance of the model, two case studies are presented: one for the forested Trout Lake watershed of north central Wisconsin, USA and the other for the urban-agricultural Pheasant Branch Creek watershed of south central Wisconsin, USA. Overall, the SWB model performs well and presents modelers and planners with a practical tool for providing recharge estimates for modeling and water resource planning purposes in humid areas. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  7. Simple and Rapid Method of Isolating Humic Acids from Tropical Peat Soils (Saprists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddin Rosliza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The isolation (extraction, fractionation and purification of humic acids (HA from soils is laborious, time consuming and expensive. The extraction, fractionation and purification periods of these substances vary from 12 h-7 days. In order to facilitate production of HA at competitive cost, this study was conducted to investigate whether a simple and rapid procedure could be developed for isolation of HA from well decomposed tropical peat soils (Saprists. Approach: A 0.1 M KOH was used to isolate HA of air dry peat soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 h extraction periods after which samples (liquid obtained after centrifugation at 16,211 G for 15 min were fractionated (using 6 M HCl at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 h. Samples were purified by washing them five times using distilled water instead of using HCl, HF, and an expensive process called dialysis that requires 1 to 7 days to purify HA. Each washing time was 10 min. Standard procedures were used to ascertain the purity (Ash, C, E4/E6, carboxylic, phenolic, total acidity, and K, Ca, Mg, and Na and quantity of HA yield. Statistical Analysis System (SAS was used for statistical analysis. Results: Although there was a linear relationship between extraction period and HA yield, there was no relationship between fractionation period and yield of HA. Distilled water used in this study was effective in purifying HA of the Saprists within 1 h without altering the true chemical nature of HA as it significantly reduced the mineral content of HA. Besides, C, E4/E6, carboxylic, phenolic, and total acidity of the isolated HA were typical of standard ones. Conclusion: The isolation of HA from peat soils can be reduced to 9 h (4 h extraction period, 4 h fractionation period and 1 h purification period instead of the existing range of 1 to 7 days.

  8. Breakdown of Azadirachtin A in a Tropical Soil Amended with Neem Leaves and Animal Manures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A field investigation was conducted to assess the breakdown of azadirachtin A in a tropical coastal savanna soil amended with neem leaves (NL) combined with poultry manure (PM) or cow dung (CD) using gas chromatography. Samples in polythene bags 15 cm long and 4.8 cm in diameter were randomly placed to a depth of 14 cm in the soil, and azadirachtin A concentration was assessed on days 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, and 84. Azadirachtin A degradation in the soil followed first-order reaction kinetics with different half-lives obtained for varying combinations of the amendments. Higher neem amendment levels of 100 g gave shorter half-lives of azadirachtin A than the lower levels of 50 g. Within the 50 g NL group the additions of the poultry manure and the cow dung gave significantly shorter (P < 0.05) half-lives of azadirachtin A than the sole neem amendment, whereas in the 100 g NL group only additions of 10 g CD and 10 g PM were significantly less (P < 0.05) than the sole neem amendment. Different changes resulting from the kind and quantity of animal manure added were observed in the half-lives of azadirachtin A. The 100 g NL group had significantly higher (P < 0.05) moisture content, which, coupled with the likely differences in microbial biomass, could be the major factor responsible for variations in the half-life of the compound. Therefore, the quantity of the neem leaves applied and the addition of animal manure affected the breakdown of azadirachtin A in the soil amended with neem leaves.

  9. Assessing chromate availability in tropical ultramafic soils using isotopic exchange kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, Jeremie; Quantin, Cecile [Univ. Paris Sud CNRS, Orsay (France); Echevarria, Guillaume [ENSAIA-INPL-INRA, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Becquer, Thierry [IRD - Univ. Paris VI and XII, Montpellier (France)

    2009-10-15

    Background, aim, and scope The presence of labile chromate in the soils is an environmental problem because of its high toxicity. The isotopic exchange kinetics (IEK) methods have been shown to be a useful tool to measure the phytoavailability of major (P, K) and trace elements (Cd, Zn, Ni, Pb) in soils. This study focused on the potential of applying IEK for chromate to characterize its availability in two tropical ultramafic Ferralsols. Materials and methods Two Ferralsols (NIQ II and NIQ III) of the ultramafic complex of Niquelandia (Goias, Brazil), known to have a high content of extractable chromate, were investigated. We adapted IEK for chromate in order to distinguish different pools of available chromate according to their rate of exchange kinetic. Results The extractable Cr(III) ranged from 9 to 132 mg kg{sup -1}, whereas extractable Cr(VI) ranged from 64 to 1,014 mg kg{sup -1}. The intensity factor, i.e., concentration of soluble Cr, ranged from 78 to 231 {mu}g L{sup -1} in profile NIQ II and from 6 to 141 {mu}g L{sup -1} in profile NIQ III. The highest concentrations were found in both topsoils and in the NIQ II-5 horizon. Most of the Cr(VI) was labile in short (E{sub 0-1} {sub min}) or medium-term (E{sub 1} {sub min-24} {sub h}) in both soils. The E{sub 0-1} {sub min} and E{sub 1} {sub min-24} {sub h} represented 39 to 83% of labile Cr (VI) in NIQ II and 69 to 80% in NIQ III. A high quantity of Cr(VI) was thus extremely labile and highly available, particularly in NIQ II. Moreover, both soils had a high buffering capacity of soluble Cr(VI) by labile pools. (orig.)

  10. Degradation of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates in tropical forest and mangrove soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew-Ping; Gan, Seng-Neon; Tan, Irene K P

    2005-07-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are perceived to be a suitable alternative to petrochemical plastics because they have similar material properties, are environmentally degradable, and are produced from renewable resources. In this study, the in situ degradation of medium-chain-length PHA (PHAMCL) films in tropical forest and mangrove soils was assessed. The PHAMCL was produced by Pseudomonas putida PGA1 using saponified palm kernel oil (SPKO) as the carbon source. After 112 d of burial, there was 16.7% reduction in gross weight of the films buried in acidic forest soil (FS), 3.0% in the ones buried in alkaline forest soil by the side of a stream (FSst) and 4.5% in those buried in mangrove soil (MS). There was a slight decrease in molecular weight for the films buried in FS but not for the films buried in FSst and in MS. However, no changes were observed for the melting temperature, glass transition temperature, monomer compositions, structure, and functional group analyses of the films from any of the burial sites during the test period. This means that the integral properties of the films were maintained during that period and degradation was by surface erosion. Scanning electron microscopy of the films from the three sites revealed holes on the film surfaces which could be attributed to attack by microorganisms and bigger organisms such as detritivores. For comparison purposes, films of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a short-chain-length PHA, and polyethylene (PE) were buried together with the PHAMCL films in all three sites. The PHB films disintegrated completely in MS and lost 73.5% of their initial weight in FSst, but only 4.6% in FS suggesting that water movement played a major role in breaking up the brittle PHB films. The PE films did not register any weight loss in any of the test sites.

  11. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be

  12. Changes in soil biological quality under legume- and maize-based farming systems in a humid savanna zone of Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tano Y.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying the impact of farming systems on soil status is essential in determining the most relevant for a given agroecological zone. A trial was conducted in a West Africa humid savanna, aiming at assessing the short-term effects of farming systems on soil (0-10 cm organic carbon (SOC content and some soil microbiological properties. A randomized complete block experimental design with three replications, and the following treatments were used: Mucuna pruriens (Mucuna, Pueraria phaseoloides (Pueraria, Lablab purpureus (Lablab, a combination of these three legumes (Mixed-legumes, maize + urea (Maize-U, maize + triple super phosphate (Maize-Sp, maize + urea + triple super phosphate (Maize-USp, fertilizer-free maize continuous cropping (Maize-Tradi. Results indicated that SOC content was improved over time under legume-based systems. The relative increase was the highest with the legume association and Lablab, where SOC varied from 7.5 to 8.6 g.kg-1 (i.e. 14.7% and from 7.2 to 8.3 g.kg-1 (i.e. 15.3% respectively, between the start and the end of the trial. Besides, applying grass and maize residues as mulch on the ground, in association with inorganic fertilizers may be a way of improving SOC content in the short-term. Although legume-based systems exhibited highest values, microbial biomass carbon (MBC did not show any statistical significant differences between treatments. However, soil C mineralization and soil specific respiration were influenced by the farming systems, with higher mean values under legume-based systems (42 ± 7.6 mg C-CO2.g-1 Corg and 0.4 mg C-CO2.g-1 biomass C, respectively, compared to maize continuous cropping systems (33.1 ± 1.6 mg C-CO2.g-1 Corg and 0.3 mg C-CO2.g-1 biomass C, respectively. Thus, these parameters can be used as sensitive indicators of the early changes in soil organic matter quality. The integration of legumes cover crops in farming systems may contribute to improve soil quality that would lead to

  13. Analysis of Differences in Productivity, Proiftability and Soil Fertility Between Organic and Conventional Cropping Systems in the Tropics and Sub-tropics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Te Pas CM; Rees RM

    2014-01-01

    Organic farming aims to stimulate soil fertility by avoiding the use of synthetic fertiliser inputs, relying instead on locally available natural resources. It is regarded by many as a sustainable alternative to conventional farming because it ensures higher biodiversity, restricts environmental pollution, prevents land degradation and is easy to apply for smallholder and subsistence farmers. Although widely practiced and studied in temperate regions, little is known about the potential overall beneifts of organic farming in the tropics and subtropics. This paper addresses this gap by undertaking an analysis of the differences between organic and conventional agriculture in the tropics and sub-tropics based on an extensive literature review including 88 papers with 458 data pairs. The comparison is based on three main indicators:yield, gross margin and soil organic carbon (SOC). The differences between the organic and conventional systems for each of these main indicators is represented by the ratio of the value of the indicator in the organic system divided by the corresponding value in the conventional system. This was initially calculated for each data pair individually, and grouped by a variety of explanatory factors, such as precipitation, human development level, soil texture, crop type, organic input type, time after conversion and certiifcation. The results demonstrate that under organic management, yields were on average 26%higher, gross margins 51%higher and soil organic carbon 53%higher than under conventional management. The highest yield increases in organic cropping systems were achieved in the least developed countries, in arid regions and on coarse soils. For gross margins, certiifcation was the main reason for differences between organic and conventional systems. Certiifed farmers, mostly located in developed countries, receive signiifcantly higher prices. Furthermore, organic farming in the driest regions results in higher proifts than in other

  14. Changes in the diversity of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi after cultivation for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba tropical system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Alguacil

    Full Text Available The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba, in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems.

  15. Changes in the diversity of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi after cultivation for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) tropical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Hernández, Guillermina; Roldán, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems.

  16. Changes in the Diversity of Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi after Cultivation for Biofuel Production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) Tropical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Hernández, Guillermina; Roldán, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems. PMID:22536339

  17. How deep does disturbance go? The long-term effects of canopy disturbance on tropical forest soil biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    We used the Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE), an ongoing ecosystem manipulation study in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico to determine the decadal-scale effects of canopy disturbance and debris deposition on biogeochemistry throughout the soil profile of a wet tropical forest. These manipulations represent the most significant effects of hurricanes, which may increase in frequency or intensity with warming, strengthening their ecosystem-level effects on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling. Four replicated treatments were applied in 2005 using a complete randomized block design: canopy trimming + debris deposition, canopy trimming only, debris deposition only, and untreated control. In 2015, we sampled soils at 10 cm intervals to 1 m depth in each of 12 plots (3 per treatment). We measured gravimetric moisture content, pH, HCl and citrate-ascorbate (CA) extractable iron (Fe) species, organic (Po) and inorganic fractions of NaHCO3 and NaOH phosphorus (P), as well as total C and nitrogen (N). Soil moisture decreased markedly with depth up to ~60-70 cm, and then stabilized at ~33% down to 1 m. Across all treatments, pH increased significantly with depth, ranging from 4.6 in surface soils (0-10 cm) of trimmed plots to 5.2 in deep soils (80-90 cm) of control plots. Canopy trimming decreased pH significantly, possibly due to increased root activity in surface soils as vegetation recovered. Both HCl and CA extractable Fe showed strong depth dependance, decreasing linearly to 50 cm, and stabilizing at very low concentrations (soil profile (deposition significantly increased Po, revealing the role of hurricanes in subsidizing the available soil P pool in these highly productive, low-P wet tropical forests. Debris deposition also increased soil C and N concentrations in surface soils (soil profile in this wet tropical forest. However, effects were persistent and detectable after ten years of the CTE, suggesting that hurricanes result in long-term changes in

  18. A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tims S.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ~1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.

  19. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  20. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  1. Spatial scaling effects on soil bacterial communities in Malaysian tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Lee-Cruz, Larisa; Kim, Mincheol; Singh, Dharmesh; Go, Rusea; Shukor, Noraini A A; Husni, M H A; Chun, Jongsik; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-08-01

    Spatial scaling to some extent determines biodiversity patterns in larger organisms, but its role in microbial diversity patterns is much less understood. Some studies have shown that bacterial community similarity decreases with distance, whereas others do not support this. Here, we studied soil bacterial communities of tropical rainforest in Malaysia at two spatial scales: a local scale with samples spaced every 5 mover a 150-m transect, and a regional scale with samples 1 to 1,800 km apart. PCR-amplified soil DNA for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene targeting the V1–V3 region was pyrosequenced using Roche/454 GS FLX Titanium platform. A ranked partial Mantel test showed a weak correlation between spatial distance and whole bacterial community dissimilarity, but only at the local scale. In contrast, environmental distance was highly correlated with community dissimilarity at both spatial scales,stressing the greater role of environmental variables rather than spatial distance in determining bacterial community variation at different spatial scales. Soil pH was the only environmental parameter that significantly explained the variance in bacterial community at the local scale, whereas total nitrogen and elevation were additional important factors at the regional scale.We obtained similar results at both scales when only the most abundant OTUs were analyzed. A variance partitioning analysis showed that environmental variables contributed more to bacterial community variation than spatial distance at both scales. In total, our results support a strong influence of the environment in determining bacterial community composition in the rainforests of Malaysia. However, it is possible that the remaining spatial distance effect is due to some of the myriad of other environmental factors which were not considered here, rather than dispersal limitation.

  2. Overstory structure and soil nutrients effect on plant diversity in unmanaged moist tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Manhas, Rajesh Kumar; Tripathi, Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Forests with intensive management past are kept unmanaged to restore diversity and ecosystem functioning. Before perpetuating abandonment after protracted restitution, understanding its effect on forest vegetation is desirable. We studied plant diversity and its relation with environmental variables and stand structure in northern Indian unmanaged tropical moist deciduous forest. We hypothesized that post-abandonment species richness would have increased, and the structure of contemporary forest would be heterogeneous. Vegetation structure, composition, and diversity were recorded, in forty 0.1 ha plots selected randomly in four forest ranges. Three soil samples per 0.1 ha were assessed for physicochemistry, fine sand, and clay mineralogy. Contemporary forest had less species richness than pre-abandonment reference period. Fourteen species were recorded as either seedling or sapling, suggesting reappearance or immigration. For most species, regeneration was either absent or impaired. Ordination and multiple regression results showed that exchangeable base cations and phosphorous affected maximum tree diversity and structure variables. Significant correlations between soil moisture and temperature, and shrub layer was observed, besides tree layer correspondence with shrub richness, suggesting that dense overstory resulting from abandonment through its effect on soil conditions, is responsible for dense shrub layer. Herb layer diversity was negatively associated with tree layer and shrub overgrowth (i.e. Mallotus spp.). Protracted abandonment may not reinforce species richness and heterogeneity; perhaps result in high tree and shrub density in moist deciduous forests, which can impede immigrating or reappearing plant species establishment. This can be overcome by density/basal area reduction strategies, albeit for both tree and shrub layer.

  3. Soil organic matter pools in a tropical savanna under agroforestry system in Northeastern Brazil

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    Luiz Fernando Carvalho Leite

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at quantifying total organic carbon stocks and its pools in Acrisol under agroforestry systems with six (AFS6 and thirteen years old (AFS13, slash-and-burn agriculture (SBA and savanna native forest (SNF in northeastern Brazil. Soil samples were collected at 0-0.05 m, 0.05-0.10 m, 0.10-0.20 m and 0.20-0.40 m depths in the dry and rainy seasons to evaluate total organic carbon (TOC stocks and labile carbon (LC, fulvic acid fraction (C-FAF, humic acid fraction (C-HAF, humin (C-HF and microbial biomass carbon (Cmic contents. Additionally, carbon management index (CMI was determined. Higher TOC stocks (97.7 and 81.8 Mg ha-1 for the 0-0.40 m depth in the dry and rainy seasons, respectively and LC, humic substances and Cmic contents were observed in the AFS13 in all the depths. CMI also was higher in the AFS13 (0-0. 05 m: 158 and 86; 0.05-0.10 m: 171 and 67, respectively for the dry and rainy seasons especially when compared to the SBA (0-0.05 m: 5.6 and 5.4; 0.05-0.10 m: 5.3 and 5.8, respectively for dry and rainy seasons. The agroforestry systems increased soil quality through the conservation of organic matter and can be considered an excellent strategy to assurance sustainability in tropical soil of Northeastern Brazil

  4. Variations in soil carbon sequestration and their determinants along a precipitation gradient in seasonally dry tropical forest ecosystems.

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    Campo, Julio; Merino, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    The effect of precipitation regime on the C cycle of tropical forests is poorly understood, despite the existence of models that suggest a drier climate may substantially alter the source-sink function of these ecosystems. Along a precipitation regime gradient containing 12 mature seasonally dry tropical forests growing under otherwise similar conditions (similar annual temperature, rainfall seasonality, and geological substrate), we analyzed the influence of variation in annual precipitation (1240 to 642 mm) and duration of seasonal drought on soil C. We investigated litterfall, decomposition in the forest floor, and C storage in the mineral soil, and analyzed the dependence of these processes and pools on precipitation. Litterfall decreased slightly - about 10% - from stands with 1240 mm yr(-1) to those with 642 mm yr(-1), while the decomposition decreased by 56%. Reduced precipitation strongly affected C storage and basal respiration in the mineral soil. Higher soil C storage at the drier sites was also related to the higher chemical recalcitrance of litter (fine roots and forest floor) and the presence of charcoal across sites, suggesting an important indirect influence of climate on C sequestration. Basal respiration was controlled by the amount of recalcitrant organic matter in the mineral soil. We conclude that in these forest ecosystems, the long-term consequences of decreased precipitation would be an increase in organic layer and mineral soil C storage, mainly due to lower decomposition and higher chemical recalcitrance of organic matter, resulting from changes in litter composition and, likely also, wildfire patterns. This could turn these seasonally dry tropical forests into significant soil C sinks under the predicted longer drought periods if primary productivity is maintained.

  5. Growth and Physiological Response of Tropical Lianas and Trees to Elevated CO2 and Soil Nutrient Availability

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    Marvin, D. C.; Morrison, E.; Quebbeman, A.; Turner, B. L.; Winter, K.

    2012-12-01

    The recent increase in the abundance and size of native lianas (woody climbing vines) in tropical forests may lead to changes in species community composition and decreased carbon storage capacity (Schnitzer & Bongers 2011). Lianas are associated with an increased risk of tree mortality and decreased tree growth due to intense above and belowground competition with trees for light, water, and soil nutrients (Schnitzer & Bongers 2002). Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition are potential drivers of the liana increase. Phosphorus availability, often assumed to be of key importance in constraining the productivity of lowland tropical forests, may decline as a consequence of increased nitrogen deposition (Matson et al. 1999). Our goal is to determine whether there is any difference in the growth and physiological response of tropical lianas and trees grown under elevated CO2, and whether any response differs as soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability change. We investigated locally abundant tropical liana and tree species grown in open-top chambers in Panama, half of which were maintained at twice-ambient levels of CO2. In two separate studies, seedlings were grown in pots that had either reduced soil nitrogen or phosphorus. Half of the pots in each experiment then received weekly additions of a nutrient mixture to return the soil nutrients to current levels found in neotropical forests. We found that elevated CO2 alone leads to a larger relative increase in the biomass of lianas than trees. The relative effect of elevated CO2 on the increase in liana biomass was much larger under low soil phosphorus availability. Nitrogen fertilization in combination with elevated CO2 led to a greater increase in tree height compared to lianas, but no other differences in growth response were found between the two plant types. These results suggest the liana increase will continue as elevated CO2 increases and phosphorus limitation is strengthened by increasing

  6. Progresses in Research on Denitrification in Tropical and Subtropical Soils of Terrestrial Ecosystems%热带亚热带土壤氮素反硝化研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    续勇波; XU Zhihong; 蔡祖聪

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification has been extensively studied in soils from temperate zones in industrialized countries. However, few studies quantifying denitrification rates in soils from tropical and subtropical zones have been reported. Denitrification mechanisms in tropical/subtropical soils may be different from other soils, due to their unique soil characteristics. The identification of denitrification in the area is crucial to understand the role of denitrification in the global nitrogen (N) cycle in terrestrial ecosystems, and in the interaction between global environmental changes and ecosystem responses. We review the existing literature on microbially-mediated denitrification in tropical/subtropical soils, attempting to provide a better understanding about and new research directions for denitrification in these regions. Tropical and subtropical soils might be characterized by generally lower denitrification capacity than temperate soils, with greater variability due to land use and management practices varying temporally and spatially. Factors that influence soil water content and the nature and rate of carbon (C) and N turnover are the landscape and field scale controls of denitrification. High redox potential in the field, which is mainly attributed to soil oxide enrichment, may be at least one critical edaphic variable responsible for slow denitrification rates in the humid tropical and subtropical soils. However, soil pH is not responsible for these slow denitrification rates. Organic C mineralization is more important than total N content and C/N in determining denitrification capacity in humid subtropical soils. There is increasing evidence that the ecological consequence of denitrification in tropical and subtropical soils may be different from that of temperate zones. Contribution of denitrification in tropical and subtropical regions to the global climate warming should be considered comprehensively since it could affect other greenhouse gases, such as methane

  7. Farm management, not soil microbial diversity, controls nutrient loss from smallholder tropical agriculture.

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    Wood, Stephen A; Almaraz, Maya; Bradford, Mark A; McGuire, Krista L; Naeem, Shahid; Neill, Christopher; Palm, Cheryl A; Tully, Katherine L; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Tropical smallholder agriculture is undergoing rapid transformation in nutrient cycling pathways as international development efforts strongly promote greater use of mineral fertilizers to increase crop yields. These changes in nutrient availability may alter the composition of microbial communities with consequences for rates of biogeochemical processes that control nutrient losses to the environment. Ecological theory suggests that altered microbial diversity will strongly influence processes performed by relatively few microbial taxa, such as denitrification and hence nitrogen losses as nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Whether this theory helps predict nutrient losses from agriculture depends on the relative effects of microbial community change and increased nutrient availability on ecosystem processes. We find that mineral and organic nutrient addition to smallholder farms in Kenya alters the taxonomic and functional diversity of soil microbes. However, we find that the direct effects of farm management on both denitrification and carbon mineralization are greater than indirect effects through changes in the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities. Changes in functional diversity are strongly coupled to changes in specific functional genes involved in denitrification, suggesting that it is the expression, rather than abundance, of key functional genes that can serve as an indicator of ecosystem process rates. Our results thus suggest that widely used broad summary statistics of microbial diversity based on DNA may be inappropriate for linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes in certain applied settings. Our results also raise doubts about the relative control of microbial composition compared to direct effects of management on nutrient losses in applied settings such as tropical agriculture.

  8. Farm management, not soil microbial diversity, controls nutrient loss from smallholder tropical agriculture

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    Stephen A Wood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical smallholder agriculture supports the livelihoods of over 900 million of the world’s poorest people. This form of agriculture is undergoing rapid transformation in nutrient cycling pathways as international development efforts strongly promote greater use of mineral fertilizers to increase crop yields. These changes in nutrient availability may alter the composition of microbial communities with consequences for rates of biogeochemical processes that control nutrient losses to the environment. Ecological theory suggests that altered microbial diversity will strongly influence processes performed by relatively few microbial taxa, such as denitrification and hence nitrogen losses as nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Whether this theory helps predict nutrient losses from agriculture depends on the relative effects of microbial community change and increased nutrient availability on ecosystem processes. We find that mineral and organic nutrient addition to smallholder farms in Kenya alters the taxonomic and functional diversity of soil microbes. However, we find that the direct effects of farm management on both denitrification and carbon mineralization are greater than indirect effects through changes in the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities. Changes in functional diversity are strongly coupled to changes in specific functional genes involved in denitrification, suggesting that it is the expression, rather than abundance, of key functional genes that can serve as an indicator of ecosystem process rates. Our results thus suggest that widely used broad summary statistics of microbial diversity based on DNA may be inappropriate for linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes in certain applied settings. Our results also raise doubts about the relative control of microbial composition compared to direct effects of management on nutrient losses in applied settings such as tropical agriculture.

  9. A Description of an Acidophilic, Iron Reducer, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 Isolated from Tropical Soils

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    Healy, O.; Souchek, J.; Heithoff, A.; LaMere, B.; Pan, D.; Hollis, G.; Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.; Weber, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and plays a significant role controlling the geochemistry in soils, sediments, and aquatic systems. As part of a study to understand microbially-catalysed iron biogeochemical cycling in tropical soils, an iron reducing isolate, strain FeAm09, was obtained. Strain FeAm09 was isolated from acidic, Fe-rich soils collected from a tropical forest (Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico). Strain FeAm09 is a rod-shaped, motile, Gram-negative bacterium. Taxonomic analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain FeAm09 is 94.7% similar to Geobacter lovleyi, placing it in the genus Geobacter within the Family Geobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. Characterization of the optimal growth conditions revealed that strain FeAm09 is a moderate acidophile with an optimal growth pH of 5.0. The optimal growth temperature was 37°C. Growth of FeAm09 was coupled to the reduction of soluble Fe(III), Fe(III)-NTA, with H2, fumarate, ethanol, and various organic acids and sugars serving as the electron donor. Insoluble Fe(III), in the form of synthetic ferrihydrite, was reduced by strain FeAm09 using acetate or H2 as the electron donor. The use of H2 as an electron donor in the presence of CO2 and absence of organic carbon and assimilation of 14C-labelled CO2 into biomass indicate that strain FeAm09 is an autotrophic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium. Together, these data describe the first acidophilic, autotrophic Geobacter species. Iron reducing bacteria were previously shown to be as abundant in tropical soils as in saturated sediments (lake-bottoms) and saturated soils (wetlands) where Fe(III) reduction is more commonly recognized as a dominant mode of microbial respiration. Furthermore, Fe(III) reduction was identified as a primary driver of carbon mineralization in these tropical soils (Dubinsky et al. 2010). In addition to mineralizing organic carbon, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 is likely to also

  10. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

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    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  11. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

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    Q. Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus. This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3−, and POx (representing the sum of PO43−, HPO42−, and H2PO4− and five potential competitors (plant roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces. The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos. The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive followed this order: (1 for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2 for NO3−, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3 for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest

  12. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3- and POx; representing the sum of PO43-, HPO42- and H2PO4-) and five potential competitors (plant roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus and NH4+ pools at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results also imply that under strong nutrient limitation, relative competitiveness depends strongly on the competitor functional traits (affinity and nutrient carrier enzyme abundance). We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among