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Sample records for humeral head fractures

  1. Humeral Shaft Fracture: Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sanjit R; Saleh, Hesham; Fisher, Nina; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    This video demonstrates the technique of intramedullary nailing for a humeral shaft fracture. The patient is a 30-year-old man who sustained a gunshot wound to his right arm. The patient was indicated for humeral nailing given the comminuted nature of the diaphysis and to allow for minimal skin incisions. Other relative indications include soft-tissue compromise about the arm precluding a large surgical exposure. This video presents a case of a comminuted humeral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail. Anatomic reduction and stable fixation was obtained with this technique. This case demonstrates a soft-tissue sparing technique of humeral shaft fixation using a humeral intramedullary nail. The technique is easy to perform and has significant benefits in minimizing surgical exposure, decreasing operative time, and decreasing blood loss. In the correct clinical setting, humeral nailing provides an expeditious form of fixation that restores length, alignment, and rotation of the fracture humeral diaphysis.

  2. New classification of proximal humeral fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, W R; Rupp, H G; Siebler, G

    1986-08-01

    Neer's classification of humeral fractures was proved on 657 patients. This classification enables the radiologist to estimate the risk of avascular necrosis of the head of the humerus. The problematic group is that of four part lesions, which has a 19% incidence of humeral head necrosis. Since in this group minimal osteosynthesis produces better functional results than extensive osteosynthesis, a detailed pre-operative radiological description of the fracture type is necessary in order to spare the patient from extensive surgery which could have unsatisfactory results.

  3. Hertel 7 fracture of the humeral head. Can two different fixation systems (Diphos/PHP) lead to different outcomes? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, S; Baudi, P; Candela, V; Campochiaro, G

    2016-10-01

    To compare clinical outcomes and complication rates in the medium-to-long-term follow-up of Hertel 7 humeral head fractures treated with two different locking plates. A total of 52 patients with type 7 humeral head fracture (in accordance with Hertel classification) were enrolled retrospectively: 24 patients [4 male, 20 female; mean age (standard deviation [SD]): 68.9 (5.8) years] were treated with Diphos H plate (Group A) and 28 patients [6 male, 22 female; mean age (SD): 61.0 (7.5) years] with Proximal Humeral Plate (PHP; Group B). The mean follow-up periods were 25.6 and 18.9 months, respectively. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Constant score and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; X-ray evaluation was also performed and complications were recorded. The mean Constant score in the Diphos and PHP groups at follow-up were 75.6 (SD 13.4) and 78.9 (SD 12.8), respectively (p>0.05). The DASH score was similar in both groups (Diphos: 18.6, range 0-51.5; PHP: 16.8, range 0-47.8) (p>0.05). In our series, 9.6% of patients had complications; these included a case of aseptic non-union and a case of avascular necrosis of the humeral head in each group, and a secondary screw perforation in a patient treated with Diphos. In patients with Hertel 7 proximal humeral fractures, Diphos and PHP lead to similar satisfactory functional outcomes and are associated with low complication rates; this confirms that both are useful implants for the treatment of this pattern of fracture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Humeral head size in shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaesel, M T; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1998-01-01

    Changes in kinematics after hemiarthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint were investigated in nine cadaveric specimens. During experiments the influence of the humeral head size on glenohumeral kinematics was evaluated. A modular prosthesis with five different head sizes and press-fit stems was use...

  5. Ipsilateral humeral neck and shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fractures of the proximal humerus or shaft are common, however, ipsilateral neck and shaft humerus fracture is a rare phenomenon. This combination injury is challenging for orthopaedic surgeons because of its complex treatment options at present. The purpose of this study was to review a series of ipsilateral humeral neck and shaft fractures to study the fracture pattern, complications and treatment outcomes of each treatment options used. Methods. A total of six patients (four female and two male with the average age of 42.8 years (range: 36–49 years was collected and reviewed retrospectively. Two of them were treated with double plates and four with antegrade intramedullary nail. According to the Neer’s classification, all proximal fractures were two-part surgical neck fractures. All humeral shaft fractures were located at the middle of one third. Five fractures were simple transverse (A3, one fragmented wedge fracture (B3. One patient had associated radial nerve palsy. Results. All surgical neck fractures except one united uneventfully in the average time span of 8.7 weeks. Four humeral shaft fractures healed in near anatomic alignment. The remaining two patients had the nonunion with no radiological signs of fracture healing. The average University of California, Los Angeles End-Results (UCLA score was 23.1. On the contrary, the average American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's (ASES score was 73.3. The patients treated with antegrade intramedullary nails presented 70.5 points. The ASES scores were 79 in the double plates group. Conclusions. Ipsilateral humeral shaft and neck fracture is extremely rare. Both antegrade intramedullar nailing and double plates result in healing of fractures. However the risk of complication is lower in the double plating group.

  6. Prosthetic replacement for proximal humeral fractures.

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    Kontakis, George; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Galanakis, Ioannis; Megas, Panagiotis

    2008-12-01

    The ideal management of complex proximal humeral fractures continues to be debatable. Evolution of proximal humeral fracture management, during the past decade, led to the implementation of many innovations in surgical treatment. Even though the pendulum of treatment seems to swing towards new trends such as locked plating, hemiarthroplasty remains a valid and reliable option that serves the patient's needs well. Hemiarthroplasty is indicated for complex proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients with poor bone stock and when internal fixation is difficult or unreliable. Hemiarthroplasty provides a better result when it is performed early post-injury. Stem height, retroversion and tuberosity positioning are technical aspects of utmost importance. Additionally reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is an alternative new modality that can be used as a primary solution in selected patients with proximal humeral fracture treatment. Failed hemiarthroplasty and fracture sequelae can be successfully managed with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Individual decision-making and tailored treatment that takes into consideration the personality of the fracture and the patient's characteristics should be used.

  7. Bone properties of the humeral head and resistance to screw cutout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, L. H.; Jensen, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of fractures involving the proximal humeral head is hampered by complications. Screw cutout is the major pitfall seen in connection with rigid plating. We have exploited a bony explanation for this phenomenon. Materials and Methods: We examined the convex surface of the humeral...... sectioning technique. Results: The bone strength and bone density correlated well and revealed large regional variations across the humeral head. Bone strength and stiffness of the trabecular bone came to a maximum in the most medial anterior and central parts of the humeral head, where strong textural...... screw directions will predictably place screws in areas of the humeral head comprising low density and low strength cancellous bone. New concepts of plates and plating techniques for the surgical treatment of complex fractures of the proximal humerus should take bone distribution, strength...

  8. Combined three-part humeral anterior fracture-dislocation and humeral shaft fracture treated with one-stage long stem shoulder hemiarthroplasty in an active elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzberg Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injuries combining a humeral head fracture-dislocation and a shaft fracture of the ipsilateral humerus are very rare. They should be separated from extended fractures of the humeral head to the shaft [1]. Case report: We present the case of an active 84-year-old man who sustained a three-part fracture-dislocation of the proximal humerus combined with a long spiral humeral middle third diaphyseal fracture, after a ski fall. We were unable to find a similar case in the literature. He was treated with a long stem hemiarthroplasty, associated with screw osteosynthesis of the long spiral shaft fracture. The result after 30 months of follow-up was excellent, with good shoulder range of motion, good bone integration of the prosthesis and uneventful healing of the fracture. Conclusion: This treatment allowed this intrepid elderly patient to recover a normal quality of life, including driving his car and to return to skiing.

  9. Spatial mapping of humeral head bone density.

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    Alidousti, Hamidreza; Giles, Joshua W; Emery, Roger J H; Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Short-stem humeral replacements achieve fixation by anchoring to the metaphyseal trabecular bone. Fixing the implant in high-density bone can provide strong fixation and reduce the risk of loosening. However, there is a lack of data mapping the bone density distribution in the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was to investigate the bone density in proximal humerus. Eight computed tomography scans of healthy cadaveric humeri were used to map bone density distribution in the humeral head. The proximal humeral head was divided into 12 slices parallel to the humeral anatomic neck. Each slice was then divided into 4 concentric circles. The slices below the anatomic neck, where short-stem implants have their fixation features, were further divided into radial sectors. The average bone density for each of these regions was calculated, and regions of interest were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance set at P density was found to decrease from proximal to distal regions, with the majority of higher bone density proximal to the anatomic neck of the humerus (P density increases from central to peripheral regions, where cortical bone eventually occupies the space (P density distribution in the medial calcar region was also observed. This study indicates that it is advantageous with respect to implant fixation to preserve some bone above the anatomic neck and epiphyseal plate and to use the denser bone at the periphery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Medial calcar of proximal humeral fracture as landmark in restoration of humeral length in case of hemiarthroplasty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromádka, R.; Kuběna, Aleš Antonín; Šmíd, Martin; Popelka, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2014), s. 473-479 ISSN 0930-1038 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Fracture of proximal humerus * Calcar of humeral fracture * Reconstruction of proximal humerus * Reconstruction of humeral length * Shoulder arthroplasty * Shoulder hemiarthroplasty Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/smid-medial calcar of proximal humeral fracture as landmark in restoration of humeral length in case of hemiarthroplasty.pdf

  11. Less invasive plate osteosynthesis in humeral shaft fractures.

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    Apivatthakakul, Theerachai; Phornphutkul, Chanakarn; Laohapoonrungsee, Anupong; Sirirungruangsarn, Yuddhasert

    2009-12-01

    Stable internal fixation of the humeral shaft by less invasive percutaneous plate insertion using two separate (proximal and distal) incisions, indirect reduction by closed manipulation and fixation to preserve the soft tissue and blood supply at the fracture zone. Early mobilization of the shoulder and elbow to ensure a good functional outcome. Humeral shaft fractures (classified according to AO classification as: 12-A, B, C). Humeral shaft fractures extending to the proximal or distal shaft, small or deformed medullary canal or open growth plate. Humeral shaft fractures with primary radial nerve palsy. Proximal humeral shaft fractures extending to the humeral head. Distal humeral fractures extending to the elbow joint. Two incisions proximal and distal to the fracture zone are used. A 3-cm proximal incision lies between the lateral border of the proximal part of the biceps and the medial border of the deltoid. Distally, a 3-cm incision is made along the lateral border of the biceps. The interval between biceps and brachialis is identified. The biceps is retracted medially to expose the musculocutaneous nerve. The brachialis muscle has dual innervation, the medial half being innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve and the lateral half by the radial nerve. The brachialis is split longitudinally at its midline. The musculocutaneous nerve is retracted along with the medial half of the brachialis, while the lateral half of the brachialis serves as a cushion to protect the radial nerve. A deep subbrachial tunnel is created from the distal to the proximal incision. The selected plate is tied with a suture to a hole at the tip of the tunneling instrument for pulling the plate back along the prepared track. The plate is aligned in the correct position on the anterior surface of the humerus. Traction is applied and the fracture reduced to restore alignment by image intensifier, followed by plate fixation with at least two bicortical locking screws or three bicortical

  12. Radial and humeral fractures as predictors of subsequent hip, radial or humeral fractures in women, and their seasonal variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Schwarz, Peter; McNair, P

    1993-01-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly women, and early risk assessment of future hip fractures is relevant in relation to prevention. We studied the predictive value of radial and humeral fractures in women. The influence of weather conditions on the risk was also studied. Women aged 20-99 years...

  13. Fishtail deformity - a delayed complication of distal humeral fractures in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, Srikala [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Shailam, Randheer; Nimkin, Katherine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Grottkau, Brian E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Concavity in the central portion of the distal humerus is referred to as fishtail deformity. This entity is a rare complication of distal humeral fractures in children. The purpose of this study is to describe imaging features of post-traumatic fishtail deformity and discuss the pathophysiology. We conducted a retrospective analysis of seven cases of fishtail deformity after distal humeral fractures. Seven children ages 7-14 years (five boys, two girls) presented with elbow pain and history of distal humeral fracture. Four of the seven children had limited range of motion. Five children had prior grade 3 supracondylar fracture treated with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. One child had a medial condylar fracture and another had a lateral condylar fracture; both had been treated with conservative casting. All children had radiographs, five had CT and three had MRI. All children had a concave central defect in the distal humerus. Other imaging features included joint space narrowing with osteophytes and subchondral cystic changes in four children, synovitis in one, hypertrophy or subluxation of the radial head in three and proximal migration of the ulna in two. Fishtail deformity of the distal humerus is a rare complication of distal humeral fractures in children. This entity is infrequently reported in the radiology literature. Awareness of the classic imaging features can result in earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  14. Fishtail deformity - a delayed complication of distal humeral fractures in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Srikala; Shailam, Randheer; Nimkin, Katherine; Grottkau, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Concavity in the central portion of the distal humerus is referred to as fishtail deformity. This entity is a rare complication of distal humeral fractures in children. The purpose of this study is to describe imaging features of post-traumatic fishtail deformity and discuss the pathophysiology. We conducted a retrospective analysis of seven cases of fishtail deformity after distal humeral fractures. Seven children ages 7-14 years (five boys, two girls) presented with elbow pain and history of distal humeral fracture. Four of the seven children had limited range of motion. Five children had prior grade 3 supracondylar fracture treated with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. One child had a medial condylar fracture and another had a lateral condylar fracture; both had been treated with conservative casting. All children had radiographs, five had CT and three had MRI. All children had a concave central defect in the distal humerus. Other imaging features included joint space narrowing with osteophytes and subchondral cystic changes in four children, synovitis in one, hypertrophy or subluxation of the radial head in three and proximal migration of the ulna in two. Fishtail deformity of the distal humerus is a rare complication of distal humeral fractures in children. This entity is infrequently reported in the radiology literature. Awareness of the classic imaging features can result in earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  15. Treatment of humeral shaft fractures with antegrade intramedullary locking nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourvakas, Stefanos; Alexandropoulos, Christos; Papachristos, Ioannis; Tsakoumis, Grigorios; Ameridis, Nikolaos

    2011-12-01

    Antegrade interlocked humeral nailing for stabilization of humeral fractures was introduced many years ago, and studies on this method in the orthopedic literature have shown mixed results. The purpose of this investigation was to document the clinical outcome and complications associated with the use of an antegrade intramedullary nail (T2, Stryker) for the humeral fractures. Between 2005 and 2008, 52 fractures of the humeral shaft were treated operatively with this intramedullary nail in our department. Eight patients were polytraumatized, and four patients had an open fracture. The mean age of patients was 51.7 years. Forty-eight patients had an adequate duration of clinical follow-up (a mean of 18 months) for analysis. Complications were recorded, and the time to union was measured. Shoulder and elbow functions were assessed using the Constant Score and the Morrey Score, respectively. Forty-six fractures healed, with a mean time to clinical union of 10.3 weeks. Two patients developed pseudarthroses. There were four adverse events: two proximal screws backed out, one superficial infection at the insertion point, and one fracture at the distal end of the nail. Ninety-one percentage of patients had an excellent or good shoulder function. Five further operations were necessary: two for treatment of pseudarthroses, two for removal the backed out proximal screws, and one wound debridement for superficial infection. Antegrade humeral nailing is a valid therapeutic option for stabilization of humeral shaft fractures. By strictly adhering to the operation technique, the number and the severity of complications can be reduced. When good fracture alignment and stability are obtained, uneventful bone healing with good functional results is the rule.

  16. Hemiarthroplasty for proximal humeral fracture: restoration of the Gothic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sumant G; Bennion, Phillip W; Reineck, John R; Burkhead, Wayne Z

    2008-10-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are the most common fractures of the shoulder girdle, and initial management of these injuries often determines final outcome. When arthroplasty is used to manage proximal humeral fractures, surgery remains technically demanding, and outcomes have been unpredictable. Recent advances in both technique and prosthetic implants have led to more successful and reproducible results. Key technical points include restoration of the Gothic arch, anatomic tuberosity reconstruction, and minimal soft tissue dissection.

  17. Interventions for treating proximal humeral fractures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen H G; Brorson, Stig

    2015-11-11

    : 64 participants) or hemiarthroplasty (one trial: 49 participants). There is high or moderate quality evidence that, compared with non-surgical treatment, surgery does not result in a better outcome at one and two years after injury for people with displaced proximal humeral fractures involving the humeral neck and is likely to result in a greater need for subsequent surgery. The evidence does not cover the treatment of two-part tuberosity fractures, fractures in young people, high energy trauma, nor the less common fractures such as fracture dislocations and head splitting fractures.There is insufficient evidence from RCTs to inform the choices between different non-surgical, surgical, or rehabilitation interventions for these fractures.

  18. Outcome of humeral shaft fractures treated by functional cast brace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Nath Pal

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Modified functional cast brace is one of the options in treatment for humeral shaft fractures as it can be applied on the 1 st day of the presentation in most of the situations. Simple objective scoring system was useful particularly in uneducated patients.

  19. Total elbow arthroplasty for the treatment of distal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, G L; Larrondo Calderón, W; Boretto, J G; Castellaro Lantermo, J A; Terán, J; de Carli, P

    2016-01-01

    To report the clinical-functional outcomes of the treatment of humeral distal fractures with a total elbow prosthesis. This retrospective study was performed in two surgical centres. A total of 23patients were included, with a mean age of 79years, and of which 21 were women. The inclusion criteria were: patients with humeral distal fractures, operated on using a Coonrad-Morrey prosthesis, and with a follow-up of more than one year. According to AO classification, 15fractures were type C3, 7 C2 and 1 A2. All patients were operated on without de-insertion of the extensor mechanism. The mean follow-up was 40 months. Flexor-extension was 123-17°, with a total mobility arc of 106° (80% of the contralateral side). Pain, according to a visual analogue scale was 1. The Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) was 83 points. Excellent results were obtained in 8 patients, good in 13, medium in 1, and poor in 1. The mean DASH (disability) score was 24 points. Treatment of humeral distal fractures with total elbow arthroplasty could be a good treatment option, but indications must be limited to patients with complex fractures, poor bone quality, with osteoporosis and low functional demands. In younger patients, the use is limited to serious cases where there is no other treatment option. Level of Evidence IV. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudoarthrosis following proximal humeral fractures: A possible mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, P.J.; Cockshott, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    A small series of four patients with pseudarthrosis of the proximal humeral shaft is reported. These patients all had restricted movement of the shoulder joint prior to the trauma, three as a result of rheumatoid arthritis and one due a surgical fusion of the glenohumeral joint. It is suggested that pseudarthrosis is more likely under these circumstances and that pursuit of union of the fracture in such patients may not always be necessary.

  1. Shoulder Arthroplasty for Humeral Head Avascular Necrosis Is Associated With Increased Postoperative Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, M Tyrrell; Cancienne, Jourdan M; Boatright, Jeffrey D; Yang, Scott; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Werner, Brian C

    2018-02-01

    Humeral head avascular necrosis (AVN) of differing etiologies may lead to shoulder arthroplasty due to subchondral bone collapse and deformity of the articular surface. There have been no large studies evaluating the complications for these patients after they undergo total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The first objective of this study is to evaluate the complication rate after TSA in patients with humeral head AVN. The secondary objective is to compare the complication rates among the different etiologies of the AVN. Patients who underwent TSA were identified in the PearlDiver database using ICD-9 codes. Patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasty for humeral head AVN were identified using ICD-9 codes and were subclassified according to AVN etiology (posttraumatic, alcohol use, chronic steroid use, and idiopathic). Complications evaluated included postoperative infection within 6 months, dislocation within 1 year, revision shoulder arthroplasty up to 8 years postoperatively, shoulder stiffness within 1 year, and periprosthetic fracture within 1 year and systemic complications within 3 months. Postoperative complication rates were compared to controls. The study cohorts included 4129 TSA patients with AVN with 141,778 control TSA patients. Patients with posttraumatic AVN were significantly more likely to have a postoperative infection (OR 2.47, P  AVN was associated with a significantly increased risk for a postoperative infection (OR 1.72, P  = 0.004), revision surgery (OR 1.33, P  = 0.040), fracture (OR 2.76, P  = 0.002), and systemic complication (OR 1.59, P  AVN were not significantly associated with any of the postoperative evaluated complications. TSA in patients with humeral head AVN is associated with significantly increased rates of numerous postoperative complications compared to patients without a diagnosis of AVN, including infection, dislocation, revision arthroplasty, stiffness, periprosthetic fracture, and medical complications

  2. Indications for computed tomography (CT-) diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrs, Christian; Rolauffs, Bernd; Südkamp, Norbert P

    2009-01-01

    diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. METHODS: In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X-rays (22 AP + axillary views, 22 AP + scapular Y-views) and CT (multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum...... diagnostic methods was assessed according to the number of fractured parts (Bonferroni-Holm adjustment). RESULTS: There was significantly more overlap of the fractured region on the scapular Y-views (mean 71.5%, range 45-90%) than on axillary views (mean 56.2%, range 10.5-100%). CT-diagnostics allowed...... a significantly better assessment of the relevant structures than conventional diagnostics (p diagnostics of the fracture...

  3. Interventions for treating proximal humeral fractures in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handoll, Helen H G; Brorson, Stig

    2015-01-01

    supervised exercise in a swimming pool plus home exercise.Eight trials, involving 567 older participants, evaluated surgical intervention for displaced fractures. There was high quality evidence of no clinically important difference in patient-reported shoulder and upper-limb function at one- or two......BACKGROUND: Fracture of the proximal humerus, often termed shoulder fracture, is a common injury in older people. The management of these fractures varies widely. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2001 and last updated in 2012. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits...... and harms) of treatment and rehabilitation interventions for proximal humeral fractures in adults. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases, conference...

  4. Treatment for proximal humeral fractures with percutaneous plating: our first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imarisio, D; Trecci, A; Sabatini, L; Scagnelli, R

    2013-06-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are common lesions; there is no generally accepted strategy about the treatment for displaced and unstable two- to four-part fractures. We have nowadays many different surgical solutions, ranging from percutaneous pinning to shoulder arthroplasty. Percutaneous plating can be a good solution to treat some of these fractures using a minimally invasive technique and performing stable fixation that can allow early mobilization. Purpose of this paper is to evaluate the results of our first cases of percutaneous plating in proximal humeral fractures in order to assess the theoretical advantages and the incidence of possible complications. From June 2009 to February 2012, we treated 29 proximal humeral fractures with a percutaneous plating (NCB-PH plate) through an anterolateral deltoid split. For each patient, we evaluated the clinical outcome according to Constant score and the radiographic results, paying attention to fracture healing, loss of reduction, hardware complications, and head necrosis. The clinical evaluation gave a mean Constant score value of 79 points. Comparing each value to the unaffected shoulder, we could find these results: 7 excellent, 10 good, 8 fair, and 4 poor. No axillary nerve lesions were clinically detected. The radiographic evaluation showed a complete bone healing in all cases within the first 3 months. No head necrosis was detected, as well as screws loosening. In two cases, the X-ray at 2 months revealed a little loss of reduction in varus. Two patients had an anterior pain; in one of these two cases, the plate was removed. In our series, we had no cases of head necrosis, screws cutout, fracture collapse, hardware mobilization, and we think this could be the real advantage of the percutaneous technique compared to the open one, thanks to the reduced biological damage. We had some poor results, related more to patient's age than to other factors. The safety of the technique for the axillary nerve is

  5. Operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirmer, Johannes; Kruppa, Christian; Fitze, Guido

    2012-08-01

    The operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children remains controversial. The result of incorrectly treated fractures may lead to complications such as pseudoarthrosis and severe deformity, with considerable functional and cosmetic restrictions. The aim of this study was to determine whether operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children using Screw-wires (Orthofix GmbH, Ottobrunn, Germany) has any advantage over treatment with Kirschner wires ("K-wires") (aap-Implantate AG, Berlin, Germany). These results were then compared with operative treatment using lag-screw osteosynthesis. We treated surgically 76 cases of fracture of the lateral humeral condyle in children at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Dresden between 1989 to 2002 and 2004 to 2008, from which 42 were available for follow-up examination. Within this group, there were seven children that were followed-up twice (in 1996 to 2002). Of these, 21 patients were treated with Screw-wires, and another 21 had K-wires inserted. The results were evaluated according to the Dhillon criteria. Only seven patients (17%) had a fair result in the overall grading according to the Dhillon criteria, four after K-wire and three after Screw-wire osteosyntheses. The remaining patients scored good to excellent results. There were no pseudoarthroses. Six patients (14%) had a varisation in the carrying angle between 10 and 16 degrees (three each procedure), and 15 patients (36%) had no difference in the carrying angle at all. Of these 15 patients, 10 were treated with Screw-wire osteosynthesis. Only one patient (2.4%) had a deficit of more than 10 degrees in elbow joint flexion, while only two (4.8%, one each procedure) had a deficit of more than 10 degrees in elbow joint extension, compared with the uninjured arm. Our results demonstrate that the employment of Screw-wire osteosynthesis is superior to the use of K-wires concerning the carrying angle while scoring alike on the

  6. An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, M

    2012-06-01

    The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth.

  7. Proximal humeral fractures: the role of calcium sulphate augmentation and extended deltoid splitting approach in internal fixation using locking plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, K; Huber, C P; Babu, V; Zadeh, H

    2013-04-01

    The aim of our study is to analyse the results of our surgical technique for the treatment of proximal humeral fractures and fracture dislocations using locking plates in conjunction with calcium sulphate bone-substitute augmentation and tuberosity repair using high-strength sutures. We used the extended deltoid-splitting approach for fracture patterns involving displacement of both lesser and greater tuberosities and for fracture-dislocations. Optimal surgical management of proximal humeral fractures remains controversial. Locking plates have become a popular method of fixation. However, failure of fixation may occur if they are used as the sole method of fixation in comminuted fractures, especially in osteopenic bone. We retrospectively analysed 22 proximal humeral fractures in 21 patients; 10 were male and 11 female with an average age of 64.6 years (range 37-77). Average follow-up was 24 months. Eleven of these fractures were exposed by the extended deltoid-splitting approach. Fractures were classified according to Neer and Hertel systems. Preoperative radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans in three- and four-part fractures were done to assess the displacement and medial calcar length for predicting the humeral head vascularity. According to the Neer classification, there were five two-part, six three-part, five four-part fractures and six fracture-dislocations (two anterior and four posterior). Results were assessed clinically with disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores, modified Constant and Murley scores and serial postoperative radiographs. The mean DASH score was 16.18 and the modified Constant and Murley score was 64.04 at the last follow-up. Eighteen out of twenty-two cases achieved good clinical outcome. All the fractures united with no evidence of infection, failure of fixation, malunion, tuberosity failure, avascular necrosis or adverse reaction to calcium sulphate bone substitute. There was no evidence of axillary nerve

  8. MONOLATERAL LOW-INVASIVE TREATMENT OF HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURE IN CHILDREN

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    V. P. Kuzmin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Humeral fractures in children are from 4 up to 10% of the general number of child fractures. Recently the trend is marked to expansion of indications to operative treatment despite of mainly conservative treatment of humeral shaft fractures. The experience of humeral shaft fractures operative treatment with use of Ender nails was analyzed. 8 humeral bones were treated with use of 2 nails, 15 humeral bones - with use of 1 nail only. The good and excellent results were received in both groups of patients. At the same time group with monolateral osteosynthesis (with 1 nail had statistically significant (p<0,01 decreasing of surgery time (average difference 16 min, and also it had statistically significant (p <0,001 decreasing of X-ray exposition time (average difference 23 sec in comparison with group where the osteosynthesis was done with use of 2 nails. The results received in study show necessity of the further work for this direction.

  9. A STUDY ON PROXIMAL HUMERAL FRACTURES STABILISED WITH PHILOS PLATE

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    Praveen Sivakumar K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Techniques for treating complex proximal humeral fractures vary and include fixations using tension bands, percutaneous pins, bone suture, T-plates, intramedullary nails, double tubular plates, hemiarthroplasty, plant tan humerus fixator plates, Polaris nails and blade plates. Complications of these techniques include cutout or back out of the screws and plates, avascular necrosis, nonunion, malunion, nail migration, rotator cuff impairment and impingement syndromes. Insufficient anchorage from conventional implants may lead to early loosening and failure, especially in osteoporotic bones. In general, nonoperative treatment of displaced three and four-part fractures of the proximal humerus leads to poor outcome due to intraarticular nature of injury and inherent instability of the fragments. Comminuted fractures of the proximal humerus are at risk of fixation failure, screw loosening and fracture displacement. Open reduction and internal fixation with conventional plate and screws has been associated with unacceptably high incidence of screw pull out. PHILOS (the proximal humeral internal locking system plate is an internal fixation system that enables angled stabilisation with multiple interlocking screws for fractures of the proximal humerus. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 patients with proximal humerus fractures who were admitted in the Department of Orthopaedics, Government General Hospital, Kakinada, during the period November 2014 - November 2016 were taken up for study according to inclusion criteria. All patients were treated with PHILOS plate. These proximal humerus fractures were classified according to Neer’s classification. Patients were followed up at 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months’ interval. Functional outcomes for pain, range of motion and muscle power and function were assessed using the Constant-Murley scoring system. Collected data analysed with independent t-test and ANNOVA test. RESULTS The outcome of the study was 1

  10. [A new method of osteosynthesis in proximal humeral fractures: a new internal fixation device. Apropos of 17 cases followed over more than 2 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doursounian, L; Grimberg, J; Cazeau, C; Touzard, R C

    1996-01-01

    The authors describe a new internal fixation device, and report on 17 proximal humeral fractures managed with this technique. The fracture patterns, using Neer's classification were: 9 displaced three-part fractures, 4 displaced four-part fractures and 4 interior fracture dislocations (mean age of the patients: 70 years). The device is a two-part titanium device. The humeral component has a long vertical stem cemented in the humeral shaft; and a short proximal portion set at an angle of 135 degrees on the stem, with a neck and a Morse taper cone. The other part is a crown-shaped stapple, whose base is a perforated disk with a central Morse taper socket. The rim of the crown has five prongs which, together with the central socket, are impacted in the cancellous bone of the humeral head. The taper of the humeral component is inserted into the central socket of the stapple to provide fracture fixation. Tuberosities are reattached to the shaft with non absorbable sutures. Mean follow-up was 29 months. The global ratings were as follows: 4 excellent results, 6 good results, 4 fair results, 3 poor results. Mean active forward flexion: 100 degrees, and mean active external rotation 22 degrees. After exclusion of the 4 fracture-dislocations, the global rating became: 4 excellent results, 5 good results, 3 fair results, 1 poor result. Mean active forward flexion: 110 degrees and mean active external rotation: 31.5 degrees. There were no case of avascular necrosis in 13 patients. Complications requiring surgery occurred in one case: an upper protrusion of the stapple which required replacement of the stapple by a prosthetic humeral head. Other complications included: 2 asymptomatic partial protrusions of the stapple, 2 complete and two partial avascular necrosis in fracture-dislocations. Except for the fracture-dislocations our device confers several major benefits. The humeral head is preserved. Typical problems associated with joint replacement (dislocations, loosening

  11. The value of different imaging methods on classification in displaced proximal humeral fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jingyu; Zhu Qingsheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of common X-ray, two-dimensional computed tomography (2D-CT), spiral computed tomography (SCT), and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction on the classification in displaced proximal humeral fractures. Methods: Three groups were divided on the basis of various imaging methods, including group A (common X-ray), group B (common X-ray and 2D-CT), and group C (3-D reconstruction of SCT and 2D-SCT). 46 cases of displaced proximal humeral fractures were classified with Neer system. The true rate of fracture classification by use of three methods was compared with each other, and clinical significance of SCT and 3-D reconstruction was evaluated. Results: Based on operation, 46 cases of displaced proximal humeral fractures in group A included 26 cases of Neer two-part fractures, 13 cases of three-part fractures, and 7 cases of four-part fractures. The true cases of common X-ray were 22 in Neer two-part fractures and 8 in three and four-part fractures, there was significant difference between Neer two-part fractures and Neer three and four-part fractures (P<0.05); 18 cases of proximal humeral fractures in group B included 3 cases of Neer two-part fractures, 9 cases of three-part fractures, and 6 cases of four-part fractures. The true cases of common X-ray and 2D-CT were 7 in Neer three and four-part fractures. 10 cases of proximal humeral fractures in group C included 1 case of Neer two-part fracture, 5 cases of three-part fractures, and 4 cases of four-part fractures. The true cases of 3-D reconstruction, MPR of SCT, and 2D-SCT were 8 in Neer three and four-part fractures. With regard to the true cases of the classification in Neer three and four-part fractures, there was significant difference in three groups and between group A and group C (P<0.05). All SCT and 3-D reconstruction played an important role in the treatment of proximal humeral fractures. Conclusion: Series of good quality X-ray examinations were the first imaging

  12. Anatomic humeral head replacement with a press-fit prosthesis: An in vivo radiographic study

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    Bryan Vopat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful total shoulder arthroplasty is, in part, dependent on anatomic reconstruction of the glenohumeral joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the post-operative anatomy of total shoulder arthroplasty with an anatomic implant design in patients with primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and compare it to published normative anatomic measurements. Fifty-one patients (56 shoulders with primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis were treated with a press-fit humeral component as part of a total shoulder arthroplasty (Aequalis, Tornier, Edina, Minnesota. Analysis of postoperative true anterior posterior radiographs was performed with use of a custom software algorithm. The mean humeral inclination (head-shaft angle, mean humeral implant anatomical humeral axis, mean greater tuberosity height, and mean humeral head center offset (medial offset were 135.4±5.1°, 1.73±1.7°, 6.9±2.4 mm, and 3.8±1.8 mm, respectively. All parameters were within the ranges reported in the literature for normal shoulders except the mean humeral head center offset, which was less than reported in the literature. Anatomic parameters of a total shoulder arthroplasty can be achieved with an anatomically designed, modular adaptable press-fit design. Reduced medial humeral head center offset was likely dependent upon implant specific design parameters.

  13. Fracture Union in Closed Interlocking Nail in Humeral Shaft Fractures

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    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study indicates that in the presence of proper indications, reamed antegrade intramedullary interlocked nailing appears to be a method of choice for internal fixation of osteoporotic and pathologic fractures.

  14. [Vascular and neurological complications of supracondylar humeral fractures in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masár, J

    2007-10-01

    The author reports two cases of pediatric patients with supracondylar humeral fractures complicated by concomitant vascular injury. One of the patients also presented with neurological symptoms from compression of the ulnar and median nerves. In the case of vascular injury only, it was necessary to resect a 1-cm segment of the brachial artery which was thrombosed due to intimal disruption. In the other case, surgery was not indicated immediately; however, liberation of the nervus ulnaris and nervus medianus was later required because of nerve compression by the scar and bone. The author considers the exact diagnosis, precise reduction and stable fixation of a fracture to be most important for a good outcome of treatment. Any associated vascular injury is indicated for surgery only after a thorough diagnostic consideration, and may not be needed in every case. The most decisive factor is the clinical presentation. Injury to the nerve system is indicated for surgical treatment at a later period, at 3 months post-injury at the earliest.

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of straight antegrade nailing in proximal humeral fractures: the rationale of the "proximal anchoring point".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Simon A; Petri, Maximilian; Venderley, Melanie B; Dornan, Grant J; Schmoelz, Werner; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Plecko, Michael; Kralinger, Franz S; Millett, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Varus failure is one of the most common failure modes following surgical treatment of proximal humeral fractures. Straight antegrade nails (SAN) theoretically provide increased stability by anchoring to the densest zone of the proximal humerus (subchondral zone) with the end of the nail. The aim of this study was to biomechanically investigate the characteristics of this "proximal anchoring point" (PAP). We hypothesized that the PAP would improve stability compared to the same construct without the PAP. Straight antegrade humeral nailing was performed in 20 matched pairs of human cadaveric humeri for a simulated unstable two-part fracture. Biomechanical testing, with stepwise increasing cyclic axial loading (50-N increments each 100 cycles) at an angle of 20° abduction revealed significantly higher median loads to failure for SAN constructs with the PAP (median, 450 N; range, 200-1.000 N) compared to those without the PAP (median, 325 N; range, 100-500 N; p = 0.009). SAN constructs with press-fit proximal extensions (endcaps) showed similar median loads to failure (median, 400 N; range, 200-650 N), when compared to the undersized, commercially available SAN endcaps (median, 450 N; range, 200-600 N; p = 0.240). The PAP provided significantly increased stability in SAN constructs compared to the same setup without this additional proximal anchoring point. Varus-displacing forces to the humeral head were superiorly reduced in this setting. This study provides biomechanical evidence for the "proximal anchoring point's" rationale. Straight antegrade humeral nailing may be beneficial for patients undergoing surgical treatment for unstable proximal humeral fractures to decrease secondary varus displacement and thus potentially reduce revision rates.

  16. Trends in epidemiology and patho-anatomical pattern of proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrs, Christian; Stojicevic, Tanja; Tanja, Stojicevic

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Proximal humeral fractures are common and frequently associated with osteoporosis. Little is known about the association between the patho-anatomical fracture pattern of proximal humeral fractures and patient characteristics. The purpose of this six year longitudinal registry analysis...... of proximal humeral fractures was to study overall numbers, certain predefined pathoanatomical patterns and distribution compared with specific patient characteristics. METHODS: Data of patients treated between 2006 and 2011 in a country hospital that provides care >95 % of the city's hospitalised patients...... with fractures was retrospectively reviewed. Data were analysed according to patient characteristics of age, gender, comorbidity, accompanying injuries and radiological analysis of pathoanatomical fracture patterns based on Neer and Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification. RESULTS: Eight...

  17. The reliability and reproducibility of the Hertel classification for comminuted proximal humeral fractures compared with the Neer classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordens, Gijs I. T.; Mahabier, Kiran C.; Buisman, Florian E.; Schep, Niels W. L.; Muradin, Galied S. R.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Patka, Peter; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; den Hartog, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The Neer classification is the most commonly used fracture classification system for proximal humeral fractures. Inter- and intra-observer agreement is limited, especially for comminuted fractures. A possibly more straightforward and reliable classification system is the Hertel classification. The

  18. Long-term outcome of segmental reconstruction of the humeral head for the treatment of locked posterior dislocation of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christian; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Jundt-Ecker, Michele; Farshad, Mazda

    2014-11-01

    Locked posterior glenohumeral dislocations with impaction fractures involving less than 30% to 35% of the humeral head are most frequently treated with lesser tuberosity transfer into the defect, whereas those involving more than 35% to 40% are treated with humeral head arthroplasty. As an alternative, reconstruction of the defect with segmental femoral or humeral head allograft has been proposed, but the long-term outcome of this joint-preserving procedure is unknown. Twenty-two shoulders in 21 patients with a locked posterior shoulder dislocation and an impaction of at least 30% (mean, 43%) of the humeral head were treated with segmental reconstruction of the humeral head defect. They were reviewed clinically and radiographically at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Of the 22 shoulders, 19 could be followed up at 128 months (range, 60-294 months) postoperatively. Only 2 of the 19 patients needed a prosthesis more than 180 months after the index operation. Of the other 17, 4 had radiographically advanced osteoarthritis (OA), 4 had mild OA, and 9 had no or minimal OA. Eighteen shoulders were rated as subjectively excellent, none were rated as good, and one was rated as fair. The final Constant-Murley score averaged 77 points (range, 52-98 points), the Subjective Shoulder Value averaged 88% (range, 75%-100%), and only 2 patients had mild to moderate pain. Mean active anterior elevation was 145°, and mean external rotation with the arm at the side was 42°. Segmental reconstruction of humeral head defects for large anteromedial impaction fractures caused by locked posterior dislocations durably restores stability and freedom from pain with an excellent subjective long-term outcome. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Indications for computed tomography (CT- diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

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    Weise Kuno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X-rays (22 AP + axillary views, 22 AP + scapular Y-views and CT (multi-planar reconstruction (MPR and maximum intensity projection (MIP with 2 D and 3 D imaging. 3 observers assessed the technical image quality, the assessment of the relevant anatomical structures (2-sample-t-test and the percentage of the osseous overlap of the proximal humerus (Welch-test using a scoring system. The quality of the different diagnostic methods was assessed according to the number of fractured parts (Bonferroni-Holm adjustment. Results There was significantly more overlap of the fractured region on the scapular Y-views (mean 71.5%, range 45–90% than on axillary views (mean 56.2%, range 10.5–100%. CT-diagnostics allowed a significantly better assessment of the relevant structures than conventional diagnostics (p Conclusion Conventional X-rays with AP view and a high-quality axillary view are useful for primary diagnostics of the fracture and often but not always show a clear presentation of the relevant bony structures such as both tuberosities, the glenoid and humeral head. CT with thin slices technology and additional 3 D imaging provides always a clear presentation of the fractured region. Clinically, a CT should be performed – independently of the number of fractured parts – when the proximal humerus and the shoulder joint are not presented with sufficient X-ray-quality to establish a treatment plan.

  20. Medial Calcar Support and Radiographic Outcomes of Plate Fixation for Proximal Humeral Fractures

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    Shih-Jie Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plate fixation remains one of the most popular surgical procedures for treating proximal humeral fractures (PHFx; however, substantial rates of complications have been reported in the literature. The objectives of the study were to examine how medial calcar support (MCS affects the radiographic outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting treatment failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 89 adult patients who had PHFx and were treated with plate fixation at our institution in 2007–2011. The enrolled patients were separated into two groups according to disruption of medial calcar. Our results revealed an increased rate of poor radiographic outcomes in patients with disrupted medial calcar. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head and redisplacement were the two radiographic outcomes which had a positive causality with disruption of medial calcar (P=0.008 and 0.050, resp.. Deficient medial calcar, inadequate reduction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and chronic liver disease were all significant predictors for the development of osteonecrosis in patients after PHFx surgery. Inadequate reduction was also a predictor for redisplacement. We confirmed that the restoration of medial calcar as well as comorbid conditions plays key roles in treatment of patients having PHFx with disrupted medial calcar.

  1. Late Prosthetic Shoulder Hemiarthroplasty after Failed Management of Complex Proximal Humeral Fractures

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    A. Panagopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with shoulder hemiarthroplasty in the context of old trauma. Methods. 33 patients with failed treatment for a complex proximal humeral fracture underwent prosthetic hemiarthroplasty. There were 15 men and 18 women with a mean age of 58.1 years. The average period from initial treatment was 14.9 months. Sequelae included 11 malunions, 4 nonunions, 15 cases with avascular necrosis (AVN and 3 neglected posterior locked dislocations. Follow up investigation included radiological assessment and clinical evaluation using the Constant score and a visual analogue pain scale. Results. After a mean follow up of 82.5 months the median Constant score was 75.7 points, improved by 60% in comparison to preoperative values. Greater tuberosity displacement, large cuff tears and severe malunion were the factors most affected outcome. No cases of stem loosening or severe migration were noted. 60% of the patients were able to do activities up to shoulder level compared with 24% before reconstruction. Conclusions. Late shoulder hemiarthroplasty is technically difficult and the results are inferior to those reported for acute humeral head replacement, nonetheless remains a satisfactory reconstructive option when primary treatment fails.

  2. High risk for revision after shoulder arthroplasty for failed osteosynthesis of proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Marc Randall; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Elmengaard, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose - It is unclear whether previous osteosynthesis is a risk factor for inferior outcome following shoulder arthroplasty for a proximal humeral fracture. We used data from the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) to examine this question. Patients and methods - All 285...... patients treated with a shoulder arthroplasty after failed osteosynthesis of a proximal humeral fracture reported to DSR from 2006 to 2013 were included. Each case was matched with 2 controls (570) treated with a primary shoulder arthroplasty for an acute proximal humeral fracture. Patient reported outcome...... for a shoulder arthroplasty after failed osteosynthesis was 2 with a primary arthroplasty for fracture as reference. In a separate analysis of patients treated by locking plate the mean WOOS was 46 (24), with a relative risk of revision at 1.5 with a primary arthroplasty as reference. Interpretation - Compared...

  3. Interventions for treating proximal humeral fractures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen H G; Ollivere, Benjamin J; Rollins, Katie E

    2012-12-12

    Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries. The management, including surgical intervention, of these fractures varies widely. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001 and last updated in 2010. To review the evidence supporting the various treatment and rehabilitation interventions for proximal humeral fractures. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases, and bibliographies of trial reports. The full search ended in January 2012. All randomised controlled trials pertinent to the management of proximal humeral fractures in adults were selected. Two people performed independent study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. Only limited meta-analysis was performed. Twenty-three small randomised trials with a total of 1238 participants were included. Bias in these trials could not be ruled out. Additionally there is a need for caution in interpreting the results of these small trials, which generally do not provide sufficient evidence to conclude that any non-statistically significant finding is 'evidence of no effect'.Eight trials evaluated conservative treatment. One trial found an arm sling was generally more comfortable than a less commonly used body bandage. There was some evidence that 'immediate' physiotherapy compared with that delayed until after three weeks of immobilisation resulted in less pain and potentially better recovery in people with undisplaced or other stable fractures. Similarly, there was evidence that mobilisation at one week instead of three weeks alleviated short term pain without compromising long term outcome. Two trials provided some evidence that unsupervised patients could generally achieve a satisfactory outcome when given sufficient instruction for an adequate self-directed exercise programme.Six heterogeneous trials, involving a total of 270 participants with

  4. Intrathoracic deplacement of the fractured humerus head mimicking lung mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incedayi, M.; Sivrioglu, A.; Candas, F.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: 79-year-old woman was admitted to emergency department because she had a trauma to her right shoulder. In chest X ray film and CT orientated to her right shoulder; fragmented proximal humeral fracture and right 3. rib fracture, hemopneumothorax, subcutaneous emphysema related to rib fracture were detected. In CT exam which is performed at one month after the trauma was viewed that a well defined, 3.5 cm in diameter, spheric, sharp in medial contour, osseous structure in right hemithorax. The intrathoracic osseous lesion was the fragmented and dislocated humeral head. if we see a bone structure in the lung while we reporting a chest-X-ray in a trauma patient, we have to retain that this structure might be the fractured and dislocated humerus head

  5. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Displaced Proximal Humeral Fractures in Patients Older Than 70 Years Using the Humerusblock

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    Robert Bogner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Surgical treatment of proximal humeral fractures (PHF in osteoporotic bone of elderly patients is challenging. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome after percutaneous reduction and internal fixation of osteoporotic PHF in geriatric patients using the semirigid Humerusblock device. Methods. In the study period from 2005 to 2010, 129 patients older than 70 years were enrolled in the study. After a mean follow-up of 23 months, a physical examination, using the Constant-Murley score and the VAS pain scale, was performed. Furthermore radiographs were taken to detect signs of malunion, nonunion, and avascular necrosis. Results. The recorded Constant-Murley score was 67.7 points (87.7% of the noninjured arm for two-part fractures, 67.9 points (90.8% for three-part fractures, and 43.0 points (56.7% for four-part fractures. In ten shoulders (7.8% loss of reduction and in four shoulders (3.1% nonunion were the reason for revision surgery. Avascular humeral head necrosis developed in eight patients (6.2%. Conclusions. In two- and three-part fractures postoperative results are promising. Sufficient ability for the activities of daily living was achieved. In four-part fractures the functional results were less satisfying regarding function and pain with a high postoperative complication rate. In those patients other treatment strategies should be considered. Study design. Therapeutic retrospective case series (evidence-based medicine (EBM level IV.

  6. Translation between the Neer- and the AO/OTA-classification for proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Eckardt, Henrik; Audigé, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The reporting and interpretation of data from clinical trials of proximal humeral fractures are hampered by the use of two partly incommensurable fracture classification systems: the Neer classification and the AO/OTA classification. It remains difficult to interpret and generalize results...

  7. Treatment of Middle Third Humeral Shaft Fractures with Anteromedial Plate Osteosynthesis through an Anterolateral Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B S; Soraganvi, P; Satyarup, D

    2016-03-01

    Background: Treatment of humeral shaft fractures has been a subject of debate for many decades. Even though a large majority of humeral shaft fractures can be treated by non operative methods, few conditions like open fractures, polytrauma, ipsilateral humeral shaft and forearm fractures require surgical intervention. The goal of treatment of humeral shaft fractures is to establish union with an acceptable humeral alignment and to restore the patient to pre-injury level of function. The objective was to assess the incidence of radial nerve palsy, non-union and mean time required for in anteromedial plate osteosynthesis with anterolateral approach and also to measure the functional outcome of this procedure. Method: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedics, PESIMSR, Kuppam, Andhra Pradesh, from August 2012 to August 2015 with a total of 54 patients who were operated with anteromedial plate osteosynthesis were included in the study. Rodriguez- Merchan criteria was used to grade the functional outcome. Results: Of the 54 patients, 28 (58.85%) were in the age group of 30-40 years. The most common fracture pattern identified was A3 type (48.14%).The mean (± SD) duration of surgery for anteromedial humeral plating was 53 ± 5.00 minutes. The time taken for the fracture to unite was less than 16 weeks in the majority or 50 patients (92.59%). Four (7.40%) patients had delayed union. There was no incidence of iatrogenic radial nerve palsy. Rodriguez - Merchan criteria showed that 37(68.51%) of the patients had good and 12 (22.22%) had excellent functional outcome.

  8. Treatment of Middle Third Humeral Shaft Fractures with Anteromedial Plate Osteosynthesis through an Anterolateral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar BS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of humeral shaft fractures has been a subject of debate for many decades. Even though a large majority of humeral shaft fractures can be treated by non operative methods, few conditions like open fractures, polytrauma, ipsilateral humeral shaft and forearm fractures require surgical intervention. The goal of treatment of humeral shaft fractures is to establish union with an acceptable humeral alignment and to restore the patient to pre-injury level of function. The objective was to assess the incidence of radial nerve palsy, non-union and mean time required for in anteromedial plate osteosynthesis with anterolateral approach and also to measure the functional outcome of this procedure. Method: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedics, PESIMSR, Kuppam, Andhra Pradesh, from August 2012 to August 2015 with a total of 54 patients who were operated with anteromedial plate osteosynthesis were included in the study. RodriguezMerchan criteria was used to grade the functional outcome. Results: Of the 54 patients, 28 (58.85% were in the age group of 30-40 years. The most common fracture pattern identified was A3 type (48.14%.The mean (+ SD duration of surgery for anteromedial humeral plating was 53 ± 5.00 minutes. The time taken for the fracture to unite was less than 16 weeks in the majority or 50 patients (92.59%. Four (7.40% patients had delayed union. There was no incidence of iatrogenic radial nerve palsy. Rodriguez – Merchan criteria showed that 37(68.51% of the patients had good and 12 (22.22% had excellent functional outcome.

  9. Attrition tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii in relation to humeral head osteonecrosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2013-01-01

    This case report identifies a 41-year-old male patient who developed anterior shoulder pain in the setting of humeral head osteonecrosis. As a consequence of the cartilage degeneration, multiple loose bodies formed and migrated into the bicipital tendon sheath, causing attrition tendinitis, which was a feature of the clinical presentation. The patient was treated by a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral joint debridement and open tenodesis of the biceps using a suture anchor. Follow-up revealed asymptomatic shoulder function by 18 months. This is the first report in the literature of bicipital tendinitis in the context of avascular necrosis of the shoulder.

  10. The supinated mediolateral radiograph for detection of humeral head osteochondrosis in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, T.F.; Ackerman, N.

    1985-01-01

    Mediolateral and supinated mediolateral radiographs of the shoulder joint were compared in 19 dogs. Twenty shoulders, representing 15 dogs (5 had bilateral lesions), had osteochondrosis of the humeral head. The flattened humeral head and subchondral defect were detectable in both views in all affected shoulders. The lesions were slightly more easily detected in the supinated view. The supinated view more consistently demonstrated the presence of a calcified cartilage flap and therefore, could be useful in determining a course of therapy. In four dogs (8 shoulders) without osteochondrosis and six normal shoulders from affected dogs, there were no instances in which a shoulder appeared normal on one view, but demonstrated a lesion on the other. The supinated view should be obtained in addition to the mediolateral view in dogs with osteochondrosis of the humeral head

  11. Articular reconstruction of the humeral head with autogenous allograft in the treatment of the osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors describe a surgical biological reconstruction of the humeral head with frozen autogenous allograft technique for the treatment of young patients with focal osteonecrosis of the humeral head. This represents a possible alternative, maybe even definitive for some patients, when compared to hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty. The technique consists of the fixation of a frozen autogenous allograft with previously-molded articular cartilage from the humeral head, after cleansing the osteonecrotic focus. Five patients under 50 years of age were treated, with three very satisfactory results, one patient was lost to follow-up, and one patient had an unsatisfactory result (converted to hemiarthroplasty. The study describes the technique in detail and the three cases with a longer follow-up time.

  12. Bilateral Atraumatic Avascular Necrosis of Both the Humeral and Femoral Heads due to the Corticosteroid Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okkes Bilal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Avascular necrosis is frequently associated with femoral head involvement and may also be observed in the knee joint, humeral head, wrist and foot. Avascular necrosis may also affect multiple joints. Bilateral involvement of both humeral and femoral heads is a rare condition in the same patient. A patient who complained about a sustained pain in both of his shoulders and hips for a few years applied to our outpatient clinic. The patient who had oral steroid treatment episodically was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis seven years ago. Arthroscopy-assisted decompression to the shoulder joints and core decompression to both hip joints were applied. The range of motions of both humeral and femoral joints was limited and painful prior to the surgical treatment. A follow-up after five years later showed that the patient's range of motions of joints was normal and no further treatment was necessary. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 246-250

  13. Displaced proximal humeral fractures: an Indian experience with locking plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Sameer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of displaced proximal humerus fractures, especially in elderly, remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate functional outcome of locking plate used for fixation of these fractures after open reduction. We also attempted to evaluate the complications and predictors of loss of fixation for such an implant. Methods Over two and a half years, 56 patients with an acute proximal humerus fracture were managed with locking plate osteosynthesis. 47 of these patients who completed a minimum follow up of 1 year were evaluated using Constant score calculation. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16 and a p value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results The average follow up period was around 21.5 months. Outcomes were excellent in 17%, good in 38.5%, moderate in 34% while poor in 10.5%. The Constant score was poorer for AO-OTA type 3 fractures as compared to other types. The scores were also inferior for older patients (> 65 years old. Complications included screw perforation of head, AVN, subacromial impingement, loss of fixation, axillary nerve palsy and infection. A varus malalignment was found to be a strong predictor of loss of fixation. Conclusion Locking plate osteosynthesis leads to satisfactory functional outcomes in all the patients. Results are better than non locking plates in osteoporotic fractures of the elderly. However the surgery has steep learning curve and various complications could be associated with its use. Nevertheless we believe that a strict adherence to the principles of locking plate use can ensure good result in such challenging fractures.

  14. Features of Three- and Four-Part Proximal Humeral Fractures and Outcome of Internal Fixation Using the Philos® Locking Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadighi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal humeral fractures are among common types of fractures and remain a challenging issue for surgical management. This study aimed to assess the clinical outcomes and complication rates of three- vs. four-part proximal humeral fractures, treated with internal fixation using the Philos® plate. Material and Methods: In this cohort study, a total of 30 consecutive patients with three-part or four-part proximal humeral fractures based on the Neer classification were included. Surgical treatment was performed with open reduction and internal fixation using the Philos® plate. The constant score was evaluated 6 months later in follow-up. The P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Four-part fractures were mainly caused by trauma from above, while insults of opposite direction were responsible for more than half of 3 part fractures (P=0.01. Open fractures were only observed in patients with a four-part fracture (P=0.018. No significant differences were noticed regarding gender, cause, and side of the fracture. The presence of other fractures, fracture of the implant, reduction loss, avascular necrosis (AVN of humerus head, rotator cuff injury, and revision surgery were significantly higher in patients with four-part fractures. The mean constant score was 81.40±11.61 and 65.09±16.09 for three-part and four-part fractures, respectively (P=0.006. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation with Philos® plate yield acceptable results in both types of fractures, however, the prognosis of this intervention is poorer four-part fractures.

  15. Osteosynthesis of medial humeral epicondyle fractures in children. 8-year follow-up of 33 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun, P S; Ravn, Pernille; Hansen, L B

    1994-01-01

    33 children with a mean age of 12 (7-15) years had open reduction and osteosynthesis for a displaced fracture of the medial humeral epicondyle. 8 (2-15) years after the operation a clinical and radiographic examination was performed. 22/33 had a prominent scar. No patients had symptoms from...

  16. Indications for computed tomography (CT-) diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Weise Kuno; Pereira Philippe L; Dietz Klaus; Eingartner Christoph; Schmal Hagen; Südkamp Norbert P; Rolauffs Bernd; Bahrs Christian; Lingenfelter Erich; Helwig Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT) in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X...

  17. Anterior glenoid rim fracture: the value of helical CT with threedimensional reconstruction and electronic humeral disarticulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton César de Oliveira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To show a new three-dimensional reconstructiontechnique based on helical computed tomography images withelectronic humeral disarticulation in anterior glenoid rim fractures,correlating the anatomic specimen with simulation of an anteriorglenoid rim fracture, as well as evaluating the extension of thefracture, the bone fragment position and distance in relation to theglenoid cavity in six patients. Methods: One scapula and onehumerus with no signs of fracture or congenital malformationswere placed in anatomical position using an adhesive tape aftersimulating an anterior glenoid rim fracture made by an osteotome.Helical CT imaging was acquired and three-dimensionalreconstructions were made based on these images, with andwithout electronic humeral disarticulation. The bone fragment waslocated, measured and its position in relation to the glenoid cavitywas assessed. Six patients with anterior glenoid rim fracture weresubmitted to CT of the shoulder using the same parameters asthose applied to the anatomic specimen. Results: In the anatomicspecimen and in all six patients the bone fragment was clearlydemonstrated; bone fragment measurements in the anatomicspecimen and in three-dimensional reconstructions wereequivalent. The fragment was better demonstrated in the imagestaken with electronic humeral disarticulation, particularly in thefrontal view of the glenoid cavity as observed in all six patients.Conclusion: We concluded that our experiment with the anatomicspecimen and the study of six patients allow us to state that thistechnique is safe and accurate to demonstrate the extension, sizeand location of the bone fragment in anterior glenoid rim fractures,and it provides essential elements for therapeutic planning.

  18. Skin puckering an uncommon sign of underlying humeral neck fracture: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davarinos, N

    2012-01-31

    Skin puckering is a sign that is well associated with certain fractures such as supracondylar humeral fractures in children. To our knowledge, there has been only one clinical report of skin puckering associated with fractured neck of humerus of an adult. This is a second such case of fractured proximal humerus in an adult presenting with skin puckering and the first from the Republic of Ireland. Skin puckering is suggestive of soft tissue interposition and may be an important clinical sign indicating the need for internal fixation.

  19. Minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis for mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Kejian; Wang, Lei; Lin, Dasheng; Chen, Zhiwen

    2013-08-01

    Mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures can be effectively treated with minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis and intramedullary nailing (IMN). However, these 2 treatments have not been adequately compared. Forty-seven patients (47 fractures) with mid-distal third humeral shaft fractures were randomly allocated to undergo either minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis (n=24) or IMN (n=23). The 2 groups were similar in terms of fracture patterns, fracture location, age, and associated injuries. Intraoperative measurements included blood loss and operative time. Clinical outcome measurements included fracture healing, radial nerve recovery, and elbow and shoulder discomfort. Radiographic measurements included fracture alignment, time to healing, delayed union, and nonunion. Functional outcome was satisfactory in both groups. Mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score and Mayo score were both better for the minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis group than for the IMN group (98.2 vs 97.6, respectively, and 93.5 vs 94.1, respectively; Pshaft fractures. Minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis is more suitable for complex fractures, especially for radial protection and motion recovery of adjacent joints, compared with IMN for simple fractures. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Postoperative malrotation of humeral shaft fracture after plating compared with intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Manyi; Huang, Lei; Huang, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    We supposed difference of rotation alignment of postoperative humeral shaft fracutres between open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and intramedullay nailing (IMN) could be identified and the difference might influence the involved shoulder. This study evaluated and compared the extent of malrotation and shoulder function after humeral shaft fractures treated operatively with IMN or ORIF. Fifty humeral shaft fractures were randomly allocated into 2 groups. Group I underwent antegrade IMN and group II underwent ORIF. Malrotation was measured postoperatively by computed tomography scan (CT). Fracture union and functional outcomes were recorded at 12 months. The final analysis comprised 45 patients. Group I had lower functional scores than group II (P shaft fracture. The study can provide baseline data for larger series and longer follow-up periods. Patients who underwent IMN had lower functional scores and a decreased range of motion postoperatively and also had a greater degree of malrotation than the ORIF group, which had none. The degree of malrotation correlated with a decreased range of motion and may possibly be a reason for degenerative arthritis at long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The management of humeral shaft fractures with associated radial nerve palsy: a review of 117 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko; Lesić, Aleksandar; Bumbasirević, Vesna; Cobeljić, Goran; Milosević, Ivan; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E

    2010-04-01

    This single center retrospective study reviews the management and outcomes of 117 consecutive patients with humeral shaft fractures and associated radial nerve palsy (RNP) treated over a 20-year period (1986-2006). A total of 101 fractures were managed conservatively and 16 fractures underwent external fixation for poor bony alignment. Sixteen grade 1 and 2 open fractures underwent wound toileting alone. No patients underwent initial radial nerve exploration or opening of the fracture sites. All patients achieved clinical and radiological bony union at a mean of 8 weeks (range 7-12 weeks). There were no complications or pin tract infections in the operated patients. A total of 111 cases had initial spontaneous RNP recovery at a mean of 6 weeks (range 3-24 weeks) with full RNP recovery at a mean of 17 weeks (range 3-70 weeks) post-injury. Fourteen patients had no clinical/EMG signs of nerve activity at 12 weeks and 6 subsequently failed to regain any radial nerve recovery; 2 had late explorations and the lacerated nerves underwent sural nerve cable neurorraphy; and 4 patients underwent delayed tendon transposition 2-3 years after initial injury, with good/excellent functional outcomes. Humeral fractures with associated RNP may be treated expectantly. With low rates of humeral nonunion, 95% spontaneous nerve recovery in closed fractures and 94% in grade 1 and 2 open fractures, one has the opportunity of waiting. If at 10-12 weeks there are no clinical/EMG signs of recovery, then nerve exploration/secondary reconstruction is indicated. Late tendon transfers may also give good/excellent functional results.

  2. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures: a technique to aid fracture reduction and minimize complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Sohn, Hoon-Sang; Do, Nam-Hoon

    2012-10-01

    To introduce a modified operative technique for minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for acute displaced humeral shaft fractures and to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes. : Prospective clinical series study. University hospital. Twenty-one patients with acute displaced humeral shaft fractures were treated by MIPO with a modified fracture reduction technique. A narrow 4.5/5.0-mm locking compression plate was applied to the anterior aspect of the humerus. Fracture reduction and manipulation were performed using a plate and drill bits. The operating time, time to union, humeral alignment, and functional outcome of the shoulder and elbow joints were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles shoulder score and Mayo elbow performance score. No patient experienced a neurological complication. Bony union was obtained in 20/21 patients at a mean 17.5 weeks postoperatively. Eighteen patients had excellent and 3 patients had good results in the University of California Los Angeles score. The average Mayo elbow performance score was 97.5. Two patients were converted to an open reduction during operation due to a failure of MIPO. There was 1 nonunion and 1 malunion in this series. Although the MIPO technique for humeral shaft fractures is technically demanding, satisfactory clinical outcomes in terms of bony union and shoulder and elbow function can be obtained using the modified fracture reduction method. Potential postoperative complications, such as malreduction and nonunion, must be considered. Appropriate surgical indications, a thorough understanding of the neurovascular anatomy and skillful surgical technique, are needed to reduce potential complications.

  3. Surgical management for displaced pediatric proximal humeral fractures: a cost analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shore, Benjamin J.; Hedequist, Daniel J.; Miller, Patricia E.; Waters, Peter M.; Bae, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this investigation was to determine which of the following methods of fixation, percutaneous pinning (PP) or intramedullary nailing (IMN), was more cost-effective in the treatment of displaced pediatric proximal humeral fractures (PPHF). Methods: A retrospective cohort of surgically treated PPHF over a 12-year period at a single institution was performed. A decision analysis model was constructed to compare three surgical strategies: IMN versus percutaneous pinning leav...

  4. Stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphysis in an elite junior badminton player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, K T; Batt, M E

    1997-01-01

    An elite junior badminton player presented with a chronic painful dominant shoulder after an intense training course. An acute stress fracture to the proximal humeral epiphysis was found. Two-plane radiography will identify abnormalities of the growth plate but comparative films of the unaffected side may also be required to differentiate subtle changes. Rest with subsequent rehabilitation is the appropriate management of these injuries although ideally they should be subjected to primary prevention. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9298564

  5. Biomecânica de quatro técnicas de fixação da fratura em quatro partes da cabeça umeral Biomechanics of four techniques for fixation of the four-part humeral head fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elpídio da Graça

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar um estudo biomecânico de quatro técnicas de fixação das fraturas em quatro partes da cabeça umeral. MÉTODOS: A fratura foi reproduzida em 40 úmeros plásticos, divididos em grupos de dez conforme a técnica de fixação, cada uma delas empregando diferentes recursos de fixação, em configurações distintas. Os modelos umerais foram montados em uma escápula de alumínio, com tiras de couro mimetizando os tendões do capuz rotador, e submetidos a ensaios de encurvamento e de torção em uma máquina universal de ensaios, usando a rigidez relativa como parâmetro de avaliação. Montagens com o úmero intacto foram analisadas para comparação. RESULTADOS: O comportamento biomecânico das técnicas de fixação variou dentro de uma ampla faixa, as montagens incluindo a placa DCP e os parafusos de 4,5mm de diâmetro sendo significantemente mais rígidos do que as montagens com os fios de Kirschner e os parafusos 3,5 mm de diâmetro. CONCLUSÃO: As quatro técnicas foram capazes de suportar cargas compatíveis com a demanda fisiológica, mas aquelas com a maior rigidez relativa devem ser as preferidas para finalidades clínicas. Trabalho experimental.OBJECTIVE: To carry out a biomechanical study of four techniques for fixation of four-part humeral head fractures. METHODS: The fracture was reproduced in 40 plastic humeri, divided into groups of ten according to the fixation technique, each one employing different fixation resources, in different configurations. The humeral models were mounted on an aluminum scapula, with leather straps simulating the rotator cuff tendons, and submitted to bending and torsion tests in a universal testing machine, using relative stiffness as an evaluation parameter. Assemblies with intact humeri were analyzed for comparison. RESULTS: The biomechanical behavior of the fixation techniques varied within a wide range, where the assemblies including the DCP plate and the 4.5mm diameter screws

  6. Evaluation of periprosthetic bone mineral density and postoperative migration of humeral head resurfacing implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenburg, Inger; Klebe, Thomas Martin; Døssing, Kaj Verner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant migration, bone mineral density (BMD), length of glenohumeral offset (LGHO), and clinical results were compared for the Copeland (Biomet Inc, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Global C.A.P. (DePuy Int, Warsaw, IN, USA) humeral head resurfacing implants (HHRIs). METHODS: The study...... improved over time for both implant groups (P migration and good clinical results. Periprosthetic BMD and LGHO both increased for the Copeland HHRI more than for the Global C.A.P HHRI....

  7. Treatment of humeral shaft fractures using antegrade nailing: functional outcome in the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Juan Martin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate shoulder outcomes and function after humeral shaft fractures treated with antegrade nailing. Thirty patients with acute humeral shaft fractures who underwent antegrade locked intramedullary nailing were retrospectively studied. Range of motion (ROM) of the affected shoulder was evaluated, comparing it with the nonaffected shoulder, radiologic position of the nails, complications, and need for a second surgery. The study enrolled 20 men and 10 women (average age, 41.9 years). The average follow-up was 35.8 months. The average shoulder elevation averaged 157°, internal rotation was variable (reaching the sacroiliac joint to T7), and external rotation averaged 75°. Elbow flexion-extension ROM averaged 133° (115°-145°). According to the Rodriguez-Merchan criteria, 12 patients achieved excellent results (40%), 7 good (20%), and 6 fair (23.3%); poor results were found in 5 cases (16.6%). Twelve patients achieved full mobility of the shoulder, whereas 18 had some loss of motion, with significant differences between the affected and nonaffected shoulders (P = .001). Decreased shoulder ROM is common after antegrade nailing of humeral shaft fractures. Avoidance of nail impingement can improve final outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unicameral bone cyst of the humeral head: arthroscopic curettage and bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Arrigoni, Paolo; Cabitza, Paolo; Denti, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has improved greatly over the past decade. Treatment of various juxta-articular disorders around the shoulder have benefited from endoscopic approaches. Cystic lesions of the shoulder on the scapular side have been treated in this way. This article describes a case of a 29-year-old patient with a unicameral bone cyst on the posterior aspect of the humeral head. Arthroscopic visualization using an accessory posteroinferior portal localized the cyst through the bare area of the humeral head. A cannulated burr was used to create an opening through the cortical wall between the cyst and the joint, and a careful curettage was performed. The cavity was filled with a demineralized bone matrix enriched with autologous blood packed into an arthroscopic cannula and delivered through the accessory portal. The patient reported pain relief immediately postoperatively and at follow-up. This case demonstrates the feasibility of arthroscopic treatment of a simple bone cyst of the humeral head. We believe that the knowledge of the juxta-articular anatomy allows the applications of scope-assisted procedures to be expanded, maximizing the results of a technique that allows a shorter recovery and less painful rehabilitation.

  9. Who are we missing? Too few skeletal surveys for children with humeral and femoral fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelmerdine, S.C.; Das, R.; Ingram, M.D.; Negus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the potential shortfall in skeletal survey referral for children presenting with an acute non-supracondylar humeral or femoral fracture. Materials and methods: Plain radiograph reports were reviewed retrospectively using the radiology information system database over a 5 year study period (May 2008–2013) in children under 18 months of age who presented with an acute fracture. Subsequent skeletal survey referral was used as a surrogate marker for further investigation of child abuse. Application of robust meta-analysis derived probability data regarding likelihood of child abuse as a cause of non-supracondylar humeral or femoral fracture was applied. An estimation of the expected number of cases of abuse, with shortfall in skeletal survey referrals, was then calculated. Results: There were 288 fractures in 281 children. Three children presented with multiple fractures and were considered separately in the present data. The mean patient age was 10.5 months. Nine (3%) non-supracondylar humeral fractures were identified of which four cases may have been due to non-accidental injury (NAI). One (11%) of these patients was referred for a skeletal survey indicating a potential shortfall of three referrals. Twenty-five (9%) femoral fractures were identified of which 13 cases may have been due to NAI, with six (24%) referrals for skeletal surveys generated. This indicates a potential shortfall of seven referrals. Conclusion: The present study serves as a current analysis of practice within a tertiary paediatric referral centre. There appeared to be local under-investigation of NAI. Improved child protection education and awareness programmes have now been introduced. - Highlights: • Long bone fractures in non-ambulatory children carry high probability for child abuse. • Suspicion for child abuse should trigger a referral for a skeletal survey. • We examine the potential shortfall in skeletal survey referrals in such patients. • Only 11% and 24% of

  10. Twenty-degree-tilt radiography for evaluation of lateral humeral condylar fracture in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryuji; Itoh, Yohei; Kishi, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of '20 -tilt anteroposterior (A-P) radiography' in the assessment of lateral condylar fractures of the distal humerus. Eighteen children with lateral humeral condylar fractures were studied. Every child underwent conventional A-P and lateral radiography, and six children underwent multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). For the investigation of 20 -tilt radiography, ten children with lateral humeral condylar fractures had conventional and 20 -tilt A-P and lateral radiography both preoperatively and postoperatively. Fragment dislocation was measured at the lateral and medial margins of the fracture on both the conventional A-P and 20 -tilt A-P radiographs. The lateral condylar fragment was triangular and was most prominent posteriorly. The fracture line was typically tilted approximately 20 to a reference line perpendicular to the long axis of the humerus in the lateral view. The extent of dislocation at the lateral and medial margins of the fracture site by 20 -tilt A-P radiography (9.3 ± 3.6 mm and 5.6 ± 2.5 mm) was significantly wider than that measured by the conventional method (6.8 ± 4.1 mm and 2.0 ± 1.5 mm), which may influence treatment. Twenty-degree-tilt A-P radiography may more precisely demonstrate fragment dislocation than standard radiographs and may influence patient treatment. (orig.)

  11. Two types of external fixators to correct humeral fracture in domestic pigeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmolin, F.; Schossler, J.E.; Bertoletti, B.; Vasconcelos, A.; Muller, D.; Schossler, D.R.; Gomes, K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper was aimed at evaluating two changes in the external fixators for osteosynthesis of the humeral fracture that induce the correction of the humeral fracture in pigeons. The reduction of diaphyseal fracture was made with an intramedulary pin associated to another perpendicular one inserted into the distal segment (Group A - GA); in the Group B (GB) an additional pin was used in the proximal fragment. All the pigeons were evaluated clinically and radiographically up to 60 days, except for four of each group which were submitted to euthanasia at 15, 22, 29 and 36 days for the macro and microscope exams. The flight test was successful in all pigeons. The bone calus was radiografically visible only in the GA; the mean time and the standard deviation for flight was 32.25 ± 6.5 days for the GA and 39.8 ± 3.83 for the GB. The mean time and standard deviation for fracture healing was 36 ± 0 days in the GA and 34 ± 3.4 in the GB. The two types of external fixator evaluated were efficient to stabilized the fracture site allowing complete consolidation and return to function. The use of the external fixator with two perpendicular pins provides more stability at the fracture site although it is necessary more time for the surgery procedure [pt

  12. Mapping the articular contact area of the long head of the biceps tendon on the humeral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brent J; Byram, Ian R; Lathrop, Ray A; Dunn, Warren R; Kuhn, John E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB) in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P = 0.002) with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%). Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho = 1, P = 0.017) as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho = 0.97, P = 0.005). The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver.

  13. Mapping the Articular Contact Area of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon on the Humeral Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J. Morris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P=0.002 with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%. Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho=1, P=0.017 as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho= 0.97, P=0.005. The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver.

  14. [Internal screwed plate for recent fractures of the humeral diaphysis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayez, J

    1999-06-01

    Can medial plating of the humerus, through an antero lateral approach, diminish incidence of iatrogenic radial palsies? We carried out a prospective study of medial plating of humeral shaft fractures through an antero lateral approach between 1988 and 1997. 41 fractures were fixed, 36 were followed up for a mean period of 5.8 years. The indications were multiple injuries (10), displaced fractures (23), and failure of conservative treatment (3). Road traffic accidents and sports injuries were the cause in 68 per cent of cases. Two fractures were open and in 9 cases there was a radial palsy. Bone graft was never used. The approach to the medial aspect of the humerus an antero lateral incision was the essential feature of the technique. After a slightly curved incision on the antero lateral aspect of the arm, the space between biceps and brachialis anterior was bluntly dissected. The assistant holded the elbow flexed in order to relax the biceps and rotated il laterally to expose the medial aspect of the bone. Splitting brachialis fibres longitudinally exposed the fracture site. It was easy to check if the radial nerve was trapped and, if not, the nerve seen during the operation. Postoperatively patients were given a simple sling and mobilised freely, including rotation. We had no intra-operative complications, no infections, no fixation failure, no post operative radial palsies and no non-unions. Results were excellent in 89 per cent of cases (full recovery of pain free range of movement). Four patient had a restriction of elbow movements of 10 degrees but without any discomfort. The mean time to union was 80 days. All radial nerve palsies recovered between 24 hours and 1 year. The plate was removed in 11 cases. Iatrogenic complications of humeral plating have led to the increased popularity of intramedullary nailing. Even if secondary radial palsies and non-unions have decreased, union of the humeral shafts is often difficult. Placing the plate into the medial

  15. Application of 3D-printing technology in the treatment of humeral intercondylar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W; Su, J; Cai, L; Lou, Y; Wang, J; Guo, X; Tang, J; Chen, H

    2018-02-01

    This study was aimed to compare conventional surgery and surgery assisted by 3D-printing technology in the treatment of humeral intercondylar fractures. In addition, we also investigated the effect of 3D-printing technology on the communication between doctors and patients. A total of 91 patients with humeral intercondylar fracture were enrolled in the study from March 2013 to August 2015. They were divided into two groups: 43 cases of 3D-printing group, 48 cases of conventional group. The individual models were used to simulate the surgical procedures and carry out the surgery according to plan. Operation duration, blood loss volume, fluoroscopy times and time to fracture union were recorded. The final functional outcomes, including the motion of the elbow, MEPS and DASH were also evaluated. Besides, we made a simple questionnaire to verify the effectiveness of the 3D-printed model for both doctors and patients. The operation duration, blood loss volume and fluoroscopy times for 3D-printing group was 76.6±7.9minutes, 231.1±18.1mL and 5.3±1.9 times, and for conventional group was 92.0±10.5minutes, 278.6±23.0mL and 8.7±2.7 times respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the conventional group and 3D-printing group (p3D-printing model. This study suggested the clinical feasibility of 3D-printing technology in treatment of humeral intercondylar fractures. Level II prospective randomized study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Radial nerve palsy in mid/distal humeral fractures: is early exploration effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighley, Geffrey; Hermans, Deborah; Lawton, Vidya; Duckworth, David

    2018-03-01

    Radial nerve palsies are a common complication with displaced distal humeral fractures. This case series examines the outcomes of early operative exploration and decompression of the nerve with fracture fixation with the view that this provides a solid construct for optimisation of nerve recovery. A total of 10 consecutive patients with a displaced distal humeral fracture and an acute radial nerve palsy were treated by the senior author by open reduction and internal fixation of the distal humerus and exploration and decompression of the radial nerve. Motor function and sensation of the radial nerve was assessed in the post-operative period every 2 months or until full recovery of the radial nerve function had occurred. All patients (100%) had recovery of motor and sensation function of their upper limb in the radial nerve distribution over a 12-month period. Recovery times ranged between 4 and 32 weeks, with the median time to recovery occurring at 26 weeks and the average time to full recovery being 22.9 weeks. Wrist extension recovered by an average of 3 months (range 2-26 weeks) and then finger extension started to recover 2-6 weeks after this. Disability of the arm, shoulder and hand scores ranged from 0 to 11.8 at greater than 1 year post-operatively. Our study demonstrated that early operative exploration of the radial nerve when performing an open stabilization of displaced distal humeral fractures resulted in a 100% recovery of the radial nerve. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. [The Extended Deltoid-Split Approach for Plating Four-Part Proximal Humeral Fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, G; Sayar, A; Thelen, U

    2016-08-01

    The deltoideopectoral approach is established as the gold standard in the surgical treatment of proximal humeral fractures. As an alternative, we demonstrate the extended deltoid approach with an intraoperative video. A direct lateral incision is performed and the anterior parts of the axillary nerve are identified and preserved. In our experience, this approach allows improved visualisation of the greater tuberosity and easier positioning of locking plates. Clinically relevant neurological injuries cannot be seen in our patients or in the literature. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Emergency or Delayed Surgical Treatment of Unstable Supracondylar Humeral Fractures in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanovic Branko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Supracondylar humeral fractures (SCHF are the most common elbow fractures in children, representing 3% of all paediatric fractures. Treatment options for SCHF in children are based on the Gartland classification. Treatment of non-displaced fractures (type I is non-operative. Plaster immobilization for 3 to 4 weeks is recommended, depending on the age of the child and fracture healing. Treatments of displaced supracondylar fractures (type II and III of the humerus in children are still undefined in clinical practice. Because of divided opinions, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether delayed or immediate surgical treatment has an advantage in the treatment of supracondylar fractures in children. This is a prospective – retrospective clinical study. This study included 64 patients from 5 to 15 years old; 47 (73.4% were boys and 17 (26.6% were girls. The most common age range (59.4% in this study was 5-8 years old. All patients were diagnosed with supracondylar fractures at the Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery “Banjica”. We analysed 17 parameters, which were obtained either from direct patient interviews or from their medical history. All patients were divided into two groups with matched characteristics. Group I consisted of 26 patients who had immediate operations. Group II consisted of 38 patients who had delayed operations.

  19. Training improves agreement among doctors using the Neer system for proximal humeral fractures in a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review studies of observer agreement among doctors classifying proximal humeral fractures according to the Neer system. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic review. We searched for observational studies in which doctors classified proximal humeral fractures according......, and the methodological quality was assessed. RESULTS: We included 11 observational studies (88 observers and 468 cases). Mean kappa-values for interobserver agreement ranged from 0.17 to 0.52. Agreement did not improve through selection of experienced observers, advanced imaging modalities, or simplification...

  20. Correlation between classification and secondary screw penetration in proximal humeral fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuke Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the correlation between fracture classification and secondary screw penetration.We retrospectively identified 189 patients with displaced proximal humeral fractures treated by ORIF at our hospital between June 2006 and June 2013. All fractures were classified radiographically before surgery and follow-up for least 2 years after surgery was recommended. At each follow-up, radiographs were taken in three orthogonal views to evaluate secondary screw penetration.The study population consisted of 189 patients. Of these, 70 were male and 119 female, with a mean age of 59.1 years; the mean follow-up time was 28.5 months. Secondary screw penetration occurred in 26 patients. The risk of developing secondary screw penetration was 11.3-fold higher in four-part fractures than two-part fractures (P 0.05.Patients with four-part fractures, type C fractures and medial hinges disruption are vulnerable to secondary screw penetration. This allows additional precautions to be instituted and measures to be taken as needed.

  1. Intramedullary nail versus dynamic compression plate fixation in treating humeral shaft fractures: grading the evidence through a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianXiong Ma

    Full Text Available There is a debate regarding the choice of operative intervention in humeral shaft fractures that require surgical intervention. The choices for operative interventions include intramedullary nailing (IMN and dynamic compression plate (DCP. This meta-analysis was performed to compare fracture union, functional outcomes, and complication rates in patients treated with IMN or DCP for humeral shaft fractures and to develop GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation-based recommendations for using the procedures to treat humeral shaft fractures. A systematic search of all the studies published through December 2012 was conducted using the Medline, Embase, Sciencedirect, OVID and Cochrane Central databases. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared IMN with DCP in treating adult patients with humeral shaft fractures and provided data regarding the safety and clinical effects were identified. The demographic characteristics, adverse events and clinical outcomes were manually extracted from all of the selected studies. Ten studies that included a total of 448 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of a meta-analysis indicated that both IMN and DCP can achieve similar fracture union with a similar incidence of radial nerve injury and infection. IMN was associated with an increased risk of shoulder impingement, more restriction of shoulder movement, an increased risk of intraoperative fracture comminution, a higher incidence of implant failure, and an increased risk of re-operation. The overall GRADE system evidence quality was very low, which reduces our confidence in the recommendations of this system. DCP may be superior to IMN in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. Because of the low quality evidence currently available, high-quality RCTs are required.

  2. Can arthroscopic rotator cuff repair prevent proximal migration of the humeral head?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sanz-Ruiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Shoulder arthroscopy has become increasingly used in recent years, especially in rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arthroscopic rotator cuff repair could prevent proximal migration of the humeral head. Material and Methods: We performed a retrospective study of 56 patients suffering from shoulder pain. They were divided into two groups, one comprising patients with impingement syndrome who underwent acromioplasty only and another comprising patients with rotator cuff tear who underwent acromioplasty combined with rotator cuff repair. The pre-operative Hirooka angle and the results of the simple shoulder test (SST were compared after 1 year. Results: We found no differences between the groups for the Hirooka angle or SST results. We did find a significant difference (P<0.05 between pre-operative and post-operative SST results. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair using arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that improves function and prevents proximal migration of the humeral head after 1 year of follow-up. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 190-195

  3. Clinic research on the treatment for humeral shaft fracture with minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis: a retrospective study of 128 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Hu, X; Yang, G; Xiang, M

    2017-04-01

    Minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) is one of the most important techniques in the treatment for humeral shaft fractures. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of MIPO technique for the treatment for humeral shaft fractures. We retrospectively evaluated 128 cases with humeral shaft fractures that were treated with MIPO technique from March 2005 to August 2008. All the patients were followed up by routine radiological imaging and clinical examinations. Constant-Murley score and HSS elbow joint score were used to evaluate the treatment outcome. The average duration of the surgery was 60 min (range 40-95 min) without blood transfusion. All fractures healed without infection. All cases recovered carrying angle except four cases with 10°-15° cubitus varus. After the average follow-up of 23 (13-38) months, satisfactory function was achieved according to Constant-Murley score and HSS elbow joint score. Constant-Murley score was 80 on average (range 68-91). According to HSS elbow joint score, there were 123 cases of excellent clinical outcome and five cases of effective outcome. It seems to be a safe and effective method for managing humeral shaft fractures with MIPO technique.

  4. [Manipulative reduction and small splint fixation combined with micromovement exercise for treatment of humeral shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao-chen; Xiang, Ming; Chen, Hang; Hu, Xiao-chuan; Yang, Guo-yong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of bone-setting manipulative reduction and small splint fixation combined with micro-movement theory exercise for treatment of humeral shaft fractures. From March 2011 to February 2014, 64 cases of humeral shaft fractures were treated by bone-setting manipulative reduction and small splint fixation including 28 males and 36 females with an average age of 38.1 years old ranging from 22 to 67 years old. According to the classification of AO/OTA, there were 10 cases of type A1, 12 cases of type A2,11 cases of type A3,10 cases of type B1,12 cases of type B2, 7 cases of type B3, 2 cases of type C1, 1 case of type C2, 1 case of type C3. After close reduction early functional exercise performed according to micro-movement theory. All patients had no other parts of the fractures, neurovascular injury, and serious medical problems. Patients were followed up for fracture healing, shoulder and elbow joint function recovery, and curative effect. All patients were followed up from 10 to 12 months with an average of 10.3 months. Of them, 2 cases had a small amount of callus growth at 3 months after close reduction, so instead of operation; 2 cases appeared radial nerve symptoms after close reduction ,so instead of operation. Other patients were osseous healing, the time was 8 to 12 weeks with an average of 10.2 weeks. After osseous healing, according to Constant-Murley score system ,the average score was (93.5 ± 3.2) points, the result was excellent in 29 cases, good in 29 cases, fair in 6 cases, excellent and good rate was 90.3%; according to the Mayo score system, the average score was (93.7 ± 4.2) points, the result was excellent in 35 cases, good in 23 cases, fair in 6 cases, excellent and good rate was 91.9%. Bone-setting manipulative reduction and small splint fixation combined with micromovement theory exercise for treatment of humeral shaft fractures has advantage of positive effect, easy and inexpensive method, the treatment has

  5. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humeral shaft fractures: are results reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Juan M; Sandoval, Alejandro; Streubel, Philipp N

    2010-12-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been advocated as a safe approach to humeral shaft fracture management. We evaluated the reproducibility of this technique in a regional hospital. Thirty-five patients underwent MIPO of humerus shaft fractures. Fifteen patients had an open fracture, six a preoperative radial nerve palsy, and nine a concomitant thoracic, musculoskeletal or vascular injury. At an average 12-month follow-up, 91% of fractures healed after a mean of 12 weeks (range, 8-16). Two infections occurred. Final alignment averaged 4° of varus (range, 5° of valgus to 20° of varus). Active elbow ROM averaged 114° (range, 60-135°) and was less than 100° in nine elbows. Five of six preoperative radial nerve injuries recovered spontaneously. Healing and infection rates in this study are consistent with those reported in the literature. Lower elbow ROM and higher fracture angulation at healing were nevertheless found. MIPO is technically demanding and requires adequate intraoperative imaging and surgical experience in order to obtain adequate fracture alignment. Brachialis muscle scarring and inadequate postoperative rehabilitation may be involved in limited elbow range of motion.

  6. Fracture of an unossified humeral medial epicondyle: use of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Katsuhisa; Miyamoto, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the humeral medial epicondyle is a relatively common injury in children. Surgery is a good option for treatment, but correct diagnosis is important. Most fractures occur after the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. If a fracture occurs before the ossification of the medial epicondyle, it is undetectable by radiographs. Here we report a case of an unossified medial epicondyle fracture of the humerus. A 9-year-old boy had persistent pain in the medial side of the right elbow after a fall. Despite his pain, he could move his injured elbow with a range from 60 to 90 . Radiographs and computed tomography showed neither fracture nor dislocation in the injured elbow, and soft tissue swelling was the only finding. Neither the trochlea nor the medial epicondyle was ossified. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the medial epicondyle was separated from the medial metaphysis and displaced. This clear finding led us to surgical fixation. Under general anesthesia, valgus stress showed gross instability of the injured elbow. Two years after the operation, he had no complaints and could play sports with the same range of motion as the left elbow. It is important to keep in mind that medial epicondylar fractures may be hidden in a normal radiograph before the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. (orig.)

  7. Fracture of an unossified humeral medial epicondyle: use of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Katsuhisa; Miyamoto, Nao [Nishinomiya Municipal Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Fracture of the humeral medial epicondyle is a relatively common injury in children. Surgery is a good option for treatment, but correct diagnosis is important. Most fractures occur after the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. If a fracture occurs before the ossification of the medial epicondyle, it is undetectable by radiographs. Here we report a case of an unossified medial epicondyle fracture of the humerus. A 9-year-old boy had persistent pain in the medial side of the right elbow after a fall. Despite his pain, he could move his injured elbow with a range from 60 to 90 . Radiographs and computed tomography showed neither fracture nor dislocation in the injured elbow, and soft tissue swelling was the only finding. Neither the trochlea nor the medial epicondyle was ossified. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the medial epicondyle was separated from the medial metaphysis and displaced. This clear finding led us to surgical fixation. Under general anesthesia, valgus stress showed gross instability of the injured elbow. Two years after the operation, he had no complaints and could play sports with the same range of motion as the left elbow. It is important to keep in mind that medial epicondylar fractures may be hidden in a normal radiograph before the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. (orig.)

  8. A prospective randomized study of operative treatment for noncomminuted humeral shaft fractures: conventional open plating versus minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Chang-Wug; Byun, Young-Soo; Kim, Jung Jae; Park, Ki Chul

    2015-04-01

    To compare the clinical and radiologic results of conventional open plating (COP) and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in the treatment of noncomminuted humeral shaft fractures. Randomized prospective study. Five level 1 trauma centers. Sixty-eight consecutive patients were randomized into 2 study groups: those treated by COP (COP group; n = 32) and those treated by MIPO (MIPO group; n = 36). Simple humeral shaft fractures (AO/OTA classification types A and B) were reduced by open reduction or closed reduction and fixed with a narrow 4.5/5.0 locking compression plate, metaphyseal locking compression plate, or proximal humeral internal locking system plate to the anterior lateral aspect of the humerus. Fracture healing time, operative time, radiation exposure time, and intraoperative nerve injury. To assess shoulder and elbow function, we used the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scoring system and the Mayo elbow performance index, including the range of motion and pain. Radiographic measurements included fracture alignment, delayed union, and nonunion. Thirty-one fractures (97%) healed in the COP group within 16 weeks, whereas 36 fractures (100%) were healed in the MIPO group by 15 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the operative time or complication rates. In both groups, all fractures achieved union without malunion and with excellent functional outcomes by definition of the Mayo elbow performance index and UCLA scoring system. This study confirmed a high overall rate of union and excellent functional outcomes in both MIPO and COP groups. MIPO is equivalent to COP as a safe and effective method for simple types of humeral shaft fractures when surgery is indicated, and the surgeon is experienced in the technique. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Humeral fractures due to low-energy trauma: an epidemiological survey in patients referred to a large emergency department in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzoni, M; Abbate, B; Verzicco, I; Pedrazzini, A; Benatti, M; Cervellin, G

    2015-01-01

    This survey describes the epidemiology of approximately 1800 low-energy humeral fractures seen in a large emergency department in Northern Italy over 7 years (2007-2013), highlighting the differences from previous Italian studies. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of humeral fractures due to low-energy trauma in patients 40 years of age or older referred to a large Emergency Department (Parma, Northern Italy) in a 7-year period (2007-2013). All humeral fractures referred to the emergency department of the Academic Hospital of Parma (the main hospital in the province with a catchment area of approximately 345,000) were retrieved from the hospital database using both ICD-9CM codes and text strings. The diagnosis of humeral fracture due to low-energy trauma was confirmed by medical records and X-ray reports, after exclusion of injuries due to a clear-cut high-energy trauma or cancer. The query identified 1843 humeral fractures (1809 first fractures), with a clear predominance in women (78 %). Fractures of the proximal humerus represented the large majority of humeral fractures (more than 85 %), with an incidence progressively increasing with age (more than 60-fold in women and 20-fold in men). Simultaneous fractures (hip in particular) were frequent especially after 85 years of age (1 out of 8 cases). When compared to other Italian studies, the incidence of humeral fractures was significantly lower than that derived from discharge data corrected for hospitalization rate (standardized rate ratio 0.74; p energy humeral fractures in Italy. Our results partly differ from previous Italian studies based on indirect estimations.

  10. Brachial Plexus Injury in a 6-Year-Old Boy with 100% Displaced Proximal Humeral Metaphyseal Fracture: A Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovich, Elizabeth Nora; Howard, James F

    2017-12-01

    Posttraumatic brachial plexopathies can occur following displaced proximal humeral fractures, causing profound functional deficits. Described here is an unusual case of a displaced proximal humeral metaphyseal fracture in a young child. The patient underwent closed reduction and serial casting, but hand weakness and forearm sensory loss persisted. Needle electromyography localized the injury to the mid/proximal arm near the fracture site, resulting in damage to the posterior and medial cords of the brachial plexus with profound involvement of the radial, ulnar, and median nerves and sparing of the axillary nerve. After months of occupational therapy, hand strength improved, with a nearly full return of function. V. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Displaced humeral lateral condyle fractures in children: should we bury the pins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das De, Soumen; Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if leaving Kirschner wires exposed is more cost-effective than burying them subcutaneously after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of humeral lateral condyle fractures. A retrospective cohort study of all lateral condyle fractures treated over a 10-year period at a single institution was performed. Data on surgical technique, fracture healing, and complications were analyzed, as well as treatment costs. A decision analysis model was then constructed to compare the strategies of leaving the pins exposed versus buried. Finally, sensitivity analyses were performed, assessing cost-effectiveness when infection rates and costs of treating deep infections were varied. A total of 235 children with displaced fractures were treated with ORIF using Kirschner wires. Pins were left exposed in 41 cases (17.4%) and buried in 194 cases (82.6%); the age, sex, injury mechanisms, and fracture patterns were similar in both the groups. The median time to removal of implants was shorter with exposed versus buried pins (4 vs. 6 wk, Pfracture union or loss of reduction rates. The rate of superficial infection was higher with exposed pins (9.8% vs. 3.1%), but this was not statistically significant (P=0.076). There were no deep infections with exposed pins, whereas the rate of deep infection was 0.5% with buried pins (P=1.00). Buried pins were associated with additional complications, including symptomatic implants (7.2%); pins protruding through the skin (16%); internal pin migration necessitating additional surgery (1%); and skin necrosis (1%). The decision analysis revealed that leaving pins exposed resulted in an average cost savings of $3442 per patient. This strategy remained cost-effective even when infection rates with exposed pins approached 40%. Leaving the pins exposed after ORIF of lateral condyle fractures is safe and more cost-effective than burying the pins subcutaneously. Retrospective cohort study (level III).

  12. A Pitfall in Fixation of Distal Humeral Fractures with Pre-Contoured Locking Compression Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jayakumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anatomically precontoured locking plates are intended to facilitate the fixation of articular fractures and particularly those associated with osteoporosis. Fractures of the distal humerus are relatively uncommon injuries where operative intervention can be exceptionally challenging. The distal humeral trochlea provides a very narrow anatomical window through which to pass a fixed-angle locking screw, which must also avoid the olecranon, coronoid, and radial fossae. We describe 3 patients (ages 27, 49, and 73 years with a bicolumnar fracture of the distal humerus where very short distal locking screws were used. Intra-articular screw placement was avoided but loss of fixation occurred in two patients and a third was treated with a prolonged period of immobilization. We postulate that fixed-angle screw trajectories may make it difficult for the surgeon to place screws of adequate length in this anatomically confined region, and may lead to insufficient distal fixation. Surgical tactics should include placement of as many screws as possible into the distal fragment, as long as possible, and that each screw pass through a plate without necessarily locking in.

  13. Humeral head cysts and rotator cuff tears: an MR arthrographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Martin; Lambert, Robert G.W.; Jhangri, Gian S.; Grace, Michael; Zelaso, Jay; Wong, Ben; Dhillon, Sukhvinder S.

    2006-01-01

    Humeral tuberosity cysts are a common finding, with previous reports suggesting they are related to rotator cuff tear or aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of cysts in the tuberosities of the humeral head and their relationship with rotator cuff tear and age. Shoulder MR arthrograms were reviewed in 120 consecutive patients - 83 males (mean age 38.0, range 19-59 years) and 37 females (mean age 41.2, range 15-59 years). Patients were referred for investigation of a variety of conditions, and instability was suspected in only a minority of cases. MR was performed before and after direct arthrography with 0.01% solution of gadolinium. Cysts were defined as well-demarcated circular/ovoid foci in two planes that demonstrated high signal on pre-arthrographic T2W sequences. Location, size and numbers of cysts and post-arthrographic enhancement were documented, along with the location of rotator cuff tears, if present. Cysts in the tuberosities of the humerus were identified in 84 patients (70%), and were seen seven times more frequently in the posterior aspect of the greater tuberosity than anteriorly. Most cysts (94%) demonstrated communication with the joint post-arthrogram. Rotator cuff tears were present in 36 patients, and 79% of all tears occurred in supraspinatus tendon. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of cysts between patients older or younger than age 40 or between genders, but rotator cuff tears were seen significantly more often in the older age group (p<0.01). Tuberosity cysts and rotator cuff tears did not appear to be related (p=0.55). However, whilst this lack of association was quite obvious posteriorly (p=0.84), the trend in the anterior aspect of the greater tuberosity is not as clear (p=0.14). Humeral cysts are most often located in the posterior aspect of the greater tuberosity, communicate with the joint space and, in this location, are not related to aging or rotator cuff tear. (orig.)

  14. Humeral head cysts and rotator cuff tears: an MR arthrographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Martin [Southmead Hospital, Department of Radiology, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol (United Kingdom); Lambert, Robert G.W.; Jhangri, Gian S.; Grace, Michael; Zelaso, Jay; Wong, Ben; Dhillon, Sukhvinder S. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    Humeral tuberosity cysts are a common finding, with previous reports suggesting they are related to rotator cuff tear or aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of cysts in the tuberosities of the humeral head and their relationship with rotator cuff tear and age. Shoulder MR arthrograms were reviewed in 120 consecutive patients - 83 males (mean age 38.0, range 19-59 years) and 37 females (mean age 41.2, range 15-59 years). Patients were referred for investigation of a variety of conditions, and instability was suspected in only a minority of cases. MR was performed before and after direct arthrography with 0.01% solution of gadolinium. Cysts were defined as well-demarcated circular/ovoid foci in two planes that demonstrated high signal on pre-arthrographic T2W sequences. Location, size and numbers of cysts and post-arthrographic enhancement were documented, along with the location of rotator cuff tears, if present. Cysts in the tuberosities of the humerus were identified in 84 patients (70%), and were seen seven times more frequently in the posterior aspect of the greater tuberosity than anteriorly. Most cysts (94%) demonstrated communication with the joint post-arthrogram. Rotator cuff tears were present in 36 patients, and 79% of all tears occurred in supraspinatus tendon. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of cysts between patients older or younger than age 40 or between genders, but rotator cuff tears were seen significantly more often in the older age group (p<0.01). Tuberosity cysts and rotator cuff tears did not appear to be related (p=0.55). However, whilst this lack of association was quite obvious posteriorly (p=0.84), the trend in the anterior aspect of the greater tuberosity is not as clear (p=0.14). Humeral cysts are most often located in the posterior aspect of the greater tuberosity, communicate with the joint space and, in this location, are not related to aging or rotator cuff tear. (orig.)

  15. [Operative treatment of proximal humeral four-part fractures in elderly patients: comparison of two angular-stable implant systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, T; Hofmann, T; Seibert, O; Gundlach, G; Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Hoffmann, R

    2012-04-01

    nigsee group. Again, no statistical difference was found. Partial humeral head necrosis was observed in 2 patients of the Philos and 1 of the Königsee group. In the remaining patients uneventful fracture consolidation was observed. There were no complications requiring further surgical intervention. To the date of follow-up all implants were still in situ and none of the patients reported discomfort with respect to the hardware. In this study we were able to demonstrate that good and satisfactory results can be achieved in the majority of patients, regardless of whether a Philos or a Königsee system was used. Significant differences between the two groups could not be found in any of the performed examinations. Both implants seem to be suitable in four-part fractures of the proximal humerus. However, the Königsee plate represents a more cost-effective option compared to the Philos system. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The female geriatric proximal humeral fracture: protagonist for straight antegrade nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Kralinger, Franz S; Kapferer, Sebastian; Hengg, Clemens; Wambacher, Markus; Euler, Simon A

    2017-10-01

    Straight antegrade humeral nailing (SAHN) has become a standard technique for the surgical fixation of proximal humeral fractures, which predominantly affect elderly females. The nail's proximal anchoring point has been demonstrated to be critical to ensure reliable fixation in osteoporotic bone and to prevent iatrogenic damage to the superior rotator cuff bony insertion. Anatomical variations of the proximal humerus, however, may preclude satisfactory anchoring of the nail's proximal end and may bare the risk of rotator cuff violation, even though the nail is inserted as recommended. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical suitability of proximal humeri of geriatric females aged 75 years and older for SAHN. Specifically, we sought to assess the proportion of humeri not anatomically amenable to SAHN for proximal humeral fracture. A total of 303 proximal humeri of 241 females aged 75 years and older (mean age 84.5 ± 5.0 years; range 75-102 years) were analyzed for this study. Multiplanar two-dimensional reformations (true ap, true lateral, and axial) were reconstructed from shoulder computed tomography (CT) data sets. The straight antegrade nail's ideal entry point, "critical point" (CP), and critical distance (CD; distance between ideal entry point and CP) were determined. The rate of proximal humeri not anatomically suitable for SAHN (critical type) was assessed regarding proximal reaming diameters of currently available straight antegrade humeral nails. Overall, 35.6% (108/303) of all proximal humeri were found to be "critical types" (CD straight antegrade nails currently in use. Moreover, 43.2% (131/303) of the humeri were considered "critical types" with regard to the alternatively used larger proximal reaming diameter of 11.5 mm. Mean CD was 9.0 ± 1.7 mm (range 3.5-13.5 mm) and did not correlate with age (r = -0.04, P = 0.54). No significant differences in CD and rate of "critical types" were found between left and right humeri

  17. Shaft-Condylar Angle for surgical correction in neglected and displaced lateral humeral condyle fracture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulpruek, Pornchai; Angsanuntsukh, Chanika; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Sa-Ngasoongsong, Paphon; Tawonsawatruk, Tulyapruek; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn

    2015-09-01

    To assess the outcome after using the Shaft-Condylar angle (SCA) as intraoperative reference for sagittal plane correction in displaced lateral humeral condyle fractures in children presented 3-weeks after injury. Ten children, with delayed presentation of a displaced lateral humeral condyle fracture and undergoing surgery during 1999-2011, were reviewed. The goal was to obtain a smooth articular surface with an intraoperative SCA of nearly 40° and nearest-anatomical carrying angle. They were allocated into two groups according to the postoperative SCA [Good-reduction group (SCA=30-50°), and Bad-reduction group (SCA50°)] and the final outcomes were then compared. All fractures united without avascular necrosis. The Good-reduction group (n=7) showed a significant improvement in final range of motion and functional outcome compared to the Bad-reduction group (n=3) (p=0.02). However, there was no significant difference in pain, carrying angle and overall outcome between both groups. SCA is a possible intraoperative reference for sagittal alignment correction in late presented displaced lateral humeral condyle fractures.

  18. [Epidemiology, treatment and results of proximal humeral fractures: experience of a district hospital in a sports- and tourism area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, J; Simmen, H-P

    2003-02-01

    The epidemiology, therapy and results of proximal humeral fractures in a touristic area were investigated and our concept for treatment presented. Between 1.1.1999 and 30.04.2000 adult patients with proximal humeral fractures were included, the fractures classified (Codman/Neer and AO) and results determined after an average of 9 months. 62 adults were treated. 59 (95 %) had an accident during leisure time, mainly skiing accidents (52 %). 7 patients (11 %) had an associated luxation of the shoulder. 51 (82 %) were treated conservatively, 11 (18 %) operatively with a T-plate. The conservatively treated had to wear a Gilchrist-cast for an average of 29 (operatively 13) days, started passive movement after 20 (operatively 9) days, and active movement after 44 (operatively 45) days. The 32 employed (52 %) were not able to work for 46 days on average. Overall, 52 patients (84 %) were totally or mostly satisfied with the result. 5 among the 13 patients (38.5 %) with 3- or 4-part-fractures, and 4 among the 11 operated patients (36.4 %) were not satisfied with the result. Proximal humeral fractures are common skiing injuries, they need a long and intensive treatment and are economically expensive. The Codman/Neer and AO-classifications are equal. The results for simple, mainly conservatively treated fractures (Codman/Neer 1, 2A, 2-part) are good. Complex, mainly operatively treated fractures (Codman/Neer 3- and 4-part) have a much poorer prognosis. Diagnostically the computed tomography with 3-D-reconstruction is recommended for a better representation of the fracture and a safer choice of the therapeutical strategy.

  19. Surgical management for displaced pediatric proximal humeral fractures: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Benjamin J; Hedequist, Daniel J; Miller, Patricia E; Waters, Peter M; Bae, Donald S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine which of the following methods of fixation, percutaneous pinning (PP) or intramedullary nailing (IMN), was more cost-effective in the treatment of displaced pediatric proximal humeral fractures (PPHF). A retrospective cohort of surgically treated PPHF over a 12-year period at a single institution was performed. A decision analysis model was constructed to compare three surgical strategies: IMN versus percutaneous pinning leaving the pins exposed (PPE) versus leaving the pins buried (PPB). Finally, sensitivity analyses were performed, assessing the cost-effectiveness of each technique when infection rates and cost of deep infections were varied. A total of 84 patients with displaced PPHF underwent surgical stabilization. A total of 35 cases were treated with IMN, 32 with PPE, and 17 with PPB. The age, sex, and preoperative fracture angulation were similar across all groups. A greater percentage of open reduction was seen in the IMN and PPB groups (p = 0.03), while a higher proportion of physeal injury was seen in the PPE group (p = 0.02). Surgical time and estimated blood loss was higher in the IMN group (p exposed implants approached 55 %. Leaving pins exposed after surgical fixation of PPHF is more cost-effective than either burying pins or using intramedullary fixation.

  20. [Treatment of proximal humeral fractures by reverse shoulder arthroplasty: mid-term evaluation of functional results and Notching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Elena, J; de la Red-Gallego, M Á; Garcés-Zarzalejo, C; Pascual-Carra, M A; Pérez-Aguilar, M D; Rodríguez-López, T; Alfonso-Fernández, A; Pérez-Núñez, M I

    2015-01-01

    An analysis was made on relationship between Notching and functional and radiographic parameters after treatment of acute proximal humeral fractures with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. A retrospective evaluation was performed on 37 patients with acute proximal humeral fracture treated by reversed shoulder arthroplasty. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Range of motion, intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded. Nerot's classification was used to evaluate Notching. Patient satisfaction was evaluated with the Constant Score (CS). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between Notching and glenosphere position, or functional outcomes. Mean range of elevation, abduction, external and internal rotation were 106.22°, 104.46°, 46.08° and 40.27°, respectively. Mean CS was 63. Notching was present at 12 months in 29% of patients. Statistical analysis showed significance differences between age and CS, age and notching development, and tilt with notching. No statistical significance differences were found between elevation, abduction, internal and external rotation and CS either with scapular or glenosphere-neck angle. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a valuable option for acute humeral fractures in patients with osteoporosis and cuff-tear arthropathy. It leads to early pain relief and shoulder motion. Nevertheless, it is not exempt from complications, and long-term studies are needed to determine the importance of notching. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of humeral head osteochondrosis in the Greater Swiss Mountain dog and the Border Collie in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlerth, S; Senn, S; Geissbühler, U; Kircher, P; Flückiger, M

    2016-11-01

    Osteochondrosis (OC) is common in large-breed dogs. According to the breeding guidelines of the Swiss kennel clubs, the shoulder joints are included in the radiographic screening for joint diseases in the Greater Swiss Mountain dog (GSMD) and the Border Collie (BC) since 1993 and 2003, respectively. The aim of this study was to estimate the overall prevalence of humeral head OC in these 2 breeds in Switzerland based on the data of the Swiss National Dysplasia Committees. All radiographs were re-evaluated to assess single radiographic changes. From 1993 and 2003, accordingly, until 2013, the overall prevalence was 14% for the GSMD and 8% for the BC, respectively. Affected joints showed a focally reduced opacity or a flattened/indented contour of the caudal section of the humeral head. Articular flaps were only seen occasionally. Degenerative joint disease was significantly more common in OC affected joints (GSMD: 32%; BC: 20%) than in joints without OC. The present study is the first report on the prevalence of humeral head OC in a large cohort of GSMD and the BC over a long study period. In comparison to other breeds, the herein reported prevalences are in the mid to upper range. Results of the present study should alert veterinarians to the disease in these breeds and may serve as a starting point for further epidemiological and genetic studies.

  2. A modified surgical technique for neglected fracture of lateral humeral condyle in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Abdul Razak; Munajat, Ismail; Mohd, Emil Fazliq

    2011-11-01

    Operative treatment for neglected fracture of lateral humeral condyle (LHC) is difficult because of contracted muscle, fibrous tissue formation, and indistinct bony edges. Its success depends on the ability to preserve blood supply during the surgery. We retrospectively reviewed eight cases of neglected fracture of LHC in children treated with open reduction with selected multiple 'V' lengthening of common extensor muscle and internal fixation. The patients were between 3 and 8 years of age. The period of neglect was between 3 and 20 weeks. Four patients with displacement of more than 10 mm and neglect for 5 weeks or more required lengthening of common extensor muscle aponeurosis. The follow-up assessments were between 1 and 6.3 years with a mean of 4.4 years. All patients had union by 2 months. They gained improvement of flexion range of motion between 60° and 120° with a mean of 86.3°. Loss of final range of motion compared with the normal side was between 5° and 35° with a mean of 10°. No patient had limitation of activities or pain. Six cases had excellent and two cases had good Dillon functional score. All patients had lateral condyle prominent with different severities. There was one mild avascular necrosis and one fishtail deformity. Both of them had almost full range of motion. All patients had early physeal closure, except one, who had only 1 year follow-up. There was no case of progressive valgus deformity. Children with neglected fracture of LHC would benefit from anatomical reduction and internal fixation through a proper exposure and if indicated combined with multiple 'V' lengthening of common extensor muscle aponeurosis. This is a level IV study.

  3. Avascular necrosis of femoral and humeral heads in a HIV (+) patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubysz, R.; Wojtycha-Kwasnica, B.; Higersberger, J.

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis (AVN-avascular necrosis) has been reported to occur occasionally among HIV-infected patient. The number of incidences appears to be rising. The hip is most commonly involved and often bilaterally. Osteonecrosis occurred more frequently in case of those patients who used systemically corticosteroids or testosterone, with hiperlipidemia, alcoholism and immune reconstruction. Case Report: A 28- year - old man, presented with a 2-years history of pain involving both hip joints and shoulders. Over the following weeks the pain was progressive. The patient had a history of HIV for 10 years before. He had a history of steroid use due to cerebellitis (3 years before). No other manifestations of AIDS was presented. The radiographs and CT examination presented irregular areas of increased endosteal density and with fragmentation femoral and humeral heads. Osteonecrosis in HIV (+) patients is most commonly associated with steroid use. HIV infected patients with persistent joints pain should be evaluated for this serious complication. Plain radiographs and TK examination help to establish the diagnosis. (author)

  4. [Comparison of clinical effect on locking plate for proximal humeral fracture with or without application of inferomedial screws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiu-wu; Fan, Jian; Yuan, Feng

    2016-06-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of locking plate for proximal humeral fracture whether application of inferomedial screws. From January 2012 to July 2013, 46 patients with proximal humeral fracture underwent locking plates were retrospectively analyzed. There were 25 males and 21 females aged from 29 to 80 years old with an average of 55.1 years old. Among them, 25 patients were treated with inferomedial screws (support group), including 13 males and 12 females aged from 38 to 80 years old with an average of (55.8 ± 11.8) years old; 8 cases were part two fracture,10 cases were part three fracture and 7 cases were part four fracture according to Neer classification. Twenty-one patients were treated without inferomedial screws (non-support group), including 12 males and 9 females aged from 29 to 79 years old with an average of (54.2 ± 14.8)years old; 6 cases were part two fracture, 9 cases were part three fracture and 6 cases were part four fracture according to Neer classification. Operative time, fracture healing time and complications were observed and compared, Neer scoring of shoulder joint were used to evaluate clinical effect. All patients were followed up from 12 to 41 months with an average of 15.6 months. Operative time and fracture healing time in support group was (1.6 ± 0.4) h and (3.0 ± 0.6) months, and (1.5 ± 0.4) h and (3.1 ± 0.6) months in non-support group, while there was no statistical difference in operative time and fracture healing time between two groups. There was significant differences in Neer score between support group (89.7± 4.9) and non-support group (83.1 ± 7.1). No complication occurred in support group,while 4 cases occurred complications in non-support group. Locking plate with inferomedial screws for proximal humeral fracture has advantages of stable fixation, less complications, quick recovery of function and satisfied clinical effect.

  5. Triceps-sparing approach for open reduction and internal fixation of neglected displaced supracondylar and distal humeral fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Ahmed Shawkat

    2015-06-01

    Supracondylar humeral fractures are one of the most common skeletal injuries in children. In cases of displacement and instability, the standard procedure is early closed reduction and percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation. However, between 10 and 20 % of patients present late. According to the literature, patients with neglected fractures are those patients who presented for treatment after 14 days of injury. The delay is either due to lack of medical facilities or social and financial constraints. The neglected cases are often closed injuries with no vascular compromise. However, the elbow may still be tense and swollen with abrasions or crusts. In neglected cases, especially after early appearance of callus, there is no place for closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. Traditionally, distal humeral fractures have been managed with surgical approaches that disrupt the extensor mechanism with less satisfactory functional outcome due to triceps weakness and elbow stiffness. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of delayed open reduction using the triceps-sparing approach and Kirschner wire fixation for treatment of neglected, displaced supracondylar and distal humeral fractures in children. This prospective study included 15 children who had neglected displaced supracondylar and distal humeral fractures. All patients were completely evaluated clinically and radiologically before intervention, after surgery and during the follow-up. The follow-up period ranged from 8 to 49 months, with a mean period of 17 months. Functional outcome was evaluated according to the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) and Mark functional criteria. All fractures united in a mean duration of 7.2 weeks (range 5-10 weeks) with no secondary displacement or mal-union. Excellent results were found at the last follow-up in 13 of the 15 patients studied (86.66 %), while good results were found in two patients (13.33 %) according to the MEPI scale. According to the Mark

  6. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humeral shaft fracture: a reproducible technique with the assistance of an external fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Oh, Chang-Wug; Oh, Jong-Keon; Apivatthakakul, Theerachai; Kim, Joon-Woo; Yoon, Jong-Pil; Lee, Dong-Joo; Jung, Jae-Wook

    2013-05-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has become a popular option for treatment of humeral shaft fractures. However, indirect reduction might risk unpromising results, with mal-alignment/mal-union or nonunion. The purpose of this study was to describe a reproducible MIPO technique that used an external fixator during the procedure as a tool for reduction and maintenance, and to assess the outcomes in patients with humeral shaft fracture. Of 31 consecutive cases of humeral shaft fracture in 30 patients, 29 were included in this study. There were seven simple (type A) and 22 comminuted (type B or C) fractures. After the insertion of one Schanz pin on each proximal and distal humerus, a provisional reduction was achieved by connecting the pins with a monolateral external fixator. The MIPO procedure was then performed over the anterior aspect of the humerus. To evaluate the efficacy of the provisional reduction by external fixator, coronal and sagittal alignments were assessed. We also assessed bony and functional results, including complications, from this technique. There was no case of mal-union >10°, and mean angulation was 1.3° (range 0°-9°) in the coronal plane and 1.2° (range 0°-8°) in the sagittal plane. Twenty-eight of 29 fractures were united, including three delayed unions, with a mean union time of 19.1 weeks (range 12.3-38.4 weeks) and a mean follow-up of 20.8 months (range 13.5-31.0 months). There was one hypertrophic nonunion that healed after fixing with two additional screws. Except one patient with associated injury in the elbow, all patients recovered to pre-injury joint motion. There were two cases of postoperative radial nerve palsy that both recovered completely. We attributed them to manipulation, and not to the Schanz pins or plate fixation. Surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures with external fixator-assisted reduction and MIPO resulted in excellent reductions and high union rates.

  7. Monoaxial versus polyaxial locking systems: a biomechanical analysis of different locking systems for the fixation of proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Ralph; Müller, Thorben; Topp, Tobias; Lewan, Ulrike; Krüger, Antonio; Kühne, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2011-08-01

    The development of locking plate systems has led to polyaxial screws and new plate designs. This study compares monoaxial head locking screws (PHILOS© by Synthes) and a new generation of polyaxial locking screws (NCB-LE© by Zimmer) with respect to biomechanical stability. On nine pairs of randomised formalin fixed humerus specimens, standardised osteotomies and osteosyntheses with nine monoaxial (group A) und nine polyaxial (group B) plate/screw systems were performed. A material testing machine by Instron (M-10 14961-DE) was used for cyclic stress tests and crash tests until defined breakup criteria as endpoints were reached. After axial cyclic stress 200 times at 90 N, plastic deformation was 1.02 mm in group A and 1.25 mm in group B. After the next cycle using 180 N the additional deformation averaged 0.23 mm in group A and 0.39 mm in group B. The deformation using 450 N was 0.72 mm in group A compared to 0.92 mm in group B. The final full power test resulted in a deformation average of 0.49 mm in group A and 0.63 mm in group B after 2,000 cycles using 450 N. When reaching the breakup criteria the plastic deformation of the NCB plate was 9.04 mm on average. The PHILOS plate was similarly deformed by 9.00 mm. As a result of the crash test, in group A the screws pulled out of the humeral head four times whereas the shaft broke one time and another time the implant was ripped out. The gap was closed four times. In group B, there were three cases of screw cut-through, four shaft fractures/screw avulsions from the shaft and two cases of gap closure. The two systems resist the cyclic duration tests and the increasing force tests in a similar manner. The considerable clinical benefits of the polyaxial system are enhanced by equal biomechanical performance.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided closed reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle: prospective clinical study of the technique and results in ten dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Reed, A L

    1999-01-01

    To report a technique for fluoroscopically guided closed reduction with internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle (FLHC) and determine the long-term results in 10 clinical cases. Prospective clinical case study. Ten dogs with 11 fractures. Fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle were stabilized with transcondylar screws and Kirschner wires. Closed reduction and implant placement were achieved using intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. After fracture repair, postoperative radiographs were evaluated for articular alignment and implant placement. Dogs were evaluated after surgery by means of lameness scores, elbow range of motion (ROM), radiographic assessment, and owner evaluation of function. Postoperative reduction was considered anatomic in 6 fractures with all other fractures having ROM values between affected and unaffected elbows. All of the dogs in this study regained 90-100% of full function, based on owner assessment. Fluoroscopic guidance for closed reduction and internal fixation of FLHC in dogs is an effective technique.

  9. Difference between radiological and functional outcome with deltoid-splitting approach versus deltopectoral approach for the management of proximal humeral fractures with philos plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Waliullah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal humeral fractures are one of the common fractures of upper extremity. Good results by various studies have been reported for proximal humeral locking plate (PHILOS fixation in proximal humeral fractures. We want to evaluate whether it is only the implant which has given good results or different surgical approach utilized for fixation of plate also affects result. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 patients with proximal humeral fractures were divided in two groups, in Group A, patient′s classical deltopectoral approach utilized, while in Group B deltoid-splitting approach was used. All patients were managed by PHILOS plate fixation. Cases were followed up clinically as well as radiologically at 4-6 weeks after operation and thereafter at 10-12 weeks and then at 6 monthly for long-term complications. Functional outcomes of patient were accessed in terms Constant Scoring System, while radiological evaluation was done by taking x-rays to access quality of reduction and union of fracture. Results: All patients were followed for a minimum of 18 months. In Group B, reduction of tuberosities was better in 3 part and 4 part fractures. Mean Constant score in Group A at the end of 3 months was 56, while in Group B it was 62 and statistically significant (P = 0.02. At the end of 18 months, mean Constant score in Group A was 79, while in Group B it was 81 and statistically insignificant (P = 0.72. One patient in Group B showed axillary nerve paresis in postoperative period and recovered at the end of 3 months. Conclusion: We recommend that deltoid-splitting approach can be used in 3 part and 4 part complex proximal humeral fractures and in posterior fracture dislocation shoulder, which are difficult to approach with deltopectoral approach; however, care should be taken while inserting calcar screw in PHILOS plate fixation to avoid iatrogenic axillary nerve injury.

  10. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of recategorized Neer classification in differentiating 2-part surgical neck fractures from multi-fragmented proximal humeral fractures in 116 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumrein, Bakir O; Mattila, Ville M; Lepola, Vesa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal fracture classification should be simple and reproducible and should guide treatment. For proximal humeral fractures, the Neer classification is commonly used. However, intraobserver and interobserver reliability of the Neer classification has been shown to be poor. In clinical...... for interobserver reliability showed substantial correlation (0.61-0.73) and was as follows: 0.73 for radiographs alone, 0.61 for CT scans alone, and 0.72 for radiographs and CT scans viewed together. After 24 weeks, the process was repeated and intraobserver reliability was calculated.The κ coefficient...... for intraobserver reliability showed substantial correlation (0.62-0.75) and was as follows: 0.62 for radiographs alone, 0.64 for CT scans alone, and 0.75 for radiographs and CT scans viewed together. CONCLUSION: Clinicians were able to differentiate 2-part surgical neck fractures from multi-fragmented fractures...

  11. Trends in incidence rate, health care consumption, and costs for patients admitted with a humeral fracture in The Netherlands between 1986 and 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Mahabier (Kiran); D. den Hartog (Dennis); M.J.M. Panneman (Martien); J.R. van Veldhuizen (Joyce); S. Polinder (Suzanne); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: This study aimed to examine long-term population-based trends in the incidence rate of patients with a humeral fracture admitted to a hospital in the Netherlands from 1986 to 2012 and to give a detailed overview of the health care consumption and productivity loss with

  12. Evaluation of shoulder and elbow functions after treatment of humeral shaft fractures: a 20-132-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fırat, Ahmet; Deveci, Alper; Güler, Ferhat; Oçgüder, Ali; Oğuz, Temel; Bozkurt, Murat

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of shoulder and elbow functions in humeral shaft fractures treated with functional brace, plate and screw osteosynthesis or intramedullary nailing. The study included 128 patients treated for humeral shaft fracture. The patients were divided into three groups according to treatment method: Group 1 (n=62) received functional brace, Group 2 (n=36) plate and screw osteosynthesis and Group 3 (n=30) intramedullary nailing. Coronal and sagittal humeral angulations were measured radiologically during the final follow-up. Shoulder and elbow functions were evaluated using the Constant shoulder score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Scoring and range of movement measurements. The mean follow-up time was 74 (range: 20 to 132) months. Mean Constant shoulder scores were 92.4 in Group 1, 85.6 in Group 2 and 74 in Group 3. A statistically significant difference was detected between the Constant shoulder scores of Groups 2 and 3 (p0.05). In the statistical evaluation of the Constant shoulder scores, a statistically significant difference was detected between the Constant scores of patients with a varus angulation greater than 20° and those with neutral alignment. Functional results of humeral shaft fractures treated with functional brace appear to be satisfactory. Varus and antecurvatum may affect shoulder and elbow function. In the presence of surgical indications, plate and screw fixation technique is the most effective method in terms of shoulder and elbow functions.

  13. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Darby, A.J. [Department of Pathology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to increase awareness of, and to show the variable clinical and radiological features of, subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head. The clinical and radiological findings in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically in 4 patients. Radiographs were performed in all patients, MRI in 5 and scintigraphy in 4 patients. Radiographs showed varying degrees of femoral head collapse in 4 patients. In the remaining 3 patients radiographs showed a normal femoral head, regional osteoporosis and focal sclerosis, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-signal band on T1- and T2-weighted images in the subchondral bone adjacent or parallel to the articular surface associated with bone marrow oedema. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake in the femoral head. Insufficiency fractures of the femoral head are easily overlooked or confused with avascular necrosis and, when there is significant joint destruction, osteoarthritis. Unsuspected insufficiency fracture of the femoral head can lead to significant and rapid loss of bone stock in osteoporotic patients waiting for arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Increased awareness of this condition will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and a successful outcome of conservative treatment. (orig.)

  14. Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the MTM-classification for proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrs, Christian; Schmal, Hagen; Lingenfelter, Erich

    2008-01-01

    tool. METHODS: Three observers classified plain radiographs of 22 fractures using both a simple version (fracture displacement, number of parts) and an extensive version (individual topographic fracture type and morphology) of the MTM classification. Kappa-statistics were used to determine reliability....... RESULTS: An acceptable reliability was found for the simple version classifying fracture displacement and fractured main parts. Fair interobserver agreement was found for the extensive version with individual topographic fracture type and morphology. CONCLUSION: Although the MTM-classification covers...

  15. Simulation-Based Educational Module Improves Intern and Medical Student Performance of Closed Reduction and Percutaneous Pinning of Pediatric Supracondylar Humeral Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bennet A; Lawton, Cort D; Burgess, Jamie; Balderama, Earvin S; Barsness, Katherine A; Sarwark, John F

    2017-12-06

    Simulation-based education has been integrated into many orthopaedic residency programs to augment traditional teaching models. Here we describe the development and implementation of a combined didactic and simulation-based course for teaching medical students and interns how to properly perform a closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of a pediatric supracondylar humeral fracture. Subjects included in the study were either orthopaedic surgery interns or subinterns at our institution. Subjects all completed a combined didactic and simulation-based course on pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. The first part of this course was an electronic (e)-learning module that the subjects could complete at home in approximately 40 minutes. The second part of the course was a 20-minute simulation-based skills learning session completed in the simulation center. Subject knowledge of closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of supracondylar humeral fractures was tested using a 30-question, multiple-choice, written test. Surgical skills were tested in the operating room or in a simulated operating room. Subject pre-intervention and post-intervention scores were compared to determine if and how much they had improved. A total of 21 subjects were tested. These subjects significantly improved their scores on both the written, multiple-choice test and skills test after completing the combined didactic and simulation module. Prior to the module, intern and subintern multiple-choice test scores were significantly worse than postgraduate year (PGY)-2 to PGY-5 resident scores (p < 0.01); after completion of the module, there was no significant difference in the multiple-choice test scores. After completing the module, there was no significant difference in skills test scores between interns and PGY-2 to PGY-5 residents. Both tests were validated using the scores obtained from PGY-2 to PGY-5 residents. Our combined didactic and simulation course significantly improved intern and

  16. [Effectiveness comparison of suspension fixation plus hinged external fixator and double plate internal fixation in treatment of type C humeral intercondylar fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Xu; Zhong, Zeli; Wu, Chao; Tan, Lun

    2017-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of suspension fixation plus hinged external fixator with double plate internal fixation in the treatment of type C humeral intercondylar fractures. Between January 2014 and April 2016, 30 patients with type C (Association for the Study of Internal Fixation, AO/ASIF) humeral intercondylar fractures were treated. Kirschner wire suspension fixation plus hinged external fixator was used in 14 cases (group A), and double plate internal fixation in 16 cases (group B). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury cause, disease duration, injury side, and type of fracture between 2 groups ( P >0.05). There was no significant difference in operation time and hospitalization stay between 2 groups ( P >0.05). But the intraoperative blood loss in group A was significantly less than that in group B ( P internal fixation removal, the intraoperative blood loss, and VAS score at 1 day and 3 days after operation in group A were significant better than those in group B ( P external fixator and double plate internal fixation for the treatment of type C humeral intercondylar fractures have ideal outcome in elbow function. But the suspension fixation plus hinged external fixator is better than double plate internal fixation in intraoperative blood loss, postoperative VAS score, and time of internal fixation removal.

  17. Femoral head vitality after intracapsular hip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemqvist, B.

    1983-01-01

    Femoral head vitality before, during and at various intervals from the operation was determined by tetracycline labeling and/or 99 sp (m)Tc-MDP scintimetry. In a three-year follow-up, healing prognosis could be determined by scintimetry 3 weeks from operation; deficient femoral head vitality predicting healing complications and retained vitality predicting uncomplicated healing. A comparison between pre- and postoperative scintimetry indicated that further impairment of the femoral head vitality could be caused by the operative procedure, and as tetracycline labeling prior to and after fracture reduction in 370 fractures proved equivalent, it was concluded that the procedure of osteosynthesis probably was responsible for capsular vessel injury, using a four-flanged nail. The four-flanged nail was compared with a low-traumatic method of osteosynthesis, two hook-pins, in a prospective randomized 14 month study, and the postoperative femoral head vitality was significantly better in the hook-pin group. This was also clearly demonstrated in a one-year follow-up for the fractures included in the study. Parallel to these investigations, the reliability of the methods of vitality determination was found satisfactory in methodologic studies. For clinical purpose, primary atraumatic osteosynthesis, postoperative prognostic scintimetry and early secondary arthroplasty when indicated, was concluded to be the appropriate approach to femoral neck fracture treatment. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of Outcomes of Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Surgery in Patients with Type C Distal Humeral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhadi Nouraei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, functional state of patients with Type C distal humerus fractures undergone surgical plating was evaluated 6 and 12 months after the surgery in order to record postsurgical factors such as pain level and job/performance satisfaction. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 46 patients with humerus fractures were recruited and their ability to do daily tasks, presence of degenerative changes, stability of elbow joint, and range of motion was evaluated. For assessment of response to surgery, Mayo score was used. Results: Among 46 patients, 45 (97.8% of them had joint stability. Evaluation of postsurgical complications showed that six subjects (13% had no complications, but superficial infection was observed in 12 (26.1% subjects. Neuromuscular disorders in ulnar nerve were present in 11 subjects (23.9%, recurrent articular bursitis of elbow joint in 6 subjects (13%, stiffness of elbow joint in 29 subjects (63%, nonunion of fracture in 3 subjects (6.5%, and myositis ossification in 4 (8.7% subjects. Furthermore, 18 (39.1% patients presented with more than one (2–4 complications. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation surgery with dual plating is the method of choice for treatment of Type C distal humeral fractures. Evaluation of long-term outcomes of this surgery could be done via several different questionnaires as many studies suggest. This study demonstrated that the outcomes of this surgery in Isfahan, Iran, have been noticeably inferior compared to results of the studies in other parts of the world.

  19. Femoral head fracture without hip dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral head fractures without dislocation or subluxation are extremely rare injuries. We report a neglected case of isolated comminuted fracture of femoral head without hip dislocation or subluxation of one year duration in a 36-year-old patient who sustained a high en- ergy trauma due to road traffic accident. He presented with painful right hip and inability to bear full weight on right lower limb with Harris hip score of 39. He received cementless total hip replacement. At latest follow-up of 2.3 years, functional outcome was excellent with Harris hip score of 95. Such isolated injuries have been described only once in the literature and have not been classified till now. The purpose of this report is to highlight the extreme rarity, possible mechanism involved and a novel classification system to classify such injuries. Key words: Femur head; Hip dislocation; Classification; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  20. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rota...

  1. Three-part head-splitting proximal humerus fracture through a unicameral bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younghein, John A; Eskander, Mark S; DeAngelis, Nicola A; Wixted, John J

    2012-06-01

    Unicameral bone cysts are rare in adults and are most often found incidentally on radiographs. However, they can persist from the adolescent period and may be present in locations that predispose to or exacerbate fractures.This article describes a case of a healthy 40-year-old woman who sustained a proximal humerus trauma that involved a large unicameral bone cyst, resulting in a 3-part head-splitting fracture. The epiphyseal location of the cyst contributed to the severity and extent of the fracture that resulted from a simple fall. Given the age of the patient, open reduction and internal fixation with a locking plate and lag screws was performed. The patient chose open reduction and internal fixation to preserve a hemiarthroplasty procedure in case of future revision. Successful humeral head reconstruction was achieved, and the patient fully recovered. One year postoperatively, the patient underwent arthroscopic debridement to alleviate subjective stiffness and decreased range of motion.Multipart head-splitting fractures require complex repair strategies. The gold standard for the treatment of these injuries is hemiarthroplasty. However, the decision process is difficult in a young patient given the average survival of autoplastic prostheses and the added difficulty of later revision. The current case demonstrates the complexity of decision making resulting from a rare injury in a young, healthy patient and shows that open reduction and internal fixation can provide acceptable reconstruction in such situations. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Surgeons agree more on treatment recommendations than on classification of proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons disagree considerably when classifying fractures of the proximal humerus. However, the clinical implications of low observer agreement remain unclear. The purpose of the study was to compare the agreement on Neer classification with the agreement on treatment recommendations....

  3. The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for proximal humeral fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, M.G.; Jayakumar, P.; King, J.D.; Guitton, T.G.; Doornberg, J.N.; Ring, D.; Poelhekke, L.M.S.J.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for fractures of the proximal humerus are debated. We hypothesized that there is no difference in treatment recommendations between surgeons shown radiographs alone and those shown radiographs and patient information.

  4. Management of proximal humeral fractures in the nineteenth century: an historical review of preradiographic sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of fractures of the proximal humerus have troubled patients and medical practitioners since antiquity. Preradiographic diagnosis relied on surface anatomy, pain localization, crepitus, and impaired function. During the nineteenth century, a more thorough understanding...

  5. Outcomes of the distal intraarticular humeral fractures treated by olecranon osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Yılmaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the management and outcome of intraarticular fractures of the distal humerus treated by open reduction and internal fixation using the olecranon osteotomy technique. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with in-traarticular fractures of the distal humerus were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. The mean age of the patients was 41.6 years and the mean follow-up pe-riod was 25.3 months. All fractures were type C accord-ing to the AO/ASIF fracture classification system. Chev-ron type olecranon osteotomy was performed within 12-24 h after the injury in all cases but 4 of them. Physical and radiological examination of patients with the appro-priate range checks were made.Results: All fractures united within average duration of 3.2 months. Excellent or good results were found in pa-tients less than 50 years-old, in women, when passing time from injury to surgery was within 12 hours and when early mobilization was achieved. The complica-tions were seen as 2 (9.6% transient neuropraxia of the ulnar nerve, 2 (9.6% failure of fixation, 1 (4.8% het-erotopic ossification and 1 (4.8% olecranon non-union. Fracture type (C1 and time from occurrence of injury to surgery (<12 hours are the main prognostic factors for achieving the excellent/ good functional results.Conclusions: The critical factors for a successful out-come of intraarticular fractures of the distal humerus in-cluded meticulous surgical technique, stable internal fix-ation, surgical experimentation and early controlled postoperative mobilization.

  6. The incidence of associated fractures of the upper limb in fractures of the radial head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaas, Laurens; van Riet, Roger P.; Vroemen, Jos P. A. M.; Eygendaal, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries. In American publications, one-third of the patients with these fractures have been shown to have associated injuries. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the epidemiology of radial head fractures and associated fractures of the ipsilateral

  7. The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for proximal humeral fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Jayakumar, Prakash; King, John D.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Doornberg, Job N.; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for fractures of the proximal humerus are debated. We hypothesized that there is no difference in treatment recommendations between surgeons shown radiographs alone and those shown radiographs and patient information. Secondarily, we

  8. Pulseless supracondylar humeral fractures in children: vascular complications in a ten year series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Jehanno, Pascal; Tribout, Laurent; Valenti, Philippe; Simon, Anne-Laure; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan

    2018-04-01

    The management of pulseless supracondylar fractures remains controversial. The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse functional and vascular outcomes of conservative treatment for cases with absent pulse before reduction, whether patients showed limb ischaemia or not; and (2) identify factors associated with vascular complications. Twenty-seven children with absent pulses on presentation were treated consecutively between 1999 and 2009. The brachial artery was surgically explored in cases of persistent signs of ischaemia after reduction. Signs of vascular impairment were recorded in the early post-operative period and at a mean final follow-up of 3.5 years. Recurrent ischaemia with a compartment syndrome occurred in a patient with initial ischaemia and a pink, pulseless hand after reduction. Patients with an initially well-perfused hand and those with pre-operative ischaemia and palpable pulses after reduction had satisfactory outcomes, as did patients with early arterial exploration. No patient showed signs of chronic vascular impairment. The need for vascular repair was significantly correlated with open fracture, initial ischaemia and nerve impairment. Conservative management of supracondylar fractures with absent pulses avoided long-term vascular complications provided that patients with a pulseless, well-perfused hand on presentation were closely monitored after reduction. Further study is necessary to determine whether a forearm Doppler would help identify children with absent pulses after reduction who need surgical revascularisation due to an insufficient collateral circulation.

  9. Selective arteriography in femoral head fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannella, P; Galeotti, R; Borrelli, M; Benea, G; Massari, L; Chiarelli, G M

    1986-01-01

    The choice between conservative and radical operation in case of femoral neck fractures is very important because it is the determining factor for a successfull therapy. In case of epiphysial necrosis, an endoprosthesis as well as an osteosynthesis will be carried out. Selective arteriography of the medical circumflex artery represents the most reliable study to establish, immediately after the fractures, the possible presence of a post-traumatic ischemic necrosis. Angiography, as a reliable diagnostic tool, has to be carried out in the most selective way and needs the image subtraction technique. The authors report their preliminary results on the reliability of angiography in the femoral epiphyseal ischemic necrosis diagnosed by comparing the results of angiography with the wood light test carried out on the surgically removed femoral head. 18 refs.

  10. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty versus Hemiarthroplasty for the Management of Complex Proximal Humeral Fractures in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; O'Hara, Nathan N; D'Cruz, Jennifer; Sprague, Sheila A; Bansback, Nick; Evaniew, Nathan; Slobogean, Gerard P

    2017-03-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal surgical treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) compared with hemiarthroplasty (HA) in the management of complex proximal humeral fractures, using a cost-utility analysis. On the basis of data from published literature, a cost-utility analysis was conducted using decision tree and Markov modeling. A single-payer perspective, with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of Can$50,000 (Canadian dollars), and a lifetime time horizon were used. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used as the study's primary outcome measure. In comparison with HA, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained for RTSA was Can$13,679. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed the model to be sensitive to the RTSA implant cost and the RTSA procedural cost. The ICER of Can$13,679 is well below the WTP threshold of Can$50,000, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that 92.6% of model simulations favored RTSA. Our economic analysis found that RTSA for the treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in the elderly is the preferred economic strategy when compared with HA. The ICER of RTSA is well below standard WTP thresholds, and its estimate of cost-effectiveness is similar to other highly successful orthopedic strategies such as total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of hip arthritis. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Michiel G J S; Jayakumar, Prakash; King, John D; Guitton, Thierry G; Doornberg, Job N; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    The factors influencing the decision making of operative treatment for fractures of the proximal humerus are debated. We hypothesized that there is no difference in treatment recommendations between surgeons shown radiographs alone and those shown radiographs and patient information. Secondarily, we addressed (1) factors associated with a recommendation for operative treatment, (2) factors associated with recommendation for arthroplasty, (3) concordance with the recommendations of the treating surgeons, and (4) factors affecting the inter-rater reliability of treatment recommendations. A total of 238 surgeons of the Science of Variation Group rated 40 radiographs of patients with proximal humerus fractures. Participants were randomized to receive information about the patient and mechanism of injury. The response variables included the choice of treatment (operative vs nonoperative) and the percentage of matches with the actual treatment. Participants who received patient information recommended operative treatment less than those who received no information. The patient information that had the greatest influence on treatment recommendations included age (55%) and fracture mechanism (32%). The only other factor associated with a recommendation for operative treatment was region of practice. There was no significant difference between participants who were and were not provided with information regarding agreement with the actual treatment (operative vs nonoperative) provided by the treating surgeon. Patient information-older age in particular-is associated with a higher likelihood of recommending nonoperative treatment than radiographs alone. Clinical information did not improve agreement of the Science of Variation Group with the actual treatment or the generally poor interobserver agreement on treatment recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A new scale measuring translation of the humeral head as a prognostic factor for the treatment of large and massive rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Noboru; D'Lima, Darryl D; Suenaga, Naoki; Chosa, Etsuo

    2018-02-01

    Failure rates after rotator cuff repair remain high in patients with massive tears. Although superior translation of the humeral head has been used to assess the severity of rotator cuff tears, the relevance of anterior migration of the humeral head to clinical outcomes has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential role of the T-scale, a measure of the anterolateral translation of the humeral head, as a prognostic factor for rotator cuff repair. One hundred twenty consecutive patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent primary rotator cuff repair. The T-scale and acromiohumeral interval (AHI) were measured preoperatively on axial computed tomography scans and radiographs, respectively. The correlations of the T-scale and AHI with previously published scores and active forward elevation (FE) were investigated. The outcome of rotator cuff repairs was compared between patients with positive and patients with negative preoperative T-scale values. The preoperative T-scale but not AHI correlated significantly with postoperative FE and clinical scores in patients with large to massive tears but not in those with small to medium tears. Postoperative FE and clinical scores were significantly higher in patients with positive T-scale values than in those with negative T-scale values. The relative risk of retear was 2.0 to 7.9 times greater in patients with negative T-scale values. Patients with large to massive tears and negative T-scale values had poorer clinical outcomes and higher retear rates. A negative T-scale value represents a useful prognostic factor for considering reverse shoulder arthroplasty in patients at greater risk of retear after rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of life after antegrade intramedullary nail fixation of humeral fractures: a survey in a selected cohort of Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Luiz Fernando; Ejnisman, Benno; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Cohen, Moises; Dos Reis, Fernando Baldy

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of humeral fractures remains controversial. Systematic reviews demonstrate similar results between dynamic compression plating and locked intramedullary nailing in the surgical treatment of these fractures. However, it appears that antegrade intramedullary nailing causes higher residual pain in the shoulder. The proposal of this work is to evaluate through the WORC protocol (Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index) the consequences in the quality of life of patients submitted to osteosynthesis of the humerus with antegrade locked intramedullary nailing. This work is a cohort retrospective study in addition to the application of a questionnaire for self-rated quality of life with its 05 domains (WORC - Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index) for patients ( N  = 26) classified in the Trauma Sector of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Federal University of São Paulo (DOT/UNIFESP) submitted to Humerus Osteosynthesis with Antegrade Locked Intramedullary Nailing. There was also the inclusion of data related to the time since surgery, age, sex, surgical laterality, dominance among members and work leave, which were not considered in the original protocol. After, the data were statistically assessed to evaluate the association between numerical and categorical variables. The overall WORC score was 82.75 ± 17.00 (Mean ± SD) and was not different considering sex, age and postoperative period. Among the WORC domains, both Work and Sport / Recreation Protocols were the most unfavorable factors in the evaluation of patients. Although not statistically significant, those who had the procedure on the dominant side presented a lower quality of life score than those who had the surgery on the non-dominant side. Although non-significant again, those who were away from work had an overall lower quality of life score than those who were not. The WORC Quality of Life Protocol shows good results for evaluating patients submitted to humerus

  14. Closed Reduction of Bilateral Posterior Shoulder Dislocation with Medium Impression Defect of the Humeral Head: A Case Report and Review of Its Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soorena Rezazadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral dislocation of the shoulder is a rare injury. The main causes are electrical shock, extreme trauma, and epilepsy. A 25-year-old athletic-body man had sustained bilateral shoulder pain and restricted external rotation following electrical shock for five days. Although articular surface damage was about 50% in the right side and 30% in the left, it could be managed successfully by close reduction without pinning. During one-year follow-up, no recurrent dislocation or limitation of motion was seen. Closed management of medium size defect of the humeral head after posterior dislocation can be performed in cooperative and especially muscular patients.

  15. Triple management of cubitus valgus deformity complicating neglected nonunion of fractures of lateral humeral condyle in children: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Yasser; Nour, Khaled; Kandil, Yasser Roshdy; El-Negery, Abed

    2018-02-01

    Long standing nonunion of the lateral humeral condyle (LHC) usually results in elbow pain and instability with progressive cubitus valgus and tardy ulnar neuritis. Surgical treatment of long standing nonunion is still a controversial issue due to the reported complications, such as stiffness, loss of elbow motion, and avascular necrosis of the LHC fragment. In this study, we reported the outcomes of treatment of cubitus valgus deformity in long standing nonunion of the LHC in children treated with combined triple management (fixation of the nonunion site, dome corrective osteotomy, and anterior transposition of ulnar nerve) through a modified para-triceptal approach. We evaluated ten patients with cubitus valgus deformity more than 20 degrees after neglected nonunion of the lateral humeral condyle more than 24 months. Only childern with post-operative follow up more than 24 months were included in this study. All patients were evaluated clinically, radio logically, and by pre- and post-operative functional evaluation using Mayo elbow performance score. For evaluation of ulnar nerve affection, the Akahori's system was used. There were six females and four males with the average age of 7.7 years at operation. The left elbow was affected in six patients and the right elbow was affected in four patients. The average time between fracture of the LHC and operation was 40.3 months with average post-operative follow up of 44.3 months. The average carrying angle of the healthy side was 5.5 degrees and pre-operative carrying angle of the affected side was 33.5 degrees. The average post-operative carrying angle of the affected side was 6.1 degrees. The improvement of the carrying angle at the last follow up was found statistically significant (p  0.05). The mean pre-operative Mayo elbow performance score was poor 55 ± 9.7, four patients had fair score, and six had poor score. The mean post-operative Mayo elbow performance score was excellent 92.5 ± 10, six

  16. Complex proximal humerus fractures: Hertel's criteria reliability to predict head necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campochiaro, G; Rebuzzi, M; Baudi, P; Catani, F

    2015-09-01

    The risk of post-traumatic humeral head avascular necrosis (AVN), regardless of the treatment, has a high reported incidence. In 2004, Hertel et al. stated that the most relevant predictors of ischemia after intracapsular fracture treated with osteosynthesis are the calcar length, medial hinge integrity and some specific fracture types. Based on Hertel's model, the purpose of this study is to evaluate both its reliability and weaknesses in our series of 267 fractures, assessing how the anatomical configuration of fracture, the quality of reduction and its maintenance were predictive of osteonecrosis development, and so to suggest a treatment choice algorithm. A retrospective study, level of evidence IV, was conducted to duly assess the radiographic features of 267 fractures treated from 2004 to 2010 following Hertel's criteria treated with open reduction and internal fixation by angular stability plates and screws. The average age was 65.2 years. The average follow-up was 28.3 ± 17.0 months. The percentage of AVN, the quality and maintenance of reduction obtained during surgery were evaluated. The AVN incidence was 3.7 %. No significant correlation with gender, age and fracture type was found. At the last follow-up X-ray, only 30 % presented all Hertel's good predictors in the AVN group, 4.7 % in the non-AVN group (p AVN group, it was poor in 50 %; while in the non-AVN group, it was poor in 3.4 % (p AVN were symptomatic, and three needed a second surgery. Hertel's criteria are important in the surgical planning, but they are not sufficient: an accurate evaluation of the calcar area fracture in three planes is required. All fractures involving calcar area should be studied with CT.

  17. The prevalence of the complications and their associated factors in humeral lengthening for achondroplasia: retrospective study of 54 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano-Matsuoka, Natsuko; Fukiage, Kenichi; Harada, Yuki; Kashiwagi, Naoya; Futami, Tohru

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the complications of humeral lengthening and their associated factors. Fifty-four achondroplastic patients were treated by bilateral humeral lengthening. Our original shoulder sling was sufficient to prevent shoulder dislocation. Pre-existing radial head dislocation was observed in 18 patients. Lengthening was accomplished in all cases without a decrease in the elbow function. Seven humeri fractured after the fixator removal. The risk factors for postoperative fracture were a waiting period of less than 5 days, a healing index less than 25, and the concave shape of the callus. There was no radial nerve palsy.

  18. Autologous Concentrated Bone Marrow Grafting for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Humeral Head: A Report of Five Shoulders in Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Makihara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Five shoulders in four patients affected by advanced osteonecrosis of the humeral head were treated with autologous concentrated bone marrow grafting. Bone marrow sample was aspirated from the iliac crests, concentrated by a centrifugation technique, and injected into the necrotic site. The shoulders were evaluated radiologically with X-ray scoring and clinically with measurement of range of motion and pain score (visual analogue scale, VAS. The mean follow-up period was 49.4 (range, 24–73 months. The concentration ratio of nucleated cells was calculated and the number of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC was estimated by a colony-forming assay. All four shoulders with stage 3 disease achieved joint sparing. One shoulder with stage 4 disease required replacement surgery. Clinical evaluation of the spared joints showed improvement in range of motion in two cases and deterioration in two cases. VAS scores were 0 after surgery in three cases. The mean concentration ratio was 2.73, and the mean number of transplanted MSC was 1125. The outcomes of autologous concentrated bone marrow grafting for advanced osteonecrosis of the humeral head were varied. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness and the indications of the present surgery.

  19. Dual small fragment plating improves screw-to-screw load sharing for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmopoulos, Victor; Luedke, Colten; Nana, Arvind D

    2015-01-01

    A smaller humerus in some patients makes the use of a large fragment fixation plate difficult. Dual small fragment plate constructs have been suggested as an alternative. This study compares the biomechanical performance of three single and one dual plate construct for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation. Five humeral shaft finite element models (1 intact and 4 fixation) were loaded in torsion, compression, posterior-anterior (PA) bending, and lateral-medial (LM) bending. A comminuted fracture was simulated by a 1-cm gap. Fracture fixation was modelled by: (A) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (wide), (B) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (narrow), (C) 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate, and (D) one 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate and one 3.5-mm 7-hole small fragment plate. Model A showed the best outcomes in torsion and PA bending, whereas Model D outperformed the others in compression and LM bending. Stress concentrations were located near and around the unused screw holes for each of the single plate models and at the neck of the screws just below the plates for all the models studied. Other than in PA bending, Model D showed the best overall screw-to-screw load sharing characteristics. The results support using a dual small fragment locking plate construct as an alternative in cases where crutch weight-bearing (compression) tolerance may be important and where anatomy limits the size of the humerus bone segment available for large fragment plate fixation.

  20. Locking plate fixation for proximal humerus fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-02-01

    Locking plates are increasingly used to surgically treat proximal humerus fractures. Knowledge of the bone quality of the proximal humerus is important. Studies have shown the medial and dorsal aspects of the proximal humeral head to have the highest bone strength, and this should be exploited by fixation techniques, particularly in elderly patients with osteoporosis. The goals of surgery for proximal humeral fractures should involve minimal soft tissue dissection and achieve anatomic reduction of the head complex with sufficient stability to allow for early shoulder mobilization. This article reviews various treatment options, in particular locking plate fixation. Locking plate fixation is associated with a high complication rate, such as avascular necrosis (7.9%), screw cutout (11.6%), and revision surgery (13.7%). These complications are frequently due to the varus deformation of the humeral head. Strategic screw placement in the humeral head would minimize the possibility of loss of fracture reduction and potential hardware complications. Locking plate fixation is a good surgical option for the management of proximal humerus fractures. Complications can be avoided by using better bone stock and by careful screw placement in the humeral head.

  1. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury. CASE REPORT: A male patient, aged 42 years, sought medical care after falling from a skateboard. The patient related pain and limitation of movement in the right elbow and difficulty to extend the fingers of the right hand. During physical examination, thumb and fingers extension deficit was observed. The wrist extension showed a slight radial deviation. After imaging, it became evident that the patient had a fracture of the radial head that was classified as grade III in the Mason classification. The patient underwent fracture fixation; at the first postoperative day, thumb and fingers extension was observed. Although rare, posterior interosseous nerve branch injury may be associated with radial head fractures. In the present case, the authors believe that neuropraxia occurred as a result of the fracture hematoma and edema.

  2. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-07-11

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis.

  4. Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Mishka N; Jankovits, Daniel A; Huber, Michael L; Strom, Adam M; Garcia, Tanya C; Stover, Susan M

    2016-09-20

    To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion. Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion. The 3.5 mm CBS-stabilized constructs were 36% stiffer than 3.0 mm HCS-stabilized constructs, but differences were not apparent in quality of fracture reduction nor in yield loads, which exceeded expected physiological loads during rehabilitation. Small residual fragment displacements were not different between CBS and HCS screws. Small fragment rotation was not significantly different between screws, but was weakly correlated with moment arm length (R² = 0.25). A CBS screw placed in lag fashion provides stiffer fixation than an HCS screw, although both screws provide similar anatomical reduction and yield strength to condylar fracture fixation in adult canine humeri.

  5. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, George N.; Galanopoulos, Ioannis P.; Vottis, Christos Th.; Karamanis, Eirinaios; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years) with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years); seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2%) at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2%) deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%), good in 23 (41.1%), fair in 10 (17.8%), and poor in 7 patients (12.5%). The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types

  6. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

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    Mavrogenis Andreas F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years; seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2% at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2% deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%, good in 23 (41.1%, fair in 10 (17.8%, and poor in 7 patients (12.5%. The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3

  7. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

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    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  8. Brain CT findings in head injury with skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, In Tae; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chung, Mi Kyung; Kwon, Kwi Hyang; Kim, Ki Jeong

    1982-01-01

    CT has revolutionized the evaluation and management of patients with head injuries. CT in non-invasion and rapidly provides accurate information regarding the presence, extent and nature of intracranial lesions resulting from trauma. We have reviewed the CT scans of 114 patients, who got head injury with confirmed to skull fracture in plain films. The results were as follows: 1. Of all cases, traffic accident was the most frequent cause and in children fall down was more than 50%. 2. Compound linear fracture was the most frequent type fractures in plain skull film.3. Of all 114 cases, epidural hematoma was 16%, subdural hematoma was 18.4%, intracerebral hematoma was 14.4%, subdural hygroma was 2.4%, normal finding was 50%. 4. Mortality rate was 13.2%. 5. Fracture was detected by CT about 28.9%, depression fracture was more easily detected in CT. 6. Incidence rate of counter coup lesion was 14.9% and mortality rate was higher than same site lesion. 7. The shape of epidural hematoma was biconvex in 75%, planoconvex in 25%. 8. The shape of subdural hematoma was cresentic shape 82.6%, biconvex shape 8.7%, planoconvex shape 8.7%

  9. Surgery for pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding femoral head and neck fractures: resection vs. stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacherl, Max; Gruber, Gerald; Glehr, Mathias; Ofner-Kopeinig, Petra; Radl, Roman; Greitbauer, Manfred; Vecsei, Vilmos; Windhager, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Pathological femoral head and neck fractures are commonly treated by arthroplasty. Treatment options for the trochanteric region or below are not clearly defined. The purpose of this retrospective, comparative, double-centre study was to analyse survival and influences on outcome according to the surgical technique used to treat pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding fractures of the femoral head and neck. Fifty-nine patients with 64 fractures were operated up on between 1998 and 2004 in two tertiary referral centres and divided into two groups. One group (S, n = 33) consisted of patients who underwent intramedullary nailing alone, and the other group (R, n = 31) consisted of patients treated by metastatic tissue resection and reconstruction by means of different implants. Median survival was 12.6 months with no difference between groups. Surgical complications were higher in the R group (n = 7) vs. the S group (n = 3), with no statistically significant difference. Patients with surgery-related complications had a higher survival rate (p = 0.049), as did patients with mechanical implant failure (p = 0.01). Survival scoring systems did not correlate with actual survival. Resection of metastases in patients with pathological fractures of the proximal femur, excluding femoral head and neck fractures, has no influence on survival. Patients with long postoperative survival prognosis are at risk of implant-related complications.

  10. O emprego de hastes intramedulares bloqueadas no tratamento das fraturas diafisárias do úmero Use of blocked intramedullary shaft for the treatment of humeral diaphyseal fractures

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    Fernando Baldy dos Reis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos os resultados clínicos e radiográficos de 31 pacientes portadores de fraturas diafisárias do úmero que foram operados com hastes intramedulares. Destes quatro apresentaram fraturas no local da inserção da haste e foram tratados com outro método. Dos 27 pacientes restantes o índice de consolidação foi de 96,1 % e que durou em média de 63,4 dias. Cinco queixaram-se de dor no ombro e em apenas um apresentou limitação da abdução. Paralisia temporária do nervo radial foi constatada em dois pacientes e pseudartrose em um que após 5 meses da cirurgia foi submetido a nova intervenção cirúrgica com o emprego de placa e enxerto ósseo autólogo. Concluímos que embora o emprego de hastes intramedulares bloqueadas apresentou alto índice de a via de acesso retrógrada pode levar a fraturas no seu ponto de entrada e via anterógrada com violação do manguito rotador pode gerar dores no ombro.Clinical and radiographic outcomes of 31 patients with humeral diaphyseal fractures submitted to surgery with intramedullary shafts were studied. From these, four patients presented fractures at the shaft insertion site and were treated using a different method. From the 27 patients left, the healing rate was 96.1%, with an average duration of 63.4 days. Five of them complained of pain in the shoulder and only one presented abduction limitation. Temporary palsy of the radial nerve was found in two patients and pseudoarthrosis in one of them, who was submitted to a new surgical intervention with plate and autologous bone graft, after 5 months. It was concluded that, although blocked intramedullary shafts presents a high incidence of the retrograde access port leading to fractures in its insertion site and the anterograde port causing pain in the shoulder.

  11. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

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    Ai Hosaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures.

  12. The mechanical benefit of medial support screws in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures.

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    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. METHODS: Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. RESULTS: Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001. When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P ≤ 0.0207. Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure.

  13. [SURGICAL HIP DISLOCATION APPROACH FOR TREATMENT OF FEMORAL HEAD FRACTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanfeng; Liu, Youwen; Zhu, Yingjie; Li, Jianming; Li, Wuyin; Li, Qiyi; Jia, Yudong

    2015-11-01

    To discuss the value of surgical hip dislocation approach in the treatment of femoral head fracture. A retrospectively analysis was made on the clinical data of 15 patients with femoral head fractures treated through surgical hip dislocation approach between January 2010 and February 2013. There were 11 men and 4 women with an average age of 30.8 years (range, 15-63 years). The causes included traffic accident injury in 9 cases, falling injury from height in 5 cases, and sports injury in 1 case. According to Pipkin typing, 2 cases were rated as type I, 7 cases as type II, 1 case as type III, and 5 cases as type IV. The interval of injury and operation was 2-10 days (mean, 4.1 days). Reduction was performed in 10 patients within 6 hours after injury, and then bone traction was given for 4-6 weeks except 5 patients who received reduction in the other hospital. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients after surgery without complications of dislocation and lower limbs deep venous thrombosis. The mean follow-up time was 29.9 months (range, 25-36 months). During follow-up, there was no infection, breakage of internal fixation, or nonunion of femoral greater trochanter fracture. In 3 patients having necrosis of the femoral head, 2 had no obvious symptoms [staging as IIa and IIb respectively according to Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) staging system], and 1 (stage IIIb) had nonunion of the femoral neck fracture, who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA). In 4 patients having myositis ossificans (2 cases of grade I, 1 case of grade II, and 1 case of grade III based on Brooker grading), no treatment was given in 3 cases and the focus was removed during THA in 1 case. According to the Thompson-Epstein scale at last follow-up, the results were excellent in 9 cases, good in 3 cases, fair in 1 case, and poor in 2 cases, and the excellent and good rate was 80%. Surgical hip dislocation approach can not only protect the residual vessels of the

  14. Exposed versus buried wires for fixation of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children: a comparison of safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lester Wai Mon; Siow, Hua Ming

    2011-10-01

    Displaced fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus are usually treated with open reduction and fixation with smooth Kirschner wires. These may be passed through the skin and left exposed or buried subcutaneously. Exposed wires may be removed in the outpatient clinic, whereas buried wires require a formal procedure under anaesthesia. This advantage may be offset if there is a higher rate of complications with exposed wires. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of exposed and buried wires. Retrospective cohort. Children with lateral condyle fractures of the humerus who had undergone surgery were identified from our departmental database. Case records and X-rays of 75 patients were reviewed. Forty-two patients had buried wires and 33 had exposed wires. There were no serious complications in either group. In the exposed wires group, 1 patient had a superficial wound infection that was treated effectively with 1 week of oral antibiotics, while 2 patients had hypergranulation of pin tracts treated with topical silver nitrate. None of the patients showed loss of reduction, deep infection, or any other complications requiring additional procedures. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the buried and exposed groups. We conclude that open reduction and exposed wiring is a safe and effective option for lateral condyle fractures, and recommend a period of 4 weeks of K-wire fixation followed by 2 weeks of backslab immobilisation as adequate for union with minimal risk of infection.

  15. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  16. Fracturing of revision of a cobalt-chrome femoral head after fracturing of a ceramic femoral head, with diffuse metallosis. Case report

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    Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa Marques

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We presente a case of a fracture of a cobalt-chrome femoral head after revision of a hip total prosthesis with ceramic femoral head fracture. During surgery we found the cobalt-chrome femoral head fracture, wear of the polyethylene and massive metallosis in muscular and cartilaginous tissue. Both femoral stem and acetabular cup were stable and without apparent wearing. After surgical debridement, we promoted the substitution of the femoral head and the acetabular polyethylene by similar ones. After 12 months of follow-up, the patient has no pain complaints, function limit or systemic signs associated with malign metallosis

  17. Retroauricular transmeatal approach to manage mandibular condylar head fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, Arnaldo; Arcuri, Francesco; Baragiotta, Nicola; Nicolotti, Matteo; Brucoli, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    There is a multitude of reported surgical approaches and technical variants with some unresolved technical problems to gain direct access to mandibular condylar head fractures; they can be divided into 2 groups: intraoral and extraoral. In 2005, Neff et al (Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir 2005;9:80), supported by a previous experimental work, reported a successful clinical study of condylar head fractures treated by a retroauricular approach; this article is in German, and the later English-language literature does not mention about this approach to open reduction and internal fixation of mandibular condylar fractures. The retroauricular transmeatal access, selected and performed by the senior author to treat 14 patients affected by highly located condylar head fracture, is illustrated in details. We collected data of 14 consecutive adult patients who, after the discussion about all options, had consented to have 16 mandibular condylar head fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation by miniplates and screws via a retroauricular transmeatal approach. We exposed the temporomandibular joint area easily and better by dissecting via a retroauricular route with identification, ligation, and transection of the retromandibular vein; because of the posterior access, the frontal branch of the facial nerve and the auriculotemporal nerve are located and protected within the substance of the anteriorly retracted flap, superficial to the retromandibular vein. The follow-up clinical examination showed temporary weakness of the frontal branch of the facial nerve in 1 case with a recovery to normal function of 1.6 months; no patients had permanent weakness of the facial nerve or injury of the auriculotemporal nerve. There was absence of any salivary fistula, sialocele, and Frey syndrome; hearing was preserved in all cases, without any auditory stenosis or aesthetic deformity, and there was absence of any infections, hematoma, or scarring. Retroauricular approach provides

  18. Simultaneous bilateral Mason type IIb radial head fractures in a young female: Was an increased carrying angle the cause?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2015-01-01

    Radial head fracture is the most common type of elbow fracture in adults. It results from a fall on an outstretched hand. However, simultaneous bilateral radial head fractures are extremely rare. We report a case of simultaneous bilateral mason type IIb radial head fractures in a young female, which was treated nonoperatively with excellent results

  19. Placement of the stemless humeral component in the Total Evolutive Shoulder System (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Ghislain F; van Riet, Roger P; Jansen, Nick; Declercq, Geert

    2010-12-01

    Humeral implant design in shoulder arthroplasty has evolved over the years. The third generation shoulder prostheses have an anatomic humeral stem that replicates the 3-dimensional parameters of the proximal humerus. The overall complication rate has decreased as a result of these changes in implant design. In contrast, the rate of periprosthetic humeral fractures has increased. To avoid stem-related complications while retaining the advantages of the third generation of shoulder implants, the stemless total evolutive shoulder system has been developed. The indications, the surgical technique, and the complications of this humeral implant in shoulder arthroplasty will be described.

  20. Intrathoracic fracture-dislocation of the humerus - case report and literature review

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    Wilson Carlos Sola Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Shoulder fracture-dislocations are uncommon. Those associated with intrathoracic dislocation are very rare conditions, resulting from high-energy trauma; usually, the affected limb is in an abduction position. In Brazil, there is only one report of a teenager with displacement of the epiphysis into the chest cavity; the present is the first adult patient report of intrathoracic dislocation of the humerus. The authors present the case of a patient female, aged 56 years, who was hit by motorcycle and thrown approximately 5 meters away. She was rescued on site with thoracic, pelvic, and right upper limb trauma. Her chest was drained due to pneumothorax and multiple fractures of ribs; she was diagnosed with fracture-dislocation in four parts, with intrathoracic dislocation of the humeral head. Displaced forearm bones fracture was also diagnosed; the olecranon, scaphoid, and ischiopubic fractures were not displaced. The patient underwent a joint procedure with a cardiothoracic surgery team to remove the humeral head through thoracotomy and chest drainage; subsequently, a partial arthroplasty of the humerus was performed, with graft from the humeral head and fixation of forearm fractures. Conservative treatment was chosen for the other fractures. After three months, all fractures were healed with gradual functional improvement. The patient remained in physiotherapy and orthopedic monitoring, having been discharged from the thoracic surgery; in a severe depressive episode, the patient committed suicide after 11 months of the trauma.

  1. FRACTURE SHAFT HUMERUS: INTERLOCKING

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    Deepak Kaladagi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence of humeral fracture has significantly increased during the present years due to the population growth and road traffic, domestic, industrial, automobile accidents & disasters like tsunami, earthquakes, head-on collisions, polytrauma etc. In order to achieve a stable fixation followed by early mobilization, numerous surgical implants have been devised. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to analyze the results of intramedullary fixation of proximal 2/3rd humeral shaft fractures using an unreamed interlocking intramedullary nail. INTRODUCTION: In 40 skeletally matured patients with fracture shaft of humerus admitted in our hospital, we used unreamed antegrade interlocking nails. MATERIAL: We carried out a prospective analysis of 40 patients randomly selected between 2001 to 2014 who were operated at JNMC Belgaum, MMC Mysore & Navodaya Medical College, Raichur. All cases were either RTAs, Domestic, Industrial, automobile accidents & also other modes of injury. METHOD: Routine investigations with pre-anaesthetic check-up & good quality X-rays of both sides of humerus was taken. Time of surgery ranged from 5-10 days from the time of admission. Only upper 1/3rd & middle 1/3rd humeral shaft fractures were included in the study. In all the cases antegrade locked unreamed humeral nails were inserted under C-arm. Patient was placed in supine position & the shoulder was kept elevated by placing a sandbag under the scapula. In all patients incision taken from tip of acromion to 3cm over deltoid longitudinally. Postoperatively sling applied with wrist & shoulder movements started after 24 hours. All the patients ranged between the age of 21-50 years. RESULTS: Total 40 patients were operated. Maximum fracture site were in the middle third- 76%, 14% upper 1/3rd. All 40 patients achieved union. The average time of union was 8-10 weeks. All patients regained full range of movements except in few cases, where there was shoulder

  2. Biomechanical properties of orthogonal plate configuration versus parallel plate configuration using the same locking plate system for intra-articular distal humeral fractures under radial or ulnar column axial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toshiya; Hara, Akira; Iwase, Hideaki; Ichihara, Satoshi; Nagao, Masashi; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have questioned whether an orthogonal or parallel configuration is superior for distal humeral articular fractures. In previous clinical and biomechanical studies, implant failure of the posterolateral plate has been reported with orthogonal configurations; however, the reason for screw loosening in the posterolateral plate is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical properties and to clarify the causes of posterolateral plate loosening using a humeral fracture model under axial compression on the radial or ulnar column separately. And we changed only the plate set up: parallel or orthogonal. We used artificial bone to create an Association for the Study of Internal Fixation type 13-C2.3 intra-articular fracture model with a 1-cm supracondylar gap. We used an anatomically-preshaped distal humerus locking compression plate system (Synthes GmbH, Solothurn, Switzerland). Although this is originally an orthogonal plate system, we designed a mediolateral parallel configuration to use the contralateral medial plate instead of the posterolateral plate in the system. We calculated the stiffness of the radial and ulnar columns and anterior movement of the condylar fragment in the lateral view. The parallel configuration was superior to the orthogonal configuration regarding the stiffness of the radial column axial compression. There were significant differences between the two configurations regarding anterior movement of the capitellum during axial loading of the radial column. The posterolateral plate tended to bend anteriorly under axial compression compared with the medial or lateral plate. We believe that in the orthogonal configuration axial compression induced more anterior displacement of the capitellum than the trochlea, which eventually induced secondary fragment or screw dislocation on the posterolateral plate, or nonunion at the supracondylar level. In the parallel configuration, anterior movement of the capitellum or

  3. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 2 years after pertrochanteric fracture surgery: Case report

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    Bogdan Deleanu

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: The avascular necrosis of the femoral head is a complication of pertrochanteric fractures that can not be foreseen or avoided. The optimal treatment in these cases is uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

  4. Humeral torsion revisited: a functional and ontogenetic model for populational variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Libby W

    2007-12-01

    Anthropological interest in humeral torsion has a long history, and several functional explanations for observed variation in the orientation of the humeral head have been proposed. Recent clinical studies have revived this topic by linking patterns of humeral torsion to habitual activities such as overhand throwing. However, the precise functional implications and ontogenetic history of humeral torsion remain unclear. This study examines the ontogeny of humeral torsion in a large sample of primarily immature remains from six different skeletal collections (n = 407). The results of this research confirm that humeral torsion displays consistent developmental variation within all populations of growing children; neonates display relatively posteriorly oriented humeral heads, and the level of torsion declines steadily into adulthood. As in adults, variation in the angle of humeral torsion in immature individuals varies by population, and these differences arise early in development. However, when examined in the context of the developing muscles of the shoulder complex, it becomes apparent that variation in the angle of humeral torsion is not necessarily related to specific habitual activities. Variability in this feature is more likely caused by a generalized functional imbalance between muscles of medial and lateral rotation that can be produced by a wide variety of upper limb activity patterns during growth. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. [Imaging evaluation on adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Youxing; Tang, Kanglai; Yuan, Chengsong; Tao, Xu; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Bo; Guo, Yupeng

    2015-03-24

    Modern shoulder prosthesis has evolved through four generations. And the fourth generation technology has a core three-dimensional design of restoring 3D reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy. Thus a new shoulder prosthesis is developed on the basis of the technology of 3D prosthesis. Assessment of whether shoulder prosthesis can restore individualized reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy is based on the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy. To evaluate the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy through measuring the parameters of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis and compare with normal data. The parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were analyzed and evaluated for a total of 12 cases undergoing shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The relevant anatomical parameters included neck-shaft angle (NSA), retroversion angle (RA), humeral head height (HH) and humeral head diameter (HD). And the anatomical parameters were compared with the data from normal side. All underwent shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The postoperative parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were compared with those of normal side. And the difference of NSA was 0.05). Individualized shoulder prosthesis has excellent adaptability to shoulder. All core parameters are freely adjustable and specification models may be optimized. With matching tools, individualized shoulder prosthesis improves the accuracy and reliability in shoulder replacement.

  6. Radiographic loss of contact between radial head fracture fragments is moderately reliable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Wendy E.; Guitton, Thierry; Ring, David; Eng, Kevin; Jokhi, Vispi; Oloruntoba, David O.; Jain, Sanjev; Melvanki, Parag; Frihagen, Frede; McGraw, Iain; Lenzlinger, Philipp; Ponsen, K. J.; Schmidt, Andrew; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Turina, Matthias; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Liem, Ronald; Gulve, R. S.; Wagg, James; Kloen, Peter; Grosso, Elena; Mormino, Matt; Choudhari, Pradeep; Zura, Robert D.; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Thomas, George; Brink, Peter; Swiontkowski, Marc; Beingessner, Daphne; Schep, Niels; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Peters, R. W.; Andrew, J.; Trenholm, I.; Mica, Ladislav; Verhofstad, M. H. J.; Taitsman, Lisa; Hernandez, Daniel; Harris, Ian; Egol, Kenneth; Jeray, Kyle; Borris, Lars C.; Barquet, Antonio; Kellam, James; Marsh, John L.; Hobby, Jonathan L.; Eygendaal, Denise; Goslings, J. C.; Kleinlugtenbelt, I. J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of contact between radial head fracture fragments is strongly associated with other elbow or forearm injuries. If this finding has adequate interobserver reliability, it could help examiners identify and treat associated ligament injuries and fractures (eg, forearm interosseous ligament injury

  7. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro [Saiseikai Sendai Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Okano, Toshihiro [Ibusuki National Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Komiya, Setsuro [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  8. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro; Okano, Toshihiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2002-01-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  9. Is Closed Manipulative Reduction and Percutaneous Kirschner Wiring of Supracondylar Humeral Fracture in Children as Day-Care Surgery a Safe Procedure ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok R Nayak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Supracondylar fracture of the humerus is a common injury in children. It accounts for 60% of fractures around the elbow children. If the fracture is not treated properly it may give rise to many complications like malunion, Volkmann’s ischemic contracture, nerve injury, arterial injury, skin slough, heterotopic bone formation , and stiffness of elbow. The management of displaced supracondylar fracture of the elbow is one of the most difficult of the many fractures seen in children. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anatomical and functional results of treatment of supracondylar fractures of humerus with closed reduction and percutaneous ‘K’ wire fixation as a day care procedure and record associated complications, thus decreasing the cost of treating these fractures and hospitalization. METHODS: Fifty displaced closed extension type supracondylar fractures (Gartland’s type III of the humerus in children were treated by closed reduction and percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires. All the patients selected for this study had been treated in a day care unit and were discharged in the same evening and followed up at 3 and 6 weeks and 3 months. Open fractures, fractures with neurovascular complications and children older than 15 yrs were excluded. The final results were evaluated by Flynn’s criteria. RESULTS: The majority (72%, of the patients had fracture displaced posteomedially, Fourty one of the fifty patients had satisfactory results. The majority of the patients were male, and the average age was 8-9 years. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous fixation of supracondylar humerus done as a day care procedure is an acceptable modality of treatment and reduces the duration of hospital stay for the patient.

  10. Distal humeral physeal injuries in child abuse: MR imaging and ultrasonography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimkin, K.; Kleinman, P.K.; Teeger, S.; Spevak, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Distal humeral physeal injuries, in particular, fracture-separation of the distal humeral epiphysis, can be seen in abused infants. Detection of physeal injury in an infant of toddler may indicate the possibility of unsuspected abuse, particularly when an appropriate history explaining the circumstance of the fracture is lacking. In addition, the extent of injury can be difficult to characterize on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging (MRI) may be of value in diagnosis and may obviate the need for intraoperative arthrography. We present MRI findings in three abused children with distal humeral physeal injuries. Sonographic correlation is also presented in one case. (orig.)

  11. Distal humeral physeal injuries in child abuse: MR imaging and ultrasonography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimkin, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Kleinman, P.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Teeger, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Spevak, M.R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Distal humeral physeal injuries, in particular, fracture-separation of the distal humeral epiphysis, can be seen in abused infants. Detection of physeal injury in an infant of toddler may indicate the possibility of unsuspected abuse, particularly when an appropriate history explaining the circumstance of the fracture is lacking. In addition, the extent of injury can be difficult to characterize on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging (MRI) may be of value in diagnosis and may obviate the need for intraoperative arthrography. We present MRI findings in three abused children with distal humeral physeal injuries. Sonographic correlation is also presented in one case. (orig.)

  12. Early results for treatment of two- and three-part fractures of the proximal humerus using Contours PHP (proximal humeral plate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazzo, Alessio; Cardile, Carlo; Brunelli, Luca; Ragni, Paolo; Clementi, Daniele

    2017-04-28

    The management of displaced 2- and 3-part fractures of the proximal humerus is controversial, both in younger and in elderly patients. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the functional results of the Contours Proximal Humerus Plate (OrthofixR, Bussolengo,Verona, Italy), for the treatment of displaced 2- and 3-part fractures of the proximal humerus. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients with proximal humerus fractures, who underwent osteosynthesis with Contours Proximal Humerus Plate from December 2011 to March 2015. We had 21 patients with 2-part fractures and with an average age of 67.1 years and 34 patients with 3-part fractures, with average age of 63.6 years. The average union time was 3 months. The mean Constant score was 67 for 2-part fracture group and 64.9 for 3-part fracture group. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). The overall complication rate was 14.5 %. Six patients underwent additional surgery (10.9%). The most frequent major complication was secondary loss of reduction following varus collapse of the fracture (2 cases). In these patients, there was loss of medial hinge integrity due to impaction and osteoporosis. The placement of the main locking screw in the calcar area to provide inferomedial support is the rational of the Contours Proximal Humerus Plate. Osteosynthesis with Contours Proximal Humerus Plate is a safe system for treating displaced 2- and 3-part fractures of the proximal humerus, with good functional results and complication rates comparable to those reported in the literature.

  13. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of femoral head fractures: excision vs. fixation of fragment in Pipkin type I: what is the optimal choice for femoral head fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Lee, Keun-Bae; Na, Bo-Ram; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present relatively long-term results of femoral head fractures with a specific focus on Pipkin type I fractures. Fifty-nine femoral head fractures were treated according to modified Pipkin's classification as follows: type I, small fragment distal to the fovea centralis (FC); type II, large fragment distal to the FC; type III, large fragment proximal to the FC; type IV, comminuted fracture. There were 15 cases of type I, 28 of type II, 9 of type III, and 7 of type IV fractures. Conservative treatment with skeletal traction was performed in 4 type II cases, excision of the fragment in 15 type I and 10 type II cases, fixation of the fragment in 14 type II and all 9 type III cases, and total hip replacement in all 7 type IV cases. The overall clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated using previously published criteria, focusing on the results in Pipkin type I fractures with relatively large fragments. Based on Epstein criteria, in type II fractures, excellent or good clinical results were seen in 6 of 10 patients (60.0 %) treated by excision of the fragment and 12 of 14 patients (85.7 %) treated by internal fixation (p = 0.05). Also, excellent or good radiologic results were seen in 4 of 10 (40.0 %) patients treated by excision of the fragment and 12 of 14 (85.7 %) patients treated by internal fixation (p = 0.03). Even in Pipkin type I fractures, if the fragment is large (modified Pipkin type II), early reduction and internal fixation can produce good results.

  14. ARTHROSCOPIC METHOD OF THE RADIAL HEAD FRACTURE OSTEOSYNTHESIS (СASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kuznetsov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial head fractures constitute about 3% of all fractures and 30% within the group of elbow joint injuries. Conventional open surgical treatment is accompanied by an extensive soft tissue incision and sometimes by capsule release for adequate visualization. Arthroscopic methods feature relatively insignificant soft tissue trauma, allow to reduce pain syndrome in postoperative period and to accelerate rehabilitation. Besides, arthroscopy improves surgical view in cases of intraarticular fractures and facilitates a better anatomical reduction of articular surface. The authors demonstrate a clinical case of a patient with closed fractures of radial head and ulna coronoid process with displacement of left elbow joint fragments where arthroscopic surgery provided for good anatomical and functional results.

  15. Total Humeral Endoprosthetic Replacement following Excision of Malignant Bone Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhel Kotwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Humerus is a common site for malignant tumors. Advances in adjuvant therapies and reconstructive methods provide salvage of the upper limb with improved outcomes. Reports of limb salvage with total humeral replacement in extensive humeral tumors are sparse. We undertook a retrospective study of 20 patients who underwent total humeral endoprosthetic replacement as limb salvage following excision of extensile malignant tumor from 1990 to 2011. With an average followup of 42.9, functional and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Ten patients were still alive at the time of review. Mean estimated blood loss was 1131 mL and duration of surgery was 314 minutes. Deep infection was encountered in one patient requiring debridement while mechanical loosening of ulnar component was identified in one patient. Subluxation of prosthetic humeral head was noted in 3 patients. Mean active shoulder abduction was 12.5° and active flexion was 15°. Incompetence of abduction mechanism was the major determinant of poor active functional outcome. Mean elbow flexion was 103.5° with 30.5° flexion contracture in 10 patients with good and useful hand function. Average MSTS score was 71.5%. Total humeral replacement is a reliable treatment option in restoring mechanical stability and reasonable functional results without compromising patient survival, with low complication rate.

  16. [Balloon osteoplasty as reduction technique in the treatment of tibial head fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freude, T; Kraus, T M; Sandmann, G H

    2015-10-01

    Tibial plateau fractures requiring surgery are severe injuries of the lower extremities. Depending on the fracture pattern, the age of the patient, the range of activity and the bone quality there is a broad variation in adequate treatment.  This article reports on an innovative treatment concept to address split depression fractures (Schatzker type II) and depression fractures (Schatzker type III) of the tibial head using the balloon osteoplasty technique for fracture reduction. Using the balloon technique achieves a precise and safe fracture reduction. This internal osteoplasty combines a minimal invasive percutaneous approach with a gently rise of the depressed area and the associated protection of the stratum regenerativum below the articular cartilage surface. This article lights up the surgical procedure using the balloon technique in tibia depression fractures. Using the balloon technique a precise and safe fracture reduction can be achieved. This internal osteoplasty combines a minimally invasive percutaneous approach with a gentle raising of the depressed area and the associated protection of the regenerative layer below the articular cartilage surface. Fracture reduction by use of a tamper results in high peak forces over small areas, whereas by using the balloon the forces are distributed over a larger area causing less secondary stress to the cartilage tissue. This less invasive approach might help to achieve a better long-term outcome with decreased secondary osteoarthritis due to the precise and chondroprotective reduction technique.

  17. Case report: multifocal subchondral stress fractures of the femoral heads and tibial condyles in a young military recruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-03-01

    Subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head may be either of the insufficiency-type with poor quality bone or the fatigue-type with normal quality bone but subject to high repetitive stresses. Unlike osteonecrosis, multiple site involvement rarely has been reported for subchondral stress fractures. We describe a case of multifocal subchondral stress fractures involving femoral heads and medial tibial condyles bilaterally within 2 weeks. A 27-year-old military recruit began having left knee pain after 2 weeks of basic training, without any injury. Subsequently, right knee, right hip, and left hip pain developed sequentially within 2 weeks. The diagnosis of multifocal subchondral stress fracture was confirmed by plain radiographs and MR images. Nonoperative treatment of the subchondral stress fractures of both medial tibial condyles and the left uncollapsed femoral head resulted in resolution of symptoms. The collapsed right femoral head was treated with a fibular strut allograft to restore congruity and healed without further collapse. There has been one case report in which an insufficiency-type subchondral stress fracture of the femoral head and medial femoral condyle occurred within a 2-year interval. Because the incidence of bilateral subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head is low and multifocal involvement has not been reported, multifocal subchondral stress fractures can be confused with multifocal osteonecrosis. Our case shows that subchondral stress fractures can occur in multiple sites almost simultaneously.

  18. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 2 years after pertrochanteric fracture surgery: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleanu, Bogdan; Prejbeanu, Radu; Vermesan, Dinu; Honcea, Lucian; Mioc, Mihail Lazar; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Predescu, Vlad

    2016-02-01

    The avascular necrosis of the femoral head represents the death of bone tissue due to the lack of blood supply. The disease has a progressive evolution and left untreated leads to femoral head collapse and severe arthritis. We present a case of a pertrochanteric fracture which has been successfully operated with a dynamic interlocking trochanteric gamma nail on the right hip. At 2 years after surgery the patient developed an incipient avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Despite the good positioning of the implant, we considered that the source of the pain was an intolerance of the implant, and thus we removed it. After implant removal, the patient was kept under observation and conservative treatment, to prevent further damage to the right hip and allow the healing to occur. At 6 months after the gamma nail was removed the X-rays revealed advanced avascular necrosis of the femoral head and secondary osteoarthritis on the right hip. The patient underwent surgery with an uncemented total hip arthroplasty. There are a few discussions regarding the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. These discussions may include the predisposing risk factors, the treatment of choice and the postoperative complications. The avascular necrosis of the femoral head is a complication of pertrochanteric fractures that can not be foreseen or avoided. The optimal treatment in these cases is uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

  19. [Particular posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for the treatment of tibial head fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobenhoffer, P; Gerich, T; Bertram, T; Lattermann, C; Pohlemann, T; Tscheme, H

    1997-12-01

    Tibial plateau fractures with depression of posterior aspects of the proximal tibia cause significant therapeutic problems. Posterior fractures on the medial side are mainly highly instable fracture-dislocations (Moore type I). Posterolateral fractures usually cause massive depression and destruction of the chondral surface. Surgical exposure of these fractures from anterior requires major soft tissue dissection and has a significant complication rate. However, incomplete restoration of the joint surface results in chronic postero-inferior joint subluxation, osteoarthritis and pain. We present new specific approaches for posterior fracture types avoiding large skin incisions, but allowing for atraumatic exposure, reduction and fixation. Posteromedial fracture-dislocations are exposed by a direct posteromedial skin incision and a deep incision between medial collateral ligament and posterior oblique ligament. The posteromedial pillar and the posterior flare of the proximal tibia are visualized. The inferior extent of the joint fragment can be reduced by indirect techniques or direct manipulation of the fragment. Fixation is achieved with subchondral lag screws and an anti-glide plate at the tip of the fragment. Posterolateral fractures are exposed by a transfibular approach: the skin is incised laterally, the peroneal nerve is dissected free. The fibula neck is osteotomized, the tibiofibular syndesmosis is divided and the fibula neck is reflected upwards in one layer with the meniscotibial ligament and the iliotibial tract attachment. Reflexion of the fibula head relaxes the lateral collateral ligament, allows for lateral joint opening and internal rotation of the tibia and thus exposes the posterolateral and posterior aspect of the tibial plateau. Fixation and buttressing on the posterolateral side can be achieved easily with this approach. In closure, the fibula head is fixed back with a lag screw or a tension-band system. These two exposures can be combined in

  20. Long Term Survivorship of a Severely Notched Femoral Stem after Replacing the Fractured Ceramic head with a Cobalt-Chromium Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tatani, Irini; Megas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Although ceramic head fracture occurs infrequently today, in the event of a fracture, the resulting revision surgery can prove very challenging, since the ceramic particles lodge into the surrounding soft tissue and can cause rapid implant failure. A case of long term survivorship of a severed notched femoral stem after replacing the fractured femoral head with a cobalt-chromium one is reported in a 40-year old woman with hip dysplasia who underwent an uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty. The incident of ceramic femoral head fracture occurred 14 months postoperatively without reporting any significant trauma. Intraoperative findings at revision were a multifragmented femoral head and a damaged polyethylene insert along with diffuse metallosis and excessive wear of the cone of the stem. Both the stem and the acetabular component were stable. After removal of ceramic fragments, metallotic tissue excision and careful lavage of the joint, the inlay was replaced by a similar one and a cobalt-chromium femoral head was placed to the existing notched taper of the firmly incorporated stem. At the 13 th year follow up examination, the patient had no pain, used no walking aids, and had normal activity with no signs of wearing or loosening in the plain x-rays. Despite current recommendations of using ceramic femoral heads in cases of fracture or to revise the severely damaged stems we were able to provide a long term survivorship up to 13 years postoperatively of a cobalt-chromium femoral head applied to a severe damaged stem.

  1. Fall Risk Assessment Predicts Fall-Related Injury, Hip Fracture, and Head Injury in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Eriksson, Joel; Larsson, Berit; Odén, Anders; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role of a fall risk assessment, using the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI), in predicting fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and death, in a large cohort of older women and men residing in Sweden. Cross sectional observational study. Sweden. Older adults (mean age 82.4 ± 7.8) who had a fall risk assessment using the DFRI at baseline (N = 128,596). Information on all fall-related injuries, all fall-related head injuries and hip fractures, and all-cause mortality was collected from the Swedish Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. The predictive role of DFRI was calculated using Poisson regression models with age, sex, height, weight, and comorbidities as covariates, taking time to outcome or end of study into account. During a median follow-up of 253 days (interquartile range 90-402 days) (>80,000 patient-years), 15,299 participants had a fall-related injury, 2,864 a head injury, and 2,557 a hip fracture, and 23,307 died. High fall risk (DFRI ≥3) independently predicted fall-related injury (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.39-1.49), hip fracture (HR = 1.51, 95% CI =1.38-1.66), head injury (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22), and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.35-1.43). DFRI more strongly predicted head injury (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.36 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11) and hip fracture (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.30-1.53 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.05-1.11) in 70-year old men than in 90-year old women (P Fall risk assessment using DFRI independently predicts fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality in older men and women, indicating its clinical usefulness to identify individuals who would benefit from interventions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Abhishek, E-mail: abhiortho27@gmail.co [Department of Orthopedics, 513, Thermal Colony, Sector-22, Faridabad 121005, Haryana (India); Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew [Department of Orthopedics, St Stephen' s Hospital, Tis hazari, Delhi, New Delhi 110054 (India)

    2010-09-15

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  3. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  4. The Role of Interface on the Impact Characteristics and Cranial Fracture Patterns Using the Immature Porcine Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deland, Trevor S; Niespodziewanski, Emily; Fenton, Todd W; Haut, Roger C

    2016-01-01

    The role of impact interface characteristics on the biomechanics and patterns of cranial fracture has not been investigated in detail, and especially for the pediatric head. In this study, infant porcine skulls aged 2-19 days were dropped with an energy to cause fracturing onto four surfaces varying in stiffness from a rigid plate to one covered with plush carpeting. Results showed that heads dropped onto the rigid surface produced more extensive cranial fracturing than onto carpeted surfaces. Contact forces generated at fracture initiation and the overall maximum contact forces were generally lower for the rigid than carpeted impacts. While the degree of cranial fracturing from impacts onto the heavy carpeted surface was comparable to that of lower-energy rigid surface impacts, there were fewer diastatic fractures. This suggests that characteristics of the cranial fracture patterns may be used to differentiate energy level from impact interface in pediatric forensic cases. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Jun Hyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Soon Yong

    1985-01-01

    Secondary ischemic necrosis of femoral head due to loss of blood supply following to femoral neck fracture is well known. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuricals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the evaluation of vascularity of the femoral head. The authors made a comparative study of scintigraphic findings and operative findings of 28 cases of femoral neck fracture treated at Kyung Hee University Hospital from April 1980 to May 1984. The results were as follows: 1. In 16 cases of proven avascular necorsis of femoral head, scintigraphy showed absent or decreased activity in 14 cases (87.5%), while radiography showed increased density in 10 cases (62.5%). 2. In 12 cases of proven vital femoral head, scintigraphy showed increased activity in 9 cases (75%) and radiography showed decreased density in 9 cases (75%). 3. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy was an excellent and useful method for assessing bone vitality of femoral head

  6. {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following femoral neck fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Jun Hyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Secondary ischemic necrosis of femoral head due to loss of blood supply following to femoral neck fracture is well known. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuricals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the evaluation of vascularity of the femoral head. The authors made a comparative study of scintigraphic findings and operative findings of 28 cases of femoral neck fracture treated at Kyung Hee University Hospital from April 1980 to May 1984. The results were as follows: 1. In 16 cases of proven avascular necorsis of femoral head, scintigraphy showed absent or decreased activity in 14 cases (87.5%), while radiography showed increased density in 10 cases (62.5%). 2. In 12 cases of proven vital femoral head, scintigraphy showed increased activity in 9 cases (75%) and radiography showed decreased density in 9 cases (75%). 3. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy was an excellent and useful method for assessing bone vitality of femoral head.

  7. Assessment of bone quality in the isolated femoral head for intracapsular fractures of the femoral head. Analysis of bone architecture using micro-CT and pQCT, and comparison with extracapsular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sando, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    Block sections were prepared from the five locations, central portion, superior portion, inferior portion, anterior portion, and posterior portion, of the region around the fracture of the femoral head isolated from 21 patients (16 patients with intracapsular fracture, 5 patients with extracapsular fracture). Cancellous bone microstructure, cortical bone thickness, and bone density were evaluated and analyzed for differences in the mechanism from which intracapsular versus extracapsular fracture and fragility developed. The method of evaluating the bone architecture differed from conventional bone histomorphometry of hard tissues and involved non-invasive micro-CT measurements, while the bone density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed topography (pQCT). The results indicate that in comparison to patients with extracapsular fractures, patients with intracapsular fractures showed significant decreases in the trabecular thickness of superior and posterior portions in the cancellous bone. The cortical bone thickness was significantly decreased in the superior portion. Bone density was significantly decreased in the superior portion, while in the extracapsular fracture group density tended to be lower in the inferior, anterior, and posterior portions, although this was not statistically significant. Although there have been previous studies on the bone quality of the femoral head isolated from intracapsular fracture of the femoral head, most reports are of two-dimensional analysis of coronal sections. As far as we are aware, there have been no previous reports comparing individual locations to extracapsular fractures. In view of the various reports that bone density is lower in the extracapsular fracture compared to the intracapsular fracture, we speculate that extracapsular fracture results from the effects of external forces on decreased bone density, while in the intracapsular fracture type, thinning of the superior portion of the cortical bone creates

  8. Bilateral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head and neck in a case of oncogenic osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, V; Agrawal, K; Vinothkumar, T K; Mathesul, A

    2010-07-01

    We describe a case of oncogenic osteomalacia in an adult male who presented with low back pain and bilateral hip pain. Extensive investigations had failed to find a cause. A plain pelvic radiograph showed Looser's zones in both femoral necks. MRI confirmed the presence of insufficiency fractures bilaterally in the femoral head and neck. Biochemical investigations confirmed osteomalacia which was unresponsive to treatment with vitamin D and calcium. A persistently low serum phosphate level suggested a diagnosis of hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. The level of fibroblast growth factor-23 was highly raised, indicating the cause as oncogenic osteomalacia. This was confirmed on positron-emission tomography, MRI and excision of a benign fibrous histiocytoma following a rapid recovery. The diagnosis of oncogenic osteomalacia may be delayed due to the non-specific presenting symptoms. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head may be missed unless specifically looked for.

  9. Osteosynthesis of the diaphysis of the humeral with plates - Series of cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Reyes, Claudia Juliana; Valencia Chamorro, Martha Patricia; Garcia Gonzalez, Luis Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Humeral shaft fractures may be treated in various ways. When surgical treatment is preferred, both plates and intramedullary nails are available and feasible options; the latter have recently gained popularity. We present the results of a case series of humeral fractures treated by open reduction and plate fixation with DCP plates, the results are described in terms of union rate, function, satisfaction, and complications. Thirty patients were included, with ages from 18 to 74 years, with mean follow-up time of 35 months; twelve patients were treated for delayed or non-union after orthopedic treatment. There was one case of nonunion, and one of iatrogenic neurapraxia of the radial nerve. Mobility and strength were excellent. All patients reported to be satisfied with the treatment and its result. We discuss that plate fixation for humeral shaft fractures is a predictable choice, with low complication rate and high union rate

  10. Traumatic humeral articular cartilage shear (THACS) lesion in a professional rugby player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, I-H; Wallace, W A

    2004-08-01

    A 20 year old male professional rugby player was seen at the clinic for evaluation of shoulder pain after rugby play. Magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive subchondral bone bruising of the humeral head with defect of the articular cartilage. Arthroscopy showed that the inferior half of the humeral head had extensive articular cartilage loss with nearly 70% of the inferior head having lost its cartilage. Sports medicine doctors should be aware that the shoulder joint in young competitive athletes playing contact sports may be exposed to greater risk of this kind of injury.

  11. Humeral stress remodelling locations differ in Thoroughbred racehorses training and racing on dirt compared to synthetic racetrack surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimock, A N; Hoffman, K D; Puchalski, S M; Stover, S M

    2013-03-01

    Veterinarians have observed a putative change in the location of humeral stress remodelling in Thoroughbred racehorses with change from dirt to synthetic racetrack surfaces. To determine whether the location and severity of humeral stress remodelling differs between Thoroughbred racehorses exercising on dirt and synthetic racetrack surfaces, the potential significance of different locations of stress remodelling, and the potential usefulness of scintigraphy for prevention of complete humeral fracture. Scintigraphic images of humeri from 841 Thoroughbred racehorses at 3 racetracks during 2 years before and after conversion from dirt to synthetic surfaces were evaluated for location and severity of lesions. The effects of surface on lesion distributions were examined using Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Archived fractured humeri were examined to determine the location and severity of stress remodelling associated with complete fracture. Databases were queried to determine whether racehorses with scintigraphic lesions suffered humeral fracture and whether racehorses with a complete humeral fracture had had a scintigraphic examination. Horses at synthetic racetracks had a greater proportion of distal humeral lesions, whereas horses at dirt racetracks had a greater proportion of caudoproximal lesions (Pdirt surfaces, and, by inference, for horses examined using scintigraphy. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi [Kyushu Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka-city (Japan); Yamamoto, Takuaki [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka-city (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  13. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  14. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction.

  15. Rate of avascular necrosis and time to surgery in proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, L A; Furey, A

    2016-12-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the humeral head is a devastating complication of proximal humeral fracture (PHF) that often results in long-term morbidity for the patient. Rates of AVN depend on the number of fracture fragments and are highly variable. The literature suggests that timely stable and anatomic reduction may decrease the rate at which AVN develops after PHF. To our knowledge, there is no literature published investigating a temporal relationship between the timing of PHF fixation and rates of AVN. Operative records of one orthopedic trauma surgeon were used to identify patients that underwent open reduction internal fixation for PHF at our institution between 2007 and 2012. Radiographs at presentation were reviewed and used to classify the fractures into two, three or four parts. Date and time of the initial radiograph were recorded as were the date and time of available intra-operative fluoroscopic images. The time from presentation radiograph to operative fixation was calculated (hours). Available follow-up plain films were then reviewed and evaluated for the presence or absence of humeral head AVN. Time to surgery (less than or greater than 72 h) and patient age did not correlate with development of AVN after PHF (p > 0.26). Notably, the number of fracture fragments did influence the rate of AVN identified in patients with PHF (p = 0.002). Early operative intervention does not appear to decrease the rate of development of avascular necrosis after PHF.

  16. Common site of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the common sites of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head (SIF) based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of MR images. In 33 hips of 31 consecutive patients diagnosed with SIF, 3-D reconstruction of the bone, fracture, and acetabular edge was performed using MR images. These 3-D images were used to measure the fractured areas and clarify the positional relationship between the fracture and degree of acetabular coverage. The fractured area in the anterior portion was significantly larger than in the posterior area. In 11 cases, the fractures contacted the acetabular edge and were distributed on the lateral portion. The indices of acetabular coverage (center-edge angle and acetabular head index) in these cases were less than the normal range. In the remaining 22 cases, the fractures were apart from the acetabular edge and distributed on the mediolateral centerline of the femoral head. The majority of these cases had normal acetabular coverage. The common site of SIF is the anterior portion. In addition, two types of SIF are proposed: (1) Lateral type: the contact stress between the acetabular edge and lateral portion of the femoral head causes SIF based on the insufficient acetabular coverage, and (2) Central type: the contact stress between the acetabular surface and the mediolateral center of the femoral head causes SIF independent from the insufficiency of acetabular coverage. These findings may be useful for considering the treatment and prevention of SIF. (orig.)

  17. Avascularity of the femoral head following intracapsular fracture: a comparative scintigraphic and bioptic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoilund-Carlsen, P F; Widding, A; Uhrenholdt, A; Christoffersen, P; Grieff, J [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark)

    1980-03-01

    Bioptic and scintigraphic methods of diagnosing avascular necrosis of the femoral head following intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck were compared. During operative treatment of patients, biospy samples of bone marrow were taken from the femoral head about 2 hours after the intravenous injection of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate; histological examination of the biopsies were also performed. Scintigrams of the femoral head using sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate were performed 2 days, 7 days and 6 weeks post-operatively. The biopsies confirmed no morphological changes being apparent in the first few days. The biopsy samples indicated two groups of patients with either high or low activity in the femoral head. However, it was concluded that the use of bone-seeking radionuclides with this technique might be more reliable. Scintigraphic trends divided the patients into three groups, one with persistently normal, another with varying, and a third with decreased activity in the femoral head. It was concluded that very early scintigraphy is probably not the method of choice since the images were often difficult to interpret. For the present, assessment of the viability of the femoral head should rest upon scintigraphic examinations performed about 6 weeks or 3 months after the injury.

  18. Evaluation of Low or High Permeability of Fractured Rock using Well Head Losses from Step-Drawdown Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Geon Young; Koh, Yong Kwon; Kim, Hyoung Soo

    2012-01-01

    The equation of the step-drawdown test 's w = BQ+CQ p ' written by Rorabaugh (1953) is suitable for drawdown increased non-linearly in the fractured rocks. It was found that value of root mean square error (RMSE) between observed and calculated drawdowns was very low. The calculated C (well head loss coefficient) and P (well head loss exponent) value of well head losses (CQ p ) ranged 3.689 x 10 -19 - 5.825 x 10 -7 and 3.459 - 8.290, respectively. It appeared that the deeper depth in pumping well the larger drawdowns due to pumping rate increase. The well head loss in the fractured rocks, unlike that in porous media, is affected by properties of fractures (fractures of aperture, spacing, and connection) around pumping well. The C and P value in the well head loss is very important to interpret turbulence interval and properties of high or low permeability of fractured rock. As a result, regression analysis of C and P value in the well head losses identified the relationship of turbulence interval and hydraulic properties. The relationship between C and P value turned out very useful to interpret hydraulic properties of the fractured rocks.

  19. Performance of computed tomography of the head to evaluate for skull fractures in infants with suspected non-accidental trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culotta, Paige A.; Tran, Quynh-Anh; Donaruma-Kwoh, Marcella [Texas Children' s Hospital, Section of Public Health Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Crowe, James E.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R.; Tran, H.B.; Dodge, Cristina T. [Texas Children' s Hospital, The Edward B. Singleton, MD, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Camp, Elizabeth A. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cruz, Andrea T. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Children' s Hospital, Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Young children with suspected abusive head trauma often receive skull radiographs to evaluate for fractures as well as computed tomography (CT) of the head to assess for intracranial injury. Using a CT as the primary modality to evaluate both fracture and intracranial injury could reduce exposure to radiation without sacrificing performance. To evaluate the sensitivity of CT head with (3-D) reconstruction compared to skull radiographs to identify skull fractures in children with suspected abusive head trauma. This was a retrospective (2013-2014) cross-sectional study of infants evaluated for abusive head trauma via both skull radiographs and CT with 3-D reconstruction. The reference standard was skull radiography. All studies were read by pediatric radiologists and neuroradiologists, with ten percent read by a second radiologist to evaluate for interobserver reliability. One hundred seventy-seven children (47% female; mean/median age: 5 months) were included. Sixty-two (35%) had skull fractures by radiography. CT with 3-D reconstruction was 97% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89-100%) and 94% specific (CI: 87-97%) for skull fracture. There was no significant difference between plain radiographs and 3-D CT scan results (P-value = 0.18). Kappa was 1 (P-value <0.001) between radiologist readings of CTs and 0.77 (P = 0.001) for skull radiographs. CT with 3-D reconstruction is equivalent to skull radiographs in identifying skull fractures. When a head CT is indicated, skull radiographs add little diagnostic value. (orig.)

  20. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  1. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head: associated imaging findings and predictors of clinical progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, Lauren A.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lee, Min Hee [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vail, Thomas P. [University of California, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To characterize the morphology and imaging findings of femoral head subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), and to investigate clinical outcomes in relation to imaging findings. Fifty-one patients with hip/pelvis magnetic resonance (MR) images and typical SIF characteristics were identified and reviewed by two radiologists. Thirty-five patients had follow-up documentation allowing assessment of clinical outcome. Subgroup comparisons were performed using regression models adjusted for age and body mass index. SIF were frequently associated with cartilage loss (35/47, 74.5 %), effusion (33/42, 78.6 %), synovitis (29/44, 66 %), and bone marrow oedema pattern (BMEP) (average cross-sectional area 885.7 ± 730.2 mm{sup 2}). Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was required in 16/35 patients, at an average of 6 months post-MRI. Compared to the THA cohort, the non-THA group had significantly (p < 0.05) smaller overlying cartilage defect size (10 mm vs. 29 mm), smaller band length ratio and fracture diameters, and greater incidence of parallel fracture morphology (p < 0.05). Male gender and increased age were significantly associated with progression, p < 0.05. SIF were associated with synovitis, cartilage loss, effusion, and BMEP. Male gender and increased age had a significant association with progression to THA, as did band length ratio, fracture diameter, cartilage defect size, and fracture deformity/morphology. (orig.)

  2. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  3. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p fractures (p = 0.0028) and death or need for mechanical ventilation ≥ 3 days (Death/Vdays ≥ 3) (p rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden. Severity of head, abdominal, and lung injuries also influence rib fracture outcomes.

  4. Medullary bone and humeral breaking strength in laying hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, R.H.; McCormack, H.A.; McTeir, L.; Whitehead, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that large amounts of medullary bone in the humeral diaphysis may increase breaking strength, various parameters of bone quality and quantity were examined in two large flocks of hens near end of lay. We conclude that the amount of medullary bone in the humerus of hens during the laying period influences bone strength. This medullary bone may not have any intrinsic strength, but may act by contributing to the fracture resistance of the surrounding cortical bone. Using a quantitative, low dose, radiographic technique, we can predict, from early in the laying period, those birds which will develop large amounts of medullary bone in their humeri by the end of the laying period. The formation of medullary bone in the humeral diaphysis is not at the expense of the surrounding radiographed cortical bone

  5. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes of Unipolar and Bipolar Radial Head Prosthesis in Patients with Radial Head Fracture: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Ziyang; Shang, Yongjun

    2018-06-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of unipolar and bipolar radial head prosthesis in the treatment of patients with radial head fracture. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar databases were searched until April 18, 2016 using the following search terms: radial head fracture, elbow fracture, radial head arthroplasty, implants, prosthesis, unipolar, bipolar, cemented, and press-fit. Randomized controlled trials, retrospective, and cohort studies were included. The Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS), disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, radiologic assessment, ROM, and grip strength following elbow replacement were similar between prosthetic devices. The pooled mean excellent/good ranking of MEPS was 0.78 for unipolar and 0.73 for bipolar radial head arthroplasty, and the pooled mean MEPS was 86.9 and 79.9, respectively. DASH scores for unipolar and bipolar prosthesis were 19.0 and 16.3, respectively. Range of motion outcomes were similar between groups, with both groups have comparable risk of flexion arc, flexion, extension deficit, rotation arc, pronation, and supination (p values bipolar prosthesis). However, bipolar radial head prosthesis was associated with an increased chance of heterotopic ossification and lucency (p values ≤0.049) while unipolar prosthesis was not (p values ≥0.088). Both groups had risk for development of capitellar osteopenia or erosion/wear (p values ≤0.039). Unipolar and bipolar radial head prostheses were similar with respect to clinical outcomes. Additional comparative studies are necessary to further compare different radial head prostheses used to treat radial head fracture.

  6. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head following trochanteric fractures in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquet, Antonio; Mayora, Gabriel; Guimaraes, Joao Matheus; Suárez, Roberto; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2014-12-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) following trochanteric fractures (TFx) is infrequent. The causal relationship between ANFH and TFx remains controversial. Although several major risk factors for ANFH have been proposed, most of them remain under discussion. In this study we undertook a systematic review of the literature to investigate the incidence of AVN, risk factors and outcomes following Tfx fixation. A comprehensive review of the literature was undertaken using the PRISMA guidelines with no language restriction. Case reports of ANFH and series of TFx with or without cases of ANFH published between inception of journals to December 2013 were eligible for inclusion. Relevant information was divided in two sections. Part I: included the analysis of detailed case reports of ANFH, either published isolated or included in series of TFx, with the objective of establishing potential risk factors, clinical and radiological presentation, time to development, treatment and outcome of this complication. Part II: analyzed series of TFx, which included cases of ANFH with or without details of aetiology, treatment modalities and outcomes, with the objective of assessing the incidence of ANFH in TFx. Overall 80 articles with 192 cases of ANFH after TFx met the inclusion criteria. The most probable developmental pathway appears to be a disruption of the extra osseous arterial blood supply to the femoral head. Suggested risk factors included high-energy trauma with fracture comminution and displacement, and an atypical course of the fracture line, more proximal, at the base of the neck. Most cases were diagnosed within the first two years after fracture. The clinical and radiological features appear to be similar to those of idiopathic avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The incidence of AVFH with a minimum of 1-year follow-up was calculated 0.95%, and with a minimum 2-year follow-up it was 1.37%. Total hip replacement was the mainstay of treatment. The

  7. Straight proximal humeral nails are surrounded by more bone stock in comparison to bent nails in an experimental cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Christian Max; Müller, Peter Ernst; Mutschler, Wolf; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Milz, Stefan; Braunstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    In the management of proximal humeral fractures intramedullary implants with bent and straight shape of the proximal part of nail are available. Based on data from previous studies on bone distribution in the humeral head, we hypothesized, that higher densities might exist in the bone stock surrounding straight nails in comparison to their angulated counterparts. With a known positive correlation between bone density and mechanical stability, this could indicate potentially higher rigidity of osteosyntheses done with straight implants. We performed high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomographies of the potential straight and bent implant bearing regions of 27 cadaveric proximal humeri. The acquired data were analyzed for differences between straight and bent Volumes of Interest as well as intra- and interindividual bone stock distribution. For both straight and bent volumes of interest a considerably declining bone mineral density was found in craniocaudal direction. Mean densities of bent volumes were significantly lower in comparison to their corresponding straight counterparts (p straight shaped implants can be assumed. Since we found a rapid decrease of bone density in cranio-caudal direction, intramedullary implants should be anchored as proximally in the subcortical area as possible to minimize the risk of displacement or cutout. The high correlation between the Volumes of Interest of the corresponding right and left sides could aid in preoperative planning when considering an intra- or extramedullary approach.

  8. Mismatch analysis of humeral nailing. Antegrade versus retrograde insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaisavariya, B.; Jiamwatthanachai, P.; Aroonjarattham, P.; Aroonjarattham, K.; Wongcumchang, M.; Sitthiseripratip, K.

    2011-01-01

    Closed humeral nailing is now considered an alternative treatment for humeral-shaft fracture. The nail can be inserted with either the antegrade or retrograde method. We investigated and compared the problem of geometric mismatch of the humeral nail to the humerus between the two methods of insertion. The study was performed using virtual simulation based on computed tomography (CT) data of 76 Thai cadaveric humeri and the commonly used Russell-Taylor humeral nail 8 mm in diameter and 220 mm long. Mismatch of the nail to the intact humerus was analyzed and compared between the antegrade and retrograde nailing approaches. The results showed: the diameter of the medullary canal averaged 7.9-13.8 mm; the minimal reaming diameter to accommodate virtual nail insertion averaged 8.8-14.8 mm for the antegrade and 8.8-29.3 mm for the retrograde approach; the minimal reaming thickness of the inner cortex averaged 0.1-1.5 mm for the antegrade and 0.1-9.9 mm for the retrograde approach; the percentages of cortical bone removed prior to nail insertion were 3.8-107.1% and 3.8-1,287.6% for the antegrade and retrograde approaches, respectively; the eccentricity of the nail-medullary canal center were 0.4-3.4 and 0.4-10.6 mm for the antegrade and retrograde approaches, respectively. Less mismatching occurred with antegrade nailing than with the retrograde approach. Retrograde nailing requires excessive reaming at the distal part of the humerus to accommodate nail insertion. This may create bone weakness and the risk of supracondylar fracture. (author)

  9. Analysis of constant-head well tests in nonporous fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.; Remer, J.

    1981-01-01

    If one compares the results of steady analyses and transient flowrate analyses, the error in assuming steady flow is less than an order of magnitude for reasonable values of storativity, and this error can be minimized through proper choice of radius of influence. Although the steady flow assumptions do not result in large errors in the calculation of permeability, careful design of constant-head well tests can yield not only storativity, but also qualitative information on the areal extent of permeable zones or fractures tested. Constant-head well tests have several major advantages over other well test techniques in low permeability rock. Unlike pump tests, wellbore storage effects are virtually nonexistant. Provided low-flow measurement apparatus is available, constant-level tests are far more rapid than slug tests and, unlike pulse tests, compliance of equipment is not a factor, since the system is maintained at constant pressure throughout the test

  10. [Treatment of avascular necrosis of femoral head after femoral neck fracture with pedicled iliac bone graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Benjie; Zhao, Dewei; Guo, Lin; Yang, Lei; Li, Zhigang; Cui, Daping; Tian, Fengde; Liu, Baoyi

    2011-05-01

    To explore the effectiveness of pedicled iliac bone graft transposition for treatment of avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH) after femoral neck fracture. Between June 2002 and December 2006, 22 cases (22 hips, 16 left hips and 6 right hips) of ANFH after femoral neck fracture were treated with iliac bone graft pedicled with ascending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex vessels. There were 18 males and 4 females with an age range from 28 to 48 years (mean, 37.5 years). The time from injury to internal fixation was 2-31 days, and all fractures healed within 12 months after internal fixation. The ANFH was diagnosed at 15-40 months (mean, 22 months) after internal fixation. The ANFH duration was 3-11 months (mean, 8 months). According to Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) staging system, 2 hips were classified as stage IIa, 3 hips as stage IIb, 3 hips as stage IIc, 3 hips as stage IIIa, 7 hips as stage IIIb, and 4 hips as stage IIIc. The preoperative Harris hip score (HHS) was 64.10 +/- 5.95. All incisions healed by first intention and the patients had no complication of lung embolism, sciatic nerve injury, lower limb deep venous thrombosis, and numbness and pain of donor site. All patients were followed up 2.5 to 6.3 years (mean, 4.8 years). The fracture healing time was 8-12 months, and no femoral neck fracture recurred. The HHS was 90.20 +/- 5.35 at last follow-up, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative value (t = -18.447, P = 0.000). The hip function were excellent in 11 hips, good in 10 hips, fair in 1 hip, and the excellent and good rate was 95.5%. Four hips were radiographically progressed in ARCO staging, 18 hips remained stable with a stable rate of 81.8%. Pedicled iliac bone graft transposition is an ideal option for treatment of ANFH after internal fixation of femoral neck fracture for the advantages of femoral head revascularization, sufficient cancellous bone supply, and relatively simple procedure.

  11. A micro-architectural evaluation of osteoporotic human femoral heads to guide implant placement in proximal femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul J; Ramaesh, Rishikesan; Pankaj, Pankaj; Patton, James T; Howie, Colin R; Goffin, Jérôme M; Merwe, Andrew van der; Wallace, Robert J; Porter, Daniel E; Simpson, A Hamish

    2013-10-01

    The micro-architecture of bone has been increasingly recognized as an important determinant of bone strength. Successful operative stabilization of fractures depends on bone strength. We evaluated the osseous micro-architecture and strength of the osteoporotic human femoral head. 6 femoral heads, obtained during arthroplasty surgery for femoral neck fracture, underwent micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanning at 30 μm, and bone volume ratio (BV/TV), trabecular thickness, structural model index, connection density, and degree of anisotropy for volumes of interest throughout the head were derived. A further 15 femoral heads underwent mechanical testing of compressive failure stress of cubes of trabecular bone from different regions of the head. The greatest density and trabecular thickness was found in the central core that extended from the medial calcar to the physeal scar. This region also correlated with the greatest degree of anisotropy and proportion of plate-like trabeculae. In the epiphyseal region, the trabeculae were organized radially from the physeal scar. The weakest area was found at the apex and peripheral areas of the head. The strongest region was at the center of the head. The center of the femoral head contained the strongest trabecular bone, with the thickest, most dense trabeculae. The apical region was weaker. From an anatomical and mechanical point of view, implants that achieve fixation in or below this central core may achieve the most stable fixation during fracture healing.

  12. Surgical treatment of proximal humerus fractures using PHILOS plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sharma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate functional outcome and complications of open reduction and internal fixation with proximal humeral internal locking system (PHILOS plate for proximal humerus fractures. Methods: We reviewed 51 patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with PHILOS plate between the years 2007 to 2012. There were 35 men and 16 women with a mean age of 38 years (range 24-68. There were 41 patients in the age group of <60 years and 10 patients in the age group of >60 years. According to Neer classification system, 8, 15 and 23 patients had 2-part, 3-part, and 4-part fractures, respectively and 5 patients had 4-part fracture dislocation. All surgeries were carried out at our tertiary care trauma centre. Functional evaluation of the shoulder at final follow-up was done using Constant-Murley score. Results: The mean follow-up period was 30 months (range 12-44 months. Two patients were lost to followup. Of the remaining 49 patients, all fractures were united clinically and radiologically. The mean time for radiological union was 12 weeks (range 8-20 weeks. At the final follow-up the mean Constant-Murley score was 79 (range 50-100. The results were excellent in 25 patients, good in 13 patients, fair in 6 atients and poor in 5 patients. During the follow-up, four cases of varus malunion, one case of subacromial impingement, one case of deep infection, one case of intraarticular screw penetration and one case of failure of fi xation were noted. No cases of avascular necrosis, hardware failure, locking screw loosening or nonunion were noted. Conclusion: PHILOS provides stable fixation in proximal humerus fractures. To prevent potential complications like avascular necrosis, meticulous surgical dissection to preserve vascularity of humeral head is necessary. Key words: Proximal humerus fracture; Fracture fixation, internal; Proximal humeral internal locking system

  13. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-05-18

    The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. We evaluated the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with the use of contemporary techniques for femoral neck fracture fixation. We then sought to determine what potential risk factors influenced the development of avascular necrosis.Between 1990 and 2005, one hundred sixty-three intracapsular femoral neck fractures in 163 patients were treated with internal fixation at our level-I trauma center. All patients were monitored until conversion to total hip arthroplasty or for a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Ten patients (10 hips) died and 7 patients (7 hips) were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 hips) had a mean 5.2 years of follow-up (range, 3 months to 17 years). The incidence of avascular necrosis was 25.3% (37 hips). The average time to diagnosis of avascular necrosis was 18.8 months (range, 3-47 months). Patient sex, age, interval from injury to surgery, and mechanism of injury were statistically not associated with the development of avascular necrosis. The quality of fracture reduction, adequacy of fixation, degree of displacement, and comminution of the posterior cortex were significantly associated. After we controlled for patient and radiographic characteristics, multivariate analyses indicated that the important predictors for avascular necrosis are poor reduction (odds ratio=13.889) and initial displacement of the fracture (odds ratio=4.693). Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Resultados de tratamento cirúrgico da pseudoartrose de fratura diafisária do úmero com placa de compressão dinâmica e enxerto de osso esponjoso Results of surgical treatment of nonunion of humeral shaft fracture with dynamic compression plate and cancellous bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olasinde Anthony Ayotunde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliamos o tratamento da pseudoartrose de fratura diafisária do úmero com placa de compressão dinâmica de janeiro de 2002 a dezembro de 2009. MÉTODOS: Vinte e dois pacientes foram tratados durante o período do estudo. O trauma foi a causa predominante de lesão em 86,4% dos pacientes. RESULTADOS: A pseudoartrose foi atrófica em 81,8% e hipertrófica em 18,2% dos indivíduos. Havia lesão primária do nervo radial nervo em 27,3% dos pacientes. Todos os participantes tinham fratura fechada à apresentação e 81,2% deles tinham recebido tratamento anterior de traditional bone setters (pessoa que faz a redução de ossos quebrados ou deslocados, geralmente sem ser médico licenciado e 18,8% tinham falha do tratamento conservador com gesso. O tempo médio até a união foi 16 semanas. O tratamento anterior com traditional bone setters afetou significantemente o tempo de consolidação da fratura (p OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the treatment of nonunion of humeral shaft fracture with dynamic compression plate from January 2002 to December 2009. METHODS: Twenty two patients were treated over the study period. Trauma was the predominant cause of injury in 86,4% of the patients. RESULTS: Nonunion was atrophic in 81,8% and hypertrophic in 18,2% of the individuals. There was a primary injury of the radial nerve in 27,3% of the patients. All the participants had closed fracture at presentation, and 81,2% had received previous treatment from traditional bone setters and 18,8% had failure of the conservative cast management.The average time to healing was 16 weeks. Previous treatment from traditional bone setters significantly affected the time to fracture healing (p<0,05. All fractures had successful union. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that dynamic compression plating remains an effective treatment option for nonunion of humeral shaft fracture. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective study.

  15. Long-Term Follow-up of Modular Metallic Radial Head Replacement: Commentary on an article by Jonathan P. Marsh, MD, FRCSC, et al.: "Radial Head Fractures Treated with Modular Metallic Radial Head Replacement: Outcomes at a Mean Follow-up of Eight Years".

    OpenAIRE

    Mansat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Radial head arthroplasty is used to stabilize the joint after a complex acute radial head fracture that is not amenable for fixation or to treat sequelae of radial head fractures. Most of the currently used radial head prostheses are metallic monoblock implants that are not consistently adaptable and raise technical challenges since their implantation requires lateral elbow subluxation. Metallic modular radial head arthroplasty implants available in various head and stem sizes have been devel...

  16. [Fracture Type and Injury-to-Surgery Interval as Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head after Internal Fixation of Intracapsular Femoral Neck Fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, O; Skála-Rosenbaum, J; Bartoška, R; Waldauf, P; Krbec, M; Džupa, V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head following the osteosynthesis of intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck in relation to the time interval between injury and surgery and the type of fracture. The data of patients with intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck surgically treated in the period from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed. Of 1555 patients treated for this fracture, 125 (7%) underwent osteosynthesis. The evaluated group included 115 patients who came for examination at one-year follow-up. There were 59 (52%) women and 56 (48%) men. Dynamic hip screw (DHS) osteosynthesis with an anti-rotation screw was performed in 103 patients and lag-screw osteosynthesis involving three parallel cannulated cancellous screws was employed in 12 patients. The patients were allocated to groups according to the injury-to-surgery interval and to sub-groups on the basis of the Garden classification of femoral fracture stage. In the group of 58 patients treated within 6 h of injury, AVN developed in 10 (17%). When the type of fracture was considered, 4% of the non-displaced fractures and 30% of the displaced fractures developed AVN. The patients with Garden stage I and II (non-displaced) fractures treated within 6 h of injury had a significantly lower risk of AVN development than those with Garden stage III or IV (displaced) fractures. The group treated between 6 and 24 post-injury hours comprised 21 patients, of whom four (19%) had AVN. In non-displaced and displaced fracture sub-groups, 25% of the patients in the former and 16% in the latter had AVN. The stage of displacement had no effect on AVN development. The two groups together (patients treated by 24 h) had a significantly lower AVN incidence than the patients treated after 24 h (p = 0.0025). In this group of 36 patients, 16 had AVN (44%) and the fracture stage made no significant difference (p = 0.6985; nondisplacement sub-group, 41%; displacement sub

  17. Fixação esquelética externa tipo Ia (unilateral-uniplanar para osteossíntese diafisária de úmero em pombos domésticos (Columba livia Type Ia (unilateral-uniplanar external Skeletal fixation for treatment of humeral diaphysis fracture in domestic pigeons (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Moraes Leotte

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Das várias patologias que podem acometer as aves, são mais freqüentes as fraturas de ossos longos das asas e dos membros pélvicos. Este experimento teve como objetivo observar, por meio de exames clínicos, histológicos e radiográficos, a resposta cicatricial óssea ao uso do fixador externo tipo Ia (unilateral-uniplanar na redução aberta de fratura diafisária, de úmero em pombos domésticos (Columba livia. Foram estudados 14 pombos com peso variando entre 290 e 420 gramas. A fratura foi realizada na diáfise do úmero direito e, logo após, estabilizada com aparelho de fixação externa tipo Ia, utilizando-se, como barra de fixação, o acrílico autopolimerizável. O tempo médio para o completo desaparecimento da linha de fratura foi de 28±6,44 dias e para formação de calo ósseo, 17±3,26 dias. As aves, mesmo com o aparelho de fixação, retornaram ao vôo aos 28±1,2 dias, exceto uma que não recuperou a capacidade de vôo. A técnica de fixação externa demonstrou ser eficaz para o tratamento de fraturas diafisárias de úmero em pombos domésticos.Among the various pathologies that can inflict birds, the long bones fractures of the wings, and pelvic members are more commom. Fourteeen domestic pigeons (Columba livia weighing 290 to 420g, were submitted to open reduction of humeral diaphysis fracture with external fixator type Ia (unilateral-uniplanar in order to evaluate the clinical, histological and radiographic evolution of the bone healing. The external fixator device was stabilized with methilmetacrylate acrylic. The average time necessary to the complete disappearance of the fracture line by radiographic evaluation was 28±6.44 days. The bone callus was identified at 17±3.26 postoperative days. The birds returned to flying in 28±1.2 days yet with the fixation device and only one did not recovere the flying abillity. The external fixation technique is an efficient method to treat diaphiseal humeral fracture in domestic

  18. Humeral repair in birds by guided tissue regeneration and external and internal associated fixation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delogu, M.

    1993-01-01

    Ten pigeons (Columba livia domestic form) with humeral diaphyseal fracture were treated with external and internal fixation techniques (Boston technique and intamedullary pin). Longitudinal space was intentionally left between fracture surfaces during osteosynthesis. This space was filled with bovine lyophilized collagen, set around an intramedullary pin, in five samples. Ossification process was checked by radiography every seven days. Results show the utility of this technique in pneumatic bird bones. In fact, shortening control and callus formation facility were observed [it

  19. Early detection by sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following medial femoral neck fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiff, J.; Lanng, S.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.; Karle, A.K.; Uhrenholdt, A.

    1980-01-01

    A selected series of 24 patients with displaced medial femoral neck fracture, treated with closed reduction and osteosynthesis with cancellous bone screws (ASIF), were investigated. During an observation period of 6 to 26 months, serial hip joint scintigraphies were performed and compared with serial X-ray examinations. At the first scintigraphic examination performed on average 5-6 weeks after the fracture, two separate investigators found a decreased amount of activity or no activity in the femoral head of 10 and 8 patients, respectively. At the second scintigraphic examination performed on average 11.1 weeks after the fracture both investigators found no activity or a decreased amount of activity in 8 patients. This figure declined to 7 during the following period, because one patient with decreased activity was recorded as having normal activity 15 months after the fracture. These 7 patients all developed radiological signs of femoral head collapse on average 16.3 months after the fracture (range 5-26 months), whereas their scintigrams displayed decreased or absent tracer uptake on average 1.2 months after the fracture (P<0.01). None of the patients with initially normal or increased uptake later showed decreased or absent uptake during the study and none developed radiological collapse. It may be concluded that absent or decreased uptake of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate in the femoral head following medial femoral neck fracture indicates femoral head necrosis and a high risk of late segmental collapse, whereas normal or increased uptake implying preserved blood supply means that late segmental collapse will probably never develop. (author)

  20. Osteochondral lesions of the humeral trochlea in the young athlete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Kelley W. [Pediatric Radiology of America, Roanoke, VA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Diagnostic Imaging of Atlanta, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States); Marshall, David L.; Busch, Michael T. [Children' s Orthopaedics of Atlanta, P.C., Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Williams, Joseph P. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Diagnostic Imaging of Atlanta, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variety of osteochondral abnormalities of the humeral trochlea in the pediatric athlete. Patients with trochlear abnormalities were identified through keyword search of radiology dictations from 1999 to 2007. The patient's medical record, imaging studies, and surgical reports were reviewed. The osteochondral lesions were categorized based on the imaging appearance. Surgical results were reviewed in conjunction with the imaging findings. Eighteen patients were identified. Trochlear lesions were stratified into two imaging groups: Osteochondral injury/osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) vs. avascular necrosis (AVN). The osteochondral injury group was stratified into medial and lateral trochlear abnormalities. The medial lesions (n=3) were small (<6 mm) and were located on the posterior articular surface of the medial trochlea. The lateral lesions (n=10) were larger (10-14 mm), circumscribed, and were located on the posterior inferior aspect of the lateral trochlea. Trochlear AVN (n=5) affected development of the lateral trochlea (type A) or both the medial and lateral aspects of the trochlea (type B). AVN occurred exclusively in athletes with history of remote distal humeral fracture. Seven of the 18 patients underwent elbow arthroscopy. Surgical findings and treatment regimens are summarized. Trochlear lesions should be considered in throwing athletes presenting with medial elbow pain and flexion contracture/extension block. Medial trochlear osteochondral injuries may result from posteromedial olecranon abutment. Lateral OCD lesions occur in a characteristic vascular watershed zone resulting from the unique blood supply of the trochlea. Trochlear AVN may be unmasked years following treated distal humeral fracture when the athletic demands upon the adolescent elbow increase, revealing the altered growth and biomechanics. (orig.)

  1. Osteochondral lesions of the humeral trochlea in the young athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Kelley W.; Marshall, David L.; Busch, Michael T.; Williams, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variety of osteochondral abnormalities of the humeral trochlea in the pediatric athlete. Patients with trochlear abnormalities were identified through keyword search of radiology dictations from 1999 to 2007. The patient's medical record, imaging studies, and surgical reports were reviewed. The osteochondral lesions were categorized based on the imaging appearance. Surgical results were reviewed in conjunction with the imaging findings. Eighteen patients were identified. Trochlear lesions were stratified into two imaging groups: Osteochondral injury/osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) vs. avascular necrosis (AVN). The osteochondral injury group was stratified into medial and lateral trochlear abnormalities. The medial lesions (n=3) were small (<6 mm) and were located on the posterior articular surface of the medial trochlea. The lateral lesions (n=10) were larger (10-14 mm), circumscribed, and were located on the posterior inferior aspect of the lateral trochlea. Trochlear AVN (n=5) affected development of the lateral trochlea (type A) or both the medial and lateral aspects of the trochlea (type B). AVN occurred exclusively in athletes with history of remote distal humeral fracture. Seven of the 18 patients underwent elbow arthroscopy. Surgical findings and treatment regimens are summarized. Trochlear lesions should be considered in throwing athletes presenting with medial elbow pain and flexion contracture/extension block. Medial trochlear osteochondral injuries may result from posteromedial olecranon abutment. Lateral OCD lesions occur in a characteristic vascular watershed zone resulting from the unique blood supply of the trochlea. Trochlear AVN may be unmasked years following treated distal humeral fracture when the athletic demands upon the adolescent elbow increase, revealing the altered growth and biomechanics. (orig.)

  2. Dispositivo de tração do membro superior para osteossínteses intramedulares bloqueadas anterógradas de fraturas diafisárias de úmero Upper limb traction device for anterograde intramedullary locked nail of humeral shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Chaves Corrêa

    2010-06-01

    surgically, usually by means of intramedullary locked nail. Some comminuted and/or very deviated shaft fractures can represent a real technical challenge. The fracture table, which allows for the vertical, horizontal and rotational instrumental stabilization of the limb, greatly facilitates reduction and implant placement maneuvers and are widely used by orthopedic surgeons. Humeral shaft fractures are mostly treated nonsurgically. However, some whose indications are well defined in literature require surgical treatment. They can be fixed by plates, or by anterograde or retrograde intramedullary nail. In the humerus, limb fracture reduction and stabilization maneuvers for implantation of intramedullary nails are done manually, usually by 2 assistants. Because they are subject to muscle fatigue, this option may be less efficient. The aim of this paper is to present an external traction device for use in anterograde intramedullary fixation of humerus shaft fractures that allows vertical, horizontal and rotational stabilization of the upper limb similarly to that used in the lower limbs. The device is portable, of simple construction, and can be installed on any operating table equipped with side rails. It was used in the surgical treatment of 29 humeral shaft fractures with anterograde locked intramedullary nail. Our experience was extremely positive. We had no complications related to its use and we believe it to have facilitated the surgical procedures in a remarkable way.

  3. The relationship of glenoid and humeral version with supraspinatus tendon tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokgoz, Nil; Kadioglu Voyvoda, Nuray; Gultekin, Serap; Tali, E.T. [Gazi University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Kanatli, Ulunay; Bolukbasi, Selcuk [Gazi University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of glenohumeral anatomic measurements on MR imaging with supraspinatus tendon tears. The study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from each subject. Forty-two patients (mean age 55.5 years; age range 40-73 years) with supraspinatus tendon tears and 50 asymptomatic shoulders of 32 controls (mean age 43 years; age range 17-69 years) without rotator cuff tears were included. The acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles were measured on coronal images, the glenoid and humeral head version as well as the bicipital-humeral distance on axial images. Significant differences were found between the patients and controls for both glenoid version and bicipital-humeral distance, which are considered to influence the distribution of forces placed on the cuff (p < 0.05). The patients had a decreased glenoid version by an average of 2.3 (-7.1 {+-} 7.8 vs. -4.8 {+-} 5.6 ), and a decreased bicipital-humeral distance by an average of 2.7 mm (12.1 {+-} 3.7 mm vs. 14.8 {+-} 4.1 mm). No significant differences were found between these groups for humeral head version and the acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles, which might contribute to extrinsic impingement by narrowing the supraspinatus tendon outlet. Differences in glenoid and humeral version may be responsible for RC tears by changing the orientation of the rotator cuff and thus increasing shearing stress. (orig.)

  4. The relationship of glenoid and humeral version with supraspinatus tendon tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokgoz, Nil; Kadioglu Voyvoda, Nuray; Gultekin, Serap; Tali, E.T.; Kanatli, Ulunay; Bolukbasi, Selcuk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of glenohumeral anatomic measurements on MR imaging with supraspinatus tendon tears. The study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from each subject. Forty-two patients (mean age 55.5 years; age range 40-73 years) with supraspinatus tendon tears and 50 asymptomatic shoulders of 32 controls (mean age 43 years; age range 17-69 years) without rotator cuff tears were included. The acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles were measured on coronal images, the glenoid and humeral head version as well as the bicipital-humeral distance on axial images. Significant differences were found between the patients and controls for both glenoid version and bicipital-humeral distance, which are considered to influence the distribution of forces placed on the cuff (p < 0.05). The patients had a decreased glenoid version by an average of 2.3 (-7.1 ± 7.8 vs. -4.8 ± 5.6 ), and a decreased bicipital-humeral distance by an average of 2.7 mm (12.1 ± 3.7 mm vs. 14.8 ± 4.1 mm). No significant differences were found between these groups for humeral head version and the acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles, which might contribute to extrinsic impingement by narrowing the supraspinatus tendon outlet. Differences in glenoid and humeral version may be responsible for RC tears by changing the orientation of the rotator cuff and thus increasing shearing stress. (orig.)

  5. Case report: AVN of the femoral head five year follow-up of the combination of ipsilateral femoral neck and sub-trochanteric fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Feng; Dong, Hanqing; Xu, Yaozeng

    2016-04-01

    To our knowledge, the type of combination of ipsilateral femoral neck and sub-trochanteric fracture is rare. And the long term follow-up is seldom been reported. A 60 year old woman suffered from a traffic accident. We gave her the intramedullary nail treatment for the combination of ipsilateral femoral neck and sub-trochanteric fracture, and the fracture indeed cured after one year and there is no clue of necrosis of the femoral head, but after 5 years, there is an evidence of necrosis of the femoral head. Combination of ipsilateral femoral neck and sub-trochanteric fracture should be kept in mind. Patients with this unusual fracture should be kept under surveillance for longer than might be thought currently to be necessary for there is a possibility of necrosis of the femoral head, even a nondisplaced femoral neck fracture.

  6. Diagnostic performance of MR imaging in the assessment of subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lee-Ren [E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung County (China); Chen, Clement K.H.; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Yi-Luan [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China)

    2009-06-15

    A prospective study was conducted to determine the accuracy of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in correctly identifying subchondral fracture in avascular necrosis of the femoral head without apparent focal collapse on standard radiographs. Spiral computed tomography (CT) with coronal and sagittal reformations and routine MR imaging with spin-echo T1WI and fat-suppressed spin-echo T2WI coronal, axial, and sagittal images were performed in 28 hips of 25 patients (M/F = 20:5; age 16-76 years) suffering from early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head on standard radiographs. The MR images were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a general radiologist in blinded fashion. Using CT as the standard of reference, the accuracy of MR imaging in diagnosing subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis was evaluated. When the diagnoses of the two readers were compared with each other, only 16 of the 28 diagnoses (57.5%) agreed. Seventeen of the 28 MR imaging readings (60.7%) made by the musculoskeletal radiologist and 15 of the 28 (53.5%) made by the general radiologist agreed with those of the CT standard. False-positive diagnosis (that is, diagnosis of fracture when no fracture could be seen on CT) was more common than false-negative diagnosis. The accuracy of routine MR imaging in the evaluation of subchondral fracture is not satisfactory. False-positive diagnosis is not uncommon. Interpretation of routine MR imaging readout should be guarded. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic performance of MR imaging in the assessment of subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Lee-Ren; Chen, Clement K.H.; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Yi-Luan

    2009-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to determine the accuracy of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in correctly identifying subchondral fracture in avascular necrosis of the femoral head without apparent focal collapse on standard radiographs. Spiral computed tomography (CT) with coronal and sagittal reformations and routine MR imaging with spin-echo T1WI and fat-suppressed spin-echo T2WI coronal, axial, and sagittal images were performed in 28 hips of 25 patients (M/F = 20:5; age 16-76 years) suffering from early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head on standard radiographs. The MR images were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a general radiologist in blinded fashion. Using CT as the standard of reference, the accuracy of MR imaging in diagnosing subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis was evaluated. When the diagnoses of the two readers were compared with each other, only 16 of the 28 diagnoses (57.5%) agreed. Seventeen of the 28 MR imaging readings (60.7%) made by the musculoskeletal radiologist and 15 of the 28 (53.5%) made by the general radiologist agreed with those of the CT standard. False-positive diagnosis (that is, diagnosis of fracture when no fracture could be seen on CT) was more common than false-negative diagnosis. The accuracy of routine MR imaging in the evaluation of subchondral fracture is not satisfactory. False-positive diagnosis is not uncommon. Interpretation of routine MR imaging readout should be guarded. (orig.)

  8. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Our aims were to investigate the imaging appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head based on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI, and evaluate its correlation with the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment. We retrospectively evaluated 40 hips in 37 patients with SIF of the femoral head (12 males and 25 females; mean age 55.8 years, range 22-78 years). MRI examinations were performed within 3 months after the onset of hip pain. Using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, we evaluated the hips for the intensity of the subchondral bone (corresponding to the area superior to the low intensity band on T1-weighted images) as well as bone marrow edema, joint effusion, and presence of the band lesion. We then correlated the intensity of the subchondral bone with clinical outcomes. The hips were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images: type 1 (21 hips) showed high intensity, type 2 (eight hips) showed heterogeneous intensity, and type 3 (11 hips) showed low intensity. The mean period between pain onset and MRI examination was significantly longer for type 2 hips than for type 1. Healing rates were 86 % for type 1, 75 % for type 2, and 18 % for type 3. SIF cases were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging performed within 3 months after pain onset. Type 3 SIF tended to be intractable to conservative treatment compared to type 1 and type 2. (orig.)

  9. Reliability and validity in measurement of true humeral retroversion by a three-dimensional cylinder fitting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Masayuki; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Hoshi, Kenji; Yoshioka, Toru; Hamada, Hidetoshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    Humeral retroversion is defined as the orientation of the humeral head relative to the distal humerus. Because none of the previous methods used to measure humeral retroversion strictly follow this definition, values obtained by these techniques vary and may be biased by morphologic variations of the humerus. The purpose of this study was 2-fold: to validate a method to define the axis of the distal humerus with a virtual cylinder and to establish the reliability of 3-dimensional (3D) measurement of humeral retroversion by this cylinder fitting method. Humeral retroversion in 14 baseball players (28 humeri) was measured by the 3D cylinder fitting method. The root mean square error was calculated to compare values obtained by a single tester and by 2 different testers using the embedded coordinate system. To establish the reliability, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and precision (standard error of measurement [SEM]) were calculated. The root mean square errors for the humeral coordinate system were reliability and precision of the 3D measurement of retroversion yielded an intratester ICC of 0.99 (SEM, 1.0°) and intertester ICC of 0.96 (SEM, 2.8°). The error in measurements obtained by a distal humerus cylinder fitting method was small enough not to affect retroversion measurement. The 3D measurement of retroversion by this method provides excellent intratester and intertester reliability. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Radiocapitellar Arthritis in Patients with a Second Radiograph at Least 2 Years after Nonoperative Treatment of an Isolated Radial Head Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Kachooei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study if patients that have a second radiograph 2 or more years after nonoperative treatment of an isolated radial head fracture have radiocapitellar osteoarthritis (RC OA. Methods: We used the database of 3 academic hospitals in one health system from 1988 to 2013 to find patients with isolated radial head fractures (no associated ligament injury or fracture that had a second elbow radiograph after more than 2 years from the initial injury. Of 887 patients with isolated radial head fractures, 54 (6% had an accessible second radiograph for reasons of a second injury (57%, pain (30%, or follow-up visit (13%. Two orthopedic surgeons independently classified the radial head fractures on the initial radiographs using the Broberg and Morrey modified Mason classification, and assessed the development of RC OA on the final radiograph using a binary system (yes/no. Results: Four out of 54 (7.5% patients had RC OA, one with isolated RC arthrosis that seemed related to capitellar cartilage injury, and 3 that presented with pain and had global OA (likely primary osteoarthritis. Conclusion: With the caveat that some percentage of patients may have left our health system during the study period, about 1 in 887 patients (0.1% returns with isolated radiocapitellar arthritis after an isolated radial head fracture, and this may relate to capitellar injury rather than attrition. Patients with isolated radial head fractures can consider post-traumatic radiocapitellar arthritis a negligible risk.

  11. A multi-packer completion to measure hydraulic heads in a lightly fractured area in the Oxfordian limestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, E.; Cruchaudet, M.; Delay, J.; Piedevache, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Andra has designed a new type of borehole completion in order to monitor simultaneously hydraulic heads. This completion is installed in a 420 m deep borehole drilled in the Oxfordian limestone formation. The borehole is located in the South-West of Andra's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in a lightly fractured area. The multi-packer completion is built and installed by Solexperts. This device is composed of five measurement intervals isolated with rubber expandable packers and supported by stainless steel tubing. The packers are inflated with water at a pressure of 10 bars above the water pressure at that depth. Each measurement interval comprises an interval module embedding a pressure / temperature gauge connected to the interval through a filter. The gauges are connected through one cable to a data acquisition system on surface. This completion is removable. The packers can be deflated and the completion can be installed in another borehole. The packers are positioned in the EST461 borehole according to the caliper logging and the results of permeability tests. The hydraulic head measurements are compared with the local rainfall. Interval 1 (the deepest) shows a stable hydraulic head whereas intervals 2 to 5 show hydraulic head variations. The amplitude of the hydraulic head variations are closely related to the interval depth: the deepest the interval, the lowest the hydraulic head variation. Hydraulic heads in intervals 4 and 5 are similar. These intervals are probably connected. (authors)

  12. The anterolateral supra-fibular-head approach for plating posterolateral tibial plateau fractures: A novel surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sun-Jun; Chang, Shi-Min; Zhang, Ying-Qi; Ma, Zhuo; Du, Shou-Chao; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The posterolateral (PL) tibial plateau quadrant is laterally covered by the fibular head and posteriorly covered by a mass of muscle ligament and important neurovascular structures. There are several limitations in exposing and fixing the PL tibial plateau fractures using a posterior approach. The aim of this study is to present a novel anterolateral supra-fibular-head approach for plating PL tibial plateau fractures. Five fresh and ten preserved knee specimens were dissected to measure the following parameters:1) the vertical distance from the apex of the fibular head to the lateral plateau surface, 2) the transverse distance between the PL platform and fibula collateral ligament (FCL), and 3) the tension of the FCL in different knee flexion positions. Clinically, isolated PL quadrant tibial plateau fractures were treated via an anterolateral supra-fibular-head approach and lateral rafting plate fixation. The outcome of the patients was assessed after a short to medium follow-up period. The distance from the apex of the fibular head to the lateral condylar surface was 12.2 ± 1.6 mm on average. With the knee extended and the FCL tensioned, the transverse distance between the PL platform and the FCL was 6.7 ± 1.1 mm. With the knee flexed to 60° and the FCL was in the most relaxed position, the distance increased to 21.1 ± 3.0 mm. Clinically, a series of 7 cases of PL tibial plateau fractures were treated via this anterolateral supra-fibular-head approach. The patient was placed in a lateral decubitus position with the knee flexed to approximately 60 degrees. After the posterior retraction of the FCL, the plate was placed more posteriorly to provide a raft or horizontal belt fixation of the PL tibial plateau fragment. After an average of 14.3 months of follow up, the knee range of motion(ROM) was 121.4° ± 8.8° (range: 105°-135°), the HSS score was 96.7 ± 2.6 (range: 90-100), and the SMFA dysfunction score was 22.4 ± 3.8 (range: 16-28) points. The

  13. A new internal fixation technique for fractures of the proximal humerus--the Bilboquet device: a report on 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doursounian, L; Grimberg, J; Cazeau, C; Jos, E; Touzard, R C

    2000-01-01

    We describe a novel internal fixation device and report on 26 patients (mean age, 70 years) whose proximal humeral fractures were managed with this technique. The 2-part titanium implant consists of a circular staple impacted into the humeral head cancellous bone and a spigoted diaphyseal stem that inserts into the staple "cup." Of the 26 cases reviewed, 16 had 3-part fractures and 10 had 4-part fractures. Mean follow-up was 25.9 months. In the 16 3-part fractures, the mean active forward elevation was 114 degrees and the results were as follows: excellent, 7; good, 5; fair, 3; poor, 1. In the 10 4-part fracture patients, the mean active forward elevation was 101 degrees and the results were as follows: excellent, 2; good, 4; fair, 3; poor, 1. There were 5 cases of avascular necrosis and 1 case of tuberosity nonunion. Only 2 cases needed conversion to hemiarthroplasty. The new technique should simplify the surgery of these fractures and reduce the need for arthroplasty.

  14. Técnica mínimamente invasiva por vía posterior para el tratamiento de fracturas diafisarias del húmero. [Posterior minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humeral shaft fractures

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    Gerardo Gallucci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Comunicar la técnica mínimamente invasiva por vía posterior para la osteosíntesis de las fracturas diafisarias de húmero y evaluar los resultados clínicos y radiológicos de una serie de pacientes. Material y métodos Se evaluaron 11 pacientes (9 hombres y 2 mujeres; edad promedio, 33 años. Diez fracturas eran cerradas y una era expuesta. Se describe prolijamente la técnica quirúrgica. El seguimiento promedio fue de 22 meses. Resultados La flexo-extensión del codo fue de 140º-0°. La movilidad del hombro fue de 170° de elevación, 70° de rotación externa y rotación interna de D9. El dolor según la escala analógica visual: 0 puntos, DASH: 6; puntaje de la Clínica Mayo: 96, test de la UCLA: 33 puntos. Todas las fracturas consolidaron. Se observó una alineación normal de la diáfisis humeral en 3 de los pacientes, 7 tenían alguna deformidad en varo y uno en valgo. Un paciente desarrolló una parálisis radial posoperatoria y otro necesitó la extracción del implante por una infección. Conclusiones La técnica mínimamente invasiva posterior es una buena opción para el tratamiento de fracturas diafisarias de húmero. Es particularmente útil cuando la línea de fractura está cerca de la fosa olecraneana, debido a que, en estos casos, la técnica mínimamente invasiva por vía anterior es difícil de realizar. Los buenos resultados son similares a los reportados con las vías anterior y lateral.

  15. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head in a Pregnant Woman with Pre-existing Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kyoko; Mimura, Tomohiro; Moritani, Suzuko; Kawasaki, Taku; Imai, Shinji; Tsuji, Shunichiro; Kimura, Fuminori; Murakami, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) is a fragility fracture secondary to osteoporosis that leads to collapse of the femoral head with no evidence of osteonecrosis. SIF of the femoral head has been reported in adults of varying ages and both sexes, but it has never been reported to occur in pregnant women. Herein, we describe a 40-year-old primiparous patient with pre-existing anorexia nervosa who developed SIF of the femoral head in the third trimester. At 29 weeks of gestation, the patient complained of sudden pain on walking in both hips. Despite the bed rest, her hip pain increased; consequently, cesarean section was performed at 36 weeks. After delivery, plain radiographs showed that the left femoral head was collapsed. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry indicated that the patient was osteoporotic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her hips showed the findings that were compatible with SIF. Her left hip pain worsened during follow-up, and a radiograph showed progressive collapse of the left femoral head. The patient then underwent left bipolar hip arthroplasty 18 months after delivery, and she was diagnosed with SIF histopathologically. This is the first report of SIF in a pregnant woman that may reflect pregnancy-associated osteoporosis. SIF in pregnancy might be overlooked or misdiagnosed because the MRI findings have several overlaps with those of other hip disorders. Precise diagnosis of SIF in pregnancy may contribute to a better outcome by avoiding early arthroplasty in young women and appropriate evaluation of the osteopenic status of the patient.

  16. Evaluation of the muscle morphology of the obturator externus and piriformis as the predictors of avascular necrosis of the femoral head in acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Lalit; Kumar, Santosh; Batra, Sahil; Gupta, Rajat; Arora, Sumit

    2016-08-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head is a recognised complication of fracture dislocation of the hip joint but is not studied frequently in relation to acetabulum fractures. The aim was to establish the relationship between obturator externus and piriformis muscle morphology in acetabulum fractures and potenital development of AVN of the femoral head. Twenty-five fractures were included in this prospective study and were subjected to radiological assessment and computed tomography of the pelvis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip was performed to assess the morphology of obturator externus and piriformis, and findings were compared intraoperatively (in 15 cases). Serial radiographs were taken at monthly intervals to assess the development of avascular necrosis. The patients with no evidence of AVN on radiographs at 6 months had additional MRI scans to look for such changes. Three patients developed AVN of femoral head and two had complete tears of piriformis and/or obturator externus muscles on the pre-operative MRI with the findings confirmed intraoperatively (p = 0.013). None of the patients without changes of AVN at 6-month follow-up had complete tears of either or both muscles. Of these patients, there was one case each of T-type fracture, isolated posterior wall fracture with hip dislocation, and posterior wall with transverse fracture of the acetabulum. Complete tears of obturator externus and/or piriformis muscles are a strong predictor of future development of AVN of the femoral head.

  17. Anterior approach versus posterior approach for Pipkin I and II femoral head fractures: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-guang; Li, Yao-min; Zhang, Hua-feng; Li, Hui; Li, Zhi-jun

    2016-03-01

    We performed a meta-analysis, pooling the results from controlled clinical trials to compare the efficiency of anterior and posterior surgical approaches to Pipkin I and II fractures of the femoral head. Potential academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, Medline (1966-2015.5), PubMed (1966-2015.5), Embase (1980-2015.5) and ScienceDirect (1966-2015.5) databases. Gray studies were identified from the references of the included literature. Pooling of the data was performed and analyzed by RevMan software, version 5.1. Five case-control trials (CCTs) met the inclusion criteria. There were significant differences in the incidence of heterotopic ossification (HO) between the approaches, but no significant differences were found between the two groups regarding functional outcomes of the hip, general postoperative complications, osteonecrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic arthritis. The present meta-analysis indicated that the posterior approach decreased the risk of heterotopic ossification compared with the anterior approach for the treatment of Pipkin I and II femoral head fractures. No other complications were related to anterior and posterior approaches. Future high-quality randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) are needed to determine the optimal surgical approach and to predict other postoperative complications. III. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteossíntese de fratura diafisária do úmero com placa em ponte: apresentação e descrição da técnica Osteosynthesis of the humeral shaft fractures, with bridge plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Livani

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o método cirúrgico inédito para o tratamento das fraturas da diáfise do úmero, com placa colocada por técnica minimamente invasiva. Após estudos anatômicos, foram identificadas três acessos cirúrgicos pelos quais se pode introduzir uma placa na face anterior do úmero, sem risco de lesão vásculo nervosa. O acesso proximal se faz entre os múculos deltóide, lateralmente, e bíceps braquial, medialmente. Nas fraturas do terço médio o acesso distal é feito entre os músculos bíceps braquial e braquial com a placa introduzida de proximal para distal. Nas fraturas distais do úmero o acesso proximal é o mesmo, mas o acesso distal é o descrito por Kocher, com a placa introduzida de distal para proximal e fixada na face anterior da coluna lateral do úmero. O método aqui apresentado vem sendo utilizado desde junho de 2001, principalmente nos pacientes politraumatizados e polifraturados, por ser rápida, segura e por permitir que o paciente possa ser operado em decúbito dorsal horizontal. Além disso, não há necessidade de intensificador de imagem, ou mesmo aparelho de radiografia. Até o momento não foram observadas complicações vásculo nervosas nos 22 pacientes tratados.The authors describe for the first time ever a minimally invasive plate osteosythesis for the treatment of the humeral shatf fractures. After anatomic human cadaver's studies, it was identified three surgical approaches for plate percutaneous insertion on the anterior surface of the humerus without vascular and nervous injury. The proximal approach is between the biceps and deltoid muscles. The distal approach for medial third fractures is between the biceps brachialis and brachialis muscles. The plate is inserted from the proximal to distal direction. For distal fractures, the proximal approach is the same described by Krocher, with the plate inserted from distal to proximal and fixed on the anterior surface of the lateral column of the

  19. Middle-term follow-up results of Pipkin type IV femoral head fracture patients treated by reconstruction plate and bioabsorbable screws

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    Shan-Xi Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the mid-term curative effects of the treatment of Pipkin type IV femoral head fractures using a reconstruction plate and bioabsorbable screws and provide the evidence for clinical practice. Methods: From February 2010 to September 2014, 21 patients with Pipkin type IV femoral head fractures were treated surgically. There were 13 males and 8 females with an average age of 41.1 years (range, 20–65 years. The causes of the fractures included traffic accidents (13 cases, falls from a height (four cases, heavy lifting injuries (three cases, and sport injury (one case. All patients were followed up with radiography and three-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography and other checks and any complications were actively managed. Closed reduction of fracture-dislocation of the hip was attempted under general anesthesia using the Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Femoral head fractures were treated with internal fixation or excision based on the size of the fracture fragments, whereas acetabular fractures were fixed with a reconstruction plate and screws following anatomic reduction. Results: The incisions healed by primary intention in all patients after surgery, without any infection, deep venous thrombosis, or other complications. All 21 patients were followed up for 36–76 months, with an average follow-up duration of 49 months. Postoperative imaging data showed that all dislocations and fractures were anatomically reduced, and bony union of the fractures was achieved. Heterotopic ossification was found in four patients, post-traumatic osteoarthritis in three, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head in two. At the final follow-up, the assessment of hip joint function according to the Thompson-Epstein scoring scale was excellent in 10 cases, good in six cases, fair in three cases, and poor in two cases. The rate of excellent and good functional outcomes was 76.1%. Conclusion: The mid-term curative effects of a

  20. ULNAR NEURITIS ASSOCIATED WITH GUN STOCK DEFORMITY FOLLOWING SUPRACONDYLAR FRACTURE OF HUMERUS

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    Sunita Morhan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This case report describes a patient who was referred to physiotherapist from a hand surgeon. Among the fractures around the elbow joint, radial head fracture and fracture of distal end of radius are common among adults. The occurrence of Supracondylar fractures are more commonly seen in children when compared to adults. One of the complications of this fracture is malunion resulting in Gun stock deformity. The main Purpose of this case report is to explore, 1. The complication associated with gunstock deformity 2. Chances of iatrogenic nerve injury after manipulation under anesthesia. 3.Long term supervised rehabilitation approach. Case Description: A 40 years old male patient referred to our Physiotherapy department by a hand surgeon. After the initial evaluation, findings revealed limitation in right elbow movement and tingling and numbness sensation in little and half of ring fingers in his right side. This patient underwent ulnar nerve transposition surgery followed by rehabilitation. His physiotherapy session includes electrotherapeutic agents for pain relief, passive mobilization of elbow and strengthening program for his flexors and extensors of elbow for a period of one year. Outcome: The outcome of the long term rehabilitation approach for a patient with ulnar neuropathy secondary to gunstock deformity after ulnar nerve transposition surgery is good. The patients tingling and numbness decreased and the range of elbow movement improved significantly. Discussion: Most common complications of fracture of distal end of humerus include malunion,ischemic contracture and nerve injuries. The relative incidence of iatrogenic nerve injuries associatedwith this fracture has been reported as being 2%-6%. Nerve injuries after Supracondylar humeral fractures occur primarily due to tenting or entrapment of the nerve on the sharp proximal humeral fragment, while iatrogenic injuries occur either during closed manipulation or percutaneous

  1. Avascular necrosis of femoral and/or humeral heads in multiple myeloma: results of a prospective study of patients treated with dexamethasone-based regimens and high-dose chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Giampaolo; Angtuaco, Edgardo; Walker, Ronald C; Dong, Li; Miceli, Marisa H; Zangari, Maurizio; Tricot, Guido; Barlogie, Bart; Anaissie, Elias

    2005-08-01

    To assess the prevalence, time of onset, risk factors, and outcome of avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing antineoplastic therapy. A total of 553 consecutive assessable patients were enrolled onto a treatment protocol consisting of dexamethasone-containing induction chemotherapy, autologous stem-cell transplantation, consolidation chemotherapy, and maintenance with interferon alfa. Patients were randomly assigned to receive thalidomide (269 patients) or no thalidomide (284 patients) throughout the study period. With a median follow-up of 33 months (range, 5 to 114 months), AVN of the femoral head(s) developed in 49 patients (9%). Median time to onset of AVN was 12 months (range, 2 to 41 months). Three risk factors for AVN were identified by multivariate analysis: cumulative dexamethasone dose (odds ratio [OR], 1.028; 95% CI, 1.012 to 1.044; P = .0006 [per 40 mg dexamethasone]), male sex (OR, 0.390; 95% CI, 0.192 to 0.790; P = .009), and younger age (OR, 0.961; 95% CI, 0.934 to 0.991 per year; P = .0122). Thalidomide-treated patients had a prevalence of AVN similar to that of the control group (8% v 10%, respectively; P = .58). AVN-related pain and limited range of motion of the affected joint were present in only nine and four patients, respectively, and four patients underwent hip replacement because of AVN. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography failed to detect abnormal uptake in the AVN-affected bones. AVN is a rare and usually asymptomatic complication during myeloma therapy. Cumulative dexamethasone dose, male sex, and younger age, but not thalidomide, increase the risk of AVN.

  2. Bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head following asynchronous postictal femoral neck fractures: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatadass, K; Avinash, M; Rajasekaran, S

    2018-05-01

    Bilateral avascular necrosis (AVN) following postictal bilateral fracture neck of the femur is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a case of bilateral AVN of the femoral head following an asynchronous bilateral postictal fracture neck of the femur. A 16-year-old autistic boy presented with left hip pain following an episode of seizures and radiographs showed Delbet type II fracture neck of the left femur. This was treated by closed reduction and cancellous screw fixation and skeletal traction for 6 weeks. At 3 months, follow-up radiograph showed union of the fracture, but he had developed segmental AVN with collapse of the head. At 8 months, the patient presented with pain in the right hip following another episode of seizures and radiograph of the pelvis showed a fresh Delbet type II fracture neck of the right femur with established AVN of the left femoral head. He underwent closed reduction and cancellous screw fixation of the right hip and implant exit of the left hip. At the 6-month follow-up after this surgery, his radiograph of the pelvis showed AVN with collapse and extrusion of the femoral head on the right side as well. Literature review shows an increased risk of fracture neck of the femur among epileptics. The incidence of AVN is maximum in Delbet type I, followed by Delbet type II and type III in that order. Although there are no clear guidelines on the management of post-traumatic AVN of the femoral head, the majority have reported that most of them will eventually develop arthritis and will require total hip replacement at a later date. Upon extensive literature search, no case report of bilateral fracture neck of the femur with bilateral AVN was found and hence this case was reported.

  3. Comparative study of the prognosis of an extracorporeal reduction and a closed treatment in mandibular condyle head and/or neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Min; Jang, Yong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Gon; Park, Young-Wook; Rotaru, Horatiu; Baciut, Grigore; Hurubeanu, Lucia

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was a comparison of the prognosis between an extracorporeal reduction technique and closed treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture. The relationship between condylar resorption and several clinical variables was also studied. Seventy-one patients who had a mandibular condyle fracture took part in this study. Thirty-five patients (female: 7, male: 28, age: 30.46 ± 14.27 years) were treated by extracorporeal reduction, and 36 patients (male: 24, female: 12, age: 24.28 ± 9.99 years) were treated using a closed treatment. The presence of complications such as condylar resorption, malocclusion, nerve disorder, and disc displacement was evaluated with panoramic radiographs and clinical examinations 12 months after treatment. The relationships between the complications and other clinical variables were evaluated statistically. The anatomic site and fracture type were closely related to condyle resorption in the bivariate analysis. Condylar head fractures showed significantly higher condyle resorption than condylar neck fractures (P = .023). A complex or compound fracture showed significantly higher condyle resorption compared with a simple fracture (P = .006). Patients who had a complex/compound fracture were 34.366 times more likely to have condyle resorption compared with those who had a simple fracture (P = .002). The patient's age and treatment method were also significant predictors for condyle resorption. Fracture type was the strongest predictor of condylar resorption. Because treatment method and patient age were also related to the prognosis, the optimal treatment for mandibular condylar head and/or neck fractures should be individualized according to the patient's condition. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis using a humeral locking plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Méndez, M P; Gamba, C; Hernández, E; Molano, J; Andrade, J C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the results of tibiotalocalcáneal arthrodesis (TTC) using a humeral locking plate. A retrospective, observational study was conducted between January 2007 and December 2013 in the Hospital Militar Central de Bogotá. The study included patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis diagnosed clinically and radiologically, and who underwent TTC arthrodesis using a humeral locking plate with a minimum follow up of 6 months. The total number patients was 35, of whom 7 (20%) were women and 28 (80%) men, with a mean age 36.3 years (19.77). 74% with post-traumatic arthritis, most of them secondary to gunshot wounds and fragmentation weapons, and neuropathic in 20%. An autogenous graft was used in 13 cases, and 14 cases using both, with a mean consolidation time of 4.37 months. Complications include, delayed union in 3 cases, and surgical site infection in 4. The postoperative functionality (AOFAS) mean was 66.7/100 points, with a score of 2.35 on a visual analogue pain scale. TTC arthrodesis using a humeral locking plate is a suitable option for fixing this type of arthrodesis, with a low rate of complications, and postoperative results that revealed satisfactory improvement in pain and consolidation. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Stability of radial head and neck fractures: a biomechanical study of six fixation constructs with consideration of three locking plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Mueller, Lars P; Krezdorn, David; Appelmann, Philipp; Prommersberger, Karl J; Sternstein, Werner; Rommens, Pol M

    2007-12-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation of radial neck fractures can lead to secondary loss of reduction and nonunion due to insufficient stability. Nevertheless, there are only a few biomechanical studies about the stability achieved by different osteosynthesis constructs. Forty-eight formalin-fixed, human proximal radii were divided into 6 groups according to their bone density (measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry). A 2.7-mm gap osteotomy was performed to simulate an unstable radial neck fracture, which was fixed with 3 nonlocking implants: a 2.4-mm T plate, a 2.4-mm blade plate, and 2.0-mm crossed screws, and 3 locking plates: a 2.0-mm LCP T plate, a 2.0-mm 6x2 grid plate, and a 2.0-mm radial head plate. Implants were tested under axial (N/mm) and torsional (Ncm/ degrees ) loads with a servohydraulic materials testing machine. The radial head plate was significantly stiffer than all other implants under axial as well as under torsional loads, with values of 36 N/mm and 13 Ncm/ degrees . The second-stiffest implant was the blade plate, with values of 20 N/mm and 6 Ncm/ degrees . The weakest implants were the 2.0-mm LCP, with values of 6 N/mm and 2 Ncm/ degrees , and the 2.0-mm crossed screws, with values of 18 N/mm and 2 Ncm/ degrees . The 2.4-mm T plate, with values of 14 N/mm and 4 Ncm/ degrees , and the 2.0-mm grid plate, with values of 8 N/mm and 4 Ncm/ degrees came to lie in the midfield. The 2.0-mm angle-stable plates-depending on their design-allow fixation with comparable or even higher stability than the bulky 2.4-mm nonlocking implants and 2.0-mm crossed screws.

  6. The development and nature of femoral head cam lesions following acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Onur; Foote, Julian; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Datta, Gorav; Bircher, Martin D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of acetabular fracture fixation is to restore joint congruity with restoration of the articular surface. Poor outcomes are seen where this has not been achieved. Letournel reported a collarette osteophyte seen postoperatively in a proportion of patients, which he suggested was an early precursor to the development of osteoarthritis. This is a retrospective study of patients treated at a tertiary referral unit who developed this lesion. The triangular index was measured in 48 of these patients and then correlated with their clinical findings, Oxford Hip Score and the presence of osteoarthritis. Length of follow-up, fracture classification, and joint congruency were also recorded. Results showed a statistically significant relationship between cam lesion size and the development of osteoarthritis (P = 0.008), cam lesion size and length of follow-up (P = 0.01), and between groin pain and postoperative joint congruency (LR = 0.035). These findings suggest that the appearance of a cam lesion is a poor long-term prognostic marker for the development of osteoarthritis in patients with an acetabular fracture.

  7. Risk of maltreatment-related injury: a cross-sectional study of children under five years old admitted to hospital with a head or neck injury or fracture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jonathan Lee

    Full Text Available To determine the predictive value and sensitivity of demographic features and injuries (indicators for maltreatment-related codes in hospital discharge records of children admitted with a head or neck injury or fracture.Population-based, cross sectional study.NHS hospitals in England.Children under five years old admitted acutely to hospital with head or neck injury or fracture.Hospital Episodes Statistics, 1997 to 2009.Maltreatment-related injury admissions, defined by ICD10 codes, were used to calculate for each indicator (demographic feature and/or type of injury: i the predictive value (proportion of injury admissions that were maltreatment-related; ii sensitivity (proportion of all maltreatment-related injury admissions with the indicator.Of 260,294 childhood admissions for fracture or head or neck injury, 3.2% (8,337 were maltreatment-related. With increasing age of the child, the predictive value for maltreatment-related injury declined but sensitivity increased. Half of the maltreatment-related admissions occurred in children older than one year, and 63% occurred in children with head injuries without fractures or intracranial injury.Highly predictive injuries accounted for very few maltreatment-related admissions. Protocols that focus on high-risk injuries may miss the majority of maltreated children.

  8. Reliability and accuracy of digital templating for the humeral component of total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S; Davis, Shane M; Lane, Christianne J; Koonce, Ryan C; Hartman, Andrew P; Ball, Kenneth; Esch, James C

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study evaluated the interobserver reliability and accuracy of pre-operative digital templating for humeral head size, stem size and neck angle for total shoulder arthroplasty. Twenty-five patients underwent a total shoulder arthroplasty with a single prosthesis. Four independent, blinded surgeons (two experienced shoulder surgeons and two PGY-6 fellows) used pre-operative radiographs and templating software to generate templates of the humeral head, stem and neck for each patient. Interobserver reliability was calculated using weighted kappa (κ) analysis. Accuracy was assessed by comparing templates to actual implant sizes. Interobserver reliability was fair to substantial (κ = 0.26 to 0.71) for head size, fair to substantial (κ = 0.39 to 0.72) for stem size and slight to fair (κ = 0.16 to 0.34) for neck angle. Templated head size, stem size and neck angle had accuracies of 53%, 77% and 68% within one size variation, respectively. Experience did not affect accuracy (p = 0.11 to 0.48). Digital templating is not a useful guide for pre-operative surgical planning and should not be used to select a prosthesis.

  9. Ipsilateral dislocation of the radial head associated with fracture of distal end of the radius: a case report and review of the literature

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    Gupta Vinay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Dislocation of the radial head in adults is uncommon. A simultaneous dislocation of the radial head and fracture of the ipsilateral distal end of radius with no other associated injuries is extremely rare. As far as we know, such an injury after an unusual mode of injury has been seldom reported in the English literature. We report such a case without any associated injuries or comorbidity. Closed reduction was performed within two hours after injury and results were satisfactory. Immobilisation was continued for 3 weeks. Gradual mobilisation was started after removal of the plaster under the supervision of a physiotherapist. At 6 months’ follow-up, the patient had no residual pain at the elbow with full flexion & extension. Almost full supination with a restriction of last 10 degrees of pronation was achieved. There was no evidence of instability of the elbow. Key words: Radial heads; Dislocations; Radius fractures

  10. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN FRACTURE MANAGEMENT: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

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    Walter W. Virkus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION: A user-friendly, unique resource for the treatment of fractures designed in a casual questions and answers format which provides basic knowledge, current information and evidence based expert advices enhanced by images and diagrams and supported by ref-erences.PURPOSE: Designing this book the editor has aimed to prepare not only a source of current knowledge and opin-ions by experienced authors in fracture management for decision making in daily practice but also a brief refer-ence and useful educational resource in orthopedic trauma surgery.FEATURES: Three Sections are composed of 49 sub-jects in a form of the answers of frequently asked ques-tions richly illustrated by images and diagrams and in-cluding references at the end of each subject.The Section I is “UPPER EXTREMITIES” including: Neck fracture; Humerus shaft fracture; Management of radial nerve palsy associated with humeral fracture; Clavicle fractures; Elbow fractures in children; Fasciot-omy technic of the forearm; Distal radius fracture; Indica-tions of radial head replacement, Femur and humeral shaft fractures; Treatment of posterolateral elbow dislocation; The Section II is “LOWER EXTREMITIES” including : Femur fractures; Pelvic fractures; Life threatening pelvic fractures; Decision for surgical treatment in pelvic frac-tures; Treatment of anterior fracture of femoral head and hip joint incongruity; Management of a displaced femoral neck fracture in young patient in ER; Elder patients with displaced femoral head fracture; Patella and tibial plateau fractures; Criteria for compartment syndromes in the tibia; Tricks in nailing proximal and distal tibial fractures; Surgical management of distal tibia spiral fracture in middle aged women; Pilon fracture; Management of syn-desmotic screws in adult patient; The management of minimally displaced posterior malleol in three malleolar fractures; Postoperative management of bimalleolar frac-tures; Management of minimally

  11. Influence of stiffness and shape of contact surface on skull fractures and biomechanical metrics of the human head of different population underlateral impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the responses of 5th-percentile female, and 50th- and 95th-percentile male human heads during lateral impacts at different velocities and determine the role of the stiffness and shape of the impacting surface on peak forces and derived skull fracture metrics. A state-of-the-art validated finite element (FE) head model was used to study the influence of different population human heads on skull fracture for lateral impacts. The mass of the FE head model was altered to match the adult size dummies. Numerical simulations of lateral head impacts for 45 cases (15 experiments×3 different population human heads) were performed at velocities ranging from 2.4 to 6.5m/s and three impacting conditions (flat and cylindrical 90D; and flat 40D padding). The entire force-time signals from simulations were compared with experimental mean and upper/lower corridors at each velocity, stiffness (40 and 90 durometer) and shapes (flat and cylindrical) of the impacting surfaces. Average deviation of peak force from the 50th male to 95th male and 5th female were 6.4% and 10.6% considering impacts on the three impactors. These results indicate hierarchy of variables which can be used in injury mitigation efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnesium-Based Absorbable Metal Screws for Intra-Articular Fracture Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a biodegradable magnesium-based alloy (MgYREZr which is currently used to manufacture bioabsorbable compression screws. To date, there are very few studies reporting on a limited number of elective foot surgeries using this innovative implant. This case report describes the application of this screw for osteochondral fracture fixation at the humeral capitulum next to a loose radial head prosthesis, which was revised at the same time. The clinical course was uneventful. Degradation of the magnesium alloy did not interfere with fracture healing. Showing an excellent clinical result and free range-of-motion, the contour of the implant was still visible in a one-year follow-up.

  13. GROSS ANATOMY AND SURGICAL APPROACH TO THE HUMERAL SHAFT IN GIANT ANTEATER (MYRMECOPHAGA TRIDACTYLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesoko, Natália Ferreira; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; Bortolini, Zara; Merlini, Natalie Bertelis; Teixeira, Carlos Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Anteater forelimbs are distinguished morphologically from domestic animals, especially due to their unique movement and their natural habits. A knowledge of the pectoral limb anatomy and the proper surgical approach are fundamental to success in osteosynthesis and other surgeries. This study aimed to describe the muscles and neurovascular structures of the pectoral limb and the surgical approach to the humeral shaft of the giant anteater ( Myrmecophaga tridactyla ). Dissections of the forelimbs of seven cadavers were performed to identify the major muscles and neurovascular structures. Three of these animals' contralateral forearms were used to simulate the surgical approach to the humeral shaft. Some specific characteristics of the muscle morphology were biceps muscle had two heads, triceps muscle had three heads, and there was an olecranon-epicondylar muscle. To expose the shaft of the humerus, it was necessary to incise the superficial pectoral muscle and separate the heads of the biceps muscle. Due to the anatomical characteristics of the humerus, the craniomedial approach was the most appropriate because it accommodated the anatomical peculiarities of the giant anteater.

  14. Throwing in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic: inferences from an analysis of humeral retroversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jill A; Churchill, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    assumption that if throwing-based projectile weaponry was used by early modern Europeans but not Neandertals, Upper Paleolithic samples should be similar to recent human groups engaged in habitual throwing in the degree of humeral retroversion in the dominant limb and in bilateral asymmetry in this feature. Neandertals on the other hand, would not be expected to show marked asymmetry in humeral retroversion. Consistent with other studies, Neandertals exhibit increased retroversion angles (decreased humeral torsion or a more posteriorly oriented humeral head) relative to most modern human samples, although this appears more likely related to body form and overall activity levels than to habitual throwing. Although Neandertals with bilaterally preserved humeri sufficient for measurement are rare (consisting of only two males and one female), levels of bilateral asymmetry in humeral retroversion are low, suggesting a lack of regular throwing. While patterning across fossil and comparative samples in levels of humeral retroversion was not clear cut, males of both the middle and late Upper Paleolithic demonstrate a high level of bilateral asymmetry, comparable to or in excess of that seen in samples of throwing athletes. This may indicate habitual use of throwing-based projectile weaponry by middle Upper Paleolithic times. Small sample sizes and relatively great variance in the fossil samples makes these results, however, suggestive rather than conclusive.

  15. Logistic regression analysis of factors associated with avascular necrosis of the femoral head following femoral neck fractures in middle-aged and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zi-Sheng; Gao, You-Shui; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Cheng-Hua

    2013-03-01

    Risk factors for femoral neck fracture-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head have not been elucidated clearly in middle-aged and elderly patients. Moreover, the high incidence of screw removal in China and its effect on the fate of the involved femoral head require statistical methods to reflect their intrinsic relationship. Ninety-nine patients older than 45 years with femoral neck fracture were treated by internal fixation between May 1999 and April 2004. Descriptive analysis, interaction analysis between associated factors, single factor logistic regression, multivariate logistic regression, and detailed interaction analysis were employed to explore potential relationships among associated factors. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was found in 15 cases (15.2 %). Age × the status of implants (removal vs. maintenance) and gender × the timing of reduction were interactive according to two-factor interactive analysis. Age, the displacement of fractures, the quality of reduction, and the status of implants were found to be significant factors in single factor logistic regression analysis. Age, age × the status of implants, and the quality of reduction were found to be significant factors in multivariate logistic regression analysis. In fine interaction analysis after multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was the most important risk factor for avascular necrosis in 56-to-85-year-old patients, with a risk ratio of 26.00 (95 % CI = 3.076-219.747). The middle-aged and elderly have less incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head following femoral neck fractures treated by cannulated screws. The removal of cannulated screws can induce a significantly high incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head in elderly patients, while a high-quality reduction is helpful to reduce avascular necrosis.

  16. Fixation of fractures of the condylar head of the mandible with a new magnesium-alloy biodegradable cannulated headless bone screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, H; Franke, A; McLeod, N M H; Lauer, G; Nowak, A

    2017-07-01

    It is difficult to fix fractures of the condylar head of the mandible. Several techniques have been described which show satisfactory outcomes, but stability can be questionable, and some can cause irritation of the soft tissues. We describe a technique and first results of treating such fractures with resorbable magnesium-based headless bone screws (Magnezix ® 2.7mm CS; Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany). Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk stratification for avascular necrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures by post-operative SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Won; Oh, Min Young; Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Jin Soo; Chang, Jae Suk; Ryu, Jin Sook [Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Wan [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a major complication after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and determines the functional prognosis. We investigated postoperative bone single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for assessing the risk of femoral head AVN. We retrospectively reviewed 53 consecutive patients who underwent bone SPECT/CT within 2 weeks of internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and follow-up serial hip radiographs over at least 12 months. Nine patients developed femoral head AVN. In 15 patients who showed normal uptake on immediate postoperative SPECT/CT, no AVN occurred, whereas 9 of 38 patients who showed cold defects of the femoral head later developed AVN. The negative predictive value of immediate postoperative SPECT/CT for AVN was 100 %, whereas the positive predictive value was 24 %. Among 38 patients with cold defects, 1 developed AVN 3 months postoperatively. A follow-up bone SPECT/CT was performed in the other 37 patients at 2–10 months postoperatively. The follow-up bone SPECT/CT revealed completely normalized femoral head uptake in 27, partially normalized uptake in 8, and persistent cold defects in 2 patients. AVN developed in 3.7 % (1/27), 62.5 % (5/8), and 100 % (2/2) of each group, respectively. According to the time point of imaging, radiotracer uptake patterns of the femoral head on postoperative bone SPECT/CT indicate the risk of AVN after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures differently. Postoperative bone SPECT/CT may help orthopedic surgeons determine the appropriate follow-up of these patients.

  18. Risk stratification for avascular necrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures by post-operative SPECT/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Won; Oh, Min Young; Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Jin Soo; Chang, Jae Suk; Ryu, Jin Sook; Kim, Ji Wan

    2017-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a major complication after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and determines the functional prognosis. We investigated postoperative bone single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for assessing the risk of femoral head AVN. We retrospectively reviewed 53 consecutive patients who underwent bone SPECT/CT within 2 weeks of internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and follow-up serial hip radiographs over at least 12 months. Nine patients developed femoral head AVN. In 15 patients who showed normal uptake on immediate postoperative SPECT/CT, no AVN occurred, whereas 9 of 38 patients who showed cold defects of the femoral head later developed AVN. The negative predictive value of immediate postoperative SPECT/CT for AVN was 100 %, whereas the positive predictive value was 24 %. Among 38 patients with cold defects, 1 developed AVN 3 months postoperatively. A follow-up bone SPECT/CT was performed in the other 37 patients at 2–10 months postoperatively. The follow-up bone SPECT/CT revealed completely normalized femoral head uptake in 27, partially normalized uptake in 8, and persistent cold defects in 2 patients. AVN developed in 3.7 % (1/27), 62.5 % (5/8), and 100 % (2/2) of each group, respectively. According to the time point of imaging, radiotracer uptake patterns of the femoral head on postoperative bone SPECT/CT indicate the risk of AVN after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures differently. Postoperative bone SPECT/CT may help orthopedic surgeons determine the appropriate follow-up of these patients

  19. Intramedullary fixation of proximal humerus fractures: do locking bolts endanger the axillary nerve or the ascending branch of the anterior circumflex artery? A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermon An

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal humerus fractures are one of the most common fractures. Intramedullary locked nailing is becoming a popular alternative treatment, especially for easier fracture patterns. Although axillary nerve injury has been reported, no study has compared the safety of the proximal locking options relative to the axillary nerve and the ascending branch of the anterior circumflex artery. Method Six different commercially available proximal humeral nails were implanted in 30 shoulders of 18 cadavers. After fluoroscopically guided implantation the shoulders were carefully dissected and the distance between the locking screws, the axillary nerve and the ascending branch of the anterior circumflex artery was measured. Results The course of the axillary nerve varies. A mean distance of 55.8 mm (SD = 5.3 between the lateral edge of the acromions and the axillary nerve at the middle of the humerus in a neutrally rotated position was observed. The minimum distance was 43.4 mm, the maximum 63.9 mm. Bent nails with oblique head interlocking bolts appeared to be the most dangerous in relation to the axillary nerve. The two designs featuring such a bend and oblique bolt showed a mean distance of the locking screw to the axillary nerve of 1 mm and 2.7 mm respectively Sirus (Zimmer® and (Stryker® T2 PHN (Proximal Humeral Nail. Regarding the ascending branch of the anterior circumflex artery, there was no difference between the nails which have an anteroposterior locking option. Conclusion It is of great importance for surgeons treating proximal humerus fractures to understand the relative risk of any procedure they perform. Since the designs of different nailing systems risk damaging the axillary nerve and ascending branch, blunt dissection, the use of protection sleeves during drilling and screw insertion, and individual risk evaluation prior to the use of a proximal humeral nail are advocated.

  20. Ball-thrower's fracture of the humerus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan, Eric B.; Bennett, D. Lee; El-Khoury, Georges Y.; Ohashi, Kenjirou

    2004-01-01

    A relatively rare case of ball-thrower's fracture of the humerus is presented. Severe muscular action is an uncommon cause of humeral fractures but has been well documented in the orthopedic literature. To our knowledge, this fracture has not been described in the radiology literature, and awareness of this entity could preclude further unnecessary workup. The mechanism of injury and its typical radiographic appearance is described. (orig.)

  1. Bilateral humeral lengthening in achondroplasia with unilateral external fixators: is it safe and does it improve daily life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, H I; Kocaoglu, M; Sen, C; Eralp, L; Batibay, S G; Bilsel, K

    2015-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed in 18 patients with achondroplasia, who underwent bilateral humeral lengthening between 2001 and 2013, using monorail external fixators. The mean age was ten years (six to 15) and the mean follow-up was 40 months (12 to 104). The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score fell from 32.3 (20 to 40) pre-operatively to 9.4 (6 to 14) post-operatively (p = 0.037). A mean lengthening of 60% (40% to 95%) was required to reach the goal of independent perineal hygiene. One patient developed early consolidation, and fractures occurred in the regenerate bone of four humeri in three patients. There were three transient radial nerve palsies. Humeral lengthening increases the independence of people with achondroplasia and is not just a cosmetic procedure. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Changing incidence and residual lifetime risk of common osteoporosis-related fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Schwarz, Peter; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    1735 fractures of the distal radius, 747 fractures of the proximal humerus, 878 cervical and 635 trochanteric hip fractures were included. In men 273 cervical and 232 trochanteric hip fractures were included. The fractures were registered during the period 1976 to 1984 and changes in age.......05) during the observation period, while no significant decrease was found in the incidence of trochanteric fractures. No significant changes in incidence were observed in women with radial or humeral fractures, or in men with hip fractures. A women 60 years old with a life expectancy of 81 years had......Changes in incidence and lifetime risk of fractures are of major importance in the epidemiology of osteoporosis. We focused on hip fractures in women and men and on radial and humeral fractures in women. The study subjects comprised 4500 women and men 20 years old or more with fractures. In women...

  3. THE METHOD OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HUMERAL EPICONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Korolev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Method of treatment of epicondylitis of humeral bone is descripted. This metod is proposited to use if conservative therapy was not effective. Experience of use this method show excellent results.

  4. Expandable Total Humeral Replacement in a Child with Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Henderson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case. A right-handed 8-year-old female patient presented with a conventional, high-grade osteosarcoma involving her right humerus; through-shoulder amputation was recommended. After consultation, total humerus resection with expandable, total humeral endoprosthesis reconstruction was performed with a sleeve to encourage soft-tissue ingrowth. At three-year follow-up she has received one lengthening procedure and her functional scores are excellent. Conclusion. Total humeral resection and replacement in the pediatric population are rare and although early reports of expandable total humeral endoprosthesis outcomes demonstrate high failure rates, this patient’s success indicates that expandable total humeral replacement is a viable option.

  5. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  6. The effect of inferomedial screw on postoperative shoulder function and mechanical alignment in proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Murat; Desteli, Engin Eren; İmren, Yunus; Üztürk, Ali; Kılıç, Mesut; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of locking plate fixation with or without inferomedial screw (IMS) in surgically treated proximal humerus fractures. Thirty-six patients with displaced proximal humerus fractures from two centers were operated using locking plate. All of the fractures were classified according to the Neer classification. In 18 of the cases, an additional IMS running through the medial curvature of the surgical neck was used. There was no significant difference among both groups in terms of height, gender, weight, and mechanism of injury. The fractures were evaluated according to the radiographic and functional findings during follow-up period of 14 months in average (range 8-32 months). At the end of first year, shoulder radiographs were received and shoulder examinations were performed using ASES scores. Humeral head-shaft angles were measured by true AP projections. Head-shaft angle measurements were categorized as varus if 145. Mean time for fracture healing was 18 weeks. Complete union was achieved in 35 patients by the end of 6 months. In one of the 18 displaced proximal humerus fractures of IMS (+) group, the head-shaft angle was measured to be <125, whereas six patients had varus deviation in IMS (-) group at follow-up (p < 0.05). Mean ASES scores of IMS (+) group and IMS (-) group were 58.21 ± 5.82 and 38.61 ± 3.44, respectively (p < 0.001). Use of inferomedial screw running through the medial curvature of surgical neck prevents varus deformity and improves functional outcome after surgical treatment for proximal humerus fractures.

  7. Proximal femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lawrence X

    2002-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region which is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must be able to accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to these injuries produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  8. Short-term effect of zoledronic acid upon fracture resistance of the mandibular condyle and femoral head in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; López-Jornet, Pía; Vicente-Hernández, Ascensión

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects in terms of resistance to fracture of the mandibular condyle and femoral head following different doses of zoledronic acid in an animal model. A total of 80 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in a prospective randomized study. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of 20 rats each. Group 1 (control) received sterile saline solution, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received a accumulated dose of 0.2 mg, 0.4 mg and 0.6 mg of zoledronic acid, respectively. The animals were sacrificed 28 days after the last dose, and the right hemimandible and the right femur were removed. The fracture strength was measured (in Newtons) with a universal test machine using a 1 kN load connected to a metal rod with one end angled at 30 degrees. The cross-head speed was 1 mm/min. Later, the specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope with backscattered electron imaging (SEM-BSE). At last, chemical analysis and elemental mapping of the mineral bone composition were generated using a microanalytical system based on energy-dispersive and X-ray spectrometry (EDX). A total of 160 fracture tests were performed. The fracture resistance increased in mandible and femur with a higher accumulated dose of zoledronic acid. Statistically significant differences were recorded versus the controls with all the studies groups. The chemical analysis in mandible showed a significantly increased of calcium and phosphorous to compare the control with all of the study groups; however, in femur no statistically significant differences between the four study groups were observed. The administration of bisphosphonates increases the fracture resistance in mandible and femur.

  9. Fractures of the proximal humerus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal humerus have been diagnosed and managed since the earliest known surgical texts. For more than four millennia the preferred treatment was forceful traction, closed reduction, and immobilization with linen soaked in combinations of oil, honey, alum, wine, or cerate......, classification of proximal humeral fractures remains a challenge for the conduct, reporting, and interpretation of clinical trials. The evidence for the benefits of surgery in complex fractures of the proximal humerus is weak. In three systematic reviews I studied the outcome after locking plate osteosynthesis...

  10. Imaging and histopathological evaluation of a cystlike formation in subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Fukushima, Mana; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2014-01-01

    In the majority of subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) of the femoral head, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging shows an irregular, serpiginous, low-intensity band that is convex to the articular surface. We report a case of a cystlike formation in SIF of the femoral head in an elderly woman. A 71-year-old woman reported right hip pain without any history of antecedent trauma. The initial radiograph showed a slight narrowing of the joint space in the right hip. The patient was treated with conservative therapy for 2 months. Radiographs obtained 3 months after the onset of pain showed non-progressive joint-space narrowing. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images obtained 2 months after pain onset revealed a round, cystlike, low-intensity area just beneath the articular cartilage. The patient underwent total hip arthroplasty. Histopathological examination showed fracture callus and granulation tissue in the subchondral area, surrounded by vascular-rich granulation tissue and fibrous tissue, which corresponded to the round, low-intensity band observed on the T1-weighted image. This case was a rare SIF of the femoral head which had a cystlike formation with a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a very high signal intensity on STIR sequences in the superolateral portion of the femoral head, surrounded by a pattern of edema in the bone marrow. To our knowledge, no similar cases were cited in the literature. It is important for surgeons to keep in mind that sometimes SIFs of the femoral head can appear as a round cystlike formation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors of avascular necrosis of the femoral head and fixation failure in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures over the age of 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyung Keun; Choi, Ho June; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to identify the risk factors for avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) and fixation failure (FF) after screw osteosynthesis in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures. We conducted a retrospective study of 308 patients (mean age, 72.5 years, range, 50-97 years), with a mean follow-up of 21.4 months (range, 12-64 months). The risk for failure in treatment (FIT) associated with patient- and fracture-related factors was evaluated by logistic regression analyses. FIT was identified in 32 cases (10.3%): 22 cases (7.1%) of AVN and 10 cases (3.2%) of FF. Initial valgus tilt>15° (p=0.023), posterior tilt>15° (p=0.012), and screw sliding distance (p=0.037) were significantly associated with FIT. FIT occurred in 7 patients (5.2%) with B1.2.1 fractures and 17 patients (48.6%) with B1.1.2 fractures (p15° (B1.1.2) compared to patients with 15° are reasonable candidates for primary arthroplasty due to high risk of FIT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of high total cholesterol and high low-density lipoprotein on avascular necrosis of the femoral head in low-energy femoral neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianshang; Zhan, Ke; Zhang, Lili; Zeng, Dan; Yu, Weiguang; Zhang, Xinchao; Zhao, Mingdong; Lai, Zhicheng; Chen, Runzhen

    2017-02-17

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) typically constitutes 5 to 15% of all complications of low-energy femoral neck fractures, and due to an increasingly ageing population and a rising prevalence of femoral neck fractures, the number of patients who develop AVNFH is increasing. However, there is no consensus regarding the relationship between blood lipid abnormalities and postoperative AVNFH. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the relationship between blood lipid abnormalities and AVNFH following the femoral neck fracture operation among an elderly population. A retrospective, comparative study was performed at our institution. Between June 2005 and November 2009, 653 elderly patients (653 hips) with low-energy femoral neck fractures underwent closed reduction and internal fixation with cancellous screws (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee). Follow-up occurred at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after surgery. Logistic multi-factor regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors of AVNFH and to determine the effect of blood lipid levels on AVNFH development. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were predetermined to focus on isolated freshly closed femoral neck fractures in the elderly population. The primary outcome was the blood lipid levels. The secondary outcome was the logistic multi-factor regression analysis. A total of 325 elderly patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures (AVNFH, n = 160; control, n = 165) were assessed. In the AVNFH group, the average TC, TG, LDL, and Apo-B values were 7.11 ± 3.16 mmol/L, 2.15 ± 0.89 mmol/L, 4.49 ± 1.38 mmol/L, and 79.69 ± 17.29 mg/dL, respectively; all of which were significantly higher than the values in the control group. Logistic multi-factor regression analysis showed that both TC and LDL were the independent factors influencing the postoperative AVNFH within femoral neck fractures. This evidence indicates that AVNFH was significantly

  13. Infant skull fracture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  14. Neglected Distal Humeral Epiphyseal Injury - Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Pankaj Kumar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Distal humeral epiphyseal separation is an uncommon injury in children, which can be missed or misdiagnosed at initial presentation. Awareness of this injury and appropriate radiological assessment helps in proper management. Neglected cases because of inappropriate diagnosis can result in cubitus varus deformity. Full range of movements of elbow can be achieved if properly diagnosed and managed. We present two cases of neglected distal humeral epiphyseal injury in children that resulted in cubitus varus deformity in one case. Full range of movements was achieved in both cases after proper management.

  15. The application of PRP combined with TCP in repairing avascular necrosis of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-L; Wang, Y-M; Chu, K; Wang, Z-H; Liu, Y-H; Jiang, L-H; Chen, X; Zhou, Z-Y; Yin, G

    2018-02-01

    In view of the high occurrence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) after femoral neck fracture and the difficulties in the treatment, our work aimed to explore the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) on the repair of ANFH after femoral neck fracture and to provide reference for clinical treatment. Thirty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control group, TCP group, and PRP+TCP group. The rabbit ANFH model was established and femoral head tissues were collected. HE staining was used for histological observation. Image analysis and statistical analysis were used to calculate the New Bone Area fraction (NBA %). The levels of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a in serum were detected by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). The new bone area of TCP group was significantly lower than that of PRP+TCP group (pPRP+TCP groups (pPRP+TCP group was higher than that in TCP group. TCP and PRP+TCP can both significantly reduce the content of IL-6 and TNF-a (pPRP+TCP group compared with the TCP group at 8 weeks after injection. PRP combined with TCP, which can promote new bone formation and inhibit inflammatory response, showed higher efficiency in repairing ANFH than internal fixation alone.

  16. Assessment of femoral head vascularity by technetium-99m antimony colloid bone marrow imaging within 24 hours of subcapital fracture: a prospective study of 30 patients followed for 2 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The rationale of preoperative imaging of bone marrow was based upon the demonstration of histochemical abnormalities secondary to ischaemia which first become apparent in marrow cells of the femoral head following interruption of the blood supply by subcapital fracture. These marrow abnormalities predate changes in bone cells by several days and may explain the absence of abnormality on conventional bone scans performed on avascular femoral heads within 24 hours of subcapital fracture. The use of an endoprosthesis for fresh femoral neck fractures in unselected patients results in high mortality, high infection rate, high incidence of thromboembolic disease and poor long term results. The successful prediction of avascular necrosis in 92% of 28 patients with active bone marrow in the femoral head in this study is sufficiently accurate to allow appropriate selection of patients for internal fixation or primary prosthetic replacement on the basis of preoperative Tc-99m antimony colloid imaging

  17. Comparison of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of long bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailian; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Gu, Shao; Jia, Fu; Li, Qunhui; Wang, Daxing; Gan, Xuewen; Liu, Wei

    2014-07-21

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical effects of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and interlocking intramedullary nail (IIN) for long bone fractures. A retrospective study was performed in 1,704 patients who suffered bone fractures and underwent RSIN or IIN operation in our hospital between March 1999 and March 2013, including 494 with femoral fractures, 572 with humeral fractures, and 638 with tibial fractures. Among them, 634 patients were followed up for more than 1 year. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, healing rate, and the excellent and good rate of functional recovery were compared between two groups. Compared with IIN group, RSIN group exhibited significantly shorter operative time and less intraoperative blood loss no matter for humeral, femoral, or tibial fractures (all p fractures (both p fracture. In IIN group, nail breakage or loosening occurred in 7 patients with femoral fractures and 16 patients with tibial fractures, radial nerve injury was observed in 8 patients with humeral fractures, and incision infection was present in 2 patients with humeral fractures and 1 patient with femoral fracture. The complication rate of IIN group was significantly higher than that of RSIN group (p knee, and ankle joint functional recovery between RSIN group and IIN group. RSIN may be a reliable and practical alternative method for the treatment of long bone fractures.

  18. Neglected distal humeral epiphyseal injury - Two Case Reports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present two cases of neglected distal humeral epiphyseal injury in children that resulted in cubitus varus deformity in one case. Full range of movements was achieved in both cases after proper management. Keywords: Neglected epiphyseal injury; Cubitus varus; Diagnosis; Treatment Internet Journal of Medical Update ...

  19. Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior circumflex humeral artery diagnosed by sonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Bodil; Court-Payen, Michel; Larsen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    with a painless, nonpulsatile mass in the posterior shoulder region and was suspected of a malignant soft-tissue tumor. Sonography, including power Doppler imaging, demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm, with the intralesional blood-filled cavity developed from the posterior circumflex humeral artery. The diagnosis...

  20. A Limb-Threatening Long Arterial Dissection Caused by Humerus Neck Fracture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnaz R

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humerus fracture is a common arm trauma and rarely occurs with vascular injury which however is a serious complication. In this case report, we present a long segment dissection of the axillary and brachial arteries as a rare complication due to fragmented proximal humerus fracture and shoulder dislocation. An 80-year old female patient was seen at the emergency department. Radiograph examination has revealed a fragmented proximal humerus fracture besides dislocation of the head of humerus towards the axillary area. On vascular examination, acute arterial occlusion such as absence of radial and ulnar pulses were observed in her left hand. The patient was immediately taken to the operating room. The dissection included the entire segment approximately 20cm between the distal subclavian artery and the distal brachial artery. This injured segment was removed and a 6mm Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE graft with rings was interpositoned between subclavian and brachial arteries. This case is a rarity because of such a significant complication after a small injury. Axillary artery injuries caused by humeral neck fractures are rare but should not be missed by the physician.

  1. Bilateral first rib anomalous articulations with pseudarthroses mimicking healing fractures in an infant with abusive head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale-Styles, Melissa A; Crowder, Christian M; Fridie, Jeannette; Milla, Sarah S

    2014-11-01

    Bilateral symmetric bone nodules were observed in the anterolateral first ribs of an infant with shaking injuries at autopsy. The location prompted diagnostic considerations of healing fractures versus anomalous articulations with pseudarthroses. The forensic pathologist worked with forensic anthropologists and pediatric radiologists to evaluate autopsy findings and compare premortem and postmortem X-rays. Gross examination of the bones by the pathologist and anthropologists confirmed bilateral, callus-like bone nodules in first-rib locations associated with pseudarthroses. Histologic examination of one of the bones further showed features most consistent with pseudarthrosis, not a healing fracture. Radiologists then compared multiple premortem and postmortem radiographs that showed no remodeling of the bone over a 2-week interval between the time of injury and death, which would be unexpected for a healing fracture in an infant. This multidisciplinary approach resulted in the appropriate diagnosis of pseudarthroses due to anomalous articulations, an uncommon finding in forensic pathology. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Bony defects in chronic anterior posttraumatic dislocation of the shoulder: Is there a correlation between humeral and glenoidal lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciais, Grégoire; Klouche, Shahnaz; Fournier, Alexandre; Rousseau, Benoit; Bauer, Thomas; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of combined humeral and glenoid defects varies between 79 and 84 % in case of chronic posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between humeral and glenoid defects based on quantitative radiological criteria. A retrospective study was performed between 2000 and 2011 including patients who underwent primary surgical shoulder stabilization for chronic posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability, with bone defects in both the glenoid and humerus and a healthy contralateral shoulder. The following measurements were taken: D/R ratio (Hill-Sachs lesion depth/humeral head radius) on an AP X-ray in internal rotation and the D1/D2 ratio [diameter of the involved glenoid articular surfaces (D1)/the healthy one (D2)] on a comparative Bernageau glenoid profile view. Measurements were taken by two observers. Correlations were determined by the Spearman correlation coefficients (r), Bland and Altman diagrams, and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). A sample size calculation was done. Thirty patients were included, 25 men/5 women, mean age 29.8 ± 11.2 years. The mean D/R was 23 ± 12 % for observer 1 and 23 ± 10 % for observer 2. The mean D1/D2 was 95 ± 4 % for observer 1 and 94 ± 6 % for observer 2. No significant correlation was found between humeral and glenoid bone defects by observer 1 (r = 0.23, p = 0.22) or observer 2 (r = 0.05, p = 0.78). Agreement of the observers for the D/R ratio was excellent (ICC = 0.89 ± 0.04, p < 0.00001) and good for the D1/D2 ratio (ICC = 0.54 ± 0.14, p = 0.006). Humeral and glenoid bone defects were not correlated. Inter-observer reliability was excellent for the D/R ratio and good for the D1/D2 ratio. Nonconsecutive Patients, Diagnostic Study, Level III.

  3. Estudo do tratamento das fraturas da cabeça do fêmur Study of the treatment of femoral head fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pereira Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer diretrizes para o tratamento das fraturas da cabeça femoral e determinar a melhor via de acesso nos casos tratados cirurgicamente. MÉTODOS: Avaliamos os resultados clínicos e radiográficos de 13 pacientes (13 fraturas tratados cirurgicamente entre maio de 1986 e julho de 1996 no Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo (SCMSP, Pavilhão "Fernandinho Simonsen". RESULTADOS: Entre as seis fraturas Pipkin 1, cinco foram submetidas à ressecção do fragmento, o que nos levou a quatro resultados excelentes e um bom, sendo este com fixação do fragmento. Três pacientes apresentaram fraturas Pipkin 2 e todas foram fixadas, observados dois excelentes resultados e um regular. Dois pacientes Pipkin 3 foram submetidos à artroplastia primária. Dos dois pacientes com lesão Pipkin 4, um foi tratado com redução e osteossíntese da fratura do acetábulo, sem abordar o fragmento da cabeça que estava bem reduzido e resultou em artrose precoce, e o outro foi submetido à artroplastia total como tratamento primário. CONCLUSÃO: Concluímos após comparação da revisão da literatura com a análise dos nossos casos, que o tratamento da fratura da cabeça femoral deve ser cirúrgico e a escolha da via de acesso vai depender do tipo de fratura.OBJECTIVE: To establish guidelines for the treatment of femoral head fractures and to determine the best form of access in cases treated surgically. METHODS: We evaluated the clinical and radiological results of 13 patients (13 fractures treated surgically, between May 1986 and July 1996, at the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology at the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo (SCMSP, Fernandinho Simonsen Pavillion. RESULTS: Among six Pipkin 1 fractures, five had resection of the fragment, resulting in four excellent and one good result. The good result had fixation of the fragment. All three Pipkin 2 fractures had fixation of the fragment

  4. Disorders of the long head of the biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, N; Wright, R; Yamaguchi, K

    1999-01-01

    Without a clear understanding of the functional role of the biceps tendon, treatment recommendations have been a subject of controversy. An objective review of the available information would suggest that some humeral head stability may be imparted through the tendon. However, the magnitude of this function is likely to be small and possibly insignificant. In contrast, the symptomatic significance of the long head of the biceps is less controversial, and it has become increasingly recognized as an important source of persistent shoulder pain when not specifically addressed. When present, persistent pain from the long head of the biceps is likely to have more negative functional consequences than loss of the tendon itself. Given these concerns, evaluation and treatment of patients with long head of the biceps disorders should be individualized, based on the likelihood that biceps-related pain will resolve. Although not universally accepted, we recommend tenodesis of the long head of the biceps in those cases in which there are either chronic inflammatory or structural changes, which would make it unlikely that the pain would resolve. These clinical situations in which tenodesis would be required include greater than 25% partial thickness tearing of the tendon, chronic atrophic changes of the tendon, any luxation of the biceps tendon from the bicipital groove, any disruption of associated bony or ligamentous anatomy of the bicipital groove that would make autotenodesis likely (i.e., 4-part fracture), and any significant reduction or atrophy of the size of the tendon that is more than 25% of the normal tendon width. Relative indications for biceps tenodesis also include biceps disease in the context of a failed decompression for rotator cuff tendinitis. It should be emphasized that routine tenodesis is not recommended during operative treatment for the rotator cuff. Rather, we avoid tenodesis whenever it is believed that inflammatory changes to the biceps tendon are

  5. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    ; they will show a sagittally oriented fracture line at the roof of the acetabulum on axial CT. Lastly, wall fractures should be evaluated with axial CT images. This is because wall fractures have an obliquely oriented fracture line on axial CT images at the roof of the acetabulum, as opposed to the coronal and sagittal fracture lines described with column and transverse fractures, respectively.2 Fractures are organized using the Letournel Classification based on whether the fracture site lies in the anterior or posterior walls and columns of bone. After diagnosis, early surgical intervention is critical in achieving good results.3 The majority of acetabular fractures are repaired by open reduction and internal fixation. Patients with significant osteopenia or communition benefit most from total hip arthroplasty. However, due to the complex nature of these fractures, there is potential for poor outcome regardless of the injury pattern due to contributing factors such as imperfect reduction, osteochondral defects in the acetabulum or femoral head, osteoarthritis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, sciatic nerve injury and infection.4

  6. Significance of the Lateral Humeral Line for Evaluating Radiocapitellar Alignment in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souder, Christopher D; Roocroft, Joanna H; Edmonds, Eric W

    The radiocapitellar line (RCL) was originally described for evaluation of the alignment of the RC joint on lateral images of the elbow. Although, many authors have translated the utilization of RCL into coronal imaging, previous studies have not been performed to confirm validity. The purpose of this paper was to identify an accurate way of evaluating pediatric RC alignment in the coronal plane. Thirty-seven anteroposterior (AP) radiographs of 37 children were evaluated to determine the position of the RC joint in the coronal plane. All had acceptable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies available for comparison. The lateral humeral line (LHL), consisting of a line along the lateral edge of the ossified condyle of the distal humerus parallel to the axis of the distal humeral shaft, was studied as it related to the lateral cortex of the radial neck. Three children with a confirmed diagnosis of a Bado III, lateral displaced radius, Monteggia fracture were also evaluated. The LHL passed along the edge of or lateral to the radial neck on all AP radiographs and all MRI studies. The RCL failed to intersect the capitellum on 2 AP radiographs. On MRI, the RCL also passed lateral to the capitellar ossification center in 3 patients. In addition, the RCL was seen passing through the capitellum at a mean of the lateral 30% (range, 0% to 64%) on AP radiographs and 26% (range, 0% to 48%) on MRI. For all 3 children with a Bado III Monteggia fracture, the LHL crossed the radial neck and the RCL did not intersect the capitellum. The RCL can fail to intersect the capitellar ossification center on AP radiographs and MRI in pediatric elbows without injury. The LHL consistently lies lateral to the radial neck in normal elbows and medial to the lateral aspect of the radial neck on all Bado III fracture-dislocations. It, therefore, can be used as an adjunct in evaluating the RC joint on AP imaging. The RCL most commonly intersects the lateral one third of the ossification center on

  7. Interest in the glenoid hull method for analyzing humeral subluxation in primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacida, Soufyane; Gauci, Marc-Olivier; Coulet, Bertrand; Lazerges, Cyril; Cyteval, Catherine; Boileau, Pascal; Chammas, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Posterior humeral subluxation is the main cause of failure of total shoulder arthroplasty. We aimed to compare humeral head subluxation in various reference planes and to search for a correlation with retroversion, inclination, and glenoid wear. We included 109 computed tomography scans of primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and 97 of shoulder problems unrelated to shoulder osteoarthritis (controls); all computed tomography scans were reconstructed in the anatomic scapular plane and the glenoid hull plane that we defined. In both planes, we measured retroversion, inclination, glenohumeral offset (Walch index), and scapulohumeral offset. Retroversion in the scapular plane (Friedman method) was lower than that in the glenoid hull plane for controls and for arthritic shoulders. The threshold of scapulohumeral subluxation was 60% and 65% in the scapular plane and glenoid hull plane, respectively. The mean upward inclination was lower in the scapular plane (Churchill method) than in the glenoid hull plane (Maurer method). In the glenoid hull plane, 35% of type A2 glenoids showed glenohumeral offset greater than 75%, with mean retroversion of 25.6° ± 6° as compared with 7.5° ± 7.2° for the "centered" type A2 glenoids (P hull plane and r = 0.59 in the scapular plane (P hull plane may be more accurate than in the scapular plane. Thus, the glenoid hull method allows for better understanding type B3 of the modified Walch classification. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Randomized Cadaver Study Comparing First-Attempt Success Between Tibial and Humeral Intraosseous Insertions Using NIO Device by Paramedics: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarpak, Lukasz; Truszewski, Zenon; Smereka, Jacek; Krajewski, Paweł; Fudalej, Marcin; Adamczyk, Piotr; Czyzewski, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Medical personnel may encounter difficulties in obtaining intravenous (IV) access during cardiac arrest. The 2015 American Heart Association guidelines and the 2015 European Resuscitation Council guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) suggest that rescuers establish intraosseous (IO) access if an IV line is not easily obtainable.The aim of the study was to compare the success rates of the IO proximal tibia and proximal humerus head access performed by paramedics using the New Intraosseous access device (NIO; Persys Medical, Houston, TX, USA) in an adult cadaver model during simulated CPR.In an interventional, randomized, crossover, single-center cadaver study, a semi-automatic spring-load driven NIO access device was investigated. In total, 84 paramedics with less than 5-year experience in Emergency Medical Service participated in the study. The trial was performed on 42 adult cadavers. In each cadaver, 2 IO accesses to the humerus head, and 2 IO accesses to the proximal tibia were obtained.The success rate of the first IO attempt was 89.3% (75/84) for tibial access, and 73.8% (62/84) for humeral access (P = 0.017). The procedure times were significantly faster for tibial access [16.8 (interquartile range, IQR, 15.1-19.9] s] than humeral access [26.7 (IQR, 22.1-30.9) s] (P < 0.001).Tibial IO access is easier and faster to put in place than humeral IO access. Humeral IO access can be an alternative method to tibial IO access. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02700867.

  9. Percutaneous Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation for humerus shaft fractures in children: A treatment concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ramji Lal

    2013-09-01

    Fractures of the humeral shaft are uncommon, representing less than 10 percent of all fractures in children. Humeral shaft fractures in children can be treated by immobilisation alone. A small number of fractures are unable to be reduced adequately or maintained in adequate alignment, and these should be treated surgically. In the present study, Kirschner wires (K-wire) were used to achieve a closed intramedullary fixation of humeral shaft fractures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramedullary K-wires for the treatment of humeral shaft fracture in children. This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedic surgery in M. M. Medical College from June 2005 to June 2010. Sixty-eight children with a mean age of 7.7 years (range, 2-14 years) were recruited from Emergency and out patient department having closed fracture of humerus shaft. All patients were operated under general anaesthesia. All patients were followed for 12 months. Out of 68 patients, 64 patients underwent union in 42-70 days with a mean of 56 days. Complications found in four patients who had insignificant delayed union which were united next 3 weeks. Intramedullary K-wires were removed after an average of 5 months without any complications. The results were excellent in 94.11% and good in 5% children. This technique is simple, quick to perform, safe and reliable and avoids prolonged hospitalization with good results and is economical.

  10. SUPRACONDYLAR FRACTURE OF THE HUMERUS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Bojović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Humeral supracondylar fractures are the second most common fractures seen in children and young teenagers (16.6%. They represent 60-70% of all the elbow fractures. The maximum incidence is found between the fifth and seventh year of age, slightly more often in boys and on non-dominant hand. We performed a retrospective study in our clinic which included 105 patients admitted to our facility during the period from January, 2008 to April, 2012. The included patients had humeral supracondylar fracture either type 2 or type 3 (Gartland classification. At the moment of admission the median age was 7.26 years. All the patients were treated during the first 12 hours, with no more than two attempts of closed reposition. Sixteen patients with type 2 fracture were treated by analgosedation, closed reduction followed by cast immobilization. All other patients were treated after induction of general anesthesia. Sixteen patients were treated by percutaneous fixation of the fragments after closed reduction and 73 were treated with open reduction and pinning with different number and positions of „К“ wires. None of the patients had deep tissue infection; four patients had pin site infection. Three patients had cubitus varus deformity, two patients had elbow contracture, five patients had temporary limitation in extension, and one patient had iatrogenic lesion of the ulnar nerve. This makes 14.2% complication rate in our series. All the fractures healed in the expected period (3–4 weeks. Bauman’s angle, carrying angle and functional factor were measured postoperatively. Closed reposition with pinning, using radiographic control, for the dislocated supracondylar humeral fractures is the safest, as well as the least time consuming and cost-effective method. We also suggest treating these fractures within 12 hours and conversion of closed into open reposition in case of lacking crepitations (possibility of interposition of soft tissues between fragments.

  11. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  12. What is the Effect of 90-Degree Double-Plate Fixation with Grafting on Healing of Humeral Shaft Non-unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Çobanoğlu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to investigate the clinical and radiological outcomes of double-plate fixation with grafting in the treatment of non-union of humeral shaft fractures. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients operated between 2006 and 2012 due to humeral shaft non-union. Patients undergoing surgery with double-plate fixation were included and those treated with external fixator, single plate, intramedullary nails and patients with pathological fractures and infected non-unions were excluded. Surgical intervention via anterolateral or posterior approach included radial nerve identification, decortication and reestablishment of medullary canal followed by compression plating with double-plate fixation and frequent application of autogenous grafts or allografts. Main outcome measures were success rate of non-union repair, rate of re-intervention and complications, range of motion, assessment of pain Visual analogue scale (VAS and function Disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH and overall outcome Stewart-Hundley classification. Results: Ten patients were treated with double-plate fixation. The study group included six females and four males aged 36 to 70 years. Union was achieved within 4.5 and 8 months in all cases. The mean preoperative VAS score of 6.1 decreased to 2, postoperatively, with an associated decrease in the mean DASH score from 74.1 to 23.4. Excellent or good results were obtained in nine cases. There was no incidence of radial nerve palsy or infection. Conclusion: Our study provides level 4 evidence of the effectiveness of treating non-union fractures of the humeral shaft with double-plate fixation and grafting in providing good-to-excellent functional results and high union rate without any significant complication.

  13. Evaluation and treatment of an adult quarter horse with an unusual fracture of the humerus and septic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Colin; Riley, Christopher B.

    2002-01-01

    Humeral fractures are rare and usually carry a guarded prognosis in adult horses. This paper describes the evaluation and the successful surgical management of a fracture of the lateral supracondyloid crest and part of the epicondyle of the humerus in an adult quarter horse.

  14. Daily number of fractures is associated with road temperature in an urban area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christopher; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Thomsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    winters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective data collection was conducted on all patients treated at Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark, for a humeral, ankle, distal radius or hip fracture during the periods October to April 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Patients were grouped according to age into the following......,938 fractures) were treated during the study periods. The daily number of distal radius, humeral and ankle fractures increased significantly with decreasing road surface temperature and the presence of IA. For hip fractures no significant association was found. Decreasing temperature was associated......INTRODUCTION: Different factors related to winter are known to influence the fracture incidence, but little is known about the effect of road surface temperature. This study examines the association between road surface temperature and the daily number of fractures in an urban area during two...

  15. Innovations in the management of hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdall, Robert D; Webb, Lawrence X

    2003-08-01

    Hip fractures include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region that is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to hip fractures produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  16. Surgical Treatment for Occipital Condyle Fracture, C1 Dislocation, and Cerebellar Contusion with Hemorrhage after Blunt Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs have been treated as rare traumatic injuries, but the number of reported OCFs has gradually increased because of the popularization of computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The patient in this report presented with OCFs and C1 dislocation, along with traumatic cerebellar hemorrhage, which led to craniovertebral junction instability. This case was also an extremely rare clinical condition in which the patient presented with traumatic lower cranial nerve palsy secondary to OCFs. When the patient was transferred to our hospital, the occipital bone remained defective extensively due to surgical treatment of cerebellar hemorrhage. For this reason, concurrent cranioplasty was performed with resin in order to fix the occipital bone plate strongly. The resin-made occipital bone was used to secure a titanium plate and screws enabled us to perform posterior fusion of the craniovertebral junction. Although the patient wore a halo vest for 3 months after surgery, lower cranial nerve symptoms, including not only neck pain but also paralysis of the throat and larynx, improved postoperatively. No complications were detected during outpatient follow-up, which continued for 5 years postoperatively.

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH LATERAL HUMERAL EPICONDYLITIS (TENNIS ELBOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Salikhov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade the clinical and anatomical studies proved that lateral humeral epicondylitis can be successfully treated arthroscopically.Purpose of the study is to identify the optimal method of surgical treatment for patients with lateral humeral epicondylitis.Material and methods. The authors conducted an integral study consisting of two sections: clinical and anatomical. Anatomical section included precision preparation of extensor muscles of the forearm. Clinical section was dedicated to comparative analysis of statistically valid and matched by lesion severity groups of patients who underwent open and arthroscopic procedures. All patients were divided into three groups. Patients of Group I underwent arthroscopic release of extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon (ECRB without decorticating of the lateral humeral epicondyle. Patients of Group II underwent arthroscopic release of ECRB in combination with decortication of the lateral humeral epicondyle. Patients in Group III underwent an open release of ECRB.Results. Patients who underwent arthroscopic release of ECRB demonstrated less pronounced pain syndrome as compared to patients after ECRB release along with decortication of epicondyle or after open release (р<0,05. VAS pain score in Group I decreased from 7 to 1 point, in Group II — from 7 to 3 points, in Group III — from 7 to 4 points. Mean time until full recovery after the surgery was 24,2±7,8 days in Group I, 39,4±5,6 days in Group II and 60,2±15,6 days in Group III (р<0,05. Functional outcomes were assessed by Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS in 9 weeks postoperatively: Group I — improvement from 60 to 79 points, Group II — from 62 to 75 points, Group III — from 60 to 75 points.Conclusion. Drilling or removal of periosteum of the damaged epicondyle does not provide a positive effect. Decortication also has certain disadvantages like postoperative pain intensification leading to lesser range of motion in elbow and

  18. Comparison of Exposure in the Kaplan Versus the Kocher Approach in the Treatment of Radial Head Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Leslie Fink; Lombardi, Joseph; Gardner, Thomas R; Strauch, Robert J; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the complete visible surface area of the radial head, neck, and coronoid in the Kaplan and Kocher approaches to the lateral elbow. The hypothesis was that the Kaplan approach would afford greater visibility due to the differential anatomy of the intermuscular planes. Ten cadavers were dissected with the Kaplan and Kocher approaches, and the visible surface area was measured in situ using a 3-dimensional digitizer. Six measurements were taken for each approach by 2 surgeons, and the mean of these measurements were analyzed. The mean surface area visible with the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) preserved in the Kaplan approach was 616.6 mm 2 in comparison with the surface area of 136.2 mm 2 visible in the Kocher approach when the LCL was preserved. Using a 2-way analysis of variance, the difference between these 2 approaches was statistically significant. When the LCL complex was incised in the Kocher approach, the average visible surface area of the Kocher approach was 456.1 mm 2 and was statistically less than the Kaplan approach. The average surface area of the coronoid visible using a proximally extended Kaplan approach was 197.8 mm 2 . The Kaplan approach affords significantly greater visible surface area of the proximal radius than the Kocher approach.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. ... typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused ...

  20. Plantar talar head contusions and osteochondral fractures: associated findings on ankle MRI and proposed mechanism of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachova, Tetyana; Wang, Peter S.; Hu, Bing [Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horrow, Jay C. [Drexel University, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the significance of plantar talar head injury (PTHI) in predicting osseous and soft tissue injuries on ankle MRI. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study group consisted of 41 ankle MRIs with PTHI that occurred at our institution over a 5 1/2 year period. Eighty MRIs with bone injuries in other locations matched for age, time interval since injury, and gender formed a control group. Injuries to the following structures were recorded: medial malleolus, lateral malleolus/distal fibula, posterior malleolus, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, lateral, medial and syndesmotic ligaments, spring ligament complex, and extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle. Twenty separate logistic regressions determined which injuries PTHI predicted, using the Holm procedure to control for family-wise alpha at 0.05. PTHI strongly predicted the occurrence of injuries involving the anterior process of the calcaneus [24 % of cases, odds ratio (OR) 12.66], plantar components of the spring ligament (27 %, OR 9.43), calcaneal origin of the EDB and attachment of the dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligament (22 %, OR 7.22), cuboid (51 %, OR 6.58), EDB (27 %, OR 5.49), anteromedial talus (66 %, OR 4.78), and posteromedial talus (49 %, OR 4.48). PTHI strongly predicted lack of occurrence of syndesmotic ligament injury (OR 19.6). The PTHI group had a high incidence of lateral ligamentous injury (78 %), but not significantly different from the control group (53 %). PTHI is strongly associated with injury involving the transverse tarsal joint complex. We hypothesize it results from talo-cuboid and/or talo-calcaneal impaction from a supination injury of the foot and ankle. (orig.)

  1. Sex determination using humeral dimensions in a sample from KwaZulu-Natal: an osteometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedengbe, Oluwatosin Olalekan; Ajayi, Sunday Adelaja; Komolafe, Omobola Aderibigbe; Zaw, Aung Khaing; Naidu, Edwin Coleridge Stephen; Okpara Azu, Onyemaechi

    2017-09-01

    The morphological characteristics of the humeral bone has been investigated in recent times with studies showing varying degrees of sexual dimorphism. Osteologists and forensic scientists have shown that sex determination methods based on skeletal measurements are population specific, and these population-specific variations are present in many body dimensions. The present study aims to establish sex identification using osteometric standards for the humerus in a contemporary KwaZulu-Natal population. A total of 11 parameters were measured in a sample of n=211 humeri (males, 113; females, 98) from the osteological collection in the Discipline of Clinical Anatomy, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. The difference in means for nearly all variables were found to be significantly higher in males compared to females ( P <0.01) with the most effective single parameter for predicting sex being the vertical head diameter having an accuracy of 82.5%. Stepwise discriminant analysis increased the overall accuracy rate to 87.7% when all measurements were jointly applied. We conclude that the humerus is an important bone which can be reliably used for sex determination based on standard metric methods despite minor tribal or ancestral differences amongst an otherwise homogenous population.

  2. Dorgan's lateral cross-wiring of supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children: A retrospective review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Queally, Joseph M

    2010-06-01

    The currently accepted treatment for displaced supracondylar humeral fractures in children is closed reduction and fixation with percutaneous Kirschner wires. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review a novel cross-wiring technique where the cross-wire configuration is achieved solely from the lateral side, thereby reducing the risk of ulnar nerve injury.

  3. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  4. Contact mechanics of reverse engineered distal humeral hemiarthroplasty implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Ryan; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2015-11-26

    Erosion of articular cartilage is a concern following distal humeral hemiarthroplasty, because native cartilage surfaces are placed in contact with stiff metallic implant components, which causes decreases in contact area and increases in contact stresses. Recently, reverse engineered implants have been proposed which are intended to promote more natural contact mechanics by reproducing the native bone or cartilage shape. In this study, finite element modeling is used in order to calculate changes in cartilage contact areas and stresses following distal humeral hemiarthroplasty with commercially available and reverse engineered implant designs. At the ulna, decreases in contact area were -34±3% (p=0.002), -27±1% (pengineered and cartilage reverse engineered designs, respectively. Peak contact stresses increased by 461±57% (p=0.008), 387±127% (p=0.229) and 165±16% (p=0.003). At the radius, decreases in contact area were -21±3% (p=0.013), -13±2% (p0.999), 241±32% (p=0.010) and 61±10% (p=0.021). Between the three different implant designs, the cartilage reverse engineered design yielded the largest contact areas and lowest contact stresses, but was still unable to reproduce the contact mechanics of the native joint. These findings align with a growing body of evidence indicating that although reverse engineered hemiarthroplasty implants can provide small improvements in contact mechanics when compared with commercially available designs, further optimization of shape and material properties is required in order reproduce native joint contact mechanics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A study of repair cartilage from osteochondrotic humeral condyles of swine: preliminary report.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, T; Aherne, F X

    1992-01-01

    A total of 16 animals, including 12 lame and four normal boars, were used. All lame boars had severe osteochondrotic humeral condyles in which repair cartilage tissues originating from subchondral bone were observed. Quantitative chemical studies of repair cartilage and normal cartilage were carried out using humeral condyles from four selected animals (two lame and two normal boars, respectively). The repair cartilage contained a higher concentration of collagen and lower concentration of pr...

  6. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  7. Three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of bilateral sagittal split osteotomy lingual fracture line and le fort I pterygomaxillary separation in orthognathic surgery using cadaver heads: ultrasonic osteotome versus conventional saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammous, Sophie; Dupont, Quentin; Gilles, Roland

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the quality of the fracture line on the lingual side of the mandible after sagittal split osteotomy and the quality of pterygomaxillary separation after Le Fort I osteotomy using the BoneScalpel ultrasonic osteotome. Bimaxillary procedures, according to the standard protocol, were performed using 10 fresh cadaver heads. The ultrasonic osteotome was used in the study group, and a reciprocating saw was used in the control group. Three-dimensional reconstructions of postoperative computed tomographic scans were obtained. The lingual ramus fracture pattern and the pterygomaxillary separation pattern were observed, classified, and compared. Postoperative dissections of the skulls were performed to assess the integrity of the infra-alveolar nerve and the descending palatine artery. No significant differences were found in the cutting time of bone between the BoneScalpel and the sagittal saw. Of the sagittal split osteotomies in the study group, 90% showed a good pattern (vertical pattern of fracture line extending to the inferior border of the mandible running behind the mandibular canal) compared with 50% of the sagittal split osteotomies in the control group. Ideal separation of the pterygoid plates without fractures was observed in 80% of the Le Fort I osteotomies in the study group compared with 50% of the osteotomies in the control group. High-level fractures occurred in 30% of cases in the control group compared with none in the study group. The integrities of the infra-alveolar nerve and the descending palatine artery were preserved in all cases. Use of the ultrasonic BoneScalpel did not require more time than the conventional method. An improved pattern of lingual fracture lines in mandibular sagittal split osteotomy procedures and the pattern of pterygomaxillary separation in Le Fort I osteotomy procedures were observed. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Essential radiology for head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones

  9. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Inferiorly Directed Versus 3 Superiorly Directed Locking Screws on Stability in a 3-Part Proximal Humerus Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, David M; Santoni, Brandon G; Stoops, T Kyle; Tanner, Gregory; Diaz, Miguel A; Mighell, Mark

    2018-06-01

    To quantify the stability of 3 points of inferiorly directed versus 3 points of superiorly directed locking screw fixation compared with the full contingent of 6 points of locked screw fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture. A standardized 3-part fracture was created in 10 matched pairs (experimental groups) and 10 nonmatched humeri (control group). Osteosynthesis was performed using 3 locking screws in the superior hemisphere of the humeral head (suspension), 3 locking screws in the inferior hemisphere (buttress), or the full complement of 6 locking screws (control). Specimens were tested in varus cantilever bending (7.5 Nm) to 10,000 cycles or failure. Construct survival (%) and the cycles to failure were compared. Seven of 10 controls survived the 10,000-cycle runout (70%: 8193 average cycles to failure). No experimental constructs survived the 10,000-cycle runout. Suspension and buttress screw groups failed an average of 331 and 516 cycles, respectively (P = 1.00). The average number of cycles to failure and the number of humeri surviving the 10,000-cycle runout were greater in the control group than in the experimental groups (P ≤ 0.006). Data support the use of a full contingent of 6 points of locking screw fixation over 3 superior or 3 inferior points of fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture with a locking construct. No biomechanical advantage to the 3 buttress or 3 suspension screws used in isolation was observed.

  10. Ultrasound assessment of the posterior circumflex humeral artery in elite volleyball players: Aneurysm prevalence, anatomy, branching pattern and vessel characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Daan; Maas, Mario; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Planken, R Nils

    2017-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) aneurysms and vessel characteristics of the PCHA and deep brachial artery (DBA) in elite volleyball players. Two-hundred and eighty players underwent standardized ultrasound assessment of the dominant arm by a vascular technologist. Assessment included determination of PCHA aneurysms (defined as segmental vessel dilatation ≥150 %), PCHA and DBA anatomy, branching pattern, vessel course and diameter. The PCHA and DBA were identified in 100 % and 93 % (260/280) of cases, respectively. The prevalence of PCHA aneurysms was 4.6 % (13/280). All aneurysms were detected in proximal PCHA originating from the axillary artery (AA). The PCHA originated from the AA in 81 % of cases (228/280), and showed a curved course dorsally towards the humeral head in 93 % (211/228). The DBA originated from the AA in 73 % of cases (190/260), and showed a straight course parallel to the AA in 93 % (177/190). PCHA aneurysm prevalence in elite volleyball players is high and associated with a specific branching type: a PCHA that originates from the axillary artery. Radiologists should have a high index of suspicion for this vascular overuse injury. For the first time vessel characteristics and reference values are described to facilitate ultrasound assessment. • Prevalence of PCHA aneurysms is 4.6 % among elite volleyball players. • All aneurysms are in proximal PCHA that originates directly from AA. • Vessel characteristics and reference values are described to facilitate US assessment. • Mean PCHA and DBA diameters can be used as reference values. • Radiologists need a high index of suspicion for this vascular overuse injury.

  11. Outcome of limb fracture repair in rabbits: 139 cases (2007-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Daisuke; Seto, Eiko; Denda, Yuki; Imai, Yutaro; Okamoto, Kanako; Okamura, Kensaku; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2018-02-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcome of limb fracture repair in rabbits. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 139 client-owned rabbits with limb fractures treated between 2007 and 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed for information on fracture location, fracture treatment, and time to fracture healing. RESULTS 25 rabbits had fractures involving the distal aspects of the limbs (ie, metacarpal or metatarsal bones, phalanges, and calcaneus or talus). Fractures were treated in 23 of these 25 rabbits (external coaptation, n = 17; external skeletal fixation, 4; and intramedullary pinning, 2) and healed in all 23, with a median healing time of 28 days (range, 20 to 45 days). One hundred ten rabbits had long bone fractures, and fractures were treated in 100 of the 110 (external skeletal fixation, n = 89; bone plating, 1; intramedullary pinning, 3; and external coaptation, 7). The percentage of fractures that healed was significantly lower for open (14/18) than for closed (26/26) tibial fractures and was significantly lower for femoral (19/26) and treated humeral (4/6) fractures than for radial (23/24) or closed tibial (26/26) fractures. Micro-CT was used to assess fracture realignment during external skeletal fixator application and to evaluate fracture healing. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prognosis for rabbits with limb fractures was good, with fractures healing in most rabbits following fracture repair (109/123). Micro-CT was useful in assessing fracture realignment and evaluating fracture healing.

  12. Diagnosing displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Bagger, Jens; Sylvest, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Displaced four-part fractures comprise 2-10 % of all proximal humeral fractures. The optimal treatment is unclear and randomised trials are needed. The conduct and interpretation of such trials is facilitated by a reproducible fracture classification. We aimed at quantifying observer agreement...... on the classification of displaced four-part fractures according to the Neer system. Published and unpublished data from five observer studies were reviewed. Observers agreed less on displaced four-part fractures than on the overall Neer classification. Mean kappa values for interobserver agreement ranged from 0.......16 to 0.48. Specialists agreed slightly more than fellows and residents. Advanced imaging modalities (CT and 3D CT) seemed to contribute more to classification of displaced four-part patterns than in less complex fracture patterns. Low observer agreement may challenge the clinical approach to displaced...

  13. Computed tomograms of blowout fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Haruhide; Hayashi, Minoru; Shoin, Katsuo; Hwang, Wen-Zern; Yamamoto, Shinjiro; Yonemura, Taizo.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 18 cases of orbital fractures, excluding optic canal fracture. There were 11 cases of pure blowout fracture and 3 of the impure type. The other 4 cases were orbital fractures without blowout fracture. The cardinal syndromes were diplopia, enophthalmos, and sensory disturbances of the trigeminal nerve in the pure type of blowout fracture. Many cases of the impure type of blowout fracture or of orbital fracture showed black eyes or a swelling of the eyelids which masked enophthalmos. Axial and coronal CT scans demonstrated: 1) the orbital fracture, 2) the degree of enophthalmos, 3) intraorbital soft tissue, such as incarcerated or prolapsed ocular muscles, 4) intraorbital hemorrhage, 5) the anatomical relation of the orbital fracture to the lacrimal canal, the trochlea, and the trigeminal nerve, and 6) the lesions of the paranasal sinus and the intracranial cavity. CT scans play an important role in determining what surgical procedures might best be employed. Pure blowout fractures were classified by CT scans into these four types: 1) incarcerating linear fracture, 2) trapdoor fracture, 3) punched-out fracture, and 4) broad fracture. Cases with severe head injury should be examined to see whether or not blowout fracture is present. If the patients are to hope to return to society, a blowout fracture should be treated as soon as possible. (author)

  14. Computed tomograms of blowout fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Haruhide; Hayashi, Minoru; Shoin, Katsuo; Hwang, Wen-Zern; Yamamoto, Shinjiro; Yonemura, Taizo

    1985-02-01

    We studied 18 cases of orbital fractures, excluding optic canal fracture. There were 11 cases of pure blowout fracture and 3 of the impure type. The other 4 cases were orbital fractures without blowout fracture. The cardinal syndromes were diplopia, enophthalmos, and sensory disturbances of the trigeminal nerve in the pure type of blowout fracture. Many cases of the impure type of blowout fracture or of orbital fracture showed black eyes or a swelling of the eyelids which masked enophthalmos. Axial and coronal CT scans demonstrated: 1) the orbital fracture, 2) the degree of enophthalmos, 3) intraorbital soft tissue, such as incarcerated or prolapsed ocular muscles, 4) intraorbital hemorrhage, 5) the anatomical relation of the orbital fracture to the lacrimal canal, the trochlea, and the trigeminal nerve, and 6) the lesions of the paranasal sinus and the intracranial cavity. CT scans play an important role in determining what surgical procedures might best be employed. Pure blowout fractures were classified by CT scans into these four types: 1) incarcerating linear fracture, 2) trapdoor fracture, 3) punched-out fracture, and 4) broad fracture. Cases with severe head injury should be examined to see whether or not blowout fracture is present. If the patients are to hope to return to society, a blowout fracture should be treated as soon as possible. (author).

  15. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  16. Osteosarcoma with a pathologic fracture in a six-month-old dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, L.; Hager, D.; Parker, R.; Yanik, D.

    1986-01-01

    This case history report describes the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of an osteosarcoma with an associated pathologic fracture in a 6-month-old dog. A 6-month-old intact male Bloodhound was presented with a primary complaint of a right forelimb lameness of one month's duration. In radiographs, a minimally displaced transverse fracture of the proximal humeral metaphysis was seen. There was extensive cortical bone destruction at the fracture site and minimal periosteal new bone suggestive of a primary bone tumor with a pathologic fracture. Biopsy specimens demonstrated neoplastic mesenchymal cells producing osteoid compatible with a diagnosis of osteosarcoma. This case history report constitutes the youngest reported canine osteosarcoma

  17. Functional results following fractures of the proximal humerus. A controlled clinical study comparing two periods of immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, B; Angermann, P; Larsen, T K

    1989-01-01

    In order to compare 1 and 3 weeks of immobilization following proximal humeral fractures a prospective controlled trial was performed in 85 patients. Clinical follow-up according to the Neer assessment system was done after 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. One week of immobilization resulted in a better...

  18. Humeral retroversion and shoulder rotational mobility in young handball practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Gustavo Aguiar; Döhnert, Marcelo Baptista

    2015-01-01

    : To evaluate the prevalence of humeral retroversion and rotational mobility (RHH) in young handball practitioners and non-practitioners. : This is a cross-sectional study performed with two groups: the handball group, with 14 female students practicing handball and the control group, with 13 young participants non-practicing pitch sports. : The handball group presented full rotational movement (FRM) hi-gher than the control group in both the dominant shoulder (p=0.001) and the non-dominant shoulder (p=0.0001). The mobility of active and passive internal rotation was significantly higher in handball players in both shoulders. The handball group presented lower internal rotation range of motion for the dominant shoulder as compared to the non-dominant shoul-der (p=0.001). : Young handball practitioners, des-pite skeletally immature, showed a higher MRT than the control group. The handball group showed loss of internal rotation (medial) on the dominant shoulder as compared to the non--dominant shoulder. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study.

  19. Eficacia del tratamiento acupuntural en pacientes con epicondilitis humeral externa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Pantoja Fornés

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una intervención terapéutica en 100 pacientes de 20-59 años, con epicondilitis humeral externa, atendidos en la Sala de Rehabilitación del Policlínico Comunitario Docente “Eduardo Mesa Llull”, del municipio de II Frente, de la provincia Santiago de Cuba, desde septiembre de 2013 hasta marzo de 2014, para evaluar la eficacia del tratamiento acupuntural en ellos. La muestra fue dividida en 2 grupos de 50 integrantes cada uno, seleccionados de forma aleatoria. Los del grupo de estudio fueron tratados con acupuntura más corriente Trabert y los del control con corriente Trabert solamente. Como principales resultados predominaron: el grupo etario de 40-49 años (64,0 %, el sexo femenino (66,0 % y los obreros de servicio (56,0 %. Se obtuvo que los tratados con acupuntura tuvieron una mejor evolución, de donde se infiere que la terapia empleada resultó efectiva para aliviar el dolor en quienes se aplicó

  20. Anatomy and histology of the transverse humeral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brian J; Narvy, Steven J; Omid, Reza; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The classic literature describes the transverse humeral ligament (THL) as a distinct anatomic structure with a role in biceps tendon stability; however, recent literature suggests that it is not a distinct anatomic structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gross and microscopic anatomy of the THL, including a specific investigation of the histology of this ligament. Thirty frozen, embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to determine the gross anatomy of the THL. Seven specimens were evaluated histologically for the presence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings. Two tissue layers were identified in the area described as the THL. In the deep layer, fibers of the subscapularis tendon were found to span the bicipital groove with contributions from the coracohumeral ligament and the supraspinatus tendon. Superficial to this layer was a fibrous fascial covering consisting of distinct bands of tissue. Neurohistology staining revealed the presence of free nerve endings but no mechanoreceptors. This study's findings demonstrate that the THL is a distinct structure continuous with the rotator cuff tendons and the coracohumeral ligament. The finding of free nerve endings in the THL suggests a potential role as a shoulder pain generator. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Ipsilateral simultaneous fracture of the trochlea involving the lateral end clavicle and distal end radius: a rare combination and a unique mechanism of injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta RK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Isolated trochlea fracture in adults is a rare surgical entity as compared to its capitellar counterpart. It has been only mentioned sporadically in the literature as case reports. Fracture of the trochlea is accompanied by other elbow injuries like elbow dislocation, capitellum fracture, ulnar fracture and extraarticular condylar fracture. Here we report a unique case of isolated displaced trochlea fracture associated with fractures of the lateral end clavicle and the distal end radius. We propose a unique mechanism for this rare combination of injuries: typical triad of injury, i.e. fracture of the distal end radius with trochlea and fracture of the lateral end of the clavicle. Nonoperative treatment is recommended for undisplaced humeral trochlea fractures; but for displaced ones, anatomical reduction and internal fixation are essential to maintain the congruous trochleacoronoid articulation and hence to maintain the intrinsic stability of the elbow. Key words: Isolated trochlea fracture; Clavicle; Radius fractures

  2. Fractures of the humerus during arm wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumbaširević Marko Ž.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Humeral shaft fractures may occur as a result of arm wrestling. The aim of this study was to present our treatment of humerus fracture sustained during arm wrestling. Methods. A total of six patients, aged 22 to 48, were treated at our department form January 2008 to January 2010 with open reduction and internal fixation and with hanging arm casts. A review of all the relevant literature on the subject was also presented. Results. In all the cases, the fractures healed and function returned to normal. No patient had any neural or vascular compromise. Conclusion. Closed and operative treatments were equally successful in all reported cases. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175-095

  3. Clinical evaluation of a new custom offset shoulder prosthesis for treatment of complex fractures of the proximal humerus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Schmal, Hagen; Sudkamp, Norbert P

    2006-01-01

    ). The Constant-Murley-Score and radiological score according to Neer's classification were used for postoperative functional and radiological assessment. Following hemiarthroplasty, Group A achieved an average Constant Score of 52 and Group B of 46. The pain relief after hemiarthroplasty was about 53% in Group......Primary hemiarthroplasty of the shoulder is an accepted procedure to treat complex proximal humeral fractures. The goal of this study was to assess the functional outcome in patients treated with hemiarthroplasty using a custom offset shoulder prosthesis, either for an acute four-part fracture...... of the proximal humerus or following failed primary treatment of a complex humeral fracture. Thirty seven patients were followed up for a mean of 17 months after shoulder replacement (Group A: four-part-fractures; n = 26, Group B: posttraumatic necrosis/non-union after failed primary treatment; n = 11...

  4. Total elbow arthroplasty in distal humerus fracture in patients older than 65 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Gallucci

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report the clinical-functional results of the treatment of humeral distal fractures with a total elbow prosthesis in patients older than 65 years old. Material and methods This retrospective paper was performed in two surgical centers. Criteria inclusion were: patients with humeral distal fractures, > 65 years, operated on with Coonrad-Morrey prostheses, and with a follow-up of  >1 year. Twenty-one patients were included. Twenty were women with an average age of 79 years old. According to AO classification, 13 fractures were type C3, 7 C2 and 1 A2. All patientes were operated on without desinsertion of the extensor mechanism. Average follow-up was 40 months. Results Flexo-extension was 123-17°, with a total arc of mobility of 106° (80 % of the contralateral side. Pain according to AVE was 1. The MEPI was 83 points: 8 patients had excellent results, 11 good, 1 regular and 1 bad. Average DASH score was 24 points. Conclusion Treatment of humeral distal fractures with total elbow arthoplasty in patients older than 65 years old, may lead to a good option of treatment, but indications must be limited to patients with complex fractures, bad bone quality, with osteoporosis and low functional demands.

  5. How sensitive is the deltoid moment arm to humeral offset changes with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David R; Kinney, Allison L; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty commonly treats cuff-deficient or osteoarthritic shoulders not amenable to rotator cuff repair. This study investigates deltoid moment arm sensitivity to variations in the joint center and humeral offset of 3 representative reverse total shoulder arthroplasty subjects. We hypothesized that a superior joint implant placement may exist, indicated by muscle moment arms, compared with the current actual surgical implant configuration. Moment arms for the anterior, lateral, and posterior aspects of the deltoid muscle were determined for 1521 perturbations of the humeral offset location away from the surgical placement in a subject-specific musculoskeletal model with motion defined by subject-specific in vivo abduction kinematics. The humeral offset was varied from its surgical position ±4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction, ±12 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and -10 to 14 mm in the superior/inferior direction. The anterior deltoid moment arm varied in humeral offset and center of rotation up to 20 mm, primarily in the medial/lateral and superior/inferior directions. The lateral deltoid moment arm varied in humeral offset up to 20 mm, primarily in the medial/lateral and anterior/posterior directions. The posterior deltoid moment arm varied up to 15 mm, primarily in early abduction, and was most sensitive to humeral offset changes in the superior/inferior direction. High variations in muscle moment arms were found for all 3 deltoid components, presenting an opportunity to dramatically change the deltoid moment arms through surgical placement of the reverse shoulder components and by varying the overall offset of the humerus. Basic Science Study; Computer Modeling. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The epidemiology of fractures in infants--Which accidents are preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Helmut; Orendi, Ingrid; Singer, Georg; Eberl, Robert; Castellani, Christoph; Schalamon, Johannes; Till, Holger

    2016-01-01

    In children, fractures have a huge impact on the health care system. In order to develop effective prevention strategies exact knowledge about the epidemiology of fractures is mandatory. This study aims to describe clinical and epidemiological data of fractures diagnosed in infants. A retrospective analysis of all infants (childrenfractures in an 11 years period (2001-2011) was performed. Information was obtained regarding the location of the fractures, sites of the accident, circumstances and mechanisms of injury and post-injury care. 248 infants (54% male, 46% female) with a mean age of 7 months presented with 253 fractures. In more than half of the cases skull fractures were diagnosed (n=151, 61%). Most frequently the accidents causing fractures happened at home (67%). Falls from the changing table, from the arm of the care-giver and out of bed were most commonly encountered (n=92, 37%). While the majority of skull fractures was caused from falls out of different heights, external impacts tended to lead to fractures of the extremities. 6 patients (2%) were victims of maltreatment and sustained 10 fractures (2 skull fractures, 4 proximal humeral fractures, 2 rib fractures, and 2 tibial fractures). Falls from the changing table, the arms of the caregivers and out of bed caused the majority of fractures (especially skull fracture) in infants. Therefore, awareness campaigns and prevention strategies should focus on these mechanisms of accident in order to decrease the rate of fractures in infants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound measurement of rotator cuff thickness and acromio-humeral distance in the diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewinski, Jerzy J; Kusz, Damian J; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Cielinski, Lukasz S; Zoladz, Miroslaw P

    2008-04-01

    The usefulness of ultrasound measurements in the diagnosis of the subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder was evaluated. Fifty-seven patients with unilateral symptoms of the impingement syndrome underwent ultrasound examination of both shoulder joints, which included assessment of rotator cuff integrity, measurement of rotator cuff thickness and the distance between the infero-lateral edge of acromion and the apex of the greater tuberosity of humerus (AGT distance) in the standard ultrasonographic positions. As a control group, 36 volunteers (72 shoulders) with no history of shoulder pain were examined sonographically. Ultrasonographic assessment of humeral head elevation, measured as the AGT distance, proved to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of the subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder. A difference in rotator cuff thickness of more than 1.1 mm and a difference in the AGT distance of more than 2.1 mm between both shoulder joints may reflect dysfunction of rotator cuff muscles.

  8. Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii distal to the glenohumeral joint: plain film radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A B

    1989-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful condition related to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals; it favors large joints. The shoulder, specifically the tendons of the rotator cuff and the insertion of the long head of the biceps on the superior glenoid rim, is a well-recognized location for this abnormality. The purpose of this article is to describe a second site of calcific tendinitis of the biceps, distal to the joint and corresponding to the junction of the tendon and muscle. Radiographs in 119 cases of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, obtained between 1980 and 1988, were reviewed. Twenty had calcific tendinitis in the region of the tendon of the long head of the biceps (nine at the glenoid insertion and 11 adjacent to the humeral shaft). All 11 patients with calcific tendinitis at the more distal site had a small, homogeneous deposit adjacent to the proximal humeral shaft. The densities in these 11 cases followed the normal course of the tendon of the long head of the biceps and were therefore medial to the proximal humeral shaft on the internal rotation view, lateral to the proximal humeral shaft on the external rotation view, and anterior to the proximal humeral shaft on the axillary projection. The major differential diagnosis of calcific tendinitis of the tendon of the long head of the biceps is loose bodies trapped in the biceps tendon sheath. Although the position of the soft-tissue densities in these two entities is similar, loose bodies have an appearance of bone, and their source (degenerative arthritis or recurrent dislocations) is usually apparent. A site of calcific tendinitis distal to the glenohumeral joint that is detectable on plain films is reviewed. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the anatomy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. The clinical charts of the 11 patients also are summarized, with emphasis on the association between the roentgen finding and bicipital tendinitis and impingement syndrome.

  9. Mathematical modelling of fracture hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, A.W.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Lever, D.A.; Robinson, P.C.; Rae, J.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarises the work performed between January 1983 and December 1984 for the CEC/DOE contract 'Mathematical Modelling of Fracture Hydrology', under the following headings: 1) Statistical fracture network modelling, 2) Continuum models of flow and transport, 3) Simplified models, 4) Analysis of laboratory experiments and 5) Analysis of field experiments. (author)

  10. Humeral metastasis from a sacrococcygeal chordoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepidbakht Sepideh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chordomas are rare tumors of the skeletal system that arise from an intra-osseous benign precursor of notochordal cells. They are mainly locally aggressive. However, metastases to other sites, including the humeri, resulting in pathological fractures have been reported. We report the case of a patient with a metastatic chordoma that produced a pathologic fracture of the humerus. Case presentation We report the case of a 60-year-old Iranian woman who presented with a fracture of her right humerus following a minor trauma. She had a history of a sacrococcygeal chordoma. Histological and immunohistochemical studies of the fracture site suggested the diagnosis of a chordoma. Conclusions Chordoma is a rare tumor and rarely metastasizes, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of epithelioid bone tumors. The only current effective treatment for this type of tumor is carbon ion therapy. There is currently no effective medical therapy available for advanced chordoma, and this type of tumor is not very responsive to radiotherapy.

  11. Humeral Metastasis in a case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rare case of squamous cell carcinoma with metastasis to distal acral skeleton – humerus within two months of diagnosis of the primary is being reported. The metastasis to the bones from carcinoma cervix is uncommon especially in the distal appendicular skeleton. A 47 years female came with spontaneous fracture of ...

  12. Spike the PCHA! Overuse injury of the Posterior Circumflex Humeral Artery in elite volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, D.

    2016-01-01

    In 1993, professor Reekers of the Academic Medical Center (AMC) Radiology department was the first to describe a traumatic aneurysm of the posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) in a volleyball player, suggesting a causal relationship. Fifteen years later, between 2008 and 2010, several elite

  13. Nonoperative Management and Novel Imaging for Posterior Circumflex Humeral Artery Injury in Volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Daan; Planken, R. Nils; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Maas, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We report on a 34-yr-old male elite volleyball player with symptomatic emboli in the spiking hand from a partially thrombosed aneurysm of the posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) in his dominant shoulder. At initial diagnosis and follow-up, a combination of time-resolved and high-resolution

  14. Treatment of proximal humerus fractures with locking plates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasas, Christos; Kontakis, George; Angoules, Antonios; Limb, David; Giannoudis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Locking plates with special configuration for the anatomic region of the proximal humerus have been introduced recently to address the difficulties of stabilizing proximal humeral fractures. The purpose of this study was to carry out a systematic review of the literature on the efficacy and early to medium term functional results of locking plates for stabilization of proximal humeral fractures. Using the PubMed database, a systematic review of the English and German literature was carried out in order to assess the efficacy and complications related to the use of these plates and the patients' functional outcome, using the key words "locking plates proximal humeral fractures," "angular stability plates proximal humeral fractures," "PHILOS plate," and "LPHP plate." Our criteria for eligibility were clinical studies with more than ten cases followed-up, adult patients, and adequate data provided at least in terms of implant related complications. Articles written in English and German language were included. Exclusion criteria were: studies dealing exclusively with 2-part fractures (since this category has a more favorable outcome); experimental studies; case reports; and, literature other than English or German. Each one of the articles was evaluated for quality of the study using the Structured Effectiveness Quality Evaluation Scale (SEQES). Twelve studies including 791 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in these studies continued to improve up to one year, achieving a mean Constant score of 74.3. The incidence of the reported complications was: avascular necrosis 7.9%, screw cut-out 11.6% and re-operation rate 13.7%. The high incidence of cut-out may be secondary to the rigidity of the implant in combination with medial inadequate support, in cases compromised by severe underlying osteoporotic bone. Definition of indications for the use of locking plates and attention on technical aspects of applying them would help optimization of the results

  15. Management of fractures of the humerus in Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome: an historical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Fractures of the humerus have challenged medical practitioners since the beginning of recorded medical history. In the earliest known surgical text, The Edwin Smith Papyrus (copied circa 1600 BC), three cases of humeral fractures were described. Reduction by traction followed by bandaging......, and multifragmented fractures. In Late Antiquity, complications from powerful traction or tight bandaging were described by Paul of Aegina (circa AD 625-690). Illustrations from sixteenth and seventeenth century surgical texts are included to show the ancient methods of reduction and bandaging. The richness...

  16. Double line sign: a helpful sonographic sign to detect occult fractures of the proximal humerus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Waal malefijt, Maarten C. de; Blickman, Johan G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new sonographic sign of bone fracture and to determine if it can be helpful in decreasing the number of missed fractures of the proximal humerus. Ultrasound (US) of the shoulder was performed in 57 consecutive patients with shoulder pain and/or disability following trauma. All cases were prospectively reviewed for the presence of a humeral fracture. Sonographic signs of fractures, with special emphasis on what was termed the 'double line sign' (DLS), were assessed. Plain radiography was considered the standard of reference and in equivocal cases magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-eight patients had a tuberosity complex fracture, which were all detected at US examination. Sonographic features of a fracture were periosteal elevation, corticol bone discontinuity, step-off deformity or a combination of these findings. This study showed that in 26 (93%) patients an additional sonographic feature, a DLS, could be demonstrated. The DLS is a helpful and probably reliable sonographic sign to indicate a humeral fracture. High-spatial-resolution US substantially increases the detection of fractures of the proximal humerus and should be considered as an alternative diagnostic tool prior to computed tomography (CT), MRI and arthroscopy in patients with persisting shoulder pain and/or disability following trauma. (orig.)

  17. Double line sign: a helpful sonographic sign to detect occult fractures of the proximal humerus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal malefijt, Maarten C. de [University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blickman, Johan G. [University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2007-03-15

    The aim of this study was to describe a new sonographic sign of bone fracture and to determine if it can be helpful in decreasing the number of missed fractures of the proximal humerus. Ultrasound (US) of the shoulder was performed in 57 consecutive patients with shoulder pain and/or disability following trauma. All cases were prospectively reviewed for the presence of a humeral fracture. Sonographic signs of fractures, with special emphasis on what was termed the 'double line sign' (DLS), were assessed. Plain radiography was considered the standard of reference and in equivocal cases magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-eight patients had a tuberosity complex fracture, which were all detected at US examination. Sonographic features of a fracture were periosteal elevation, corticol bone discontinuity, step-off deformity or a combination of these findings. This study showed that in 26 (93%) patients an additional sonographic feature, a DLS, could be demonstrated. The DLS is a helpful and probably reliable sonographic sign to indicate a humeral fracture. High-spatial-resolution US substantially increases the detection of fractures of the proximal humerus and should be considered as an alternative diagnostic tool prior to computed tomography (CT), MRI and arthroscopy in patients with persisting shoulder pain and/or disability following trauma. (orig.)

  18. Least possible fixation techniques of 4-part valgus impacted fractures of the proximal humerus: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Panagopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The valgus-impacted (VI 4-part fractures are a subset of fractures of the proximal humerus with a unique anatomic configuration characterized by a relatively lower incidence of avascular necrosis after operative intervention. We systematically reviewed clinical studies assessing the benefits and harms of least possible fixation techniques (LPFT for this unique fracture type. Such information would be potentially helpful in developing an evidence-based approach in the management of these complex injuries. We performed analytic searches of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library, restricting it to the years 1991-2014. Included studies had to describe outcomes and complications after primary osteosynthesis with any type of LPFT apart from plate-screws and intramedullary nailing. Eligibility criteria were also included English language, more than 5 cases, minimum follow up of one year and report of clinical outcome using at least one relevant score (Constant, Neer or ASES. Based on 292 database hits we identified 12 eligible studies including 190 four-part valgus impacted fractures in 188 patients. All eligible studies were case series composed of min 8 to max 45 patients per study. The gender distribution was 60% (112 female and 40% (76 male. The average age of the patients at the time of injury was 54.5 years. In 8/12 studies an open reduction was used for fracture fixation using different surgical techniques including KW, cerclage wires, cannulated screws and osteosutures. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation was used in 4 studies. Mean follow-up time ranged from 24 to 69 months. A good functional outcome (constant score >80 was reported in 9/12 studies. The most common complication was avascular necrosis of the humeral head with an overall incidence of 11% (range, 0-26.3%. Total avascular necrosis (AVN was found in 15/188 patients (7.9% and was more common in percutaneous techniques and partial AVN in 6

  19. Primary tendinitis of the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, M; Benca, P

    1989-09-01

    Seventeen patients with chronic painful shoulders who showed evidence of isolated bicipital tendinitis involving only the extracapsular, intertubercular portion of the long head of the biceps were chosen for surgical treatment when conservative treatment failed. The patients were thought to have primary bicipital tendinitis. The latter condition is secondary to other shoulder pathologies. Thirteen patients had tenodeses and four patients had transfer of the long head of the biceps to the origin of the conjoined tendon. Overall, excellent and good results were noted in 94% of both groups of patients when the long head of the biceps was tenodesed or transferred. Whether or not the long head of the biceps is a significant depressor of the humeral head requires further investigation.

  20. Osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum: reliability of four classification systems using radiographs and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Femke M A P; van den Ende, Kimberly I M; Doornberg, Job N; Guitton, Thierry G; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2015-10-01

    The radiographic appearance of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the humeral capitellum varies according to the stage of the lesion. It is important to evaluate the stage of OCD lesion carefully to guide treatment. We compared the interobserver reliability of currently used classification systems for OCD of the humeral capitellum to identify the most reliable classification system. Thirty-two musculoskeletal radiologists and orthopaedic surgeons specialized in elbow surgery from several countries evaluated anteroposterior and lateral radiographs and corresponding computed tomography (CT) scans of 22 patients to classify the stage of OCD of the humeral capitellum according to the classification systems developed by (1) Minami, (2) Berndt and Harty, (3) Ferkel and Sgaglione, and (4) Anderson on a Web-based study platform including a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine viewer. Magnetic resonance imaging was not evaluated as part of this study. We measured agreement among observers using the Siegel and Castellan multirater κ. All OCD classification systems, except for Berndt and Harty, which had poor agreement among observers (κ = 0.20), had fair interobserver agreement: κ was 0.27 for the Minami, 0.23 for Anderson, and 0.22 for Ferkel and Sgaglione classifications. The Minami Classification was significantly more reliable than the other classifications (P reliable for classifying different stages of OCD of the humeral capitellum. However, it is unclear whether radiographic evidence of OCD of the humeral capitellum, as categorized by the Minami Classification, guides treatment in clinical practice as a result of this fair agreement. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  2. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kee Jeong [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ''Buttonholing'' of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. (orig.)

  3. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for humerus diaphyseal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shantharam Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO technique is reported as a satisfactory procedure for the treatment of humeral shaft fractures by the anterior approach by several authors. However, none of the published reports had a significant follow-up nor have they reported patient outcomes. We evaluated the clinical, radiographic, and functional outcome over a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the same MIPO technique to humeral shaft fracture. Materials and Methods: 32 adult patients with diaphyseal fractures of the humerus treated with MIPO between June 2007 and October 2008 were included in the study. Patients with metabolic bone disease, polytrauma, and Gustilo and Anderson type 3 open fractures with injury severity score >16 were excluded from the study. All cases were treated with closed indirect reduction and locking plate fixation using the MIPO technique. The surgery time, radiation exposure, and time for union was noted. The shoulder and elbow function was assessed using the UCLA shoulder and Mayo elbow performance scores, respectively. Results: Of the 32 patients in the study, 19 were males and 13 were females. The mean age was 39 years (range: 22-70 years. Twenty-seven of the thirty-two patients (84.3% had the dominant side fractured. We had eight cases of C2 type; five cases of C1 and A2 type; four cases of B2 type; three cases each of B3, B1, and A1 type; and one case of A3 type of fracture. The mean surgical time was 91.5 minutes (range: 70-120 minutes and mean radiation exposure was 160.3 seconds (range: 100-220 seconds. The mean radiological fracture union time was 12.9 weeks (range: 10-20 weeks. Shoulder function was excellent in 27 cases (84.3% and good in remaining 5 cases (15.6% on the UCLA score. Elbow function was excellent in 26 cases (81.2%, good in 5 cases (15.6%, and fair in 1 case (3.1% who had an associated olecranon fracture that was fixed by tension band wire in the same sitting. Conclusion: MIPO of

  4. Diagnosing displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus: a review of observer studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Bagger, Jens; Sylvest, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Displaced four-part fractures comprise 2-10 % of all proximal humeral fractures. The optimal treatment is unclear and randomised trials are needed. The conduct and interpretation of such trials is facilitated by a reproducible fracture classification. We aimed at quantifying observer agreement...... on the classification of displaced four-part fractures according to the Neer system. Published and unpublished data from five observer studies were reviewed. Observers agreed less on displaced four-part fractures than on the overall Neer classification. Mean kappa values for interobserver agreement ranged from 0.......16 to 0.48. Specialists agreed slightly more than fellows and residents. Advanced imaging modalities (CT and 3D CT) seemed to contribute more to classification of displaced four-part patterns than in less complex fracture patterns. Low observer agreement may challenge the clinical approach to displaced...

  5. Considerations for the head-injured air-evacuated patient: a case report of frontal sinus fracture and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Eric; McKinlay, Alex J

    2005-07-01

    Head and neck injuries are not uncommon in combat environments and may be increasing due to survivable injuries from the use of kevlar helmets and body armor. With the current capability of rapid evacuation from the battlefield, acutely injured patients with frontal sinus injuries may undergo further barometric challenges. Proper care during transport can prevent the occurrence of secondary injury (increased intracranial pressure, tension pneumocephalus) that would complicate the patient's management at the next level of care. Management principles (importance of low-level flight/pressurized cabin, preflight use of decongestants, avoidance of valsalva, and ability to manage complications either procedurally or by landing) are reviewed. In addition, we propose a simple mechanism for pressure equilibration of a compromised frontal sinus during air evacuation using an angiocatheter placed through the wound before closure.

  6. Identification of Recent Bats belonging to the Rhinolophidae by the Humeral Characters

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Myung Hee; Uchida, Teruaki; 内田, 照章

    1983-01-01

    Humeral characters of eleven recent species and one subspecies belonging to three genera of the Rhinolophidae including two subfamilies were described. A key provides for their identification as well as the identification of the fossil bats found on the Akiyoshi-dai Plateau. Further, we discussed differences in the adaptability for flight of the bats not only within each taxon of the family but also between the phylogenetically less advanced Rhinolophidae and the more advanced Vespertilionida...

  7. Humeral lengthening and proximal deformity correction with monorail external fixator in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hongjiang; Zhu, Yi; Liu, Shen; Kang, Qinglin

    2018-05-01

    Several humeral lengthening or simultaneous deformity corrections through one osteotomy using various external fixators were reported, while literature regarding correction of shortening and proximal varus deformity is scarce. This retrospective clinical study evaluated the results of preforming an acute correction and delayed lengthening in young adults through two osteotomies using monorail external fixator. We report seven patients with various pathologies who underwent humeral proximal deformity correction and lengthening between 2009 and 2015. Pre-operative and post-operative clinical and radiographic data were collected. The mean follow-up time was 33.4 months (25-46 months). The humeral neck-shaft angle improved from 97.9° (85-110°) to 138.6° (135-145°). The magnitude of lengthening achieved was average 7.6 cm (range, 6-10 cm) at an average healing index of lengthening of 30.2 days/cm (range, 27.7-35.4 days/cm). There was a significant increase in range of shoulder abduction, and active abduction improved from pre-operative 136.4° (range, 95-160°) to post-operative 166.4° (range, 150-180°). The DASH score improved significance from 23.29 ± 8.36 to 6.57 ± 3.65 (t = 4.848; p monorail external fixator can be used for humeral shortening and proximal varus angular deformity. Functional improvement is expected after surgery and post-operative therapy.

  8. "Floating arm" injury in a child with fractures of the proximal and distal parts of the humerus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güven Melih

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Simultaneous supracondylar humerus fracture and ipsilateral fracture of the proximal humerus in children is rare. Case presentation A 10-year-old Turkish boy with an extension type supracondylar humerus fracture and ipsilateral fracture at the proximal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction of the humerus was treated by closed reduction and percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation. Closed reduction was performed using a Kirschner wire as a "joystick" to manipulate the humeral shaft after some swelling occurred around the elbow and shoulder. Conclusion The combination of fractures at the proximal and distal parts of the humerus can be termed as "floating arm" injury. Initial treatment of this unusual injury should be focused on the supracondylar humerus fracture. However, closed reduction can be difficult to perform with the swelling around the elbow and shoulder. A temporary Kirschner wire can be used as a "joystick" to fix and reduce the fracture.

  9. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  10. Biomechanical in vitro assessment of screw augmentation in locked plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderer, Götz; Scola, Alexander; Schmölz, Werner; Gebhard, Florian; Windolf, Markus; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina

    2013-10-01

    Proximal humerus fracture fixation can be difficult because of osteoporosis making it difficult to achieve stable implant anchorage in the weak bone stock even when using locking plates. This may cause implant failure requiring revision surgery. Cement augmentation has, in principle, been shown to improve stability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether augmentation of particular screws of a locking plate aimed at a region of low bone quality is effective in improving stability in a proximal humerus fracture model. Twelve paired human humerus specimens were included. Quantitative computed tomography was performed to determine bone mineral density (BMD). Local bone quality in the direction of the six proximal screws of a standard locking plate (PHILOS, Synthes) was assessed using mechanical means (DensiProbe™). A three-part fracture model with a metaphyseal defect was simulated and fixed with the plate. Within each pair of humeri the two screws aimed at the region of the lowest bone quality according to the DensiProbe™ were augmented in a randomised manner. For augmentation, 0.5 ml of bone cement was injected in a screw with multiple outlets at its tip under fluoroscopic control. A cyclic varus-bending test with increasing upper load magnitude was performed until failure of the screw-bone fixation. The augmented group withstood significantly more load cycles. The correlation of BMD with load cycles until failure and BMD with paired difference in load cycles to failure showed that augmentation could compensate for a low BMD. The results demonstrate that augmentation of screws in locked plating in a proximal humerus fracture model is effective in improving primary stability in a cyclic varus-bending test. The augmentation of two particular screws aimed at a region of low bone quality within the humeral head was almost as effective as four screws with twice the amount of bone cement. Screw augmentation combined with a knowledge of the local bone quality

  11. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    , 31-A2) and intertrochanteric (31-A3) fractures is considered an important approach because of their different behaviour at reduction. Pertrochanteric fractures occurred more frequently (81.5%); the patients' age was higher (80 years on the average) and women outnumbered men at a ratio of 3:1. Intertrochanteric fractures were found in significantly younger patients (average, 72 years), with a women-to-men ratio of 1.3:1. Stable pertrochanteric fractures (31-A1) were preferably indicated for DHS surgery. Unstable pertrochanteric (31-A2) and intertrochanteric (31- A3) fractures were treated with a nail. The patients underwent surgery on the day of injury or the next day. In the case of contraindications to an urgent intervention, surgery was performed after the patient's medical condition had stabilised. The number of complications was largely related to technical errors, such as insufficient reduction or an incorrectly inserted implant. Intertrochanteric fractures were associated with a higher occurrence of complications. No implant can compensate for errors due to surgery. Serious complications can be reduced by the correct assessment of fracture type, the use of an appropriate operative technique and early treatment of potential complications. The necessity of restoring continuity in the medial cortex of the femoral neck (Adams' arch) is the requirement that should be observed. Pseudoarthrosis or varus malalignment in a healed hip should be managed by valgus osteotomy. When the femoral head or the acetabulum is damaged, total hip arthroplasty is indicated. A prerequisite for successful surgical outcome is urgently and correctly performed osteosynthesis allowing for early rehabilitation and mobilisation of the patient.

  12. Fratura epifisiolise da extremidade proximal do úmero com luxação intratorácica: relato de caso Epiphysiolysis fracture of the proximal end of the humerus with intrathoracic dislocation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Guiotti Filho

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A fratura da extremidade proximal do úmero com luxação intratorácica foi relatada em 1949 por West, em que a fratura era, somente, do tubérculo maior. Desde então, poucos casos foram relatados na literatura, a maioria constituída por pessoas idosas, prevalecendo como indicação terapêutica artroplastia parcial. Os autores relatam o caso de um adolescente de 14 anos de idade, sexo masculino, que apresentou fratura epifisiolise da extremidade proximal do úmero com luxação intratorácica em decorrência de acidente ciclístico e que foi submetido a tratamento cirúrgico com redução, osteossíntese e reinserção do manguito rotador. A recuperação da cabeça do úmero totalmente desvitalizada e o acompanhamento do processo de necrose e revas cularização durante seis anos, em paciente adolescente, parece não terem sido previamente relatados.Fracture of the proximal end of the humerus with intrathoracic dislocation was reported in 1949 by West, and the fracture was only a fracture of the greater tubercle. Few cases have since been published, and most of them in elderly individuals, partial arthroplasty prevailing as the therapy indication. The authors report the case of a 14 year old boy who presented with an epiphysiolysis fracture of the proximal end of the humerus with intrathoracic dislocation resulting from a bicycle accident. The boy was submitted to surgical treatment with reduction, osteosynthesis, and reinsertion of the rotator cuff. The totally devitalized humeral head recovery and the monitoring of the necrosis and revascularization process for a period of six years in a teenager patient seems to have never been reported before.

  13. Economic aspects of complicated osteoporosis: The cost of treatment in the first year after fracture

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Dobrovolskaya; N. V. Toroptsova; O. M. Lesnyak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to estimate the cost of treatment in patients with complicated osteoporosis (OP) in the first year after fracture under the conditions of the Moscow municipal healthcare system.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 196 women (mean age, 65.8±9.1 years) who had sustained fractures at five major osteoporotic sites (proximal hip (PH), distal forearm (DF), surgical humeral neck, vertebral column, and medial and/or lateral ankle). A unified questionnaire that included data on ...

  14. Anchorage strategies in geriatric hip fracture management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobe Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an enormous humanitarian and socioeconomic need to improve the quality and effectiveness of care for patients with hip fracture. To reduce mechanical complications in the osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fractures, improved fixation techniques have been developed including blade or screw-anchor devices, locked minimally invasive or cement augmentation strategies. However, despite numerous innovations and advances regarding implant design and surgical techniques, systemic and mechanical complication rates remain high. Treatment success depends on secure implant fixation in often-osteoporotic bone as well as on patient-specific factors (fracture stability, bone quality, comorbidity, and gender and surgeon-related factors (experience, correct reduction, and optimal screw placement in the head/neck fragment. For fracture fixation, the anchorage of the lag screw within the femoral head plays a crucial role depending on the implant’s design. Meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies demonstrate that there is a strong trend towards arthroplasty treating geriatric femoral neck fractures. However, for young adults as well as older patients with less compromised bone quality, or in undisplaced fractures, head-preserving therapy is preferred as it is less invasive and associated with good functional results. This review summarizes the evidence for the internal fixation of femoral neck fractures and trochanteric femoral fractures in elderly patients. In addition, biomechanical considerations regarding implant anchorage in the femoral head including rotation, migration, and femoral neck shortening are made. Finally, cement augmentation strategies for hip fracture implants are evaluated critically.

  15. December 2004 - 38 War Wounds with Fractures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... War Wounds With Fractures: The ICRC Experience. East and Central ... limbs, the remaining 30% have central wounds involving head, chest or abdomen. The longer .... holding, especially for the lower limb. It can be used for ...

  16. Benefits and harms of locking plate osteosynthesis in intraarticular (OTA Type C) fractures of the proximal humerus: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2012-01-01

    stable plates in AO/OTA Type C fractures of the proximal humerus. METHODS: We conducted an iterative search in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Cinahl, and PEDro in all languages from 1999 to November 2010. Eligible studies should study the outcome for Type C fractures after primary...... according to study type and synthesised qualitatively. No randomised clinical trials were identified. Two comparative, observational studies reported a mean CS of 71 (relative to contralateral shoulder) and 75 (non-adjusted Constant Score) for Type C fractures. For all studies mean non-adjusted CS ranged......INTRODUCTION: Locking plate osteosynthesis of proximal humeral fractures are widely recommended and used, even in complex intraarticular fracture patterns such as AO/OTA Type C fractures. We systematically reviewed clinical studies assessing the benefits and harms of osteosynthesis with angle...

  17. Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video) Achilles Tendon Tear Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, ... Tamponade Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  18. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  19. ANALYSIS ON THE VARIATION OF MEDIAL ROTATION VALUES ACCORDING TO THE POSITION OF THE HUMERAL DIAPHYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Cohen, Carina; Busin Giora, Taís Stedile; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Raia, Fabio; Pekelman, Hélio; Cymrot, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the validity of measurements of medial rotation (MR) of the shoulder, using vertebral levels, according to the variation in the position of the humeral diaphysis, and to test the bi-goniometer as a new measuring instrument. 140 shoulders (70 patients) were prospectively evaluated in cases presenting unilateral shoulder MR limitation. The vertebral level was evaluated by means of a visual scale and was correlated with the angle obtained according to the position of the humeral diaphysis, using the bi-goniometer developed with the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Mackenzie University. The maximum vertebral level reached through MR on the unaffected side ranged from T3 to T12, and on the affected side, from T6 to the trochanter. Repositioning of the affected limb in MR according to the angular values on the normal side showed that 57.13% of the patients reached lower levels, between the sacrum, gluteus and trochanter. From analysis on the maximum vertebral level attained and the variation between the affected angle x (frontal plane: abduction and MR of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle x in MR, we observed that the greater the angle of the diaphyseal axis was, the lower the variation in the vertebral level attained was. From evaluating the linear correlation between the variables of difference in maximum vertebral level reached and variation in the affected angle y (extension and abduction of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle y in MR, we observed that there was no well-established linear relationship between these variables. Measurement of MR using vertebral levels does not correspond to the real values, since it varies according to the positioning of the humeral diaphysis.

  20. Dominant-limb range-of-motion and humeral-retrotorsion adaptation in collegiate baseball and softball position players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E; Oyama, Sakiko; Tatman, Justin; Myers, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanically, the motions used by baseball and softball pitchers differ greatly; however, the throwing motions of position players in both sports are strikingly similar. Although the adaptations to the dominant limb from overhead throwing have been well documented in baseball athletes, these adaptations have not been clearly identified in softball players. This information is important in order to develop and implement injury-prevention programs specific to decreasing the risk of upper extremity injury in softball athletes. To compare range-of-motion and humeral-retrotorsion characteristics of collegiate baseball and softball position players and of baseball and softball players to sex-matched controls. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratories and athletic training rooms at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Fifty-three collegiate baseball players, 35 collegiate softball players, 25 male controls (nonoverhead athletes), and 19 female controls (nonoverhead athletes). Range of motion and humeral retrotorsion were measured using a digital inclinometer and diagnostic ultrasound. Glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, external-rotation gain, total glenohumeral range of motion, and humeral retrotorsion. Baseball players had greater glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, total-range-of-motion, and humeral-retrotorsion difference than softball players and male controls. There were no differences between glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit, total-range-of-motion, and humeral-retrotorsion difference in softball players and female controls. Few differences were evident between softball players and female control participants, although range-of-motion and humeral-retrotorsion adaptations were significantly different than baseball players. The throwing motions are similar between softball and baseball, but the athletes adapt to the demands of the sport differently; thus, stretching/strengthening programs designed for baseball may not be the most

  1. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A; Danish, Qazi

    2016-09-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation.

  3. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  4. Preliminary experience with biodegradable implants for fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biodegradable implants were designed to overcome the disadvantages of metal-based internal fixation devices. Although they have been in use for four decades internationally, many surgeons in India continue to be skeptical about the mechanical strength of biodegradable implants, hence this study. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done to assess the feasibility and surgeon confidence level with biodegradable implants over a 12-month period in an Indian hospital. Fifteen fractures (intra-articular, metaphyseal or small bone fractures were fixed with biodegradable implants. The surgeries were randomly scheduled so that different surgeons with different levels of experience could use the implants for fixation. Results: Three fractures (one humeral condyle, two capitulum, were supplemented by additional K-wires fixation. Trans-articular fixator was applied in two distal radius and two pilon fractures where bio-pins alone were used. All fractures united, but in two cases the fracture displaced partially during the healing phase; one fibula due to early walking, and one radius was deemed unstable even after bio-pin and external fixator. Conclusions: Biodegradable -implants are excellent for carefully selected cases of intra-articular fractures and some small bone fractures. However, limitations for use in long bone fractures persist and no great advantage is gained if a "hybrid" composite is employed. The mechanical properties of biopins and screws in isolation are perceived to be inferior to those of conventional metal implants, leading to low confidence levels regarding the stability of reduced fractures; these implants should be used predominantly in fracture patterns in which internal fixation is subjected to minimal stress.

  5. Does Humeral Component Lateralization in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Affect Rotator Cuff Torque? Evaluation in a Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Langohr, G Daniel G; Mahaffy, Matthew; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S

    2017-10-01

    Humeral component lateralization in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may improve the biomechanical advantage of the rotator cuff, which could improve the torque generated by the rotator cuff and increase internal and external rotation of the shoulder. The purpose of this in vitro biomechanical study was to evaluate the effect of humeral component lateralization (or lateral offset) on the torque of the anterior and posterior rotator cuff. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders from eight separate donors (74 ± 8 years; six males, two females) were tested using an in vitro simulator. All shoulders were prescreened for soft tissue deficit and/or deformity before testing. A custom RTSA prosthesis was implanted that allowed five levels of humeral component lateralization (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mm), which avoided restrictions imposed by commercially available designs. The torques exerted by the anterior and posterior rotator cuff were measured three times and then averaged for varying humeral lateralization, abduction angle (0°, 45°, 90°), and internal and external rotation (-60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 60°). A three-way repeated measures ANOVA (abduction angle, humeral lateralization, internal rotation and external rotation angles) with a significance level of α = 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Humeral lateralization only affected posterior rotator cuff torque at 0° abduction, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm at 60° internal rotation decreased external rotation torque by 1.6 ± 0.4 Nm (95% CI, -0.07 -1.56 Nm; p = 0.06) from 4.0 ± 0.3 Nm to 2.4 ± 0.6 Nm, respectively, but at 60° external rotation increased external rotation torque by 2.2 ± 0.5 Nm (95% CI, -4.2 to -0.2 Nm; p = 0.029) from 6.2 ± 0.5 Nm to 8.3 ± 0.5 Nm, respectively. Anterior cuff torque was affected by humeral lateralization in more arm positions than the posterior cuff, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm when at 60° internal rotation

  6. The normal development of proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center in the first 2 years of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Cheol

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to ascertain the normal maturation of proximal epiphyseal ossification centers by monthly age during the first years of life. The distribution of age was 0 to 24 months. Six hundred and seventy-five infants were male and 436 were female; their ages were measured in months, and there was no evidence of developmental problems. Proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification centers were evaluated from chest radiographs ; if not visualized, they were graded as 0, and otherwise, as follows : grade 1 : visualized with poor margin or a diameter of less than 1/4 of metaphyseal width; grade 2: visualized with good margin or a diameter of more than 1/4 of metaphyseal width; in grade 3 and 4, two ossification centers were visualized. Grade 3 indicated that one ossification center had the morphology of grade 2. Grade 5 indicated that two ossification centers were fused. We then assessed the relationship between the development of an ossification center and monthly age. A proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center shows regular maturational features according to monthly age. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  7. Surgical management of medial humeral epicondylitis, cubital synovial osteochondromatosis and humeroradial subluxation in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Perry

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 13-year-old domestic shorthair cat presented for evaluation of pain and difficulty ambulating. Orthopedic examination and CT facilitated a diagnosis of bilateral elbow synovial osteochondromatosis with medial humeral epicondylitis and concurrent osteoarthritis. Right humeroradial subluxation was evident on CT images, but no instability was evident preoperatively. Surgical treatment was elected, including external neurolysis of the ulnar nerve, removal of the areas of mineralization within the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and medial arthrotomy to remove intra-articular mineralized bodies. Following closure, instability of the right elbow was noted with humeroradial subluxation necessitating placement of circumferential suture prostheses to provide satisfactory stability. Reassessment was performed 2, 6, 12, 24 and 40 weeks postoperatively and revealed maintenance of elbow stability and substantial improvement in mobility and comfort. Relevance and novel information While humeroradial subluxation has been reported in association with medial humeral epicondylitis on post-mortem examination, associated clinically significant instability has not been documented previously. Surgeons should be aware of the potential for this complication and check elbow stability following surgery. Despite this complication, a favorable medium-term outcome was achieved for this cat.

  8. Little Leaguer's shoulder (proximal humeral epiphysiolysis): MRI findings in four boys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obembe, Olufolajimi O.; Gaskin, Cree M.; Anderson, Mark W.; Taffoni, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a common problem among adolescent athletes. A possible cause of such pain that can be diagnosed on MRI is a stress injury to the proximal humerus known as Little Leaguer's shoulder (proximal humeral epiphysiolysis). Our objective was to describe the MRI appearance of Little Leaguer's shoulder. Four patients (all boys; age range 11-15 years; median 13 years) with clinical, plain radiographic, and MR imaging findings of Little Leaguer's shoulder were studied retrospectively. MRI demonstrated focal physeal widening in all four boys with extension of physeal signal intensity into the metaphysis on T1-weighted and gradient echo coronal and sagittal sequences. T2-weighted sequences were of limited use in demonstrating the physeal widening, which is critical to the diagnosis. Abnormal high T2-signal intensity was seen in the metaphysis adjacent to the focal physeal widening in all the boys. Focal extension of normal physeal T1-weighted and gradient echo signal intensity into the adjacent metaphysis is a sign of stress injury in the proximal humeral physis (Little Leaguer's shoulder). Children should suspend the offending sport to allow healing. (orig.)

  9. CT of the acetabular fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magu, N.K.; Moda, S.K.; Magu, Sarita; Airon, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients with 10 injured hips, in whom acetabular fractures with posterior dislocation of the femoral heads were demonstrated on initial radiography, underwent CT. CT was found superior in detecting the presence of intra-articular bony fragments in Group A patients (40%), where conventional radiography exhibited congruous manipulative reduction of the joint surfaces. The spatial position of the intra-articular fragments could not be ascertained on conventional radiography in 40% of the patients in Group B, in whom congruous manipulative reduction could not be achieved and subluxation of the femoral heads was observed. On conventional radiography, it was also difficult to appreciate the presence of intra-articular fragments in 60% of the patients in Group B, in whom either the dislocation could not be reduced (40%) or the femoral head redislocated after close manipulative reduction (20%). CT proved its superiority in detecting the extent of the fractures of the acetabular roof, posterior and anterior acetabular margins, the quadrilateral plate along with rotation of the acetabular columns and displacements of the major fractured fragments. Associated fractures of the sacrum (20%), and traumatic lesions of the sacro-iliac joint (20%), not apparent on conventional radiography were well demonstrated by CT. As a result of CT, the treatment was changed in 60% of the patients in Group A, and 40% in Group B. In addition, CT permitted a better choice of surgical technique in the management of acetabular fractures. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Surgical interventions to treat humerus shaft fractures: A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Guo Zhao

    Full Text Available There are three main surgical techniques to treat humeral shaft fractures: open reduction and plate fixation (ORPF, intramedullary nail (IMN fixation, and minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO. We performed a network meta-analysis to compare three surgical procedures, including ORPF, IMN fixation, and MIPO, to provide the optimum treatment for humerus shaft fractures.MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, and Cochrane library were researched for reports published up to May 2016. We only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing two or more of the three surgical procedures, including the ORPF, IMN, and MIPO techniques, for humeral shaft fractures in adults. The methodological quality was evaluated based on the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We used WinBUGS1.4 to conduct this Bayesian network meta-analysis. We used the odd ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs to calculate the dichotomous outcomes and analyzed the percentages of the surface under the cumulative ranking curve.Seventeen eligible publications reporting 16 RCTs were included in this study. Eight hundred and thirty-two participants were randomized to receive one of three surgical procedures. The results showed that shoulder impingement occurred more commonly in the IMN group than with either ORPF (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.37 or MIPO fixation (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.00-0.69. Iatrogenic radial nerve injury occurred more commonly in the ORPF group than in the MIPO group (OR, 11.09; 95% CI, 1.80-124.20. There were no significant differences among the three procedures in nonunion, delayed union, and infection.Compared with IMN and ORPF, MIPO technique is the preferred treatment method for humeral shaft fractures.

  11. Radiographic evaluation of the canine elbow joint with special reference to the medial humeral condyle and the medial coronoid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhout, G.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of radiographic examination of clinically affected elbow joints in 14 young, large-breed dogs, including standard and oblique projections and linear tomography, were compared with the findings of medial arthrotomy. Radiographs revealed arthrosis (13 dogs), osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle (2 dogs), fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (5 dogs), and a combination of osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle and fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (2 dogs). In one dog fissures in the medial coronoid process and in another dog a linear radiopacity along the articular surface of the medial coronoid process were found. In three dogs both medial humeral condyle and medial coronoid process appeared normal. The radiographic findings were confirmed during surgery in 11 dogs. Cartilage erosion of the medial humeral condyle in two dogs and of the medial coronoid process in one dog had not resulted in radiographically visible abnormalities. Radiographic examination of the elbow joints in young, large-breed dogs should include standard mediolateral and craniocaudal projections, a mediolateral projection with the joint maximally extended and the leg supinated 15°, and a craniolateral-to-caudomedial projection

  12. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF SUPRACONDYLAR FRACTURES OF THE HUMERUS IN CHILDREN TREATED BY CLOSED REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Imobi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is no universal agreement regarding the management of displaced supracondylar fracture of the humerous in children. According to some orthopaedic surgeon almost all supracondylar humeral fractures should be treated operatively by reduction and pinning. While according to others closed reduction and pinning should be used for Gartland type II and some type III fractures. We present 50 cases of displaced supracondylar fracture treated by closed manipulative reduction under G.A. and immobilization with a posterior plaster of paris slab and collar and cuff. OBJECTIVE : T o assess the functional results of the injured elbow and to study the incidence of change in the carrying angle of the elbow. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in 50 patients with extension type of displaced supracondylar fractures of humerus in children (Gartland type II and type III treated by closed manipulative reduction and immobilization in flexion of the elbow with a posterior plaster of paris slab and collar and cuff. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Flexion type of supracondylar fracture and those fractures which are absolutely indicated for operative intervention, Viz an open fracture and severe vascular compromise were excluded from the study. The range of movement and carrying angle was measured with the help of a Goniometer and Flynn criteria were used for functional assessment. RESULTS: At the end of follow up period, the end results were graded as excellent in 40%, good in 42%, fair in 12% and poor in 6%. A satisfactory result was therefore obtained in 94% and unsatisfactory result in 6% of the 50 patients who were followed and evaluated. CONCLUSION: This closed method of treatment for all practical proposes produces least complications, shorter hospital stay, can be expected to yield reproducible consistent satisfactory results not surpassed by any other method of treatment.

  13. Classification of Porcine Cranial Fracture Patterns Using a Fracture Printing Interface,.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Bucak, Serhat Selçuk; Vollner, Jennifer M; Fenton, Todd W; Jain, Anil K; Haut, Roger C

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing between accidental and abusive head trauma in children can be difficult, as there is a lack of baseline data for pediatric cranial fracture patterns. A porcine head model has recently been developed and utilized in a series of studies to investigate the effects of impact energy level, surface type, and constraint condition on cranial fracture patterns. In the current study, an automated pattern recognition method, or a fracture printing interface (FPI), was developed to classify cranial fracture patterns that were associated with different impact scenarios documented in previous experiments. The FPI accurately predicted the energy level when the impact surface type was rigid. Additionally, the FPI was exceedingly successful in determining fractures caused by skulls being dropped with a high-level energy (97% accuracy). The FPI, currently developed on the porcine data, may in the future be transformed to the task of cranial fracture pattern classification for human infant skulls. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Brent B; Serebrakian, Arman T; Maricevich, Renata S

    2017-05-01

    Mandible fractures account for a significant portion of maxillofacial injuries and the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these fractures remain challenging despite improved imaging technology and fixation techniques. Understanding appropriate surgical management can prevent complications such as malocclusion, pain, and revision procedures. Depending on the type and location of the fractures, various open and closed surgical reduction techniques can be utilized. In this article, the authors review the diagnostic evaluation, treatment options, and common complications of mandible fractures. Special considerations are described for pediatric and atrophic mandibles.

  15. Denervation of the lateral humeral epicondyle for treatment of chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nicholas E; Forman, Scott K; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-02-01

    Chronic lateral epicondylitis remains a treatment challenge. Traditional surgical treatments for lateral epicondylitis involve variations of the classic Nirschl lateral release. Anatomic studies reveal that the posterior branch or branches of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm consistently innervate the lateral humeral epicondyle. We undertook the present study to determine the effectiveness of denervation of the lateral humeral epicondyle in treating chronic lateral epicondylitis. An institutional review board-approved prospective study included 30 elbows in 26 patients. Inclusion criteria included failure to respond to nonoperative treatment for more than 6 months and improvement in grip strength and in visual analog pain scale after diagnostic nerve block of the posterior branches of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm proximal to the lateral humeral epicondyle. We excluded patients who had undergone previous surgery for lateral epicondylitis. Outcome measures included visual analog pain scale and grip strength testing. Denervation surgery involved identification and transection of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm branches with implantation into the triceps. The presence of radial tunnel syndrome was noted but did not affect inclusion criteria; if it was present, we did not correct it surgically. We used no postoperative splinting and permitted immediate return to activities of daily living. At a mean of 28 months of follow-up, the average visual analog scale score decreased from 7.9 to 1.9. Average grip strength with the elbow extended improved from 13 to 24 kg. A total of 80% of patients had good or excellent results, as defined by an improvement of 5 or more points on the visual analog scale for pain. Denervation of the lateral epicondyle was effective in relieving pain in 80% of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis who had a positive response to a local anesthetic block of the posterior branches of the posterior

  16. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nits. You should also use hot water to wash any bed linens, towels, and clothing recently worn by the person who had head lice. Vacuum anything that can’t be washed, such as the couch, carpets, your child’s car seat, and any stuffed animals. Because head lice ...

  17. Morphometric quantification of biodegradable PLDLLA-anchor implant-beds on magnetic resonance images of the humeral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, D.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the functional anatomy of the human shoulder joint is the base for understanding of rotator cuff tears and its surgical repair by means of suture anchors. These anchors, manufactured of biodegradable polymers, do not (or not totally) degrade in the period of time postulated by the manufactures. Bone healing seems to be impaired. Radiological follow-ups of 8 months to years postoperative revealed osteolysis and even cystic deformation of the implant beds (=anchor-holes). In this present study the anchor-holes are morphometrically measured for the first time on MRT-images. For this prospective study MRIs from altogether 38 patients (20 female/18 male, age 43.9a - 81.6a) were selected after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with 1-4 biodegradable suture anchors (PLDLLA 'Bio-Corkscrews', Arthrex Inc., Naples FL, USA) at a single institution. After signing an informed consent form patients' MRIs could be evaluated after a mean follow-up period of 15.8 and 36 months. The shapes of the bony implant beds were subjectively categorized and for the computer-assisted morphometry of the anchor-hole areas Adobe Photoshop; CS3 Extended (Version 10.0) was used and adapted. The results were statistically analyzed and correlated with the clinical success rate (Constant Score=CS). All anchor-holes were discernable for up to 42 months. A significant shift of threaded to cylindric anchor-hole shapes was evident from the 1 st to 2 nd follow-up. Only 11.5% of the anchor-holes showed a cystic enlargement. At the 1 st follow-up the anchor-hole areas increased on average by 50.87% compared to original anchor size. However, at the 2 nd follow-up all anchor-hole areas decreased significantly (p st follow-up. The average preoperative CS improved from 38.5 points to 87.4 (1 st follow-up) and then remained at 87 points (2 nd follow-up). Anchor-holes of biodegradable suture anchor are, as opposed to the time period claimed by the manufacturers, visible and thus not totally degraded for up to 42 months. Osteolysis seems to be the cause of enlargement of the anchor-holes for up to 22 months. Nevertheless, at the 2 nd follow-up period (32 to 42 months) the anchor-holes decrease in size and change their shapes change from a threaded to cylindric outline. Thus, it is concluded that degradation of the implant material starts at the screw threads. In particular the rare cystic anchor-hole shapes point to impaired bone healing. In contrast to the only previous quantitative-radiological study this present study did not show any statistical correlation of shape/enlargement of anchor-holes on MRIs and clinical success rate regarding joint function and stability. (author) [de

  18. Local application of a gentamicin-loaded thermo-responsive hydrogel allows for fracture healing upon clearance of a high Staphylococcus aureus load in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-JA ter Boo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ntibiotic-loaded biomaterials (ALBs have emerged as a potential useful adjunctive antimicrobial measure for the prevention of infection in open fracture care. A biodegradable thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide grafted hyaluronic acid (HApN hydrogel loaded with gentamicin has recently been shown to prevent implant-related infection in a rabbit osteosynthesis model. The primary aim of this study was to determine the influence of this HApN hydrogel on bone healing at an early stage (4 weeks. A rabbit humeral osteotomy model with plating osteosynthesis was used to compare fracture healing in rabbits receiving the hydrogel as compared with control animals. The secondary aim was to observe fracture healing in groups treated with and without antibiotic-loaded hydrogel in the presence of bacterial contamination. In all groups, outcome measures were mechanical stability and histological score, with additional quantitative bacteriology in the inoculated groups. Application of the HApN hydrogel in non-inoculated rabbits did not significantly influence humeral stiffness or histological scores for fracture healing in comparison to controls. In the inoculated groups, animals receiving the bacterial inoculum without hydrogel were culture-positive at euthanasia and found to display lower humeral stiffness values and higher histopathological scores for bacterial presence in comparison with equivalents receiving the gentamicin-loaded HApN hydrogel, which were also infection-free. In summary, our data showed that HApN was an effective antibiotic carrier that did not affect fracture healing. This data supported its suitability for application in fracture care. Addition of osteopromotive compounds could provide further support for accelerating fracture healing in addition to successful infection prophylaxis.

  19. Fracture sacrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely rare case of combined transverse and vertical fracture of sacrum with neurological deficit is reported here with a six month follow-up. The patient also had an L1 compression fracture. The patient has recovered significantly with conservative management.

  20. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  1. The humeral origin of the brachioradialis muscle: an unusual site of high radial nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchel, A; Zirak, C; De Mey, A

    2013-11-01

    Radial nerve compression is seldom encountered in the upper arm, and most commonly described compression syndromes have their anatomical cause in the forearm. The teres major, the triceps muscle, the intermuscular septum region and the space between the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles have all been identified as radial nerve compression sites above the elbow. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male patient who presented with dorso-lateral forearm pain and paraesthesias without neurological deficit. Surgical exploration revealed radial nerve compression at the humeral origin of the brachioradialis muscle. Liberation of the nerve at this site was successful at relieving the symptoms. To our knowledge, this compression site has not been described in the literature. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New approach for simulating groundwater flow in discrete fracture network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Zhu, J.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we develop a new approach to calculate groundwater flowrate and hydraulic head distribution in two-dimensional discrete fracture network (DFN) where both laminar and turbulent flows co-exist in individual fractures. The cubic law is used to calculate hydraulic head distribution and flow behaviors in fractures where flow is laminar, while the Forchheimer's law is used to quantify turbulent flow behaviors. Reynolds number is used to distinguish flow characteristics in individual fractures. The combination of linear and non-linear equations is solved iteratively to determine flowrates in all fractures and hydraulic heads at all intersections. We examine potential errors in both flowrate and hydraulic head from the approach of uniform flow assumption. Applying the cubic law in all fractures regardless of actual flow conditions overestimates the flowrate when turbulent flow may exist while applying the Forchheimer's law indiscriminately underestimate the flowrate when laminar flows exist in the network. The contrast of apertures of large and small fractures in the DFN has significant impact on the potential errors of using only the cubic law or the Forchheimer's law. Both the cubic law and Forchheimer's law simulate similar hydraulic head distributions as the main difference between these two approaches lies in predicting different flowrates. Fracture irregularity does not significantly affect the potential errors from using only the cubic law or the Forchheimer's law if network configuration remains similar. Relative density of fractures does not significantly affect the relative performance of the cubic law and Forchheimer's law.

  3. A bi-articular model for scapular-humeral rhythm reconstruction through data from wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; De Rossi, Danilo; Tognetti, Alessandro

    2016-04-23

    Patient-specific performance assessment of arm movements in daily life activities is fundamental for neurological rehabilitation therapy. In most applications, the shoulder movement is simplified through a socket-ball joint, neglecting the movement of the scapular-thoracic complex. This may lead to significant errors. We propose an innovative bi-articular model of the human shoulder for estimating the position of the hand in relation to the sternum. The model takes into account both the scapular-toracic and gleno-humeral movements and their ratio governed by the scapular-humeral rhythm, fusing the information of inertial and textile-based strain sensors. To feed the reconstruction algorithm based on the bi-articular model, an ad-hoc sensing shirt was developed. The shirt was equipped with two inertial measurement units (IMUs) and an integrated textile strain sensor. We built the bi-articular model starting from the data obtained in two planar movements (arm abduction and flexion in the sagittal plane) and analysing the error between the reference data - measured through an optical reference system - and the socket-ball approximation of the shoulder. The 3D model was developed by extending the behaviour of the kinematic chain revealed in the planar trajectories through a parameter identification that takes into account the body structure of the subject. The bi-articular model was evaluated in five subjects in comparison with the optical reference system. The errors were computed in terms of distance between the reference position of the trochlea (end-effector) and the correspondent model estimation. The introduced method remarkably improved the estimation of the position of the trochlea (and consequently the estimation of the hand position during reaching activities) reducing position errors from 11.5 cm to 1.8 cm. Thanks to the developed bi-articular model, we demonstrated a reliable estimation of the upper arm kinematics with a minimal sensing system suitable for

  4. [Treatment of type C intercondylar fractures of distal humerus using dual plating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Ke; Xu, Hua; Liu, Fan; Wang, You-Hua; Tao, Ran; Cao, Yi; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Yong

    2009-06-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of dual plating in the treatment of humeral intercondylar type-C fractures in adults. From June 2004 to October 2007, 38 cases of type-C distal humeral fractures were stabilised with dual plating. There were 21 males and 17 females. The average age was 43 years with a range from 21 to 71 years. According to the AO classification, 9 cases were of type C1, 17 of C2 and 12 of C3. The posterior midline approach was selected. Twenty-one cases were exposed through the trans-olecranon osteotomy, 11 through the Campbell (Van Gorder) approach, 6 through triceps sparing approach. Autogenous bone graft was performed in 5 cases because of severe comminution. Thirty-five patients were followed-up for 14-30 months (mean 24.2 months). At the latest follow-up, the elbow flexion averaged 119 degrees (range 90 degrees - 135 degrees ), and the loss of extension averaged 16.2 degrees (range 5 degrees - 25 degrees ). All the patients got bony healing, the average healing period was 14 weeks. The patients were evaluated using the criteria of Aitken and Rorabeek and the scores were 13 excellent, 16 good, 6 fair. Twenty-nine patients (82.9%) had a good or excellent results. Complications included 4 cases of traumatic osteoarthritis, 2 heterotopic ossification, 1 ulnar neuropathy. Infection as well as loosening or breakage of the implant was not found. The dual plating is able to provide rigid fixation for the humeral intercondylar fractures. In addition, it can allow early functional exercise after operation, decrease the related complications significantly, and improve the functional results.

  5. Closed Versus Open Supracondylar Fractures of the Humerus in Children: A Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Presentation and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewine, Eliza; Kim, Jaehon M; Miller, Patricia E; Waters, Peter M; Mahan, Susan T; Snyder, Brian; Hedequist, Daniel; Bae, Donald S

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the presentation and postoperative results of children treated for open and closed, completely displaced type III supracondylar humerus fractures (SCFs). Thirty patients with open and 66 patients with closed, completely displaced type III SCFs were evaluated. Open fractures underwent irrigation and debridement, and all patients were treated by open or closed reduction and pin fixation. Medical records were reviewed to obtain demographic information as well as preoperative and postoperative clinical data regarding mechanism of injury, neurovascular status, associated injuries, postoperative range of motion, infections, and pain. Radiographs were evaluated to quantify displacement, Baumann's angle, humeral capitellar angle, position of the anterior humeral line, and adequacy of reduction. Outcomes were assessed using Flynn criteria. Mean clinical follow-up for the open and closed fracture groups was 8.9 and 5.7 months, respectively. Both groups were similar with respect to age, sex distribution, weight and body mass index, laterality of involvement, and mechanism of injury. At presentation, 35% of closed SCFs and 23% of open SCFs presented with abnormal neurovascular status. There was a higher prevalence of diminished/absent pulses or distal limb ischemia in patients with open injuries (27%) compared with closed fractures (18%). Conversely, severely displaced closed fractures were more commonly associated with nerve injury/palsy at presentation (35%) than those with open fractures (23%). Spontaneous nerve recovery was seen in 87% within 3 to 6 months. Postoperative loss of reduction and malunion were more common in the closed fracture group. However, 84% of patients achieved good-to-excellent results by Flynn criteria, with no appreciable difference based upon open versus closed fractures. With timely wound and fracture treatment, the clinical and radiographic results of children treated for open SCFs is similar to

  6. Management of post-traumatic elbow instability after failed radial head excision: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Touloupakis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Radial head excision has always been a safe commonly used surgical procedure with a satisfactory clinical outcome for isolated comminuted radial head fractures. However, diagnosis of elbow instability is still very challenging and often underestimated in routine orthopaedic evaluation. We present the case of a 21-years old female treated with excision after radial head fracture, resulting in elbow instability. The patient underwent revision surgery after four weeks. We believe that ligament reconstruction without radial head substitution is a safe alternative choice for Mason III radial head fractures accompanied by complex ligament lesions.

  7. Head injury in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Makoto; Mori, Nobuhiko; Yokosuka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Imanaga, Hirohisa

    1981-01-01

    Findings of computerized tomography (CT) in 183 cases of head injury in children were investigated with special reference to CT findings of mild head injury. As was expected, CT findings of mild head injury fell within the normal range, in almost all cases. However, abnormal findings were noticed in 4 out of 34 cases (12%) in acute stage and 7 out of 76 cases (9%) in chronic stage. They were 3 cases of localized low density area in acute stage and 6 cases of mild cerebral atrophy in chronic stage, etc. There were some cases of mild head injury in which CT findings were normal while EEG examination revealed abnormality. Also in some cases, x-ray study demonstrated linear skull fracture which CT failed to show. These conventional techniques could be still remained as useful adjunct aid in diagnosis of head injury. CT findings of cases of cerebral contusion in their acute stage were divided as follows; normal, low density, small ventricle and ventricular and/or cisternal hemorrhage, frequency of incidence being 38, 17, 22, 11% respectively. These findings were invariably converted to cerebral atrophy from 10 days to 2 months after the impacts. In the cases with intracranial hematoma revealed by CT, only 32% of them showed clinical signs of Araki's type IV in their acute stage and 63% of them showed no neurological defects, that is Araki's type I and II. A case of extreme diffuse cerebral atrophy which followed acute subdural hematoma caused by tear of bridging veins without cortical contusion was presented. (author)

  8. Evaluation and Management of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Khmelnitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries, especially among older osteoporotic women. Restoration of function requires a thorough understanding of the neurovascular, musculotendinous, and bony anatomy. This paper addresses the relevant anatomy and highlights various management options, including indication for arthroplasty. In the vast majority of cases, proximal humerus fractures may be treated nonoperatively. In the case of displaced fractures, when surgical intervention may be pursued, numerous constructs have been investigated. Of these, the proximal humerus locking plate is the most widely used. Arthroplasty is generally reserved for comminuted 4-part fractures, head-split fractures, or fractures with significant underlying arthritic changes. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is reserved for patients with a deficient rotator cuff, or highly comminuted tuberosities.

  9. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a severe blow to the head can still knock the brain into the side of the skull ... following certain precautions and taking a break from sports and other activities that make symptoms worse. Playing ...

  10. Fracture risk in unicameral bone cyst. Is magnetic resonance imaging a better predictor than plain radiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pireau, Nathalie; De Gheldere, Antoine; Mainard-Simard, Laurence; Lascombes, Pierre; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2011-04-01

    The classical indication for treating a simple bone cyst is usually the risk of fracture, which can be predicted based on three parameters: the bone cyst index, the bone cyst diameter, and the minimal cortical thickness. A retrospective review was carried out based on imaging of 35 simple bone cysts (30 humeral and 5 femoral). The three parameters were measured on standard radiographs, and on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. The measurements were performed by two independent reviewers, and twice by the same reviewer. Kappa values and binary logistic regression were used to assess the ability of the parameters to predict the fracture risk. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was measured. T1-weighted MRI was found to have the best inter- and intraobserver repeatability. The bone cyst index was found to be the best predictor for the risk of fracture.

  11. Seat belt syndrome with unstable Chance fracture dislocation of the second lumbar vertebra without neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Bohmer, Robert D

    2014-01-08

    The seat belt syndrome is a recognised complication of seat belt use in vehicles. Unstable Chance fractures of the spine without neurological deficits have been reported infrequently. We describe a young woman with completely disrupted Chance fracture of the second lumbar vertebra in association with left hemidiaphragmatic rupture/hernia, multiple bowel perforations, splenic capsular tear, left humeral shaft and multiple rib fractures. These injuries which resulted from high-speed vehicle collision and led to death of one of the occupants were readily detected by trauma series imaging. The patient was successfully treated by a dedicated multidisciplinary team which adopted a staged surgical approach and prioritisation of care. There were no manifested neurological or other deficits after 1 year of follow-up. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such a case in Australasia. We discuss the challenging surgical management, highlighting the role of radiological imaging in such cases and provide a literature review.

  12. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  13. Fracture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueng, Tzoushin; Towse, D.

    1991-01-01

    Fractures are not only the weak planes of a rock mass, but also the easy passages for the fluid flow. Their spacing, orientation, and aperture will affect the deformability, strength, heat transmittal, and fluid transporting properties of the rock mass. To understand the thermomechanical and hydrological behaviors of the rock surrounding the heater emplacement borehole, the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures of the rock mass should be known. Borehole television and borescope surveys were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes drilled in the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) at G-Tunnel. Core logging was also performed during drilling. However, because the core was not oriented and the depth of the fracture cannot be accurately determined, the results of the core logging were only used as reference and will not be discussed here

  14. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Sophie; Gill, Hameet S; Fialkov, Jeffery A; Matic, Damir B; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of some of the changes in aspects of facial fracture management. 2. Assess a patient presenting with facial fractures. 3. Understand indications and timing of surgery. 4. Recognize exposures of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. 5. Identify methods for repair of typical facial fracture patterns. 6. Discuss the common complications seen with facial fractures. Restoration of the facial skeleton and associated soft tissues after trauma involves accurate clinical and radiologic assessment to effectively plan a management approach for these injuries. When surgical intervention is necessary, timing, exposure, sequencing, and execution of repair are all integral to achieving the best long-term outcomes for these patients.

  15. Burden of high fracture probability worldwide: secular increases 2010-2040.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odén, A; McCloskey, E V; Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Johansson, H

    2015-09-01

    The number of individuals aged 50 years or more at high risk of osteoporotic fracture worldwide in 2010 was estimated at 158 million and is set to double by 2040. The aim of this study was to quantify the number of individuals worldwide aged 50 years or more at high risk of osteoporotic fracture in 2010 and 2040. A threshold of high fracture probability was set at the age-specific 10-year probability of a major fracture (clinical vertebral, forearm, humeral or hip fracture) which was equivalent to that of a woman with a BMI of 24 kg/m(2) and a prior fragility fracture but no other clinical risk factors. The prevalence of high risk was determined worldwide and by continent using all available country-specific FRAX models and applied the population demography for each country. Twenty-one million men and 137 million women had a fracture probability at or above the threshold in the world for the year 2010. The greatest number of men and women at high risk were from Asia (55 %). Worldwide, the number of high-risk individuals is expected to double over the next 40 years. We conclude that individuals with high probability of osteoporotic fractures comprise a very significant disease burden to society, particularly in Asia, and that this burden is set to increase markedly in the future. These analyses provide a platform for the evaluation of risk assessment and intervention strategies.

  16. Multiple growing fractures and cerebral venous anomaly after penetrating injuries: delayed diagnosis in a battered child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkat, S.; Vandevenne, J.E.; Parizel, P.M.; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    A growing fracture usually results from a skull fracture with dural tear after blunt head trauma during infancy. We present a case of child abuse with multiple growing fractures resulting from penetrating head trauma by scissors. MR imaging confirmed the presence of growing fractures and revealed a presumably post-traumatic venous anomaly (occluded left cavernous sinus and aberrant posterior venous drainage via the internal cerebral veins). Diagnosis of the growing fractures and venous anomaly was delayed until the age of 15 years. Medical expertise should be more readily available to battered children, and MR imaging is advocated in growing skull fracture to exclude associated post-traumatic brain lesions. (orig.)

  17. Multiple growing fractures and cerebral venous anomaly after penetrating injuries: delayed diagnosis in a battered child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkat, S.; Vandevenne, J.E.; Parizel, P.M.; Schepper, A.M. de [Dept. of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Edegem (Belgium)

    2001-05-01

    A growing fracture usually results from a skull fracture with dural tear after blunt head trauma during infancy. We present a case of child abuse with multiple growing fractures resulting from penetrating head trauma by scissors. MR imaging confirmed the presence of growing fractures and revealed a presumably post-traumatic venous anomaly (occluded left cavernous sinus and aberrant posterior venous drainage via the internal cerebral veins). Diagnosis of the growing fractures and venous anomaly was delayed until the age of 15 years. Medical expertise should be more readily available to battered children, and MR imaging is advocated in growing skull fracture to exclude associated post-traumatic brain lesions. (orig.)

  18. Pisiform fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleege, M.A.; Jebson, P.J.; Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Steyers, C.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fractures of the pisiform are often missed due to improper radiographic evaluation and a tendency to focus on other, more obvious injuries. Delayed diagnosis may result in disabling sequelae. A high index of clinical suspicion and appropriate radiographic examination will establish the correct diagnosis. Ten patients with pisiform fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, radiographic features, and evaluation of this injury are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Stress fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Cooper, K.L.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of a stress fracture should be considered in patients presented with pain after a change in activity, especially if the activity is strenuous and the pain is in the lower extremities. Since evidence of the stress fracture may not be apparent for weeks on routine radiographs, proper use of other imaging techniques will allow an earlier diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is especially important in the femur, where displacement may occur

  20. Risks of all-cause and site-specific fractures among hospitalized patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high prevalence of osteoporosis. The clinical sequel of osteoporosis is fracture. Patients with COPD who experience a fracture also have increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, the types of all-cause and site-specific fracture among patients with COPD are unknown. Thus, we elucidated the all-cause and site-specific fractures among patients with COPD. A retrospective, population-based, cohort study was conducted utilizing the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. Patients with COPD were defined as those who were hospitalized with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code of 490 to 492 or 496 between 2001 and 2011. The index date was set as the date of discharge. The study patients were followed from the index date to the date when they sought care for any type of fracture, date of death, date of health insurance policy termination, or the last day of 2013. The types of fracture analyzed in this study included vertebral, rib, humeral, radial and ulnar/wrist, pelvic, femoral, and tibial and fibular fractures. The cohort consisted of 11,312 patients with COPD. Among these patients, 1944 experienced fractures. The most common site-specific fractures were vertebral, femoral, rib, and forearm fractures (radius, ulna, and wrist) at 32.4%, 31%, 12%, and 11.8%, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of fracture were 1.71 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.56–1.87] for female patient with COPD and 1.50 (95% CI = 1.39–1.52) for patients with osteoporosis after covariate adjustment. Vertebral and hip fractures are common among patients with COPD, especially among males with COPD. Many comorbidities contribute to the high risk of fracture among patients with COPD. PMID:27749576

  1. Ultrasound assessment of the posterior circumflex humeral artery in elite volleyball players: Aneurysm prevalence, anatomy, branching pattern and vessel characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    van de Pol, Daan; Maas, Mario; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Planken, R. Nils

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) aneurysms and vessel characteristics of the PCHA and deep brachial artery (DBA) in elite volleyball players. Methods Two-hundred and eighty players underwent standardized ultrasound assessment of the dominant arm by a vascular technologist. Assessment included determination of PCHA aneurysms (defined as segmental vessel dilatation ?150 %), PCHA and DBA anatomy, branching pattern, vessel course and diameter. R...

  2. CT findings in patient with skull fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Han Gi; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    CT scan has been inevitable method for patient with head trauma. CT scans of 94 cases, which were confirmed skull fracture by plain film, were reviewed for better and useful dealing of CT. The results were as follows: 1. Car accident was the most frequent cause of head injury. 2. No evidence of intracranial abnormality in CT scan of skull fractures on plane film was 45.7%, and alert mentality was 46.8% of skull fracture on skull fracture on simple film. 3. Detection rate on CT scan to skull fractures was 27.7%, but detection rate to depression fractures of skull fracture was 70.2%. 4. Mortality rate of patients with skull fracture was 10.6%. 5. Associated CT findings were pneumocephalus on CT scan 3.2%, contusion of edema 4.2%, epidural hematoma 16.0%, subdural hematoma 17.0%, subdural hygroma 2.1%, intracerebral hemorrhage 4.9%, and subarachnoid hemorrhage 2.0%.

  3. Management of neglected lateral condyle fractures of humerus in children: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Late presentation of humeral lateral condylar fracture in children is a surgical dilemma. Osteosynthesis of the fracture fragment or correction of elbow deformity with osteotomies and ulnar nerve transposition or sometimes both procedures combined is a controversial topic. We retrospectively evaluated open reduction and fixation cases in late presentation of lateral humeral condyle fracture in pediatric cases with regards to union and functional results. Materials and Methods: Twenty two pediatric (≤12 years patients with fractures of lateral condyle presenting 4 weeks or more post injury between the study period of 2006 and 2010 were included. Multiple K-wires / with or without screws along with bone grafting were used. At final evaluation, union (radiologically and elbow function (Liverpool Elbow Score, LES was assessed. Results: There were 19 boys and 3 girls. Followup averaged 33 months. Pain (n=9, swelling (n=6, restriction of elbow motion (n=6, prominence of lateral condylar region (n=4, valgus deformity (n=4 were the main presenting symptoms. Ulnar nerve function was normal in all patients. There were nine Milch type I and 13 type II fractures. Union occurred in 20 cases. One case had malunion and in another case there was resorption of condyle following postoperative infection and avascular necrosis. Prominent lateral condyles (4/12, fish tail appearance (n=7, premature epiphyseal closure (n=2 were other observations. LES averaged 8.12 (range, 6.66-9.54 at final followup. Conclusions: There is high rate of union and satisfactory elbow function in late presenting lateral condyle fractures in children following osteosynthesis attempt. Our study showed poor correlation between patient′s age, duration of late presentation or Milch type I or II and final elbow function as determined by LES.

  4. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  5. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  6. Scaphoid Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kim, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 25-year-old, right-handed male presented to the emergency department with left wrist pain after falling from a skateboard onto an outstretched hand two-weeks prior. He otherwise had no additional concerns, including no complaints of weakness or loss of sensation. On physical exam, there was tenderness to palpation within the anatomical snuff box. The neurovascular exam was intact. Plain films of the left wrist and hand were obtained. Significant findings: The anteroposterior (AP plain film of this patient demonstrates a full thickness fracture through the middle third of the scaphoid (red arrow, with some apparent displacement (yellow lines and subtle angulation of the fracture fragments (blue line. Discussion: The scaphoid bone is the most commonly fractured carpal bone accounting for 70%-80% of carpal fractures.1 Classically, it is sustained following a fall onto an outstretched hand (FOOSH. Patients should be evaluated for tenderness with palpation over the anatomical snuffbox, which has a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 40%.2 Plain films are the initial diagnostic modality of choice and have a sensitivity of 70%, but are commonly falsely negative in the first two to six weeks of injury (false negative of 20%.3 The Mayo classification organizes scaphoid fractures as involving the proximal, mid, and distal portions of the scaphoid bone with mid-fractures being the most common.3 The proximal scaphoid is highly susceptible to vascular compromise because it depends on retrograde blood flow from the radial artery. Therefore, disruption can lead to serious sequelae including osteonecrosis, arthrosis, and functional impairment. Thus, a low threshold should be maintained for neurovascular evaluation and surgical referral. Patients with non-displaced scaphoid fractures should be placed in a thumb spica splint.3 Patients with even suspected scaphoid fractures should be placed in a thumb spica splint and re

  7. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries and account for 4-5 percent of all fractures, second only to hip and wrist fractures. The incidence is positively correlated with age and osteoporosis, and is likely to increase. Displaced four-part fractures are among the most...... severe injuries, accounting for 2-10 percent of proximal humeral fractures. The optimal intervention is disputed. Two previous randomised trials were very small and involved a noticeable risk of bias, and systematic reviews consequently conclude that there is inadequate basis for evidence-based treatment...... ten national shoulder units within a two-year period. We plan to include 162 patients. A central randomisation unit will allocate patients. All patients will receive a standardised three-month rehabilitation program of supervised physiotherapy regardless of treatment allocation. Patients...

  8. Effective management of bone fractures with the IlluminOss® photodynamic bone stabilization system: initial clinical experience from the European Union registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gausepohl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The IlluminOss® system (IS uses a light-curable polymer contained within an inflatable balloon catheter, forming a patient customized intramedullary implant. A registry was established in Germany and The Netherlands to prospectively collect technical and clinical outcomes in patients treated with IS for fractures of the phalange, metacarpal, radius, ulna, distal radius, fibula, clavicle and/or olecranon. Humeral, femoral, tibial and pelvic fractures were included under compassionate use. Procedural success included successful placement of the device at the target fracture site and achievement of fracture stabilization. Clinical and radiographic assessments were made postoperatively through 12 months. One hundred thirty two patients (149 fractures were enrolled with most fractures (85% resulting from low-energy trauma. Simple fractures predominated (47% followed by complex (23% and wedge (16% fractures. Procedural success was achieved in all patients and no implants required removal or revision. Normal range of motion was realized in 87% of fractures. Radiographically, there was substantial cortical bridging, total dissolution of the fracture line, and complete fracture healing. Across a variety of fracture types, the IS provides a safe and effective approach for rapid healing and functional recovery.

  9. Treatment of Pediatric Condylar Fractures: A 20-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Swanson, Edward W; Utria, Alan F; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to define patterns of injury and treatment for condylar and subcondylar fractures and evaluate short-term outcomes in the pediatric population. A retrospective chart review was performed on pediatric patients with mandibular condylar fractures who presented between 1990 and 2010. Computed tomographic imaging was reviewed for all patients to assess fracture characteristics. Mandibular fractures were codified using the Strasbourg Osteosynthesis Research Group and Lindahl classification methods. Sixty-four patients with 92 condylar fractures were identified. Of these patients, 29 had isolated condylar fracture and 35 had a condylar fracture associated with an additional mandibular arch fracture. The most common fracture patterns were diacapitular fracture in the Strasbourg Osteosynthesis Research Group system (n = 46) and vertical condylar head fracture in the Lindahl system (n = 14). Condylar fracture with additional mandibular arch fractures were treated with maxillomandibular fixation more often than patients with condylar fracture [n = 40 (74.1 percent) versus n = 14 (25.9 percent); p = 0.004]. No condylar fracture was treated in an open fashion. Forty-three patients returned for follow-up. The median follow-up period was 81 days (interquartile range, 35 to 294 days). Ten patients had complications (23.3 percent). The most common complication was malocclusion (n = 5). Nine of 10 patients with complications had condylar fracture with an additional mandibular arch fracture. Closed treatment of condylar fractures yields satisfactory results in pediatric patients. Pediatric patients with condylar fractures combined with additional arch fractures experience a higher rate of unfavorable outcomes.

  10. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head and Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 33. Christophel JJ. Facial, eye, ... Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 27. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. ...

  11. Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  12. Stress fractures of the humerus, radius, and tibia in horses: clinical features and radiographic and/or scintigraphic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, V.S.; Trout, D.R.; Meagher, D.M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The medical records, radiographic and nuclear scintigraphic findings of 26 racing horses with 27 stress fracture episodes of the humerus, radius, or tibia were reviewed. The purposes of this study were to describe the radiographic and/or scintigraphic features of stress fractures of the humerus, radius, or tibia, and to evaluate the signalment and history of horses in which stress fracture occurred. Stress fractures of the three long bones examined were primarily seen in 2- and 3-year-old male Thoroughbred horses; commonly, the onset of lameness was immediately following training gallops or racing. There were 13 humeral stress fracture episodes in 12 horses. Ten were in the proximal caudolateral cortex, and three were in the distal craniomedial cortex. Radical stress fractures were seen in three horses, all in the midshaft radius. Tibial stress fractures were diagnosed in 11 horses. They were located in the proximal lateral tibia in six horses, the distal caudolateral tibia in three horses, and the midshaft tibia in three horses. Fifteen stress fractures were diagnosed with radiography alone, one was diagnosed with scintigraphy alone, nine were diagnosed with radiographs and scintigraphy, and, in two horses, radiographs were negative, but the scintigraphic findings were consistent with stress fracture

  13. Trochanteric fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrlin, K.; Stroemberg, T.; Lidgren, L.; Walloee, A.; Pettersson, H.; Lund Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty trochanteric factures operated upon with McLaughlin, Ender or Richard's osteosynthesis were divided into 6 different types based on their radiographic appearance before and immediately after reposition with special reference to the medial cortical support. A significant correlation was found between the fracture type and subsequent mechanical complications where types 1 and 2 gave less, and types 4 and 5 more complications. A comparison of the various osteosyntheses showed that Richard's had significantly fewer complications than either the Ender or McLaughlin types. For Richard's osteosynthesis alone no correlation to fracture type could be made because of the small number of complications in this group. (orig.)

  14. Fracture Blisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uebbing, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fracture blisters are a relatively uncommon complication of fractures in locations of the body, such as the ankle, wrist elbow and foot, where skin adheres tightly to bone with little subcutaneous fat cushioning. The blister that results resembles that of a second degree burn.These blisters significantly alter treatment, making it difficult to splint or cast and often overlying ideal surgical incision sites. Review of the literature reveals no consensus on management; however, most authors agree on early treatment prior to blister formation or delay until blister resolution before attempting surgical correction or stabilization. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;131-133.

  15. Nonoperative Management and Novel Imaging for Posterior Circumflex Humeral Artery Injury in Volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Daan; Planken, R Nils; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Maas, Mario

    We report on a 34-yr-old male elite volleyball player with symptomatic emboli in the spiking hand from a partially thrombosed aneurysm of the posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) in his dominant shoulder. At initial diagnosis and follow-up, a combination of time-resolved and high-resolution steady state contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) enabled detailed visualization of: (1) emboli that were not detectable by vascular ultrasound; and (2) the PCHA aneurysm, including compression during abduction and external rotation (ABER provocation). At 15-month follow-up, including forced cessation of volleyball activities over the preceding 9 months, the PCHA aneurysm remained unchanged. Central filling defects in the palmar arch and digital arteries resolved over time and affected arterial vessel segments showed postthrombotic changes. Digital blood pressure values improved substantially and almost normalized during follow-up. In conclusion, this case report is the first to show promising results of nonoperative management for a vascular shoulder overuse injury in a professional volleyball player as an alternative to invasive therapeutic options.

  16. [Clinical observation on external humeral epicondylitis treated with back-rotation traction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rui-yang; Wang, Ya-ling; Gu, Zhong-zhong; Wang, Bao-hu; Zhu, Qi; Li, Ye; Wang, En-ping

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of manipulation on external humeral epicondylitis, and to explore the functional mechanism and ideal treatment. Eighty-six patients who had been treated with acupuncture, obturation and needle-knife were divided into routine group and treatment group randomly. In routine group, there were 42 cases (male 13, female 29, means 40.8 years); and in treatment group there were 44 cases (male 16, female 28, means 41.2 years). There's no further treatment for the routine group after the therapy above, while the treatment group was added with back-rotation traction manipulation. Taking Verhaar therapy effect appraisal system of tennis-ball elbow to evaluate elbow function. After 7 days of therapy, the results were excellent in 13 cases, good in 16, fair in 4, poor in 9 in the routine group; and excellent in 38, good in 4 and fair in 2 in treatment group; and the effect in the treatment group were better than that of the routine group (P Making manipulation after routine acupuncture, local obturation and needle-knife has active meaning to remove trauma inflammation, prevent re-conglutination, promote recovery and prevent recurrence.

  17. Drifting Diaphyses: Asymmetry in Diametric Growth and Adaptation Along the Humeral and Femoral Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiano, Isabel S; Maggiano, Corey M; Tiesler, Vera G; Chi-Keb, Julio R; Stout, Sam D

    2015-10-01

    This study quantifies regional histomorphological variation along the human humeral and femoral diaphysis in order to gain information on diaphyseal growth and modeling drift patterns. Three thin sections at 40, 50, and 60% bone length were prepared from a modern Mexican skeletal sample with known age and sex to give a longitudinal perspective on the drifting cortex (12 adults and juveniles total, 7 male and 5 female). Point-count techniques were applied across eight cross-sectional regions of interest using the starburst sampling pattern to quantify percent periosteal and endosteal primary lamellar bone at each diaphyseal level. The results of this study show a posterio-medial drift pattern in the humerus with a posterior rotational trend along the diaphysis. In the femur, we observed a consistent lateral to anteriolateral drift and an increase in primary lamellar bone area of both, periosteal and endosteal origin, towards the distal part of the diaphysis. These observations characterize drifting diaphyses in greater detail, raising important questions about how to resolve microscopic and macroscopic cross-sectional analysis towards a more complete understanding of bone growth and mechanical adaptation. Accounting for modeling drift has the potential to positively impact age and physical activity estimation, and explain some of the significant regional variation in bone histomorphology seen within (and between) bone cross-sections due to differing ages of tissue formation. More study is necessary, however, to discern between possible drift scenarios and characterize populational variation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Real Time Hand Motion Reconstruction System for Trans-Humeral Amputees Using EEG and EMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Fernandez-Vargas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting a hand’s position using only biosignals is a complex problem that has not been completely solved. The only reliable solutions currently available require invasive surgery. The attempts using non-invasive technologies are rare, and usually have led to lower correlation values between the real and the reconstructed position than those required for real-world applications. In this study, we propose a solution for reconstructing the hand’s position in three dimensions using EEG and EMG to detect from the shoulder area. This approach would be valid for most trans-humeral amputees. In order to find the best solution, we tested four different architectures for the system based on artificial neural networks. Our results show that it is possible to reconstruct the hand’s motion trajectory with a correlation value up to 0.809 compared to a typical value in the literature of 0.6. We also demonstrated that both EEG and EMG contribute jointly to the motion reconstruction. Furthermore, we discovered that the system architectures do not change the results radically. In addition, our results suggest that different motions may have different brain activity patterns that could be detected through EEG. Finally, we suggest a method to study non-linear relations in the brain through the EEG signals, which may lead to a more accurate system.

  19. Fracture propagation in gas pipelines - relevance to submarine lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fearnehough, G D [British Gas Corp., Newcastle upon Tyne. Engineering Research Station

    1976-09-01

    This paper reviews the factors which control fracture propagation in pipes and suggests how they are influenced by submarine environments. If fracture arrest capability is required then these factors should be considered in terms of the design philosophy and the maximum tolerable length of fracture which can be repaired. The paper shows that brittle fracture characteristics of submarine pipelines are probably similar to land based lines and fracture arrest can only be guaranteed by appropriate material toughness specification. Resistance to ductile fracture propagation in submarine lines is enhanced by lower design stresses, thicker pipe, concrete coating and the effect of hydrostatic head on gas dynamics. However, additional factors due to submarine design can be deleterious viz: uncertainty about backfill integrity and a tendency of thicker steels to low fracture resistance arising from 'separation' formation. Attention is drawn to problems which may arise with transportation of gases rich in hydrocarbons and the use of mechanical methods of fracture arrest.

  20. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head

  1. Evaluation in femoral neck fracture scintimetry: modes of region of interest selection and influence on results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, S.; Mesko, L.; Stroemqvist, B.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1985-04-01

    Different sized ROIs within the femoral head and different modes of calculation were used in (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP scintimetry after femoral neck fracture. In preoperative scintimetry, correction for increased trochanteric uptake gave the best discrimination, whereas in postoperative scintimetry the direct ratio fractured/intact femoral head was superior. The change in ROI size had little influence.

  2. Evaluation in femoral neck fracture scintimetry: modes of region of interest selection and influence on results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, S.; Mesko, L.; Stroemqvist, B.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Different sized ROIs within the femoral head and different modes of calculation were used in [/sup 99m/Tc]MDP scintimetry after femoral neck fracture. In preoperative scintimetry, correction for increased trochanteric uptake gave the best discrimination, whereas in postoperative scintimetry the direct ratio fractured/intact femoral head was superior. The change in ROI size had little influence

  3. Bilateral femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuda, Kenji; Nishi, Hosei; Oba, Hiroshi

    1977-01-01

    Over 300 cases of femoral neck fractures following radiotherapy for intrapelvic malignant tumor have been reported in various countries since Baensch reported this disease in 1927. In Japan, 40 cases or so have been reported, and cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures have not reached to ten cases. The authors experienced a case of 75 year-old female who received radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, and suffered from right femoral neck fracture 3 months after and left femoral neck fracture one year and half after. As clinical symptoms, she had not previous history of trauma in bilateral femurs, but she complained of a pain in a hip joint and of gait disturbance. The pain in left femoral neck continued for about one month before fracture was recognized with roentgenogram. As histopathological findings, increase of fat marrow, decrease of bone trabeculae, and its marked degeneration were recognized. Proliferation of some blood vessels was found out, but thickness of the internal membrane and thrombogenesis were not recognized. Treatment should be performed according to degree of displacement of fractures. In this case, artificial joint replacement surgery was performed to the side of fracture of this time, because this case was bilateral femoral neck fractures and the patient had received artificial head replacement surgery in the other side of fracture formerly. (Tsunoda, M.)

  4. Complications of hip fractures: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  5. [Treatment of femoral neck fracture--preference to internal fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Izumi

    2011-03-01

    In the guidelines for the treatment of femoral neck fracture, prosthetic replacement is recommended in displaced one and internal fixation is in undisplaced one. However, in the long view, survived femoral head after internal fixation can be superior to prosthesis which will deteriorate as time goes by. Surgical method should be considered not only by type of fracture but general status of the patient.

  6. Isolated posterior dislocation of the radial head in an adult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negi A

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated posterior dislocation of the radial head was detected on X-ray in a patient following a vehicular accident. Such a dislocation without an associated fracture is extremely rare in adults. Immobilization of the elbow in full pronation and 90 degrees flexion for 4 weeks normalized the position of the head of the radius.

  7. Elbow Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also an important factor when treating elbow fractures. Casts are used more frequently in children, as their risk of developing elbow stiffness is small; however, in an adult, elbow stiffness is much more likely. Rehabilitation directed by your doctor is often used to ...

  8. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  9. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  10. CT assisted follow-up of arthroscopically placed hydroxylapatite grafts in repair of fracture of the tibial head. Initial results of a CT assisted, quantitative assessment of the incorporation of the calcium hydroxylapatite graft and the reactions of the surrounding tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, T.; Schedel, H.; Kodadadyan, Z.; Ricke, J.; Hoffmann, R.; Haas, N.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    Four patients bearing a hydroxylapatite graft in repair of tibial head fracture have been examined by CT immediately after surgery and several times in the post operative period of up to 24 months. Density measurements of the graft, the spongiosa immediately next to it, and the spongiosa in fibula and tibia reveal the integration and ossous connection of the graft, quantifiable by the X-ray density. The spongiosa in immediate contact with the graft shows an initial density increase related to the first post-operative data, followed by a density decrease observed by subsequent measurements. These results are in agreement with animal experimental data and histomorphologic studies of other authors, which show that porous hydroxylapatite is used by the bone as a matrix serving as a pathway for osteoblast migration and subsequent ossification of the graft. Thus CT is capable of showing the post-operative integration process by quantifying and reproducible data. (orig.) [de

  11. Trochanteric Stress Fracture in a Female Window Cleaner

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bong-Jin; Song, Jyewon

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures may occur at various sites in the femur including the head, neck, shaft, supracondylar and condylar regions. To the best of our knowledge, stress fracture occurring in the trochanteric region has not been previously reported. We report here a case of trochanteric stress fracture in a 53-year-old female window cleaner treated with hip nailing without adverse consequences. Careful consideration of this entity is needed when evaluating patients who have repetitive jumping up and...

  12. Management of post-traumatic elbow instability after failed radial head excision: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Touloupakis, Georgios; Theodorakis, Emmanouil; Favetti, Fabio; Nannerini, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Radial head excision has always been a safe commonly used surgical procedure with a satisfactory clinical outcome for isolated comminuted radial head fractures. However, diagnosis of elbow instability is still very challenging and often underestimated in routine orthopaedic evaluation. We present the case of a 21-years old female treated with excision after radial head fracture, resulting in elbow instability. The patient underwent revision surgery after four weeks. We believe that ligament r...

  13. Bimalleolar ankle fracture with proximal fibular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colenbrander, R. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Ultee, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient suffered a bimalleolar ankle fracture with an additional proximal fibular fracture. This is an unusual fracture type, seldom reported in literature. It was operatively treated by open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolar fracture. The proximal fibular

  14. Computed tomography evaluation of petrous bone fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Petrous bone trauma is the sequel of blunt head injury and can have life threatening complications resulting in immediate mortality. Early detection and good knowledge of the Computed Tomography (CT) findings ensure prompt treatment of both fractures and complications. Objective: To document the ...

  15. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the "Pubmed" search with the keywords "NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture." A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG, (b closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective, classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu′s staging neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90

  16. Acute radial ulno-humeral ligament injury in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis: an observational report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzugan, Sergey S; Savoie, Felix H; Field, Larry D; O'Brien, Michael J; You, Zongbing

    2012-12-01

    Lateral elbow pain has multiple etiologies; most common is lateral epicondylitis. Radio-capitellar arthritis, posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI), plica and radial tunnel syndromes may produce similar pain. The purpose of this study is to report on a rare subset of patients who had an acute injury during treatment for chronic lateral epicondylitis, exacerbating symptoms and lessening function. Indications for surgery were a failure of another round of nonoperative management and diagnosis of a new injury to the lateral ligaments in addition to the lateral epicondylitis. Surgical intervention revealed the acute injury to the radial ulno-humeral ligament (RUHL) complex, superimposed on chronic lateral epicondylitis, which we believe caused worsening of symptoms. Surgical repair of both lesions provided satisfactory results. Seven patients (range, 29-46 years; mean, 40.7) being treated for chronic lateral epicondylitis each sustained an acute elbow injury resulting in PLRI. Study data, including Andrews-Carson Elbow Score (ACES) and Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS), were collected in the initial evaluation and at regular postoperative intervals, with a follow-up period of 12-24 months. Indications for surgery were pain, functional impairment, and failure of other treatments. All surgeries were performed on an outpatient basis under general anesthesia in the prone position. All patients showed arthroscopic evidence of chronic lateral epicondylitis and acute RUHL injury. All showed significant improvement in total ACES and MEPS after repair of both lesions, full range of motion, and objective improvement in strength and function, with no adverse effects or complications. Patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis who sustain an acute injury may damage the RUHL complex. Early recognition of this additional injury may allow surgical repair of both injuries with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees

  17. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  18. Retrospective analysis of extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures treated with the use of pre-contoured lateral column metaphyseal LCP by triceps-sparing posterolateral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatinder Kharbanda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management of extra-articular distal humerus fractures presents a challenge to the treating surgeon due to the complex anatomy of the distal part of the humerus and complicated fracture morphology. Although surgical treatment has shown to provide a more stable reduction and alignment and predictable return to function, it has been associated with complications like iatrogenic radial nerve palsy, infection, non-union and Implant failure. We in the present series retrospectively analysed 20 patients with extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures surgically treated using the extra-articular distal humeral locking plate approached by the triceps-sparing posterolateral approach. The outcome was assessed using the DASH score, range of motion at the elbow and the time to union. The mean time to radiographic fracture union was 12 weeks.

  19. Retrospective analysis of extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures treated with the use of pre-contoured lateral column metaphyseal LCP by triceps-sparing posterolateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Yatinder; Tanwar, Yashwant Singh; Srivastava, Vishal; Birla, Vikas; Rajput, Ashok; Pandit, Ramsagar

    2017-04-01

    Management of extra-articular distal humerus fractures presents a challenge to the treating surgeon due to the complex anatomy of the distal part of the humerus and complicated fracture morphology. Although surgical treatment has shown to provide a more stable reduction and alignment and predictable return to function, it has been associated with complications like iatrogenic radial nerve palsy, infection, non-union and Implant failure. We in the present series retrospectively analysed 20 patients with extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures surgically treated using the extra-articular distal humeral locking plate approached by the triceps-sparing posterolateral approach. The outcome was assessed using the DASH score, range of motion at the elbow and the time to union. The mean time to radiographic fracture union was 12 weeks.

  20. Flued head replacement alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetters, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses flued head replacement options. Section 2 discusses complete flued head replacement with a design that eliminates the inaccessible welds. Section 3 discusses alternate flued head support designs that can drastically reduce flued head installation costs. Section 4 describes partial flued head replacement designs. Finally, Section 5 discusses flued head analysis methods. (orig./GL)

  1. Expression of TGF-β in Fractures Fixed by Nitinol Swan-like Memory Compressive Connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Xu, S. G.; Fu, Q. G.

    2011-07-01

    In this article, the effect of internal fixation of a Nitinol swan-like memory compressive connector (SMC) on the temporal expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) at fracture sites is evaluated. Specimens were collected from 35 New Zealand rabbits modeled for bilateral humeral fracture fixed with either SMC or stainless dynamic compression plate (DCP). Five rabbits each were killed at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56. The local positive staining potency, positive area ratio, and positive index of TGF-β were measured using an immunohistochemistry approach (EnVision) in combination with a computerized image analysis system. TGF-β staining was seen in mesenchymal cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and in the extracellular matrix of fractures fixed in both the SMC and the DCP samples without a significant difference in staining at both the early stages (days 1 and 3) and day 56. A higher TGF-β content was observed in the fractures fixed with SMC when compared to that of DCP from day 7 to 28. As a conclusion, TGF-β is highly expressed in fractures fixed with SMC during chondrogenesis stage and entochondrostosis stage. Finally, the mechanism of how SMC promoting synthesis and secretion of TGF-β in the process of fracture healing has been discussed.

  2. DYNAMICS OF THE FUNCTIONAL STATUS OF PATIENTS IN THE TREATMENT OF CLAVICLE FRACTURES BY TRANSOSSEOUS OSTEOSYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Shchurov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - assessment of the dynamics of the state, blood supply regenerate bone, muscle contractility of the arm and forearm in patients with clavicle fractures during the treatment with external fixation device. Material and methods. Authors studied 38 patients during the treatment by Ilizarov method. The muscle dynamometry, Doppler ultrasound, psychophysiological study using SF-36 test were performed. Results. The strength of the humeral and forearm muscles on the side of damage was reduced and increased by 50-80% of the conditional baseline during transosseous fixation. The high rate of blood flow in the area of injury was characteristic during the first week in the fixation period. In the process of the treatment and recovery of muscle contractility its value normalized. The treatment of clavicle fractures by Ilizarov method allows in the early period of fixation to restore the ability of patients to self-service, to reduce the influence of pain limiting factor, improves mood and health of patients.

  3. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  4. Prótesis de cúpula monopolar en el tratamiento de fracturas y luxofracturas del radio. [Monopolar ­radial­ head ­arthroplasty­ in ­the ­treatment­ of ­fracture and ­fracture-dislocations ­of ­the ­radius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo L. Gallucci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar retrospectivamente los resultados clínicos y radiológicos de una serie consecutiva de pacientes con fracturas y luxofracturas de la cúpula radial a quienes se les realizó el reemplazo por una prótesis monopolar. Materiales­ y ­Métodos: Se incluyeron 20 pacientes. Criterios de inclusión: <18 años, con fracturas o luxofracturas de la cúpula radial, tratados con prótesis monoblock de titanio y seguimiento mínimo de un año. Quince eran mujeres, edad promedio 59 años. Siete eran fracturas aisladas y 13, luxofracturas. Se evaluaron el grado de aflojamiento protésico, la erosión capitelar, el ensanchamiento del espacio articular humeral lateral y las calcificaciones heterotópicas. El seguimiento fue de 26 meses. Resultados: La flexo-extensión fue de 139º-5º y la prono-supinación, de 79-79°. El arco total fue de 134°. Fuerza de puño: 84% del lado contralateral. El dolor según la escala analógica visual fue de 2, DASH: 11 puntos, 13 resultados excelentes y 6 buenos. Se detectó aflojamiento del implante (12 casos, aumento de la radiolucidez capitelar (4 casos y ensanchamiento del espacio ulnohumeral lateral (2 casos. Hubo 2 complicaciones: una neurodocitis cubital que debió ser operada y una extracción de implante por aflojamiento y dolor. Conclusiones: El reemplazo de la cúpula radial en lesiones no reconstruibles es una opción terapéutica viable, con buenos resultados funcionales a corto y mediano plazo. La recuperación de la estabilidad articular fue posible en todos los casos y el índice de aflojamiento protésico asintomático fue elevado.

  5. Minimally invasive approach of panfacial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Wijaya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Panfacial fractures involves fractures of several bones of face. They are associated with malocclusion, dish face deformity, enopthalmos, diplopia, cerebrospinal fluid leak and soft tissue injuries. Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of minimizing surgical wound and morbidity. Case. A 40 year old female presented with severe maxillofacial injuries caused by motor vehicle collisions about 5 days prior to admission. The assessment of the patient is mild head injury, panfacial fractures, lacerated wound at face,  rupture of globe of occular sinistra. An open reduction and internal fixation  (ORIF and enucleation of globe occular sinistra was performed.  Intraoral vestibular incision is made in the upper and lower vestibular region. Mucoperiosteal flap elevation of vestibular will exposure of the anterior maxilla and mandibular fractures. Intermaksilary fixation within 3 week and restore aesthetic with prosthesis fitting eyeball and denture. Discusion. The goal of  treatment of  panfacial fracture is to restore both the functions and pre-injury 3-dimensional facial contours. To achieve this goal two common  sequences of management of Panfacial fractures are proposed, “Bottom up and inside out” or “Top down and outside in”. Other sequences exist but there are variations of these two major approaches. Conclusion. A minimally invasive approach to  the fracture site is an alternative method  to manage panfacial fracture with a simple, effective and lower complication rate.

  6. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly: a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries and account for 4-5 percent of all fractures, second only to hip and wrist fractures. The incidence is positively correlated with age and osteoporosis, and is likely to increase. Displaced four-part fractures are among the most...... severe injuries, accounting for 2-10 percent of proximal humeral fractures. The optimal intervention is disputed. Two previous randomised trials were very small and involved a noticeable risk of bias, and systematic reviews consequently conclude that there is inadequate basis for evidence-based treatment...... ten national shoulder units within a two-year period. We plan to include 162 patients. A central randomisation unit will allocate patients. All patients will receive a standardised three-month rehabilitation program of supervised physiotherapy regardless of treatment allocation. Patients...

  7. Temporal Bone Fracture Causing Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD is a third window lesion of the inner ear causing symptoms of vertigo, autophony, tinnitus, and hearing loss. A “two-hit” hypothesis has traditionally been proposed, whereby thinly developed bone overlying the superior canal is disrupted by a sudden change in intracranial pressure. Although the symptoms of SCD may be precipitated by head injury, no previous reports have described a temporal bone fracture directly causing SCD. Observations. Two patients sustained temporal bone fractures after closed head trauma, and developed unilateral otologic symptoms consistent with SCD. In each instance, computed tomography imaging revealed fractures extending through the bony roof of the superior semicircular canal. Conclusions and Relevance. Temporal bone fractures, which are largely treated nonoperatively, have not previously been reported to cause SCD. As it is a potentially treatable entity, SCD resulting from temporal bone fracture must be recognized as a possibility and diagnosed promptly if present.

  8. Humeral avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizing structures after anterior shoulder dislocation: demonstration by MRI and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirman, P.F.J.; Steinbach, L.S.; Feller, J.F.; Stauffer, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MRI findings of an anterior shoulder capsular avulsion from the humerus, with or without subscapularis rupture, after anterior dislocation or severe abduction external rotation injury. Design and patients. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI and MR arthrographic examinations of seven patients who were identified at surgery with avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizers from the humerus. MRI was correlated with clinical history and surgical results. Results. MRI findings included: inhomogeneity or frank disruption of the anterior capsule at the humeral insertion (all), fluid intensity anterior to the shoulder (six patients), tear of the subscapularis tendon (six patients), dislocation of the biceps tendon (four patients), and a Hill-Sachs deformity (four patients). MR arthrography additionally found extravasation of contrast through the capsular defect (two patients). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that MRI is helpful for diagnosing humeral avulsion of the anterior glenohumeral capsule, especially when a tear of the subscapularis tendon insertion is present. MR arthrography may be of benefit for diagnosing capsular avulsion without associated subscapularis tendon abnormality. (orig.). With 4 figs

  9. Long head of biceps: from anatomy to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sarmento

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long head of the biceps (LHB, tendinous structure of the proximal brachial biceps, has its well-known anatomy, which contrasts with its current functional characterization. Various forms of proximal anchor and intra–articular route, important for the correct interpretation of its contribution to the pathology of the shoulder as well as the treatment methodology, are described. Knowledge of its biomechanics results mainly from cadaveric studies that contradict each other. Already the few studies in vivo indicate a depressant and stabilizing action, anterior, for the humeral head. Its pathology is rarely isolated because it is almost always correlated with rotator cuff or labrum pathology. It can be divided into 3 major groups (inflammatory, instability and traumatic and subdivided according to its location. The anterior shoulder pain is the initial symptom of pathology of LHB Its perfect characterization is dependent on the associated injuries. Clinical tests are multiple and only their combination allows better sensitivity and specificity for LHB pathology. The arthro-MRI and dynamic ultrasound are able to increase proper diagnostic of the pathology of LHB. Treatment ranges from conservative and surgical. The latter includes the repair, tenotomy and tenodesis of LHB which can be performed by open or arthroscopic methodology. The author intends to review existing literature on all aspects related to the long head of the biceps from anatomy to treatment, presenting the latest results.

  10. [Petrous bone fracture. Our experience: 1999-2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Sabio, J B; de Paula Vernetta, C; García Sanchís, J M; Callejo García, F J; Cortés Andrés, O; Quilis Quesada, V; Dualde Beltrán, D; Marco Algarra, J

    2006-12-01

    To review the petrous bone fractures during the last five years (1999-2004) in our hospital, its manage, control, and analysis onf the associated factors. To analyse the managing protocoles and current bibliography. We review 266 temporal bone fractures, 74 with petrous bone association. We analyse these fractures by sex distribution, injurie severity, otorhinolaryngological clinical findings, production mechanism and radiological findings. The cases are discussed and compared with current bibliography. Petrous bone fractures must be always suspected in patients with head trauma, specially if it associates severity and otorrhagia. It is necessary a deep colaboration between neurosurgeons, radiologists and otorhinolaryngologists to obtain a good management, control and follow up of the patients.

  11. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge ... in the hospital for surgery to repair a hip fracture, a break in the upper part of ...

  12. Mathematical modelling of fracture hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, A.W.; Hodgkindon, D.P.; Lever, D.A.; Robinson, P.C.; Rae, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report reviews work carried out between January 1983 and December 1984 for the CEC/DOE contract 'Mathematical Modelling of Fracture Hydrology' which forms part of the CEC Mirage project (CEC 1984. Come 1985. Bourke et. al. 1983). It describes the development and use of a variety of mathematical models for the flow of water and transport of radionuclides in flowing groundwater. These models have an important role to play in assessing the long-term safety of radioactive waste burial, and in the planning and interpretation of associated experiments. The work is reported under five headings, namely 1) Statistical fracture network modelling, 2) Continuum models of flow and transport, 3) Simplified models, 4) Analysis of laboratory experiments, 5) Analysis of field experiments

  13. Diverse Aquatic Adaptations in Nothosaurus spp. (Sauropterygia-Inferences from Humeral Histology and Microanatomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Klein

    , developmental plasticity, and possibly sexual dimorphism. Humeral microanatomy documents the diversification of nothosaur species into different environments to avoid intraclade competition as well as competition with other marine reptiles. Nothosaur microanatomy indicates that knowledge of processes involved in secondary aquatic adaptation and their interaction are more complex than previously believed.

  14. Fused Filament Fabrication of Prosthetic Components for Trans-Humeral Upper Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Steven M.

    Presented below is the design and fabrication of prosthetic components consisting of an attachment, tactile sensing, and actuator systems with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technique. The attachment system is a thermoplastic osseointegrated upper limb prosthesis for average adult trans-humeral amputation with mechanical properties greater than upper limb skeletal bone. The prosthetic designed has: a one-step surgical process, large cavities for bone tissue ingrowth, uses a material that has an elastic modulus less than skeletal bone, and can be fabricated on one system. FFF osseointegration screw is an improvement upon the current two-part osseointegrated prosthetics that are composed of a fixture and abutment. The current prosthetic design requires two invasive surgeries for implantation and are made of titanium, which has an elastic modulus greater than bone. An elastic modulus greater than bone causes stress shielding and overtime can cause loosening of the prosthetic. The tactile sensor is a thermoplastic piezo-resistive sensor for daily activities for a prosthetic's feedback system. The tactile sensor is manufactured from a low elastic modulus composite comprising of a compressible thermoplastic elastomer and conductive carbon. Carbon is in graphite form and added in high filler ratios. The printed sensors were compared to sensors that were fabricated in a gravity mold to highlight the difference in FFF sensors to molded sensors. The 3D printed tactile sensor has a thickness and feel similar to human skin, has a simple fabrication technique, can detect forces needed for daily activities, and can be manufactured in to user specific geometries. Lastly, a biomimicking skeletal muscle actuator for prosthetics was developed. The actuator developed is manufactured with Fuse Filament Fabrication using a shape memory polymer composite that has non-linear contractile and passive forces, contractile forces and strains comparable to mammalian skeletal muscle, reaction

  15. Clinical outcome and complications using a polyaxial locking plate in the treatment of displaced proximal humerus fractures. A reliable system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königshausen, M; Kübler, L; Godry, H; Citak, M; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2012-02-01

    The surgical treatment of displaced proximal humeral fractures (ORIF) is a perpetual challenge to the surgeon. For this reason, the principle of polyaxiality was developed to provide an improved primary stability of the fracture through better anchorage of the screws, especially in osteoporotic bone. The aim of this study was to present clinical results with the polyaxial locking plate in the operative treatment of proximal humerus fractures in order to determine whether the technique of polyaxiality leads to better functional outcome and lower complication rates in comparison to monoaxial plates in the literature. Seventy-three patients with displaced proximal humeral fractures were treated surgically with the polyaxial locking Suture Plate™ (Arthrex(®)) between 03/2007 and 06/2009. Fifty-two of the patients (mean age, 69.9 ± 12.1) were included in a radiographical and clinical examination using the Constant score (CS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH). The follow-up examinations were on average 13.9 ± 4.5 months (10-27 months) after surgical treatment. The mean CS of the patients was 66.0 ± 13.7 points, the age- and gender-related CS was 90.9% ± 20.0% and the mean DASH score was 23.8 ± 19.8 points for the injured side. The patients with a nearly anatomical reduction of their fracture (n = 13) reached a significantly higher CS (75.1 ± 8.5; p = 0.004) and DASH-score (13.6 ± 11.6; p = 0.043) and none of these patients had a complication. The complications were identified in 12 (23.1%) cases, 5 of which involved loss of reduction. All of these 5 cases were lacking of initial medial column support and 4 of which were type C2.3 AO-Classification. The data show that the combination of angular stability with the possibility of variable polyaxial screw direction is a good concept for reduction and fixation of displaced proximal humeral fractures, but anatomical reduction and medial support remain important preconditions for a good

  16. Economic aspects of complicated osteoporosis: The cost of treatment in the first year after fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Dobrovolskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the cost of treatment in patients with complicated osteoporosis (OP in the first year after fracture under the conditions of the Moscow municipal healthcare system.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 196 women (mean age, 65.8±9.1 years who had sustained fractures at five major osteoporotic sites (proximal hip (PH, distal forearm (DF, surgical humeral neck, vertebral column, and medial and/or lateral ankle. A unified questionnaire that included data on inpatient and outpatient treatment, patients' personal costs, and social benefits, as well as tariffs on services of the Moscow City Fund of Obligatory Health Insurance was used to estimate the cost of treatment for complicated OP during one year after fracture.Results. The direct cost of treatment for PH fracture amounted to 101,243 rubles and was significantly higher (p < 0.01 than that for fractures at other sites: DF (22,080 rubles; humeral neck (39,855 rubles, vertebral column (51,167 rubles, and ankle (43,345 rubles. The average cost of treatment in terms of indirect costs of treatment for complicated OP during a year was as high as 61,151 rubles. In the overall cost structure for the disease, hospital costs accounted for 44%; social benefits were 12% and the cost of antiosteoporotic drugs was only 7%, which was associated with the fact that the latter were rarely prescribed by primary healthcare physicians.Conclusion. Costs of treatment in patients with complicated OP in Moscow were estimated in relation to the site of low-energy fracture. The disease was shown to cause considerable economic losses regardless of the site of osteoporotic fracture; however, the cost of antiosteoporotic drugs has an insignificant share in the overall cost structure for treatment. At the same time, secondary prevention of OP requires that combination antiosteoporotic therapy should be performed in all patients who have sustained low-energy fracture.

  17. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, Perry W; Roberts, Heidi L; Perez, Carlos A

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication.

  18. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigsby, Perry W.; Roberts, Heidi L.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication

  19. Transverse dispersion in heterogeneous fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, Bill; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate; Outters, Nils; Hermanson, Jan

    2004-12-01

    fracture. The transport properties of these fractures were adjusted to be consistent with the STT1b tracer transport experiment of the Aespoe TRUE-1 in situ transport experiment. For most of the cases simulated, transport aperture, e (m), was correlated to transmissivity, T (m 2 /s), according to e = 15xT 0.6 . This relationship was established based on the results of simulation of STT1b tracer experiments inside the Base case stochastic field fracture. For Case 5, a range of alternative relationships between aperture and transmissivity were considered. Values for transverse dispersion were simulated between 0.01 m and 10 m. The value of 0.01 m represents a 'typical' value of transverse dispersion from the literature, estimated as approximately 1% of the travel distance. The value of 10 is extreme, and is approximately ten times greater than the upper bound realistic value of 1 m (10% of the travel distance). Simulations were carried out primarily for a basically one-dimensional flow field in the plane of the fracture. This boundary condition was implemented by applying no flow boundaries on the north and south edges of the fracture, and heads of 0.5 m and 0 m to the west and east edges of the fracture respectively. The breakthrough statistics t 5 , t 50 , and t 95 , correspond to the time for 5%, 50%, and 95% mass recovery respectively. These results are based on a correlation between transmissivity and transport aperture et 15 T0.6. For this correlation, and the range of spatial transmissivity fields considered in Case 1, changes in transverse dispersion did not produce a significant change in the mean conservative tracer breakthrough times, although it did somewhat decrease the standard deviation. For the simple, channelized fracture considered in Case 5, this same aperture-transmissivity relationship also produced relatively small impacts of even large values of transverse dispersivity. However, when this channelized fracture is given a constant aperture the tracer

  20. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  1. Internal fixation of severely displaced mandibular condylar neck fracture with the aid of ramus osteotomy. A revised technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S

    1997-01-01

    A technique is described whereby the mandibular condyle can be located, replaced and fixed in case of a severely displaced fracture with exarticulation of the condylar head.......A technique is described whereby the mandibular condyle can be located, replaced and fixed in case of a severely displaced fracture with exarticulation of the condylar head....

  2. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  3. Comparison of femoral morphology and bone mineral density between femoral neck fractures and trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuki; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masanobu; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    Many studies that analyzed bone mineral density (BMD) and skeletal factors of hip fractures were based on uncalibrated radiographs or dual-energy xray absorptiometry (DXA). Spatial accuracy in measuring BMD and morphologic features of the femur with DXA is limited. This study investigated differences in BMD and morphologic features of the femur between two types of hip fractures using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Forty patients with hip fractures with normal contralateral hips were selected for this study between 2003 and 2007 (trochanteric fracture, n=18; femoral neck fracture, n=22). Each patient underwent QCT of the bilateral femora using a calibration phantom. Using images of the intact contralateral femur, BMD measurements were made at the point of minimum femoral-neck cross-sectional area, middle of the intertrochanteric region, and center of the femoral head. QCT images also were used to measure morphologic features of the hip, including hip axis length, femoral neck axis length, neck-shaft angle, neck width, head offset, anteversion of the femoral neck, and cortical index at the femoral isthmus. No significant differences were found in trabecular BMD between groups in those three regions. Patients with trochanteric fractures showed a smaller neck shaft angle and smaller cortical index at the femoral canal isthmus compared with patients with femoral neck fractures. We conclude that severe osteoporosis with thinner cortical bone of the femoral diaphysis is seen more often in patients with trochanteric fracture than in patients with femoral neck fracture. Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  5. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A.B.; Jacobs, B.

    1984-09-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora.

  6. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, A.B.; Jacobs, B.

    1984-01-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora. (orig.)

  7. Fracture of the Atlas through a Synchondrosis of Anterior Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Turk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical fractures are rare in paediatric population. In younger children, cervical fractures usually occur above the level of C4; whereas in older population, fractures or dislocations more commonly involve the lower cervical spine. Greater elasticity of intervertebral ligaments and also the spinal vertebrae explains why cervical fractures in paediatric ages are rare. The injury usually results from a symmetric or asymmetric axial loading. In paediatric cases, most fractures occur through the synchondroses which are the weakest links of the atlas. The prognosis depends on the severity of the spinal cord injury. In this case, we presented an anterior fracture in synchondrosis of atlas after falling on head treated with cervical collar. There was no neurologic deficit for the following 2 years.

  8. An unusual fracture of the talus in a snowboarder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovich, A Tanja; Mehin, Ramin; O'Brien, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Fractures of the talus are uncommon. However, snow- boarding and skateboarding are 2 activities that are specifically associated with talus fractures. These patients sustain occult lateral talus process fractures that present as a severe ankle injury. The diagnosis is difficult because of subtle clinical and plain radiographic findings. Computed tomography is a very useful tool for the assessment of these injuries. Although the majority of these athletes have lateral sided talus fractures, there are variants. We present an unusual case of a displaced intra-articular fracture of the subtalar joint involving the middle articular facet of the talus with extension of the fracture into the talar head. This highlights the importance of carefully assessing snowboarders' "ankle injuries."

  9. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A B; Jacobs, B

    1984-09-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora.

  10. Assessment of femoral head perfusion by dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Ryuya; Nakano, Tetsuo; Miyazono, Kazuki; Tsurugami, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Tomohiro; Inaba, Daisuke; Takada, Koji

    2004-01-01

    We studied femoral head perfusion in 21 femoral neck fractures using dynamic MR imaging (MRI) between November 2001 and July 2002. MRI patterns divided into four groups when the results between the fractured side and unaffected side were compared. Femoral head perfusion at the fractured side was normal in Type A, about half in Type B, and absent in Type C. When perfusion at both the fractured side and unaffected side was absent, Exceptional Type was suspected. The Garden I group consisted of one Type B. The Garden II group consisted of one Type A, six Type B, one Type C, and two Exceptional Type. The Garden III group consisted of two Type B and one Type C, and the Garden IV group consisted of six Type C and one Exceptional Type. Post operations of by internal fixation confirmed the incidence of aseptic necrosis using MRI. (author)

  11. Traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Siebenga (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic spinal fractures have the lowest functional outcomes and the lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ systems.1 This thesis will cover traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures and not osteoporotic spine fractures because of the difference in fracture

  12. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increase...

  13. TREATMENT OF TRANSCONDYLAR EXTENSOR FRACTURES OF THE HUMERUS IN CHILDREN: ON THE ISSUE OF HISTORY OF THE METHOD “COLLAR AND CUFF”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Zolotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the history of one of the methods of conservative treatment humeral transcondylar extensor fractures in children - a method «collar and cuff». The second and very common name of this method is connected with the name of the american orthopaedist Walter Blount. «The method of Blount» is mentioned in many domestic and foreign sources. Nevertheless the analysis of publications on the history of the discussed method of treatment indicates the priority in this matter other famous doctor - British podiatrist Robert Jones.

  14. [Treatment of periprosthetic and peri-implant fractures : modern plate osteosynthesis procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, M J; Stange, R; Kösters, C

    2012-11-01

    Periprosthetic fractures are increasing not only due to the demographic development with high life expectancy, the increase in osteoporosis and increased prosthesis implantation but also due to increased activity of the elderly population. The therapeutic algorithms are manifold but general valid rules for severe fractures are not available. The most commonly occurring periprosthetic fractures are proximal and distal femoral fractures but in the clinical routine fractures of the tibial head, ankle, shoulder, elbow and on the borders to other implants (peri-implant fractures) and complex interprosthetic fractures are being seen increasingly more. It is to be expected that in the mid-term further options, such as cement augmentation of cannulated polyaxial locking screws will extend the portfolio of implants for treatment of periprosthetic fractures. The aim of this review article is to present the new procedures for osteosynthesis of periprosthetic fractures.

  15. Assessment of fracture risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanis, John A.; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V.

    2009-01-01

    Fractures are a common complication of osteopo