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Sample records for humans protects cells

  1. Human embryonic stem cells and patent protection

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    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of biotechnological research in modern diagnostics and therapeutics, on the one hand, and stimulative function of a patent, on the other hand, this work deals with the question of the possibility of pa-tent protection of human embryonic stem cells. Taking into account that this is a biotechnological invention, the key question that this paper highlights is the interpretation of the provisions of their patentability. Namely, thanks to the advanced methods of isolation, purification and preparation for implementation, modern patent systems do not exclude a priori living organisms from patent protection. Therefore, the analysis of representative administrative decisions or court rulings sought to define the criteria that would be applied in order to give patent protection to a certain biotechnological invention (stem cells while others do not.

  2. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

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    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  3. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  4. Protective Effects of Memantine on Hydroquinone-Treated Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Human Retinal Müller Cells.

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    Moustafa, Mohamed Tarek; Ramirez, Claudio; Schneider, Kevin; Atilano, Shari R; Limb, Gloria Astrid; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Kenney, Maria Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Memantine (MEM) acts on the glutamatergic system by blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. The role that MEM plays in protecting retinal cells is unknown. Hydroquinone (HQ) is one of the cytotoxic components in cigarette smoke. In the present study, we tested whether pretreatment with MEM could protect against the cytotoxic effects of HQ on human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) and human retinal Müller cells (MIO-M1) in vitro. Cells were plated, pretreated for 6 h with 30 μM of MEM, and then exposed for 24 h to 200, 100, 50, and 25 μM of HQ while MEM was still present. Cell viability (CV), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays were performed. HQ-treated cells showed a dose-dependent decrease in CV and ΔΨm, but an increase in ROS production and LDH levels in both cell lines. MEM pretreatment reversed the CV in 50, 100, and 200 μM doses in ARPE-19 cells and at all HQ concentrations in MIO-M1 cells compared to HQ-treated cultures. ROS production was reversed in all HQ concentrations in both cell lines. ΔΨm was significantly increased after MEM pretreatment only in 50 μM HQ concentration for both cell lines. LDH levels were decreased at 50 and 25 μM HQ in ARPE-19 and MIO-M1 cells, respectively. HQ-induced toxicity is concentration dependent in ARPE-19 and MIO-M1 cultures. MEM exerts protective effects against HQ-induced toxicity on human retinal pigment epithelial and Müller cells in vitro.

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

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    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  6. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

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    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  8. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, protects against Shiga toxin cytotoxicity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Ohmi, K; Kiyokawa, N; Sekino, T; Suzuki, T; Mimori, K; Taguchi, T; Nakajima, H; Katagiri, Y U; Fujimoto, J; Nakao, H; Takeda, T

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause microvascular endothelial cell damage, resulting in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The prevention of endothelial cell damage is therefore a crucial step in overcoming this disorder. Here, we report that nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, has a protective effect against the cytotoxicity of Stxs in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). The relative viability of cells treated with 1.5-15 pM of Stx1 was reduced to 10-20% of that without Stx1. However, the viability of cells treated with NBT (10-100 microM) remained higher than 80%, even in the presence of Stx1. NBT also protected against Stx1 cytotoxicity in sodium butyrate-treated hypersensitive HMVECs. The protective effect of NBT against Stx cytotoxicity may be due to the depletion of ATP in the cells, thereby inhibiting the entry of Stx1.

  9. Exercise training protects human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis.

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    Paula, Flavia M M; Leite, Nayara C; Borck, Patricia C; Freitas-Dias, Ricardo; Cnop, Miriam; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara P T; Cavaglieri, Claudia R; Marchetti, Piero; Boschero, Antonio C; Zoppi, Claudio C; Eizirik, Decio L

    2017-11-13

    Prolonged exercise has positive metabolic effects in obese or diabetic individuals. These effects are usually ascribed to improvements in insulin sensitivity. We evaluated whether exercise also generates circulating signals that protect human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. For this purpose, we obtained serum from humans or mice before and after an 8 wk training period. Exposure of human islets or mouse or rat β cells to human or rodent sera, respectively, obtained from trained individuals reduced cytokine (IL-1β+IFN-γ)- or chemical ER stressor-induced β-cell ER stress and apoptosis, at least in part via activation of the transcription factor STAT3. These findings indicate that exercise training improves human and rodent β-cell survival under diabetogenic conditions and support lifestyle interventions as a protective approach for both type 1 and 2 diabetes.-Paula, F. M. M., Leite, N. C., Borck, P. C., Freitas-Dias, R., Cnop, M., Chacon-Mikahil, M. P. T., Cavaglieri, C. R., Marchetti, P., Boschero, A. C., Zoppi, C. C., Eizirik, D. L. Exercise training protects human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. © FASEB.

  10. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

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    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration.

  11. Protective effect of a Phyllanthus orbicularis aqueous extract against UVB light in human cells.

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    Vernhes, Marioly; González-Pumariega, Maribel; Andrade, Luciana; Schuch, Andre Passaglia; de Lima-Bessa, Keronninn Moreno; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel

    2013-01-01

    One approach to protect human skin against the dangerous effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the use of natural products, such as photoprotectors. Phyllanthus orbicularis Kunth (Euphorbiaceae) is a Cuban endemic plant used in popular medicine. Its antigenotoxicity effect against some harmful agents has been investigated. However, the effect in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human cells has not been previously assessed. The protective effect of a P. orbicularis extract against UVB light-induced damage in human cells was evaluated. DNA repair proficient (MRC5-SV) and deficient (XP4PA, complementation group XPC) cell-lines were used. Damaging effects of UVB light were evaluated by clonogenic assay and apoptosis induction by flow cytometry techniques. The extent of DNA repair itself was determined by the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs were detected and quantified by slot-blot assay. Treatment of UVB-irradiated MRC5-SV cells with P. orbicularis extract increased the percentage of colony-forming cells from 36.03 ± 3.59 and 4.42 ± 1.45 to 53.14 ± 8.8 and 14.52 ± 1.97, for 400 and 600 J/m(2), respectively. A decrease in apoptotic cell population was observed in cells maintained within the extract. The P. orbicularis extract enhanced the removal of CPD from genomic DNA. The CPDs remaining were found to be about 27.7 and 1.1%, while with plant extract, treatment these values decreased to 16.1 and 0.2%, for 3 and 24 h, respectively. P. orbicularis aqueous extract protects human cells against UVB damage. This protective effect is through the modulation of DNA repair effectiveness.

  12. Elemene injection induced autophagy protects human hepatoma cancer cells from starvation and undergoing apoptosis.

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    Lin, Yan; Wang, Keming; Hu, Chunping; Lin, Lin; Qin, Shukui; Cai, Xueting

    2014-01-01

    Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anticancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. In an in vivo experiment, we found that apatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits VEGFR2, combined with elemene injection (Ele) for the treatment of H22 solid tumor in mice resulted in worse effectiveness than apatinib alone. Moreover, Ele could protect HepG2 cells from death induced by serum-free starvation. Further data on the mechanism study revealed that Ele induced protective autophagy and prevented human hepatoma cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. Proapoptosis effect of Ele was enhanced when proautophagy effect was inhibited by hydroxychloroquine. Above all, Ele has the effect of protecting cancer cells from death either in apatinib induced nutrient deficient environment or in serum-free induced starvation. A combination of elemene injection with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

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    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  14. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Protect Bladder Epithelial Cells Against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Invasion and Cytotoxicity

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    Lin, Ann E.; Autran, Chloe A.; Espanola, Sophia D.; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants. PMID:23990566

  15. Isoflurane Protects Against Human Endothelial Cell Apoptosis by Inducing Sphingosine Kinase-1 via ERK MAPK

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    H. Thomas Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO2 then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1 and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II or S1P1 receptor (with W146 abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  16. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

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    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  17. The protective effect of resveratrol on human lens epithelial cells against ultraviolet-induced apoptosis

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    Xue - Fang Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the protective effect of resveratrol on human lens epithelial cells against ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. METHODS:Subcultured human lens epithelial cell line, ultraviolet induced cell apoptosis, 20μmol/L resveratrol pretreated cell, the indicators change was observed: rate of apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and apoptosis-related factors of caspses-3 and caspase-9 were detected by colorimetric detection, ultrastructure changes were observed under transmission electron microscope. RESULTS: Flow cytometry instrument testing found that resveratrol can suppress the apoptosis induced by ultraviolet irradiation, caspses-3 and caspase-9 content in positive control group were significantly higher than that of the negative control group at the same time period, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05; caspses-3 and caspase-9 content in experimental group were lower than that in the positive control group at the same time, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. In addition, the damage of human lens epithelial cells was alleviated with the incubation time of resveratrol elongated. CONCLUSION:Resveratrol may inhibit ultraviolet-induced apoptosis of human lens epithelial cells, it has preventive function against radioactive cataract, and it can provide reliable evidence for pursuing effective medicine to prevent and treat cataract.

  18. Maytenus ilicifolia dry extract protects normal cells, induces apoptosis and regulates Bcl-2 in human cancer cells.

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    Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Cabral de Sá Leitão; Pessoa, Jonas Bispo; Garcia, Vinícios Barreto; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Souza, Tatiane Pereira de; Petrovick, Pedro Ros; Araújo, Aurigena Antunes de

    2013-11-01

    Maytenus is the largest genus of the family Celastraceae and the species Maytenus ilicifolia (popularly known as 'Espinheira Santa'). It is widely used in traditional Brazilian medicine to treat stomach conditions including nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. In this study, the apoptotic effects of a spray-dried extract of M. ilicifolia (SDEMI) was evaluated using human hepatocellular cells (HepG2), colorectal carcinoma cells (HT-29), and normal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Cells were treated with SDEMI for 4 and 24 h, then were assayed for levels of apoptosis, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 by flow cytometry, immunostaining, and Western blot, respectively. Significant differences between groups were determined using analysis of variance (P < 0.05). For HepG2 and HT-29 cells treated with SDEMI, various cytotoxic effects were observed compared with control cells at all timepoints assayed (P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive caspase-3 staining and down-regulation of Bcl-2 were observed, consistent with the induction of cell death detected in these cell lines. In contrast, treatment of HaCaT cells with SDEMI was associated with a protective effect compared with control cells at both timepoints (P < 0.001). For example, increased expression of Bcl-2 and negative caspase-3 staining were detected. Taken together, these results suggest that SDEMI protects normal cells, while SDEMI mediates induction of apoptosis via down-regulation of Bcl-2 and involvement of caspase-3 in human carcinoma cells.

  19. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

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    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  20. A dry extract of Phyllanthus niruri protects normal cells and induces apoptosis in human liver carcinoma cells.

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    de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Tatiane Pereira; Pires, Júlia Glória Lucatelli; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Petrovick, Pedro Ros; Mâcedo, Helainy Daline Oliveira; de Sá Leitão Oliveira, Ana Luiza Cabral; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo

    2012-11-01

    The ability to induce apoptosis is an important marker for cytotoxic antitumor agents. Some natural compounds have been shown to modulate apoptosis pathways that are frequently blocked in human cancers, and therefore, these compounds provide novel opportunities for cancer drug development. Phyllanthus, a plant genus of the family Euphorbiaceae, exhibits multiple pharmacological actions. Of these, Phyllanthus niruri extracts exhibit significant antitumor activity, which is consistent with the traditional medicinal use of this plant. To examine the apoptotic effects of a spray-dried extract of P. niruri (SDEPN), human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2, Huh-7), colorectal carcinoma cells (Ht29) and keratinocytes (HaCaT) were exposed to the extract for 4, 8 and 24 h. Flow cytometry and caspase-3 immunostaining were used to detect apoptosis, while analysis of variance was applied to identify significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). At all timepoints, the SDEPN induced significantly different cytotoxic effects for HepG2 and Huh-7 cells compared with control cells (P < 0.001). In contrast, the SDEPN had a protective effect on HaCaT cells compared with control cells at all timepoints (P < 0.001). In caspase-3 assays, activation was detected after cell death was induced in Huh-7 and HepG2 cancer cells by the SDEPN. In combination, these results indicate that the SDEPN is selectively toxic towards cancer cell lines, yet is protective towards normal cells.

  1. [The protection effects of resveratrol on irradiated human pneumonic cell lines and its mechanism].

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    Fu, Xiao-yue; Xue, Jian-xin; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Yong-sheng; Huang, Mei-juan; Li, Lu; Lu, You

    2012-05-01

    This study was to explore whether resveratrol could protect human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) and human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC5) from radiation injury and to investigate its potential HBE and MRC5 were divided into four groups: Group 1 (Vehicle), control group, only mechanism. treated with vehicle; Group 2 (resveratrol, Res), the resveratrol group, treated with 5 micromol/L resveratrol; Group 3 (RT+Vehicle), the X-ray irradiation group, only subjected to irradiation of 20 Gy X-ray; Group 4 (RT+Res), the combination therapy group, 2 hours before X-ray treatment (20 Gy, 8. 33 Gy/min for 144 s), 5 micromol/L resveratrol was added to the cells. Several experimental methods were used to observe cellular morphology, ultrastructure, viability, DNA damage, apoptosis, and to determine the change of oxidative stress indexes such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), total glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). X-ray could induce HBE and MRC5 cell injury. Resveratrol could significantly ease the morphological and ultrastructure injury, relieve the decrease of cellular viability and the damage of DNA, and reduce cellular apoptosis. Besides, oxidative stress indexes including ROS, MDA, GSH, SOD were improved by resveratrol after irradiation. Resveratrol protect HBE and MRC5 from radiation injury, which is related to the alleviation of oxidative stress injury.

  2. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  3. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Girard

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen (Tam is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1 promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  4. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells

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    Zhi-gao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis.

  5. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Gao; Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Fa-Wei; Xu, Cheng-Yong; Geng, Miao

    2016-07-01

    The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM) was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM)-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis.

  6. DPP-4 inhibition protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced vascular barrier impairment

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    Naoko Hashimoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are relatively new class of anti-diabetic drugs. Some protective effects of DPP-4 on cardiovascular disease have been described independently from glucose-lowering effect. However, the detailed mechanisms by which DPP-4 inhibitors exert on endothelial cells remain elusive. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor on endothelial barrier function. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were cultured and exposed to hypoxia in the presence or absence of Diprotin A, a DPP-4 inhibitor. Immunocytochemistry of vascular endothelial (VE- cadherin showed that jagged VE-cadherin staining pattern induced by hypoxia was restored by treatment with Diprotin A. The increased level of cleaved β-catenin in response to hypoxia was significantly attenuated by Diprotin A, suggesting that DPP-4 inhibition protects endothelial adherens junctions from hypoxia. Subsequently, we found that Diprotin A inhibited hypoxia-induced translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus through decreasing TNF-α expression level. Furthermore, the tube formation assay showed that Diprotin A significantly restored hypoxia-induced decrease in number of tubes by HUVECs. These results suggest that DPP-4 inhibitior protects HUVECs from hypoxia-induced barrier impairment.

  7. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

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    M. Mathy-Hartert

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−. In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M, this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC. Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2− generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2 was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon. So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis.

  8. β-Elemene-induced autophagy protects human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis

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    Zhang Jingdong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anti-cancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. The mechanism by which β-elemene kills cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate the anti-tumor effect of β-elemene on human gastric cancer cells and the molecular mechanism involved. Results β-Elemene inhibited the viability of human gastric cancer MGC803 and SGC7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of apoptosis. A robust autophagy was observed in the cells treated with β-elemene; it was characterized by the increase of punctate LC3 dots, the cellular morphology, and the increased levels of LC3-II protein. Further study showed that β-elemene treatment up-regulated Atg5-Atg12 conjugated protein but had little effect on other autophagy-related proteins. PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K1 activity was inhibited by β-elemene. Knockdown of Beclin 1 with small interfering RNA, or co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine or chlorochine enhanced significantly the antitumor effects of β-elemene. Conclusions Our data provides the first evidence that β-elemene induces protective autophagy and prevents human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. A combination of β-elemene with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for advanced gastric cancer.

  9. Ultraviolet-B Protective Effect of Flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata on Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Juilee; Bhatt, Purvi

    2015-10-01

    The exposure of skin to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiations leads to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and can induce production of free radicals which imbalance the redox status of the cell and lead to increased oxidative stress. Clove has been traditionally used for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-viral, and antiseptic effects. To evaluate the UV-B protective activity of flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata (clove) buds on human dermal fibroblast cells. Protective ability of flavonoid-enriched (FE) fraction of clove was studied against UV-B induced cytotoxicity, anti-oxidant regulation, oxidative DNA damage, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptotic morphological changes, and regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 antioxidant response element (Nrf2 ARE) pathway. FE fraction showed a significant antioxidant potential. Pretreatment of cells with FE fraction (10-40 μg/ml) reversed the effects of UV-B induced cytotoxicity, depletion of endogenous enzymatic antioxidants, oxidative DNA damage, intracellular ROS production, apoptotic changes, and overexpression of Nrf2 and HO-1. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the FE fraction from clove could confer UV-B protection probably through the Nrf2-ARE pathway, which included the down-regulation of Nrf2 and HO-1. These findings suggested that the flavonoids from clove could potentially be considered as UV-B protectants and can be explored further for its topical application to the area of the skin requiring protection. Pretreatment of human dermal fibroblast with flavonoid-enriched fraction of Eugenia caryophylata attenuated effects of ultraviolet-B radiationsIt also conferred protection through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2-antioxidant response pathway and increased tolerance of cells against oxidative stressFlavonoid-enriched fraction can be explored further for topical application to the skin as a

  10. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Protects Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

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    János Pálóczi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Human embryonic stem cell- (hESC- derived cardiomyocytes are one of the useful screening platforms of potential cardiocytoprotective molecules. However, little is known about the behavior of these cardiomyocytes in simulated ischemia/reperfusion conditions. In this study, we have tested the cytoprotective effect of an NO donor and the brain type natriuretic peptide (BNP in a screening platform based first on differentiated embryonic bodies (EBs, 6 + 4 days and then on more differentiated cardiomyocytes (6 + 24 days, both derived from hESCs. Methods. Both types of hESC-derived cells were exposed to 150 min simulated ischemia, followed by 120 min reperfusion. Cell viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining. The following treatments were applied during simulated ischemia in differentiated EBs: the NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP (10−7, 10−6, and 10−5 M, BNP (10−9, 10−8, and 10−7 M, and the nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 10−5 M. Results. SNAP (10−6, 10−5 M significantly attenuated cell death in differentiated EBs. However, simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cell death was not affected by BNP or by L-NNA. In separate experiments, SNAP (10−6 M also protected hESC-derived cardiomyocytes. Conclusions. We conclude that SNAP, but not BNP, protects differentiated EBs or cardiomyocytes derived from hESCs against simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present screening platform is a useful tool for discovery of cardiocytoprotective molecules and their cellular mechanisms.

  11. The protective effect of geniposide on human neuroblastoma cells in the presence of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde can induce misfolding and aggregation of Tau protein and β amyloid protein, which are characteristic pathological features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). An increase in endogenous formaldehyde concentration in the brain is closely related to dementia in aging people. Therefore, the discovery of effective drugs to counteract the adverse impact of formaldehyde on neuronal cells is beneficial for the development of appropriate treatments for age-associated cognitive decline. Methods In this study, we assessed the neuroprotective properties of TongLuoJiuNao (TLJN), a traditional Chinese medicine preparation, against formaldehyde stress in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). The effect of TLJN and its main ingredients (geniposide and ginsenoside Rg1) on cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular antioxidant activity and the expression of apoptotic-related genes in the presence of formaldehyde were monitored. Results Cell counting studies showed that in the presence of TLJN, the viability of formaldehyde-treated SH-SY5Y cells significantly recovered. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the morphology of formaldehyde-injured cells was rescued by TLJN and geniposide, an effective ingredient of TLJN. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of geniposide on formaldehyde-induced apoptosis was dose-dependent. The activity of intracellular antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) increased, as did mRNA and protein levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2 after the addition of geniposide. In contrast, the expression of the apoptotic-related gene - P53, apoptotic executer - caspase 3 and apoptotic initiator - caspase 9 were downregulated after geniposide treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against formaldehyde stress through modulating the expression of Bcl-2, P53, caspase 3 and caspase 9, and by increasing the activity of intracellular superoxide dismutase and glutathione

  12. Protective effect of lycopene for oxidative damage in human lens epithelial cells induced by UV

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    Jing-Wen Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the protective effect and possible mechanisms of lycopene for oxidative damage induced by ultraviolet in cultured human lens epithelial cells(HLEC. METHODS:HLEC was subcultured and divided into negative control group, oxidative injury group, lycopene low dose group and lycopene high dose group. Cell viability was assayed by MTT colorimetric. Cell morphological changes were detected by electron microscope. Reactive oxygen species(ROSlevels were detected with DCFH-DA fluorescent probe. Content of superoxide dismutase(SOD, glutathione peroxidase(GSHand malondialdehyde(MDAin supernatants were detected by spectrophotometer. RESULTS:Lycopene could obviously inhibited UV-induced decline in cell activity, reduce UV-induced ROS generation within HLEC, cause SOD, GSH-Px levels increased and MDA levels decreased.CONCLUSION:Lycopene plays its strong antioxidant role in increasing the intracellular SOD and GSH-Px content levels and decreasing MDA levels, which provide reliable experimental basis for prevent and treatment of cataracts.

  13. Dig1 protects against cell death provoked by glyphosate-based herbicides in human liver cell lines

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    Travert Carine

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide used pesticides containing different adjuvants like Roundup formulations, which are glyphosate-based herbicides, can provoke some in vivo toxicity and in human cells. These pesticides are commonly found in the environment, surface waters and as food residues of Roundup tolerant genetically modified plants. In order to know their effects on cells from liver, a major detoxification organ, we have studied their mechanism of action and possible protection by precise medicinal plant extracts called Dig1. Methods The cytotoxicity pathways of four formulations of glyphosate-based herbicides were studied using human hepatic cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, known models to study xenobiotic effects. We monitored mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity and caspases 3/7 for cell mortality and protection by Dig1, as well as cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2, 3A4 and 2C9 and glutathione-S-transferase to approach the mechanism of actions. Results All the four Roundup formulations provoke liver cell death, with adjuvants having stronger effects than glyphosate alone. Hep3B are 3-5 times more sensitive over 48 h. Caspases 3/7 are greatly activated in HepG2 by Roundup at non-cytotoxic levels, and some apoptosis induction by Roundup is possible together with necrosis. CYP3A4 is specifically enhanced by Roundup at doses 400 times less than used in agriculture (2%. CYP1A2 is increased to a lesser extent together with glutathione-S-transferase (GST down-regulation. Dig 1, non cytotoxic and not inducing caspases by itself, is able to prevent Roundup-induced cell death in a time-dependant manner with an important efficiency of up to 89%, within 48 h. In addition, we evidenced that it prevents Caspases 3/7 activation and CYP3A4 enhancement, and not GST reduction, but in turn it slightly inhibited CYP2C9 when added before Roundup. Conclusion Roundup is able to provoke intracellular disruption in hepatic cell lines at different levels, but a

  14. Turkish propolis protects human endothelial cells in vitro from homocysteine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Tartik, Musa; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic cardiovascular and neurodegenerative complications induced by hyperhomocysteinemia have been most relatively associated with endothelial cell injury. Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanying with oxidative stress which is hallmarks of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular disease. Propolis is a natural product, obtained by honeybee from various oils, pollens, special resins and wax materials, conventionally used with the purpose of treatment by folks Propolis has various biological activities and powerful antioxidant capacity. The flavonoids and phenolic acids, most bioactive components of propolis, have superior antioxidant ability to defend cell from free radicals. This study was designed to examine the protective effects of Turkish propolis (from east of country) on Hcy induced ROS production and apoptosis in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). According to results, co-treatment of HUVECs with propolis decreased Hcy-induced ROS overproduction and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels. Furthermore, overproductions of Bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3 protein, elevation of cytochrome c release in Hcy-treated HUVECs were significantly reduced by propolis. It was concluded that propolis has cytoprotective ability against cytotoxic effects of high Hcy in HUVECs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Cisplatin induces protective autophagy through activation of BECN1 in human bladder cancer cells

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    Lin JF

    2017-05-01

    cisplatin toward BC cells. These results indicated that cisplatin induced protective autophagy which may contribute to the development of cisplatin resistance and resulted in treatment failure. Mechanistically, upregulation of beclin-1 (BECN1 was detected in cisplatin-treated cells, and knockdown of BECN1 using shRNA attenuated cisplatin-induced autophagy and subsequently enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis.Conclusion: Collectively, the study results indicated that cisplatin-induced autophagy is mediated by BECN1 in BC cells. Therefore, combinative treatment using cisplatin and autophagy inhibitors could potentially overcome cisplatin resistance related to autophagy induction. Keywords: autophagy inhibition, autophagy related genes, apoptosis, cisplatin resistance, human urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma, lentiviral-based shRNA

  16. In Vitro Protective Effect and Antioxidant Mechanism of Resveratrol Induced by Dapsone Hydroxylamine in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Rosyana V; Malcher, Nívea S; Amado, Lílian L; Coleman, Michael D; Dos Santos, Danielle C; Borges, Rosivaldo Sa; Valente, Sebastião Aldo S; Valente, Vera C; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone (DDS) hydroxylamine metabolites cause oxidative stress- linked adverse effects in patients, such as methemoglobin formation and DNA damage. This study evaluated the ameliorating effect of the antioxidant resveratrol (RSV) on DDS hydroxylamine (DDS-NHOH) mediated toxicity in vitro using human erythrocytes and lymphocytes. The antioxidant mechanism was also studied using in-silico methods. In addition, RSV provided intracellular protection by inhibiting DNA damage in human lymphocytes induced by DDS-NHOH. However, whilst pretreatment with RSV (10-1000 μM significantly attenuated DDS-NHOH-induced methemoglobinemia, but it was not only significantly less effective than methylene blue (MET), but also post-treatment with RSV did not reverse methemoglobin formation, contrarily to that observed with MET. DDS-NHOH inhibited catalase (CAT) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, but did not alter superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in erythrocytes. Pretreatment with RSV did not alter these antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes treated with DDS-NHOH. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory methods showed that DDS-NHOH has a pro-oxidant effect, whereas RSV and MET have antioxidant effect on ROS. The effect on methemoglobinemia reversion for MET was significantly higher than that of RSV. These data suggest that the pretreatment with resveratrol may decrease heme-iron oxidation and DNA damage through reduction of ROS generated in cells during DDS therapy.

  17. In Vitro Protective Effect and Antioxidant Mechanism of Resveratrol Induced by Dapsone Hydroxylamine in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosyana V Albuquerque

    Full Text Available Dapsone (DDS hydroxylamine metabolites cause oxidative stress- linked adverse effects in patients, such as methemoglobin formation and DNA damage. This study evaluated the ameliorating effect of the antioxidant resveratrol (RSV on DDS hydroxylamine (DDS-NHOH mediated toxicity in vitro using human erythrocytes and lymphocytes. The antioxidant mechanism was also studied using in-silico methods. In addition, RSV provided intracellular protection by inhibiting DNA damage in human lymphocytes induced by DDS-NHOH. However, whilst pretreatment with RSV (10-1000 μM significantly attenuated DDS-NHOH-induced methemoglobinemia, but it was not only significantly less effective than methylene blue (MET, but also post-treatment with RSV did not reverse methemoglobin formation, contrarily to that observed with MET. DDS-NHOH inhibited catalase (CAT activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, but did not alter superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in erythrocytes. Pretreatment with RSV did not alter these antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes treated with DDS-NHOH. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory methods showed that DDS-NHOH has a pro-oxidant effect, whereas RSV and MET have antioxidant effect on ROS. The effect on methemoglobinemia reversion for MET was significantly higher than that of RSV. These data suggest that the pretreatment with resveratrol may decrease heme-iron oxidation and DNA damage through reduction of ROS generated in cells during DDS therapy.

  18. Protection of human cultured cells against oxidative stress by Rhodiola rosea without activation of antioxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Avanesian, Agnesa; Liu, Yanxia; Luesch, Hendrik; Jafari, Mahtab

    2009-09-01

    Rhodiola rosea root has been long used in traditional medical systems in Europe and Asia as an adaptogen to increase an organism's resistance to physical stress. Recent research has demonstrated its ability to improve mental and physical stamina, to improve mood, and to help alleviate high-altitude sickness. We have also recently found that R. rosea is able to extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. The mode of action of R. rosea is currently unknown; it has been suggested by some to act as an antioxidant, whereas others have argued that it may actually be a pro-oxidant and act through a hormetic mechanism. We found that R. rosea supplementation could protect cultured cells against ultraviolet light, paraquat, and H(2)O(2). However, it did not alter the levels of the major antioxidant defenses nor did it markedly activate the antioxidant response element or modulate heme-oxygenase-1 expression levels at relevant concentrations. In addition, R. rosea extract was not able to significantly degrade H(2)O(2) in vitro. These results suggest that in human cultured cells R. rosea does not act as an antioxidant and that its mode of action cannot be sufficiently explained through a pro-oxidant hormetic mechanism.

  19. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors l-deprenyl and clorgyline protect nonmalignant human cells from ionising radiation and chemotherapy toxicity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seymour, C B

    2003-11-17

    l-Deprenyl (R-(-)-deprenyl, selegiline) is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) that is known to protect nerve cells from a variety of chemical and physical insults. As apoptosis is a common mechanism of radiation-induced cell death, the effect of l-deprenyl on the survival of cultured cells and tissue explants was studied following exposure to gamma radiation. The results obtained were compared with the effects of the less-selective MAO-B inhibitor pargyline and the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. l-Deprenyl at a concentration of 10(-9) M protected the nontumorigenic cell line (HaCaT) and normal human urothelial explants from the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation, but did not protect tumorigenic human cell lines HaCaT-ras, HPV-transfected human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells), or PC3. Human bladder carcinoma explants were not protected. Clorgyline showed a smaller protective effect of normal cells, whereas pargyline had no effect. Radiation-induced delayed effects (genomic instability measured as delayed cell death) were prevented in normal cells by l-deprenyl but, interestingly, deprenyl appeared to increase the amount of delayed death in the tumorigenic cell lines. Studies using l-deprenyl prior to the exposure of nonmalignant cells to cisplatin showed that cell death due to this agent was also reduced. Treatment of cultures of nontumorigenic cells with l-deprenyl or clorgyline significantly increased the levels of the protein Bcl-2 following irradiation, but there was no such effect on the already-elevated levels of this protein in the tumour samples. Since the Bcl-2 has been shown to be an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, this would imply that the protective effects of l-deprenyl and clorgyline involve activation of antiapoptotic pathways within the normal cell. This hypothesis is supported by data showing reduced levels of apoptosis in HaCAT cells and in normal bladder explant cultures following treatment with l-deprenyl.

  20. Protective Effects of L-Carnitine Against Oxidative Injury by Hyperosmolarity in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xia; Deng, Ruzhi; Li, Jin; Chi, Wei; Su, Zhitao; Lin, Jing; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan

    2015-08-01

    L-carnitine suppresses inflammatory responses in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, we determined if L-carnitine induces this protective effect through suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage in HCECs. Primary HCECs were established from donor limbal explants. A hyperosmolarity dry-eye model was used in which HCECs are cultured in 450 mOsM medium with or without L-carnitine for up to 48 hours. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage markers, oxygenases and antioxidative enzymes were analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) kit, semiquantitative PCR, immunofluorescence, and/or Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species production increased in HCECs upon substitution of the isotonic medium with the hypertonic medium. L-carnitine supplementation partially suppressed this response. Hyperosmolarity increased cytotoxic membrane lipid peroxidation levels; namely, malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydroxynonenal (HNE), as well as mitochondria DNA release along with an increase in 8-OHdG and aconitase-2. Interestingly, these oxidative markers were significantly decreased by coculture with L-carnitine. Hyperosmotic stress also increased the mRNA expression and/or protein production of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), but inhibited the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1), and peroxiredoxin-4 (PRDX4). However, L-carnitine partially reversed this altered imbalance between oxygenases and antioxidant enzymes induced by hyperosmolarity. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that L-carnitine protects HCECs from oxidative stress by lessening the declines in antioxidant enzymes and suppressing ROS production. Such suppression reduces membrane lipid oxidative damage markers and mitochondrial DNA damage.

  1. Heat shock protein-27 protects human bronchial epithelial cells against oxidative stress–mediated apoptosis: possible implication in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merendino, Anna M.; Paul, Catherine; Vignola, Antonio M.; Costa, Maria A.; Melis, Mario; Chiappara, Giuseppina; Izzo, V.; Bousquet, J.; Arrigo, André-Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Inflammation of the human bronchial epithelium, as observed in asthmatics, is characterized by the selective death of the columnar epithelial cells, which desquamate from the basal cells. Tissue repair initiates from basal cells that resist inflammation. Here, we have evaluated the extent of apoptosis as well as the Hsp27 level of expression in epithelial cells from bronchial biopsy samples taken from normal and asthmatic subjects. Hsp27 is a chaperone whose expression protects against oxidative stress. We report that in asthmatic subjects the basal epithelium cells express a high level of Hsp27 but no apoptotic morphology. In contrast, apoptotic columnar cells are devoid of Hsp27 expression. Moreover, we observed a decreased resistance to hydrogen peroxide–induced apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial 16–HBE cells when they were genetically modified to express reduced levels of Hsp27. PMID:12482203

  2. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  3. Antibody-Secreting Cell Responses and Protective Immunity Assessed in Gnotobiotic Pigs Inoculated Orally or Intramuscularly with Inactivated Human Rotavirus†

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Lijuan; Kang, S.-Y.; Ward, Lucy A.; To, Thanh L.; Saif, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    Newborn gnotobiotic pigs were inoculated twice perorally (p.o.) (group 1) or intramuscularly (i.m.) (group 2) or three times i.m. (group 3) with inactivated Wa strain human rotavirus and challenged with virulent Wa human rotavirus 20 to 24 days later. To assess correlates of protection, antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were enumerated in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues from pigs in each group at selected postinoculation days (PID) or postchallenge days. Few virus-specific ASC were dete...

  4. Hydrogen-rich PBS protects cultured human cells from ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play an important role in ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage, while hydrogen can selectively reduce hydroxyl radicals in vitro. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrogen-rich PBS may be an effective radioprotective agent in vitro. Compared to cells pretreated without hydrogen, we demonstrated that treating cells with hydrogen-rich PBS before irradiation could significantly inhibit IR-induced apoptosis, increase viability of human intestinal crypt cells, significantly increase endogenous antioxidant, and decrease malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentrations of human lymphocyte AHH-1 cells. It is concluded that hydrogen has a potential as an effective and safe radioprotective agent.

  5. Protection of neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells by veratridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter J; Ortinau, Stefanie; Frahm, Jana; Krüger, Norman; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2009-08-26

    The survival of developing dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be modulated by voltage-dependent mechanisms. Manipulation of these mechanisms in human neural progenitor cell cultures could improve the survival of immature dopaminergic neurons, and therefore aid research into pharmacological and cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease. Here, we examined the effect of the Na+ channel agonist veratridine on the human fetal neural progenitor ReNcell VM cell line. Neuronal differentiation was determined by immunocytochemistry, whereas patch clamp recordings showed the expression of functional voltage-gated sodium channels. Our results show that veratridine is neuroprotective in human fetal neural progenitor cells, which may benefit studies investigating neuronal development by reducing premature death amongst developing neurons.

  6. Doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: Implications from an in-vitro hypoxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Berndt, Rouven; Kott, Matthias; Schildhauer, Christin; Parczany, Kerstin; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a grave clinical emergency and associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Based on the complex underlying mechanisms, a multimodal pharmacological approach seems necessary to prevent intestinal I/R injury. The antibiotic drug doxycycline, which exhibits a wide range of pleiotropic therapeutic properties, might be a promising candidate for also reducing I/R injury in the intestine. To investigate possible protective effects of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury, human intestinal CaCo-2 cells were exposed to doxycycline at clinically relevant concentrations. In order to mimic I/R injury, CaCo-2 were thereafter subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation by using our recently described two-enzyme in-vitro hypoxia model. Investigations of cell morphology, cell damage, apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide formation were performed 24h after the hypoxic insult. Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, elevated LDH concentrations in the respective culture media (Pdoxycycline (5µM, 10µM, 50µM) reduced the hypoxia induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (Pdoxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in-vitro. Further animal and clinical studies are required to prove the protective potential of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury under in-vivo conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of "excess" human embryos for stem cell research: protecting women's rights and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C B

    2000-01-01

    Proposed National Institutes of Health guidelines for stem cell research are too narrowly drawn and do not adequately protect the freedom of choice and health of women who donate embryos. They need to be expanded to cover not only the point of embryo donation, but also that of embryo creation. Guidelines are provided to ensure that donors undergoing hyperstimulation and egg retrieval gave voluntary informed consent to the production of embryos that might later prove in excess. A standard for determining when embryos have been overproduced is presented to address the possibility that additional embryos will be created for stem cell research in violation of the guidelines and at risk to women's health.

  8. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well......-conserved among different GAS strains, upregulated in host-pathogen interaction studies, and predicted to be extracellular or associated with the surface of the bacteria. The antigens were tested for both antibody recognition and T cell responses in human adults and children. The antigenicity of a selected group...

  9. Protective effect of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) extracts on cultured human corneal limbal epithelial cells (HCLEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juxian; Li, Yiqing; Ge, Jian; Duan, Yongheng; Sze, Stephen Cho-Wing; Tong, Yao; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Tsui, Kam Chuen; Zhuo, Yehong; Zhang, Kalin Yanbo

    2010-04-01

    The use of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) as a food and medicine for improving human vision has a long history all over the world. However, there is lack of convincing evidence from rigorous clinical trials or scientific research. This study investigated the effects of different concentrations of bilberry extracts on the cell viability, cell cycle and the expression of hyaluronic acid and glycosaminoglycans of cultured human corneal limbal epithelial cells. The data showed that bilberry extracts had no cytotoxicity to the corneal limbal epithelial cells at a wide range of concentrations (10(-9)-10(-4) M, equalized to the content of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside). Bilberry extract (10(-6), 10(-5) and 10(-4) M) increased cell viability after 48 h incubation. The number of cells decreased in G(0)/G(1) phase and increased prominently in S and G(2)/M phases after treatment with bilberry extracts at a high concentration (10(-4) M). The expression of glycosaminoglycans increased prominently after incubation with bilberry extracts (10(-7) and 10(-4) M) for 48 h while no significant changes were observed for the expression of hyaluronic acid. The results indicated that bilberry extract may be beneficial for the physiological renewal and homeostasis of corneal epithelial cells. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Protective effect of Salidroside on oxidative damage to human lens epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengmei; Zheng, Guangying; Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Meng

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the experiment was to investigate the effects of salidroside (Sal) on oxidative damage to human lens epithelial cells (HLEC). Experimental study. The cultured HLECwas intervened with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) which created oxidative damage model to observe the effect of Sal on HLECs. The cultured cells during the logarithmic phase were interposed by different concentrations Sal (0 µmol/L, 10 µmol/L, 30 µmol/L, 50 µmol/L, 100 µmol/L, 200 µmol/L) for 24 h. Then the viability of cells was detected by cell counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The cells were divided into 5 groups:control group, H2O2 group, Sal low dose group (30 µmol/L Sal+ H2O2 group), Sal middle dose group (50 µmol/L Sal+H2O2 group), Sal high dose group (100 µmol/L Sal+ H2O2 group). The effects of Sal on the apoptosis of the HLEC were determined by Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry assay.Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect B cell lymphoma-2 associated X protein (Bax), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase 3 (Caspase-3) expression. Data between groups were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), while LSD-t test was used for further comparison between every two groups. CCK-8 result showed that when the concentration of H2O2 was 200 µmol/L, the survival of HLEC inhibition rate was 49.56% ± 7.07%, which was close to the half of the cell survival inhibition rate (IC50). So 200 µmol/L was chosen as the concentration of H2O2 in follow-up experiments. Different concentrations of Sal had no inhibitive influence on HLEC viability. After 24 hours cultivated with Sal (10 µmol/L, 30 µmol/L, 50 µmol/L, 100 µmol/L, 200 µmol/L), the survival rate of HLEC were 100.24% ± 2.07%, 101.18% ± 2.14%, 101.32% ± 2.48%, 101.76% ± 1.93% and 99.28% ± 1.74% correspondingly. There was no significant difference comparing with that of the control group 99.84% ± 2.21% (F = 1.044, P = 0.415; all P > 0.05). Hoechst

  11. DNA polymerase kappa protects human cells against MMC-induced genotoxicity through error-free translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Yuki; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sassa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kyomu; Adachi, Noritaka; Honma, Masamitsu; Numazawa, Satoshi; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between genes and environment are critical factors for causing cancer in humans. The genotoxicity of environmental chemicals can be enhanced via the modulation of susceptible genes in host human cells. DNA polymerase kappa (Pol κ) is a specialized DNA polymerase that plays an important role in DNA damage tolerance through translesion DNA synthesis. To better understand the protective roles of Pol κ, we previously engineered two human cell lines either deficient in expression of Pol κ (KO) or expressing catalytically dead Pol κ (CD) in Nalm-6-MSH+ cells and examined cytotoxic sensitivity against various genotoxins. In this study, we set up several genotoxicity assays with cell lines possessing altered Pol κ activities and investigated the protective roles of Pol κ in terms of genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C (MMC), a therapeutic agent that induces bulky DNA adducts and crosslinks in DNA. We introduced a frameshift mutation in one allele of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of the KO, CD, and wild-type Pol κ cells (WT), thereby establishing cell lines for the TK gene mutation assay, namely TK+/- cells. In addition, we formulated experimental conditions to conduct chromosome aberration (CA) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays with cells. By using the WT TK+/- and KO TK+/- cells, we assayed genotoxicity of MMC. In the TK gene mutation assay, the cytotoxic and mutagenic sensitivities of KO TK+/- cells were higher than those of WT TK+/- cells. MMC induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), base pair substitutions at CpG sites and tandem mutations at GpG sites in both cell lines. However, the frequencies of LOH and base substitutions at CpG sites were significantly higher in KO TK+/- cells than in WT TK+/- cells. MMC also induced CA and SCE in both cell lines. The KO TK+/- cells displayed higher sensitivity than that displayed by WT TK+/- cells in the SCE assay. These results suggest that Pol κ is a modulating factor for the genotoxicity of MMC and

  12. Cinnamaldehyde protects human dental pulp cells against oxidative stress through the Nrf2/HO-1-dependent antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Yi; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kim, Soo-A

    2017-11-15

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) has various functional properties, such as anti-cancer, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. This study examined the intracellular signaling mechanisms of CA on the oxidative stress response in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). The results showed that CA did not have any cell cytotoxicity or cause morphological changes at concentrations up to 50µM. A CA treatment strongly up-regulated the cellular protein level of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and promoted Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. CA-mediated Nrf2/HO-1 activation reduced the level of reactive oxygen species and protected the hDPCs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress, which induces apoptosis. Moreover, HO-1 depletion by siRNA attenuated the CA-mediated cell protection against oxidative stress. These results indicate that CA protects hDPCs dysfunction under oxidative stress conditions, and this effect is mediated by Nrf2 activation and the up-regulation of HO-1. Overall, these observations suggest that CA is a potential therapeutic agent for cell protection against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Porcine complement regulators protect aortic smooth muscle cells poorly against human complement-induced lysis and proliferation: consequences for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capey, Steven; van den Berg, Carmen W

    2005-05-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis after transplantation has been observed and is characterized by smooth muscle cell proliferation in the graft. Porcine cells are frequently used in models of atherosclerosis and porcine organs are considered for use in transplantation. Complement (C) activation is known to play a major role in rejection of xenografts and is also considered to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of membrane bound regulators of complement (CReg) on porcine aortic smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The PASMC were assessed for expression of CReg and susceptibility to lysis by human C by flow-cytometry. The effect of various cytokines on CReg expression and C-susceptibility was investigated. The ability of human C to induce cell proliferation was assessed using the Alamar blue assay. The PASMC only express the CReg membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and CD59 on their cell surface. MCP expression was increased by interleukin (IL)-4. In contrast to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), PASMC were found to be surprisingly sensitive to C-mediated lysis, mainly due to a low level of expression of CD59. Human C-induced proliferation of PASMC, which was dependent on complete membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. Endogenously expressed CReg on PASMC poorly protect these cells to human C. Human C can induce proliferation of PASMC. In order to prevent accelerated atherosclerosis in porcine xenografts, increased levels of CReg not only have to be obtained on the endothelial cells but also on the smooth muscle cells.

  14. Aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus protects against DNA damage in human lymphoblast Cell K562 and enhances antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bouhlel, Inès; Chaabane, Fadwa; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cellular antioxidant effect of the aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus and its antigenotoxic potential using human myelogenous cells, K562. The antioxidant capacity of this extract was evaluated by determining its cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in K562 cells. Also, preceding antigenotoxicity assessment, its eventual genotoxicity property was investigated by evaluating its capacity to induce the DNA degradation of treated cell nuclei. As no genotoxicity was detected at different exposure times, its ability to protect cell DNA against H2O2 oxidative effect was investigated, using the "comet assay." It appears that 800 μg/mL of extract inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2 with a rate of 41.30 %, after 4 h of incubation. In addition, this extract revealed a significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in K562 cells.

  15. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Reviewed by Wendy Marcason, ...

  16. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Karen A; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A; Tindle, Robert W

    2004-02-20

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses.

  17. NEIL2 protects against oxidative DNA damage induced by sidestream smoke in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf H Sarker

    Full Text Available Secondhand smoke (SHS is a confirmed lung carcinogen that introduces thousands of toxic chemicals into the lungs. SHS contains chemicals that have been implicated in causing oxidative DNA damage in the airway epithelium. Although DNA repair is considered a key defensive mechanism against various environmental attacks, such as cigarette smoking, the associations of individual repair enzymes with susceptibility to lung cancer are largely unknown. This study investigated the role of NEIL2, a DNA glycosylase excising oxidative base lesions, in human lung cells treated with sidestream smoke (SSS, the main component of SHS. To do so, we generated NEIL2 knockdown cells using siRNA-technology and exposed them to SSS-laden medium. Representative SSS chemical compounds in the medium were analyzed by mass spectrometry. An increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in SSS-exposed cells was detected through the fluorescent detection and the induction of HIF-1α. The long amplicon-quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR assay detected significant dose-dependent increases of oxidative DNA damage in the HPRT gene of cultured human pulmonary fibroblasts (hPF and BEAS-2B epithelial cells exposed to SSS for 24 h. These data suggest that SSS exposure increased oxidative stress, which could contribute to SSS-mediated toxicity. siRNA knockdown of NEIL2 in hPF and HEK 293 cells exposed to SSS for 24 h resulted in significantly more oxidative DNA damage in HPRT and POLB than in cells with control siRNA. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that decreased repair of oxidative DNA base lesions due to an impaired NEIL2 expression in non-smokers exposed to SSS would lead to accumulation of mutations in genomic DNA of lung cells over time, thus contributing to the onset of SSS-induced lung cancer.

  18. Defined plant extracts can protect human cells against combined xenobiotic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clair Emilie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollutants representative of common environmental contaminants induce intracellular toxicity in human cells, which is generally amplified in combinations. We wanted to test the common pathways of intoxication and detoxification in human embryonic and liver cell lines. We used various pollutants such as Roundup residues, Bisphenol-A and Atrazine, and five precise medicinal plant extracts called Circ1, Dig1, Dig2, Sp1, and Uro1 in order to understand whether specific molecular actions took place or not. Methods Kidney and liver are major detoxification organs. We have studied embryonic kidney and hepatic human cell lines E293 and HepG2. The intoxication was induced on the one hand by a formulation of one of the most common herbicides worldwide, Roundup 450 GT+ (glyphosate and specific adjuvants, and on the other hand by a mixture of Bisphenol-A and Atrazine, all found in surface waters, feed and food. The prevention and curative effects of plant extracts were also measured on mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity, on the entry of radiolabelled glyphosate (in Roundup in cells, and on cytochromes P450 1A2 and 3A4 as well as glutathione-S-transferase. Results Clear toxicities of pollutants were observed on both cell lines at very low sub-agricultural dilutions. The prevention of such phenomena took place within 48 h with the plant extracts tested, with success rates ranging between 25-34% for the E293 intoxicated by Roundup, and surprisingly up to 71% for the HepG2. By contrast, after intoxication, no plant extract was capable of restoring E293 viability within 48 h, however, two medicinal plant combinations did restore the Bisphenol-A/Atrazine intoxicated HepG2 up to 24-28%. The analysis of underlying mechanisms revealed that plant extracts were not capable of preventing radiolabelled glyphosate from entering cells; however Dig2 did restore the CYP1A2 activity disrupted by Roundup, and had only a mild preventive effect

  19. Protection against Pertussis in Humans Correlates to Elevated Serum Antibodies and Memory B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Marcellini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis is a respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis that may be particularly severe and even lethal in the first months of life when infants are still too young to be vaccinated. Adults and adolescents experience mild symptoms and are the source of infection for neonates. Adoptive maternal immunity does not prevent pertussis in the neonate. We compared the specific immune response of mothers of neonates diagnosed with pertussis and mothers of control children. We show that women have pre-existing pertussis-specific antibodies and memory B cells and react against the infection with a recall response increasing the levels specific serum IgG, milk IgA, and the frequency of memory B cells of all isotypes. Thus, the maternal immune system is activated in response to pertussis and effectively prevents the disease indicating that the low levels of pre-formed serum antibodies are insufficient for protection. For this reason, memory B cells play a major role in the adult defense. The results of this study suggest that new strategies for vaccine design should aim at increasing long-lived plasma cells and their antibodies.

  20. Salmonella Typhi-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cells play a dominant role in protection from typhoid fever in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-03-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), is a major public health problem worldwide. Development of novel vaccines remains imperative, but is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the immune responses that correlate with protection. Recently, a controlled human infection model was re-established in which volunteers received ~10(3) cfu wild-type S. Typhi (Quailes strain) orally. Twenty-one volunteers were evaluated for their cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. Ex vivo PBMC isolated before and up to 1 year after challenge were exposed to three S. Typhi-infected targets, i.e., autologous B lymphoblastoid cell-lines (B-LCL), autologous blasts and HLA-E restricted AEH B-LCL cells. CMI responses were evaluated using 14-color multiparametric flow cytometry to detect simultaneously five intracellular cytokines/chemokines (i.e., IL-17A, IL-2, IFN-g, TNF-a and MIP-1b) and a marker of degranulation/cytotoxic activity (CD107a). Herein we provide the first evidence that S. Typhi-specific CD8+ responses correlate with clinical outcome in humans challenged with wild-type S. Typhi. Higher multifunctional S. Typhi-specific CD8+ baseline responses were associated with protection against typhoid and delayed disease onset. Moreover, following challenge, development of typhoid fever was accompanied by decreases in circulating S. Typhi-specific CD8+ T effector/memory (TEM) with gut homing potential, suggesting migration to the site(s) of infection. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or no changes in circulating S. Typhi-specific TEM. These studies provide novel insights into the protective immune responses against typhoid disease that will aid in selection and development of new vaccine candidates.

  1. SIRT1 Protects Human Lens Epithelial Cells Against Oxidative Stress by Inhibiting p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianyu; Lu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to test the hypothesis that sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1) plays a role in modulating resistance against oxidative stress in lens epithelial cells (LECs), and to determine its mechanism if this hypothesis is found to be true. Cultured LECs were treated with resveratrol (RES, an activator of SIRT1) or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor) and incubated with H2O2. Changes in SIRT1, p53, and acetyl-p53 expressions were measured. Cell proliferation was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. TUNEL assay was used to evaluate apoptosis. Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) was applied to block the p53 pathway. SIRT1 expressions significantly increased with H2O2 treatment and further increased with RES treatment in a dose-dependent manner. RES eliminated cellular morphological changes related to H2O2 treatment, increased cell proliferation, and inhibited apoptosis under oxidative stress. In contrast, NAM enhanced cell apoptosis under oxidative stress and decreased cell proliferation. RES caused a dose-dependent decrease in acetyl-p53 levels under oxidative stress, while NAM increased p53 acetylation. Under oxidative conditions, PFT-α, a p53 pathway inhibitor, eliminated the destructive effect of NAM. PFT-α decreased the morphological changes in LECs compared to NAM treatment and increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis. SIRT1 protected LECs from oxidative stress via the inhibition of the p53 pathway. SIRT1 or SIRT1 activators could potentially be used to prevent ocular aging and cataract in the future.

  2. The protective effects of silybin on the cytotoxicity of thiram in human, rat and chicken cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radko, Lidia; Cybulski, Wojciech; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2017-11-01

    The study objective was a determination of thiram cytotoxicity and silybin cytoprotective activity in course of the fungicide impact on cell metabolism and membrane integrity. Firstly, human, rat, chicken hepatoma cells and rat myoblasts cultures were incubated with thiram. The results showed higher sensitivity of myoblasts on thiram exposure than the hepatoma cells. Among hepatoma cells, the chicken cultures were the most sensitive on the fungicide endangering. The mitochondrial activity was the most thiram affected function within all types the cell lines used. When silybin co-acted with thiram, an increase of the cell viability was recorded. The EC50-values were higher for thiram subjected to interaction with silybin than the effect of alone thiram action. The interaction mode between the studied compounds shown by combination index (CI) represented an antagonistic or an additive nature and was depended on thiram concentration, type of the cells and the assay used. Moreover, the morphology changes were dependent on silybin presence in the cell cultures subjected to thiram impact at the same time. Staining with Hoechst 33342 and propidium ioidium revealed the apoptosis cell death in the incubation cultures. Definitely, the results have shown a potential of silybin to protect the cultured cells in course of cytotoxicity induced by thiram. However, future studies taking into account other endpoints of thiram cytotoxicity pathways including species differences and the cytoprotection efficacy could be of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ouabain Protects Human Renal Cells against the Cytotoxic Effects of Shiga Toxin Type 2 and Subtilase Cytotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María M. Amaral

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is one of the most common causes of acute renal failure in children. The majority of cases are associated with Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and presents the highest incidence rate in the world. STEC strains expressing Stx type 2 (Stx2 are responsible for the most severe cases of this pathology. Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB is another STEC virulence factor that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis. To date, neither a licensed vaccine nor effective therapy for HUS is available for humans. Considering that Ouabain (OUA may prevent the apoptosis process, in this study we evaluated if OUA is able to avoid the damage caused by Stx2 and SubAB on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC and the human proximal tubule epithelial cell (HK-2 line. HGEC and HK-2 were pretreated with OUA and then incubated with the toxins. OUA protected the HGEC viability from Stx2 and SubAB cytotoxic effects, and also prevented the HK-2 viability from Stx2 effects. The protective action of OUA on HGEC and HK-2 was associated with a decrease in apoptosis and an increase in cell proliferation. Our data provide evidence that OUA could be considered as a therapeutic strategy to avoid the renal damage that precedes HUS.

  4. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  5. Antibody-secreting cell responses and protective immunity assessed in gnotobiotic pigs inoculated orally or intramuscularly with inactivated human rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Kang, S Y; Ward, L A; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1998-01-01

    Newborn gnotobiotic pigs were inoculated twice perorally (p.o.) (group 1) or intramuscularly (i.m.) (group 2) or three times i.m. (group 3) with inactivated Wa strain human rotavirus and challenged with virulent Wa human rotavirus 20 to 24 days later. To assess correlates of protection, antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were enumerated in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues from pigs in each group at selected postinoculation days (PID) or postchallenge days. Few virus-specific ASC were detected in any tissues of group 1 pigs prior to challenge. By comparison, groups 2 and 3 had significantly greater numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) ASC in intestinal and splenic tissues at PID 8 and significantly greater numbers of virus-specific IgG ASC and IgG memory B cells in spleen and blood at challenge. However, as for group 1, few virus-specific IgA ASC or IgA memory B cells were detected in any tissues of group 2 and 3 pigs. Neither p.o. nor i.m. inoculation conferred significant protection against virulent Wa rotavirus challenge (0 to 6% protection rate), and all groups showed significant anamnestic virus-specific IgG and IgA ASC responses. Hence, high numbers of IgG ASC or memory IgG ASC in the systemic lymphoid tissues at the time of challenge did not correlate with protection. Further, our findings suggest that inactivated Wa human rotavirus administered either p.o. or parenterally is significantly less effective in inducing intestinal IgA ASC responses and conferring protective immunity than live Wa human rotavirus inoculated orally, as reported earlier (L. Yuan, L. A. Ward, B. I. Rosen, T. L. To, and L. J. Saif, J. Virol. 70:3075-3083, 1996). Thus, more efficient mucosal delivery systems and rotavirus vaccination strategies are needed to induce intestinal IgA ASC responses, identified previously as a correlate of protective immunity to rotavirus.

  6. Integrin-Associated Focal Adhesion Kinase Protects Human Embryonic Stem Cells from Apoptosis, Detachment, and Differentiation

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    Loriana Vitillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be maintained in a fully defined niche on extracellular matrix substrates, to which they attach through integrin receptors. However, the underlying integrin signaling mechanisms, and their contribution to hESC behavior, are largely unknown. Here, we show that focal adhesion kinase (FAK transduces integrin activation and supports hESC survival, substrate adhesion, and maintenance of the undifferentiated state. After inhibiting FAK kinase activity we show that hESCs undergo cell detachment-dependent apoptosis or differentiation. We also report deactivation of FAK downstream targets, AKT and MDM2, and upregulation of p53, all key players in hESC regulatory networks. Loss of integrin activity or FAK also induces cell aggregation, revealing a role in the cell-cell interactions of hESCs. This study provides insight into the integrin signaling cascade activated in hESCs and reveals in FAK a key player in the maintenance of hESC survival and undifferentiated state.

  7. Structural optimization of a retrograde trafficking inhibitor that protects cells from infections by human polyoma- and papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel W; Nelson, Christian D S; Ferris, Bennett D; Stevens, Julia P; Lipovsky, Alex; Kazakov, Teymur; DiMaio, Daniel; Atwood, Walter J; Sello, Jason K

    2014-09-01

    Human polyoma- and papillomaviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses that cause severe pathologies and mortalities. Under circumstances of immunosuppression, JC polyomavirus causes a fatal demyelinating disease called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and the BK polyomavirus is the etiological agent of polyomavirus-induced nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis. Human papillomavirus type 16, another non-enveloped DNA virus, is associated with the development of cancers in tissues like the uterine cervix and oropharynx. Currently, there are no approved drugs or vaccines to treat or prevent polyomavirus infections. We recently discovered that the small molecule Retro-2(cycl), an inhibitor of host retrograde trafficking, blocked infection by several human and monkey polyomaviruses. Here, we report diversity-oriented syntheses of Retro-2(cycl) and evaluation of the resulting analogs using an assay of human cell infections by JC polyomavirus. We defined structure-activity relationships and also discovered analogs with significantly improved potency as suppressors of human polyoma- and papillomavirus infection in vitro. Our findings represent an advance in the development of drug candidates that can broadly protect humans from non-enveloped DNA viruses and toxins that exploit retrograde trafficking as a means for cell entry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective effects of hesperidin against genotoxicity induced by {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in human cultured lymphocyte cells

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    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjhosseinim@yahoo.com; Ahmadi, Amirhossein [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beiki, Davood [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi, Emran [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz [Laboratory of Cytogenetics, Novin Radiation Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used as nuclear tracers for myocardial perfusion imaging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effects of hesperidin as a flavonoid which protects against the genotoxic effects of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI in human cultured lymphocytes. Methods: Whole blood samples from human volunteers were incubated with hesperidin at doses of 10, 50 and 100 {mu}mol. After 1 h of incubation, the lymphocytes were incubated with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI (200 {mu}Ci/2 ml) for 3 h. The lymphocyte cultures were then mitogenically stimulated to allow for evaluation of the number of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Incubation of lymphocytes with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI at this high dose induces additional genotoxicity and shown by increases in micronuclei frequency in human lymphocytes. Hesperidin at these doses significantly reduced the micronuclei frequency in cultured lymphocytes. The maximum protective effect and greatest decrease in micronuclei frequency occurred when cultures were incubated with a 100-{mu}mol dose of 65% hesperidin. Conclusion: This study has important implications for patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures. The results indicate a protective role for hesperidin against the genetic damage and side effects induced by radiopharmaceutical administration.

  9. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

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    Wenlu Li

    Full Text Available Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  10. Protective effects of antioxidants on high Glucose-induced malfunctions in human glomerular mesangial cells

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    Hosseini R

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Altered functions of mesangial cells induced by high glucose concentrations are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore investigated the effect of high glucose (39.2 mM alone and in combination with taurine (500 µM or vitamin E (100 µM in serum free medium (RPMI 1640 on the proliferative growth response and turnover of type IV collagen by human glomerular mesangial cells (GMC. The results showed that the high glucose level decreases the proliferation of the GMC which is reversed by taurine and vitamin E. In order to control the osmotic effects of high glucose, the GMC were also cultured in the presence of manitol. Manitol had no effect on the proliferation of GMC. Furthermore, the results showed that addition of vitamin E or taurine to media containing high glucose could reverse and normalize the collagen turn-over by the cultured mesangial cells. These results suggest that taurie and vitamin E may function as endogenous agents in the kidney to limit the development of glomerulosclerosis in diabetic renal disease.

  11. Infection of human fallopian tube epithelial cells with Neisseria gonorrhoeae protects cells from tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Priscilla; Reyes, Paz; Vargas, Macarena; Rios, Miguel; Imarai, Mónica; Cardenas, Hugo; Croxatto, Horacio; Orihuela, Pedro; Vargas, Renato; Fuhrer, Juan; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bacteria may ascend into the Fallopian tubes (FT) and induce salpingitis, a major cause of infertility. In the FT, interactions between mucosal epithelial cells and gonococci are pivotal events in the pathogen's infection cycle and the inflammatory response. In the current study, primary FT epithelial cells were infected in vitro with different multiplicities of infection (MOI) of Pil+ Opa+ gonococci. Bacteria showed a dose-dependent association with cells and induced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). A significant finding was that gonococcal infection (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in approximately 30% of cells, whereas increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100) did not induce apoptosis. Apoptosis was observed in only 11% of cells with associated bacteria, whereas >84% of cells with no adherent bacteria were apoptotic. TNF-alpha was a key contributor to apoptosis, since (i) culture supernatants from cells infected with gonococci (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in naïve cultures, suggesting that a soluble factor was responsible; (ii) gonococcal infection-induced apoptosis was inhibited with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies; and (iii) the addition of exogenous TNF-alpha induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by the presence of increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100). These data suggest that TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis of FT epithelial cells is likely a primary host defense mechanism to prevent pathogen colonization. However, epithelial cell-associated gonococci have evolved a mechanism to protect the cells from undergoing TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis, and this modulation of the host innate response may contribute to establishment of infection. Understanding the antiapoptotic mechanisms used by Neisseria gonorrhoeae will inform the pathogenesis of salpingitis and could suggest new intervention strategies for prevention and treatment of the disease.

  12. Human Adipose Tissue Conditioned Media from Lean Subjects Is Protective against H2O2 Induced Neurotoxicity in Human SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

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    Zhongxiao Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secretes numerous hormone-like factors, which are known as adipokines. Adipokine receptors have been identified in the central nervous system but the potential role of adipokine signaling in neuroprotection is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine (1 Whether adipokines secreted from cultured adipose tissue of lean humans is protective against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and (2 To explore potential signaling pathways involved in these processes. Adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM from healthy lean subjects completely prevented H2O2 induced neurotoxicity, while this effect is lost after heating ATCM. ATCM activated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and Akt at serine 308 in SH-SY5Y cells. PD98059 (25 µM, SP600125 (5 µM and LY29400 (20 µM partially blocked the protective effects of ATCM against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity. Findings demonstrate that heat-sensitive factors secreted from human adipose tissue of lean subjects are protective against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity and ERK1/2, JNK, and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in these processes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates preliminary but encouraging data to further support that adipose tissue secreted factors from lean human subjects might possess neuroprotective properties and unravel the specific roles of ERK1/2, JNK and PI3K in these processes.

  13. Microencapsulation-protected l-ascorbic acid for the application of human epithelial HaCaT cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Gambari, R; Lee, K K-H; Chui, C-H

    2014-01-01

    l-ascorbic acid is an abundant water-soluble nutrient found in vegetables and fruits. It enhances the cell proliferation, which is helpful in wound healing process. However, it is relatively unstable and easily degraded under external environments including acidity, alkalinity, evaporation, heat, oxidization, light or moisture. Its storage remains challenged. This study reported the development of l-ascorbic acid microcapsules using the natural protein, gelatin, and the natural polysaccharide, agar, as the wall protection carrier. The physical properties including entrapment efficiency, particle size, surface morphology, chemical compositions and release profile were identified. The cell proliferation of l-ascorbic acid microcapsules was stronger than the free drug. Significant cell growth in microencapsulated l-ascorbic acid-treated human epithelial HaCaT cells was observed when compared with untreated control. Since cell proliferation and wound repair are closely related, it is believed that l-ascorbic acid microcapsules would effectively increase the potential effect of wound healing activity in human skin.

  14. Salidroside protects against homocysteine-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via the regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Jia, Fang; Wei, Jiang; Yu, Yang; Yu, Tianhong; Wang, Yanjun; Sun, Jianhui; Luo, Guanghua

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies showed that homocysteine (Hcy) could injure vascular endothelial cells via several mechanisms, including its promotion of oxidative stress pathway and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) pathway. Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. Emerging evidence conformed that SAL attenuated Hcy-induced endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress. However, its role in ER stress pathway remains unclarified. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on Hcy-induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cell damage effects brought by Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. Functional studies on the HUVECs found that SAL rescued the endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by Hcy. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of Hcy-induced activation of binding protein (Bip) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), as well as the phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) or inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1α). Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could regulate ER stress pathway on the viability of endotheliocyte induced by Hcy in vitro. Our findings provide the first evidence that SAL plays an important role in endotheliocyte protection via suppressing ER stress pathway in HUVEC cells and that it may be a promising therapeutic target for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Protective effect of C. sativa leaf extract against UV mediated-DNA damage in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, I F; Pinto, A S; Monteiro, C; Monteiro, H; Belo, L; Fernandes, J; Bento, A R; Duarte, T L; Garrido, J; Bahia, M F; Sousa Lobo, J M; Costa, P C

    2015-03-01

    Toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on skin include protein and lipid oxidation, and DNA damage. The latter is known to play a major role in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Many plant extracts and natural compounds are emerging as photoprotective agents. Castanea sativa leaf extract is able to scavenge several reactive species that have been associated to UV-induced oxidative stress. The aim of this work was to analyze the protective effect of C. sativa extract (ECS) at different concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 μg/mL) against the UV mediated-DNA damage in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). For this purpose, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used. Elucidation of the protective mechanism was undertaken regarding UV absorption, influence on (1)O₂ mediated effects or NRF2 activation. ECS presented a concentration-dependent protective effect against UV-mediated DNA damage in HaCaT cells. The maximum protection afforded (66.4%) was achieved with the concentration of 0.1 μg/mL. This effect was found to be related to a direct antioxidant effect (involving (1)O₂) rather than activation of the endogenous antioxidant response coordinated by NRF2. Electrochemical studies showed that the good antioxidant capacity of the ECS can be ascribed to the presence of a pool of different phenolic antioxidants. No genotoxic or phototoxic effects were observed after incubation of HaCaT cells with ECS (up to 0.1 μg/mL). Taken together these results reinforce the putative application of this plant extract in the prevention/minimization of UV deleterious effects on skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The protection of salidroside on oxidative stress induced in human lens epithelium cells

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    Li-Ting Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the effect of different concentrations of salidroside on H2O2 induced oxidative stress damage in human lens epithelium cells(HLEC. METHODS: HLEC were cultured and divided into negative control group: cultured in normal cultivation; oxidative damage group: treated with 100μmol/L H2O2 for 12h; Salidroside low concentration group: 10μmol/L salidroside treated for 24h and H2O2 treated for 12h; Salidroside high concentration group: 100μmol/L salidroside treated for 24h and H2O2 treated for 12h. MTT method was applied to observe the effect of salidroside on HLEC survival rate. Morphological change of each group were observed and recorded under inverted microscope. DCFH-DA fluorescent probe was applied to detect intracellular ROS changes; content of malondialdehyde(MDA, superoxide dismutase(SODand glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Pxin supernatants were detected by pectrophotometer. RESULTS: Salidroside obviously inhibited H2O2-induced HLEC vitality decline, inhibited ROS generation in cells, causing SOD, GSH-Px levels increased and MDA levels decreased. CONCLUSION: Salidroside inhibited H2O2 induced HLEC injury by decreasing the intracellular MDA content levels and increasing SOD, GSH-Px content levels, which conclude that salidroside may have a certain role in the treatment of HLEC damage.

  17. Dimethylfumarate protects against TNF-α-induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Simon; König, Veronika; Doll, Monika; Hailemariam-Jahn, Tsige; Hrgovic, Igor; Zöller, Nadja; Kaufmann, Roland; Kippenberger, Stefan; Meissner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation, angiogenesis and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. Recent evidence suggests that dimethylfumarate (DMF), an antiposriatic and anti-multiple sclerosis agent, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-angiogenic properties. Here, we analyze the influence of DMF on TNF-α-induced expression of the important pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic chemokine MCP-1 and investigate the underlying mechanisms of this expression. We analyzed constitutive and TNF-α-induced expression of MCP-1 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) +/- DMF treatment via enzyme-linkes immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DMF significantly inhibited the protein expression levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MCP-1 mRNA expression was also reduced in response to DMF, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Thus, the regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, DMF prolonged the TNF-α-induced p38 and JNK phosphorylation in HUVEC, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis; however, the p38 and JNK inhibitor SB203580 did not affect the DMF-conveyed suppression of TNF-α-induced MCP-1 expression. DMF suppressed the TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation and phosphorylation (Serine 536) of p65 in these cells. These results were additionally approved by p65 luciferase promoter assays. Furthermore, we found that DMF slightly inhibited the early degradation of IκBα. In addition, we verified our results using other important inflammatory cytokines such as CCL-5, PDGF-BB, GM-CSF and IL-6. DMF suppresses various TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokines/chemokines in human endothelial cells. This action is regulated by reduced p65 activity and nuclear translocation, which can be explained in part by the reduced early degradation of IκBα and more important the reduced phosphorylation of p65 at Serine 536. These effects were independent of the p38, PI3K and p42

  18. TLQP-21 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against high-glucose-induced apoptosis by increasing G6PD expression.

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    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress that could damage vascular endothelial cells, leading to cardiovascular complications. The Vgf gene was identified as a nerve growth factor-responsive gene, and its protein product, VGF, is characterized by the presence of partially cleaved products. One of the VGF-derived peptides is TLQP-21, which is composed of 21 amino acids (residues 556-576. Past studies have reported that TLQP-21 could stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic cells and protect these cells from apoptosis, which suggests that TLQP-21 has a potential function in diabetes therapy. Here, we explore the protective role of TLQP-21 against the high glucose-mediated injury of vascular endothelial cells. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs, we demonstrated that TLQP-21 (10 or 50 nM dose-dependently prevented apoptosis under high-glucose (30 mmol/L conditions (the normal glucose concentration is 5.6 mmol/L. TLQP-21 enhanced the expression of NAPDH, resulting in upregulation of glutathione (GSH and a reduction in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. TLQP-21 also upregulated the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, which is known as the main source of NADPH. Knockdown of G6PD almost completely blocked the increase of NADPH induced by TLQP-21, indicating that TLQP-21 functions mainly through G6PD to promote NADPH generation. In conclusion, TLQP-21 could increase G6PD expression, which in turn may increase the synthesis of NADPH and GSH, thereby partially restoring the redox status of vascular endothelial cells under high glucose injury. We propose that TLQP-21 is a promising drug for diabetes therapy.

  19. In Vitro Protective Effects of Lycium barbarum Berries Cultivated in Umbria (Italy on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

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    M. R. Ceccarini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lycium barbarum is a famous plant in the traditional Chinese medicine. The plant is known to have health-promoting bioactive components. The properties of Lycium barbarum berries cultivated in Umbria (Italy and their effect on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 have been investigated in this work. The obtained results demonstrated that the Lycium barbarum berries from Umbria region display high antioxidant properties evaluated by total phenolic content and ORAC method, on hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions. Moreover, on HepG2 cell line Lycium barbarum berries extract did not change cell viability analyzed by MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assay and did not induce genotoxic effect analyzed by comet assay. Furthermore, it was demonstrated, for the first time, that the berries extract showed a protective effect on DNA damage, expressed as antigenotoxic activity in vitro. Finally, Lycium barbarum berries extract was able to modulate the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In particular, downexpression of genes involved in tumor migration and invasion (CCL5, in increased risk of metastasis and antiapoptotic signal (DUSP1, and in carcinogenesis (GPx-3 and PTGS1, together with overexpression of tumor suppressor gene (MT3, suggested that Umbrian Lycium barbarum berries could play a protective role against hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. (-)-Patchouli alcohol protects against Helicobacter pylori urease-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianhui; Lin, Zhixiu; Xian, Yanfang; Kong, Songzhi; Lai, Zhengquan; Ip, Siupo; Chen, Haiming; Guo, Huizhen; Su, Zuqing; Yang, Xiaobo; Xu, Yang; Su, Ziren

    2016-06-01

    (-)-Patchouli alcohol (PA), the major active principle of Pogostemonis Herba, has been reported to have anti-Helicobacter pylori and gastroprotective effects. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of PA on H. pylori urease (HPU)-injured human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Results showed that pre-treatment with PA (5.0, 10.0, 20.0μM) was able to remarkably ameliorate the cytotoxicity induced by 17.0U/mg HPU in GES-1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis on cellular apoptosis showed that pre-treatment with PA effectively attenuated GES-1 cells from the HPU-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the cytoprotective effect of PA was found to be associated with amelioration of the HPU-induced disruption of MMP, attenuating oxidative stress by decreasing contents of intracellular ROS and MDA, and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymatic activities. In addition, pre-treatment with PA markedly attenuated the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas elevated the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) in the HPU-stimulated GES-1 cells. Molecular docking assay suggested that PA engaged in the active site of urease bearing nickel ions and interacted with important residues via covalent binding, thereby restricting the active urease catalysis conformation. Our experimental findings suggest that PA could inhibit the cellular processes critically involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection, and its protective effects against the HPU-induced cytotoxicity in GES-1 cells are believed to be associated with its anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and HPU inhibitory actions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Overexpression of Telomerase Protects Human and Murine Lung Epithelial Cells from Fas- and Bleomycin-Induced Apoptosis via FLIP Upregulation.

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    Nissim Arish

    be a novel mechanism to confer protection from apoptosis in bleomycin-exposed human lung epithelial cells.

  2. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

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    Didik Priyandoko

    Full Text Available The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  3. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyandoko, Didik; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2011-05-04

    The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA) induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  4. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence.

  5. Adrenergic Stress Protection of Human iPS Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes by Fast Kv7.1 Recycling

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    Ilaria Piccini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fight-or-flight response (FFR, a physiological acute stress reaction, involves positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on heart muscle cells mediated through β-adrenoceptor activation. Increased systolic calcium is required to enable stronger heart contractions whereas elevated potassium currents are to limit the duration of the action potentials and prevent arrhythmia. The latter effect is accomplished by an increased functional activity of the Kv7.1 channel encoded by KCNQ1. Current knowledge, however, does not sufficiently explain the full extent of rapid Kv7.1 activation and may hence be incomplete. Using inducible genetic KCNQ1 complementation in KCNQ1-deficient human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs, we here reinvestigate the functional role of Kv7.1 in adapting human CMs to adrenergic stress. Under baseline conditions, Kv7.1 was barely detectable at the plasma membrane of hiPSC-CMs, yet it fully protected these from adrenergic stress-induced beat-to-beat variability of repolarization and torsade des pointes-like arrhythmia. Furthermore, isoprenaline treatment increased field potential durations specifically in KCNQ1-deficient CMs to cause these adverse macroscopic effects. Mechanistically, we find that the protective action by Kv7.1 resides in a rapid translocation of channel proteins from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane, induced by adrenergic signaling. Gene silencing experiments targeting RAB GTPases, mediators of intracellular vesicle trafficking, showed that fast Kv7.1 recycling under acute stress conditions is RAB4A-dependent.Our data reveal a key mechanism underlying the rapid adaptation of human cardiomyocytes to adrenergic stress. These findings moreover aid to the understanding of disease pathology in long QT syndrome and bear important implications for safety pharmacological screening.

  6. Extracts from Calendula officinalis offer in vitro protection against H2 O2 induced oxidative stress cell killing of human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuqaydan, Abdullah M; Lenehan, Claire E; Hughes, Rachel R; Sanderson, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro safety and antioxidant potential of Calendula officinalis flower head extracts was investigated. The effect of different concentrations (0.125, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0% (v/v)) of Calendula extracts on human skin cells HaCaT in vitro was explored. Doses of 1.0% (v/v) (0.88 mg dry weight/mL) or less showed no toxicity. Cells were also exposed to the Calendula extracts for either 4, 24 or 48 h before being exposed to an oxidative insult (hydrogen peroxide H2 O2 ) for 1 h. Using the MTT cytotoxicity assay, it was observed that two independent extracts of C. officinalis gave time-dependent and concentration-dependent H2 O2 protection against induced oxidative stress in vitro using human skin cells. Pre-incubation with the Calendula extracts for 24 and 48 h increased survival relative to the population without extract by 20% and 40% respectively following oxidative challenge. The antioxidant potential of the Calendula extracts was confirmed using a complimentary chemical technique, the DPPH(●) assay. Calendula extracts exhibited free radical scavenging abilities. This study demonstrates that Calendula flower extracts contain bioactive and free radical scavenging compounds that significantly protect against oxidative stress in a human skin cell culture model. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected agai...

  8. Human Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial-Hepatic Platform for Efficacy Testing of Vascular-Protective Metabolites from Nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani; Goh, Yeek Teck; Li, Huan; Sinha, Sanjay; Yu, Hanry; Cheung, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Nutraceuticals are emerging as a therapeutic moiety for restoring vascular health. Unlike small-molecule drugs, the complexity of ingredients in nutraceuticals often confounds evaluation of their efficacy in preclinical evaluation. It is recognized that the liver is a vital organ in processing complex compounds into bioactive metabolites. In this work, we developed a coculture system of human pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hPSC-ECs) and human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hPSC-HEPs) for predicting vascular-protective effects of nutraceuticals. To validate our model, two compounds (quercetin and genistein), known to have anti-inflammatory effects on vasculatures, were selected. We found that both quercetin and genistein were ineffective at suppressing inflammatory activation by interleukin-1β owing to limited metabolic activity of hPSC-ECs. Conversely, hPSC-HEPs demonstrated metabolic capacity to break down both nutraceuticals into primary and secondary metabolites. When hPSC-HEPs were cocultured with hPSC-ECs to permit paracrine interactions, the continuous turnover of metabolites mitigated interleukin-1β stimulation on hPSC-ECs. We observed significant reductions in inflammatory gene expressions, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB, and interleukin-8 production. Thus, integration of hPSC-HEPs could accurately reproduce systemic effects involved in drug metabolism in vivo to unravel beneficial constituents in nutraceuticals. This physiologically relevant endothelial-hepatic platform would be a great resource in predicting the efficacy of complex nutraceuticals and mechanistic interrogation of vascular-targeting candidate compounds. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:851-863. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  9. Tanshinone II-A is protective against human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury after exposure to serum from preeclampsia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, ChunFeng; Yuan, Jing; Sui, RenFang; Li, ShuYuan; Sun, JingXia

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the most common and dangerous complications during pregnancy and is characterized by high blood pressure and significant amounts of protein in the urine. Vascular endothelial cell dysfunction is the major pathology in PE. This study was designed to assay the effects of tanshinone II-A (TII-A) on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury after incubation with serum from PE patients and to determine the underlying mechanism. After treating HUVECs with different TII-A concentrations, cell viability, apoptosis and CD40/CD40 ligand (CD40L) mRNA and protein expression levels were measured. Incubation of HUVECs with serum from PE patients induced morphological alterations, caused decreased cell viability and increased the rate of apoptosis. However, TII-A (5-40 μg/ml) significantly reversed these injuries. Importantly, preapplication of TII-A attenuated PE sera-induced expression of CD40 and CD40L mRNA and protein. TII-A has a protective effect against PE sera, likely through regulation of the CD40/CD40L signal transduction pathway. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Engrafted human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived anterior specified neural progenitors protect the rat crushed optic nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Satarian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs is a common occurrence in several eye diseases. This study examined the functional improvement and protection of host RGCs in addition to the survival, integration and neuronal differentiation capabilities of anterior specified neural progenitors (NPs following intravitreal transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NPs were produced under defined conditions from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted into rats whose optic nerves have been crushed (ONC. hiPSCs were induced to differentiate into anterior specified NPs by the use of Noggin and retinoic acid. The hiPSC-NPs were labeled by green fluorescent protein or a fluorescent tracer 1,1' -dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI and injected two days after induction of ONC in hooded rats. Functional analysis according to visual evoked potential recordings showed significant amplitude recovery in animals transplanted with hiPSC-NPs. Retrograde labeling by an intra-collicular DiI injection showed significantly higher numbers of RGCs and spared axons in ONC rats treated with hiPSC-NPs or their conditioned medium (CM. The analysis of CM of hiPSC-NPs showed the secretion of ciliary neurotrophic factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor. Optic nerve of cell transplanted groups also had increased GAP43 immunoreactivity and myelin staining by FluoroMyelin™ which imply for protection of axons and myelin. At 60 days post-transplantation hiPSC-NPs were integrated into the ganglion cell layer of the retina and expressed neuronal markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The transplantation of anterior specified NPs may improve optic nerve injury through neuroprotection and differentiation into neuronal lineages. These NPs possibly provide a promising new therapeutic approach for traumatic optic nerve injuries and loss of RGCs caused by other diseases.

  11. Additive effects of dipyridamole and Trolox in protecting human red cells during photodynamic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, G. A. J.; van Engelenburg, F. A. C.; Ebbing, I. G.; Hilarius, P. M.; de Korte, D.; Verhoeven, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Photodynamic treatment (PDT) of red blood cell (RBC) suspensions has been reported to result in virus inactivation, but also in deterioration of cell quality. Recently, we have demonstrated the potential usefulness of the reactive oxygen species scavenger dipyridamole in

  12. Naringin Protects Against High Glucose-Induced Human Endothelial Cell Injury Via Antioxidation and CX3CL1 Downregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The induction of endothelial injury by hyperglycemia in diabetes has been widely accepted. Naringin is a bio-flavonoid. Some studies showed that naringin alleviates diabetic complications, but the exact mechanisms by which naringin improves diabetic anomalies are not yet fully understood. The aim of this research was to study the protective effect of naringin on high glucose-induced injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods: HUVECs were cultured with or without high glucose in the absence or presence of naringin for 5 days. The expression of CX3CL1 was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR and western blot. The cellular bioenergetic analysis oxygen consumption rate (OCR was measured with a Seahorse Bioscience XF analyzer. Results: The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the expression of CX3CL1 and the level of AKT phosphorylation were increased in HUVECs cultured with high glucose compared with controls. However, naringin rescued these increases in ROS production, CX3CL1 expression and AKT phosphorylation. Nitric oxide (NO production and OCR were lower in the high glucose group, and naringin restored the changes induced by high glucose. Molecular docking results suggested that Naringin might interact with the CX3CL1 protein. Conclusion: Naringin protects HUVECs from high-glucose-induced damage through its antioxidant properties by downregulating CX3CL1 and by improving mitochondrial function.

  13. Recombinant AAV-mediated expression of human BDNF protects neurons against cell apoptosis in Abeta-induced neuronal damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Ma, Dongliang; Feng, Gaifeng; Ma, Yanbing; Hu, Haitao

    2007-06-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Abeta(25-35) and serued as the experimental Abeta-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against A-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAv-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Oleanolic Acid, a Compound Present in Grapes and Olives, Protects against Genotoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sánchez-Quesada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic acid (AO and maslinic acid (MA are constituents of the skins of different fruits, including olives and white or red grapes. Although both compounds are known to have beneficial properties against different types of cancers, thus far, there are no studies about their chemopreventive effects in human breast cancer. Thus, we sought to elucidate whether both compounds possess chemopreventive activity. Two cell lines of human breast cancer cells and one noncancerous human mammary epithelial cells were used to determine the effects of OA and MA. The results showed that OA inhibited the proliferation and increased the oxidative stress of highly invasive cells. Additionally, OA decreased oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the DNA in human mammary epithelial cells. These results suggest that OA could act as a chemopreventive agent in human breast cancer and could inhibit the proliferation of highly invasive breast cancer cells.

  15. Critical role of perforin-dependent CD8+ T cell immunity for rapid protective vaccination in a murine model for human smallpox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kremer

    Full Text Available Vaccination is highly effective in preventing various infectious diseases, whereas the constant threat of new emerging pathogens necessitates the development of innovative vaccination principles that also confer rapid protection in a case of emergency. Although increasing evidence points to T cell immunity playing a critical role in vaccination against viral diseases, vaccine efficacy is mostly associated with the induction of antibody responses. Here we analyze the immunological mechanism(s of rapidly protective vaccinia virus immunization using mousepox as surrogate model for human smallpox. We found that fast protection against lethal systemic poxvirus disease solely depended on CD4 and CD8 T cell responses induced by vaccination with highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA or conventional vaccinia virus. Of note, CD4 T cells were critically required to allow for MVA induced CD8 T cell expansion and perforin-mediated cytotoxicity was a key mechanism of MVA induced protection. In contrast, selected components of the innate immune system and B cell-mediated responses were fully dispensable for prevention of fatal disease by immunization given two days before challenge. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrate that perforin-dependent CD8 T cell immunity plays a key role in MVA conferred short term protection against lethal mousepox. Rapid induction of T cell immunity might serve as a new paradigm for treatments that need to fit into a scenario of protective emergency vaccination.

  16. Critical role of perforin-dependent CD8+ T cell immunity for rapid protective vaccination in a murine model for human smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Melanie; Suezer, Yasemin; Volz, Asisa; Frenz, Theresa; Majzoub, Monir; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Lehmann, Michael H; Kalinke, Ulrich; Sutter, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is highly effective in preventing various infectious diseases, whereas the constant threat of new emerging pathogens necessitates the development of innovative vaccination principles that also confer rapid protection in a case of emergency. Although increasing evidence points to T cell immunity playing a critical role in vaccination against viral diseases, vaccine efficacy is mostly associated with the induction of antibody responses. Here we analyze the immunological mechanism(s) of rapidly protective vaccinia virus immunization using mousepox as surrogate model for human smallpox. We found that fast protection against lethal systemic poxvirus disease solely depended on CD4 and CD8 T cell responses induced by vaccination with highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or conventional vaccinia virus. Of note, CD4 T cells were critically required to allow for MVA induced CD8 T cell expansion and perforin-mediated cytotoxicity was a key mechanism of MVA induced protection. In contrast, selected components of the innate immune system and B cell-mediated responses were fully dispensable for prevention of fatal disease by immunization given two days before challenge. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrate that perforin-dependent CD8 T cell immunity plays a key role in MVA conferred short term protection against lethal mousepox. Rapid induction of T cell immunity might serve as a new paradigm for treatments that need to fit into a scenario of protective emergency vaccination.

  17. Atractylenolide-I Protects Human SH-SY5Y Cells from 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Vasant More

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and apoptosis are the major mechanisms that induce dopaminergic cell death. Our study investigates the protective effects of atractylenolide-I (ATR-I on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+-induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, as well as its underlying mechanism. Our experimental data indicates that ATR-I significantly inhibits the loss of cell viability induced by MPP+ in SH-SY5Y cells. To further unravel the mechanism, we examined the effect of ATR-I on MPP+-induced apoptotic cell death characterized by an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA ratio, the release of cytochrome-c, and the activation of caspase-3 leading to elevated levels of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP resulting in SH-SY5Y cell death. Our results demonstrated that ATR-I decreases the level of pro-apoptotic proteins induced by MPP+ and also restored Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA levels, which are critical for inducing apoptosis. In addition, ATR-I demonstrated a significant increase in the protein expression of heme-oxygenase in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that the pharmacological effect of ATR-I may be, at least in part, caused by the reduction in pro-apoptotic signals and also by induction of anti-oxidant protein.

  18. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Protects Human Islets against Cytokine-Mediated β-Cell Dysfunction and Death: A Proteomic Study of the Pathways Involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Bugliani, Marco; D’Hertog, Wannes

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to protect pancreatic β-cells against cytokine-induced dysfunction and destruction. The mechanisms through which GLP-1 exerts its effects are complex and still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the protein expression profiles...... of human islets of Langerhans treated with cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) in the presence or absence of GLP-1 by 2D difference gel electrophoresis and subsequent protein interaction network analysis to understand the molecular pathways involved in GLP-1-mediated β-cell protection. Co-incubation of cytokine......-treated human islets with GLP-1 resulted in a marked protection of β-cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis and significantly attenuated cytokine-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The cytoprotective effects of GLP-1 coincided with substantial alterations in the protein expression...

  19. Enhanced T cell-mediated protection against malaria in human challenges by using the recombinant poxviruses FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Daniel P; Dunachie, Susanna; Vuola, Jenni M; Berthoud, Tamara; Keating, Sheila; Laidlaw, Stephen M; McConkey, Samuel J; Poulton, Ian; Andrews, Laura; Andersen, Rikke F; Bejon, Philip; Butcher, Geoff; Sinden, Robert; Skinner, Michael A; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2005-03-29

    Malaria is a major global health problem for which an effective vaccine is required urgently. Prime-boost vaccination regimes involving plasmid DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-encoding liver-stage malaria antigens have been shown to be powerfully immunogenic for T cells and capable of inducing partial protection against experimental malaria challenge in humans, manifested as a delay in time to patent parasitemia. Here, we report that substitution of plasmid DNA as the priming vector with a specific attenuated recombinant fowlpox virus, FP9, vaccine in such prime-boost regimes can elicit complete sterile protection that can last for 20 months. Protection at 20 months was associated with persisting memory but not effector T cell responses. The protective efficacy of various immunization regimes correlated with the magnitude of induced immune responses, supporting the strategy of maximizing durable T cell immunogenicity to develop more effective liver-stage vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  20. Characterization of protective human CD4CD25 FOXP3 regulatory T cells generated with IL-2, TGF-β and retinoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protective CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells bearing the Forkhead Foxp3 transcription factor can now be divided into three subsets: Endogenous thymus-derived cells, those induced in the periphery, and another subset induced ex-vivo with pharmacological amounts of IL-2 and TGF-β. Unfortunately, endogenous CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are unstable and can be converted to effector cells by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Although protective Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ cells resistant to proinflammatory cytokines have been generated in mice, in humans this result has been elusive. Our objective, therefore, was to induce human naïve CD4+ cells to become stable, functional CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory cells that were also resistant to the inhibitory effects of proinflammatory cytokines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The addition of the vitamin A metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (atRA to human naïve CD4+ cells suboptimally activated with IL-2 and TGF-β enhanced and stabilized FOXP3 expression, and accelerated their maturation to protective regulatory T cells. AtRA, by itself, accelerated conversion of naïve to mature cells but did not induce FOXP3 or suppressive activity. The combination of atRA and TGF-β enabled CD4+CD45RA+ cells to express a phenotype and trafficking receptors similar to natural Tregs. AtRA/TGF-β-induced CD4+ regs were anergic and low producers of IL-2. They had potent in vitro suppressive activity and protected immunodeficient mice from a human-anti-mouse GVHD as well as expanded endogenous Tregs. However, treatment of endogenous Tregs with IL-1β and IL-6 decreased FOXP3 expression and diminished their protective effects in vivo while atRA-induced iTregs were resistant to these inhibitory effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed a methodology that induces human CD4(+ cells to rapidly become stable, fully functional suppressor cells that are also resistant to proinflammatory cytokines. This methodology offers a practical

  1. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  2. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Scott, Laura L.; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher P.; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains about 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice, but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in

  3. Auranofin Inhibits the Enzyme Activity of Pasteurella multocida Toxin PMT in Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Carle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The AB-type protein toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT contains a functionally important disulfide bond within its catalytic domain, which must be cleaved in the host cell cytosol to render the catalytic domain of PMT into its active conformation. Here, we found that the reductive potential of the cytosol of target cells, and more specifically, the activity of the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR is crucial for this process. This was demonstrated by the strong inhibitory effect of the pharmacological TrxR inhibitor auranofin, which inhibited the intoxication of target cells with PMT, as determined by analyzing the PMT-catalyzed deamidation of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins in the cytosol of cells. The amount of endogenous substrate levels modified by PMT in cells pretreated with auranofin was reduced compared to cells treated with PMT alone. Auranofin had no inhibitory effect on the activity of the catalytic domain of constitutively active PMT in vitro, demonstrating that auranofin did not directly inhibit PMT activity, but interferes with the mode of action of PMT in cells. In conclusion, the results show that TrxR is crucial for the mode of action of PMT in mammalian cells, and that the drug auranofin can serve as an efficient inhibitor, which might be a starting point for novel therapeutic options against toxin-associated diseases.

  4. Auranofin Inhibits the Enzyme Activity of Pasteurella multocida Toxin PMT in Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Stefan; Brink, Thorsten; Orth, Joachim H C; Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2017-01-13

    The AB-type protein toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) contains a functionally important disulfide bond within its catalytic domain, which must be cleaved in the host cell cytosol to render the catalytic domain of PMT into its active conformation. Here, we found that the reductive potential of the cytosol of target cells, and more specifically, the activity of the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is crucial for this process. This was demonstrated by the strong inhibitory effect of the pharmacological TrxR inhibitor auranofin, which inhibited the intoxication of target cells with PMT, as determined by analyzing the PMT-catalyzed deamidation of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) in the cytosol of cells. The amount of endogenous substrate levels modified by PMT in cells pretreated with auranofin was reduced compared to cells treated with PMT alone. Auranofin had no inhibitory effect on the activity of the catalytic domain of constitutively active PMT in vitro, demonstrating that auranofin did not directly inhibit PMT activity, but interferes with the mode of action of PMT in cells. In conclusion, the results show that TrxR is crucial for the mode of action of PMT in mammalian cells, and that the drug auranofin can serve as an efficient inhibitor, which might be a starting point for novel therapeutic options against toxin-associated diseases.

  5. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  6. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  7. Human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  8. Selenoprotein R Protects Human Lens Epithelial Cells against D-Galactose-Induced Apoptosis by Regulating Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans. Much of selenium’s beneficial influence on health is attributed to its presence within 25 selenoproteins. Selenoprotein R (SelR, known as methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1, is a selenium-dependent enzyme that, like other Msrs, is required for lens cell viability. In order to investigate the roles of SelR in protecting human lens epithelial (hLE cells against damage, the influences of SelR gene knockdown on d-galactose-induced apoptosis in hLE cells were studied. The results showed that both D-galactose and SelR gene knockdown by siRNA independently induced oxidative stress. When SelR-gene-silenced hLE cells were exposed to D-galactose, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 protein level was further increased, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly decreased and accompanied by a release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. At the same time, the apoptosis cells percentage and the caspase-3 activity were visibly elevated in hLE cells. These results suggested that SelR might protect hLE cell mitochondria and mitigating apoptosis in hLE cells against oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress induced by d-galactose, implying that selenium as a micronutrient may play important roles in hLE cells.

  9. Selenoprotein R Protects Human Lens Epithelial Cells against D-Galactose-Induced Apoptosis by Regulating Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Hongmei; Zhou, Jun; Huang, Kaixun

    2016-02-10

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans. Much of selenium's beneficial influence on health is attributed to its presence within 25 selenoproteins. Selenoprotein R (SelR), known as methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1), is a selenium-dependent enzyme that, like other Msrs, is required for lens cell viability. In order to investigate the roles of SelR in protecting human lens epithelial (hLE) cells against damage, the influences of SelR gene knockdown on d-galactose-induced apoptosis in hLE cells were studied. The results showed that both d-galactose and SelR gene knockdown by siRNA independently induced oxidative stress. When SelR-gene-silenced hLE cells were exposed to d-galactose, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) protein level was further increased, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly decreased and accompanied by a release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. At the same time, the apoptosis cells percentage and the caspase-3 activity were visibly elevated in hLE cells. These results suggested that SelR might protect hLE cell mitochondria and mitigating apoptosis in hLE cells against oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by d-galactose, implying that selenium as a micronutrient may play important roles in hLE cells.

  10. DJ-1 Modulates Nuclear Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2-Mediated Protection in Human Primary Alveolar Type II Cells in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmed, Karim; Messier, Elise M; Zhou, Wenbo; Tuder, Rubin M; Freed, Curt R; Chu, Hong Wei; Kelsen, Steven G; Bowler, Russell P; Mason, Robert J; Kosmider, Beata

    2016-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a main source of oxidative stress and a key risk factor for emphysema, which consists of alveolar wall destruction. Alveolar type (AT) II cells are in the gas exchange regions of the lung. We isolated primary ATII cells from deidentified organ donors whose lungs were not suitable for transplantation. We analyzed the cell injury obtained from nonsmokers, moderate smokers, and heavy smokers. DJ-1 protects cells from oxidative stress and induces nuclear erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, which activates the antioxidant defense system. In ATII cells isolated from moderate smokers, we found DJ-1 expression by RT-PCR, and Nrf2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 translocation by Western blotting and immunocytofluorescence. In ATII cells isolated from heavy smokers, we detected Nrf2 and HO-1 cytoplasmic localization. Moreover, we found high oxidative stress, as detected by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) (immunoblotting), inflammation by IL-8 and IL-6 levels by ELISA, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay in ATII cells obtained from heavy smokers. Furthermore, we detected early DJ-1 and late Nrf2 expression after ATII cell treatment with CS extract. We also overexpressed DJ-1 by adenovirus construct and found that this restored Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and induced nuclear translocation in heavy smokers. Moreover, DJ-1 overexpression also decreased ATII cell apoptosis caused by CS extract in vitro. Our results indicate that DJ-1 activates the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense system. Furthermore, DJ-1 overexpression can restore the impaired Nrf2 pathway, leading to ATII cell protection in heavy smokers. This suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting DJ-1 in CS-related lung diseases.

  11. Synergy between sulforaphane and selenium in the up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase and protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yujuan; Barrera, Lawrence N; Howie, Alexander F; Beckett, Geoffrey J; Wu, Kun; Bao, Yongping

    2012-07-15

    Dietary isothiocyanates and selenium are chemopreventive agents and potent inducers of antioxidant enzymes. It has been previously shown that sulforaphane and selenium have a synergistic effect on the upregulation of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. In this paper, further evidence is presented to show that sulforaphane and selenium synergistically induce TrxR-1 expression in immortalised human hepatocytes. Sulforaphane was found to be more toxic toward hepatocytes than HepG2 cells with IC50=25.1 and 56.4 μM, respectively. Sulforaphane can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and this protection was enhanced by co-treatment with selenium. Using siRNA to knock down TrxR-1 or Nrf2, sulforaphane (5 μM)-protected cell viability was reduced from 73% to 46% and 34%, respectively, suggesting that TrxR-1 is an important enzyme in protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Sulforaphane-induced TrxR-1 expression was positively associated with significant levels of Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, but co-treatment with selenium showed no significant increase in Nrf2 translocation. Moreover, MAPK (ERK, JNK and p38) and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways were found to play no significant role in sulforaphane-induced Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus. However, blocking ERK and JNK signalling pathways decreased sulforaphane-induced TrxR-1 mRNA by about 20%; whereas blocking p38 and PI3K/AKT increased TrxR-1 transcription. In summary, a combination of sulforaphane and selenium resulted in a synergistic upregulation of TrxR-1 that contributed to the enhanced protection against free radical-mediated oxidative damage in human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of Vaccinium myrtillus extract against UVA- and UVB-induced damage in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Rossella; Marabini, Laura

    2014-03-05

    Recently, the field of skin protection have shown a considerable interest in the use of botanicals. Vaccinium myrtillus contains several polyphenols and anthocyanins with multiple pharmacological properties. The purpose of our study was to examine whether a water-soluble V. myrtillus extract (dry matter 12.4%; total polyphenols 339.3mg/100 g fw; total anthocyanins 297.4 mg/100 g fw) was able to reduce UVA- and UVB-induced damage using a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). HaCaT cells were pretreated for 1h with extract in a serum-free medium and then irradiated with UVA (8-40 J/cm(2)) and UVB (0.008-0.72 J/cm(2)) rays. All experiments were performed 24h after the end of irradiation, except for oxidative stress tests. The extract was able to reduce the UVB-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (studied by comet and micronucleous assays) at lower doses. V. myrtillus extract reduced lipid peroxidation UVB-induced, but had no effect against the ROS UVB-produced. With UVA-induced damage V. myrtillus reduced genotoxicity as well as the unbalance of redox intracellular status. Moreover our extract reduced the UVA-induced apoptosis, but had no effect against the UVB one. V. myrtillus extract showed its free radical scavenging properties reducing oxidative stress and apoptotic markers, especially in UVA-irradiated cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  14. Alternative BCG delivery strategies improve protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in non-human primates: Protection associated with mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4 effector memory T-cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, S; White, A; Sarfas, C; Sibley, L; Gleeson, F; McIntyre, A; Basaraba, R; Clark, S; Hall, G; Rayner, E; Williams, A; Marsh, P D; Dennis, M

    2016-12-01

    Intradermal (ID) BCG injection provides incomplete protection against TB in humans and experimental models. Alternative BCG vaccination strategies may improve protection in model species, including rhesus macaques. This study compares the immunogenicity and efficacy of BCG administered by ID and intravenous (IV) injection, or as an intratracheal mucosal boost (ID + IT), against aerosol challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman strain. Disease pathology was significantly reduced, and survival improved, by each BCG vaccination strategy, relative to unvaccinated animals. However, IV induced protection surpassed that achieved by all other routes, providing an opportunity to explore protective immunological mechanisms using antigen-specific IFN-γ ELISpot and polychromatic flow cytometry assays. IFN-γ spot forming units and multifunctional CD4 T-cell frequencies increased significantly following each vaccination regimen and were greatest following IV immunisation. Vaccine-induced multifunctional CD4 T-cells producing IFN-γ and TNF-α were associated with reduced disease pathology following subsequent M.tb challenge; however, high frequencies of this population following M.tb infection correlated with increased pathology. Cytokine producing T-cells primarily occupied the CD4 transitional effector memory phenotype, implicating this population as central to the mycobacterial response, potentially contributing to the stringent control observed in IV vaccinated animals. This study demonstrates the protective efficacy of IV BCG vaccination in rhesus macaques, offering a valuable tool for the interrogation of immunological mechanisms and potential correlates of protection. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective Effect of Pycnogenol® in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells Following Acrolein Induced Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mubeen A.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the hypotheses involved in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Considerable attention has focused on increasing the intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in many neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Pycnogenol® (PYC) has antioxidant properties and stabilizes intracellular antioxidant defense systems including glutathione (GSH) levels. The present study investigated the protective effects of PYC on acrolein-induced oxidative cell toxicity in cultured SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Decreased cell survival in SH-SY5Y cultures treated with acrolein correlated with oxidative stress, increased NADPH-oxidase activity, free radical production, protein oxidation/nitration (protein carbonyl, 3-nitrotyrosine) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Pretreatment with PYC significantly attenuated acrolein induced cytotoxicity, protein damages, lipid peroxidation, and cell death. A dose-response study suggested that PYC showed protective effects against acrolein toxicity by modulating oxidative stress and increasing GSH. These findings provide support that PYC may provide a promising approach for the treatment of oxidative stress related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:18822368

  16. Resveratrol Protects Against Ultraviolet A-Mediated Inhibition of the Phagocytic Function of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Via Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Jiuan Sheu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to examine the protective effect of resveratrol on human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell phagocytosis against ultraviolet irradiation damage. Cultured RPE cells were exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA, 20 minutes irradiation, and treated with meclofenamic acid (30μM, 20 minutes, paxilline (100 μM, 20 minutes or resveratrol (10μM, 20 minutes. Meclofenamic acid and resveratrol were given after exposure to UVA. Pretreatment with meclofenamic acid, resveratrol or paxilline before UVA irradiation was also performed. Fluorescent latex beads were then fed for 4 hours and the phagocytotic function was assessed by flow cytometry. UVA irradiation inhibited the phagocytic function of human RPE cells. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel activator meclofenamic acid ameliorated the damage caused by UVA irradiation. Pretreatment with resveratrol acid also provided protection against damage caused by UVA. Posttreatment with meclofenamic acid offered mild protection, whereas resveratrol did not. In conclusion, the red wine flavonoid resveratrol ameliorated UVA-mediated inhibition of human RPE phagocytosis. The underlying mechanism might involve the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

  17. Binding of the Fap2 Protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum to Human Inhibitory Receptor TIGIT Protects Tumors from Immune Cell Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Chamutal; Ibrahim, Yara; Isaacson, Batya; Yamin, Rachel; Abed, Jawad; Gamliel, Moriya; Enk, Jonatan; Bar-On, Yotam; Stanietsky-Kaynan, Noah; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Shussman, Noam; Almogy, Gideon; Cuapio, Angelica; Hofer, Erhard; Mevorach, Dror; Tabib, Adi; Ortenberg, Rona; Markel, Gal; Miklić, Karmela; Jonjic, Stipan; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Garrett, Wendy S.; Bachrach, Gilad; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, are present in the tumor microenvironment. However, the immunological consequences of intra-tumoral bacteria remain unclear. Here, we have shown that natural killer (NK) cell killing of various tumors is inhibited in the presence of various F. nucleatum strains. Our data support that this F. nucleatum-mediated inhibition is mediated by human, but not by mouse TIGIT, an inhibitory receptor present on all human NK cells and on various T cells. Using a library of F. nucleatum mutants, we found that the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum directly interacted with TIGIT, leading to the inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. We have further demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expressed TIGIT and that T cell activities were also inhibited by F. nucleatum via Fap2. Our results identify a bacterium-dependent, tumor-immune evasion mechanism in which tumors exploit the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum to inhibit immune cell activity via TIGIT. PMID:25680274

  18. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-05-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease.

  19. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  20. Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (CM) extract protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against MPP+-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Su; Koppula, Sushruta; Park, Pyo-Jam; Kim, Ee Hwa; Kim, Chan Gil; Choi, Wahn Soo; Lee, Kwang Ho; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2009-12-10

    Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (Asteraceae) has (CM) long been used in Korean and Chinese traditional herbal medicines with numerous therapeutic applications. To evaluate the neuroprotective activities of Chrysanthemum morifolium (CM) extract against 1-methyl-4-phenylpridinium ions (MPP(+)), Parkinsonian toxin through oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and the underlying mechanisms. The effects of CM against MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity and neuronal cell viability, oxidative damage, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteolysis were evaluated by using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. CM effectively inhibited the cytotoxicity and improved cell viability. CM also attenuated the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP proteolysis. These results demonstrate that CM possesses potent neuroprotective activity and therefore, might be a potential candidate in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  1. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  2. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of bo...

  3. APO-9′-Fucoxanthinone Extracted from Undariopsis peteseniana Protects Oxidative Stress-Mediated Apoptosis in Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho Jang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term cigarette smoking increases the risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, characterized by irreversible expiratory airflow limitation. The pathogenesis of COPD involves oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Various natural marine compounds possess both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but few have been tested for their efficacy in COPD models. In this study, we conducted an in vitro screening test to identify natural compounds isolated from various brown algae species that might provide protection against cigarette smoke extract (CSE-induced cytotoxicity. Among nine selected natural compounds, apo-9′-fucoxanthinone (Apo9F exhibited the highest protection against CSE-induced cytotoxicity in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC2. Furthermore, the protective effects of Apo9F were observed to be associated with a significant reduction in apoptotic cell death, DNA damage, and the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS released from CSE-exposed HBEC2 cells. These results suggest that Apo9F protects against CSE-induced DNA damage and apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial ROS production.

  4. Trolox contributes to Nrf2-mediated protection of human and murine primary alveolar type II cells from injury by cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, E M; Bahmed, K; Tuder, R M; Chu, H W; Bowler, R P; Kosmider, B

    2013-04-04

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress induced by CS causes DNA and lung damage. Oxidant/antioxidant imbalance occurs in the distal air spaces of smokers and in patients with COPD. We studied the effect of oxidative stress generated by CS both in vivo and in vitro on murine primary alveolar type II (ATII) cells isolated from nuclear erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)(-/-) mice. We determined human primary ATII cell injury by CS in vitro and analyzed ATII cells isolated from smoker and non-smoker lung donors ex vivo. We also studied whether trolox (water-soluble derivative of vitamin E) could protect murine and human ATII cells against CS-induced DNA damage and/or decrease injury. We analyzed oxidative stress by 4-hydroxynonenal expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide Assay, Nrf2, heme oxygenase 1, p53 and P53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) expression by immonoblotting, Nrf2 nuclear translocation, Nrf2 and p53 DNA-binding activities, apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay and cytokine production by ELISA. We found that ATII cells isolated from Nrf2(-/-) mice are more susceptible to CS-induced oxidative DNA damage mediated by p53/53BP1 both in vivo and in vitro compared with wild-type mice. Therefore, Nrf2 activation is a key factor to protect ATII cells against injury by CS. Moreover, trolox abolished human ATII cell injury and decreased DNA damage induced by CS in vitro. Furthermore, we found higher inflammation and p53 mRNA expression by RT-PCR in ATII cells isolated from smoker lung donors in comparison with non-smokers ex vivo. Our results indicate that the Nrf2 and p53 cross talk in ATII cells affect the susceptibility of these cells to injury by CS. Trolox can protect against oxidative stress, genotoxicity and inflammation induced by CS through ROS scavenging mechanism, and serve as a potential

  5. Protection against RAGE-mediated neuronal cell death by sRAGE-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells in 5xFAD transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Park, Hyunjin; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Junwon; Kim, Hyungho; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Sojung; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Bonghee; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the most commonly encountered neurodegenerative disease, causes synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss due to various pathological processes that include tau abnormality and amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation. Aβ stimulates the secretion and the synthesis of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) ligand by activating microglial cells, and has been reported to cause neuronal cell death in Aβ 1-42 treated rats and in mice with neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is known to reduce inflammation, and to decrease microglial cell activation and Aβ deposition, and thus, it protects from neuronal cell death in AD. However, sRAGE protein has too a short half-life for therapeutic purposes. We developed sRAGE-secreting umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (sRAGE-MSCs) to enhance the inhibitory effects of sRAGE on Aβ deposition and to reduce the secretion and synthesis of RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. In addition, these cells improved the viability of injected MSCs, and enhanced the protective effects of sRAGE by inhibiting the binding of RAGE and RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. These findings suggest sRAGE protein from sRAGE-MSCs has better protection against neuronal cell death than sRAGE protein or single MSC treatment by inhibiting the RAGE cell death cascade and RAGE-induce inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective Effect of Allium tuberosum Extract on Vascular Inflammation in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Human Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Haeng Jeon; Lee, Ae Sin

    2017-12-01

    Endothelial adhesion molecule expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine plays an important role in vascular endothelial cell injury, leading to vascular disease. Allium tuberosum (AT), which is used as a functional food, has a thrombolytic effect. It contains vitamin A, vitamin C, carbohydrate, calcium, iron, and phosphorus. There are many carotenes that turn into vitamin A in the body. Also, it helps blood circulation and stimulates metabolism. The purpose of the this study was to estimate the anti-inflammatory effects of the AT extract. Human vascular endothelial cells were pre-treated with 100 μg/mL AT extract for 30 minutes and subsequently co-treated with TNF-α (10 ng/mL) and AT extract (100 μg/mL) for 1, 4, and 6 hours. After treatment, the cells were lysed and used for quantitative reverse transcription PCR, Western blot analysis, and monocyte adhesion assay. We examined the effect of the AT extract on inflammatory gene expression in TNF-α-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The extract reduced the expression levels of mRNA and protein of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. It also inhibited the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, the AT extract prevented the increased adhesion capacity of monocyte to TNF-α-stimulated vascular endothelial cells by reducing ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The AT extract has preventive and anti-inflammatory effect against vascular disease and has potential for supporting prevention against the early process of atherosclerosis.

  7. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  8. The protective effect of soybean phytochemicals on androgen responsive human prostate cancer cells LNCaP is likely mediated through modulation of hormone/cytokine-dependent pathways

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    Thomas T.Y. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Population studies suggested that consumption of a soy rich diet provides protective effects against several chronic diseases, including prostate cancer. However, the active components in soy as well as the mechanisms of action of soy’s protective effects remain unclear. It would be important to elucidate these questions to support the use of soy in the prevention of chronic disease.Methods: A cell culture model and molecular techniques were used as tools to identify a molecular signature induced by soy-derived phytochemicals.Results: Soy phytochemicals inhibit growth of androgen responsive prostate cancer cells. Global gene expression analysis using DNA microarray and real time PCR analysis identified multiple pathways affected by the soy-derived phytochemicals genistein, daidzein, equol, and glyceollins in the androgen responsive human prostate cancer cell LNCaP. These pathways included androgen receptor-dependent pathways, insulin-like growth factors pathways, and cell cyclerelated pathways. Soy-derived phytochemicals modulated these pathways in a concentrationdependent fashion. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the physiological achievable concentration of diet-derived soy phytochemicals, we propose the concentration-dependent cancer protective effect is likely mediated through modulation of hormone/cytokine-dependent pathways.

  9. The Protective Effect of Brown-, Gray-, and Blue-Tinted Lenses against Blue LED Light-Induced Cell Death in A2E-Laden Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Il; Jang, Young Pyo

    2017-01-01

    A2E-laden ARPE-19 cells were exposed to a blue light to induce cytotoxicity, in order to investigate the protective effects of various tinted ophthalmic lenses against photo-induced cytotoxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells laden with A2E, known to be among the etiologies of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Different-colored tinted lenses with varying levels of tint and different filtering characteristics, such as polarized, blue-cut, and photochromatic lenses, were placed over the cells, and the protective efficacies thereof were evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase assay. When tinted lenses were placed over ARPE-19 cells, there were different reductions in cytotoxicity according to the colors and tint levels. The level of protection afforded by brown-tinted lenses was 6.9, 36.1, and 49% with a tint level of 15, 50, and 80%, respectively. For gray-tinted lenses, the protective effect was 16.3, 35, and 43.4% for the corresponding degree of tint, respectively. In the case of blue-tinted lenses, a protective effect of 20% was observed with 80% tinted lenses, but 15 and 50% tinted lenses provided no significant protection. In addition, photochromic lenses showed a protective effect but blue-cut lenses and polarized lenses provided no significant protection. Tinted lenses significantly reduced cytotoxicity in RPE cells irradiated with blue light. The protection was more efficient in lenses with a brown or gray tint than in blue-tinted lenses. Tinted glasses may provide significant protection against potential blue-light-induced photochemical and photo-oxidative damage in RPE cells. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

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    Nadia Ferlazzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders.

  11. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders.

  12. The in vitro protection of human decay accelerating factor and hDAF/heme oxygenase-1 transgenes in porcine aortic endothelial cells against sera of Formosan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C-F; Tai, H-C; Wu, C-P; Ho, L-L; Lin, Y-J; Hwang, C-S; Yang, T-S; Lee, J-M; Tseng, Y-L; Huang, C-C; Weng, C-N; Lee, P-H

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate hyperacute rejection, pigs have been generated with alpha-Gal transferase gene knockout and transgenic expression of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF), MCP, and CD59. Additionally, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been suggested to defend endothelial cells. Sera (MS) (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%) from Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis, MC), an Old World monkey wildly populated in Taiwan, was used to test the protective in vitro, effects of hDAF or hDAF/hHO-1 on porcine aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) derived from hDAF(+), hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+), and hDAF(+)/hHO-1(-) and 1 nontransgenic pAEC. Ten percent human serum (HS) served as a positive control. When MS addition increased to 10% or 15%, all transgenic pAEC exhibited a greater survival than nontransgenic pAEC. Noticeably, 15% MS reduced survived to 40% in nontransgenic and transgenic pAEC, respectively. These results revealed that hDAF exerted protective effects against MC complement activation. However, comparing with 10% MS and HS in pAEC of nontransgenic pigs, the survivability was higher in HS, suggesting that complement activation by MS was more toxic than that by HS. Furthermore, hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+) showed no further protection against effects of MS on transgenic pAEC. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of protection against rotavirus in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R L

    1996-09-01

    Immune responses following either natural or experimental rotavirus infection provide protection against subsequent rotavirus illnesses, and the mechanisms involved have been examined in humans and animals. In adult volunteers challenged with human rotaviruses, protection has been shown to correlate with serum and intestinal antibodies; however, titers of no specific antibody could be used reliably as a marker of protection, including neutralizing antibody to the challenge virus. Studies in children confirmed these general associations between antibody titers and protection, but the serotype specificity of antibody and its role in protection remained unclear. Studies in mice suggested antibody, CD8 cells, and a third, undetermined, factor as mediators of protection. Antibody appeared to be most important, both in resolution of infection and protection against subsequent infection, but its activity was not serotype specific. CD8 cells helped resolve rotavirus infection but were less important in protection against reinfection. The third factor remains to be identified.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is necessary to protect fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells against hyperoxic injury: Mechanistic roles of antioxidant enzymes and RelB

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    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Chu, Chun; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy, E-mail: shivanna@bcm.edu

    2015-07-15

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protects adult and newborn mice against hyperoxic lung injury by mediating increases in the expression of phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A) and phase II (NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)) antioxidant enzymes (AOE). AhR positively regulates the expression of RelB, a component of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) protein that contributes to anti-inflammatory processes in adult animals. Whether AhR regulates the expression of AOE and RelB, and protects fetal primary human lung cells against hyperoxic injury is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AhR-deficient fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) will have decreased RelB activation and AOE, which will in turn predispose them to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC upon exposure to hyperoxia. AhR-deficient HPMEC showed increased hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC. Additionally, AhR-deficient cell culture supernatants displayed increased macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and 1β, indicating a heightened inflammatory state. Interestingly, loss of AhR was associated with a significantly attenuated CYP1A1, NQO1, superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1), and nuclear RelB protein expression. These findings support the hypothesis that decreased RelB activation and AOE in AhR-deficient cells is associated with increased hyperoxic injury compared to AhR-sufficient cells. - Highlights: • AhR deficiency potentiates oxygen toxicity in human fetal lung cells. • Deficient AhR signaling increases hyperoxia-induced cell death. • AhR deficiency increases hyperoxia-induced ROS generation and inflammation. • Anti-oxidant enzyme levels are attenuated in AhR-deficient lung cells

  15. [Protective effect of intraperitoneal transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells at different times against concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Y Z; Fan, Z; Chen, D F; Li, S S; Wang, Q Y; Gao, P F; Wang, Q Q; Duan, Z P; Chen, Y; Kong, L B; Wang, Y B; Hong, F

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of intraperitoneal transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells at different times against concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute liver injury in mice. Methods: A total of 88 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normal control group (group C), ConA model group (group M), and human liver-derived stem cells (HYX1)+ConA group (group E); according to the interval between phosphate buffer/HYX1 injection and ConA injection, Groups M and E were further divided into 3-hour groups (M1 and E1 groups), 6-hour groups (M2 and E2 groups), 12-hour groups (M3 and E3 groups), 24-hour groups (M4 and E4 groups), and 48-hour groups (M5 and E5 groups). The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and total bilirubin (TBil) in peripheral blood were measured, liver tissue sections were used to observe pathological changes, and the Ishak score for liver inflammation was determined. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison between groups, and P 0.05). The pathological sections of liver tissue showed that compared with group M, group E had significant reductions in the degree of necrosis and Ishak score (both P transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells has a protective effect against ConA-induced acute liver injury in mice, and the injection at 6 and 12 hours in advance has the best protective effect.

  16. The pivotal role of the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component 2 in protecting human cells against apoptotic effects of the base analog N6-hydroxylaminopurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plitzko, Birte; Havemeyer, Antje; Kunze, Thomas; Clement, Bernd

    2015-04-17

    N-Hydroxylated nucleobases and nucleosides as N-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) or N-hydroxyadenosine (HAPR) may be generated endogenously in the course of cell metabolism by cytochrome P450, by oxidative stress or by a deviating nucleotide biosynthesis. These compounds have shown to be toxic and mutagenic for procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. For DNA replication fidelity it is therefore of great importance that organisms exhibit effective mechanisms to remove such non-canonical base analogs from DNA precursor pools. In vitro, the molybdoenzymes mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component 1 and 2 (mARC1 and mARC2) have shown to be capable of reducing N-hydroxylated base analogs and nucleoside analogs to the corresponding canonical nucleobases and nucleosides upon reconstitution with the electron transport proteins cytochrome b5 and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. By RNAi-mediated down-regulation of mARC in human cell lines the mARC-dependent N-reductive detoxication of HAP in cell metabolism could be demonstrated. For HAPR, on the other hand, the reduction to adenosine seems to be of less significance in the detoxication pathway of human cells as HAPR is primarily metabolized to inosine by direct dehydroxylamination catalyzed by adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the effect of mARC knockdown on sensitivity of human cells to HAP was examined by flow cytometric quantification of apoptotic cell death and detection of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. mARC2 was shown to protect HeLa cells against the apoptotic effects of the base analog, whereas the involvement of mARC1 in reductive detoxication of HAP does not seem to be pivotal. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Low-dose energetic protons induce adaptive and bystander effects that protect human cells against DNA damage caused by a subsequent exposure to energetic iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; De Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Azzam, Edouard I

    2015-05-01

    During interplanetary missions, astronauts are exposed to mixed types of ionizing radiation. The low 'flux' of the high atomic number and high energy (HZE) radiations relative to the higher 'flux' of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons makes it highly probable that for any given cell in the body, proton events will precede any HZE event. Whereas progress has been made in our understanding of the biological effects of low-LET protons and high-LET HZE particles, the interplay between the biochemical processes modulated by these radiations is unclear. Here we show that exposure of normal human fibroblasts to a low mean absorbed dose of 20 cGy of 0.05 or 1-GeV protons (LET ∼ 1.25 or 0.2 keV/μm, respectively) protects the irradiated cells (P proton-irradiated cells were co-cultured were also significantly protected from the DNA-damaging effects of the challenge dose. The mitigating effect persisted for at least 24 h. These results highlight the interactions of biological effects due to direct cellular traversal by radiation with those due to bystander effects in cell populations exposed to mixed radiation fields. They show that protective adaptive responses can spread from cells targeted by low-LET space radiation to bystander cells in their vicinity. The findings are relevant to understanding the health hazards of space travel. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  18. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Diamine Oxidase from White Pea (Lathyrus sativus) Combined with Catalase Protects the Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Line from Histamine Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumarie, Catherine; Séïde, Marilyne; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2017-07-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) administration has been proposed to treat certain gastrointestinal dysfunctions induced by histamine, an immunomodulator, signaling, and pro-inflammatory factor. However, H2O2 resulting from the oxidative deamination of histamine by DAO may be toxic. The purpose of this study was to investigate to which extent DAO from white pea (Lathyrus sativus), alone or in combination with catalase, may modulate histamine toxicity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. The results show that histamine at concentrations higher than 1 mM is toxic to the Caco-2 cells, independently of the cell differentiation status, with a LC50 of ≅ 10 mM following a 24-h exposure. Depending on its concentration, DAO increased histamine toxicity to a greater extent in differentiated cells compared to undifferentiated cultures. In the presence of catalase, the DAO-induced increase in histamine toxicity was completely abolished in the undifferentiated cells and only partially decreased in differentiated cells, showing differences in the sensitivity of Caco-2 cells to the products resulting from histamine degradation by DAO (H2O2, NH3, or imidazole aldehyde). It appears that treatment of food histaminosis using a combination of vegetal DAO and catalase would protect against histamine toxicity and prevent H2O2-induced damage that may occur during histamine oxidative deamination.

  1. Protective Effects of a New Phloretin Derivative against UVB-Induced Damage in Skin Cell Model and Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoungwoo Shin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic compound phloretin is a prominent member of the chemical class of dihydrochalcones. Phloretin is specifically found in apple and apple juice and known for its biological properties. We were particularly interested in its potential dermo-cosmetic applications. However, practical limitations of phloretin do exist due to its poor water-solubility. Phloretin was sulfonated with sulfuric acid (98%, wt and mixed with saturated salt water to produce phloretin 3',3-disulfonate in order to increase its water-solubility. Here we reported the photoprotective effect of phloretin 3',3-disulfonate (PS, a new semi-synthetic derivative of phloretin. Results showed that PS attenuated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPDs formation, glutathione (GSH depletion and apoptosis induced by ultraviolet B (UVB. The photoprotective effect of PS is tightly correlated to the enhancement of nucleotide excision repair (NER gene expression. Furthemore, PS had inhibitory effects on UVB-induced release of the inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and prostaglandin-E2. We also confirmed the safety and clinical efficacy of PS on human skin. Overall, the results demonstrated significant benefits of PS on the protection of keratinocytes against UVB-induced injuries and suggested its potential use in skin photoprotection.

  2. Regulating stem-cell research and human cloning in an Australian context: an exercise in protecting the status of the human subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Olivia

    2005-01-01

    Over 12 months prior to the recent United Nations decision to defer a decision about what type of international treaty should be developed in the global stem-cell research and human cloning debate, the Federal Parliament of Australia passed two separate pieces of legislation relating to both these concerns. After a five-year long process of community consultation, media spectacle and parliamentary debate, reproductive cloning has been banned in Australia and only embryos considered to be excess to assisted reproductive technologies in existence on the 5th of April 2002 are currently valid research material. This paper argues that underpinning both pieces of legislation is a profound belief in the disruptive potential of all types of human cloning for the very nature and integrity of human species being. A belief, moreover, that is based on a presumption that it is apparently possible to conceptualise what being human even means for all Australians.

  3. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affords Protection against Lead-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although lead exposure has declined in recent years as a result of change to lead-free gasoline, several epidemiological have pointed out that it represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in young children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. A previous study in our laboratory indicated that lead exposure induces cytotoxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress in lead-induced toxicity, and the protective effect of the anti-oxidant n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. We hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a role in lead-induced cytotoxicity, and that NAC affords protection against this adverse effect. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the trypan blue exclusion test for cell viability. We also performed the thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that NAC significantly increased the viability of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner upon 48 hours of exposure. Similar trend was obtained with the trypan blue exclusion test. Data generated from the thiobarbituric acid test showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05 increase of MDA levels in lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells compared to control cells. Interestingly, the addition of NAC to lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells significantly decreased cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as evidenced by the decrease in lipid peroxidation byproducts. Overall, findings from this study suggest that NAC inhibits lead nitrate-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Hence, NAC may be used as a salvage therapy for lead-induced toxicity in exposed persons.

  4. Crocin protects human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) from α- and β-Zearalenol-induced ER stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Intidhar; Boussabbeh, Manel; Prola, Alexandre; Guilbert, Arnaud; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-08-01

    α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) and β-zearalenol (β-ZOL) are the major metabolites of Zearalenone (ZEN) and are known to induce many toxic effects. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in α- and β-ZOL-mediated toxicity in human kidney cells (HEK293) and evaluated the effect of a common dietary compound Crocin (CRO), from saffron. We show that α- and β-ZOL treatment induces ER stress as evidenced by the upregulation of the 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and the Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein (GADD34). Activation of the ER stress response is associated with activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This apoptotic process is characterized by an increase in ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and activation of caspases. We also demonstrate that the antioxidant properties of CRO help to prevent ER stress and reduce α- and β-ZOL-induced apoptosis in HEK293 cells. Our results suggest that saffron consumption might be helpful to prevent α- and β-ZOL-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  5. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Human Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells and Restoration of Motor Function in Neonatal Rats with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Since oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs are the target cells of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, the present study was aimed at investigating the protective effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a well-known antioxidant and precursor of glutathione, in OPCs as well as in neonatal rats. Methods. In in vitro study, protective effects of NAC on KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 OPCs were investigated via MTT assay and apoptotic signal analysis. In in vivo study, NAC was administered to rats with HIE induced by hypoxia-ischemia surgery at postnatal day 7, and their motor functions and white matter demyelination were analyzed. Results. NAC decreased KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 cells and especially suppressed apoptosis by regulating Bcl2 and p-ERK. Administration of NAC recovered motor functions such as the using ratio of forelimb contralateral to the injured brain, locomotor activity, and rotarod performance of neonatal HIE animals. It was also confirmed that NAC attenuated demyelination in the corpus callosum, a white matter region vulnerable to HIE. Conclusion. The results indicate that NAC exerts neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo by preserving OPCs, via regulation of antiapoptotic signaling, and that F3.Olig2 human OPCs could be a good tool for screening of candidates for demyelinating diseases.

  7. B-cell depletion is protective against anti-AAV capsid immune response: a human subject case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Corti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy strategies for congenital myopathies may require repeat administration of adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors due to aspects of the clinical application, such as: (i administration of doses below therapeutic efficacy in patients enrolled in early phase clinical trials; (ii progressive reduction of the therapeutic gene expression over time as a result of increasing muscle mass in patients treated at a young age; and (iii a possibly faster depletion of pathogenic myofibers in this patient population. Immune response triggered by the first vector administration, and to subsequent doses, represents a major obstacle for successful gene transfer in young patients. Anti-capsid and anti-transgene product related humoral and cell-mediated responses have been previously observed in all preclinical models and human subjects who received gene therapy or enzyme replacement therapy (ERT for congenital myopathies. Immune responses may result in reduced efficacy of the gene transfer over time and/or may preclude for the possibility of re-administration of the same vector. In this study, we evaluated the immune response of a Pompe patient dosed with an AAV1-GAA vector after receiving Rituximab and Sirolimus to modulate reactions against ERT. A key finding of this single subject case report is the observation that B-cell ablation with rituximab prior to AAV vector exposure results in non-responsiveness to both capsid and transgene, therefore allowing the possibility of repeat administration in the future. This observation is significant for future gene therapy studies and establishes a clinically relevant approach to blocking immune responses to AAV vectors.

  8. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in human corneal epithelial cells: protective effects of ethanol extracts of various medicinal plant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Hee-Gu; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Li, Zhengri; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2014-06-12

    To investigate the effects of visible light on human corneal epithelial cells and the impact of natural antioxidants on oxidative stress produced by overexposure to light. Light-emitting diodes with various wavelengths (410-830 nm) were used to irradiate human corneal epithelial cells, and cell viability was assessed. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA). Ethyl alcohol (EtOH) extracts were prepared from mixtures of medicinal plants. After application of the EtOH extracts, the free radical scavenging activity was measured using a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. The induction of antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx-1), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2) by the extracts was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The ability of the extracts to inhibit ROS was also analyzed using DCF-DA. The viability of corneal epithelial cells was diminished after irradiation of blue light (above 10 J at 410 nm and 50 J at 480 nm). Reactive oxygen species production was induced by irradiation at 410 and 480 nm at doses of 5 J/cm(2) and higher. Ethyl alcohol extracts had potent radical scavenging activity. Application of the extracts not only increased the expression of HO-1, Prx-1, CAT, and SOD-2, but it also attenuated the ROS production induced by blue light in a dose-dependent manner. Overexposure to blue light (410-480 nm) may have a harmful effect on human corneal epithelial cells compared with other visible light wavelengths. Medicinal plant extracts can have potent protective effects on blue light-induced oxidative stress. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protects human lens epithelial cells (SRA01/04) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianju; Chen, Tingjun; Li, Peng; Ye, Zi; Zhai, Wei; Jia, Liang; Chen, Wenqian; Sun, Ang; Huang, Yang; Wei, Shihui; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (hLEC; SRA01/04). SRA01/04 cells were exposed to a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration gradient and inducers of HO-1 such as cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), respectively. In addition, an RNA silencing experiment was conducted to investigate the HO-1 function in this study. A Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to measure cell viability. Western blot and ELISA were used to detect the level of HO-1 expression. In our study, hLECs were exposed to 400 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 24 h with or without pretreatment with 10μΜ CoPP or 10μΜ ZnPP, respectively. Double immunofluorescence staining was used for cell identification and the qualitative expression of HO-1. Expression of HO-1 was monitored using Western blot and ELISA. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by flow cytometry analyses; commercial enzymatic kits were used to measure the levels of glutathione (GSH), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD). The proportion of cell apoptosis was quantified by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. The expression of caspase family (-8, -3) proteins was measured by Western blot analysis. HO-1 significantly restored the cell viability under H2O2 injury via reducing the generation of ROS and increasing the levels of SOD and GSH activity. Moreover, HO-1 also inhibited H2O2-induced caspase-8 and caspase-3 proteins, thus significantly reducing the apoptosis of SRA01/04. An RNA silencing experiment demonstrated the increased resistance of LECs to oxidative stress specifically for increased levels of HO-1. These findings suggested that HO-1 protects human lens epithelial cells from H2O2-induced oxidant stress by upregulating antioxidant enzyme activity, reducing ROS generation, and thus inhibiting caspase family

  10. Acacia salicina extracts protect against DNA damage and mutagenesis in bacteria and human lymphoblast cell K562 cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Ines; Kilani, Soumaya; Skandrani, Ines; Ben Amar, Rebaii; Nefatti, Aicha; Laporte, François; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2008-03-01

    Three extracts were prepared from the leaves of Acacia salicina: aqueous, methanol, and ethyl acetate extracts. The antigenotoxic properties of these extracts were investigated by assessing the inhibition of mutagenicity of the indirect-acting mutagen benzo[a]pyrene using the Ames assay and the genotoxicity of the direct-acting mutagen, hydrogen peroxide, using the "Comet assay." Aqueous, methanol, and ethyl acetate extracts at doses of 500, 50, and 500 microg per plate reduced benzo[a]pyrene mutagenicity by 95%, 82%, and 40%, respectively, in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain and by 91%, 66% and 63%, respectively, at the same doses with a TA97 assay system. Human lymphoblast cells K562 were pretreated with 50% inhibition concentration of each extracts and then treated by H(2)O(2), for the Comet assay. The Comet assay results showed that ethyl acetate and methanol extracts decreased the DNA damage caused by H(2)O(2) by, respectively, 34.8% and 31.3%. We envisaged also the study of the antioxidant effect of these extracts by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay. Results indicated that methanol and ethyl acetate extracts were potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. We conclude that these integrated approaches to antigenotoxicity and antioxidant assessment may be useful to help compare the beneficial effects associated with using A salicina as medicinal and dietary plant.

  11. Serum-free corneal organ culture medium (SFM) but not conventional minimal essential organ culture medium (MEM) protects human corneal endothelial cells from apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, Thekla; Knels, Lilla; Valtink, Monika; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of organ culture media on corneal endothelial cell survival. The human corneal endothelial cell line HCEC-12 was cultured in five different media: human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) growth medium (F99(HCEC)), standard minimal essential corneal organ culture medium (MEM)+2% fetal calf serum (FCS), MEM+5% FCS, and humanised, endothelial serum-free medium (SFM) (with and without antibiotics). A portion of the cells was treated with 0.5 μmol/l staurosporine and examined for signs of apoptosis by assessing mitochondrial membrane polarisation state (intravital JC-1 staining), by YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide staining, by determining fragmentation of nuclei by sub-G1 DNA content, by immunocytochemistry for cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and by western blotting for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). The number of apoptotic cells in untreated control cultures was significantly higher in MEM compared with F99(HCEC) and SFM. Staurosporine treatment induced apoptosis in all tested cultures to varying degrees. Cells cultured in MEM showed stronger staining for cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved PARP, increased sub-G1 DNA content, more propidium iodide- and YO-PRO-1-positive cells, and more mitochondria with depolarised membranes. All parameters were significantly higher in MEM compared with F99(HCEC) and SFM. SFM cultures were significantly less susceptible to cell stress. SFM is superior to MEM in promoting HCEC survival.

  12. The novel triterpenoid RTA 408 protects human retinal pigment epithelial cells against H2O2-induced cell injury via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell damage is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Previous studies have shown that RTA 408, a synthetic triterpenoid compound, potently activates Nrf2. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of RTA 408 in cultured RPE cells during oxidative stress and to determine the effects of RTA 408 on Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. Primary human RPE cells were pretreated with RTA 408 and then incubated in 200 μM H2O2 for 6 h. Cell viability was measured with the WST-8 assay. Apoptosis was quantitatively measured by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI double staining and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reduced (GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG were measured using colorimetric assays. Nrf2 activation and its downstream effects on phase II enzymes were examined by Western blot. Treatment of RPE cells with nanomolar ranges (10 and 100 nM of RTA 408 markedly attenuated H2O2-induced viability loss and apoptosis. RTA 408 pretreatment significantly protected cells from oxidative stress-induced GSH loss, GSSG formation and decreased ROS production. RTA 408 activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of its downstream genes, such as HO-1, NQO1, SOD2, catalase, Grx1, and Trx1. Consequently, the enzyme activities of NQO1, Grx1, and Trx1 were fully protected by RTA 408 pretreatment under oxidative stress. Moreover, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly reduced the cytoprotective effects of RTA 408. In conclusion, our data suggest that RTA 408 protect primary human RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced damage by activating Nrf2 and its downstream genes.

  13. Allopurinol protects human glomerular endothelial cells from high glucose-induced reactive oxygen species generation, p53 overexpression and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2017-11-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in capillary endothelial cells is a prerequisite for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase, another ROS generator, ameliorates experimental diabetic nephropathy. To test the hypothesis that the initial high glucose-induced ROS production by the mitochondria activates xanthine oxidase, which afterward remains as the major source of ROS, we cultured primary human glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) under normal or high-glucose conditions, with or without the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol. ROS generation and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were assessed by chemiluminescence or colorimetrically. Levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), p53 and phosphorylated p53 (p-p53) were assessed by western blotting. Allopurinol prevented high glucose-induced ROS generation indicating that xanthine oxidase is the major source of ROS. Allopurinol protected GEnC from endothelial dysfunction since it prevented the high glucose-induced decrease in NOS activity and increase in ICAM-1 expression. Allopurinol reduced p53 and p-p53 levels induced by high glucose suggesting an axis of xanthine oxidase-derived ROS, DNA damage, p53 stabilization and endothelial dysfunction that may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Allopurinol protects GEnC from high glucose-induced ROS generation, p53 overexpression and endothelial dysfunction. These data provide a pathogenetic mechanism that supports the results of experimental and clinical studies about the beneficial effect of xanthine oxidase inhibitors on the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Protective effect of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 on human vascular endothelial cells damaged by oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL.

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    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available Although the 30K family proteins are important anti-apoptotic molecules in silkworm hemolymph, the underlying mechanism remains to be investigated. This is especially the case in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs. In this study, a 30K protein, 30Kc6, was successfully expressed and purified using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system in silkworm cells. Furthermore, the 30Kc6 expressed in Escherichia coli was used to generate a polyclonal antibody. Western blot analysis revealed that the antibody could react specifically with the purified 30Kc6 expressed in silkworm cells. The In vitro cell apoptosis model of HUVEC that was induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL and in vivo atherosclerosis rabbit model were constructed and were employed to analyze the protective effects of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 on these models. The results demonstrated that the silkworm protein 30Kc6 significantly enhanced the cell viability in HUVEC cells treated with Ox-LDL, decreased the degree of DNA fragmentation and markedly reduced the level of 8-isoprostane. This could be indicative of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 antagonizing the Ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis by inhibiting the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. Furthermore, Ox-LDL activated the cell mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK, especially JNK and p38. As demonstrated with Western analysis, 30Kc6 inhibited Ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis in HUVEC cells by preventing the MAPK signaling pathways. In vivo data have demonstrated that oral feeding of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 dramatically improved the conditions of the atherosclerotic rabbits by decreasing serum levels of total triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and total cholesterol (TC. Furthermore, 30Kc6 alleviated the extent of lesions in aorta and liver in the atherosclerotic rabbits. These data are not only helpful in understanding the anti

  15. Lp-PLA2 silencing protects against ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis via Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human THP1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, HuaDong; Cui, DaJiang; Quan, XiaoJuan; Yang, WeiLin; Li, YingNa; Zhang, Lin; Liu, EnQi

    2016-09-02

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the large- and medium-size arteries that is characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, in which foam cells are the characteristic pathological cells. However, the key underlying pathomechanisms are still not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) in ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis, and further, elucidated the potential machanisms in human THP1 macrophages. Flow cytometry and western blot analyses showed that both cell apoptosis and Lp-PLA2 expression were dose-dependently elevated after ox-LDL treatment for 24 h and also time-dependently increased after 50 mg/L ox-LDL incubation in THP1 macrophages. In addition, Lp-PLA2 silencing decreased ox-LDL-induced Lp-PLA2 and CD36 expression in THP1 macrophages. We also found that the levels of oil red O-staining, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) were significantly upregulated in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, but inhibited by Lp-PLA2 silencing. Furthermore, ox-LDL treatment resulted in significant increases of ROS and MDA but a marked decrease of SOD, effects that were reversed by Lp-PLA2 silencing in THP1 cells. Lp-PLA2 silencing reduced ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis and caspase-3 expression in THP1 cells. Moreover, Lp-PLA2 siRNA transfection dramatically lowered the elevated levels of p-Akt and p-mTOR proteins in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells. Both PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreased the augmented caspase-3 expression and TC content induced by ox-LDL, respectively. Taken together, these results revealed that Lp-PLA2 silencing protected against ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis via Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human THP1 macrophages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An isoflavonoid-enriched extract from Pueraria lobata (kudzu) root protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative stress induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Wang, Xu; He, Chunnian

    2016-12-04

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate vascular cell dysfunction and lead to atherosclerosis and other chronic cardiovascular diseases. The root of Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi, also known as kudzu or Gegen (Chinese name), is one of the most important herbs in traditional Chinese medicine and has been widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, osteonecrosis and neurodegradation diseases. In this study, an ethanol extract from kudzu root was prepared and the in vitro protective effect of the kudzu root extract (KUD) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. An ethanol extract of dried kudzu root was purified with an AB-8 resin column, and the concentrations of puerarin, daidzin and daidzein in the KUD were determined using UV spectroscopy. HUVECs were pretreated with various concentrations of the KUD with or without rotenone and the viability was assessed by AlamarBlue cell viability assay. Next, HUVECs were pretreated with the KUD and then treated with rotenone, and the levels of ROS generation, apoptosis, and changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in HUVECs were measured using fluorescent staining assay and high-content analysis. The contents of three major isoflavonoids (puerarin, daidzin and daidzein) were enriched by 7.75-27.51 fold in the extract. The KUD enhanced the proliferation of HUVECs, and protected HUVECs against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Additionally, the KUD prevented the loss of ΔΨm in HUVECs stimulated by oxidative stress. We demonstrated that an isoflavonoid-rich extract prepared from kudzu root has the potential to act as a protector for vascular endothelial cells against intracellular ROS mediated apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenotype and specificity of T cells in primary human cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy: IL-7Rpos long-term memory phenotype is associated with protection from vertical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Federico; Fornara, Chiara; Jarrossay, David; Furione, Milena; Arossa, Alessia; Spinillo, Arsenio; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Gerna, Giuseppe; Sallusto, Federica; Lilleri, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is the major cause of birth defects and a precise definition of the HCMV-specific T-cell response in primary infection may help define reliable correlates of immune protection during pregnancy. In this study, a high throughput method was used to define the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for four HCMV proteins in the naïve compartment of seronegative subjects and the effector/memory compartments of subjects with primary/remote HCMV infection. The naïve repertoire displayed comparable frequencies of T cells that were reactive with HCMV structural (pp65, gB and the pentamer gHgLpUL128L) and non-structural (IE-1) proteins. Whereas, following natural infection, the majority of effector/memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognized either gB or IE-1, respectively, and pp65. The pattern of T cell reactivity was comparable at early and late stages of infection and in pregnant women with primary HCMV infection transmitting or not transmitting the virus to the fetus. At an early stage of primary infection, about 50% of HCMV-reactive CD4+ T cells were long-term IL-7Rpos memory cells, while 6-12 months later, the frequency of these cells increased to 70%, approaching 100% in remote infections. In contrast, only 10-20% of HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells were long-term memory cells up to 12 months after infection onset, thereafter increasing to 70% in remote infections. Interestingly, a significantly higher frequency of HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells with a long-term IL-7Rpos memory phenotype was observed in non-transmitting compared to transmitting women. These findings indicate that immunodominance in HCMV infection is not predetermined in the naïve compartment, but is the result of virus-host interactions and suggest that prompt control of HCMV infection in pregnancy is associated with the rapid development of long-term IL-7Rpos memory HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells and a low risk of virus transmission to the fetus.

  18. [Impact of sera from children with active Henoch-Schönlein purpura on human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Yuan, Li-Ping; Fei, Wen-Jun; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Qin; Hu, Bo; Lu, Ling

    2012-01-01

    To observe the changes of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by the sera from children with active Henoch-Sch-nlein purpura (HSP) and the protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury. HUVECs were divided into four groups based on the culture conditions: blank control group, normal serum group, HSP serum group, and HSP serum plus methylprednisolone group. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 in the supernatants of each group were detected using ELISA and the nitric oxide (NO) level by nitrate reductase determination. Moreover, the expressions of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Fractalkine in HUVECs were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and NO in the HSP serum group were significantly higher than those in the blank control and normal serum groups (Pinflamation.

  19. Galectin-3 Protects Human Breast Carcinoma Cells against Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis : Implication of Galectin-3 Function during Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Bong-Ki; Lee, Yong J; Battle, Paul; Jessup, J. Milburn; Raz, Avraham; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2001-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside-binding protein which regulates many biological processes including cell adhesion, migration, cell growth, tumor progression, metastasis, and apoptosis. Although the exact function of galectin-3 in cancer development is unclear, galectin-3 expression is associated with neoplastic progression and metastatic potential. Since studies have suggested that tumor cell survival in microcirculation determines the metastatic outcome, we examined the effect of galectin-3 ov...

  20. σ-1 receptor stimulation protects against pressure-induced damage through InsR-MAPK signaling in human trabecular meshwork cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Li, Hongyi; Sun, Xian; Qu, Wei; Yang, Binbin; Cheng, Fang; Shi, Liping; Yuan, Huiping

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the σ-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist (+)-pentazocin (PTZ) on pressure-induced apoptosis and death of human trabecular meshwork cells (hTMCs). The expression levels of Sig-1R and insulin receptor (InsR) were examined in hTMCs. Cells were cultured under a pressure of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg for 48 h, and under 80 mmHg for 44 h, after which the cells were treated with (+)-PTZ (20 µM), N-(2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl)-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine (BD-1063; 20 µM) administered 30 min prior to (+)-PTZ, or BD-1063 (20 µM) and then exposed to 80 mmHg again until the 48 h time-point. The changes of the cells were observed by optical and electron microscopy, the apoptosis and death of hTMCs were detected by ethidium bromide/acridine orange dual staining assay and the expression of Sig-1R and InsR by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important downstream protein of the InsR-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway, was also detected by western blot analysis when (+)-PTZ and BD-1063 were added to the 80 mmHg-treated cells. Sig-1Rs and InsRs were expressed in hTMCs. The apoptosis and death of hTMCs increased from 40 mmHg with 50% cell death when the pressure was at 80 mmHg and the structure of the cells noticeably changed. The expression of Sig-1R and InsR increased along with the elevation of pressure. (+)-PTZ decreased the apoptosis and death of hTMCs and increased the expression of Sig-1R and InsR, and the phosphorylation of ERK. Such effects were blocked by BD-1063. The present study suggested that Sig-1R agonist (+)-PTZ can protect hTMCs from pressure-induced apoptosis and death by activating InsR and the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:28560459

  1. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scutellarin (SCU is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6, heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1, and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  2. Protective Macroautophagy Is Involved in Vitamin E Succinate Effects on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cell Line SGC-7901 by Inhibiting mTOR Axis Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Hou

    Full Text Available Vitamin E succinate (VES, a potential cancer therapeutic agent, potently induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of various cancer cells. Autophagy has been supposed to promote cancer cell survival or trigger cell death, depending on particular cancer types and tumor microenvironments. The role of autophagy in the growth suppressive effect of VES on gastric cancer cell is basically unknown. We aimed to determine whether and how autophagy affected the VES-induced inhibition of SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cell growth. SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES or pre-treated with autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA. Electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and Western blot were used to study whether VES induced autophagy reaction in SGC-7901 cells. Western blot evaluated the activities of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR axis. Then we used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and flow cytometry to detect the level of cell viability and apoptosis. Collectively, our data indeed strongly support our hypothesis that VES treatment produced cytological variations that depict autophagy, increased the amount of intracellular green fluorescent protein-microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence and the number of autophagic vacuoles. It altered the expression of endogenous autophagy marker LC3. VES activated the suppression of mTOR through inhibiting upstream regulators p38 MAPK and Akt. mTOR suppression consequently inhibited the activation of mTOR downstream targets p70S6K and 4E-BP-1. The activation of the upstream mTOR inhibitor AMPK had been up-regulated by VES. The results showed that pre-treatment SGC-7901 with autophagy inhibitors before VES treatment could increase the capacity of VES to reduce cell viability and to provoke apoptosis. In conclusion, VES-induced autophagy participates in SGC-7901 cell protection by inhibiting mTOR axis

  3. Glycoconjugates in human milk: protecting infants from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robyn; Cheah, Wai Yuen; Grinyer, Jasmine; Packer, Nicolle

    2013-12-01

    Breastfeeding is known to have many health benefits for a newborn. Not only does human milk provide an excellent source of nutrition, it also contains components that protect against infection from a wide range of pathogens. Some of the protective properties of human milk can be attributed to the immunoglobulins. Yet, there is another level of defense provided by the "sweet" protective agents that human milk contains, including free oligosaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sugar epitopes in human milk are similar to the glycan receptors that serve as pathogen adhesion sites in the human gastrointestinal tract and other epithelial cell surfaces; hence, the milk glycans can competitively bind to and remove the disease-causing microorganisms before they cause infection. The protective value of free oligosaccharides in human milk has been well researched and documented. Human milk glycoconjugates have received less attention but appear to play an equally important role. Here, we bring together the breadth of research that has focused on the protective mechanisms of human milk glycoconjugates, with a particular focus on the glycan moieties that may play a role in disease prevention. In addition, human milk glycoconjugates are compared with bovine milk glycoconjugates in terms of their health benefits for the human infant.

  4. Anti-herpes simplex virus and anti-human cell growth activity of E-5-propenyl-2'-deoxyuridine and the concept of selective protection in antivirus chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y C; Grill, S; Ruth, J; Bergstrom, D E

    1980-12-01

    E-5-Propenyl-2'-deoxyuridine (E-5-propenyl-dUrd) inhibited the growth of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 in culture. The concentration of drug required to give a 2-log reduction in virus titer was 5 microM for HSV-1 and 23 microM for HSV-2. The anti-HSV-1 activity of this agent was more potent than 5-propyl-dUrd, equivalent to E-5(3,3,3-trifluoropropenyl)-dUrd, and less potent than E-5-bromovinyl-dUrd. The HSV-1 mutant (B2006) lacking the ability to induce virus-specific thymidine kinase could not be inhibited by E-5-propenyl-dUrd. The binding constants of E-5-propenyl-dUrd to HSV-1, HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus, and human mitochondrial thymidine kinases were established to be 0.2, 6.2, 0.3, and 0.8 microM, respectively. Thymidine phosphorylation catalyzed by human cytosol thymidine kinase could not be inhibited by E-5-propenyl-dUrd at a concentration 10-fold higher than the thymidine in the assay. When thymidine and E-5-propenyl-dUrd were added concomitantly at equal concentrations to virus-infected cells, the antiviral activity was not reversed in HSV-1 and only partially reversed in HSV-2. E-5-Propenyl-dUrd also inhibited the growth of human cells in culture with 50% inhibitory dose of 50 microM. Since this inhibition could be readily reversed by a lower concentration of thymidine, the idea of selective protection is proposed. This approach could avoid the cytotoxic effect of an antiviral agent with properties similar to E-5-propenyl-dUrd without sacrificing antiviral activity.

  5. Human Stem Cell?Derived Endothelial?Hepatic Platform for Efficacy Testing of Vascular?Protective Metabolites from Nutraceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani; Goh, Yeek Teck; Li, Huan; Sinha, Sanjay; Yu, Hanry; Cheung, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis underlies many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Nutraceuticals are emerging as a therapeutic moiety for restoring vascular health. Unlike small?molecule drugs, the complexity of ingredients in nutraceuticals often confounds evaluation of their efficacy in preclinical evaluation. It is recognized that the liver is a vital organ in processing complex compounds into bioactive metabolites. In this work, we developed a coculture system of human pluripotent stem...

  6. Aspirin protects human coronary artery endothelial cells against atherogenic electronegative LDL via an epigenetic mechanism: a novel cytoprotective role of aspirin in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Jie; Chang, Fu-Hsiung; Lu, Jonathan; Huang, Wen-Huei; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2013-07-01

    L5 is the most negatively charged subfraction of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and is the only subfraction of LDL capable of inducing apoptosis in cultured vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by inhibiting fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) transcription. We examined whether plasma L5 levels are elevated in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and whether aspirin provides epigenetic protection of human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) exposed to L5. Plasma L5 levels were compared between patients with STEMI (n = 10) and control subjects with chest pain syndrome but a normal coronary arteriogram (n = 5). L5 was isolated from the plasma of STEMI patients and control subjects, and apoptosis, FGF2 expression, and FGF2 promoter methylation were examined in HCAECs treated with L5 and aspirin. Plasma L5 levels were significantly higher in STEMI patients than in control subjects (P aspirin (0.2 mM) attenuated the adverse effects of L5 on HCAEC survival, FGF2 expression, and FGF2 promoter methylation. In contrast, high concentrations of aspirin (≥1.0 mM) accentuated the effects of L5. Our results show that L5 levels are significantly increased in STEMI patients. Furthermore, L5 impairs HCAEC function through CpG methylation of the FGF2 promoter, which is suppressed in the presence of low-concentration aspirin. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism of aspirin in the prevention of MI.

  7. Rhodiola rosea extract protects human cortical neurons against glutamate and hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death through reduction in the accumulation of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Dora Rita; Occhiuto, Francesco; Spadaro, Federica; Circosta, Clara

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of a titolated extract from Rhodiola rosea L. (RrE) and of salidroside (Sa), one of the major biologically active compounds extracted from this medicinal plant, against oxidative stressor hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and glutamate (GLU)-induced cell apoptosis in a human cortical cell line (HCN 1-A) maintained in culture. The results obtained indicate that exposure of differentiated HCN 1-A neurons to GLU or H₂O₂ resulted in concentration-dependent cell death. A 24 h pre-treatment with RrE significantly increased cell survival and significantly prevented the plasma membrane damage and the morphological disruption caused by GLU or H₂O₂, indicating that neurons treated with RrE were protected from the neurotoxicity induced by the oxidative stressor used. In addition, RrE significantly reduced H₂O₂ or GLU-induced elevation of intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration. The results obtained have also shown that Sa caused similar effects in all experimental models used; however, the potency of the action was lower than that of the extract containing corresponding quantities of Sa. These findings indicate that RrE has a neuroprotective effect in cortical neurons and suggest that the antioxidant activity of the RrE, due to the structural features of the synergic active principles they contain, may be responsible for its ability to stabilize cellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Protective effect of the ultra-filtration extract from Xin Mai Jia on human aortic smooth muscle cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAN, JIA; YIN, YALING; SUN, RUILI; PAN, GUOPIN; LI, PENG; JIA, YANLONG; WAN, GUANGRUI; LIU, ZHANG-SUO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore whether an ultra-filtration extract from Xin Mai Jia (XMJ), a Chinese medicinal formulation, has a protective effect on human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) injury models induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and to consider the mechanism and efficacy of the therapeutic action of XMJ on atherosclerosis. HASMCs were injured by H2O2 and then exposed to various concentrations of XMJ. The morphological changes, growth, proliferation, migration and cytokine release of HASMCs were detected using 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a scratch adhesion test. H2O2 significantly promoted the proliferation of HASMCs. The ultra-filtration extract from XMJ was observed to significantly attenuate the morphological changes of injured HASMCs, reduce the expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and increase the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). XMJ has clear anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, and significantly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HASMCs. PMID:24348756

  9. Interference of silibinin with IGF-1R signalling pathways protects human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells from UVB-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiwei; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Li, Lingzhi; Wang, Qiong; He, Hao; Zang, Linghe; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Xia, Mingyu [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Silibinin protects A431 cells from UVB irradiation-induced apoptosis. ► Up-regulation of the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways by UVB induces cell apoptosis. ► Silibinin inhibits IGF-1R pathways to repress caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet B (UVB) from sunlight is a major cause of cutaneous lesion. Silibinin, a traditional hepatic protectant, elicits protective effects against UVB-induced cellular damage. In A431 cells, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was markedly up-regulated by UVB irradiation. The activation of the IGF-1R signalling pathways contributed to apoptosis of the cells rather than rescuing the cells from death. Up-regulated IGF-1R stimulated downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). The subsequent activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 led to apoptosis. The activation of IGF-1R signalling pathways is the cause of A431 cell death. The pharmacological inhibitors and the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IGF-1R suppressed the downstream activation of JNK/ERK-caspases to help the survival of the UVB-irradiated A431 cells. Indeed, silibinin treatment suppressed the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways and thus protected the cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  10. Protective Effect of D-Limonene against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Damage in Human Lens Epithelial Cells via the p38 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, as mediated by ROS, is a significant factor in initiating the development of age-associated cataracts; D-limonene is a common natural terpene with powerful antioxidative properties which occurs naturally in a wide variety of living organisms. It has been shown to have antioxidant effect; we found that D-limonene can effectively prevent the oxidative damage caused by H2O2 and propose that the main mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of D-limonene is the inhibition of HLECs apoptosis. In the present study, we used confocal-fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry analysis, Hoechst staining, H2DCFDA staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunoblot analysis; the results revealed that slightly higher concentrations of D-limonene (125–1800 μM reduced the H2O2-induced ROS generation and inhibited the H2O2-induced caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation and decreased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Furthermore, it inhibited H2O2-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, we conclude that D-limonene could effectively protect HLECs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and that its antioxidative effect is significant, thereby increasing the cell survival rate.

  11. Long Term Study of Protective Mechanisms of Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cisplatin Induced Kidney injury in Sprague-Daweley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhusseini FM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Long-term evaluation of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and the probable renal protective activities of stem cells are lacking up until now. We evaluated the early and long-term role of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs in prevention or amelioration of cisplatin induced acute kidney injury (AKI in Sprague-Dawley rats. For this, we determined the kidney tissue level of oxidative stress markers in conjugation with a renal histopathological scoring system of both acute and chronic renal changes. Methods: This study used eighty Sprague-Dawley (SD rats weighing 250-300g. They were assigned into four equal groups (each group n=20: (I Negative control group, rats injected with single dose of 1 ml normal saline. (II Positive control cisplatin, rats injected with a single dose of 5 mg/kg I.P in 1 ml saline. (III Cisplatin and culture media group, rats injected with 0.5 ml of culture media single dose into the tail vein and (IV Cisplatin and ADMSCs group, rats injected with a single dose of 0.5 ml of culture media containing 5 x106ADMSCs into the tail vein one day after cisplatin administration. Each main group was further divided according to the timing of sacrifice into four subgroups (each subgroup n=5. Rats in the subgroup A were sacrificed after 4 days; subgroup B were sacrificed after 7 days; subgroup C were sacrificed after 11 days; and subgroup D were sacrificed after 30 days. Before sacrifice, 24 hrs.-urine was collected using a metabolic cage. Renal function was evaluated through blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance. Kidney tissue homogenate oxidative stress parameters, Malondialdehyde (MDA, Superoxide dismutase (SOD and Glutathione (GSH were determined. In addition, histopathological analysis for active injury, regenerative and chronic changes was performed. Results: ADMSCs were characterized and their capability of differentiation was proved. Cisplatin induced a significant

  12. Dragon's blood extracts reduce radiation-induced peripheral blood injury and protects human megakaryocyte cells from GM-CSF withdraw-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Xu, Bing; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Shan, Shuangquan; Ma, Hong; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB), a Chinese traditional herb, was shown to have certain protective effects on radiation-induced bone marrow injury due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. The 50% ethanol extracts (DBE) were separated from DB by the methods of alcohol extracting-water precipitating. The protective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis were studied, particularly on megakaryocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vivo radioprotective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis and pathological changes using an irradiated-mouse model. Moreover, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of DBE on megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro were explored in GM-CSF depletion-induced Mo7e cell model. DBE significantly promoted the recovery of peripheral blood cells in irradiated mice. Histology bone marrow confirmed the protective effect of DBE, as shown by an increased number of hematopoietic cells and a reduction of apoptosis. In a megakaryocytic apoptotic model, DBE (50 µg/mL) markedly alleviated GM-CSF withdrawal-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest of Mo7e cells. DBE (50 µg/mL) also significantly decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 expression, inhibited the active caspase-3 expression. In addition, DBE could induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in GM-CSF-depleted Mo7e cell, but not Akt. Our data demonstrated that DBE could effectively accelerate the recovery of peripheral blood cells, especially platelet. DBE attenuated cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the reduction of active caspase-3 expression. The effect of DBE on Mo7e cells survival and proliferation is likely associated with the activation of ERK, but not Akt. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A recombinant chimeric protein composed of human and mice-specific CD4+and CD8+T-cell epitopes protects against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, V T; Duarte, M C; Lage, D P; Costa, L E; Carvalho, A M R S; Mendes, T A O; Roatt, B M; Menezes-Souza, D; Soto, M; Coelho, E A F

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a recombinant chimeric protein (RCP), which was composed of specific CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell epitopes to murine and human haplotypes, was evaluated as an immunogen against Leishmania infantum infection in a murine model. BALB/c mice received saline were immunized with saponin or with RCP with or without an adjuvant. The results showed that RCP/saponin-vaccinated mice presented significantly higher levels of antileishmanial IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF before and after challenge, which were associated with the reduction of IL-4 and IL-10 mediated responses. These animals showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in all evaluated organs, when both limiting dilution and quantitative real-time PCR techniques were used. In addition, the protected animals presented higher levels of parasite-specific nitrite, as well as the presence of anti-Leishmania IgG2a isotype antibodies. In conclusion, the RCP/saponin vaccine could be considered as a prophylactic alternative to prevent against VL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as a modulator of NF-κB, on proliferation of hypoxia-induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC), and the probable mechanism. Methods: After exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2) for 5 days, cell proliferation and cell cycle of HREC were ...

  15. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  16. Purification of antilisterial peptide (SubtilosinA from novel Bacillus tequilensis FR9 and demonstrate their pathogen invasion protection ability using human carcinoma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Parveen Rani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on isolation, screening and characterization of novel probiotics from gastrointestinal tract of free-range chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus. Fifty seven colonies were isolated and three isolates (FR4, FR9 and FR12 were selected and identified as Lactobacillus gasseri FR4, Bacillus tequilensis FR9 and L. animalis FR12 by 16S rRNA sequencing. Three strains were able to survive in stimulated acidic and bile conditions and inhibit the growth of pathogens. Especially, FR9 exhibited maximum inhibition against Listeria monocytogenes and none of them exhibited hemolytic activity. Native-PAGE revealed the presence of low molecular weight (3.4-5.0 KDa antimicrobial peptide. The peptide was further purified by Sephadex G-50 column and RP-HPLC using C18 column. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of antimicrobial peptide showed 100% consensus to antilisterial peptide SubtilosinA and SboA gene was amplified from FR9 genome. FR9 showed maximum aggregation activity, EPS production (85.46 mg/L and cholesterol assimilation (63.12 ± 0.05 µg/mL. Strong adhesion property (12.6% and pathogen invasion protection ability was revealed by B. tequilensis FR9 towards HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cell line. This is the first study to demonstrate antilisterial SubtilosinA production of B. tequilensis. Our results indicate that B. tequilensis FR9 strain furnish the essential characteristics of a potential probiotics and might be incorporated into human and animal food supplements.

  17. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  18. Resveratrol Protects against TNF-α-Induced Injury in Human Umbilical Endothelial Cells through Promoting Sirtuin-1-Induced Repression of NF-KB and p38 MAPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Resveratrol has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidative stress activities, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis associated with the protective effects of resveratrol on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α-induced injury in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs using a variety of approaches including a cell viability assay, reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunofluorescence staining. We showed that TNF-α induced CD40 expression and ROS production in cultured HUVECs, which were attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Also, resveratrol increased the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1; and repression of SIRT1 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA and the SIRT1 inhibitor Ex527 reduced the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on CD40 expression and ROS generation. In addition, resveratrol downregulated the levels of p65 and phospho-p38 MAPK, but this inhibitory effect was attenuated by the suppression of SIRT1 activity. Moreover, the p38 MAPK inhibitor SD203580 and the nuclear factor (NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC achieved similar repressive effects as resveratrol on TNF-α-induced ROS generation and CD40 expression. Thus, our study provides a mechanistic link between resveratrol and the activation of SIRT1, the latter of which is involved in resveratrol-mediated repression of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway and ROS production in TNF-α-treated HUVECs.

  19. Resveratrol Protects against TNF-α-Induced Injury in Human Umbilical Endothelial Cells through Promoting Sirtuin-1-Induced Repression of NF-KB and p38 MAPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujie; Zhu, Pengli

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Resveratrol has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidative stress activities, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis associated with the protective effects of resveratrol on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced injury in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a variety of approaches including a cell viability assay, reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunofluorescence staining. We showed that TNF-α induced CD40 expression and ROS production in cultured HUVECs, which were attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Also, resveratrol increased the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1); and repression of SIRT1 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and the SIRT1 inhibitor Ex527 reduced the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on CD40 expression and ROS generation. In addition, resveratrol downregulated the levels of p65 and phospho-p38 MAPK, but this inhibitory effect was attenuated by the suppression of SIRT1 activity. Moreover, the p38 MAPK inhibitor SD203580 and the nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) achieved similar repressive effects as resveratrol on TNF-α-induced ROS generation and CD40 expression. Thus, our study provides a mechanistic link between resveratrol and the activation of SIRT1, the latter of which is involved in resveratrol-mediated repression of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway and ROS production in TNF-α-treated HUVECs. PMID:26799794

  20. Ginger Oleoresin Alleviated γ-Ray Irradiation-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species via the Nrf2 Protective Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaihua Ji; Lianying Fang; Hui Zhao; Qing Li; Yang Shi; Chang Xu; Yan Wang; Liqing Du; Jinhan Wang; Qiang Liu

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, it is imperative to search effective radioprotectors for hMSCs. This study was to demonstrate whether natural source ginger oleoresin would mitigate IR-induced injuries in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs...

  1. Sickle cell protection from malaria: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC‘s, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1, whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO. A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from

  2. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and the probable mechanism. Methods: After ... Keywords: Mitochondrial transcription factor A, NF-κB, Hypoxia, Human retinal endothelial cell,. Diabetic retinopathy ..... choice for diabetic retinopathy therapy, as TFAM activity clearly affects the ...

  3. Are pharmaceutical patents protected by human rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millum, J

    2008-11-01

    The International Bill of Rights enshrines a right to health, which includes a right to access essential medicines. This right frequently appears to conflict with the intellectual property regime that governs pharmaceutical patents. However, there is also a human right that protects creative works, including scientific productions. Does this right support intellectual property protections, even when they may negatively affect health? This article examines the recent attempt by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights to resolve this issue and argues that it fails. This is problematic because it means defenders of the present patent regime can continue using human rights documents to support their position. I offer a new framework for resolving the problem by examining the values that underlie human rights.

  4. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  5. DJ-1 Modulates Nuclear Erythroid 2–Related Factor-2–Mediated Protection in Human Primary Alveolar Type II Cells in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmed, Karim; Messier, Elise M.; Zhou, Wenbo; Tuder, Rubin M.; Freed, Curt R.; Chu, Hong Wei; Kelsen, Steven G.; Bowler, Russell P.; Mason, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a main source of oxidative stress and a key risk factor for emphysema, which consists of alveolar wall destruction. Alveolar type (AT) II cells are in the gas exchange regions of the lung. We isolated primary ATII cells from deidentified organ donors whose lungs were not suitable for transplantation. We analyzed the cell injury obtained from nonsmokers, moderate smokers, and heavy smokers. DJ-1 protects cells from oxidative stress and induces nuclear erythroid 2–related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, which activates the antioxidant defense system. In ATII cells isolated from moderate smokers, we found DJ-1 expression by RT-PCR, and Nrf2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 translocation by Western blotting and immunocytofluorescence. In ATII cells isolated from heavy smokers, we detected Nrf2 and HO-1 cytoplasmic localization. Moreover, we found high oxidative stress, as detected by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) (immunoblotting), inflammation by IL-8 and IL-6 levels by ELISA, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay in ATII cells obtained from heavy smokers. Furthermore, we detected early DJ-1 and late Nrf2 expression after ATII cell treatment with CS extract. We also overexpressed DJ-1 by adenovirus construct and found that this restored Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and induced nuclear translocation in heavy smokers. Moreover, DJ-1 overexpression also decreased ATII cell apoptosis caused by CS extract in vitro. Our results indicate that DJ-1 activates the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense system. Furthermore, DJ-1 overexpression can restore the impaired Nrf2 pathway, leading to ATII cell protection in heavy smokers. This suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting DJ-1 in CS-related lung diseases. PMID:27093578

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  7. Criminal and Legal Aspects of Human Life Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Janule

    2012-01-01

    The promotion work "Criminal and Legal Aspects of Human Life Protection" is the first such volume complex theoretical and practical research in Latvia on the legal protection of human life. The main idea of the thesis is the human right for physical existence and human life protection by the Criminal Law. The central idea of the thesis is the human rights to the physical existence from the moment of conception and the life protection with criminally legal instruments, which, fi...

  8. Institutional Mechanisms for Human Rights Protection in Nigeria: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . There are legal and institutional mechanisms for protecting the human rights guaranteed in these constitutions. This paper has focused on the institutional mechanisms for human rights protection in Nigeria. The meaning, features and ...

  9. Medicinal herbs Oenanthe javanica (Blume) DC., Casuarina equisetifolia L. and Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench protect human cells from MPP+ damage via inducing FBXO7 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung-Mei; Chen, I-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Lin; Lin, Te-Hsien; Chen, Wan-Ling; Chao, Chih-Ying; Wu, Yih-Ru; Lu, Yeah-Ting; Lee, Cheng-Yu; Chien, Hong-Chi; Chen, Ting-Shou; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2016-11-15

    The F-box protein 7 (FBXO7) mutations have been identified in families with early-onset parkinsonism and pyramidal tract signs, and designated as PARK15. In addition, FBXO7 mutations were found in typical and young onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Evidence has also shown that FBXO7 plays an important role in the development of dopaminergic neurons and increased stability and overexpression of FBXO7 may be beneficial to PD. We screened extracts of medicinal herbs to enhance FBXO7 expression for neuroprotection in MPP+-treated cells. Promoter reporter assay in HEK-293 cells was used to examine the cis/trans elements controlling FBXO7 expression and to screen extracts of medicinal herbs enhancing FBXO7 expression. MTT assay was performed to assess cell viability of MPP+-treated HEK-293/SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, proteasome activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and FBXO7/TRAF2/GATA2 protein expression were evaluated. We demonstrated that -202--57 region of the FBXO7 promoter is likely to contain sequences that are bound by positive trans protein factors to activate FBXO7 expression and GATA2 is the main trans protein factor enhancing FBXO7 expression. Extracts of medicinal herbs Oenanthe javanica (Blume) DC. (Umbelliferae), Casuarina equisetifolia L. (Casuarinaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Gramineae) improved cell viability of both MPP+-treated HEK-293 and SH-SY5Y cells, rescued proteasome activity in MPP+-treated HEK-293 cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These protection effects of herbal extracts are acting through enhancing FBXO7 and decreasing TRAF2 expression, which is probably mediated by GATA2 induction. Collectively, our study provides new targets, FBXO7 and its regulator GATA2, for the development of potential treatments of PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. The protective effects of carvacrol and thymol against paracetamol-induced toxicity on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabiyik, S S; Karakus, E; Halici, Z; Cadirci, E; Bayir, Y; Ayaz, G; Cinar, I

    2016-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose could induce liver damage and lead to acute liver failure. The treatment of APAP overdoses could be improved by new therapeutic strategies. Thymus spp., which has many beneficial effects and has been used in folk medicine, is one such potential strategy. In the present study, the hepatoprotective activity of the main constituents of Thymus spp., carvacrol and thymol, were evaluated in light of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We hoped to understand the hepatoprotective mechanism of these agents on the antioxidant system and pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Dose-dependent effects of thymol and carvacrol (25, 50, and 100 µM) were tested on cultured HepG2 cells. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) was tested as positive control. We showed that APAP inhibited HepG2 cell growth by inducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Incubating APAP-exposed HepG2 cells with carvacrol and thymol for 24 h ameliorated this inflammation and oxidative stress. We also evaluated alanine transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase levels of HepG2 cells. We found that thymol and carvacrol protected against APAP-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells by increasing antioxidant activity and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β. Taking together high-dose thymol and carvacrol treatment has an effect close to NAC treatment in APAP toxicity, but thymol has better treatment effect than carvacrol. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Ginger Oleoresin Alleviated γ-Ray Irradiation-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species via the Nrf2 Protective Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaihua; Li, Qing; Shi, Yang; Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing

    2017-01-01

    Unplanned exposure to radiation can cause side effects on high-risk individuals; meanwhile, radiotherapies can also cause injury on normal cells and tissues surrounding the tumor. Besides the direct radiation damage, most of the ionizing radiation- (IR-) induced injuries were caused by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), which possess self-renew and multilineage differentiation capabilities, are a critical population of cells to participate in the regeneration of IR-damaged tissues. Therefore, it is imperative to search effective radioprotectors for hMSCs. This study was to demonstrate whether natural source ginger oleoresin would mitigate IR-induced injuries in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We demonstrated that ginger oleoresin could significantly reduce IR-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA strand breaks. In addition, the ROS-scavenging mechanism of ginger oleoresin was also investigated. The results showed that ginger oleoresin could induce the translocation of Nrf2 to cell nucleus and activate the expression of cytoprotective genes encoding for HO-1 and NQO-1. It suggests that ginger oleoresin has a potential role of being an effective antioxidant and radioprotective agent. PMID:29181121

  12. Ginger Oleoresin Alleviated γ-Ray Irradiation-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species via the Nrf2 Protective Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaihua; Fang, Lianying; Zhao, Hui; Li, Qing; Shi, Yang; Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Wang, Jinhan; Liu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Unplanned exposure to radiation can cause side effects on high-risk individuals; meanwhile, radiotherapies can also cause injury on normal cells and tissues surrounding the tumor. Besides the direct radiation damage, most of the ionizing radiation- (IR-) induced injuries were caused by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), which possess self-renew and multilineage differentiation capabilities, are a critical population of cells to participate in the regeneration of IR-damaged tissues. Therefore, it is imperative to search effective radioprotectors for hMSCs. This study was to demonstrate whether natural source ginger oleoresin would mitigate IR-induced injuries in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We demonstrated that ginger oleoresin could significantly reduce IR-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA strand breaks. In addition, the ROS-scavenging mechanism of ginger oleoresin was also investigated. The results showed that ginger oleoresin could induce the translocation of Nrf2 to cell nucleus and activate the expression of cytoprotective genes encoding for HO-1 and NQO-1. It suggests that ginger oleoresin has a potential role of being an effective antioxidant and radioprotective agent.

  13. Ginger Oleoresin Alleviated γ-Ray Irradiation-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species via the Nrf2 Protective Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihua Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned exposure to radiation can cause side effects on high-risk individuals; meanwhile, radiotherapies can also cause injury on normal cells and tissues surrounding the tumor. Besides the direct radiation damage, most of the ionizing radiation- (IR- induced injuries were caused by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, which possess self-renew and multilineage differentiation capabilities, are a critical population of cells to participate in the regeneration of IR-damaged tissues. Therefore, it is imperative to search effective radioprotectors for hMSCs. This study was to demonstrate whether natural source ginger oleoresin would mitigate IR-induced injuries in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs. We demonstrated that ginger oleoresin could significantly reduce IR-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA strand breaks. In addition, the ROS-scavenging mechanism of ginger oleoresin was also investigated. The results showed that ginger oleoresin could induce the translocation of Nrf2 to cell nucleus and activate the expression of cytoprotective genes encoding for HO-1 and NQO-1. It suggests that ginger oleoresin has a potential role of being an effective antioxidant and radioprotective agent.

  14. Protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in persons with repeated exposure: evidence for T cell immunity in the absence of inherited CCR5 coreceptor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, W C; Markee, J; Akridge, R E; Meldorf, M; Musey, L; Karchmer, T; Krone, M; Collier, A; Corey, L; Emerman, M; McElrath, M J

    1999-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection may result from either acquired host immunity, inheritance of a dysfunctional CCR5 HIV-1 coreceptor, or a low or attenuated virus inoculum. Thirty-seven HIV-1-uninfected persons engaging in repeated high-risk sexual activity with an HIV-1-infected partner were prospectively studied to determine the contribution of these factors in protecting against HIV-1 transmission. More than one-third (13/36) demonstrated HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity, and this activity significantly correlated with the wild type CCR5 genotype (P=.03). Only 1 subject (3%) demonstrated the homozygous CCR5 32-bp deletion (Delta32/Delta32). Median plasma HIV-1 RNA levels from 18 HIV-1-infected sex partners were not statistically different from those of matched infected control patients. These results indicate that inheritance of the Delta32 CCR5 mutation does not account for the majority of persistently HIV-1-resistant cases, and the presence of cellular immunity in these persons suggests either undetected infection or protective immunity.

  15. Transplantation of Human Urine-Derived Stem Cells Transfected with Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor to Protect Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiyun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Tao; Han, Dayu; Zhang, Heng; Shi, Yanan; Bian, Jun; Sun, Xiangzhou; Xia, Kai; Liang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Guihua; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Chunhua

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intracavernous injection of urine-derived stem cells (USCs) or USCs genetically modified with pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) could protect the erectile function and cavernous structure in a bilateral cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction (CNIED) rat model. USCs were cultured from the urine of six healthy male donors. Seventy-five rats were randomly divided into five groups ( n = 15 per group): sham, bilateral cavernous nerve (CN) crush injury (BCNI), USC, USCGFP+, and USCGFP/PEDF+ groups. The sham group received only laparotomy without CN crush injury and intracavernous injection with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All of the other groups were subjected to BCNI and intracavernous injection with PBS, USCs, USCsGFP+, or USCsGFP/PEDF+, respectively. The total intracavernous pressure (ICP) and the ratio of ICP to mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP) were recorded. The penile dorsal nerves, the endothelium, and the smooth muscle were assessed within the penile tissue. The USC and USCGFP/PEDF+ groups displayed more significantly enhanced ICP and ICP/MAP ratio ( p cavernous structure by USCsGFP/PEDF+ was associated with an increased number of nNOS-positive fibers within the penile dorsal nerves, improved expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and eNOS) and a smooth muscle marker (smoothelin), an enhanced smooth muscle to collagen ratio, decreased expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and decreased cell apoptosis in the cavernous tissue. The paracrine effect of USCs and USCsGFP/PEDF+ prevented the destruction of erectile function and the cavernous structure in the CNIED rat model by nerve protection, thereby improving endothelial cell function, increasing the smooth muscle content, and decreasing fibrosis and cell apoptosis in the cavernous tissue.

  16. G-CSF protects human brain vascular endothelial cells injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia through MAPK and Akt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Su

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A, cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and Akt

  17. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep R Varma

    Full Text Available Human skin is body's vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF and human keratinocytes (HaCaT were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL, nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2, aquaporin-3 (AQP-3, filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations.

  19. Vitamin D up-regulates the vitamin D receptor by protecting it from proteasomal degradation in human CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina R; Boding, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, has significant immunomodulatory properties and is an important determinant in the differentiation of CD4+ effector T cells. The biological actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and are believed to correlate with the VDR...... protein expression level in a given cell. The aim of this study was to determine if and how 1,25(OH)2D3 by itself regulates VDR expression in human CD4+ T cells. We found that activated CD4+ T cells have the capacity to convert the inactive 25(OH)D3 to the active 1,25(OH)2D3 that subsequently up......-regulates VDR protein expression approximately 2-fold. 1,25(OH)2D3 does not increase VDR mRNA expression but increases the half-life of the VDR protein in activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 induces a significant intracellular redistribution of the VDR. We show that 1,25(OH)2D3 stabilizes the VDR...

  20. Hydroethanolic extracts from different genotypes of açaí (Euterpe oleracea) presented antioxidant potential and protected human neuron-like cells (SH-SY5Y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torma, Priscila do Carmo Marchioro Raupp; Brasil, Allana Von Sulzback; Carvalho, Ana Vânia; Jablonski, André; Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Flôres, Simone Hickmann; Augusti, Paula Rossini; Rios, Alessandro de Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    Fruit breeding programs have resulted in bioactive compounds increase and health effects. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects of the hydroethanolic extracts from six açaí (Euterpe oleracea) genotypes using ABTS, deoxyribose, and glutathione oxidation assays, as well as, SH-SY5Y cells insulted with H2O2. L22P13 genotype showed the highest total content of anthocyanins, while L06P13 showed a high content of total carotenoids. However, the genotypes showed no difference in the antioxidant activity by ABTS and deoxyribose assays. The hydroethanolic extracts from different genotypes of açaí showed a protective effect (13-62%) on SH-SY5Y cells insulted by H2O2 at a concentration of 50μg/mL by DCFH-DA assay. Except L04P16, no genotypes showed cytotoxicity in the SRB assay. These results indicate that açaí genotypes have antioxidant effect against reactive species generated in SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of the hydroethanolic extracts from these fruits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fruits and vegetables protect against the genotoxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines activated by human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes expressed in immortal mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, K L; Edenharder, R; Aderhold, S; Muckel, E; Glatt, H

    2010-12-21

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) can be formed during the cooking of meat and fish at elevated temperatures and are associated with an increased risk for cancer. On the other hand, epidemiological findings suggest that foods rich in fruits and vegetables can protect against cancer. In the present study three teas, two wines, and the juices of 15 fruits and 11 vegetables were investigated for their protective effect against the genotoxic effects of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). To closely mimic the enzymatic activation of these HAAs in humans, genetically engineered V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts were employed that express human cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (hCYP) 1A2 (responsible for the first step of enzymatic activation) and human N(O)-acetyltransferase (hNAT) 2*4 or human sulfotransferase (hSULT)1A1*1 (responsible for the second step of enzymatic activation): V79-hCYP1A2-hNAT2*4 for IQ activation and V79-hCYP1A2-hSULT1A1*1 for PhIP activation. HAA genotoxicity was determined by use of the comet assay. Black, green and rooibos tea moderately reduced the genotoxicity of IQ (IC(50)=0.8-0.9%), whereas red and white wine were less active. From the fruit juices, sweet cherry juice exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on IQ genotoxicity (IC(50)=0.17%), followed by juices from kiwi fruit, plum and blueberry (IC(50)=0.48-0.71%). The juices from watermelon, blackberry, strawberry, black currant, and Red delicious apple showed moderate suppression, whereas sour cherry, grapefruit, red currant, and pineapple juices were only weakly active. Granny Smith apple juice and orange juice proved inactive. Of the vegetable juices, strong inhibition of IQ genotoxicity was only seen with spinach and onion juices (IC(50)=0.42-0.54%). Broccoli, cauliflower, beetroot, sweet pepper, tomato, chard, and red-cabbage juices suppressed IQ genotoxicity only moderately, whereas cucumber juice was

  2. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Immunoregulatory mechanisms and CD4-CD8- (double negative) T cell subpopulations in human cutaneous leishmaniasis: a balancing act between protection and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollob, Kenneth J.; Antonelli, Lis R. V.; Faria, Daniela R.; Keesen, Tatjana S.L.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular immune responses directed against protozoan parasites are key for controlling pathogen replication and disease resolution. However, an uncontrolled, or improperly controlled, response can be deleterious to the host in terms of both allowing for the establishment of pathology, as well as less effective establishment of memory responses. Human cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease caused by the infection with Leishmania spp. following a bite from the sandfly, the natural vector of this disease. Tens of millions worldwide are currently infected with Leishmania and no effective vaccines have been developed to date. In the face of the complexity presented by the interaction between a host (humans) with the parasite, Leishmania, and the fact that this parasite is inoculated by another complex, biologically active, vector, the sandfly, it is clearly important to study the immunoregulatory mechanisms that are induced in humans naturally infected by this parasite if we hope to develop effective vaccines and immunotherapeutic treatments in the future. Our laboratory has focused over the years on the study of the local and systemic T cell response during the first episode of cutaneous leishmaniasis suffered by individuals before they undergo antimony treatment. The goal of this review is to briefly outline our findings with hopes of putting our most recent studies concerning the dichotomy between alpha/beta TCR and gamma/delta TCR expressing, CD4- CD8- (double negative-DN) T cells in the context of a balanced immune response against Leishmania and to discuss the implications of these findings toward our understanding of human leishmaniasis. PMID:18687296

  5. Melatonin signaling and cell protection function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Francesca; Canonico, Barbara; Betti, Michele; Arcangeletti, Marcella; Pilolli, Francesca; Piroddi, Marta; Canesi, Laura; Papa, Stefano; Galli, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Besides its well-known regulatory role on circadian rhythm, the pineal gland hormone melatonin has other biological functions and a distinct metabolism in various cell types and peripheral tissues. In different tissues and organs, melatonin has been described to act as a paracrine and also as an intracrine and autocrine agent with overall homeostatic functions and pleiotropic effects that include cell protection and prosurvival factor. These latter effects, documented in a number of in vitro and in vivo studies, are sustained through both receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms that control detoxification and stress response genes, thus conferring protection against a number of xenobiotics and endobiotics produced by acute and chronic noxious stimuli. Redox-sensitive components are included in the cell protection signaling of melatonin and in the resulting transcriptional response that involves the control of NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2. By these pathways, melatonin stimulates the expression of antioxidant and detoxification genes, acting in turn as a glutathione system enhancer. A further and converging mechanism of cell protection by this indoleamine described in different models seems to lie in the control of damage and signaling function of mitochondria that involves decreased production of reactive oxygen species and activation of the antiapoptotic and redox-sensitive element Bcl2. Recent evidence suggests that upstream components in this mitochondrial route include the calmodulin pathway with its central role in melatonin signaling and the survival-promoting component of MAPKs, ERK1/2. In this review article, we will discuss these and other molecular aspects of melatonin signaling relevant to cell protection and survival mechanisms.

  6. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  7. Lysine demethylase inhibition protects pancreatic β cells from apoptosis and improves β-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Andersson, Jan Legaard; Bacos, Karl

    2018-01-01

    ) protects β cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and reduces type 1 diabetes incidence in animals. We hypothesized that also lysine demethylases (KDMs) regulate β-cell fate in response to inflammatory stress. Expression of the demethylase Kdm6B was upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines suggesting...... a possible role in inflammation-induced β-cell destruction. Inhibition of KDM6 demethylases using the selective inhibitor GSK-J4 protected insulin-producing cells and human and mouse islets from cytokine-induced apoptosis by blunting nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress...

  8. Protective effects of TRH and its analogues against various cytotoxic agents in retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska-Feil, L; Jantas, D; Leskiewicz, M; Budziszewska, B; Kubera, M; Basta-Kaim, A; Lipkowski, A W; Lason, W

    2010-12-01

    TRH (thyroliberin) and its analogues were reported to possess neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal experimental models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we evaluated effects of TRH and its three stable analogues, montirelin (CG-3703), RGH-2202 and Z-TRH (N-(carbobenzyloxy)-pGlutamyl-Histydyl-Proline) on the neuronally differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, which is widely accepted for studying potential neuroprotectants. We found that TRH and all the tested analogues at concentrations 0.1-50 μM attenuated cell damage induced by MPP(+) (2 mM), 3-nitropropionate (10 mM), hydrogen peroxide (0.5 mM), homocysteine (250 μM) and beta-amyloid (20μM) in retinoic acid differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TRH and its analogues decreased the staurosporine (0.5 μM)-induced LDH release, caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation, which indicate the anti-apoptotic proprieties of these peptides. The neuroprotective effects of TRH (10 μM) and RGH-2202 (10 μM) on St-induced cell death was attenuated by inhibitors of PI3-K pathway (wortmannin and LY294002), but not MAPK/ERK1/2 (PD98059 and U0126). Moreover, TRH and its analogues at neuroprotective concentrations (1 and 10 μM) increased expression of Bcl-2 protein, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. All in all, these results extend data on neuroprotective properties of TRH and its analogues and provide evidence that mechanism of anti-apoptotic effects of these peptides in SH-SY5Y cell line involves induction of PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the data obtained on human cell line with a dopaminergic phenotype suggest potential utility of TRH and its analogues in the treatment of some neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  10. Specifying and protecting germ cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strome, Susan; Updike, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Germ cells are the special cells in the body that undergo meiosis to generate gametes and subsequently entire new organisms after fertilization, a process that continues generation after generation. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the factors and mechanisms that specify germ cell fate, including the partitioning of maternally supplied ‘germ plasm’, inheritance of epigenetic memory and expression of transcription factors crucial for primordial germ cell (PGC) development. Even after PGCs are specified, germline fate is labile and thus requires protective mechanisms, such as global transcriptional repression, chromatin state alteration and translation of only germline-appropriate transcripts. Findings from diverse species continue to provide insights into the shared and divergent needs of these special reproductive cells. PMID:26122616

  11. Elevated glutathione level does not protect against chronic alcohol mediated apoptosis in recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A over-expressing alcohol metabolizing enzymes--alcohol dehydrogenase and Cytochrome P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2011-06-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol leads to liver injury. Ethanol-inducible Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) plays a critical role in alcohol mediated oxidative stress due to its ability to metabolize ethanol. In the present study, using the recombinant human hepatoma cell line VL-17A that over-expresses the alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and CYP2E1; and control HepG2 cells, the mechanism and mode of cell death due to chronic ethanol exposure were studied. Untreated VL-17A cells exhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress when compared with untreated HepG2 cells. Chronic alcohol exposure, i.e., 100 mM ethanol treatment for 72 h caused a significant decrease in viability (47%) in VL-17A cells but not in HepG2 cells. Chronic ethanol mediated cell death in VL-17A cells was predominantly apoptotic, with increased oxidative stress as the underlying mechanism. Chronic ethanol exposure of VL-17A cells resulted in 1.1- to 2.5-fold increased levels of ADH and CYP2E1. Interestingly, the level of the antioxidant GSH was found to be 3-fold upregulated in VL-17A cells treated with ethanol, which may be a metabolic adaptation to the persistent and overwhelming oxidative stress. In conclusion, the increased GSH level may not be sufficient enough to protect VL-17A cells from chronic alcohol mediated oxidative stress and resultant apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. TH17 cells in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency: protective or pathogenic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish eMarwaha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2005 a newly discovered T helper cell subset that secreted interleukin (IL-17 became the center of attention in immunology. Initial studies painted Th17 cells as the culprit for destruction caused in many different autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Subsequently, the discovery of patients with primary immunodeficiencies in the IL-17 pathway taught us that Th17 cells have a critical role in defense against certain fungal and bacterial infections. Moreover, the paradoxical exacerbation of Crohn’s disease in the clinical trials of a Secukiumab (AIN457, a fully human neutralizing antibody to IL-17A, has cast into doubt a universal pro-inflammatory and harmful role for Th17 cells. Evidence now suggests that depending on the environment Th17 cell can alter their differentiation program, ultimately giving rise to either protective or pro-inflammatory cells. In this review will summarize the evidence from patients with immunodeficiencies, autoimmune, or auto-inflammatory disease that teaches us how the pro-inflammatory versus protective function of Th17 cells varies within the context of different human diseases.

  13. Leaf extracts from Teucrium ramosissimum protect against DNA damage in human lymphoblast cell K562 and enhance antioxidant, antigenotoxic and antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier, Mohamed Ben; Ismail, Manel Ben; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-06-01

    The in vitro antioxidant, antigenotoxic and antiproliferative activities of Teucrium ramosissimum extracts were investigated. The antioxidant activities of the tested extracts were evaluated through three chemical assays: The Cupric reducing antioxidant capacity, the reducing power and the ferric reducing antioxidant power. TR1 fraction from methanol extract showed the best antioxidant activity evaluated by the CUPRAC, RP and FRAP assays with TEAC values of 4.04, 1.77 and 1.48μM respectively compared to control. Yet, TR2 fraction exhibited the lowest antioxidant effect with a TEAC values of 1.97, 0.408 and 0.35μM respectively. All the tested extracts were also found to be effective in protecting plasmid DNA against the strand breakage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, the effects of T. ramosissimum extracts on cell proliferation were also examined. The cytotoxic study revealed that methanol extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells (IC50=150μg/mL). The antigenotoxic properties of these extracts were investigated by assessing the induction and inhibition of the genotoxicity induced by the direct-acting mutagen, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), using an eukaryotic system; the "Comet assay." The results showed that all the extracts inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2, and particularly TR2 fraction (96.99%) and methanol extract (96.64%). The present study has demonstrated that T. ramosissimum extract possess potent antioxidant, antiproliferative and antigenotoxic activities, which could be derived from compounds such as flavonoids and polyphenols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Puerarin protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced injury of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells via downregulating alpha-hemolysin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng; Li, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Yong-Hua; Li, Zhe; Tang, Yu-Shun; Kou, Xu; Wang, Shu-De; Bao, Min; Qu, Lian-Da; Li, Min; Li, Bing

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-hemolysin, a secreted pore-forming toxin, plays an indispensable role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of puerarin against S. aureus was investigated; as a result, puerarin showed no influence on the growth of this organism. However, hemolysis and western blotting assays showed that puerarin concentration dependently inhibited the secretion of alpha-hemolysin at low concentrations. Real-time RT-PCR assay was further employed to evaluate the transcriptional level of hla, the gene encoding alpha-hemolysin, and RNAIII, an effector molecule of the agr system. The results indicated that the RNAIII expression and subsequent hla transcription were also inhibited by puerarin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, puerarin significantly prevented human alveolar epithelial A549 cells from S. aureus-induced injury. Thereby, puerarin may be considered as a potential candidate for the development of antivirulence drugs in the treatment of S. aureus-mediated infections.

  15. Lycopene protects human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced death via inhibition of oxidative stress and mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    FENG, CHUNSHENG; LUO, TIANFEI; ZHANG, SHUYAN; LIU, KAI; ZHANG, YANHONG; LUO, YINAN; GE, PENGFEI

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common pathway that results in neuronal injury or death due to various types of pathological stress. Although lycopene has been identified as a potent antioxidant, its effect on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage remains unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with lycopene was observed to protect SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced death via inhibition of apoptosis resulting from activation of caspase-3 and translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. Furthermore, the over-produced ROS, as well as the reduced activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were demonstrated to be alleviated by lycopene. Additionally, lycopene counteracted H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, attenuation of the decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of the increase of Bax and decrease of Bcl-2 levels within the mitochondria. The release of cytochrome c and AIF from the mitochondria was also reduced. These results indicate that lycopene is a potent neuroprotectant against apoptosis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and could be administered to prevent neuronal injury or death. PMID:27035331

  16. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  17. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  18. The protective effect of soybean phytochemicals on androgen responsive human prostate cancer cells LNCaP is likely mediated through modulation of hormone/cytokine-dependent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population studies suggested that the consumption of a soy rich diet provides protective effects against several chronic diseases including prostate cancer. However, the active components in soy, as well as the mechanisms of action of soy’s protective effects, remain unclear. It would be important t...

  19. Human physiology as the determining factor in protective clothing design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Protective clothing is designed to protect humans against risks like fire, chemicals or blunt impact. Although protect¡ve clothing diminishes the effects of external risks, it may hinder people in functioning and it may also introduce new (internal) risks. Manufacturers are often not aware of the

  20. Leaf and root extracts of Moricandia arvensis protect against DNA damage in human lymphoblast cell K562 and enhance antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2010-07-01

    Four extracts were prepared from the roots and leaves of Moricandia arvensis: root chloroform extract (ChlR), leaf chloroform extract (ChlL), root ethyl acetate extract (EAR) and leaf ethyl acetate extract (EAL). The genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of these extracts were investigated by assessing the induction and inhibition of the genotoxicity induced by the direct-acting mutagen, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), using the "Comet assay." It appears that none of the different extracts produces a genotoxic effect, except the highest tested concentrations of the leaf extracts which were capable to eliciting DNA damage. Human lymphoblast cells K562 were pretreated with different concentrations of each extracts and then treated by H(2)O(2), for the antigenotoxic study. The results showed that all extracts inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H(2)O(2) and particularly ChlR (42.5μg/ml) and ChlL (65μg/ml) extracts. In addition, antioxidant potential study of root and leaf extracts using different antioxidant tests indicated that root extracts possess a potent antioxidant activity through namely their capacity to transfer electrons. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. β-Amyloid1-42, HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection and drugs of abuse induced degeneration in human neuronal cells and protective effects of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera and its constituent Withanolide A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' (ASH is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is paucity of data on potential neuroprotective effects of ASH against β-Amyloid (1-42 (Aβ induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of Methanol: Chloroform (3:1 extract of ASH and its constituent Withanolide A (WA against Aβ induced toxicity, HIV-1(Ba-L (clade B infection and the effects of drugs of abuse using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Aβ when tested individually, induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by increased trypan blue stained cells. However, when ASH was added to Aβ treated cells the toxic effects were neutralized. This observation was supported by cellular localization of Aβ, MTT formazan exocytosis, and the levels of acetylcholinesterase activity, confirming the chemopreventive or protective effects of ASH against Aβ induced toxicity. Further, the levels of MAP2 were significantly increased in cells infected with HIV-1(Ba-L (clade B as well as in cells treated with Cocaine (COC and Methamphetamine (METH compared with control cells. In ASH treated cells the MAP2 levels were significantly less compared to controls. Similar results were observed in combination experiments. Also, WA, a purified constituent of ASH, showed same pattern using MTT assay as a parameter. These results suggests that neuroprotective properties of ASH observed in the present study may provide some explanation for the ethnopharmacological uses of ASH in traditional medicine for cognitive and other HIV associated neurodegenerative disorders and further ASH could be a potential novel drug to

  2. β-Amyloid1-42, HIV-1Ba-L (clade B) infection and drugs of abuse induced degeneration in human neuronal cells and protective effects of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) and its constituent Withanolide A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao Venkata; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. Withania somnifera (WS) also known as 'ashwagandha' (ASH) is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is paucity of data on potential neuroprotective effects of ASH against β-Amyloid (1-42) (Aβ) induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of Methanol: Chloroform (3:1) extract of ASH and its constituent Withanolide A (WA) against Aβ induced toxicity, HIV-1(Ba-L) (clade B) infection and the effects of drugs of abuse using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Aβ when tested individually, induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by increased trypan blue stained cells. However, when ASH was added to Aβ treated cells the toxic effects were neutralized. This observation was supported by cellular localization of Aβ, MTT formazan exocytosis, and the levels of acetylcholinesterase activity, confirming the chemopreventive or protective effects of ASH against Aβ induced toxicity. Further, the levels of MAP2 were significantly increased in cells infected with HIV-1(Ba-L) (clade B) as well as in cells treated with Cocaine (COC) and Methamphetamine (METH) compared with control cells. In ASH treated cells the MAP2 levels were significantly less compared to controls. Similar results were observed in combination experiments. Also, WA, a purified constituent of ASH, showed same pattern using MTT assay as a parameter. These results suggests that neuroprotective properties of ASH observed in the present study may provide some explanation for the ethnopharmacological uses of ASH in traditional medicine for cognitive and other HIV associated neurodegenerative disorders and further ASH could be a potential novel drug to reduce

  3. A single, low dose of a cGMP recombinant BCG vaccine elicits protective T cell immunity against the human respiratory syncytial virus infection and prevents lung pathology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Pablo F; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rivera, Claudia A; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a major health burden worldwide, causing the majority of hospitalizations in children under two years old due to bronchiolitis and pneumonia. HRSV causes year-to-year outbreaks of disease, which also affects the elderly and immunocompromised adults. Furthermore, both hRSV morbidity and epidemics are explained by a consistently high rate of re-infections that take place throughout the patient life. Although significant efforts have been invested worldwide, currently there are no licensed vaccines to prevent hRSV infection. Here, we describe that a recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine expressing the nucleoprotein (N) of hRSV formulated under current good manufacture practices (cGMP rBCG-N-hRSV) confers protective immunity to the virus in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the GMP rBCG-N-hRSV vaccine retains its capacity to protect mice against a challenge with a disease-causing infection of 1×107 plaque-forming units (PFUs) of the hRSV A2 clinical strain 13018-8. Compared to unimmunized infected controls, vaccinated mice displayed reduced weight loss and less infiltration of neutrophils within the airways, as well as reduced viral loads in bronchoalveolar lavages, parameters that are characteristic of hRSV infection in mice. Also, ex vivo re-stimulation of splenic T cells at 28days post-immunization activated a repertoire of T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-17, which further suggest that the rBCG-N-hRSV vaccine induced a mixed, CD8+ and CD4+ T cell response capable of both restraining viral spread and preventing damage of the lungs. All these features support the notion that rBCG-N-hRSV is a promising candidate vaccine to be used in humans to prevent the disease caused by hRSV in the susceptible population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.

  5. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins.

  6. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  7. Inactivation of p53 and of pRb protects human colorectal carcinoma cells against hyperthermia-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, C.; van der Maat, B.; Ceha, H. M.; Franken, N. A.; Haveman, J.; Bakker, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints are thought to govern the cellular response to external stimuli. The involvement of the p53 tumour-suppressor protein and the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in the cell-cycle checkpoint in G1 phase is well established. However, little is known about the importance of these G1

  8. Quantification and Purification of Mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L. Cultivars and Its Protective Effect on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells under H2O2-induced Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunsong Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L. cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM fruit (7.49 mg/g DW. Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC. Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC under H2O2-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H2O2 stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  9. Quantification and purification of mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars and its protective effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells under H(2)O(2)-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fenglei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yuqin; Hu, Guibing; Huang, Guodi; Zhang, Jiukai; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2012-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM) fruit (7.49 mg/g DW). Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH(•) free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc) or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) under H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H(2)O(2) stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  10. Quantification and Purification of Mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cultivars and Its Protective Effect on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells under H2O2-induced Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fenglei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yuqin; Hu, Guibing; Huang, Guodi; Zhang, Jiukai; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2012-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM) fruit (7.49 mg/g DW). Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH• free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc) or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) under H2O2-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H2O2 stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:23109851

  11. Exosomes from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hiPSC-MSCs Protect Liver against Hepatic Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury via Activating Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingdong Du

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exosomes produced by human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Exosomes derived from hiPSC-MSCs were isolated and characterized both biochemically and biophysically. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo were injected systemically into a murine ischemia/reperfusion injury model via the inferior vena cava, and then the therapeutic effects were evaluated. The serum levels of transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT, as well as histological changes were examined. Primary hepatocytes and human hepatocyte cell line HL7702 were used to test whether exosomes could induce hepatocytes proliferation in vitro. In addition, the expression levels of proliferation markers (proliferation cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; Phosphohistone-H3, PHH3 were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, SK inhibitor (SKI-II and S1P1 receptor antagonist (VPC23019 were used to investigate the role of sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate-dependent pathway in the effects of hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatocytes. Results: hiPSCs were efficiently induced into hiPSC-MSCs that had typical MSC characteristics. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo had diameters ranging from 100 to 200 nm and expressed exosome markers (Alix, CD63 and CD81. After hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration, hepatocyte necrosis and sinusoidal congestion were markedly suppressed in the ischemia/reperfusion injury model, with lower histopathological scores. The levels of hepatocyte injury markers AST and ALT were significantly lower in the treatment group compared to control, and the expression levels of proliferation markers (PCNA and PHH3 were greatly induced after hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration. Moreover, hiPSC-MSCs-Exo also induced primary hepatocytes and HL7702 cells proliferation in vitro in a dose

  12. Protective Effect of Modified Human Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether modified acidic fibroblast growth factor (MaFGF) can protect NRK52E cell against apoptotic death induced by actinomycin D (Act D) and the effect of MaFGF on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Methods: NRK52E cell apoptotic death was measured by several methods including cell morphologic ...

  13. Child protection from trafficking in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Žegarac Nevenka

    2005-01-01

    Trafficking in children is particularly severe form of exploitation and breach of the children rights, while security and welfare of children that are exposed to trafficking are obligations of state authorities, services and organizations of civil society. System of protection and support to children victims of trafficking should contain following: criteria for proper identification of child-victim of trafficking, mechanisms for immediate referring of a child to specialized services, procedur...

  14. Child protection from trafficking in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žegarac Nevenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in children is particularly severe form of exploitation and breach of the children rights, while security and welfare of children that are exposed to trafficking are obligations of state authorities, services and organizations of civil society. System of protection and support to children victims of trafficking should contain following: criteria for proper identification of child-victim of trafficking, mechanisms for immediate referring of a child to specialized services, procedures for appointing a guardian who will secure that procedures and decisions are in accordance with the best interest of child, measures for regulating of residential status, assistance with reparation and reintegration as well as measures for protection of children witnesses and victims of trafficking. Finally, it should include a proper access to justice. In the article, recommendations are proposed for improvement of identification system, proper evaluation of needs and planning services and protection measures as well as measures and activities which should secure long term solutions in accordance with rights of the child and her/his best interests.

  15. Polyphenolics from açaí ( Euterpe oleracea Mart.) and red muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia ) protect human umbilical vascular Endothelial cells (HUVEC) from glucose- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and target microRNA-126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2011-07-27

    Endothelial anti-inflammatory effects of açaí (Ac) and red muscadine grape (Gp) polyphenolics have not been extensively investigated. It was hypothesized that polyphenolics from Ac and Gp exert comparable protective effects in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) upon inflammatory stress. Furthermore, this study investigated whether microRNAs relevant to endothelial function might be regulated by Ac and Gp. Results showed that Ac and Gp (5-20 mg gallic acid equivalent/L) protected HUVEC against glucose-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Glucose-induced expression of interleukin-6 and -8 was down-regulated by Ac and Gp at mRNA and protein levels. Upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 μg/L)-induced inflammation, Ac and Gp inhibited gene expression of adhesion molecules and NF-κB activation to similar extents, although Gp was more effective in decreasing PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein. Of the screened microRNAs, only microRNA-126 expression was found to be modulated by Ac and Gp as the underlying mechanism to inhibit gene and protein expression of VCAM-1.

  16. Retinoic acid protects human breast cancer cells against etoposide-induced apoptosis by NF-kappaB-dependent but cIAP2-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gronemeyer Hinrich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinoids, through their cognate nuclear receptors, exert potent effects on cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis, and have significant promise for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. These ligands can determine the ultimate fate of target cells by stimulating or repressing gene expression directly, or indirectly through crosstalking with other signal transducers. Results Using different breast cancer cell models, we show here that depending on the cellular context retinoids can signal either towards cell death or cell survival. Indeed, retinoids can induce the expression of pro-apoptotic (i.e. TRAIL, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, Apo2L/TNFSF10 and anti-apoptotic (i.e. cIAP2, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 genes. Promoter mapping, gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that retinoids induce the expression of this gene mainly through crosstalk with NF-kappaB. Supporting this crosstalk, the activation of NF-kappaB by retinoids in T47D cells antagonizes the apoptosis triggered by the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide, camptothecin or doxorubicin. Notably apoptosis induced by death ligands (i.e. TRAIL or antiFAS is not antagonized by retinoids. That knockdown of cIAP2 expression by small interfering RNA does not alter the inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis by retinoids in T47D cells reveals that stimulation of cIAP2 expression is not the cause of their anti-apoptotic action. However, ectopic overexpression of a NF-kappaB repressor increases apoptosis by retinoids moderately and abrogates almost completely the retinoid-dependent inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis. Our data exclude cIAP2 and suggest that retinoids target other regulator(s of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway to induce resistance to etoposide on certain breast cancer cells. Conclusions This study shows an important role for the NF-kappaB pathway in retinoic acid signaling and retinoic acid-mediated resistance to

  17. Human rights protection under the FDRE and the Oromia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper makes a comparative analysis of human rights protection as provided under the 1995 Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopian Constitution (FDRE Constitution) and the 2001 Oromia Regional State Revised Constitution with its amendments (OromiaConstitution). Guided by the principle of a better protection of ...

  18. Protective effect of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 on inflammatory cytokine response to brominated diphenyl ether-47 in the HTR-8/SVneo human first trimester extravillous trophoblast cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Ryung, E-mail: heaven@umich.edu; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-11-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardants, and BDE-47 is a prevalent PBDE congener detected in human tissues. Exposure to PBDEs has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans. Although the underlying mechanisms of adverse birth outcomes are poorly understood, critical roles for oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated. The present study investigated antioxidant responses in a human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, and examined the role of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidative transcription factor, in BDE-47-induced inflammatory responses in the cells. Treatment of HTR-8/SVneo cells with 5, 10, 15, and 20 μM BDE-47 for 24 h increased intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels compared to solvent control. Treatment of HTR-8/SVneo cells with 20 μM BDE-47 for 24 h induced the antioxidant response element (ARE) activity, indicating Nrf2 transactivation by BDE-47 treatment, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes compared to solvent control. Pretreatment with tert-butyl hydroquinone (tBHQ) or sulforaphane, known Nrf2 inducers, reduced BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release with increased ARE reporter activity, reduced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) reporter activity, increased GSH production, and stimulated expression of antioxidant genes compared to non-Nrf2 inducer pretreated groups, suggesting that Nrf2 may play a protective role against BDE-47-mediated inflammatory responses in HTR-8/SVneo cells. These results suggest that Nrf2 activation significantly attenuated BDE-47-induced IL-6 release by augmentation of cellular antioxidative system via upregulation of Nrf2 signaling pathways, and that Nrf2 induction may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with toxicant-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. - Highlights: • BDE-47 stimulated ARE reporter activity and GSH production. • BDE-47 resulted in differential

  19. Protection of cumulus cells following dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, San-Nung; Li, Chia-Jung; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Tsui, Kuan-Hao

    2017-02-01

    Growing studies have demonstrated that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may improve fertility outcomes in poor ovarian responders (PORs). The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and cumulus cell (CC) expression before and after DHEA treatment in PORs undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. Six patients with poor ovarian response were enrolled in the study according to Bologna criteria. DHEA was supplied at least 2 months before patients entered into the next IVF cycle. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in CCs was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity of CCs was assessed by cell counting kit-8 assay. Metaphase II oocytes, maturation rate, embryos at Day 3, and fertilization rate significantly increased following DHEA treatment. Expression of cytochrome c, caspase 9, and caspase 3 genes in CCs were significantly reduced after DHEA therapy. Additionally, increased mitochondrial activity of CCs was observed following DHEA supplementation. DHEA supplementation may protect CCs via improved mitochondrial activity and decreased apoptosis, leading to better clinical outcomes in PORs.

  20. Protection of Brain Injury by Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Secreted Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, Francesca; Brunelli, Laura; Romele, Pietro; Silini, Antonietta; Sammali, Eliana; Paracchini, Lara; Marchini, Sergio; Talamini, Laura; Bigini, Paolo; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Pastorelli, Roberta; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Parolini, Ornella; Zanier, Elisa R

    2016-11-01

    To define the features of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell secretome and its protective properties in experimental models of acute brain injury. Prospective experimental study. Laboratory research. C57Bl/6 mice. Mice subjected to sham or traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact received human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or phosphate-buffered saline infused intracerebroventricularly or intravenously 24 hours after injury. Organotypic cortical brain slices exposed to ischemic injury by oxygen-glucose deprivation were treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or with their secretome (conditioned medium) in a transwell system. Traumatic brain injured mice receiving human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells intravenously or intracerebroventricularly showed early and lasting functional and anatomical brain protection. cortical slices injured by oxigen-glucose deprivation and treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or conditioned medium showed comparable protective effects (neuronal rescue, promotion of M2 microglia polarization, induction of trophic factors) indicating that the exposure of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells to the injured tissue is not necessary for the release of bioactive factors. Using sequential size-exclusion and gel-filtration chromatography, we identified a conditioned medium subfraction, which specifically displays these highly protective properties and we found that this fraction was rich in bioactive molecules with molecular weight smaller than 700 Da. Quantitative RNA analysis and mass spectrometry-based peptidomics showed that the active factors are not proteins or RNAs. The metabolomic profiling of six metabolic classes identified a list of molecules whose abundance was selectively elevated in the active conditioned medium fraction. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted factors protect the brain after acute injury. Importantly, a fraction rich in metabolites, and

  1. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  2. First characterization of bioactive components in soybean tempe that protect human and animal intestinal cells against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Schols, H.A.; Nout, M.J.R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Tempe extracts can inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to intestinal cells and thereby can play a role in controlling ETEC-induced diarrhea. The component responsible for this adhesion inhibition activity is still unknown. This research describes the purification and

  3. First characterization of bioactive components in soybean tempe that protect human and animal intestinal cells against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, Petra J; Schols, Henk A; Nout, M J Rob; Zwietering, Marcel H; Gruppen, Harry

    2010-07-14

    Tempe extracts can inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to intestinal cells and thereby can play a role in controlling ETEC-induced diarrhea. The component responsible for this adhesion inhibition activity is still unknown. This research describes the purification and partial characterization of this bioactive component of tempe. After heating, defatting, and protease treatment, the extracts were found to remain active. However, after treatment with polysaccharide-degrading enzyme mixtures the bioactivity was lost. Ultrafiltration revealed the active component to be >30 kDa. Further purification of the bioactive tempe extracts yielded an active fraction with an increased carbohydrate content of higher arabinose content than the nonactive fractions. In conclusion, the bioactive component contains arabinose and originates from the arabinan or arabinogalactan side chain of the pectic cell wall polysaccharides of the soybeans, which is probably released or formed during fermentation by enzymatic modifications.

  4. Progress in the international protection of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Keith

    2002-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the international protection of human rights since 10 December 1948 (when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights). Amidst the doom and gloom of the media's reporting of current affairs, it is easy to overlook this progress. This article provides a definition of 'human rights' and examines early human rights campaigns. It then considers the areas of progress: human rights are now part of the international political vocabulary, there is a recognition that respect for human rights can assist a country's economic and social development, there has been a growth of human rights treaties and techniques and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) see protecting human rights as a major activity. State sovereignty has been eroded as national governments are being held accountable to the international community for their human rights policies. A new challenge is to ensure respect for human rights by non-state entities, such as transnational corporations. The growing culture of international protection of human rights is here to stay. This is not a reason for complacency, but it is a sign of hope.

  5. Protective effect of Xin Mai Jia ultrafiltration extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide and the effect on the NO-cGMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    YIN, YALING; WAN, JIA; LI, PENG; JIA, YANLONG; SUN, RUILI; PAN, GUOPIN; WAN, GUANGRUI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of the ultrafiltration extract of Xin Mai Jia (XMJ) on a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), by providing experimental data to investigate the mechanism and efficacy underlying the therapeutic effects on atherosclerosis. HUVECs were first injured by H2O2 and then varying final concentrations of the Chinese herb extract were added. Effects of the XMJ extract on morphology, activity, monolayer permeability, biochemical indicators, cytokines, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein content and eNOS gene expression in the HUVECs were analyzed. H2O2 significantly promoted HUVEC injury. The XMJ ultrafiltration extract significantly improved the morphological changes in the injured HUVECs. In addition, XMJ treatment increased cell activity and decreased monolayer permeability. The expression levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1 and -6 and nuclear factor-κB decreased, while the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 increased with XMJ administration. Increased levels of nitric oxide (NO), eNOS protein and eNOS gene expression were also observed. Therefore, the XMJ ultrafiltration extract exhibits marked anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant abilities. These properties significantly inhibited the H2O2-induced injury of HUVECs, which may be associated with the NO-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway. PMID:24944594

  6. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, Aisling F

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  7. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling F Brown

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI. These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  8. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  9. Diffusion inside living human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J. -H.; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring lipid granules diffuse in the cytoplasm and can be used as tracers to map out the viscoelastic landscape inside living cells. Using optical trapping and single particle tracking we found that lipid granules exhibit anomalous diffusion inside human umbilical vein endothelial...... cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center...... of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell...

  10. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  11. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  12. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  13. institutional mechanisms for human rights protection in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    legal and institutional mechanisms for protecting the human rights guaranteed in these constitutions. ... U.O. Umuzurike Introduction to international Law, Spectrum Law Publishing, Ibadan, 1995 p.141. 2. G Ezejiofor. ... Liaise and cooperate with local and international organizations on human rights for the purpose of ...

  14. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  15. Sun Ginseng Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Senescence Associated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wooseok; Chung, Jin-Young; Bhan, Jaejun; Lim, Jiyeon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a population of cells that circulate in the blood stream. They play a role in angiogenesis and, therefore, can be prognostic markers of vascular repair. Ginsenoside Rg3 prevents endothelial cell apoptosis through the inhibition of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. It also affects estrogen activity, which reduces EPC senescence. Sun ginseng (SG), which is heat-processed ginseng, has a high content of ginsenosides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of SG on senescence-associated apoptosis in EPCs. In order to isolate EPCs, mononuclear cells of human blood buffy coats were cultured and characterized by their uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein (acLDL) and their binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (ulex-lectin). Flow cytometry with annexin-V staining was performed in order to assess early and late apoptosis. Senescence was determined by β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining. Staining with 4′-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole verified that most adherent cells (93±2.7%) were acLDL-positive and ulex-lectin-positive. The percentage of β-gal-positive EPCs was decreased from 93.8±2.0% to 62.5±3.6% by SG treatment. A fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis showed that 4.9% of EPCs were late apoptotic in controls. Sun ginseng decreased the apoptotic cell population by 39% in the late stage of apoptosis from control baseline levels. In conclusion, these results show antisenescent and antiapoptotic effects of SG in human-derived EPCs, indicating that SG can enhance EPC-mediated repair mechanisms. PMID:23717107

  16. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Hui; Chen, Yan; Gao, Chuan-Yu; Cui, Zhen-Tian; Yao, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126)-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC), miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K) and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell apoptosis, while the miR-126 inhibitor

  17. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hui Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Methods: Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD, nitric oxide (NO, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Results: Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell

  18. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  19. RILEY AND ABANDONMENT: EXPANDING FOURTH AMENDMENT PROTECTION OF CELL PHONES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abigail Hoverman

    2017-01-01

    ... of cell phones during searches incident to arrest in Riley v. California. This Note argues for expansion of heightened protections for cell phones in the context of abandoned evidence because the same privacy concerns apply...

  20. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8+ T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8+ T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8+ T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8+ T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14286-294), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14504-512), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14544-552), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RAlow CD44high CCR7low CD62Llow CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8+ TEM-cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the phenotypic and functional

  1. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A.; Furness, Julie N.; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8+ T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8+ T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8+ T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8+ T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14286–294), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14504–512), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14544–552), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RAlow CD44high CCR7low CD62Llow CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8+ TEM-cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the phenotypic and

  2. Anti-human α-synuclein N-terminal peptide antibody protects against dopaminergic cell death and ameliorates behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahaduzzaman

    Full Text Available The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN, while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1, or central region (AB2 of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2 significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30 = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29 = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively, as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003. Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37 = 9.786; p = 0.0001 and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD.

  3. Anti-Human α-Synuclein N-Terminal Peptide Antibody Protects against Dopaminergic Cell Death and Ameliorates Behavioral Deficits in an AAV-α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahaduzzaman, Md; Nash, Kevin; Hudson, Charles; Sharif, Masroor; Grimmig, Bethany; Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Liu, Hui; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Cao, Chuanhai; Bickford, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn) has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN), while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1), or central region (AB2) of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II) immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2) significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA) and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30) = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29) = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively), as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003). Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37) = 9.786; p = 0.0001) and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD. PMID:25658425

  4. Neuroglobin protects nerve cells from apoptosis by inhibiting the intrinsic pathway of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Subhadip; Skommer, Joanna; Henty, Kristen; Birch, Nigel; Brittain, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, overwhelming evidence has accrued that a high level of expression of the protein neuroglobin protects neurons in vitro, in animal models, and in humans, against cell death associated with hypoxic and amyloid insult. However, until now, the exact mechanism of neuroglobin's protective action has not been determined. Using cell biology and biochemical approaches we demonstrate that neuroglobin inhibits the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in vitro and intervenes in activation of pro-caspase 9 by interaction with cytochrome c. Using systems level information of the apoptotic signalling reactions we have developed a quantitative model of neuroglobin inhibition of apoptosis, which simulates neuroglobin blocking of apoptosome formation at a single cell level. Furthermore, this model allows us to explore the effect of neuroglobin in conditions not easily accessible to experimental study. We found that the protection of neurons by neuroglobin is very concentration sensitive. The impact of neuroglobin may arise from both its binding to cytochrome c and its subsequent redox reaction, although the binding alone is sufficient to block pro-caspase 9 activation. These data provides an explanation the action of neuroglobin in the protection of nerve cells from unwanted apoptosis.

  5. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Brown (Aisling F.); A.G. Murphy (Alison G.); S.J. Lalor (Stephen J.); J.M. Leech (John M.); K.M. O’Keeffe (Kate M.); M. Mac Aogáin (Micheál); D.P. O’Halloran (Dara P.); K.A. Lacey (Keenan A.); M. Tavakol (Mehri); C.H. Hearnden (Claire H.); D. Fitzgerald-Hughes (Deirdre); H. Humphreys (Hilary); J.P. Fennell (Jérôme P.); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); T.J. Foster (Timothy J.); J.A. Geoghegan (Joan A.); E.C. Lavelle (Ed C.); T.R. Rogers (Thomas R.); R.M. McLoughlin (Rachel M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we

  6. Reimagining Human Research Protections for 21st Century Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Cinnamon; Nebeker, Camille; Bietz, Matthew; Bae, Deborah; Bigby, Barbara; Devereaux, Mary; Fowler, James; Waldo, Ann; Weibel, Nadir; Patrick, Kevin; Klemmer, Scott; Melichar, Lori

    2016-12-22

    Evolving research practices and new forms of research enabled by technological advances require a redesigned research oversight system that respects and protects human research participants. Our objective was to generate creative ideas for redesigning our current human research oversight system. A total of 11 researchers and institutional review board (IRB) professionals participated in a January 2015 design thinking workshop to develop ideas for redesigning the IRB system. Ideas in 5 major domains were generated. The areas of focus were (1) improving the consent form and process, (2) empowering researchers to protect their participants, (3) creating a system to learn from mistakes, (4) improving IRB efficiency, and (5) facilitating review of research that leverages technological advances. We describe the impetus for and results of a design thinking workshop to reimagine a human research protections system that is responsive to 21st century science.

  7. Planetary protection for humans in space: Mars and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Catharine A.; Rummel, John D.

    When searching for life beyond Earth, the unique capabilities provided by human astronauts will only be advantageous if the biological contamination associated with human presence is monitored and minimized. Controlling biological contamination during planetary exploration is termed 'planetary protection,' and will be a critical element in the human exploration of other solar system bodies. To ensure the safety and health of the astronauts and the Earth, while preserving science value, planetary protection considerations must be incorporated from the earliest stages of mission planning and development. Issues of concern to planetary protection involve both 'forward contamination,' which is the contamination of other solar system bodies by Earth microbes and organic materials, and 'backward contamination,' which is the contamination of Earth systems by potential alien life. Forward contamination concerns include contamination that might invalidate current or future scientific exploration of a particular solar system body, and that may disrupt the planetary environment or a potential endogenous (alien) ecosystem. Backward contamination concerns include both immediate and long-term effects on the health of the astronaut explorers from possible biologically active materials encountered during exploration, as well as the possible contamination of the Earth. A number of national and international workshops held over the last seven years have generated a consensus regarding planetary protection policies and requirements for human missions to Mars, and a 2007 workshop held by NASA has considered the issues and benefits to planetary protection that might be offered by a return to the Moon. Conclusions from these workshops recognize that some degree of forward contamination associated with human astronaut explorers is inevitable. Nonetheless, the principles and policies of planetary protection, developed by COSPAR in conformance with the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, can and

  8. Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions: Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret S. (Editor); Johnson, James E. (Editor); Spry, James A. (Editor); Siegel, Bette; Conley, Catharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This report on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions summarizes the presentations, deliberations and findings of a workshop at NASA Ames Research Center, March 24-26, 2015, which was attended by more than 100 participants representing a diverse mix of science, engineering, technology, and policy areas. The main objective of the three-day workshop was to identify specific knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to make incremental progress towards the development of NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for Planetary Protection during human missions to Mars.

  9. Fractalkine (CX3CL1, a new factor protecting β-cells against TNFα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that human islets express and secrete CX3CL1 and CX3CL1 impacts them by decreasing glucagon secretion without affecting insulin secretion. Moreover, CX3CL1 decreases basal apoptosis of human β-cells. We further demonstrate that CX3CL1 protects β-cells from the adverse effects of TNFα on their function by restoring the expression and phosphorylation of key proteins of the insulin secretion pathway.

  10. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  11. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Velappan, Nileena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  12. Protection of human rights in South Africa: public awareness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To that end, the survey sought information on public knowledge or awareness of the Bill of Rights, violation or protection of various types of rights, and awareness and perceptions regarding human rights institutions. It was found that many South Africans are unaware of the existence of the Bill of Rights and that the majority ...

  13. Human dendritic cell culture and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah E; Klein, Nigel; Dixon, Garth L J

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in the development of natural immunity to microbes. The DC form a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune system by providing key instructions particularly to antigen naïve T-cells. The interaction of DC with T lymphocytes involves three signals: (1) antigen processing and presentation in context of MHC Class I and/or II, (2) expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules, and (3) cytokine production. Studying the interactions of DCs with specific pathogens allows for better understanding of how protective immunity is generated, and may be particularly useful for assessing vaccine components. In this chapter, we describe methods to generate human monocyte-derived DCs and assess their maturation, activation, and function, using interaction with the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as a model.

  14. Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective effects of vitamins C and E against its cytotoxicity on normal cell lines. ... Cytotoxicity of SEE on cancer (HepG2 and CT26) and normal (CHO and rat fibroblast) cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay. IC50 of SEE on ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  15. Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... Also, protective effects of vitamins C and E against SEE-induced cytotoxicity on normal cell lines were studied. Cytotoxicity of SEE on cancer (HepG2 and CT26) and normal (CHO and rat fibroblast) cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay. IC50 of SEE on the cell lines was assessed. Furthermore, IC50 of ...

  16. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    ). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...... marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future...

  17. Inhibition of the oxidative stress-induced miR-23a protects the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from apoptosis through the upregulation of glutaminase and glutamine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan-Dan; Zhong, Bin-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Luo, Jie; Liu, Yang; Xu, Gui-Chun; Luan, Chun-Sheng; Fang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the sub retinal pigment epithelial space and choroid is an initial pathological characteristic for the age-related macular degeneration which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in old people. Moreover, oxidative stress is implicated as a major inducer of RPE cell death. Here, we assessed the correlation between the H2O2-induced RPE cell death and glutamine metabolism. We found under low glutamine supply (20 %), the ARPE-19 cells were more susceptive to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the glutamine uptake and the glutaminase (GLS) were suppressed by H2O2 treatments. Moreover, we observed miR-23a was upregulated by H2O2 treatments and overexpression of miR-23a significantly sensitized ARPE-19 cells to H2O2. Importantly, Western blotting and luciferase assay demonstrated GLS1 is a direct target of miR-23a in RPE cells. Inhibition of the H2O2-induced miR-23a by antagomiR protected the RPE cells from the oxidative stress-induced cell death. In addition, recovery of GLS1 expression in miR-23a overexpressed RPE cells rescued the H2O2-induced cell death. This study illustrated a mechanism for the protection of the oxidative-induced RPE cell death through the recovery of glutamine metabolism by inhibition of miR-23a, contributing to the discovery of novel targets and the developments of therapeutic strategies for the prevention of RPE cells from oxidative stress.

  18. The protection of individuals by means of diplomatic protection : diplomatic protection as a human rights instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer-Künzli, Anna Maria Helena

    2007-01-01

    Individuals whose international (human) rights are violated outside their state of nationality often have very limited means to address such violations. For instance, the foreign nationals detained by the United States in Guantanamo Bay have been unable to improve their situation themselves. Their

  19. Protective effects of sesaminol on BEAS-2B cells impaired by cigarette smoke extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ping; Fu, Xiao; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Wen-mei; Cao, Wen-ming; Zhang, Wei-yun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate protective effects of sesaminol on the human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell line against oxidative damage of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). BEAS-2B cells were pre-incubated with sesaminol for 12 h and then treated with various concentrations of CSE for 24 h. After that proliferation ability, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cell apoptosis, activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and mRNA levels of IL-8 and IL-6 were measured. The results showed that sesaminol significantly improved BEAS-2B cell viability, reduced the production of ROS and LDH of cells, inhibited cell apoptosis and increased CAT and SOD activities in CSE-treated cells. Sesaminol also inhibited the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 mRNA following CSE exposure. In conclusion, sesaminol may protect BEAS-2B cells against CSE-induced oxidative damage.

  20. The interaction of human population, food production, and biodiversity protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Eileen; Mora, Camilo; Engelman, Robert

    2017-04-21

    Research suggests that the scale of human population and the current pace of its growth contribute substantially to the loss of biological diversity. Although technological change and unequal consumption inextricably mingle with demographic impacts on the environment, the needs of all human beings-especially for food-imply that projected population growth will undermine protection of the natural world. Numerous solutions have been proposed to boost food production while protecting biodiversity, but alone these proposals are unlikely to staunch biodiversity loss. An important approach to sustaining biodiversity and human well-being is through actions that can slow and eventually reverse population growth: investing in universal access to reproductive health services and contraceptive technologies, advancing women's education, and achieving gender equality. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Ligands Protect Tumor Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Alves da Silva-Junior

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation generates oxidized phospholipids that activate platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR associated with pro-tumorigenic effects. Here, we investigated the involvement of PAFR in tumor cell survival after irradiation. Cervical cancer samples presented higher levels of PAF-receptor gene (PTAFR when compared with normal cervical tissue. In cervical cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT, the expression of PTAFR was significantly increased. Cervical cancer-derived cell lines (C33, SiHa, and HeLa and squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC90 and SCC78 express higher levels of PAFR mRNA and protein than immortalized keratinocytes. Gamma radiation increased PAFR expression and induced PAFR ligands and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in these tumor cells. The blocking of PAFR with the antagonist CV3938 before irradiation inhibited PGE2 and increased tumor cells death. Similarly, human carcinoma cells transfected with PAFR (KBP were more resistant to radiation compared to those lacking the receptor (KBM. PGE2 production by irradiated KBP cells was also inhibited by CV3988. These results show that irradiation of carcinoma cells generates PAFR ligands that protect tumor cells from death and suggests that the combination of RT with a PAFR antagonist could be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  2. The Effect of Protected Wilderness Spaces on Local Human Population

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Drew; Duda, Kaylyn; Brosch, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to analyze the effect that protected wilderness areas have on local human populations through the use of GIS. Using data from Northern Tanzania and from Virginia we hope to discover the degree and kind of difference between these two very different areas. Our current theory based on accounts by people who have traveled in the respective regions is that in Tanzania the protected areas have forced people to move and change their habits and home places whereas in Virg...

  3. Using human data to protect the public's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourson, M L; Andersen, M E; Erdreich, L S; MacGregor, J A

    2001-04-01

    The value of using human data in the assessment and management of risk is evaluated. Although the use of such data has a long and successful history with environmental contaminants and the development of drugs and commercial chemicals, recent deliberations within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have questioned this practice in part. Specifically, we evaluate the degree to which reference doses (RfDs) and reference concentrations (RfCs) derived from human data on EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) differ with RfDs and RfCs that we estimate from experimental animal data. We also use several minimal risk levels of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and tolerable intakes of Health Canada in this comparison. Human-based RfDs are more than threefold lower than the corresponding animal-based RfDs for 23% of the comparisons. Human- based RfDs or RfCs are lower than corresponding animal-based RfDs or RfCs for 36% of the comparisons. Furthermore, for 10 of 43 possible comparisons, insufficient experimental animal data are readily available or data are inappropriate to estimate either RfDs or RfCs. We also discuss human pharmacokinetic data from volunteer studies and mechanistic studies with human tissues in vitro and demonstrate through a series of case discussions that utilization of such data is important when making decisions to protect exposed individuals. Moreover, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling evaluates critical information in assessing interindividual variability and identifying at-risk populations. Within the limits of our analysis, we conclude that the direct use and interpretation of human data, in conjunction with data gathered from experimental animals, are public health protective policies that should be encouraged. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Effectiveness of Human Research Protection Program Performance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed human research protection program performance metric data of all Department of Veterans Affairs research facilities obtained from 2010 to 2016. Among a total of 25 performance metrics, 21 (84%) showed improvement, four (16%) remained unchanged, and none deteriorated during the study period. The overall improvement from these 21 performance metrics was 81.1% ± 18.7% (mean ± SD), with a range of 30% to 100%. The four performance metrics that did not show improvement all had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance metrics that showed improvement ranged from 0.05% to 60%. However, of the 21 performance metrics that showed improvement, 10 had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance measurement is an effective tool in improving the performance of human research protection programs.

  5. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....... review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides...

  6. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki; Wei, Chungwen; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Anolik, Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Memory B cells are more heterogeneous than previously thought. Given that B cells play powerful antibody-independent effector functions, it seems reasonable to assume division of labor between distinct memory B cells subpopulations in both protective and pathogenic immune responses. Here we review the information emerging regarding the heterogeneity of human memory B cells. A better understanding of this topic should greatly improve our ability to target specific B cell subsets either in vaccine responses or in autoimmune diseases and organ rejection among other pathological conditions where B cells play central pathogenic roles.

  8. Human migration, protected areas, and conservation outreach in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Salerno, JD; Mulder, MB; Kefauver, SC

    2014-01-01

    A recent discussion debates the extent of human in-migration around protected areas (PAs) in the tropics. One proposed argument is that rural migrants move to bordering areas to access conservation outreach benefits. A counter proposal maintains that PAs have largely negative effects on local populations and that outreach initiatives even if successful present insufficient benefits to drive in-migration. Using data from Tanzania, we examined merits of statistical tests and spatial methods use...

  9. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  10. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  11. Niacin protects against UVB radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured human skin keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIN, FUQUAN; XU, WEN; GUAN, CUIPING; ZHOU, MIAONI; HONG, WEISONG; FU, LIFANG; LIU, DONGYIN; XU, AIE

    2012-01-01

    Niacin and its related derivatives have been shown to have effects on cellular activities. However, the molecular mechanism of its reduced immunosuppressive effects and photoprotective effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the photoprotective effect of niacin in ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). We found that niacin effectively suppressed the UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis of HaCaT cells. Existing data have shown that AKT activation is involved in the cell survival process. Yet, the potential mechanism of niacin in protection against UV-induced skin damage has thus far not fully been eluvidated. We observed that niacin pretreatment enhances UV induced activation of AKT (Ser473 phosphorylation) as well as that of the downstream signal mTOR (S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation). The PI3K/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, largely neutralized the protective effects of niacin, suggesting that AKT and downstream signaling mTOR/S6 activation are necessary for the niacin-induced protective effects against UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis. Collectively, our data suggest that niacin may be utilized to prevent UV-induced skin damage and provide a novel mechanism of its photoprotective effects against the UV radiation of sunlight by modulating both AKT and downstream mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:22246168

  12. Protective effects of exogenous gangliosides on ROS-induced changes in human spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavella, Mirjana; Lipovac, Vaskresenija

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the available evidence on the efficacy of gangliosides to reduce the degree of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated damage. The antioxidative efficacy of exogenous gangliosides in protecting different cells encouraged us to examine their ability to protect human spermatozoa. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids with strong amphiphilic character due to the bulky headgroup made of several sugar rings with sialic acid residues and the double-tailed hydrophobic lipid moiety. The amphiphilicity of gangliosides allows them to exist as micelles in aqueous media when they are present at a concentration above their critical micellar concentration. The protective effect of ganglioside micelles on spermatozoa is believed to stem from their ability to scavenge free radicals and prevent their damaging effects. In our study, we particularly focused our attention on the protective effect of ganglioside micelles on DNA in human spermatozoa exposed to cryopreservation. The results indicate that ganglioside micelles can modulate the hydrophobic properties of the sperm membrane to increase tolerance to DNA fragmentation, thus protecting the DNA from cryopreservation-induced damage. Further actions of ganglioside micelles, which were documented by biochemical and biophysical studies, included (i) the modulation of superoxide anion generation by increasing the diffusion barrier for membrane events responsible for signal translocation to the interior of the cell; (ii) the inhibition of iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation due to the iron chelation potential of gangliosides; and (iii) inhibition of hydrogen peroxide diffusion across the sperm membrane. PMID:23503425

  13. Third-party CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Baker, Jeanette; Pierini, Antonio; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H; Meyer, Everett H; Negrin, Robert S

    2015-05-28

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is driven by extensive activation and proliferation of alloreactive donor T cells causing significant morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a potent immunoregulatory T-cell subset in both humans and mice. Here, we explored the role of adoptively transferred third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells for protection from lethal GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. We found that low numbers of CD4(+) iNKT cells from third-party mice resulted in a significant survival benefit with retained graft-versus-tumor effects. In vivo expansion of alloreactive T cells was diminished while displaying a T helper cell 2-biased phenotype. Notably, CD4(+) iNKT cells from third-party mice were as protective as CD4(+) iNKT cells from donor mice although third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells were rejected early after allogeneic HCT. Adoptive transfer of third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells resulted in a robust expansion of donor CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) that were required for protection from lethal GVHD. However, in vivo depletion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells abrogated both Treg expansion and protection from lethal GVHD. Despite the fact that iNKT cells are a rare cell population, the almost unlimited third-party availability and feasibility of in vitro expansion provide the basis for clinical translation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. The Plant Hormone Cytokinin Confers Protection against Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Eman M; Naseem, Muhammed; Awad, Eman; Dandekar, Thomas; Stopper, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Modulating key dynamics of plant growth and development, the effects of the plant hormone cytokinin on animal cells gained much attention recently. Most previous studies on cytokinin effects on mammalian cells have been conducted with elevated cytokinin concentration (in the μM range). However, to examine physiologically relevant dose effects of cytokinins on animal cells, we systematically analyzed the impact of kinetin in cultured cells at low and high concentrations (1nM-10μM) and examined cytotoxic and genotoxic conditions. We furthermore measured the intrinsic antioxidant activity of kinetin in a cell-free system using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay and in cells using the dihydroethidium staining method. Monitoring viability, we looked at kinetin effects in mammalian cells such as HL60 cells, HaCaT human keratinocyte cells, NRK rat epithelial kidney cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. Kinetin manifests no antioxidant activity in the cell free system and high doses of kinetin (500 nM and higher) reduce cell viability and mediate DNA damage in vitro. In contrast, low doses (concentrations up to 100 nM) of kinetin confer protection in cells against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results show that pretreatment of the cells with kinetin significantly reduces 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide mediated reactive oxygen species production. Also, pretreatment with kinetin retains cellular GSH levels when they are also treated with the GSH-depleting agent patulin. Our results explicitly show that low kinetin doses reduce apoptosis and protect cells from oxidative stress mediated cell death. Future studies on the interaction between cytokinins and human cellular pathway targets will be intriguing.

  15. Physical-Chemical Basis of the Protection of Slowly Frozen Human Erythrocytes by Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, W. F.; Mazur, Peter; Souzu, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    One theory of freezing damage suggests that slowly cooled cells are killed by being exposed to increasing concentrations of electrolytes as the suspending medium freezes. A corollary to this view is that protective additives such as glycerol protect cells by acting colligatively to reduce the electrolyte concentration at any subzero temperature. Recently published phase-diagram data for the ternary system glycerol-NaCl-water by M. L. Shepard et al. (Cryobiology, 13:9-23, 1976), in combination with the data on human red cell survival vs. subzero temperature presented here and in the companion study of Souzu and Mazur (Biophys. J., 23:89-100), permit a precise test of this theory. Appropriate liquidus phase-diagram information for the solutions used in the red cell freezing experiments was obtained by interpolation of the liquidus data of Shepard and his co-workers. The results of phase-diagram analysis of red cell survival indicate that the correlation between the temperature that yields 50% hemolysis (LT50) and the electrolyte concentration attained at that temperature in various concentrations of glycerol is poor. With increasing concentrations of glycerol, the cells were killed at progressively lower concentrations of NaCl. For example, the LT50 for cells frozen in the absence of glycerol corresponds to a NaCl concentration of 12 weight percent (2.4 molal), while for cells frozen in 1.75 M glycerol in buffered saline the LT50 corresponds to 3.0 weight percent NaCl (1.3 molal). The data, in combination with other findings, lead to two conclusions: (a) The protection from glycerol is due to its colligative ability to reduce the concentration of sodium chloride in the external medium, but (b) the protection is less than that expected from colligative effects; apparently glycerol itself can also be a source of damage, probably because it renders the red cells susceptible to osmotic shock during thawing. PMID:667300

  16. Physical-chemical basis of the protection of slowly frozen human erythrocytes by glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rall, W.F.; Mazur, P.; Souzu, H.

    1978-07-01

    One theory of freezing damage suggests that slowly cooled cells are killed by being exposed to increasing concentrations of electrolytes as the suspending medium freezes. A corollary to this view is that protective additives such as glycerol protect cells by acting colligatively to reduce the electrolyte concentration at any subzero temperature. Recently published phase-diagram data for the ternary system glycerol-NaCl-water by M.L. Shepard et al. (Cryobiology, 13: 9-23, 1976), in combination with the data on human red cell survival vs. subzero temperature presented here and in the companion study of Souzu and Mazur (Biophys. J., 23: 89-100), permit a precise test of this theory. Appropriate liquidus phase-diagram information for the solutions used in the red cell freezing experiments was obtained by interpolation of liquidus data of Shepard and his co-workers. The results of phase-diagram analysis of red cell survival indicate that the correlation between the temperature that yields 50% hemolysis (LT/sub 50/) and the electrolyte concentration attained at that temperature in various concentrations of glycerol is poor. With increasing concentrations of glycerol, the cells were killed at progressively lower concentrations of NaCl. For example, the LT/sub 50/ for cells frozen in the absence of glycerol corresponds to a NaCl concentration of 12 weight percent (2.4 molal), while for cells frozen in 1.75 M glycerol in buffered saline the LT/sub 50/ corresponds to 3.0 weight percent NaCl (1.3 molal). The data, in combination with other findings, lead to two conclusions: (a) The protection from glycerol is due to its colligative ability to reduce the concentration of sodium chloride in the external medium, but (b) the protection is less than that expected from colligative effects; apparently glycerol itself can also be a source of damage, probably because it renders the red cells susceptible to osmotic shock during thawing.

  17. Protective effect of carnosic acid against acrylamide-induced toxicity in RPE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalawi, Aishah; Alhasani, Reem Hasaballah A; Biswas, Lincoln; Reilly, James; Shu, Xinhua

    2017-10-01

    Acrylamide is a substance that can be neurotoxic in humans and experimental animals. It is formed at different rates in starchy foods cooked at temperatures above 120 °C as a result of interaction between monosaccharides and the amino acid asparagine. Carnosic acid accounts for over 90% of the antioxidant properties of rosemary extract and is a powerful inhibitor of lipid peroxidation in microsomal and liposomal systems. Carnosic acid has been shown to protect against oxidative and inflammatory effects. In order to investigate the protective properties of carnosic acid against acrylamide-induced toxicity in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, ARPE-19 cells were pre-treated with 10 μM carnosic acid for 24 h followed by treatment with acrylamide (0.7 or 1 mM) for 24 h. ARPE-19 cells pre-treated with 10 μM carnosic acid showed significantly increased cell viability and decreased cell death rate when compared to ARPE-19 cells treated with acrylamide alone. Activities of SOD and catalase and the level of GSH and expression of NRF2 and a number of anti-oxidant genes were significantly decreased in ARPE-19 cells, while there were significant increases in ROS and MDA; pre-treatment with carnosic acid significantly counteracted these changes. Our results suggest that carnosic acid protected RPE cells from acrylamide-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Human Rights and the Social Protection of Vulnerable Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Mititelu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the texts with binding juridical force, drafted and published by the Council of theEuropean Union, we find no provisions regarding the juridical protection of the vulnerable persons (disabled persons, old people and mentally retarded, only planned measures regarding their social protection, that the E.U. States granted in the Social Charter (of 1961 and in the revised one of 1996, and, finally, in the additional Protocol from the year 1988. Given that to know these measures – that also remain compulsory for the signatory States or for the ones that ratified this Charter – is not possible without getting acquainted, at least in brief, with the human Rights provided by the E.U. legislation, within the pages of this study we referred explicitly to the text of the latter in order to evince the imperious necessity to draft a special legislation also regarding the juridical protection of vulnerable persons, not only a protection of a preeminently social nature.

  19. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Kashiwagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200 μM induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW.

  20. Human telomere biology: A contributory and interactive factor in aging, disease risks, and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue

    2015-12-04

    Telomeres are the protective end-complexes at the termini of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere attrition can lead to potentially maladaptive cellular changes, block cell division, and interfere with tissue replenishment. Recent advances in the understanding of human disease processes have clarified the roles of telomere biology, especially in diseases of human aging and in some aging-related processes. Greater overall telomere attrition predicts mortality and aging-related diseases in inherited telomere syndrome patients, and also in general human cohorts. However, genetically caused variations in telomere maintenance either raise or lower risks and progression of cancers, in a highly cancer type-specific fashion. Telomere maintenance is determined by genetic factors and is also cumulatively shaped by nongenetic influences throughout human life; both can interact. These and other recent findings highlight both causal and potentiating roles for telomere attrition in human diseases. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Scheffer, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A possible protective effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on human endothelial cells was studied both under basal culture conditions and in the presence of agents capable of influencing oxidative damage, such as glucose/glucose oxidase and oxidized low-density lipoproteins. Propionyl-L-carnitine had no

  2. Type III Interferons Produced by Human Placental Trophoblasts Confer Protection against Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Avraham; Lennemann, Nicholas J; Ouyang, Yingshi; Bramley, John C; Morosky, Stefanie; Marques, Ernesto Torres De Azeved; Cherry, Sara; Sadovsky, Yoel; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-05-11

    During mammalian pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier between the maternal and fetal compartments. The recently observed association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy and fetal microcephaly and other anomalies suggests that ZIKV may bypass the placenta to reach the fetus. This led us to investigate ZIKV infection of primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), which are the barrier cells of the placenta. We discovered that PHT cells from full-term placentas are refractory to ZIKV infection. In addition, medium from uninfected PHT cells protects non-placental cells from ZIKV infection. PHT cells constitutively release the type III interferon (IFN) IFNλ1, which functions in both a paracrine and autocrine manner to protect trophoblast and non-trophoblast cells from ZIKV infection. Our data suggest that for ZIKV to access the fetal compartment, it must evade restriction by trophoblast-derived IFNλ1 and other trophoblast-specific antiviral factors and/or use alternative strategies to cross the placental barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neonatal protection by an innate immune system of human milk consisting of oligosaccharides and glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, D S

    2009-04-01

    This review discusses the role of human milk glycans in protecting infants, but the conclusion that the human milk glycans constitute an innate immune system whereby the mother protects her offspring may have general applicability in all mammals, including species of commercial importance. Infants that are not breastfed have a greater incidence of severe diarrhea and respiratory diseases than those who are breastfed. In the past, this had been attributed primarily to human milk secretory antibodies. However, the oligosaccharides are major components of human milk, and milk is also rich in other glycans, including glycoproteins, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids. These milk glycans, especially the oligosaccharides, are composed of thousands of components. The milk factor that promotes gut colonization by Bifidobacterium bifidum was found to be a glycan, and such prebiotic characteristics may contribute to protection against infectious agents. However, the ability of human milk glycans to protect the neonate seems primarily to be due to their inhibition of pathogen binding to their host cell target ligands. Many such examples include specific fucosylated oligosaccharides and glycans that inhibit specific pathogens. Most human milk oligosaccharides are fucosylated, and their production depends on fucosyltransferase enzymes; mutations in these fucosyltransferase genes are common and underlie the various Lewis blood types in humans. Variable expression of specific fucosylated oligosaccharides in milk, also a function of these genes (and maternal Lewis blood type), is significantly associated with the risk of infectious disease in breastfed infants. Human milk also contains major quantities and large numbers of sialylated oligosaccharides, many of which are also present in bovine colostrum. These could similarly inhibit several common viral pathogens. Moreover, human milk oligosaccharides strongly attenuate inflammatory processes in the intestinal mucosa. These

  4. CRFR1 activation protects against cytokine-induced beta cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Lykke; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Matsumoto, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    During diabetes development beta cells are exposed to elevated concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β which in vitro, induce beta cell death. The class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): Corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) and CRFR2 are expressed in pancreatic...... islets. As downstream signalling by other class B GPCRs can protect against cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis we evaluated the protective potential of CRFR activation in beta cells in a pro-inflammatory setting. CRFR1/CRFR2 ligands activated AKT and CRFR1 signalling reduced apoptosis in human islets...... on prolonged exposure to CRF family peptides and following PKA activation mediating IRS2 upregulation. This suggests that CRFR signalling counteracts proinflammatory cytokine-mediated apoptotic pathways by upregulation of survival signalling in beta-cells. Interestingly, CRFR signalling also counteracts basal...

  5. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Hair Cells against Aminoglycoside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30–0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  7. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  8. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Protective effect of sulforaphane against dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji Man; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Eun Mee; Moon, Younghye; Kim, Ha Won; Hwang, Onyou

    2007-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Evidence suggests oxidation of dopamine (DA) to DA quinone and consequent oxidative stress as a major factor contributing to this vulnerability. We have previously observed that exposure to or induction of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR1), the enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of quinone, effectively protects DA cells. Sulforaphane (SF) is a drug identified as a potent inducer of QR1 in various non-neuronal cells. In the present study, we show that SF protects against compounds known to induce DA quinone production (6-hydroxydopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin) in DAergic cell lines CATH.a and SK-N-BE(2)C as well as in mesencephalic DAergic neurons. SF leads to attenuation of the increase in protein-bound quinone in tetrahydrobiopterin-treated cells, but this does not occur in cells that have been depleted of DA, suggesting involvement of DA quinone. SF pretreatment prevents membrane damage, DNA fragmentation, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species. SF causes increases in mRNA levels and enzymatic activity of QR1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that SF causes induction of QR1 gene expression, removal of intracellular DA quinone, and protection against toxicity in DAergic cells. Thus, this major isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables may serve as a potential candidate for development of treatment and/or prevention of PD.

  10. Planetary health: protecting human health on a rapidly changing planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Samuel S

    2018-12-23

    The impact of human activities on our planet's natural systems has been intensifying rapidly in the past several decades, leading to disruption and transformation of most natural systems. These disruptions in the atmosphere, oceans, and across the terrestrial land surface are not only driving species to extinction, they pose serious threats to human health and wellbeing. Characterising and addressing these threats requires a paradigm shift. In a lecture delivered to the Academy of Medical Sciences on Nov 13, 2017, I describe the scale of human impacts on natural systems and the extensive associated health effects across nearly every dimension of human health. I highlight several overarching themes that emerge from planetary health and suggest advances in the way we train, reward, promote, and fund the generation of health scientists who will be tasked with breaking out of their disciplinary silos to address this urgent constellation of health threats. I propose that protecting the health of future generations requires taking better care of Earth's natural systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  12. Generation and maintenance of human memory cells during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwani, Rabih; Doroudchi, Mehrnoosh; Yassine-Diab, Bader; Janbazian, Loury; Shi, Yu; Said, Elias A; Haddad, Elias K; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2006-11-01

    Long-term maintenance of memory T cell response is the hallmark of immune protection and hence the holy grail of most vaccine development studies. Persistent memory cells, developed after either viral infection or vaccination, ensure the generation of an antiviral response upon reexposure to the pathogen. During acute viral infections, as in the case of measles and influenza viruses, strong T cell effector functions, which eradicate the virus and protect patients against reexposure, are achieved by the generation of persistent protective memory cells. However, in chronic infections, T cells drastically lose effector functions before acquiring a memory phenotype. Chronic infections can be categorized into infections where viremia is controlled and protective memory cells are maintained as in the case of EBV and CMV infections, or where the virus persists and memory cells are exhausted and disrupted as in the case of human immunodeficiency virus infection. In this review, we will discuss the different phenotypical and functional characteristics of memory cells subsets, the importance of the role they play during acute and chronic infections, and the mechanisms behind their effectiveness and persistence.

  13. Ceftriaxone protects against the neurotoxicity of human immunodeficiency virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A; Li, Guanhan; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2007-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins Tat and gp120 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV dementia by various mechanisms, including down-regulation of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT2), which is responsible for inactivation of synaptic glutamate. Recent work indicates that beta-lactam antibiotics are potent stimulators of EAAT2 expression. The authors treated mixed human fetal neuronal cultures with recombinant gp120 or Tat, in the presence or absence of ceftriaxone, and determined neurotoxicity by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal cell death. Ceftriaxone produced dose-dependent attenuation of the neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death caused by both viral proteins. This study demonstrates that this class of drugs may have therapeutic efficacy in HIV dementia.

  14. Protective role of allicin (diallyl thiosulfinate) on cell surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    altered glycoconjugates in plasma, buccal mucosa tumour tissues and erythrocyte membrane of tumour bearing hamsters were normalized after treated with allicin. Conclusion: The results suggest that allicin has considerable potential to protect and restore the cell surface glycoconjugates moieties in the presence of allicin ...

  15. Protective role of allicin (diallyl thiosulfinate) on cell surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DMBAaltered glycoconjugates in plasma, buccal mucosa tumour tissues and erythrocyte membrane of tumour bearing hamsters were normalized after treated with allicin. Conclusion: The results suggest that allicin has considerable potential to protect and restore the cell surface glycoconjugates moieties in the presence of ...

  16. Ascorbic acid inhibits human insulin aggregation and protects against amyloid induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Parvez; Beg, Ayesha Zainab; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Zaman, Masihuz; Abdelhameed, Ali S; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-05-01

    Protein aggregation into oligomers and fibrils are associated with many human pathophysiologies. Compounds that modulate protein aggregation and interact with preformed fibrils and convert them to less toxic species, expect to serve as promising drug candidates and aid to the drug development efforts against aggregation diseases. In present study, the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation by human insulin (HI) and the anti-amyloidogenic activity of ascorbic acid (AA) were investigated by employing various spectroscopic, imaging and computational approaches. We demonstrate that ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the fibrillation of HI in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly ascorbic acid destabilise the preformed amyloid fibrils and protects human neuroblastoma cell line (SH- SY5Y) against amyloid induced cytotoxicity. The present data signifies the role of ascorbic acid that can serve as potential molecule in preventing human insulin aggregation and associated pathophysiologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A soluble suppressor T cell factor protects against experimental intraabdominal abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleznik, D F; Finberg, R W; Shapiro, M E; Onderdonk, A B; Kasper, D L

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes a suppressor T cell factor which protects mice against intraabdominal abscesses caused by Bacteroides fragilis. This soluble cell-free factor (ITF) is derived from splenic T cells from mice immunized with capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis. Mice receiving ITF are protected from developing abscesses caused by B. fragilis to the same degree as animals receiving intact immune splenic T cells. The factor appears to be small in molecular size as protective activity is dialyzable through a 12,000-mol wt exclusion dialysis membrane and is present in fractions intermediate between the bed and void volumes of a P2 Biogel column. The protective effect of ITF is antigen-specific to B. fragilis alone. Mice given a complex inoculum of B. fragilis, enterococcus, and another anaerobe develop abscesses even after receiving column-purified ITF. The activity of ITF also is eliminated after adsorption with B. fragilis CP coupled to sheep erythrocytes but not with an unrelated CP coupled to sheep erythrocytes. ITF, therefore, appears to have a binding site for B. fragilis CP. ITF is heat-labile and loses efficacy after protease digestion, suggesting that the active material is a protein. These studies define a suppressor cell factor with activity in a model system resembling human disease and offer promise for increased understanding of the diversity of cell-mediated immune systems.

  18. Reactive Astrocytes Protect Melanoma Cells from Chemotherapy by Sequestering Intracellular Calcium through Gap Junction Communication Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingtang Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are highly resistant to chemotherapy. Metastatic tumor cells are known to exploit the host microenvironment for their growth and survival. We report here that melanoma brain metastases are surrounded and infiltrated by activated astrocytes, and we hypothesized that these astrocytes can play a role similar to their established ability to protect neurons from apoptosis. In coculture experiments, astrocytes, but not fibroblasts, reduced apoptosis in human melanoma cells treated with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This chemoprotective effect was dependent on physical contact and gap junctional communication between astrocytes and tumor cells. Moreover, the protective effect of astrocytes resulted from their sequestering calcium from the cytoplasm of tumor cells. These data suggest that brain tumors can, in principle, harness the neuroprotective effects of reactive astrocytes for their own survival and implicate a heretofore unrecognized mechanism for resistance in brain metastasis that might be of relevance in the clinic.

  19. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  20. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  1. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  2. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  3. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  4. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes protect SH-SY5Y nerve cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bing; Chai, Yi; Lv, Shigang; Ye, Minhua; Wu, Miaojing; Xie, Liyuan; Fan, Yanghua; Zhu, Xingen; Gao, Ziyun

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a leading cause of death and disability. A previous study indicated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIP) in the treatment of cerebral ischemia reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, the authors hypothesized that the protective effect of RIP on neurological damage is mediated by exosomes that are released by endothelial cells in femoral arteries. To test this, right middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion with RIP was performed in rats. In addition, an I/R injury cell model was tested that included human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and SH-SY5Y cells. Both the in vivo and in vitro models were examined for injury. Markers of exosomes (CD63, HSP70 and TSG101) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Exosomes were extracted from both animal serum and HUVEC culture medium and identified by electron microscopy. They investigated the role of endothelial cell-derived exosomes in the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion of I/R-injured SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, apoptosis-related molecules caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 were detected. RIP was determined to increase the number of exosomes and the expression levels of CD63, HSP70 and TSG101 in plasma, but not in brain hippocampal tissue. The size of exosomes released after I/R in HUVECs was similar to the size of exosomes released in rats subjected to RIP. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes partly suppressed the I/R-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SH-SY5Y nerve cells. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes directly protect nerve cells against I/R injury, and are responsible for the protective role of RIP in I/R.

  5. CB2 receptor agonists protect human dopaminergic neurons against damage from HIV-1 gp120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Hu

    Full Text Available Despite the therapeutic impact of anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND remains a serious threat to AIDS patients, and there currently remains no specific therapy for the neurological manifestations of HIV-1. Recent work suggests that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic area is a critical brain region for the neuronal dysfunction and death seen in HAND and that human dopaminergic neurons have a particular sensitivity to gp120-induced damage, manifested as reduced function (decreased dopamine uptake, morphological changes, and reduced viability. Synthetic cannabinoids inhibit HIV-1 expression in human microglia, suppress production of inflammatory mediators in human astrocytes, and there is substantial literature demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of cannabinoids in other neuropathogenic processes. Based on these data, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that synthetic cannabinoids will protect dopaminergic neurons against the toxic effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120. Using a human mesencephalic neuronal/glial culture model, which contains dopaminergic neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, we were able to show that the CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 blunts gp120-induced neuronal damage as measured by dopamine transporter function, apoptosis and lipid peroxidation; these actions were mediated principally by the CB2 receptor. Adding supplementary human microglia to our cultures enhances gp120-induced damage; WIN55,212-2 is able to alleviate this enhanced damage. Additionally, WIN55,212-2 inhibits gp120-induced superoxide production by purified human microglial cells, inhibits migration of human microglia towards supernatants generated from gp120-stimulated human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures and reduces chemokine and cytokine production from the human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures. These data suggest that synthetic cannabinoids are capable of protecting human dopaminergic neurons from

  6. Human subjects protection issues in QUERI implementation research: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie Mona

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Subjects protections approaches, specifically those relating to research review board oversight, vary throughout the world. While all are designed to protect participants involved in research, the structure and specifics of these institutional review boards (IRBs can and do differ. This variation affects all types of research, particularly implementation research. Methods In 2001, we began a series of inter-related studies on implementing evidence-based collaborative care for depression in Veterans Health Administration primary care. We have submitted more than 100 IRB applications, amendments, and renewals, and in doing so, we have interacted with 13 VA and University IRBs across the United States (U.S.. We present four overarching IRB-related themes encountered throughout the implementation of our projects, and within each theme, identify key challenges and suggest approaches that have proved useful. Where applicable, we showcase process aids developed to assist in resolving a particular IRB challenge. Results There are issues unique to implementation research, as this type of research may not fit within the traditional Human Subjects paradigm used to assess clinical trials. Risks in implementation research are generally related to breaches of confidentiality, rather than health risks associated with traditional clinical trials. The implementation-specific challenges discussed are: external validity considerations, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, risk-benefit issues, the multiple roles of researchers and subjects, and system-level unit of analysis. Discussion Specific aspects of implementation research interact with variations in knowledge, procedures, and regulatory interpretations across IRBs to affect the implementation and study of best methods to increase evidence-based practice. Through lack of unambiguous guidelines and local liability concerns, IRBs are often at risk of applying both variable and inappropriate or

  7. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  8. The Endogenous Hallucinogen and Trace Amine N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Displays Potent Protective Effects against Hypoxia via Sigma-1 Receptor Activation in Human Primary iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons and Microglia-Like Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Riba, Jordi; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs), monocyte-derived macrophages (moMACs), and dendritic cells (moDCs). Results showed that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2) through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  10. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 48 CFR 1352.235-71 - Protection of human subjects-exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; (2) Documentation of approval for the human subjects research protocol, questionnaires, surveys..., if the contractor modifies a human subjects research protocol, questionnaire, survey, advertisement... forth in solicitation #____, related to the Protection of Human Subjects in research. The Government has...

  12. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li WY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Weiyi Li,1,2 Chen Yang,2 Jing Lu,2 Ping Huang,1 Colin J Barnstable,2 Chun Zhang,1 Samuel S Zhang2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University Eye Center, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, USA; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore Abstract: This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01. Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 µM, 2 µL 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival, which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6, middle (P=0.018, n=6, and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6 parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed

  13. STEM CELL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ITS PROTECTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Suryo Utomo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This research discusses the possibility of patenting stem cells under the Indonesian patent law by focusing on two essential issues: (a what approaches should be chosen by the Indonesian government to protect stem cell research under the Indonesian Patent Act and non-patent regulations? and (b what types of stem cells can be protected under the Indonesian Patent Act? In order to provide comparative perspectives, this paper discusses the experience and policies of the US, German and South Korean governments in protecting stem cell research under their patent acts. Penelitian ini mendiskusikan kemungkinan mematenkan sel punca dalam hukum paten di Indonesia dengan memfokuskan pada dua isu pokok: (a Pendekatan apa yang sebaiknya dipilih oleh pemerintahan Indonesia untuk melindungi penelitian sel punca dalam hukum paten Indonesia dan peraturan non paten? (b Tipe sel punca apa yang dapat dilindungi dalam hukum paten Indonesia? Untuk mencakupi pendekatan melalui perbandingan dengan luar negeri, penelitian ini membahas pengalaman dan kebijakan di pemerintahan AS, Jerman, dan Korea Selatan dalam melindungi penelitan sel punca dalam hukum paten masing-masing negara.

  14. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease? Reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S.; Hudson, Peter J.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2016-01-01

    The dilution effect is the sort of idea that everyone wants to be true. If nature protects humans against infectious disease, imagine the implications: nature's value could be tallied in terms of human suffering avoided. This makes a potent argument for conservation, convincing even to those who would otherwise be disinclined to support conservation initiatives. The appeal of the dilution effect has been recognized by others: “the desire to make the case for conservation has led to broad claims regarding the benefits of nature conservation for human health” (Bauch et al. 2015). Randolph and Dobson (2012) were among the first to critique these claims, making the case that promotion of conservation to reduce Lyme disease risk, although well intentioned, was flawed. Along with Randolph and Dobson's critique, there have been several calls for a more nuanced scientific assessment of the relationship between biodiversity and disease transmission (Dunn 2010, Salkeld et al. 2013, Wood and Lafferty 2013, Young et al. 2013). In response, supporters of the dilution effect have instead increased the scope of their generalizations with review papers, press releases, and, like Levi et al. (2015), letters. These responses have been successful; it is not uncommon to read papers that repeat the assertion that biodiversity generally interferes with disease transmission and that conservation will therefore generally benefit human health. Here, we explain how Levi et al. (2015) and other, similar commentaries use selective interpretation and shifting definitions to argue for the generality of the dilution effect hypothesis.

  15. Protection of pancreatic beta-cells: is it feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, which is the biochemical hallmark of type 2 diabetes, mainly results from insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. However, the latter is crucial in the development of the disease because diabetes cannot occur without an impairment of insulin secretion. Beta-cell failure is also responsible for progressive loss of metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients and the eventual need for insulin treatment. An impairment of beta-cell function can be detected in several ways and can be observed already in pre-diabetic individuals. Histopathology studies documented that beta-cell volume is reduced in pre-diabetes and, to a greater extent, in type 2 diabetes mainly because the apoptotic rate of beta-cells is increased whereas neogenesis is intact. All anti-diabetic agents can improve, directly or indirectly, beta-cell function. However, only PPAR-gamma agonists and incretin-mimetic agents seem to have favorable effects on beta-cell morphology and volume. Many trials showed that type 2 diabetes can be prevented but few of them directly addressed the issue of beta-cell protection by the intervention used in the study. It is reasonable to conclude that in these trials diabetes prevention, which was based on the use of lifestyle changes (diet and/or exercise) or different drugs (tolbutamide, acarbose, metformin, glitazones, bezafibrate, orlistat, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers or pravastatin), depended also, or mainly, on a protection of the beta-cells but in most studies data on insulin secretion are not available or are insufficient to draw firm conclusions. The mechanisms of beta-cell protection in these trials, if any, remain unknown. They could be various and likely included reduced glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, inflammation, oxidant stress and/or apoptosis, an amelioration of islet blood flow and/or favorable changes in cation balance within the islets. Contrasting the decline and the

  16. Human gamma-satellite DNA maintains open chromatin structure and protects a transgene from epigenetic silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ebersole, Thomas; Kouprina, Natalay; Noskov, Vladimir N; Ohzeki, Jun-Ichirou; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Mravinac, Brankica; Sullivan, Beth A; Pavlicek, Adam; Dovat, Sinisa; Pack, Svetlana D; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Flanagan, Patrick T; Loukinov, Dmitri; Lobanenkov, Victor; Larionov, Vladimir

    2009-04-01

    The role of repetitive DNA sequences in pericentromeric regions with respect to kinetochore/heterochromatin structure and function is poorly understood. Here, we use a mouse erythroleukemia cell (MEL) system for studying how repetitive DNA assumes or is assembled into different chromatin structures. We show that human gamma-satellite DNA arrays allow a transcriptionally permissive chromatin conformation in an adjacent transgene and efficiently protect it from epigenetic silencing. These arrays contain CTCF and Ikaros binding sites. In MEL cells, this gamma-satellite DNA activity depends on binding of Ikaros proteins involved in differentiation along the hematopoietic pathway. Given our discovery of gamma-satellite DNA in pericentromeric regions of most human chromosomes and a dynamic chromatin state of gamma-satellite arrays in their natural location, we suggest that gamma-satellite DNA represents a unique region of the functional centromere with a possible role in preventing heterochromatin spreading beyond the pericentromeric region.

  17. Remifentanil protects human keratinocytes against hypoxia-reoxygenation injury through activation of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kwon

    Full Text Available The proliferation, differentiation, and migration of keratinocytes are essential in the early stages of wound healing. Hypoxia-Reoxygenation (H/R injury to keratinocytes can occur in various stressful environments such as surgery, trauma, and various forms of ulcers. The effects of remifentanil on human keratinocytes under hypoxia-reoxygenation have not been fully studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of remifentanil on the proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagic activation of human keratinocytes during hypoxic-reoxygenation. Human keratinocytes were cultured under 1% oxygen tension for 24 h. The cells were then treated with various concentrations of remifentanil (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng/mL for 2 h. Thereafter, the cells were reoxygenated for 12 h at 37°C. We measured cell viability via MTT assay. Using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis, we measured the expression levels of proteins associated with apoptosis and autophagy. Quantification of apoptotic cells was performed using flow cytometer analysis and autophagic vacuoles were observed under a fluorescence microscope. Remifentanil treatment brought about an increase in the proliferation of human keratinocytes damaged by hypoxia-reoxygenation and decreased the apoptotic cell death, enhancing autophagic activity. However, the autophagy pathway inhibitor 3-MA inhibited the protective effect of remifentanil in hypoxia-reoxygenation injury. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that remifentanil treatment stimulated autophagy and reduced apoptotic cell death in a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of human keratinocytes. Our results provide additional insights into the relationship between apoptosis and autophagy.

  18. Sickle cell trait protects against Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billo, Mounkaila A; Johnson, Eric S; Doumbia, Seydou O; Poudiougou, Belco; Sagara, Issaka; Diawara, Sory I; Diakité, Mahamadou; Diallo, Mouctar; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Tounkara, Anatole; Rice, Janet; James, Mark A; Krogstad, Donald J

    2012-10-01

    Although sickle cell trait protects against severe disease due to Plasmodium falciparum, it has not been clear whether sickle trait also protects against asymptomatic infection (parasitemia). To address this question, the authors identified 171 persistently smear-negative children and 450 asymptomatic persistently smear-positive children in Bancoumana, Mali (June 1996 to June 1998). They then followed both groups for 2 years using a cohort-based strategy. Among the 171 children with persistently negative smears, the median time for conversion to smear-positive was longer for children with sickle trait than for children without (274 vs. 108 days, P sickle trait than for children without (190 vs. 365 days; P = 0.02). These protective effects of sickle trait against asymptomatic P. falciparum infection under conditions of natural transmission were demonstrable using a cohort-based approach but not when the same data were examined using a cross-sectional approach.

  19. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  20. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  1. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Habib

    Full Text Available Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE, which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8-10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia.

  2. VACCINES. A mucosal vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis generates two waves of protective memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stary, Georg; Olive, Andrew; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Gondek, David; Alvarez, David; Basto, Pamela A; Perro, Mario; Vrbanac, Vladimir D; Tager, Andrew M; Shi, Jinjun; Yethon, Jeremy A; Farokhzad, Omid C; Langer, Robert; Starnbach, Michael N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2015-06-19

    Genital Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infection induces protective immunity that depends on interferon-γ-producing CD4 T cells. By contrast, we report that mucosal exposure to ultraviolet light (UV)-inactivated Ct (UV-Ct) generated regulatory T cells that exacerbated subsequent Ct infection. We show that mucosal immunization with UV-Ct complexed with charge-switching synthetic adjuvant particles (cSAPs) elicited long-lived protection in conventional and humanized mice. UV-Ct-cSAP targeted immunogenic uterine CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs), whereas UV-Ct accumulated in tolerogenic CD11b(-)CD103(+) DCs. Regardless of vaccination route, UV-Ct-cSAP induced systemic memory T cells, but only mucosal vaccination induced effector T cells that rapidly seeded uterine mucosa with resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells). Optimal Ct clearance required both T(RM) seeding and subsequent infection-induced recruitment of circulating memory T cells. Thus, UV-Ct-cSAP vaccination generated two synergistic memory T cell subsets with distinct migratory properties. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Protective effects of remifentanil against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Kim, Do-Wan; Kim, Eun-Jung; Park, Bong-Soo; Yoon, Ji-Uk; Kim, Hyung-Joon; Park, Jeong-Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Bone injury is common in many clinical situations, such as surgery or trauma. During surgery, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production decreases the quality and quantity of osteoblasts. Remifentanil decreases ROS production, reducing oxidative stress and the inflammatory response. We investigated remifentanil's protective effects against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress in osteoblasts. To investigate the effect of remifentanil on human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells, the cells were incubated with 1 ng/ml of remifentanil for 2 h before exposure to H 2 O 2 . For induction of oxidative stress, hFOB cells were then treated with 200 µM H 2 O 2 for 2 h. To evaluate the effect on autophagy, a separate group of cells were incubated with 1 mM 3-methyladenine (3-MA) before treatment with remifentanil and H 2 O 2 . Cell viability and apoptotic cell death were determined via MTT assay and Hoechst staining, respectively. Mineralized matrix formation was visualized using alizarin red S staining. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression levels of bone-related genes. Cell viability and mineralized matrix formation increased on remifentanil pretreatment before exposure to H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress. As determined via western blot analysis, remifentanil pretreatment increased the expression of bone-related genes (Col I, BMP-2, osterix, and TGF-β). However , pretreatment with 3-MA before exposure to remifentanil and H 2 O 2 inhibited remifentanil's protective effects on hFOB cells during oxidative stress. We showed that remifentanil prevents oxidative damage in hFOB cells via a mechanism that may be highly related to autophagy. Further clinical studies are required to investigate its potential as a therapeutic agent.

  4. Dendritic cells therapy confers a protective microenvironment in murine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, S; Litwin, S; Barrientos, G; Szereday, L; Chuluyan, E; Bartho, J S; Arck, P C; Blois, S M

    2006-11-01

    The fetal-placental unit is a semi-allograft and immunological recognition of pregnancy, together with the subsequent response of the maternal immune system, is necessary for a successful pregnancy. Dendritic cells (DC) show a biological plasticity that confers them special characteristics regulating both immunity and tolerance. Therapy employing DC proved to diminish the abortion in the DBA/2J-mated CBA/J females; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we evaluated whether DC therapy influences the presence of immunoregulatory populations of cells at the fetal-maternal interface. To address this hypothesis, we analysed the pregnancy-protective CD8, gammadelta cell populations as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) expression at the fetal-maternal interface from abortion-prone female mice that had previously received adoptive transfer of syngeneic DC. Syngeneic DC therapy induced an increase in the number of CD8 and gammadelta cells. Additionally, an upregulation of TGF-beta1 and PIBF expression could be detected after DC transfer. We suggest that DC therapy differentially upregulates a regulatory/protective population of cells at the fetal-maternal interface. It is reasonable to assure that this mechanism would be responsible for the lower abortion rate.

  5. Protective Effect of Gwakhyangjeonggisan Herbal Acupuncture Solution in Glioblastoma Cells: Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Seok Lee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Neurological disorders have been one of main therapeutic targets of acupuncture. The present study investigated the protective effects of Gwakhyangjeonggisan herbal acupuncture solution (GHAS. Methods : We performed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in glioblastoma cells, and did microarray analysis with cells exposed to reactive oxigen species (ROS of hydrogen peroxide by 8.0 k Human cDNA, with cut-off level of 2-fold changes in gene expression. Results : MTT assay showed protective effect of GHAS on the glioblastoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. When glioblastoma cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, 24 genes were downregulated. When the cells were pretreated with GHAS before exposure to hydrogen peroxide, 46 genes were downregulated. Many of the genes downregulated by hydrogen peroxide stimulation were decreased in the amount of downregulation or reversed to upregulation. Conclusions : The gene expression changes observed in the present study are supposed to be related to the protective molecular mechanism of GHAS in the glioblastoma cells exposed to ROS stress.

  6. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  7. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  8. 10 CFR 63.321 - Individual protection standard for human intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Individual protection standard for human intrusion. 63.321... Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.321 Individual protection standard for human intrusion. (a) DOE must... intrusion (see § 63.322) could occur without recognition by the drillers. (b) DOE must demonstrate that...

  9. The Mitochondrial-Derived Peptide Humanin Protects RPE Cells From Oxidative Stress, Senescence, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Spee, Chris; Mehta, Hemal H; Wan, Junxiang; Yen, Kelvin; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the expression of humanin (HN) in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and its effect on oxidative stress-induced cell death, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and senescence. Humanin localization in RPE cells and polarized RPE monolayers was assessed by confocal microscopy. Human RPE cells were treated with 150 μM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) in the absence/presence of HN (0.5-10 μg/mL) for 24 hours. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by XF96 analyzer. Retinal pigment epithelial cell death and caspase-3 activation, mitochondrial biogenesis and senescence were analyzed by TUNEL, immunoblot analysis, mitochondrial DNA copy number, SA-β-Gal staining, and p16INK4a expression and HN levels by ELISA. Oxidative stress-induced changes in transepithelial resistance were studied in RPE monolayers with and without HN cotreatment. A prominent localization of HN was found in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments of hRPE. Humanin cotreatment inhibited tBH-induced reactive oxygen species formation and significantly restored mitochondrial bioenergetics in hRPE cells. Exogenous HN was taken up by RPE and colocalized with mitochondria. The oxidative stress-induced decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics was prevented by HN cotreatment. Humanin treatment increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and upregulated mitochondrial transcription factor A, a key biogenesis regulator protein. Humanin protected RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death by STAT3 phosphorylation and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. Humanin treatment inhibited oxidant-induced senescence. Polarized RPE demonstrated elevated cellular HN and increased resistance to cell death. Humanin protected RPE cells against oxidative stress-induced cell death and restored mitochondrial function. Our data suggest a potential role for HN therapy in the prevention of retinal degeneration, including AMD.

  10. Hypothermia postpones DNA damage repair in irradiated cells and protects against cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Brandon J.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Parekh, Palak [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Griko, Yuri V. [Radiation and Space Biotechnology Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G. [Biology Department, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Bonner, William M. [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Martin, Olga A., E-mail: sedelnio@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Hibernation is an established strategy used by some homeothermic organisms to survive cold environments. In true hibernation, the core body temperature of an animal may drop to below 0 {sup o}C and metabolic activity almost cease. The phenomenon of hibernation in humans is receiving renewed interest since several cases of victims exhibiting core body temperatures as low as 13.7 {sup o}C have been revived with minimal lasting deficits. In addition, local cooling during radiotherapy has resulted in normal tissue protection. The experiments described in this paper were prompted by the results of a very limited pilot study, which showed a suppressed DNA repair response of mouse lymphocytes collected from animals subjected to 7-Gy total body irradiation under hypothermic (13 {sup o}C) conditions, compared to normothermic controls. Here we report that human BJ-hTERT cells exhibited a pronounced radioprotective effect on clonogenic survival when cooled to 13 {sup o}C during and 12 h after irradiation. Mild hypothermia at 20 and 30 {sup o}C also resulted in some radioprotection. The neutral comet assay revealed an apparent lack on double strand break (DSB) rejoining at 13 {sup o}C. Extension of the mouse lymphocyte study to ex vivo-irradiated human lymphocytes confirmed lower levels of induced phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) and persistence of the lesions at hypothermia compared to the normal temperature. Parallel studies of radiation-induced oxidatively clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) revealed partial repair at 13 {sup o}C compared to the rapid repair at 37 {sup o}C. For both {gamma}-H2AX foci and OCDLs, the return of lymphocytes to 37 {sup o}C resulted in the resumption of normal repair kinetics. These results, as well as observations made by others and reviewed in this study, have implications for understanding the radiobiology and protective mechanisms underlying hypothermia and potential opportunities for exploitation in terms of protecting normal tissues against

  11. Islet Brain 1 Protects Insulin Producing Cells against Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Brajkovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intake of saturated free fatty acids is associated with diabetes and may contribute to the impairment of functional beta cell mass. Mitogen activated protein kinase 8 interacting protein 1 also called islet brain 1 (IB1 is a candidate gene for diabetes that is required for beta cell survival and glucose-induced insulin secretion (GSIS. In this study we investigated whether IB1 expression is required for preserving beta cell survival and function in response to palmitate. Chronic exposure of MIN6 and isolated rat islets cells to palmitate led to reduction of the IB1 mRNA and protein content. Diminution of IB1 mRNA and protein level relied on the inducible cAMP early repressor activity and proteasome-mediated degradation, respectively. Suppression of IB1 level mimicked the harmful effects of palmitate on the beta cell survival and GSIS. Conversely, ectopic expression of IB1 counteracted the deleterious effects of palmitate on the beta cell survival and insulin secretion. These findings highlight the importance in preserving the IB1 content for protecting beta cell against lipotoxicity in diabetes.

  12. Differential protection of injured retinal ganglion cell dendrites by brimonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, James D; Duong-Polk, Karen X; Hammond, Dustin; Chindasub, Panida; Leung, Christopher Kai-Shun; Weinreb, Robert N

    2015-01-29

    To determine whether brimonidine protects against the retraction and loss of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendrites after optic nerve crush (ONC). Fluorescent RGCs of mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under the control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-YFP mice) were imaged in vivo and assigned to one of six groups according to dendrite structure. The mice then received brimonidine every other day starting 2 days before, or 2 or 6 days after, unilateral ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Total dendrite length, dendrite branching complexity, and the time until complete loss of dendrites were assessed weekly for 4 weeks. Overall, brimonidine treatment significantly slowed the complete loss of RGC dendrites and significantly slowed the reduction of total dendrite length and branching complexity. Separate analysis of each RGC group showed brimonidine significantly delayed the time until complete loss of dendrites in four of the RGC groups. These delays generally were similar when treatment started either 2 days before or 2 days after ONC, but were smaller or absent when treatment started 6 days after ONC Protection against loss of total dendrite length and loss of branching complexity was observed in three of the RGC groups. In two of these RGC groups, protective effects persisted until the end of the study. Brimonidine protects many RGC types against dendrite retraction, loss of branching complexity, and complete loss of dendrites following ONC. However, the pattern and magnitude of this protection differs substantially among different RGC types. These results indicate that requirements for RGC-protective therapies following optic nerve injury may differ among RGC types. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. L-carnitine protects C2C12 cells against mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Ravaut, Gaétan; Bernard, Arnaud; Demarquoy, Jean

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify and characterize the protective effect that L-carnitine exerted against an oxidative stress in C2C12 cells. METHODS Myoblastic C2C12 cells were treated with menadione, a vitamin K analog that engenders oxidative stress, and the protective effect of L-carnitine (a nutrient involved in fatty acid metabolism and the control of the oxidative process), was assessed by monitoring various parameters related to the oxidative stress, autophagy and cell death. RESULTS Associated with its physiological function, a muscle cell metabolism is highly dependent on oxygen and may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially under pathological conditions. High levels of ROS are known to induce injuries in cell structure as they interact at many levels in cell function. In C2C12 cells, a treatment with menadione induced a loss of transmembrane mitochondrial potential, an increase in mitochondrial production of ROS; it also induces autophagy and was able to provoke cell death. Pre-treatment of the cells with L-carnitine reduced ROS production, diminished autophagy and protected C2C12 cells against menadione-induced deleterious effects. CONCLUSION In conclusion, L-carnitine limits the oxidative stress in these cells and prevents cell death. PMID:28289521

  14. Protective Effector Cells of the Recombinant Asp f3 Anti-Aspergillosis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Ito, James I; Kalkum, Markus

    2012-01-01

    An Aspergillus fumigatus vaccine based on recombinant Asp f3-protein has the potential to prevent aspergillosis in humans, a devastating fungal disease that is the prime obstacle to the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation. This vaccine protects cortisone acetate (CA)-immunosuppressed mice from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis via CD4(+) T cell mediators. Aside from these mediators, the nature of downstream fungicidal effectors is not well understood. Neutrophils and macrophages protect immunocompetent individuals from invasive fungal infections, and selective neutrophil depletion rendered mice susceptible to aspergillosis whereas macrophage depletion failed to increase fungal susceptibility. We investigated the effect of neutrophil depletion on rAsp f3-vaccine protection, and explored differences in pathophysiology and susceptibility between CA-immunosuppression and neutrophil depletion. In addition to being protective under CA-immunosuppression, the vaccine also had a protective effect in neutrophil-depleted mice. However, in non-immunized mice, a 10-fold higher conidial dose was required to induce similar susceptibility to infection with neutrophil depletion than with CA-immunosuppression. The lungs of non-immunized neutrophil-depleted mice became invaded by a patchy dense mycelium with highly branched hyphae, and the peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate consisted mainly of CD3(+) T cells and largely lacked macrophages. In contrast, lungs of non-immunized CA-immunosuppressed mice were more evenly scattered with short hyphal elements. With rAsp f3-vaccination, the lungs were largely clear of fungal burden under either immunosuppressive condition. We conclude that neutrophils, although important for innate antifungal protection of immunocompetent hosts, are not the relevant effectors for rAsp f3-vaccine derived protection of immunosuppressed hosts. It is therefore more likely that macrophages represent the crucial effectors of the rAsp f3-based vaccine.

  15. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf) polyphenols protect human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) from oxidative damage induced by high glucose, hydrogen peroxide and oxidised low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Leiva, E; Guzmán, L; Orrego, R; Fernández, P; González, M; Radojkovic, C; Zuñiga, F A; Lamperti, L; Pastene, E; Aguayo, C

    2014-05-15

    The aromatic herb Cymbopogon citratus Stapf is widely used in tropical and subtropical countries in cooking, as a herbal tea, and in traditional medicine for hypertension and diabetes. Some of its properties have been associated with the in vitro antioxidant effect of polyphenols isolated from their aerial parts. However, little is known about C. citratus effects on endothelial cells oxidative injury. Using chromatographic procedures, a polyphenol-rich fraction was obtained from C. citratus (CCF) and their antioxidant properties were assessed by cooper-induced LDL oxidation assay. The main constituents of the active CCF, identified by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS), were chlorogenic acid, isoorientin and swertiajaponin. CCF 10 and 100 μg/ml diminishes reactive oxidative species (ROS) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs), challenged with high D-glucose (60% inhibition), hydrogen peroxide (80% inhibition) or oxidised low-density lipoprotein (55% inhibition). CCF 10 or 100 μg/ml did not change nitric oxide (NO) production. However, CCF was able to inhibit vasoconstriction induced by the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619, which suggest a NO-independent vasodilatador effect on blood vessels. Our results suggest that lemon grass antioxidant properties might prevent endothelial dysfunction associated to an oxidative imbalance promoted by different oxidative stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  17. Autophagy protects meniscal cells from glucocorticoids-induced apoptosis via inositol trisphosphate receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Gu, Wen; Cai, Gui-Quan; Peng, Jian-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular injection of glucocorticoids (GCs) has been widely used in the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, several studies showed that GCs had toxic effects on chondrocytes as well as synovial cells. Previously we reported the protective role of autophagy in the degeneration of meniscal tissues. However, the effects of GCs on autophagy in the meniscal cells have not been fully elucidated. To investigate whether GCs can regulate autophagy in human meniscal cells, the meniscal cells were cultured in vitro and exposed in the presence of dexamethasone. The levels of apoptosis and autophagy were investigated via flow cytometry as well as western blotting analysis. The changes of the aggrecanases were measured using real-time PCR. The role of autophagy in dexamethasone-induced apoptosis was investigated using pharmacological agents and RNA interference technique. An agonist of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) was used to investigate the mechanism of dexamethasone-induced autophagy. The results showed that dexamethasone induced autophagy as well as apoptosis in normal human meniscal cells. Using RNA interference technique and pharmacological agents, our results showed that autophagy protected the meniscal cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. Our results also indicated that dexamethasone increased the mRNA levels of aggrecanases. This catabolic effect of dexamethasone was enhanced by 3-MA, the autophagy inhibitor. Furthermore, our results showed that dexamethasone induced autophagy via suppressing the phosphorylation of IP3R. In summary, our results indicated that autophagy protected meniscal cells from GCs-induced apoptosis via inositol trisphosphate receptor signaling.

  18. Immunoregulation in Human American Leishmaniasis: Balancing Pathology and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollob, Kenneth J.; Viana, Agostinho G.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of diseases with distinct, and sometimes overlapping, characteristics. The common thread in all forms of leishmaniasis is the infection by the parasite Leishmania belonging to the genus Leishmania. Upon infection of humans there can be at least three outcomes, 1) control of Leishmania by the host immune response resulting in asymptomatic disease, 2) patent infection and development of a relatively mild form of leishmaniasis, and 3) patent infection and development of severe clinical forms. The factors that determine the outcome of an initial inoculation with Leishmania are many, with the species of Leishmania representing one of the strongest predictive factors for the development of a given clinical form of disease. This is seen with L. braziliensis and L. amazonensis, infection leading mostly to tegumentary forms of disease, and L. infantum with the potential to induce visceral disease. However, it is also clear that the host immune response is a key factor in disease progression, not only responsible for control of Leishmania, but also playing an important role in disease progression and pathology. This duality between protective and pathogenic immune responses in individuals infected with Leishmania in the Americas is the focus of this review. PMID:24471648

  19. Punicalagin promotes autophagy to protect primary human syncytiotrophoblasts from apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Baosheng; Longtine, Mark S; Nelson, D Michael

    2016-02-01

    Punicalagin is a prominent polyphenol in pomegranate juice that protects cultured syncytiotrophoblasts from stress-induced apoptosis. Here, we test the hypothesis that punicalagin has this effect by inhibiting the mTOR kinase pathway to enhance autophagic turnover and limit apoptosis in cultured primary human syncytiotrophoblasts. In syncytiotrophoblasts, starvation, rapamycin, or punicalagin all decreased the expression of phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, a downstream target of the mTOR kinase, and of the autophagy markers, LC3-II and p62. In contrast, in the presence of bafilomycin, an inhibitor of late stages of autophagy and degradation in the autophagolysosome, syncytiotrophoblasts exposed to starvation, rapamycin, or punicalagin all showed increased levels of LC3-II and p62. The number of LC3-II punctae also increased in punicalagin-treated syncytiotrophoblasts exposed to chloroquine, another inhibitor of autophagic degradation, and punicalagin increased the number of lysosomes. The apoptosis-reducing effect of punicalagin was attenuated by inhibition of autophagy using bafilomycin or knockdown of the autophagy related gene, ATG16L1. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that punicalagin modulates the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis to promote survival in cultured syncytiotrophoblasts. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  20. Human migration, protected areas, and conservation outreach in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Jonathan D; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Kefauver, Shawn C

    2014-06-01

    A recent discussion debates the extent of human in-migration around protected areas (PAs) in the tropics. One proposed argument is that rural migrants move to bordering areas to access conservation outreach benefits. A counter proposal maintains that PAs have largely negative effects on local populations and that outreach initiatives even if successful present insufficient benefits to drive in-migration. Using data from Tanzania, we examined merits of statistical tests and spatial methods used previously to evaluate migration near PAs and applied hierarchical modeling with appropriate controls for demographic and geographic factors to advance the debate. Areas bordering national parks in Tanzania did not have elevated rates of in-migration. Low baseline population density and high vegetation productivity with low interannual variation rather than conservation outreach explained observed migration patterns. More generally we argue that to produce results of conservation policy significance, analyses must be conducted at appropriate scales, and we caution against use of demographic data without appropriate controls when drawing conclusions about migration dynamics. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Human cord blood cells can differentiate into retinal nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike-Kiriyama, Naoko; Adachi, Yasushi; Minamino, Keizo; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Nakano, Keiji; Koike, Yasushi; Yamada, Haruhiko; Mukaide, Hiromi; Shigematsu, Akio; Mizokami, Tomomi; Matsumura, Miyo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and dystrophy are the major causes of blindness in the developed world. It has been reported that human cord blood cells (HCBCs) can differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. We have recently demonstrated that bone marrow cells (BMCs) of both mice and rats can differentiate into retinal nerve cells (RNCs). In the present study, we show the differentiation capacity of HCBCs into RNCs in vivo. We transplanted lineage-negative HCBCs into the subretinal space of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Two weeks after the transplantation, some of the transplanted cells expressed human nestin, human MAP2, human neuron specific enolase (NSE), beta-III tubulin and also rhodopsin. These results indicate that HCBCs can differentiate into RNCs and suggest that our new strategy could be used for the regeneration of retinal nerve cells in degenerative or dystrophic diseases.

  2. Human Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Beata; Messier, Elise M.; Chu, Hong Wei; Mason, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke (CS) is a highly complex mixture and many of its components are known carcinogens, mutagens, and other toxic substances. CS induces oxidative stress and cell death, and this cell toxicity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in human alveolar epithelial type I-like (ATI-like) cells. These are isolated type II cells that are differentiating toward the type I cell phenotype in vitro and have lost many type II cell markers and express type I cell markers. ATI-like cells were more sensitive to CSE than alveolar type II cells, which maintained their differentiated phenotype in vitro. We observed disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis and necrosis that were detected by double staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide or Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide and TUNEL assay after treatment with CSE. We also detected caspase 3 and caspase 7 activities and lipid peroxidation. CSE induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased expression of Nrf2, HO-1, Hsp70 and Fra1. Moreover, we found that Nrf2 knockdown sensitized ATI-like cells to CSE and Nrf2 overexpression provided protection against CSE-induced cell death. We also observed that two antioxidant compounds N-acetylcysteine and trolox protected ATI-like cells against injury by CSE. Conclusions Our study indicates that Nrf2 activation is a major factor in cellular defense of the human alveolar epithelium against CSE-induced toxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidant agents that modulate Nrf2 would be expected to restore antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes and to prevent CS-related lung injury and perhaps lessen the development of emphysema. PMID:22163265

  3. Human Satellite Cell Isolation and Xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steven M; Tamaki, Stanley; Xu, Xiaoti; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells are mononucleated cells of the skeletal muscle lineage that exist beneath the basal lamina juxtaposed to the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. It is widely accepted that satellite cells mediate skeletal muscle regeneration. Within the satellite cell pool of adult muscle are skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also called satellite stem cells, which fulfill criteria of tissue stem cells: They proliferate and their progeny either occupies the adult MuSC niche during self-renewal or differentiates to regenerate mature muscle fibers. Here, we describe robust methods for the isolation of enriched populations of human satellite cells containing MuSCs from fresh human muscle, utilizing mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and purification by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We also describe a process for xenotransplantation of human satellite cells into mouse muscle by injection into irradiated, immunodeficient, mouse leg muscle with concurrent notexin or bupivacaine muscle injury to increase engraftment efficiency. The engraftment of human MuSCs and the formation of human muscle can then be analyzed by histological and immunofluorescence staining, or subjected to in vivo experimentation.

  4. Scutellaria radix Extract as a Natural UV Protectant for Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Choi, Go Woon; An, Sang Mi; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Hyeong-Ho; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces oxidative injury and inflammation in human skin. Scutellaria radix (SR, the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) contains flavonoids with high UV absorptivity and antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential use of SR extract as an additive in cosmetic products for UV protection. SR extract and its butanol (BuOH) fraction strongly absorbed UV radiation and displayed free radical scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radials and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. They also attenuated the UV-induced death of HaCaT cells. Sunscreen creams, with or without supplementation of SR extract BuOH fraction, were tested in vivo in human trials to evaluate potential skin irritation and determine the sun protection factor (SPF). Both sunscreen creams induced no skin irritation. A sunscreen cream containing 24% ZnO showed an SPF value of 17.8, and it increased to 22.7 when supplemented with 5% SR extract BuOH fraction. This study suggests that SR-derived materials are useful as safe cosmetic additives that provide UV protection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Authentication and banking of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Richard; Auerbach, Jonathan

    2009-12-01

    Pluripotent human stem cell lines from embryos or reprogrammed adult cells are not all alike. Cell lines differ widely in their propensity for differentiation, their chromosomal integrity and epigenetic state, immunological profiles, and their availability for research. It is important that all pluripotent cell lines be protected from loss by being properly banked and authenticated, which will also protect current experimental data by enabling its future reproducibility. This unit considers basic guidelines for banking and authentication of pluripotent stem cells that should be easily implementable within any laboratory. Cell Banking is the disciplined preservation of a cell stock in the originally obtained state, as well as stocks representing the baseline state for experimental efforts. Each of these stocks must be authenticated appropriately. Authentication of pluripotent lines verifies five properties: the unique identity of the line, its sterility or freedom from contaminating microorganisms and pathogens, the integrity and stability of its genome, its expression of typical markers of the stem cell phenotype, and its pluripotency upon differentiation. This unit lists and compares several assays to verify each of these stem cell line properties. Thanks to recent advances in molecular biology and the availability of state-of-the-art assays from service providers, the time and material costs of banking and authentication are not excessive for the typical research laboratory. Copyright 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Potent protection of gallic acid against DNA oxidation: Results of human and animal experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferk, Franziska; Chakraborty, Asima [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Jaeger, Walter [Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Diagnostic, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kundi, Michael [Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bichler, Julia; Misik, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Wagner, Karl-Heinz [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Sagmeister, Sandra [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haidinger, Gerald [Department of Epidemiology, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hoelzl, Christine; Nersesyan, Armen [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Dusinska, Maria [Health Effect Laboratory, Center for Ecological Economics, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Simic, Tatjana [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is a constituent of plant derived foods, beverages and herbal remedies. We investigated its DNA protective properties in a placebo controlled human intervention trial in single cell gel electrophoresis experiments. Supplementation of drinking water with GA (12.8 mg/person/d) for three days led to a significant reduction of DNA migration attributable to oxidised pyrimidines (endonuclease III sensitive sites) and oxidised purines (formamidopyrimidine glycosylase sensitive sites) in lymphocytes of healthy individuals by 75% and 64% respectively. Also DNA damage caused by treatment of the cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced after GA consumption (by 41%). These effects were paralleled by an increase of the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathion-S-transferase-{pi}) and a decrease of intracellular ROS concentrations in lymphocytes, while no alterations of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), of malondialdehyde levels in serum and of the urinary excretion of isoprostanes were found. Experiments with rats showed that GA reduces oxidatively damaged DNA in lymphocytes, liver, colon and lungs and protects these organs against {gamma}-irradiation-induced strand breaks and formation of oxidatively damaged DNA-bases. Furthermore, the number of radiation-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci was decreased by 43% after oral administration of the phenolic. Since we did not find alterations of the TAC in plasma and lipid peroxidation of cell membranes but intracellular effects it is likely that the antioxidant properties of GA seen in vivo are not due to direct scavenging of radicals but rather to indirect mechanisms (e.g. protection against ROS via activation of transcription factors). As the amount of GA used in the intervention trial is similar to the daily intake in Middle Europe (18 mg/person/day), our findings indicate that it may contribute to prevention of

  7. Report on Liver Cell Transplantation Using Human Fetal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosi, Giada; Chinnici, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    In an era of organ shortage, human fetuses donated after medically indicated abortion could be considered a potential liver donor for hepatic cell isolation. We investigated transplantation of fetal liver cells as a strategy to support liver functionality in end-stage liver disease. Here, we report our protocol of human fetal liver cells (hFLC) isolation in fetuses from 17 to 22 gestational weeks, and our clinical procedure of hFLC transplantation through the splenic artery.

  8. Human T Cell Development, Localization, and Function throughout Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Brahma V; Connors, Thomas J; Farber, Donna L

    2018-02-20

    Throughout life, T cells coordinate multiple aspects of adaptive immunity, including responses to pathogens, allergens, and tumors. In mouse models, the role of T cells is studied in the context of a specific type of pathogen, antigen, or disease condition over a limited time frame, whereas in humans, T cells control multiple insults simultaneously throughout the body and maintain immune homeostasis over decades. In this review, we discuss how humancells develop and provide essential immune protection at different life stages and highlight tissue localization and subset delineation as key determinants of the T cell functional role in immune responses. We also discuss how anatomic compartments undergo distinct age-associated changes in T cell subset composition and function over a lifetime. It is important to consider age and tissue influences on humancells when developing targeted strategies to modulate T cell-mediated immunity in vaccines and immunotherapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pigment epithelium-derived factor protects retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleenor Debra L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are responsible for the transmission of visual signals to the brain. Progressive death of RGCs occurs in glaucoma and several other retinal diseases, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF is a potent antiangiogenic, neurotrophic and neuroprotective protein that can protect neurons from a variety of pathologic insults. We tested the effects of PEDF on the survival of cultured adult rat RGCs in the presence of glaucoma-like insults, including cytotoxicity induced by glutamate or withdrawal of trophic factors. Results Cultured adult rat RGCs exposed to glutamate for 3 days showed signs of cytotoxicity and death. The toxic effect of glutamate was concentration-dependent (EC50 = 31 μM. In the presence of 100 μM glutamate, RGC number decreased to 55 ± 4% of control (mean ± SEM, n = 76; P 50 values of 13.6 ng/mL (glutamate and 3.4 ng/mL (trophic factor withdrawal, respectively. At 100 ng/mL, PEDF completely protected the cells from both insults. Inhibitors of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 significantly reduced the protective effects of PEDF. Conclusion We demonstrated that PEDF potently and efficaciously protected adult rat RGCs from glutamate- and trophic factor withdrawal-mediated cytotoxicity, via the activation of the NFκB and ERK1/2 pathways. The neuroprotective effect of PEDF represents a novel approach for potential treatment of retinopathies, such as glaucoma.

  10. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  11. Energy Generation in the Human Body by the Human Cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We adapted the thermodynamics equation for energy generation in a diesel engine in modeling energy generation in human body by the human cells by doing a thorough study on both systems and saw that the process of energy generation is the same in them. We equally saw that the stages involved in energy generation ...

  12. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Colin F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae. Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1 were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1. Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the

  13. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  14. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  15. Emerging concepts in tissue-resident T cells: lessons from humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Joseph J C; Farber, Donna L

    2015-07-01

    Intensified efforts to promote protective T cell-based immunity in vaccines and immunotherapies have created a compelling need to expand our understanding of human T cell function and maintenance beyond its characterization in peripheral blood. Mouse studies of T cell immunity show that, in response to infection, T cells migrate to diverse sites and persist as tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM), which mediate rapid in situ protection on antigen recall. Here we discuss new approaches to probe human T cell immunity, including novel sampling, that indicate a broad distribution and high frequency of human TRM in multiple sites. These newer findings further implicate anatomic compartmentalization as a generalized mechanism for long-term maintenance of human T cells throughout life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  17. A multivalent and cross-protective vaccine strategy against arenaviruses associated with human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya F Kotturi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses are the causative pathogens of severe hemorrhagic fever and aseptic meningitis in humans, for which no licensed vaccines are currently available. Pathogen heterogeneity within the Arenaviridae family poses a significant challenge for vaccine development. The main hypothesis we tested in the present study was whether it is possible to design a universal vaccine strategy capable of inducing simultaneous HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against 7 pathogenic arenaviruses (including the lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Lassa, Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Whitewater Arroyo viruses, either through the identification of widely conserved epitopes, or by the identification of a collection of epitopes derived from multiple arenavirus species. By inoculating HLA transgenic mice with a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs expressing the different arenavirus proteins, we identified 10 HLA-A02 and 10 HLA-A03-restricted epitopes that are naturally processed in human antigen-presenting cells. For some of these epitopes we were able to demonstrate cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses, further increasing the coverage afforded by the epitope set against each different arenavirus species. Importantly, we showed that immunization of HLA transgenic mice with an epitope cocktail generated simultaneous CD8+ T cell responses against all 7 arenaviruses, and protected mice against challenge with rVACVs expressing either Old or New World arenavirus glycoproteins. In conclusion, the set of identified epitopes allows broad, non-ethnically biased coverage of all 7 viral species targeted by our studies.

  18. The Functions of Selected Human Rights Institutions and Related Role-Players in the Protection of Human Rights in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Chitimira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various violations of the human rights of ordinary people and human rights defenders have been reported in Zimbabwe since the late 1980s. It is widely acknowledged that such violations have been perpetrated mostly by the government through its different organs for political and other related reasons. Human rights violations were also easily committed against ordinary people and human rights defenders because there was no Constitution that adequately protected such people's fundamental human rights (including their civil and political rights and their socio-economic rights in Zimbabwe. Given this background, the article discusses the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe, in the light of the Zimbabwe Constitution Amendment Act 20 of 2013 (Zimbabwe Constitution 2013. This is done in order to investigate whether the promotion, protection, enforcement and respect for human rights in Zimbabwe has now improved. To this end, the functions of selected national human rights institutions and other related role-players, namely civil society, the judiciary, the law enforcement organs and the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission, are briefly discussed first. Secondly, the functions of selected regional and international institutions, namely the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the United Nations are discussed in relation to the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe. Thereafter, concluding remarks and possible recommendations that could be utilised to combat human rights violations and enhance the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe are provided.

  19. Mesenchymal origin of multipotent human testis-derived stem cells in human testicular cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J. V.; van Daalen, S. K. M.; Korver, C. M.; Repping, S.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to mouse germ cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, the pluripotent state of human testis-derived embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like that spontaneously arise in primary testicular cell cultures remains controversial. Recent studies have shown that these cells closely resemble multipotent

  20. Strategies for Protecting and Implementing Human Rights in Today

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos Oltra, Salvador; Añón Roig, María José

    2010-01-01

    Human Rights and integration: and appraisal from Europe. Conference on Human Rigths Research Centres and Institutes. December 2-3, 2010. Institut de Drets Humans. Universitat de València.Duración:49M

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  2. Carotenoids in fresh and processed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits protect cells from oxidative stress injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Rita; Petruk, Ganna; Raiola, Assunta; Barone, Amalia; Monti, Daria Maria; Rigano, Maria Manuela

    2017-03-01

    Lipophilic antioxidants in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits exert important functions in reducing the risk of human diseases. Here the effect of thermal processing on the antioxidant activity of lipophilic extracts from the commercial tomato hybrid 'Zebrino' was analysed. Carotenoid content and lipophilic antioxidant activity were determined and the ability of tomato extracts in rescuing cells from oxidative stress was assessed. Lipophilic antioxidant activity was completely retained after heat treatment and extracts were able to mitigate the detrimental effect induced by oxidative stress on different cell lines. Lycopene alone was able to rescue cells from oxidative stress, even if to a lower extent compared with tomato extracts. These results were probably due to the synergistic effect of tomato compounds in protecting cells from oxidative stress injury. The current study provides valuable insights into the health effect of the dietary carotenoids present in fresh and processed tomato fruits. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Modeling human infertility with pluripotent stem cells

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    Di Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human fertility is dependent upon the correct establishment and differentiation of the germline. This is because no other cell type in the body is capable of passing a genome and epigenome from parent to child. Terminally differentiated germline cells in the adult testis and ovary are called gametes. However, the initial specification of germline cells occurs in the embryo around the time of gastrulation. Most of our knowledge regarding the cell and molecular events that govern human germline specification involves extrapolating scientific principles from model organisms, most notably the mouse. However, recent work using next generation sequencing, gene editing and differentiation of germline cells from pluripotent stem cells has revealed that the core molecular mechanisms that regulate human germline development are different from rodents. Here, we will discuss the major molecular pathways required for human germline differentiation and how pluripotent stem cells have revolutionized our ability to study the earliest steps in human embryonic lineage specification in order to understand human fertility.

  4. Evolving International Practices for Protection of Human Rights- the UN Human Rights Advisory Panel and EU Human Rights Review Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzije ISTREFI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the unique development of the international human rights non judicial protection mechanism in Kosovo. Since 1999 Kosovo has been placed under international supervision carried out by international organizations, namely the United Nations and the European Union. The UN’s Mission in Kosovo (UNMK was unprecedented both in scope and structural complexity. After the Declaration of Independence by Kosovo authorities on 17 February 2008, the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo EULEX took over to assist and support the Kosovo authorities in the rule of law area, specifically in the areas of the police, the judiciary and customs. The UNMIK’s extensive mandate and EULEXs limited executive powers in practice have affected human rights of Kosovars as a consequence of the UNMIK and EULEX actions and inactions in the course of exercise of their mandates. This study will try to reveal the processes that lead to establishment of these two unique international human rights Panels and their impact on human rights protection of individuals under international administration. The main question to be addressed is if these two human rights panels are providing the adequate remedy for addressing human rights violations by international actors in a post conflict Kosovo.

  5. Declining human population but increasing residential development around protected areas in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Castro-Prieto; S. Martinuzzi; V.C. Radeloff; D.P. Helmers; M. Quiñones; W.A. Gould

    2017-01-01

    Increasing residential development around protected areas is a major threat for protected areas worldwide, and human population growth is often the most important cause. However, population is decreasing in many regions as a result of socio-economic changes, and it is unclear how residential development around protected areas is affected in these situations. We...

  6. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  7. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

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    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  8. Cell communication in the basal cells of the human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heukelom, J S; Slaaf, D W; van der Leun, J C

    1972-10-01

    Electrotonic spread can be measured in the basal cells of the human epidermis. The communication between neighboring cells is high, whereas no leak to the intercellular spaces could be detected. The specific resistance of the membranes between the cells is about 10 Omegacm(2). This finding suggests that for those particles that are able to pass the cell membrane the intracellular path through the epidermis is at least as suitable as the path through the intercellular spaces.

  9. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

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    Claudia Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis

  10. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Claudia; Brunswig-Spickenheier, Bärbel; Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Eggert, Katharina; Gehling, Ursula M; Rudolph, Cornelia; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cornils, Kerstin; Zustin, Jozef; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Zander, Axel R

    2011-01-05

    Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs) were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures) and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i) decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii) boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis thereby serving as fast and effective first-line treatment to

  11. The Natural Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate Protects Intervertebral Disc Cells from Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Krupkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-related phenotypic changes and a decline in the number of viable cells are crucial contributors to intervertebral disc degeneration. The polyphenol epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG can interfere with painful disc degeneration by reducing inflammation, catabolism, and pain. In this study, we hypothesized that EGCG furthermore protects against senescence and/or cell death, induced by oxidative stress. Sublethal and lethal oxidative stress were induced in primary human intervertebral disc cells with H2O2 (total n=36. Under sublethal conditions, the effects of EGCG on p53-p21 activation, proliferative capacity, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase were tested. Further, the effects of EGCG on mitochondria depolarization and cell viability were analyzed in lethal oxidative stress. The inhibitor LY249002 was applied to investigate the PI3K/Akt pathway. EGCG inhibited accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase but did not affect the loss of proliferative capacity, suggesting that EGCG did not fully neutralize exogenous radicals. Furthermore, EGCG increased the survival of IVD cells in lethal oxidative stress via activation of prosurvival PI3K/Akt and protection of mitochondria. We demonstrated that EGCG not only inhibits inflammation but also can enhance the survival of disc cells in oxidative stress, which makes it a suitable candidate for the development of novel therapies targeting disc degeneration.

  12. Dietary antioxidants protect gut epithelial cells from oxidant-induced apoptosis

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    Bobrowski Paul

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of ascorbic acid and two botanical decoctions, green tea and cat's claw, to limit cell death in response to oxidants were evaluated in vitro. Methods Cultured human gastric epithelial cells (AGS or murine small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18 were exposed to oxidants – DPPH (3 μM, H2O2 (50 μM, peroxynitrite (300 μM – followed by incubation for 24 hours, with antioxidants (10 μg/ml administered as a 1 hour pretreatment. Cell number (MTT assay and death via apoptosis or necrosis (ELISA, LDH release was determined. The direct interactions between antioxidants and DPPH (100 μM or H2O2 (50 μM were evaluated by spectroscopy. Results The decoctions did not interact with H2O2, but quenched DPPH although less effectively than vitamin C. In contrast, vitamin C was significantly less effective in protecting human gastric epithelial cells (AGS from apoptosis induced by DPPH, peroxynitrite and H2O2 (P 2O2, but green tea was more effective than cat's claw in reducing DPPH-induced apoptosis (P 2O2, and was attenuated both by cat's claw and green tea (P Conclusions These results indicate that dietary antioxidants can limit epithelial cell death in response to oxidant stress. In the case of green tea and cat's claw, the cytoprotective response exceed their inherent ability to interact with the injurious oxidant, suggestive of actions on intracellular pathways regulating cell death.

  13. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

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    Tim eSnijders

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodelling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodelling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodelling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  15. IL-33-Mediated Expansion of Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Protects from Progressive Glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Becker, Martina; Kopp, Kerstin; Düster, Mathis; Brix, Silke R; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Kluth, Luis A; Gnirck, Ann-Christin; Attar, Madena; Krohn, Sonja; Fehse, Boris; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf; Turner, Jan-Eric

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have an important role in the immune system's response to different forms of infectious and noninfectious pathologies. In particular, IL-5- and IL-13-producing type 2 ILCs (ILC2s) have been implicated in repair mechanisms that restore tissue integrity after injury. However, the presence of renal ILCs in humans has not been reported. In this study, we show that ILC populations are present in the healthy human kidney. A detailed characterization of kidney-residing ILC populations revealed that IL-33 receptor-positive ILC2s are a major ILC subtype in the kidney of humans and mice. Short-term IL-33 treatment in mice led to sustained expansion of IL-33 receptor-positive kidney ILC2s and ameliorated adriamycin-induced glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, the expansion of ILC2s modulated the inflammatory response in the diseased kidney in favor of an anti-inflammatory milieu with a reduction of pathogenic myeloid cell infiltration and a marked accumulation of eosinophils that was required for tissue protection. In summary, kidney-residing ILC2s can be effectively expanded in the mouse kidney by IL-33 treatment and are central regulators of renal repair mechanisms. The presence of ILC2s in the human kidney tissue identifies these cells as attractive therapeutic targets for CKD in humans. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Selenium supplementation protects trophoblast cells from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M; van Leer, L; Vanderlelie, J J; Perkins, A V

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a key feature in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia and antioxidants have been proposed as a potential therapy in the treatment of this important complication of pregnancy. In this report selenium supplementation was used to up-regulate the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase and the protective effect that this had on cellular metabolism during oxidative stress was examined. Bewo and Jeg-3 trophoblast cells were supplemented with organic and inorganic forms of selenium and 3 forms of peroxide in a range of doses were utilised to generate oxidative stress. Thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase activity were maximally expressed after supplementation with 100 nM NaSe and 500 nM SeMethionine. Application of H₂O₂ in the range of 200-400 μM for 24h resulted in significant (psupplementation. Tert-butyl H₂O₂ and cumene H₂O₂ concentrations between 30 and 50 uM similarly inhibited cellular activity and this could be significantly (psupplementation. Auranofin, a specific inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase was used to prove that the protective effect generated by Se supplementation was due to up regulation of these enzymes. These studies provide direct evidence that selenium supplementation can up-regulate endogenous antioxidant systems and protects trophoblast cells from oxidative stress. This may inform the development of future therapies for pre-eclampsia and emphasises the importance of selenium adequacy during pregnancy. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of human satellite cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gloy, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells guarantee the regeneration of skeletal muscle until old age. They are genuine muscle stem cells that are localized in a characteristic anatomic localization between basal lamina and sarkolemma of each muscle fiber. On protein level they are characterized by their expression of the transcription factor Pax7 and different other markers like c-Met and CXCR4. Most of our knowledge is based on studies with mouse models. Due to their availability and remarkable capacity to regen...

  18. Evolving International Practices for Protection of Human Rights- the UN Human Rights Advisory Panel and EU Human Rights Review Panel

    OpenAIRE

    Istrefi, Remzije

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses the unique development of the international human rights non judicial protection mechanism in Kosovo. Since 1999 Kosovo has been placed under international supervision carried out by international organizations, namely the United Nations and the European Union. The UN’s Mission in Kosovo (UNMK) was unprecedented both in scope and structural complexity. After the Declaration of Independence by Kosovo authorities on 17 February 2008, the European Union Rule ...

  19. Interleukin 27R regulates CD4+ T cell phenotype and impacts protective immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey J; Liao, Mingfeng; Tighe, Michael; Reiley, William W; Lai, Rachel P; Meintjes, Graeme; Pearl, John E; Chen, Xinchun; Zak, Daniel E; Thompson, Ethan G; Aderem, Alan; Ghilardi, Nico; Solache, Alejandra; McKinstry, K Kai; Strutt, Tara M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Swain, Susan L; Cooper, Andrea M

    2015-08-24

    CD4+ T cells mediate protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb); however, the phenotype of protective T cells is undefined, thereby confounding vaccination efforts. IL-27 is highly expressed during human tuberculosis (TB), and absence of IL-27R (Il27ra) specifically on T cells results in increased protection. IL-27R deficiency during chronic Mtb infection does not impact antigen-specific CD4+ T cell number but maintains programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD69, and CD127 expression while reducing T-bet and killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expression. Furthermore, T-bet haploinsufficiency results in failure to generate KLRG1+, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and in improved protection. T cells in Il27ra(-/-) mice accumulate preferentially in the lung parenchyma within close proximity to Mtb, and antigen-specific CD4+ T cells lacking IL-27R are intrinsically more fit than intact T cells and maintain IL-2 production. Improved fitness of IL-27R-deficient T cells is not associated with increased proliferation but with decreased expression of cell death-associated markers. Therefore, during Mtb infection, IL-27R acts intrinsically on T cells to limit protection and reduce fitness, whereas the IL-27R-deficient environment alters the phenotype and location of T cells. The significant expression of IL-27 in TB and the negative influence of IL-27R on T cell function demonstrate the pathway by which this cytokine/receptor pair is detrimental in TB. © 2015 Torrado et al.

  20. A Nanoconjugate Apaf-1 Inhibitor Protects Mesothelial Cells from Cytokine-Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Beatriz; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Ucero, Alvaro Conrado; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Reyero, Ana; Vicent, María Jesús; Orzáez, Mar; Celdrán, Angel; Esteban, Jaime; Selgas, Rafael; Ruíz-Ortega, Marta; Cabrera, Manuel López; Egido, Jesús; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Ortiz, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammation may lead to tissue injury. We have studied the modulation of inflammatory milieu-induced tissue injury, as exemplified by the mesothelium. Peritoneal dialysis is complicated by peritonitis episodes that cause loss of mesothelium. Proinflammatory cytokines are increased in the peritoneal cavity during peritonitis episodes. However there is scarce information on the modulation of cell death by combinations of cytokines and on the therapeutic targets to prevent desmesothelization. Methodology Human mesothelial cells were cultured from effluents of stable peritoneal dialysis patients and from omentum of non-dialysis patients. Mesothelial cell death was studied in mice with S. aureus peritonitis and in mice injected with tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma alone do not induce apoptosis in cultured mesothelial cells. By contrast, the cytokine combination increased the rate of apoptosis 2 to 3-fold over control. Cell death was associated with the activation of caspases and a pancaspase inhibitor prevented apoptosis. Specific caspase-8 and caspase-3 inhibitors were similarly effective. Co-incubation with both cytokines also impaired mesothelial wound healing in an in vitro model. However, inhibition of caspases did not improve wound healing and even impaired the long-term recovery from injury. By contrast, a polymeric nanoconjugate Apaf-1 inhibitor protected from apoptosis and allowed wound healing and long-term recovery. The Apaf-1 inhibitor also protected mesothelial cells from inflammation-induced injury in vivo in mice. Conclusion Cooperation between tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma contributes to mesothelial injury and impairs the regenerative capacity of the monolayer. Caspase inhibition attenuates mesothelial cell apoptosis but does not facilitate regeneration. A drug targeting Apaf-1 allows protection from apoptosis as well as regeneration in the course of

  1. A nanoconjugate Apaf-1 inhibitor protects mesothelial cells from cytokine-induced injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Santamaría

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammation may lead to tissue injury. We have studied the modulation of inflammatory milieu-induced tissue injury, as exemplified by the mesothelium. Peritoneal dialysis is complicated by peritonitis episodes that cause loss of mesothelium. Proinflammatory cytokines are increased in the peritoneal cavity during peritonitis episodes. However there is scarce information on the modulation of cell death by combinations of cytokines and on the therapeutic targets to prevent desmesothelization. METHODOLOGY: Human mesothelial cells were cultured from effluents of stable peritoneal dialysis patients and from omentum of non-dialysis patients. Mesothelial cell death was studied in mice with S. aureus peritonitis and in mice injected with tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma alone do not induce apoptosis in cultured mesothelial cells. By contrast, the cytokine combination increased the rate of apoptosis 2 to 3-fold over control. Cell death was associated with the activation of caspases and a pancaspase inhibitor prevented apoptosis. Specific caspase-8 and caspase-3 inhibitors were similarly effective. Co-incubation with both cytokines also impaired mesothelial wound healing in an in vitro model. However, inhibition of caspases did not improve wound healing and even impaired the long-term recovery from injury. By contrast, a polymeric nanoconjugate Apaf-1 inhibitor protected from apoptosis and allowed wound healing and long-term recovery. The Apaf-1 inhibitor also protected mesothelial cells from inflammation-induced injury in vivo in mice. CONCLUSION: Cooperation between tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma contributes to mesothelial injury and impairs the regenerative capacity of the monolayer. Caspase inhibition attenuates mesothelial cell apoptosis but does not facilitate regeneration. A drug targeting Apaf-1 allows protection from apoptosis as well as regeneration

  2. Neovascular niche for human myeloma cells in immunodeficient mouse bone.

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    Hirono Iriuchishima

    Full Text Available The interaction with bone marrow (BM plays a crucial role in pathophysiological features of multiple myeloma (MM, including cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and bone lesion progression. To characterize the MM-BM interactions, we utilized an in vivo experimental model for human MM in which a GFP-expressing human MM cell line is transplanted into NOG mice (the NOG-hMM model. Transplanted MM cells preferentially engrafted at the metaphyseal region of the BM endosteum and formed a complex with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A subpopulation of MM cells expressed VE-cadherin after transplantation and formed endothelial-like structures in the BM. CD138(+ myeloma cells in the BM were reduced by p53-dependent apoptosis following administration of the nitrogen mustard derivative bendamustine to mice in the NOG-hMM model. Bendamustine maintained the osteoblast lining on the bone surface and protected extracellular matrix structures. Furthermore, bendamustine suppressed the growth of osteoclasts and mesenchymal cells in the NOG-hMM model. Since VE-cadherin(+ MM cells were chemoresistant, hypoxic, and HIF-2α-positive compared to the VE-cadherin(- population, VE-cadherin induction might depend on the oxygenation status. The NOG-hMM model described here is a useful system to analyze the dynamics of MM pathophysiology, interactions of MM cells with other cellular compartments, and the utility of novel anti-MM therapies.

  3. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  4. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  5. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  6. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  7. Poliovirus persistence in human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbère-Garapin, F; Jacques, S; Drillet, A S; Pavio, N; Couderc, T; Blondel, B; Pelletier, I

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) can persist in vivo in the intestine of immunocompromised hosts for years. Moreover, immunocompetent individuals who have survived paralytic poliomyelitis sometimes develop the post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), consisting of a variety of symptoms including new muscular atrophies. PPS may be due to PV persistence. We have developed models of PV persistence in neural cells and epidermoid cells. Cell determinants are of crucial importance for the establishment of persistent infections in human neuronal cells, whereas viral determinants play the primary role in human epidermoid HEp-2 cells. The results obtained with these in vitro models show the capacity of PV to persist and reveal a virus and cell co-evolution involving PV-receptor interactions. In addition, they suggest that several mechanisms are used by PV to establish and maintain persistent infections.

  8. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hee Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM, a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL, the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  9. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-19

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  10. Genetically engineered red cells expressing single domain camelid antibodies confer long-term protection against botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Pishesha, Novalia; Mukherjee, Jean; Zhang, Sicai; Deshycka, Rhogerry; Sudaryo, Valentino; Dong, Min; Shoemaker, Charles B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2017-09-04

    A short half-life in the circulation limits the application of therapeutics such as single-domain antibodies (VHHs). We utilize red blood cells to prolong the circulatory half-life of VHHs. Here we present VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on the surface of red blood cells by expressing chimeric proteins of VHHs with Glycophorin A or Kell. Mice whose red blood cells carry the chimeric proteins exhibit resistance to 10,000 times the lethal dose (LD50) of BoNT/A, and transfusion of these red blood cells into naive mice affords protection for up to 28 days. We further utilize an improved CD34+ culture system to engineer human red blood cells that express these chimeric proteins. Mice transfused with these red blood cells are resistant to highly lethal doses of BoNT/A. We demonstrate that engineered red blood cells expressing VHHs can provide prolonged prophylactic protection against bacterial toxins without inducing inhibitory immune responses and illustrates the potentially broad translatability of our strategy for therapeutic applications.The therapeutic use of single-chain antibodies (VHHs) is limited by their short half-life in the circulation. Here the authors engineer mouse and human red blood cells to express VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on their surface and show that an infusion of these cells into mice confers long lasting protection against a high dose of BoNT/A.

  11. Protective CD8+ T cell responses against the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria parasites: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira-Ferreira J

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells have been implicated as critical effector cells in protection against the pre-erythrocytic stage of malaria in mice and humans following irradiated sporozoite immunization. Immunization experiments in animal models by several investigators have suggested different strategies for vaccination against malaria and many of the targets from liver stage malaria antigens have been shown to be immunogenic and to protect mice from the sporozoite challenge. Several prime/boost protocols with replicating vectors, such as vaccinia/influenza, with non-replicating vectors, such as recombinant particles derived from yeast transposon (Ty-particles and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, and DNA, significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell immunogenicity and also the protective efficacy against the circumsporosoite protein of Plasmodium berghei and P. yeti. Based on these experimental results the development of a CD8+ T cell inducing vaccine has moved forward from epitope identification to planning stages of safety and immunogenicity trials of candidate vaccines.

  12. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SurR9C84A protects and recovers human cardiomyocytes from hypoxia induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashok, Ajay [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Rd. WRB 5128, Cleveland, OH 44106-7288 (United States); Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Krishnan, Uma Maheswari [Centre for Nanotechnology & Advanced Biomaterials (CeNTAB), School of Chemical & Biotechnology (SCBT), SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur, E-mail: rupinder.kanwar@deakin.edu.au [Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (NLIMBR), School of Medicine (SoM), Faculty of Health, Centre for Molecular and Medical Research - C-MMR, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2017-01-01

    Survivin, as an anti-apoptotic protein and a cell cycle regulator, is recently gaining importance for its regenerative potential in salvaging injured hypoxic cells of vital organs such as heart. Different strategies are being employed to upregulate survivin expression in dying hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We investigated the cardioprotective potential of a cell permeable survivin mutant protein SurR9C84A, for the management of hypoxia mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis, in a novel and clinically relevant model employing primary human cardiomyocytes (HCM). The aim of this research work was to study the efficacy and mechanism of SurR9C84A facilitated cardioprotection and regeneration in hypoxic HCM. To mimic hypoxic microenvironment in vitro, well characterized HCM were treated with 100 µm (48 h) cobalt chloride to induce hypoxia. Hypoxia induced (HI) HCM were further treated with SurR9C84A (1 µg/mL) in order to analyse its cardioprotective efficacy. Confocal microscopy showed rapid internalization of SurR9C84A and scanning electron microscopy revealed the reinstatement of cytoskeleton projections in HI HCM. SurR9C84A treatment increased cell viability, reduced cell death via, apoptosis (Annexin-V assay), and downregulated free cardiac troponin T and MMP-9 expression. SurR9C84A also upregulated the expression of proliferation markers (PCNA and Ki-67) and downregulated mitochondrial depolarization and ROS levels thereby, impeding cell death. Human Apoptosis Array further revealed that SurR9C84A downregulated expression of pro-apoptotic markers and augmented expression of HSPs and HTRA2/Omi. SurR9C84A treatment led to enhanced levels of survivin, VEGF, PI3K and pAkt. SurR9C84A proved non-toxic to normoxic HCM, as validated through unaltered cell proliferation and other marker levels. Its pre-treatment exhibited lesser susceptibility to hypoxia/damage. SurR9C84A holds a promising clinical potential for human cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation following hypoxic injury

  14. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  15. Exploration of protective strategies against oligodendrocyte cell death in Krabbe disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Arboleda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Krabbe disease (KD patients accumulate psychosine (galactosylsphingosine, a cytotoxic metabolite for oligodendrocytes, inducing early demyelination. Apoptosis has been suggested that plays an important role in psychosine-induced oligodendrocytes cell death in culture and in brains of Krabbe patients and an animal model of the disease (twitcher mouse. However, the molecular mechanism that triggers the activation of the apoptotic pathway, and hence the development/progression of the disease, still is not well understood. Here we report that silencing GALC gene expression induces cell death of the human derived oligodendrocyte cell line MO3.13. The induction of cell death is associated with the activation of caspase 3 and increase in Bax expression, suggesting that mitochondria is compromise, and decrease in cell survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK and AMPK, as observed by western blot analysis, 2 days after silencing. The data suggests an important psychosine-induced deregulation in apoptotic and anti-apoptotic cellular pathways. Moreover, pre-treatment with insuline-like growth factor (IGF-1 and PPARalfa agonist (WY 14643, significantly provides protection against the psychosine-induced changes described. Our data indicates that oligodendrocytes have a marked susceptibility to endogenous accumulation of psychosine and identified potential compounds that may offer protection against psychosine-induced apoptosis in vivo.

  16. Sterile protection against human malaria by chemoattenuated PfSPZ vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Surat, Güzin; Lagler, Heimo; Chakravarty, Sumana; Ishizuka, Andrew S; Lalremruata, Albert; Gmeiner, Markus; Campo, Joseph J; Esen, Meral; Ruben, Adam J; Held, Jana; Calle, Carlos Lamsfus; Mengue, Juliana B; Gebru, Tamirat; Ibáñez, Javier; Sulyok, Mihály; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Natasha, K C; Manoj, Anita; Murshedkar, Tooba; Gunasekera, Anusha; Eappen, Abraham G; Li, Tao; Stafford, Richard E; Li, Minglin; Felgner, Phil L; Seder, Robert A; Richie, Thomas L; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G

    2017-02-23

    A highly protective malaria vaccine would greatly facilitate the prevention and elimination of malaria and containment of drug-resistant parasites. A high level (more than 90%) of protection against malaria in humans has previously been achieved only by immunization with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (PfSPZ) inoculated by mosquitoes; by intravenous injection of aseptic, purified, radiation-attenuated, cryopreserved PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Vaccine'); or by infectious PfSPZ inoculated by mosquitoes to volunteers taking chloroquine or mefloquine (chemoprophylaxis with sporozoites). We assessed immunization by direct venous inoculation of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved, non-irradiated PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Challenge') to malaria-naive, healthy adult volunteers taking chloroquine for antimalarial chemoprophylaxis (vaccine approach denoted as PfSPZ-CVac). Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ of PfSPZ Challenge at 28-day intervals were well tolerated and safe, and prevented infection in 9 out of 9 (100%) volunteers who underwent controlled human malaria infection ten weeks after the last dose (group III). Protective efficacy was dependent on dose and regimen. Immunization with 3.2 × 10(3) (group I) or 1.28 × 10(4) (group II) PfSPZ protected 3 out of 9 (33%) or 6 out of 9 (67%) volunteers, respectively. Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ at five-day intervals protected 5 out of 8 (63%) volunteers. The frequency of Pf-specific polyfunctional CD4 memory T cells was associated with protection. On a 7,455 peptide Pf proteome array, immune sera from at least 5 out of 9 group III vaccinees recognized each of 22 proteins. PfSPZ-CVac is a highly efficacious vaccine candidate; when we are able to optimize the immunization regimen (dose, interval between doses, and drug partner), this vaccine could be used for combination mass drug administration and a mass vaccination program approach to eliminate malaria from geographically defined areas.

  17. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe's success as a human pathogen.

  18. Protective Pleiotropic Effect of Flavonoids on NAD+ Levels in Endothelial Cells Exposed to High Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle M. P. H. J. Boesten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NAD+ is important for oxidative metabolism by serving as an electron transporter. Hyperglycemia decreases NAD+ levels by activation of the polyol pathway and by overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. We examined the protective role of three structurally related flavonoids (rutin, quercetin, and flavone during high glucose conditions in an in vitro model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Additionally we assessed the ability of these flavonoids to inhibit aldose reductase enzyme activity. We have previously shown that flavonoids can inhibit PARP activation. Extending these studies, we here provide evidence that flavonoids are also able to protect endothelial cells against a high glucose induced decrease in NAD+. In addition, we established that flavonoids are able to inhibit aldose reductase, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. We conclude that this protective effect of flavonoids on NAD+ levels is a combination of the flavonoids ability to inhibit both PARP activation and aldose reductase enzyme activity. This study shows that flavonoids, by a combination of effects, maintain the redox state of the cell during hyperglycemia. This mode of action enables flavonoids to ameliorate diabetic complications.

  19. 48 CFR 1352.235-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subjects research protocol, all questionnaires, surveys, advertisements, and informed consent forms... . (f) In addition, if the contractor modifies a human subjects research protocol, questionnaire, survey... of Human Subjects (APR 2010) (a) Research involving human subjects is not permitted under this award...

  20. A soluble suppressor T cell factor protects against experimental intraabdominal abscesses.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleznik, D F; Finberg, R W; Shapiro, M E; Onderdonk, A B; Kasper, D L

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a suppressor T cell factor which protects mice against intraabdominal abscesses caused by Bacteroides fragilis. This soluble cell-free factor (ITF) is derived from splenic T cells from mice immunized with capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis. Mice receiving ITF are protected from developing abscesses caused by B. fragilis to the same degree as animals receiving intact immune splenic T cells. The factor appears to be small in molecular size as protective activity is...

  1. The evaluation of protective effect of lycopene against genotoxic influence of X-irradiation in human blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajowik, Aneta; Dobrzynska, Malgorzata M. [National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Department of Radiation Protection and Radiobiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-11-15

    Many studies suggest that exogenous antioxidants may protect cells against DNA damage caused with ionizing radiation. One of the most powerful antioxidants is lycopene (LYC), a carotenoid derived from tomatoes. The aim of this study was to investigate, using the comet assay, whether LYC can act as protectors/modifiers and prevent DNA damage induced in human blood lymphocytes, as well as to mitigate the effects of radiation exposure. In this project, LYC, dissolved in DMSO at a concentration of 10, 20 or 40 μM/ml of cell suspension, was added to the isolated lymphocytes from human blood at appropriate intervals before or after the X-irradiation at doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 Gy. Cell viability in all groups was maintained at above 70%. The results showed the decrease of DNA damage in cells treated with various concentrations of LYC directly and 1 h before exposure to X-rays compared to the control group exposed to irradiation alone. Contrary results were observed in cells exposed to LYC immediately after exposure to ionizing radiation. The studies confirmed the protective effect of LYC against DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, but after irradiation the carotenoid did not stimulate of DNA repair and cannot act as modifier. However, supplementation with LYC, especially at lower doses, may be useful in protection from radiation-induced oxidative damage. (orig.)

  2. Do Beta 2-Glycoprotein I Disulfide Bonds Protect the Human Retina in the Setting of Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Miao; Abdelatti, Mahmoud; Krilis, Matthew; Madigan, Michele C; Weaver, James; Guymer, Robyn H; McCluskey, Peter; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Saijun; Krilis, Steven A; Giannakopoulos, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects the region of the retina that is responsible for high-resolution vision. It is a major cause of blindness in the aging population. This is the first study that examines the association of redox-modified, cysteine-based, post-translational forms of beta 2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) in the plasma of individuals with early and late stages of patients with AMD compared with controls. Exploration is also undertaken to assess whether the free thiol form of β2GPI versus the oxidized disulfide form have distinct functional properties in the setting of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-mediated cell death of an immortalized human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line. We demonstrate β2GPI in the retina and choroid of patients with AMD. Free thiol β2GPI is shown to protect the immortalized human RPE cell line against H(2)O(2)-induced cell death, whereas the oxidized form of β2GPI and free thiol bovine serum albumin were not protective. Free thiol β2GPI levels were significantly decreased in patients with late AMD compared with early AMD and healthy controls. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that free thiol β2GPI may protect against oxidative stress injury to RPE cells in the early stages of AMD.

  3. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Rafael A; de Castro, Frederico A V; Eleutherio, Elis C A; de Souza, Raquel M; da Silva, Joaquim F M; Pereira, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1Δ, sod1Δ, gsh1Δ, gtt1Δ and gtt2Δ) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1Δ, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 μg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.

  4. Human ES cells: Starting Culture from Frozen Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80C freezer is sourced and quickly submer...

  5. Response of human skin to ultraviolet radiation: dissociation of erythema and metabolic changes following sunscreen protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearse, A.D.; Marks, R.

    1983-03-01

    After UV irradiation of human skin there is an increase in epidermal and stratum corneum thickness and an increase in the thymidine autoradiographic labeling index. Previously we have demonstrated that persistent exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) alters the distribution and activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) within the epidermis; G-6-PDH activity is increased over the whole epidermis and SDH activity is diminished in the granular cell area but increased in the basal layer. When skin is protected by an efficient sunscreen and irradiated with UVB, there is almost complete inhibition of the erythema normally seen following UVR exposure. In this study we have investigated the cytochemical, cell kinetic, and histometric changes that take place in the epidermis after UVB irradiation, with and without two different types of sunscreen. Some of the histometric and metabolic changes associated with UVB exposure were still evident despite sunscreen protection and the successful blocking of the erythema response. The implications of these findings are discussed together with the use of sunscreens to prevent development of solar damage.

  6. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  7. Simvastatin Protects Human Melanocytes from H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress by Activating Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuqian; Li, Shuli; Guo, Weinan; Yang, Yuqi; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qian; He, Yuanmin; Yi, Xiuli; Cui, Tingting; An, Yawen; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Liu, Ling; Li, Kai; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Lin; Li, Chunying

    2017-06-01

    The prevention of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress has proved to be beneficial to vitiligo patients. Simvastatin possesses antioxidative capacity and has shown protective effect in various oxidative stress-related diseases. However, whether simvastatin can protect human melanocytes against oxidative stress has not been investigated. In this study, we initially found that pretreatment with 0.1 μmol/L to 1.0 μmol/L simvastatin led to increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis of melanocytes in response to H2O2. In addition, simvastatin was able to potentiate the activity of antioxidant enzymes and lessen intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation. Furthermore, we found that simvastatin promoted the activation of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and that knockdown of Nrf2 abolished the protective effect of simvastatin against H2O2-induced oxidative damage. More importantly, the mutual enhancement between mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and p62 contributed to simvastatin-induced Nrf2 activation in melanocytes. Finally, simvastatin showed more antioxidative capacity and better protective effect than aspirin in H2O2-treated melanocytes. Taken together, our results show that simvastatin protects human melanocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress by activating Nrf2, thus supporting simvastatin as a potential therapeutic agent for vitiligo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-21

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  9. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  10. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress at the time of reperfusion is a major aspect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart as well as in other organs. There is a continuing interest in development of pharmacological approaches to alleviate this injury. 6-Aminonicotinamide (6AN) has been shown to diminish myocardial...... necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6....... The protective effect of 6AN was associated with a decrease in total cell content of the reduced glutathione (GSH) by 15-44%, indicative of an oxidative shift in the GSH/GSSG system redox potential. We propose that this redox shift caused an increased Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors, reflecting their known...

  11. Leptin Protects Host Cells from Entamoeba histolytica Cytotoxicity by a STAT3-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans P.; Paul, Shom N.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Petri, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The adipocytokine leptin links nutritional status to immune function. Leptin signaling protects from amebiasis, but the molecular mechanism is not understood. We developed an in vitro model of ameba-host cell interaction to test the hypothesis that leptin prevents ameba-induced apoptosis in host epithelial cells. We demonstrated that activation of mammalian leptin signaling increased cellular resistance to amebic cytotoxicity, including caspase-3 activation. Exogenous expression of the leptin receptor conferred resistance in susceptible cells, and leptin stimulation enhanced protection. A series of leptin receptor signaling mutants showed that resistance to amebic cytotoxicity was dependent on activation of STAT3 but not the Src homology-2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) or STAT5. A common polymorphism in the leptin receptor (Q223R) that increases susceptibility to amebiasis in humans and mice was found to increase susceptibility to amebic cytotoxicity in single cells. The Q223R polymorphism also decreased leptin-dependent STAT3 activation by 21% relative to that of the wild-type (WT) receptor (P = 0.035), consistent with a central role of STAT3 signaling in protection. A subset of genes uniquely regulated by STAT3 in response to leptin was identified. Most notable were the TRIB1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) genes, which have opposing roles in the regulation of apoptosis. Overall apoptotic genes were highly enriched in this gene set (P leptin regulation of host apoptotic genes via STAT3 is responsible for protection. This is the first demonstration of a mammalian signaling pathway that restricts amebic pathogenesis and represents an important advance in our mechanistic understanding of how leptin links nutrition and susceptibility to infection. PMID:22331430

  12. Does protecting humans protect the environment? A crude examination for UK nuclear power plants and the marine environment using information in the public domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownless, G P

    2008-12-01

    Current activity around radiological protection of the environment implies concerns over the effectiveness of the current approach to this--namely if humans are adequately protected, then so are non-human species. This study uses models and data currently available in the public domain to carry out a 'quick and dirty' examination of whether protecting humans does indeed imply that other species are well protected. Using marine discharges and human habits data for operational coastal UK nuclear power stations, this study compares doses to humans and a set of reference non-human species. The study concludes that the availability of data and models, and consequent ease of studying potential effects on non-humans (as well as humans), vindicates recent efforts in this area, and that these imply a high level of protection, in general, for non-human biota from UK nuclear power station marine discharges. In general terms, the study finds that protection of non-human biota relies on taking ingestion and external exposure doses to humans into account; where only one of these pathways is considered, the level of protection of non-human biota through protection of humans would depend on the radionuclide(s) in question.

  13. Natural T Cell-mediated Protection against Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza. Results of the Flu Watch Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Andrew C; Wang, Lili; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fragaszy, Ellen B; Bermingham, Alison; Copas, Andrew; Dukes, Oliver; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Nazareth, Irwin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Watson, John M; Zambon, Maria; Johnson, Anne M; McMichael, Andrew J

    2015-06-15

    A high proportion of influenza infections are asymptomatic. Animal and human challenge studies and observational studies suggest T cells protect against disease among those infected, but the impact of T-cell immunity at the population level is unknown. To investigate whether naturally preexisting T-cell responses targeting highly conserved internal influenza proteins could provide cross-protective immunity against pandemic and seasonal influenza. We quantified influenza A(H3N2) virus-specific T cells in a population cohort during seasonal and pandemic periods between 2006 and 2010. Follow-up included paired serology, symptom reporting, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) investigation of symptomatic cases. A total of 1,414 unvaccinated individuals had baseline T-cell measurements (1,703 participant observation sets). T-cell responses to A(H3N2) virus nucleoprotein (NP) dominated and strongly cross-reacted with A(H1N1)pdm09 NP (P < 0.001) in participants lacking antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09. Comparison of paired preseason and post-season sera (1,431 sets) showed 205 (14%) had evidence of infection based on fourfold influenza antibody titer rises. The presence of NP-specific T cells before exposure to virus correlated with less symptomatic, PCR-positive influenza A (overall adjusted odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.68; P = 0.005, during pandemic [P = 0.047] and seasonal [P = 0.049] periods). Protection was independent of baseline antibodies. Influenza-specific T-cell responses were detected in 43%, indicating a substantial population impact. Naturally occurring cross-protective T-cell immunity protects against symptomatic PCR-confirmed disease in those with evidence of infection and helps to explain why many infections do not cause symptoms. Vaccines stimulating T cells may provide important cross-protective immunity.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, Lih-Ann, E-mail: lihann@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of