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Sample records for humans detected noninvasively

  1. Noninvasive optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in the human retina

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    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    This dissertation develops laser Raman and fluorescence based spectroscopy for the noninvasive detection of medically important pigments in the human retina. Large-scale epidemiological studies have recently shown that the pigments lutein and zeaxanthin, located in the ˜1 mm diameter macular area of the retina, protect the eye from phototoxic blue light and/or oxidative damage. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) can detect and monitor macular pigments in intact human eyes quantitatively by recording the Raman scattered light originating from the highly specific stretching vibrations of the pigment molecules' conjugated carbon backbone. This dissertation develops RRS from a spatially averaged measuring approach to spatially resolved imaging. For this purpose, a filter-based Raman imaging setup with speckle-free illumination was constructed that permits detection of macular pigments at physiological concentrations with eye-safe laser excitation levels. Subsequently, RRS images would be obtained from the living human retina. The images demonstrate quantitative as well as micron-scale, spatially resolved RRS detection of the whole macular pigment distribution. The RRS images reveal important physiological details of a subject's macular pigment distribution such as the peaked pigment concentration in the center of the macula, and the rapidly dropping pigment concentration towards the periphery of the macula. As an alternative to direct RRS imaging of macular pigments, this dissertation explores an indirect imaging approach of macular pigments, based on excitation spectroscopy of lipofuscin. A dual-wavelength laser apparatus was constructed that excites the lipofuscin fluorescence at wavelengths inside and outside the spectral range of macular pigment absorption, and that allows one to image the fluorescence intensities in a large section of the retina centered on the macula. Measuring the lipofuscin fluorescence intensities inside and outside the macula area at the two

  2. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction in humans detected noninvasively using I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine

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    Stanton, M.S.; Tuli, M.M.; Radtke, N.L.; Heger, J.J.; Miles, W.M.; Mock, B.H.; Burt, R.W.; Wellman, H.N.; Zipes, D.P. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, IN (USA))

    1989-11-15

    Transmural myocardial infarction in dogs produces denervation of sympathetic nerves in viable myocardium apical to the infarct that may be arrhythmogenic. It is unknown whether sympathetic denervation occurs in humans. The purpose of this study was to use iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiolabeled guanethidine analog that is actively taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals, to image noninvasively the cardiac sympathetic nerves in patients with and without ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. Results showed that 10 of 12 patients with spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias after myocardial infarction exhibited regions of thallium-201 uptake indicating viable perfused myocardium, with no MIBG uptake. Such a finding is consistent with sympathetic denervation. One patient had frequent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia induced at exercise testing that was eliminated by beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Eleven of the 12 patients had ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study and metoprolol never prevented induction. Sympathetic denervation was also detected in two of seven postinfarction patients without ventricular arrhythmias. Normal control subjects had no regions lacking MIBG uptake. This study provides evidence that regional sympathetic denervation occurs in humans after myocardial infarction and can be detected noninvasively by comparing MIBG and thallium-201 images. Although the presence of sympathetic denervation may be related to the onset of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias in some patients, it does not appear to be related to sustained ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study.

  3. Detection of Melanoma Metastases in Resected Human Lymph Nodes by Noninvasive Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging

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    Gerrit Cornelis Langhout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sentinel node biopsy in patients with cutaneous melanoma improves staging, provides prognostic information, and leads to an increased survival in node-positive patients. However, frozen section analysis of the sentinel node is not reliable and definitive histopathology evaluation requires days, preventing intraoperative decision-making and immediate therapy. Photoacoustic imaging can evaluate intact lymph nodes, but specificity can be hampered by other absorbers such as hemoglobin. Near infrared multispectral photoacoustic imaging is a new approach that has the potential to selectively detect melanin. The purpose of the present study is to examine the potential of multispectral photoacoustic imaging to identify melanoma metastasis in human lymph nodes. Methods. Three metastatic and nine benign lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients were scanned ex vivo using a Vevo LAZR© multispectral photoacoustic imager and were spectrally analyzed per pixel. The results were compared to histopathology as gold standard. Results. The nodal volume could be scanned within 20 minutes. An unmixing procedure was proposed to identify melanoma metastases with multispectral photoacoustic imaging. Ultrasound overlay enabled anatomical correlation. The penetration depth of the photoacoustic signal was up to 2 cm. Conclusion. Multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging allowed for selective identification of melanoma metastases in human lymph nodes.

  4. Detection of melanoma metastases in resected human lymph nodes by noninvasive multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

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    Langhout, Gerrit Cornelis; Grootendorst, Diederik Johannes; Nieweg, Omgo Edo; Wouters, Michel Wilhelmus Jacobus Maria; van der Hage, Jos Alexander; Jose, Jithin; van Boven, Hester; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang; Ruers, Theodoor Jacques Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Sentinel node biopsy in patients with cutaneous melanoma improves staging, provides prognostic information, and leads to an increased survival in node-positive patients. However, frozen section analysis of the sentinel node is not reliable and definitive histopathology evaluation requires days, preventing intraoperative decision-making and immediate therapy. Photoacoustic imaging can evaluate intact lymph nodes, but specificity can be hampered by other absorbers such as hemoglobin. Near infrared multispectral photoacoustic imaging is a new approach that has the potential to selectively detect melanin. The purpose of the present study is to examine the potential of multispectral photoacoustic imaging to identify melanoma metastasis in human lymph nodes. Methods. Three metastatic and nine benign lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients were scanned ex vivo using a Vevo LAZR(©) multispectral photoacoustic imager and were spectrally analyzed per pixel. The results were compared to histopathology as gold standard. Results. The nodal volume could be scanned within 20 minutes. An unmixing procedure was proposed to identify melanoma metastases with multispectral photoacoustic imaging. Ultrasound overlay enabled anatomical correlation. The penetration depth of the photoacoustic signal was up to 2 cm. Conclusion. Multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging allowed for selective identification of melanoma metastases in human lymph nodes.

  5. Noninvasive skeletal muscle lactate detection between periods of intense exercise in humans.

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    Mercier, B; Granier, P; Mercier, J; Foucat, L; Bielicki, G; Pradere, J; Renou, J P; Prefaut, C

    1998-06-01

    We investigated whether localized 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) using stimulated echoes (STEAM) with a long mixing time (t(m)) allowed the suppression of the fat signal and detection of lactate in skeletal muscle. The 1H NMRS sequence was first validated in three isolated and perfused rabbit biceps brachii muscles. Spectra were obtained on a wide-bore spectrometer using a dual-tuned probe (1H and 31P). Death was simulated by ceasing the muscle perfusion, which allowed post-mortem changes to be followed. During and after the simulated death, changes in levels of pH and in content of energy-rich compounds were observed with 31P NMRS. Our results showed an inverse linear relationship between pH and lactate in each of the three rabbits (r = 0.93, P recovery between periods of intense exercise (force-velocity test, F-v test). Seven subjects mean age 25.1 (SEM 0.8) years participated in this study. Soleus muscle lactate was detected at rest and for 3 min 30 s of the 5-min recovery between periods using a 2.35-T 40-cm bore magnet spectrometer. Arm venous plasma lactate concentration was measured at rest, during the F-v test when the subject stopped pedalling (S1), and at the end of each 5-min recovery between periods (S2). Results showed that the venous plasma lactate concentration at S1 and S2 increased significantly from the beginning of the F-v test to peak anaerobic power (W(an,peak)) (P braking forces (P < 0.05). We concluded from these results that localized 1H NMRS using STEAM with a long t(m) allows suppression of the fat signal and repeated detection of lactate on isolated perfused skeletal muscle in animals and between periods of intense exercise in humans.

  6. Noninvasive genomic detection of melanoma.

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    Wachsman, W; Morhenn, V; Palmer, T; Walls, L; Hata, T; Zalla, J; Scheinberg, R; Sofen, H; Mraz, S; Gross, K; Rabinovitz, H; Polsky, D; Chang, S

    2011-04-01

    Early detection and treatment of melanoma is important for optimal clinical outcome, leading to biopsy of pigmented lesions deemed suspicious for the disease. The vast majority of such lesions are benign. Thus, a more objective and accurate means for detection of melanoma is needed to identify lesions for excision. To provide proof-of-principle that epidermal genetic information retrieval (EGIR™; DermTech International, La Jolla, CA, U.S.A.), a method that noninvasively samples cells from stratum corneum by means of adhesive tape stripping, can be used to discern melanomas from naevi. Skin overlying pigmented lesions clinically suspicious for melanoma was harvested using EGIR. RNA isolated from the tapes was amplified and gene expression profiled. All lesions were removed for histopathological evaluation. Supervised analysis of the microarray data identified 312 genes differentially expressed between melanomas, naevi and normal skin specimens (Pclassifier that discriminates these skin lesions. Upon testing with an independent dataset, this classifier discerned in situ and invasive melanomas from naevi with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity, with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0·955. These results demonstrate that EGIR-harvested specimens can be used to detect melanoma accurately by means of a 17-gene genomic biomarker. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  7. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

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    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  8. Non-invasive matrices in human biomonitoring: a review.

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    Esteban, Marta; Castaño, Argelia

    2009-02-01

    Humans and other living organisms are exposed to a variety of chemical pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. Environmental pollutants are incorporated into the organism by different routes and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, which leads to an internal concentration that can induce different alterations, adverse effects and/or diseases. Control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biomonitoring is a very useful tool that can contribute to this aim. Human biomonitoring uses different matrices to measure the target chemicals depending on the chemical, the amount of matrix necessary for the analysis and the detection limit (LOD) of the analytical technique. Blood is the ideal matrix for most chemicals due to its contact with the whole organism and its equilibrium with organs and tissues where chemicals are stored. However, it has an important disadvantage of being an invasive matrix. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of other matrices that are less or non-invasive, such as saliva, urine, meconium, nails, hair, and semen or breast milk. The presence of a chemical in these matrices reflects an exposure, but correlations between levels in non-invasive matrices and blood must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. The development of new biomarkers that are measurable in these matrices will improve non-invasive biomonitoring. This paper reviews studies that measure Cd, Pb, Hg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides and phthalates in non-invasive matrices, the most used techniques for measurements and what alternative techniques are available.

  9. Successful Noninvasive Trisomy 18 Detection Using Single Molecule Sequencing

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    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Johansson, Lennart F.; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F.; Hoffer, Mariette J. V.; Sinke, Richard J.; Bakker, Egbert; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Boon, Elles M. J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive trisomy 21 detection performed by use of massively parallel sequencing is achievable with high diagnostic sensitivity and low false-positive rates. Detection of fetal trisomy 18 and 13 has been reported as well but seems to be less accurate with the use of this approach. The

  10. Successful Noninvasive Trisomy 18 Detection Using Single Molecule Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Johansson, Lennart F.; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F.; Hoffer, Mariette J. V.; Sinke, Richard J.; Bakker, Egbert; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Boon, Elles M. J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive trisomy 21 detection performed by use of massively parallel sequencing is achievable with high diagnostic sensitivity and low false-positive rates. Detection of fetal trisomy 18 and 13 has been reported as well but seems to be less accurate with the use of this approach. The

  11. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

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    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  12. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

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    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  13. Biophysical basis for noninvasive skin cancer detection using Raman spectroscopy

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    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J.; Markey, Mia K.; Fox, Matthew C.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is proving to be a valuable tool for real time noninvasive skin cancer detection via optical fiber probe. However, current methods utilizing RS for skin cancer diagnosis rely on statistically based algorithms to provide tissue classification and do not elucidate the underlying biophysical changes of skin tissue. Therefore, we aim to use RS to explore skin biochemical and structural characteristics and then correlate the Raman spectrum of skin tissue with its disease state. We have built a custom confocal micro-Raman spectrometer system with an 830nm laser light. The high resolution capability of the system allows us to measure spectroscopic features from individual tissue components in situ. Raman images were collected from human skin samples from Mohs surgical biopsy, which were then compared with confocal laser scanning, two-photon fluorescence and hematoxylin and eosin-stained images to develop a linear model of skin tissue Raman spectra. In this model, macroscopic tissue spectra obtained from RS fiber probe were fit into a linear combination of individual basis spectra of primary skin constituents. The fit coefficient of the model explains the biophysical changes spanning a range of normal and various disease states. The model allows for determining parameters similar to that a pathologist is familiar reading and will be a significant guidance in developing RS diagnostic decision schemes.

  14. Non-invasive Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography...

  15. Real-time non-invasive eyetracking and gaze-point determination for human-computer interaction and biomedicine

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    Talukder, Ashit; Morookian, John-Michael; Monacos, S.; Lam, R.; Lebaw, C.; Bond, A.

    2004-01-01

    Eyetracking is one of the latest technologies that has shown potential in several areas including human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological problems in individuals.

  16. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

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    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  17. Noninvasive biological sensor system for detection of drunk driving.

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    Murata, Kohji; Fujita, Etsunori; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Shinitirou; Ogura, Yumi; Kamei, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Toshio; Kaneko, Shigehiko; Yoshizumi, Masao; Suzuki, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Systems capable of monitoring the biological condition of a driver and issuing warnings during instances of drowsiness have recently been studied. Moreover, many researchers have reported that biological signals, such as brain waves, pulsation waves, and heart rate, are different between people who have and have not consumed alcohol. Currently, we are developing a noninvasive system to detect individuals driving under the influence of alcohol by measuring biological signals. We used the frequency time series analysis to attempt to distinguish between normal and intoxicated states of a person as the basis of the sensing system.

  18. Saliva surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for noninvasive optical detection of nasopharyngeal cancer

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    Lin, Xueliang; Ge, Xiaosong; Xu, Zhihong; Zheng, Zuci; Huang, Wei; Hong, Quanxing; Lin, Duo

    2016-10-01

    The early cancer detection is of great significance to increase the patient's survival rate and reduce the risk of cancer development. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique, a rapid, convenient, nondestructive optical detection method, can provide a characteristic "fingerprint" information of target substances, even achieving single molecule detection. Its ultra-high detection sensitivity has made it become one of the most potential biochemical detection methods. Saliva, a multi-constituent oral fluid, contains the bio-markers which is capable of reflecting the systemic health condition of human, showing promising potential as an effect medium for disease monitoring. Compared with the serum samples, the collection and processing of saliva is safer, more convenient and noninvasive. Thus, saliva test is becoming the hotspot issues of the noninvasive cancer research field. This review highlights and analyzes current application progress within the field of SERS saliva test in cancer detection. Meanwhile, the primary research results of SERS saliva for the noninvasive differentiation of nasopharyngeal cancer, normal and rhinitis obtained by our group are shown.

  19. A novel noninvasive method to detect rejection after heart transplantation

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    Jun Hu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Prompt and accurate detection of rejection prior to pathological changes after organ transplantation is vital for monitoring rejections. Although biopsy remains the current gold standard for rejection diagnosis, it is an invasive method and cannot be repeated daily. Thus, noninvasive monitoring methods are needed. In this study, by introducing an IL-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (IL-2 N-mAb and immunosuppressants into the culture with the presence of specific stimulators and activated lymphocytes, an activated lymphocyte-specific assay (ALSA system was established to detect the specific activated lymphocytes. This assay demonstrated that the suppression in the ALSA test was closely related to the existence of specific activated lymphocytes. The ALSA test was applied to 47 heart graft recipients and the proliferation of activated lymphocytes from all rejection recipients proven by endomyocardial biopsies was found to be inhibited by spleen cells from the corresponding donors, suggesting that this suppression could reflect the existence of activated lymphocytes against donor antigens, and thus the rejection of a heart graft. The sensitivity of the ALSA test in these 47 heart graft recipients was 100%; however, the specificity was only 37.5%. It was also demonstrated that IL-2 N-mAb was indispensible, and the proper culture time courses and concentrations of stimulators were essential for the ALSA test. This preliminary study with 47 grafts revealed that the ALSA test was a promising noninvasive tool, which could be used in vitro to assist with the diagnosis of rejection post-heart transplantation.

  20. Information-theoretical noninvasive damage detection in bridge structures

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    Sudu Ambegedara, Amila; Sun, Jie; Janoyan, Kerop; Bollt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Damage detection of mechanical structures such as bridges is an important research problem in civil engineering. Using spatially distributed sensor time series data collected from a recent experiment on a local bridge in Upper State New York, we study noninvasive damage detection using information-theoretical methods. Several findings are in order. First, the time series data, which represent accelerations measured at the sensors, more closely follow Laplace distribution than normal distribution, allowing us to develop parameter estimators for various information-theoretic measures such as entropy and mutual information. Second, as damage is introduced by the removal of bolts of the first diaphragm connection, the interaction between spatially nearby sensors as measured by mutual information becomes weaker, suggesting that the bridge is "loosened." Finally, using a proposed optimal mutual information interaction procedure to prune away indirect interactions, we found that the primary direction of interaction or influence aligns with the traffic direction on the bridge even after damaging the bridge.

  1. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

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    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  2. Non-invasive imaging of human embryonic stem cells.

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    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and multimodality approaches. Although the focus of this review article is primarily on hESCs, the labeling/tracking strategies described here can be readily applied to other (stem) cell types as well. Non-invasive imaging can provide convenient means to monitor hESC survival, proliferation, function, as well as overgrowth (such as teratoma formation), which could not be readily investigated previously. The requirement for hESC tracking techniques depends on the clinical scenario and each imaging technique will have its own niche in preclinical/clinical research. Continued evolvement of non-invasive imaging techniques will undoubtedly contribute to significant advances in understanding stem cell biology and mechanisms of action.

  3. Non-invasive blood glucose detection system based on conservation of energy method.

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    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Yong-Bo; Chen, Hong-Bo; Yin, Shi-Min; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    The most common method used for minimizing the occurrence of diabetes complications is frequent glucose testing to adjust the insulin dose. However, using blood glucose (BG) meters presents a risk of infection. It is of great importance to develop non-invasive BG detection techniques. To realize high-accuracy, low-cost and continuous glucose monitoring, we have developed a non-invasive BG detection system using a mixed signal processor 430 (MSP430) microcontroller. This method is based on the combination of the conservation-of-energy method with a sensor integration module, which collects physiological parameters, such as the blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), blood flow velocity and heart rate. New methods to detect the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and BV are proposed, which combine the human body heat balance and characteristic signals of photoplethysmography as well dual elastic chambers theory. Four hundred clinical trials on real-time non-invasive BG monitoring under suitable experiment conditions were performed on different individuals, including diabetic patients, senior citizens and healthy adults. A multisensory information fusion model was applied to process these samples. The algorithm (we defined it as DCBPN algorithm) applied in the model combines a decision tree and back propagation neural network, which classifies the physiological and environmental parameters into three categories, and then establishes a corresponding prediction model for the three categories. The DCBPN algorithm provides an accuracy of 88.53% in predicting the BG of new samples. Thus, this system demonstrates a great potential to reliably detect BG values in a non-invasive setting.

  4. Noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance

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    Edward L. Hull, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ENGINE study evaluated noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT. The AGT detection performance of SFS was compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG and hemoglobin A1C (A1C. The study was a head-to-head comparison of SFS to FPG and A1C in an at-risk population of 507 subjects, with no prior diagnosis of diabetes, each of whom received a 75 g, two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Subjects were measured by SFS on multiple days in fasting and non-fasting states. SFS data were acquired and analyzed with the SCOUT DS® device (VeraLight, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Disease truth was AGT, defined as OGTT ≥ 7.8 mmol/L. Sensitivity, false positive rate (FPR, ROC area, and equal error rate (EER for detection of AGT were computed. The reproducibility of SFS and FPG was assessed. The AGT sensitivity of SFS at the device's recommended screening threshold of 50 was 75.2%, higher than that of FPG (thresholds of 5.6 mmol/L or 6.1 mmol/L and A1C (thresholds of 5.7% or 6.0%. The SFS FPR was 42.1%, comparable to an A1C threshold of 5.7% (FPR = 43.5%. The EERs of SFS, FPG and A1C were similar, as were the partial ROC areas for FPRs of 20–50%. The reproducibility of SFS was 7.7% versus 8.1% for FPG. SFS had similar AGT detection performance to FPG and A1C and is a viable alternative to screening individuals for AGT.

  5. Human Urine as a Noninvasive Source of Kidney Cells

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    Fanny Oliveira Arcolino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urine represents an unlimited source of patient-specific kidney cells that can be harvested noninvasively. Urine derived podocytes and proximal tubule cells have been used to study disease mechanisms and to screen for novel drug therapies in a variety of human kidney disorders. The urinary kidney stem/progenitor cells and extracellular vesicles, instead, might be promising for therapeutic treatments of kidney injury. The greatest advantages of urine as a source of viable cells are the easy collection and less complicated ethical issues. However, extensive characterization and in vivo studies still have to be performed before the clinical use of urine-derived kidney progenitors.

  6. Non-invasive quantification of hemodynamics in human choriocapillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Rou; An, Senyou; McDonough, James; Gelfand, Bradley; Yao, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The development of retinal disease is inextricably linked to defects in the choroidal blood supply. However, to date a description of the hemodynamics in the human choroidal circulation is lacking. Through high resolution choroidal vascular network mapped from immunofluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy of human cadaver donor eyes. We noninvasively quantify hemodynamics including velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress (WSS) in choriocapillaries through mesoscale modeling and GPU-accelerated fast computation. This is the first-ever map of hemodynamic parameters (WSS, pressure, and velocity) in anatomically accurate human choroidal vasculature in health and disease. The pore scale simulation results are used to evaluate porous media models with the same porosity and boundary conditions. School of Medicine, Indiana University.

  7. UWB based low-cost and non-invasive practical breast cancer early detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarveswari, V.; Khatun, S.; Fakir, M. M.; Jusoh, M.; Ali, S.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of women death worldwide. Breast tumor is an early stage of cancer that locates in cells of a human breast. As there is no remedy, early detection is crucial. Towards this, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) is a prominent candidate. It is a wireless communication technology which can achieve high bandwidth with low power utilization. UWB is suitable to be used for short range communication systems including breast cancer detection since it is secure, non-invasive and human health friendly. This paper presents the low-cost and non-invasive early breast cancer detection strategy using UWB sensor (or antenna). Emphasis is given here to detect breast tumor in 2D and 3D environments. The developed system consisted of hardware and software. Hardware included UWB transceiver and a pair of home-made directional sensor/antenna. The software included feed-forward back propagation Neural Network (NN) module to detect the tumor existence, size and location along with soft interface between software and hardware. Forward scattering technique was used by placing two sensors diagonally opposite sides of a breast phantom. UWB pulses were transmitted from one side of phantom and received from other side, controlled by the software interface in PC environment. Collected received signals were then fed into the NN module for training, testing and validation. The system exhibited detection efficiency on tumor existence, location (x, y, z), and size were approximately 100%, (78.17%, 70.66%, 92.46%), 85.86% respectively. The proposed UWB based early breast cancer detection system could be more practical with low-cost, user friendly and non-harmful features. This project may help users to monitor their breast health regularly at their home.

  8. In vivo noninvasive detection of Brown Adipose Tissue through intermolecular zero-quantum MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa T Branca

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of active Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT in adult humans has opened new avenues for obesity research and treatment, as reduced BAT activity seem to be implicated in human energy imbalance, diabetes, and hypertension. However, clinical applications are currently limited by the lack of non-invasive tools for measuring mass and function of this tissue in humans. Here we present a new magnetic resonance imaging method based on the normally invisible intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (1H MR signal. This method, which doesn't require special hardware modifications, can be used to overcome partial volume effect, the major limitation of MR-based approaches that are currently being investigated for the detection of BAT in humans. With this method we can exploit the characteristic cellular structure of BAT to selectively image it, even when (as in humans it is intimately mixed with other tissues. We demonstrate and validate this method in mice using PET scans and histology. We compare this methodology with conventional (1H MR fat fraction methods. Finally, we investigate its feasibility for the detection of BAT in humans.

  9. In vivo noninvasive detection of Brown Adipose Tissue through intermolecular zero-quantum MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Rosa T; Zhang, Le; Warren, Warren S; Auerbach, Edward; Khanna, Arjun; Degan, Simone; Ugurbil, Kamil; Maronpot, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of active Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) in adult humans has opened new avenues for obesity research and treatment, as reduced BAT activity seem to be implicated in human energy imbalance, diabetes, and hypertension. However, clinical applications are currently limited by the lack of non-invasive tools for measuring mass and function of this tissue in humans. Here we present a new magnetic resonance imaging method based on the normally invisible intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (1)H MR signal. This method, which doesn't require special hardware modifications, can be used to overcome partial volume effect, the major limitation of MR-based approaches that are currently being investigated for the detection of BAT in humans. With this method we can exploit the characteristic cellular structure of BAT to selectively image it, even when (as in humans) it is intimately mixed with other tissues. We demonstrate and validate this method in mice using PET scans and histology. We compare this methodology with conventional (1)H MR fat fraction methods. Finally, we investigate its feasibility for the detection of BAT in humans.

  10. Deconstructing autofluorescence: non-invasive detection and monitoring of biochemistry in cells and tissues (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Cassano, Juan C.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Pernichery, Sandeep M.; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol; Sutton-Mcdowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.

    2016-03-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous fluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from imaging of native fluorescence has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Multispectral intrinsic fluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. The versatility of our method is further illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent.

  11. Noninvasive optical measurement of bone marrow lesions: a Monte Carlo study on visible human dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow is both the main hematopoietic and important immune organ. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a series of severe complications and even myeloma. The traditional diagnosis of BMLs rely on mostly bone marrow biopsy/ puncture, and sometimes MRI, X-ray, and etc., which are either invasive and dangerous, or ionizing and costly. A diagnosis technology with advantages in noninvasive, safe, real-time continuous detection, and low cost is requested. Here we reported our preliminary exploration of feasibility verification of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in clinical diagnosis of BMLs by Monte Carlo simulation study. We simulated and visualized the light propagation in the bone marrow quantitatively with a Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media and Visible Chinese Human data set, which faithfully represents human anatomy. The results indicate that bone marrow actually has significant effects on light propagation. According to a sequence of simulation and data analysis, the optimal source-detector separation was suggested to be narrowed down to 2.8-3.2cm, at which separation the spatial sensitivity distribution of NIRS cover the most region of bone marrow with high signal-to-noise ratio. The display of the sources and detectors were optimized as well. This study investigated the light transport in spine addressing to the BMLs detection issue and reported the feasibility of NIRS detection of BMLs noninvasively in theory. The optimized probe design of the coming NIRS-based BMLs detector is also provided.

  12. Using intramyocardial electrograms combined with other noninvasive methods for monitoring acute rejection following human heart transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yi-xin; MENG Xu; SUN Ling-bo; HAN Jie; CHEN Yang-tian

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute allograft rejection in heart transplantation remains as one of the major complications. Obligatory graft surveillance is still achieved with the invasive and expensive endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). Our study aimed to study the use of intramyocardial electrograms combined with other noninvasive methods for the monitoring of acute rejection after human heart transplantation. Methods Permanent pacemakers were implanted in 58 patients undergoing heart transplantations. Intramyocardial electrograms (IMEG) were recorded periodically and the results were compared with those from EMBs. The R wave amplitude of the IMEG was used as the index value, the average R wave amplitude at the third week following transplantation was considered as the baseline, and a reduction of >20% compared with the baseline was regarded as a positive result. EMB was performed in cases of positive IMEG results and also at other times. Other noninvasive methods were used to help the diagnosis. Acute rejection (AR) was defined as international Society of Heart-Lung Transplantation grade Ilia or higher.Results We obtained 1231 IMEG records and 127 EMBs. Of the total 127 EMBs, 53 were positive, in which there were 42 IMEG positive results and 11 negative, while in the rest 74 negative EMBs, there were 9 IMEG positive results and 65 negative. The sensitivity of IMEG for the diagnosis of AR was 79.2%, and the specificity was 87.8%. The positive predictive value was 82.4% and the negative predictive value was 85.5%. Of the total of 1231 IMEG records, 51 were positive and 1180 were negative. Excluding 11 proved by EMB to be false negative, if the other 1169 were considered as no evidence of rejection, through the other noninvasive methods, AR diagnosed by this noninvasive monitoring strategy, the sensitivity was 79.2%, and the specificity was 99.2%. The positive predictive value was 82.4% and the negative predictive value was 99.1%. Conclusions IMEG can be used as a noninvasive method for

  13. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  14. Effective Detection of Porcine Cytomegalovirus Using Non-Invasively Taken Samples from Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Vladimir A; Heinrichs, Gerd; Denner, Joachim

    2017-01-12

    Shortage of human organs forced the development of xenotransplantation using cells, tissues, and organs from pigs. Xenotransplantation may be associated with the transmission of porcine zoonotic microorganisms, among them the porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV). To prevent virus transmission, pigs have to be screened using sensitive methods. In order to perform regular follow-ups and further breeding of the animals, samples for testing should be collected by low-invasive or non-invasive methods. Sera, ear biopsies, as well as oral and anal swabs were collected from ten 10-day-old Aachen minipigs (AaMP) and tested for PCMV using sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as uniplex and duplex real-time PCR. Porcine cytomegalovirus DNA was detected most frequently in oral and anal swabs. Comparison of duplex and uniplex real-time PCR systems for PCMV detection demonstrated a lower sensitivity of duplex real-time PCR when the copy numbers of the target genes were low (less 200). Therefore, to increase the efficacy of PCMV detection in piglets, early testing of oral and anal swabs by uniplex real-time PCR is recommended.

  15. Effective Detection of Porcine Cytomegalovirus Using Non-Invasively Taken Samples from Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Morozov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of human organs forced the development of xenotransplantation using cells, tissues, and organs from pigs. Xenotransplantation may be associated with the transmission of porcine zoonotic microorganisms, among them the porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV. To prevent virus transmission, pigs have to be screened using sensitive methods. In order to perform regular follow-ups and further breeding of the animals, samples for testing should be collected by low-invasive or non-invasive methods. Sera, ear biopsies, as well as oral and anal swabs were collected from ten 10-day-old Aachen minipigs (AaMP and tested for PCMV using sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR as well as uniplex and duplex real-time PCR. Porcine cytomegalovirus DNA was detected most frequently in oral and anal swabs. Comparison of duplex and uniplex real-time PCR systems for PCMV detection demonstrated a lower sensitivity of duplex real-time PCR when the copy numbers of the target genes were low (less 200. Therefore, to increase the efficacy of PCMV detection in piglets, early testing of oral and anal swabs by uniplex real-time PCR is recommended.

  16. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  17. The advance of non-invasive detection methods in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiao; Chen, Yanping

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases which badly affected the patients' living quality and economy. Detection and evaluation technology can provide basic information for early treatment. A variety of imaging methods in OA were reviewed, such as conventional X-ray, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Among the existing imaging modalities, the spatial resolution of X-ray is extremely high; CT is a three-dimensional method, which has high density resolution; US as an evaluation method of knee OA discriminates lesions sensitively between normal cartilage and degenerative one; as a sensitive and nonionizing method, MRI is suitable for the detection of early OA, but the cost is too expensive for routine use; NIRS is a safe, low cost modality, and is also good at detecting early stage OA. In a word, each method has its own advantages, but NIRS is provided with broader application prospect, and it is likely to be used in clinical daily routine and become the golden standard for diagnostic detection.

  18. Non-invasive imaging in detecting myocardial viability: Myocardial function versus perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal A. Elfigih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the most prevalent and single most common cause of morbidity and mortality [1] with the resulting left ventricular (LV dysfunction an important complication. The distinction between viable and non-viable myocardium in patients with LV dysfunction is a clinically important issue among possible candidates for myocardial revascularization. Several available non-invasive techniques are used to detect and assess ischemia and myocardial viability. These techniques include echocardiography, radionuclide images, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and recently myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging. This review aims to distinguish between the available non-invasive imaging techniques in detecting signs of functional and perfusion viability and identify those which have the most clinical relevance in detecting myocardial viability in patients with CAD and chronic ischemic LV dysfunction. The most current available studies showed that both myocardial perfusion and function based on non-invasive imaging have high sensitivity with however wide range of specificity for detecting myocardial viability. Both perfusion and function imaging modalities provide complementary information about myocardial viability and no optimum single imaging technique exists that can provide very accurate diagnostic and prognostic viability assessment. The weight of the body of evidence suggested that non-invasive imaging can help in guiding therapeutic decision making in patients with LV dysfunction.

  19. Accurate, noninvasive detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from stool samples: potential usefulness for monitoring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J; Boynton, Kevin A; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F; El-Rifai, Wa'el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  20. Accurate, Noninvasive Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from Stool Samples: Potential Usefulness for Monitoring Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J.; Boynton, Kevin A.; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F.; El-Rifai, Wa’el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  1. Model Validation for a Noninvasive Arterial Stenosis Detection Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-09

    Diastolic murmur caused by coronary artery stenosis , Ann. Int. Med, 72 (1970), 543. [33] T. Deffieux, G. Montaldo, M. Tanter, Shear wave spectroscopy for...Circulation, 103 (2001), 604–616. [45] N. Owsley and A. Hull, Beamformed nearfield imaging of a simulated coronary artery containing a stenosis , IEEE...murmur of coronary artery stenosis , Brit. Heart J., 35 (1973), 840. [53] J. Semmlow and K. Rahalkar, Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease, Annu

  2. Obesity and the challenges of noninvasive imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siok P; Arasaratnam, Punitha; Chow, Benjamin J; Beanlands, Rob S; Hessian, Renée C

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem that could potentially lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Noninvasive imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms and risk of these patients. Selection of the appropriate test in the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease in this unique population is important. In this article, we focus on the strengths, limitations, and recommendations of the various noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities available in the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. We have suggested an algorithm to help direct investigation. Ultimately, patient management should be individualized based on clinical judgement, test availability, and local expertise.

  3. A potential method for non-invasive acute myocardial infarction detection based on saliva Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Jinyong; Lin, Jia; Xu, Zhihong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Weng, Guoxing; Chen, Guannan

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was employed for human saliva biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a rapidly non-invasive test for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. High-quality Raman spectra were obtained from human saliva samples of 46 AMI patients and 43 healthy controls. Significant differences in Raman intensities of prominent bands were observed between AMI and normal saliva. The tentative assignment of the observed Raman bands indicated constituent and conformational differences between the two groups. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and classify the Raman spectra acquired from AMI and healthy saliva, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 80.4% and specificity of 81.4%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated the feasibility and potential for developing RS analysis of human saliva into a clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  4. Study on a noninvasive method for rapid screening Human Serum albumin injectables by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA injectable product is a severely afflicted area on drug safety due to its high price and restricted supply. Raman spectroscopy performances high specificity on HSA detection and it is even possible to determine HSA injectable products noninvasively. In this study, we developed a noninvasive rapid screening method for of HSA injectable products by using portable Raman spectrometer. Qualitative models were established by using principal component analysis combined with classical least squares (PCA-CLS algorithm, while quantitative model was established by using partial least squares (PLS algorithm. Model transfer in different instruments of both the same and different apparatus modules was further discussed in this paper. A total of 34 HSA injectable samples collected from markets were used for verification. The identification results showed 100% accuracy and the predicted concentrations of those identified as true HSA were consistent with their labeled concentrations. The quantitative results also indicated that model transfer was excellent in the same apparatus modules of Raman spectrometer at all concentration levels, and still good enough in the different apparatus modules although the relative standard deviation (RSD value showed a little increasing trend at low HSA concentration level. In conclusion, the method was proved to be feasible and efficient for screening HSA injections, especially on its screening speed and the consideration of glass containers. Moreover, with inspiring results on the model transfer, the method could be used as a universal screening mean to different Raman instruments.

  5. A novel signal acquisition platform of human cardiovascular information with noninvasive method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longcong; Cai, Shaoxi; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qifeng; Ke, Ming; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Sijia; Zou, Misha

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are considered the major cause of death worldwide, so more researchers pay more and more attention to the development of a non-invasive method to obtain as much cardiovascular information (CVI) as possible for early screening and diagnosing. It is known that considerable brain information could be probed by a variety of stimuli (such as video, light, and sound). Therefore, it is quite possible that much more CVI could be extracted via giving the human body some special interrelated stimulus. Based on this hypothesis, we designed a novel signal platform to acquire more CVI with a special stimulus, which is to give a gradual decrease and a different settable constant pressure to six air belts placed on two-side brachia, wrists, and ankles, respectively. During the stimulating process, the platform is able to collect 24-channel dynamic signals related with CVI synchronously. Moreover, to improve the measurement accuracy of signal acquisition, a high precision reference chip and a software correction are adopted in this platform. Additionally, we have also shown some collection instances and analysis results in this paper for its reliability. The results suggest that our platform can not only be applied on study in a deep-going way of relationship between collected signals and CVDs but can also serve as the basic tool for developing a new noninvasive cardiovascular function detection instrument and system that can be used both at home and in the hospital.

  6. Theoretical and computational methods for the noninvasive detection of gastric electrical source coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Andrei; Bradshaw, L Alan

    2004-05-01

    The ability to study the pathology of the stomach noninvasively from magnetic field measurements is important due to the significant practical advantages offered by noninvasive methods over other techniques of investigation. The inverse biomagnetic problem can play a central role in this process due to the information that inverse solutions can yield concerning the characteristics of the gastric electrical activity (GEA). To analyze gastrointestinal (GI) magnetic fields noninvasively, we have developed a computer implementation of a least-squares minimization algorithm that obtains numerical solutions to the biomagnetic inverse problem for the stomach. In this paper, we show how electric current propagation and the mechanical coupling of gastric smooth muscle cells during electrical control activity can be studied using such solutions. To validate our model, two types of numerical simulations of the GEA were developed and successfully used to demonstrate the ability of our computer algorithm to detect and accurately analyze these two phenomena. We also describe our analysis of experimental, noninvasively acquired gastric biomagnetic data as well as the information of interest that our numerical method can yield in clinical studies. Most importantly, we present experimental evidence that the coupling of gastric electrical sources can be observed using noninvasive techniques of measurement, in our case with the use of a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. We discuss the relevance and implications of our achievement to the future of GI research.

  7. Non-invasive laser Raman detection of lycopene and ž-carotene antioxidants in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2003-07-01

    The predominant long-chain carotenoids found in the human skin are lycopene and β-carotene. They are powerful antioxidants and thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and single oxygen that are formed by excessive exposure of skin to sunlight. However the role of the particular representatives of the carotenoid antioxidants family in the skin defense mechanism is still unclear and has to be clarified. We demonstrate the opportunity for fast non-invasive selective quantitative detection of β-carotene and lycopene in human skin employing Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the molecules under blue and green laser excitation we were able to characterize quantitativly the concentrations of each carotenoid in alive human skin. In this method we take an advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profile for β-carotene and lycopene molecules. This novel technique allows the quantitative assessment of individual carotenoid species in the skin rather then the cumulative level of long-chain carotenoids mixture as we could measure in our previous works. The required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Prelimininary dichoromatic Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different volunteer's skin: even in statistically small group of seven subjects the ratio of β-carotene-to-lycopene in their skin vary from 0.5 to 1.6. This technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoids composition of human skin in large populations and suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  8. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  9. The research on noninvasive detection of skin cholesterol by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huayi; Han, Yongsheng; Dong, Meili; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Yikun; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Skin cholesterol is a novel biomarker to assess the risk of atherosclerotic diseases. To detect skin cholesterol noninvasively and rapidly, a system was designed based on the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The feasibility of this system was validated through detecting cholesterol of pig skin samples, and skin cholesterol in vivo of subjects. The experimental results showed that, diffuse reflectance absorbance integrated intensity S measured the concentration of cholesterol in the pig skin samples quantitatively. After adjusting for age, gender and other factors, it showed a significant positive correlation between S of subjects and the total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) which were the main risk factors for atherosclerotic diseases with the correlation coefficients 0.860(P <0.01) and 0.787(P <0.01). The study has shown that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a noninvasive and convenient method for the detection of skin cholesterol, and the noninvasive detection of skin cholesterol in vivo will contribute to the early detection of atherosclerotic diseases.

  10. Photogrammetry: a Non-Invasive and Objective Method for Detecting Locomotion Problems in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Locomotion problems in broiler chickens can cause economic losses of up to 40% of the total revenues due to carcass condemnation and downgrading at processing. Leg disorders, such as femoral lesions, tibial dyschondroplasia, and spondylolisthesis, substantially impact the welfare of chickens as these disorders can prevent birds from reaching the feeders and drinkers, thus reducing feed and water intake. The most important issues related to broiler welfare reported in the last two decades are their growing sensitivity to metabolic and locomotion problems due to the fast growth rates and inactivity. Traditional methods for the determination of gait score include the manual scoring of animal behavior in the broiler house. Recorded video images can also be used for manual scoring of chicken gait score. However, scoring of some animal-based information by human experts and manual methods remain difficult, time consuming and expensive when implemented at farm level. In an effort to objectively detect leg disorders, this study aimed at validating the photogrammetry technique as a non-invasive method for identifying locomotion problems in broilers. Photogrammetry allows determining the geometric properties of broilers from digital photos that are processed and analyzed using a computer software. Results obtained using photogrammetry were tested for their correlation with those obtained by accepted methodologies, including gait score and macroscopic examination of femoral degeneration and tibial dyschondroplasia. The photogrammetry results agreed with the results of the afore mentioned accepted methods.

  11. SNP-based non-invasive prenatal testing detects sex chromosome aneuploidies with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Banjevic, Milena; Ryan, Allison; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Hill, Matthew; Hall, Megan P.; Westemeyer, Margaret; Saucier, Jennifer; Demko, Zachary; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a single nucleotide polymorphism- and informatics-based non-invasive prenatal test that detects sex chromosome aneuploidies early in pregnancy. Methods Fifteen aneuploid samples, including thirteen 45,X, two 47,XXY, and one 47,XYY, along with 185 euploid controls, were analyzed. Cell-free DNA was isolated from maternal plasma, amplified in a single multiplex PCR assay that targeted 19,488 polymorphic loci covering chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using a Bayesian-based maximum likelihood statistical method to determine copy number of interrogated chromosomes, calculating sample-specific accuracies. Results Of the samples that passed a stringent quality control metric (93%), the algorithm correctly identified copy number at all five chromosomes in all 187 samples, for 934/935 correct calls as early as 9.4 weeks of gestation. We detected 45,X with 91.7% sensitivity (CI: 61.5-99.8%) and 100% specificity (CI: 97.9-100%), and 47,XXY and 47,XYY. The average calculated accuracy was 99.78%. Conclusion This method non-invasively detected 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XYY fetuses from cfDNA isolated from maternal plasma with high calculated accuracies, and thus offers a non-invasive method with the potential to function as a routine screen allowing for early prenatal detection of rarely diagnosed yet commonly occurring sex aneuploidies. PMID:23712453

  12. Cell-Free Nucleic Acids As Noninvasive Biomarkers For Colorectal Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham eMansour

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA have been reported by several authors in blood, stool and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC. These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, so they can potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests can be very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation in large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  13. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-08-27

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  14. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giancarlo; Patrignani, Andrea; Poveda, Lucy; Hoehn, Frederic; Scholtka, Bettina; Schlapbach, Ralph; Garvin, Alex M

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents one of the most prevalent and lethal malignant neoplasms and every individual of age 50 and above should undergo regular CRC screening. Currently, the most effective preventive screening procedure to detect adenomatous polyps, the precursors to CRC, is colonoscopy. Since every colorectal cancer starts as a polyp, detecting all polyps and removing them is crucial. By exactly doing that, colonoscopy reduces CRC incidence by 80%, however it is an invasive procedure that might have unpleasant and, in rare occasions, dangerous side effects. Despite numerous efforts over the past two decades, a non-invasive screening method for the general population with detection rates for adenomas and CRC similar to that of colonoscopy has not yet been established. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have yet to be successfully applied to this problem, because the detection of rare mutations has been hindered by the systematic biases due to sequencing context and the base calling quality of NGS. We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS) to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  15. Non-invasive electrocardiogram detection of in vivo zebrafish embryos using electric potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon-Morales, E.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Aviles-Espinosa, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, we report the continuous detection of the cardiac electrical activity in embryonic zebrafish using a non-invasive approach. We present a portable and cost-effective platform based on the electric potential sensing technology, to monitor in vivo electrocardiogram activity from the zebrafish heart. This proof of principle demonstration shows how electrocardiogram measurements from the embryonic zebrafish may become accessible by using electric field detection. We present preliminary results using the prototype, which enables the acquisition of electrophysiological signals from in vivo 3 and 5 days-post-fertilization zebrafish embryos. The recorded waveforms show electrocardiogram traces including detailed features such as QRS complex, P and T waves.

  16. Noninvasive temperature estimation by detecting echo-strain change including thermal expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yong; Zhang Dong; Gong Xiu-Fen; Liu Xiao-Zhou; Ma Qing-Yu; Qiu Yuan-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    This article studies the feasibility of noninvasive temperature estimation by detecting echo-strain including thermal expansion in therapeutic ultrasound treatment. This technique evaluates distributions of echo-strain and temperature inside the tissue by detecting echo signals pre- and post-heating, in combination with the temperature dependence of sound speed and thermal expansion. In the computer simulation and experimental study, echo signals pre- and postheating are acquired and then the temperature elevation is evaluated by correlation analysis. Results demonstrate that this technique can effectively extend the measured temperature range up to 75℃ with an accuracy of ±2 ℃.

  17. Feasibility of non-invasive optical blood-glucose detection using overtone circular dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most debilitating and costly diseases currently plaguing humanity. It is a leading cause of death and dismemberment in the world, and we know how to treat it. Accurate, continuous monitoring and control of blood glucose levels via insulin treatments are widely known to mitigate the majority of detrimental effects caused by the disease. The primary limitation of continuous glucose monitoring is patient non-compliance due to the unpleasant nature of "finger-stick" testing methods. This limitation can be largely, or even completely, removed by non-invasive testing methods. In this report, we demonstrate the vibrational overtone circular dichroism properties of glucose and analyze its use as a method of non-invasive glucose monitoring, capable of assuaging this trillion dollar scourge.

  18. Applications in Bioastronautics and Bioinformatics: Early Radiation Cataracts Detected by Noninvasive, Quantitative, and Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars is a key goal in NASA's exploration planning in the next 20 years. Maintaining crew health and good vision is certainly an important aspect of achieving a successful mission. Continuous radiation exposure is a risk factor for radiation-induced cataracts in astronauts because radiation exposure in space travel has the potential of accelerating the aging process (ref. 1). A patented compact device (ref. 2) based on the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) was designed for monitoring an astronaut's ocular health during long-duration space travel. This capability of early diagnosis, unmatched by any other clinical technique in use today, may enable prompt initiation of preventive/curative therapy. An Internet web-based system integrating photon correlation data and controlling the hardware to monitor cataract development in vivo at a remote site in real time (teleophthalmology) is currently being developed. The new technology detects cataracts very early (at the molecular level). Cataract studies onboard the International Space Station will be helpful in quantifying any adverse effect of radiation to ocular health. The normal lens in a human eye, situated behind the cornea, is a transparent tissue. It contains 35 wt % protein and 65 wt % water. Aging, disease (e.g., diabetes), smoking, dehydration, malnutrition, and exposure to ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation can cause agglomeration of the lens proteins. Protein aggregation can take place anywhere in the lens, causing lens opacity. The aggregation and opacification could produce nuclear (central portion of the lens) or cortical (peripheral) cataracts. Nuclear and posterior subcapsular (the membrane's capsule surrounds the whole lens) cataracts, being on the visual optical axis of the eye, cause visual impairment that can finally lead to blindness. The lens proteins, in their native state, are small in size. As a cataract develops, this size grows from a few nanometers

  19. Noninvasive quantification of ascorbate and glutathione concentration in the elderly human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, Ascorbate (Asc) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations were non-invasively quantified using double edited 1H MRS at 4T in the occipital cortex of healthy young(age 18 – 22 years, N = 22) and elderly (age 70 – 89 years, N = 22) human subjects. Elderly subjects had a lower GSH concentrati...

  20. Noninvasive Detection of TMPRSS2:ERG Fusion Transcripts in the Urine of Men with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi Laxman

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the identification of recurrent gene fusions in the majority of prostate cancers involving the 5V untranslated region of the androgenregulated gene TMPRSS2, the ETS family members ERG, ETV1, ETV4. Here we report the noninvasive detection of these gene fusions in the urine of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we assessed the expression of ERG, TMPRSS2:ERG transcripts in urine samples obtained after prostatic massage from 19 patients (11 prebiopsy, 8 pre-radical prostatectomy with prostate cancer. We observed a strong concordance between ERG overexpression, TMPRSS2:ERG expression, with 8 of 19 (42% patients having detectable TMPRSS2:ERG transcripts in their urine. Importantly, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, we confirmed the presence or the absence of TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusions in matched prostate cancer tissue samples from three of three patients with fusion transcripts in their urine, from two of two patients without fusion transcripts in their urine. These results demonstrate that TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusions can be detected in the urine of patients with prostate cancer, support larger studies on prospective cohorts for noninvasive detection of prostate cancer.

  1. Systematic identification of placental epigenetic signatures for the noninvasive prenatal detection of Edwards syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana W Y Tsui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidy by maternal plasma analysis is challenging owing to the low fractional and absolute concentrations of fetal DNA in maternal plasma. Previously, we demonstrated for the first time that fetal DNA in maternal plasma could be specifically targeted by epigenetic (DNA methylation signatures in the placenta. By comparing one such methylated fetal epigenetic marker located on chromosome 21 with another fetal genetic marker located on a reference chromosome in maternal plasma, we could infer the relative dosage of fetal chromosome 21 and noninvasively detect fetal trisomy 21. Here we apply this epigenetic-genetic (EGG chromosome dosage approach to detect Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18 in the fetus noninvasively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have systematically identified methylated fetal epigenetic markers on chromosome 18 by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP and tiling array analysis with confirmation using quantitative DNA methylation assays. Methylated DNA sequences from an intergenic region between the VAPA and APCDD1 genes (the VAPA-APCDD1 DNA were detected in pre-delivery, but not post-delivery, maternal plasma samples. The concentrations correlated positively with those of an established fetal genetic marker, ZFY, in pre-delivery maternal plasma. The ratios of methylated VAPA-APCDD1(chr18 to ZFY(chrY were higher in maternal plasma samples of 9 male trisomy 18 fetuses than those of 27 male euploid fetuses (Mann-Whitney test, P=0.029. We defined the cutoff value for detecting trisomy 18 fetuses as mean+1.96 SD of the EGG ratios of the euploid cases. Eight of 9 trisomy 18 and 1 of 27 euploid cases showed EGG ratios higher than the cutoff value, giving a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specificity of 96.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our data have shown that the methylated VAPA-APCDD1 DNA in maternal plasma is predominantly derived from the fetus. We have demonstrated that this novel fetal epigenetic marker

  2. Human kin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Paola; Kramer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection has favored the evolution of behaviors that benefit not only one's genes, but also their copies in genetically related individuals. These behaviors include optimal outbreeding (choosing a mate that is neither too closely related, nor too distant), nepotism (helping kin), and spite (hurting non-kin at a personal cost), and all require some form of kin detection or kin recognition. Yet, kinship cannot be assessed directly; human kin detection relies on heuristic cues that take into account individuals' context (whether they were reared by our mother, or grew up in our home, or were given birth by our spouse), appearance (whether they smell or look like us), and ability to arouse certain feelings (whether we feel emotionally close to them). The uncertainties of kin detection, along with its dependence on social information, create ample opportunities for the evolution of deception and self-deception. For example, babies carry no unequivocal stamp of their biological father, but across cultures they are passionately claimed to resemble their mother's spouse; to the same effect, 'neutral' observers are greatly influenced by belief in relatedness when judging resemblance between strangers. Still, paternity uncertainty profoundly shapes human relationships, reducing not only the investment contributed by paternal versus maternal kin, but also prosocial behavior between individuals who are related through one or more males rather than females alone. Because of its relevance to racial discrimination and political preferences, the evolutionary pressure to prefer kin to non-kin has a manifold influence on society at large.

  3. Research on the best measurement situation between optical probe and tissue surfaces in non-invasive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuyao; Liu, Rong; Yu, Hui; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Xu, Kexin

    2016-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is often used for the non-invasive detection of composition in the human body, such as that of blood glucose and haemoglobin, due to its high penetration depth into tissues. Although it is feasible to position the optical probe precisely, contact situation between probe and human tissues is a difficult problem to determine because of physiological tremor and mechanical performance of bio-soft tissue. Here, we proposed a novel estimation method for the situation between the optical probe and tissue surfaces based on the dynamic auto-correlation matrix of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and radar chart. The diffuse reflectance spectra from the left palm of 4 healthy volunteers were collected while the optical probe gradually approached and pressed bio-tissues with a custom-design controlling device. 2DCOS in the wavelength with lower absorption (1000-1400 nm) was calculated under the perturbation of relative-distance and contact pressure between the optical probe and tissue surface. The synchronous 2DCOS showed that the surface reflection and diffuse reflectance were greatly affected by the contact conditions in 1100 nm, 1220 nm, and 1300 nm. Then the dynamic auto-correlation matrix of 2DCOS was established for the adjacent spectra, and the significant difference wavelengths were used to build radar charts to determine the critical contact situation visually. Results showed that the maximum variations of dynamic auto-correlation matrix appeared at near 1300 nm, and the relative distance between the probe and tissue corresponding to the critical contact state can be easily observed with radar charts with 0.25 mm uncertainty, which was consistent with the self-feeling of each volunteer. So this method can be applied to exactly determine the optimal measurement status for the non-invasive body composition detection in vivo. It is important for the design of human-machine interface and the accuracy improvement of body

  4. Non-invasive epigenetic detection of fetal trisomy 21 in first trimester maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Down syndrome (DS is the most common known aneuploidy, caused by an extra copy of all or part of chromosome 21. Fetal-specific epigenetic markers have been investigated for non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal DS. The phosphodiesterases gene, PDE9A, located on chromosome 21q22.3, is completely methylated in blood (M-PDE9A and unmethylated in the placenta (U-PDE9A. Therefore, we estimated the accuracy of non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy using this tissue-specific epigenetic characteristic of PDE9A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested, case-control study was conducted using maternal plasma samples collected from 108 pregnant women carrying 18 DS and 90 normal fetuses (each case was matched with 5 controls according to gestational weeks at blood sampling. All pregnancies were singletons at or before 12 weeks of gestation between October 2008 and May 2009. The maternal plasma levels of M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A were measured by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A levels were obtained in all samples and did not differ between male and female fetuses. M-PDE9A levels did not differ between the DS cases and controls (1854.3 vs 2004.5 copies/mL; P = 0.928. U-PDE9A levels were significantly elevated in women with DS fetuses compared with controls (356.8 vs 194.7 copies/mL, P<0.001. The sensitivities of U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A for non-invasive fetal DS detection were 77.8% and 83.3%, respectively, with a 5% false-positive rate. In the risk assessment for fetal DS, the adjusted odds ratios of U-PDE9A level and UI were 46.2 [95% confidence interval: 7.8-151.6] and 63.7 [95% confidence interval: 23.2-206.7], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A may be useful biomarkers for non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy, regardless of fetal

  5. Noninvasive topographical investigation of functional parameters in the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Manfred D.; Krug, Alfons; Hoeper, Jens

    1996-04-01

    A rapid micro-lightguide spectrometer (EMPHO II) coupled to an automatic three axis positioning system enables very precise and fast 2D-scans at the surface of human skin. The positioning accuracy amounts to 1 micrometer. This allows measurements with excellent spatial reproducibility. With this system examinations of local distribution of HbO2 and Hb have been performed in human skin. For this purpose at the back of the hand areas of 5 by 5 mm to 5 by 10 mm were scanned in defined steps of 100 micrometers. Functional images of local hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation of microscopical structures have been resolved by use of 250 micrometer lightguide sensors. Two-dimensional-images of local oxygen supply parameters corresponding directly to morphological structures of human skin have been gained. The local pattern matches the distribution of the papillas of the corium. In the papillas the capillary loops supplying the lower part of the epidermis are situated. The measured parameters describe very exactly the local oxygen supply situation of the area under investigation.

  6. Noninvasive presymptomatic detection of Cercospora beticola infection and identification of early metabolic responses in sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Mock

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cercospora beticola is an economically significant fungal pathogen of sugar beet, and is the causative pathogen of Cercospora leaf spot. Selected host genotypes with contrasting degree of susceptibility to the disease have been exploited to characterize the patterns of metabolite responses to fungal infection, and to devise a pre-symptomatic, non-invasive method of detecting the presence of the pathogen. Sugar beet genotypes were analyzed for metabolite profiles and hyperspectral signatures. Correlation of data matrices from both approaches facilitated identification of candidates for metabolic markers. Hyperspectral imaging was highly predictive with a classification accuracy of 98.5-99.9 % in detecting C. beticola. Metabolite analysis revealed metabolites altered by the host as part of a successful defence response: these were L-DOPA, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-β-D-glucoside, pantothenic acid and 5-O-feruloylquinic acid. The accumulation of glucosylvitexin in the resistant cultivar suggests it acts as a constitutively-produced protectant. The study establishes a proof-of-concept for an unbiased, presymptomatic and non-invasive detection system for the presence of C. beticola. The test needs to be validated with a larger set of genotypes, to be scalable to the level of a crop improvement program, aiming to speed up the selection for resistant cultivars of sugar beet. Untargeted metabolic profiling is a valuable tool to identify metabolites which correlate with hyperspectral data.

  7. Non-invasive optical detection of HBV based on serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuci; Wang, Qiwen; Weng, Cuncheng; Lin, Xueliang; Lin, Yao; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-10-01

    An optical method of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for non-invasive detection of hepatitis B surface virus (HBV). Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an established serological marker that is routinely used for the diagnosis of acute or chronic hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. Utilizing SERS to analyze blood serum for detecting HBV has not been reported in previous literature. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum samples: one group for 50 HBV patients and the other group for 50 healthy volunteers. Blood serum samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with HBV. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to differentiate HBV patients from healthy volunteer and achieved sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 74.0%. This exploratory work demonstrates that SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of HBV.

  8. Noninvasive detection of concealed explosives: depth profiling through opaque plastics by time-resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Ingeborg E Iping; López-López, María; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Gooijer, Cees; Buijs, Joost B; Ariese, Freek

    2011-11-15

    The detection of explosives concealed behind opaque, diffusely scattering materials is a challenge that requires noninvasive analytical techniques for identification without having to manipulate the package. In this context, this study focuses on the application of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy (TRRS) with a picosecond pulsed laser and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) detector for the noninvasive identification of explosive materials through several millimeters of opaque polymers or plastic packaging materials. By means of a short (250 ps) gate which can be delayed several hundred picoseconds after the laser pulse, the ICCD detector allows for the temporal discrimination between photons from the surface of a sample and those from deeper layers. TRRS was applied for the detection of the two main isomers of dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 2,6-dinitrotoluene as well as for various other components of explosive mixtures, including akardite II, diphenylamine, and ethyl centralite. Spectra were obtained through different diffuse scattering white polymer materials: polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polyethylene (PE). Common packaging materials of various thicknesses were also selected, including polystyrene (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). With the demonstration of the ability to detect concealed, explosives-related compounds through an opaque first layer, this study may have important applications in the security and forensic fields.

  9. Non-invasive measurement of hepatic oxygenation by an oxygen electrode in human orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifalian, A M; Mallett, S; Piasecki, C; Rolles, K; Davidson, B R

    2000-06-01

    Precise evaluation of graft reperfusion is difficult in clinical liver transplantation. The oxygen electrode (OE) is a novel technique to detect blood flow indirectly by measuring the quantity of oxygen which can diffuse from the hepatic tissue to the surface electrode. Application of the surface OE does not influence the liver blood flow or parenchymal perfusion. Adequate graft oxygenation is essential to the outcome of organ transplantation and has not previously been analysed intra-operatively in liver transplant recipients. The OE was applied to the surface of the graft intra-operatively in 22 human liver grafts after restoring portal vein and hepatic artery inflow. OE readings were compared with liver blood flow using an electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF). Intra-operative haemodynamics and donor organ parameters known to influence graft function were correlated with the OE readings. There was a significant correlation (r=0.89; poxygenation using the OE and total liver blood flow measured by EMF. The tissue oxygenation measurements were reproducible with a coefficient of variation of 5%. The hepatic tissue oxygenation increased significantly from baseline following venous reperfusion of the graft (282+/-23 vs 3107+/-288 (+/-SE) nA, poxygen perfusion. There was significant negative correlation (r=0.80, poxygenation. The OE provides a reliable, cheap and non-invasive method of monitoring liver graft oxygenation and perfusion during transplantation.

  10. Clinical system for non-invasive in situ monitoring of gases in the human paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewander, Märta; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; Svensson, Tomas

    2009-06-22

    We present a portable system for non-invasive, simultaneous sensing of molecular oxygen (O(2)) and water vapor (H(2)O) in the human paranasal cavities. The system is based on high-resolution tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) and digital wavelength modulation spectroscopy (dWMS). Since optical interference and non-ideal tuning of the diode lasers render signal processing complex, we focus on Fourier analysis of dWMS signals and procedures for removal of background signals. Clinical data are presented, and exhibit a significant improvement in signal-to-noise with respect to earlier work. The in situ detection limit, in terms of absorption fraction, is about 5x10(-5) for oxygen and 5x10(-4) for water vapor, but varies between patients due to differences in light attenuation. In addition, we discuss the use of water vapor as a reference in quantification of in situ oxygen concentration in detail. In particular, light propagation aspects are investigated by employing photon time-of-flight spectroscopy.

  11. Non-invasive Self-Care Anemia Detection during Pregnancy Using a Smartphone Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, M. D.; Fatoni, A.

    2017-02-01

    Indonesian maternal mortality rate is the highest in South East Asia. Postpartum hemorrhage is the major causes of maternal mortality in Indonesia. Anemia during pregnancy contributes significantly to postpartum hemorrhage. Early detection of anemia during pregnancy may save mothers from maternal death. This research aim to develop a non-invasive self-care anemia detection based on the palpebral color observation and using a smartphone camera. The color intensity (Red, Green, and Blue) was then measured using a Colorgrab software (Loomatix) and analyzed compared to the hemoglobin concentration of the samples, measured using standard Spectrophotometer method. The result showed that the red color intensity had a high correlation (R2=0.814) with a linear regression of y=14.486x + 50.228. This preliminary study may be used as anemia early detection which more objective compared to visual assessment usually performed.

  12. Grizzly Bear Noninvasive Genetic Tagging Surveys: Estimating the Magnitude of Missed Detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason T; Heim, Nicole; Code, Sandra; Paczkowski, John

    2016-01-01

    Sound wildlife conservation decisions require sound information, and scientists increasingly rely on remotely collected data over large spatial scales, such as noninvasive genetic tagging (NGT). Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), for example, are difficult to study at population scales except with noninvasive data, and NGT via hair trapping informs management over much of grizzly bears' range. Considerable statistical effort has gone into estimating sources of heterogeneity, but detection error-arising when a visiting bear fails to leave a hair sample-has not been independently estimated. We used camera traps to survey grizzly bear occurrence at fixed hair traps and multi-method hierarchical occupancy models to estimate the probability that a visiting bear actually leaves a hair sample with viable DNA. We surveyed grizzly bears via hair trapping and camera trapping for 8 monthly surveys at 50 (2012) and 76 (2013) sites in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. We used multi-method occupancy models to estimate site occupancy, probability of detection, and conditional occupancy at a hair trap. We tested the prediction that detection error in NGT studies could be induced by temporal variability within season, leading to underestimation of occupancy. NGT via hair trapping consistently underestimated grizzly bear occupancy at a site when compared to camera trapping. At best occupancy was underestimated by 50%; at worst, by 95%. Probability of false absence was reduced through successive surveys, but this mainly accounts for error imparted by movement among repeated surveys, not necessarily missed detections by extant bears. The implications of missed detections and biased occupancy estimates for density estimation-which form the crux of management plans-require consideration. We suggest hair-trap NGT studies should estimate and correct detection error using independent survey methods such as cameras, to ensure the reliability of the data upon which species management and

  13. Non-Invasive Detection of Anaemia Using Digital Photographs of the Conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Shaun; Thompson, Oliver; Hirst, Evan; Goossens, Louise; George, Anup; Weinkove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Anaemia is a major health burden worldwide. Although the finding of conjunctival pallor on clinical examination is associated with anaemia, inter-observer variability is high, and definitive diagnosis of anaemia requires a blood sample. We aimed to detect anaemia by quantifying conjunctival pallor using digital photographs taken with a consumer camera and a popular smartphone. Our goal was to develop a non-invasive screening test for anaemia. The conjunctivae of haemato-oncology in- and outpatients were photographed in ambient lighting using a digital camera (Panasonic DMC-LX5), and the internal rear-facing camera of a smartphone (Apple iPhone 5S) alongside an in-frame calibration card. Following image calibration, conjunctival erythema index (EI) was calculated and correlated with laboratory-measured haemoglobin concentration. Three clinicians independently evaluated each image for conjunctival pallor. Conjunctival EI was reproducible between images (average coefficient of variation 2.96%). EI of the palpebral conjunctiva correlated more strongly with haemoglobin concentration than that of the forniceal conjunctiva. Using the compact camera, palpebral conjunctival EI had a sensitivity of 93% and 57% and specificity of 78% and 83% for detection of anaemia (haemoglobin anaemia. Erythema index of the palpebral conjunctiva calculated from images taken with a compact camera or mobile phone correlates with haemoglobin and compares favourably to clinician assessment for prediction of anaemia. If confirmed in further series, this technique may be useful for the non-invasive screening for anaemia.

  14. Detection of Methylated Circulating DNA as Noninvasive Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Isabella Wai Yin; Shin, Vivian Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, breast cancer is the most common female cancer, and is induced by a combination of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic risk factors. Despite the advancement of imaging techniques, invasive sampling of breast epithelial cells is the only definitive diagnostic procedure for patients with breast cancer. To date, molecular biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the screening and early detection of breast cancer are lacking. Recent evidence suggests that the detection of methylated circulating cell-free DNA in the peripheral blood of patients with cancer may be a promising quantitative and noninvasive method for cancer diagnosis. Methylation detection based on a multi-gene panel, rather than on the methylation status of a single gene, may be used to increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening. In this review, the results of 14 relevant studies, investigating the efficacy of cell-free DNA methylation screening for breast cancer diagnosis, have been summarized. The genetic risk factors for breast cancer, the methods used for breast cancer detection, and the techniques and limitations related to the detection of cell-free DNA methylation status, have also been reviewed and discussed. From this review, we conclude that the analysis of peripheral blood or other samples to detect differentially methylated cell-free DNA is a promising technique for use in clinical settings, and may improve the sensitivity of screening for both, early detection and disease relapse, and thus improve the future prognosis of patients with breast cancer. PMID:28382090

  15. Non-invasive bleaching of the human lens by femtosecond laser photolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, L.; Eskildsen, Lars; Poel, Mike van der

    2010-01-01

    were susceptible to photobleaching by a non-invasive procedure and whether this would lead to optical rejuvenation of the lens. Methodology/Principal Findings: Nine human donor lenses were treated with an 800 nm infra-red femtosecond pulsed laser in a treatment zone measuring 1 x 1 x 0.52 mm. After...... laser treatment the age-induced yellow discoloration of the lens was markedly reduced and the transmission of light was increased corresponding to an optical rejuvenation of 3 to 7 years. Conclusions/Significance: The results demonstrate that the age-induced yellowing of the human lens can be bleached...... by a non-invasive procedure based on femtosecond laser photolysis. Cataract is a disease associated with old age. At the current technological stage, lens aging is delayed but with a treatment covering the entire lens volume complete optical rejuvenation is expected. Thus, femtosecond photolysis has...

  16. A multi-analyte assay for the non-invasive detection of bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Goodison

    Full Text Available Accurate urinary assays for bladder cancer (BCa detection would benefit both patients and healthcare systems. Through genomic and proteomic profiling of urine components, we have previously identified a panel of biomarkers that can outperform current urine-based biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of BCa. Herein, we report the diagnostic utility of various multivariate combinations of these biomarkers. We performed a case-controlled validation study in which voided urines from 127 patients (64 tumor bearing subjects were analyzed. The urinary concentrations of 14 biomarkers (IL-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, SDC1, CCL18, PAI-1, CD44, VEGF, ANG, CA9, A1AT, OPN, PTX3, and APOE were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Diagnostic performance of each biomarker and multivariate models were compared using receiver operating characteristic curves and the chi-square test. An 8-biomarker model achieved the most accurate BCa diagnosis (sensitivity 92%, specificity 97%, but a combination of 3 of the 8 biomarkers (IL-8, VEGF, and APOE was also highly accurate (sensitivity 90%, specificity 97%. For comparison, the commercial BTA-Trak ELISA test achieved a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 83%, and voided urine cytology detected only 33% of BCa cases in the same cohort. These data show that a multivariate urine-based assay can markedly improve the accuracy of non-invasive BCa detection. Further validation studies are under way to investigate the clinical utility of this panel of biomarkers for BCa diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  17. Detection of fetal mutations causing hemoglobinopathies by non-invasive prenatal diagnosis from maternal plasma

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    E D′Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies enables couples at risk to have a healthy child. Currently used fetal sampling procedures are invasive with some risk of miscarriage. A non-invasive approach to obtain fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA for diagnosis would eliminate this risk. Aim: To develop and evaluate a non-invasive prenatal diagnostic approach for hemoglobinopathies using cell-free fetal DNA circulating in the maternal plasma. Settings and Design: Couples referred to us for prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies where the maternal and paternal mutations were different were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Maternal peripheral blood was collected at different periods of gestation before the invasive fetal sampling procedure was done. The blood was centrifuged to isolate the plasma and prepare DNA. A size separation approach was used to isolate fetal DNA. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based protocols were developed for detection of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation. Results and Conclusions: There were 30 couples where the parental mutations were different. Of these, in 14 cases the paternal mutation was absent and in 16 cases it was present in the fetus. Using cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma, the absence of the paternal mutation was accurately determined in 12 of the 14 cases and the presence of the paternal mutation was correctly identified in 12 of the 16 cases. Thus, this non-invasive approach gave comparable results to those obtained by the conventional invasive fetal sampling methods in 24 cases giving an accuracy of 80.0%. Although the nested PCR approach enabled amplification of small quantities of cell-free DNA from maternal plasma at different periods of gestation after size separation to eliminate the more abundant maternal DNA, an accurate diagnosis of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the fetus was not possible in all cases to make it clinically

  18. Noninvasive and Painless Urine Glucose Detection by Using Computer-based Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno; Laksono, Y. A.; Hidayat, N.

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes kills millions of people worldwide each year. It challenges us as researchers to give contribution in early diagnosis to ensure a healthy life. As a matter of fact, common glucose testing devices that have been widely used so far are, at least, glucose meter and urine glucose test strip. The glucose meter ordinarily requires blood taken from patient’s finger. The glucose test strip uses patient’s urine but records unspecific urine glucose level, since the strip only provides the glucose level in some particular ranges. Instead of detecting the glucose level in blood and using the non-specific technique, a noninvasive and painless technique that can detect glucose level accurately will provide a more feasible approach for diabetes diagnosis. The noninvasive and painless urine glucose level monitoring by means of computer-based polarimeter is presented in this paper. The instrument consisted of a power source, a sample box, a light sensor, a polarizer, an analyzer, an analog to digital converter (ADC), and a computer. The concentration of urine glucose concentration was evaluated from the curve of the change in detected optical rotation angle and output potential by the computer-based polarimeter. Statistical analyses by means of Gaussian fitting and linear regression were applied to investigate the rotation angle and urine glucose concentration, respectively. From our experiment, the urine glucose level, measured by glucose test strips, of the normal patient was 100 mg/dl, and the diabetic patient was 500 mg/dl. Our polarimeter even read more precise values for the urine glucose concentrations of those normal and diabetic of the same patients, i.e. 50.61 mg/dl and 502.41 mg/dl, respectively. In other words, the results showed that our polarimeter was able to quantitatively measure the urine glucose level more accurate than urine glucose test strips. Hence, this computer-based polarimeter could be used as an alternative for early detection of urine

  19. Noninvasive metabolic imaging of engineered 3D human adipose tissue in a perfusion bioreactor.

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    Andrew Ward

    Full Text Available The efficacy and economy of most in vitro human models used in research is limited by the lack of a physiologically-relevant three-dimensional perfused environment and the inability to noninvasively quantify the structural and biochemical characteristics of the tissue. The goal of this project was to develop a perfusion bioreactor system compatible with two-photon imaging to noninvasively assess tissue engineered human adipose tissue structure and function in vitro. Three-dimensional (3D vascularized human adipose tissues were engineered in vitro, before being introduced to a perfusion environment and tracked over time by automated quantification of endogenous markers of metabolism using two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF. Depth-resolved image stacks were analyzed for redox ratio metabolic profiling and compared to prior analyses performed on 3D engineered adipose tissue in static culture. Traditional assessments with H&E staining were used to qualitatively measure extracellular matrix generation and cell density with respect to location within the tissue. The distribution of cells within the tissue and average cellular redox ratios were different between static and perfusion cultures, while the trends of decreased redox ratio and increased cellular proliferation with time in both static and perfusion cultures were similar. These results establish a basis for noninvasive optical tracking of tissue structure and function in vitro, which can be applied to future studies to assess tissue development or drug toxicity screening and disease progression.

  20. Noninvasive metabolic imaging of engineered 3D human adipose tissue in a perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Andrew; Quinn, Kyle P; Bellas, Evangelia; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and economy of most in vitro human models used in research is limited by the lack of a physiologically-relevant three-dimensional perfused environment and the inability to noninvasively quantify the structural and biochemical characteristics of the tissue. The goal of this project was to develop a perfusion bioreactor system compatible with two-photon imaging to noninvasively assess tissue engineered human adipose tissue structure and function in vitro. Three-dimensional (3D) vascularized human adipose tissues were engineered in vitro, before being introduced to a perfusion environment and tracked over time by automated quantification of endogenous markers of metabolism using two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF). Depth-resolved image stacks were analyzed for redox ratio metabolic profiling and compared to prior analyses performed on 3D engineered adipose tissue in static culture. Traditional assessments with H&E staining were used to qualitatively measure extracellular matrix generation and cell density with respect to location within the tissue. The distribution of cells within the tissue and average cellular redox ratios were different between static and perfusion cultures, while the trends of decreased redox ratio and increased cellular proliferation with time in both static and perfusion cultures were similar. These results establish a basis for noninvasive optical tracking of tissue structure and function in vitro, which can be applied to future studies to assess tissue development or drug toxicity screening and disease progression.

  1. Non-invasive optical detection of esophagus cancer based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weiwei; Lin, Duo; Huang, Lingling; Wu, Shanshan; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) approach was utilized for urine biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a label-free and non-invasive optical diagnostic method for esophagus cancer detection. SERS spectrums were acquired from 31 normal urine samples and 47 malignant esophagus cancer (EC) urine samples. Tentative assignments of urine SERS bands demonstrated esophagus cancer specific changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of urea and a decrease in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of normal compared with EC. The empirical algorithm integrated with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to identify some important urine SERS bands for differentiation between healthy subjects and EC urine. The empirical diagnostic approach based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity at 527 to 1002 cm-1 and 725 to 1002 cm-1 coupled with LDA yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.3% and specificity of 96.8%, respectively. The area under the receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.954, which further evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the SERS peak intensity combined with LDA analysis. This work demonstrated that the urine SERS spectra associated with empirical algorithm has potential for noninvasive diagnosis of esophagus cancer.

  2. Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Carrier Detection

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    Mónica Alejandra Anaya-Segura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive biological indicators of the absence/presence or progress of the disease that could be used to support diagnosis and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment are of utmost importance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. This neuromuscular disorder affects male children, causing weakness and disability, whereas female relatives are at risk of being carriers of the disease. A biomarker with both high sensitivity and specificity for accurate prediction is preferred. Until now creatine kinase (CK levels have been used for DMD diagnosis but these fail to assess disease progression. Herein we examined the potential applicability of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, myostatin (GDF-8 and follistatin (FSTN as non-invasive biomarkers to distinguish between DMD steroid naïve patients and healthy controls of similar age and also for carrier detection. Our data suggest that serum levels of MMP-9, GDF-8 and FSTN are useful to discriminate DMD from controls (p < 0.05, to correlate with some neuromuscular assessments for DMD, and also to differentiate between Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD and Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD patients. In DMD individuals under steroid treatment, GDF-8 levels increased as FSTN levels decreased, resembling the proportions of these proteins in healthy controls and also the baseline ratio of patients without steroids. GDF-8 and FSTN serum levels were also useful for carrier detection (p < 0.05. Longitudinal studies with larger cohorts are necessary to confirm that these molecules correlate with disease progression. The biomarkers presented herein could potentially outperform CK levels for carrier detection and also harbor potential for monitoring disease progression.

  3. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI STOOL ANTIGEN BY NON-INVASIVE ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢盛恺; 林其燧; 宋耀虹; 王树琴

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical utility of a new non-invasive enzyme immunoassay(EIA) for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Methods. Stool specimens of 63 patients were collected and tested by using a commercial kit for detecting Helicobacter pylori stool antigen (HpSA), of which 61 patients also underwent 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT). The tissue samples of 31 patients were obtained endoscopically and were examined with histologic technique (Warthin-Starry silver stain).Regarded 13C-UBT as a golden standard, HpSA test and histologic techniques were evaluated. Using this method,we also investigated the positive rate of H.Pylori infection in children in Beijing.Results.The sensitivity and specificity of HpSA test were 94.7% and 95.1% respectively; the positive and negative predictive values were 97.3% and 91.7% respectively; and the accuracy was 95.1%.The results showed the prevalence of H.pylori infection was 26.0% in children (3~18 years) of district of Xicheng in Beijing. After treatment, HpSA seems to disappear rapidly(3~5 days) from the feces. Conclusion. The detection of HpSA in stool samples by HpSA test is a rapid noninvasive test for detecting H.pylori infection, and has both high sensitivity and high specificity. It is suitable for screening and diagnosis of H.pylori infection, monitoring the treatment efficacy in routine in all hospitals.

  4. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  5. Label-free SPR detection of gluten peptides in urine for non-invasive celiac disease follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Cebolla, Angel; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by the necessity of new and efficient methods for dietary gluten control of celiac patients, we have developed a simple and highly sensitive SPR biosensor for the detection of gluten peptides in urine. The sensing methodology enables rapid and label-free quantification of the gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) by using G12 mAb. The overall performance of the biosensor has been in-depth optimized and evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility, reaching a limit of detection of 0.33 ng mL(-1). Besides, the robustness and stability of the methodology permit the continuous use of the biosensor for more than 100 cycles with excellent repeatability. Special efforts have been focused on preventing and minimizing possible interferences coming from urine matrix enabling a direct analysis in this fluid without requiring extraction or purification procedures. Our SPR biosensor has proven to detect and identify gluten consumption by evaluating urine samples from healthy and celiac individuals with different dietary gluten conditions. This novel biosensor methodology represents a novel approach to quantify the digested gluten peptides in human urine with outstanding sensitivity in a rapid and non-invasive manner. Our technique should be considered as a promising opportunity to develop Point-of-Care (POC) devices for an efficient, simple and accurate gluten free diet (GFD) monitoring as well as therapy follow-up of celiac disease patients.

  6. Non-Invasive Detection of Lung Inflammation by Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Using Bimodal Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desu, Hari R; Wood, George C; Thoma, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome results in respiratory obstruction and severe lung inflammation. Critical characteristics of ALI are alveolar edema, infiltration of leukocytes (neutrophils and monocytes), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines into broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, and activation of integrin receptors. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate non-invasive detection of lung inflammation using integrin receptor targeted fluorescence liposomes. An inflammation similar to that observed in ALI was elicited in rodents by intra-tracheal instillation of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Cyclic arginine glycine-(D)-aspartic acid-peptide (cRGD-peptide) grafted fluorescence liposomes were administered to ALI induced male Sprague-Dawley rats for targeting lung integrin receptors. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) was applied for visualization and quantitation of lung inflammation. NIRFI signals were correlated with inflammatory cellular and biochemical markers of lungs. A positive correlation was observed between NIRF signals and lung inflammation markers. Compared to control group, an intense NIRF signal was observed in ALI induced rats in the window 6-24 h post-IL-1beta instillation. Interaction of integrin receptors with targeted liposomes was assumed to contribute to intense NIRF signal. RT-PCR studies showed an elevated lung expression of alphavbeta5 integrin receptors, 12 h post-IL-1beta instillation. In vitro studies demonstrated integrin receptor specificity of targeted liposomes. These targeted liposomes showed binding to alphavbeta5 integrin receptors expressed on alveolar cells. Non-invasive detection of lung inflammation was demonstrated using a combination of integrin receptor targeting and NIRFI.

  7. Non-invasive detection of high gamma band activity during motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Smith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High gamma oscillations (70-150 Hz; HG are rapidly evolving, spatially localized neurophysiological signals that are believed to be the best representative signature of engaged neural populations. The HG band has been best characterized from invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electrocorticography (ECoG because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio that results when by-passing the scalp and skull. Despite the recent observation that HG activity can be detected non-invasively by electroencephalography (EEG, it is unclear to what extent EEG can accurately resolve the spatial distribution of HG signals during active task engagement. We have overcome some of the limitations inherent to acquiring HG signals across the scalp by utilizing individual head anatomy in combination with an inverse modeling method. We applied a linearly constrained minimum variance beamformer (LCMV method on EEG data during a motor imagery paradigm to extract a time-frequency spectrogram at every voxel location on the cortex. To confirm spatially distributed patterns of HG responses, we contrasted overlapping maps of the EEG HG signal with BOLD fMRI data acquired from the same set of neurologically normal subjects during a separate session. We show that scalp-based HG band activity detected by EEG during motor imagery spatially co-localizes with BOLD fMRI data. Taken together, these results suggest that EEG can accurately resolve spatially specific estimates of local cortical high frequency signals, potentially opening an avenue for non-invasive measurement of HG potentials from diverse sets of neurologically impaired populations for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: A Potential Technique for Noninvasive Detection of Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilany, Kambiz; Pouracil, Roudabeh Sadat Moazeni; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background The seminal plasma is an excellent source for noninvasive detection of spermatogenesis. The seminal plasma of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed for detection of spermatogenesis. Methods Optical spectroscopy (Attenuated Total Reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to analyze the seminal plasma and the metabolome of seminal plasma for detection of spermatogenesis. Results The seminal plasma of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed by ATR-IR. The results show that there is a pattern variation in the azoospermic men compared to normospermic men. However, the seminal plasma is too complex to show significant pattern variation. Therefore, the metabolome which is a subcomponent of the seminal plasma was analyzed. The seminal plasma metabolome of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed by FT-IR. A significant pattern change was observed. The data combined with chemometrics analysis showed that significant changes are observed at metabolome level. Conclusion We suggest that FT-IR has the potential as a diagnostic tool instead of testicular biopsy. PMID:24523955

  9. Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

  10. Non-invasive aneuploidy detection using free fetal DNA and RNA in maternal plasma: recent progress and future possibilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Go, A.T.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Oudejans, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA (cff DNA) and RNA can be detected in maternal plasma and used for non-invasive prenatal diagnostics. Recent technical advances have led to a drastic change in the clinical applicability and potential uses of free fetal DNA and RNA. This review summarizes the latest cl

  11. Widespread changes in network activity allow non-invasive detection of mesial temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-10-01

    Decades of experience with intracranial recordings in patients with epilepsy have demonstrated that seizures can occur in deep cortical regions such as the mesial temporal lobes without showing any obvious signs of seizure activity on scalp electroencephalogram. Predicated on the idea that these seizures are purely focal, currently, the only way to detect these 'scalp-negative seizures' is with intracranial recordings. However, intracranial recordings are only rarely performed in patients with epilepsy, and are almost never performed outside of the context of epilepsy. As such, little is known about scalp-negative seizures and their role in the natural history of epilepsy, their effect on cognitive function, and their association with other neurological diseases. Here, we developed a novel approach to non-invasively identify scalp-negative seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe based on scalp electroencephalogram network connectivity measures. We identified 25 scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures in 10 patients and obtained control records from an additional 13 patients, all of whom underwent recordings with foramen ovale electrodes and scalp electroencephalogram. Scalp data from these records were used to train a scalp-negative seizure detector, which consisted of a pair of logistic regression classifiers that used scalp electroencephalogram coherence properties as input features. On cross-validation performance, this detector correctly identified scalp-negative seizures in 40% of patients, and correctly identified the side of seizure onset for each seizure detected. In comparison, routine clinical interpretation of these scalp electroencephalograms failed to identify any of the scalp-negative seizures. Among the patients in whom the detector raised seizure alarms, 80% had scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures. The detector had a false alarm rate of only 0.31 per day and a positive predictive value of 75%. Of the 13 control patients, false

  12. Noninvasive quantitation of human liver steatosis using magnetic resonance and bioassay methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Assignies, Gaspard; Ruel, Martin; Khiat, Abdesslem; Lepanto, Luigi; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chagnon, Miguel [Universite de Montreal (UDEM), Departement de Mathematiques et de Statistique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gaboury, Louis [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Boulanger, Yvan [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hopital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the ability of three magnetic resonance (MR) techniques to detect liver steatosis and to determine which noninvasive technique (MR, bioassays) or combination of techniques is optimal for the quantification of hepatic fat using histopathology as a reference. Twenty patients with histopathologically proven steatosis and 24 control subjects underwent single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS; 3 voxels), dual-echo in phase/out of phase MR imaging (DEI) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) examinations of the liver. Blood or urine bioassays were also performed for steatosis patients. Both MRS and DEI data allowed to detect steatosis with a high sensitivity (0.95 for MRS; 1 for DEI) and specificity (1 for MRS; 0.875 for DEI) but not DWI. Strong correlations were found between fat fraction (FF) measured by MRS, DEI and histopathology segmentation as well as with low density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. A Bland-Altman analysis showed a good agreement between the FF measured by MRS and DEI. Partial correlation analyses failed to improve the correlation with segmentation FF when MRS or DEI data were combined with bioassay results. Therefore, FF from MRS or DEI appear to be the best parameters to both detect steatosis and accurately quantify fat liver noninvasively. (orig.)

  13. Two-wavelength Raman detector for noninvasive measurements of carotenes and lycopene in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2005-04-01

    Carotenoids are an important part of the antioxidant system in human skin. Carotenoid molecules, provided by fruits and vegetables, are potent free radical quenchers that accumulate in the body. If not balanced by carotenoids and other antioxidants, free radicals may cause premature skin aging, oxidative cell damage, and even skin cancers. As carotenoids depletion may predispose a person to cancer or other disease, rapid and noninvasive measurement of carotenoid level in skin may be of preventive or diagnostic help. At the very least, such measurement can be used to obtain a biomarker for healthy levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Recently we have developed noninvasive optical technique based on Raman spectroscopy. In this paper we describe compact optical detector for clinical applications that utilizes two-wavelength excitation. It selectively measures the two most prominent skin carotenoids found in the human skin, lycopene and carotenes. According to the medical literature, these two compounds may play different roles in the human body and be part of different tissue defense mechanisms. Dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects.

  14. NONINVASIVE DETECTION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY VARIATION UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA BY EEG COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jin; Li Wenwen; Zheng Chongxun; Jing Guixia; Liu Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the change of brain activity under different depth of anesthesia (DOA)noninvasively. Methods The Lempel-Ziv complexity C(n) was used to analyze EEG and its four components (delta,theta, alpha, beta), which was recorded from SD rats under different DOA. The relationship between C(n) and DOA was studied. Results The C(n) of EEG will decrease while the depth of anesthesia increasing and vice versa. It can be used to detect the change of DOA sensitively. Compared with power spectrum, the change of C(n) is opposite to that of power spectru,. Only the C(n) of delta rhythm has obvious variations induced by the change of DOA, and the variations of delta is as similar as the EEG's. Conclusion The study shows that the desynchronized EEG is replaced by the synchronized EEG when rat goes into anesthesia state from awake, that is just the reason why complexity and power spectrum appear corresponding changes under different DOA. C(n) of delta rhythm dynamic change leads to the change of EEG, and the delta rhythm is the dominant rhythm during anesthesia for rats.

  15. Noninvasive Detection of Inflammation-Associated Colon Cancer in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Ericsson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter bilis-infected Smad3-/- mice represent an attractive model of inflammation-associated colon cancer. Most infected mice develop mucinous adenocarcinoma (MUC by 6 weeks post inoculation (PI; however, approximately one third do not progress to MUC. The ability to predict the development of MUC in mice used in therapeutic studies would confer a considerable saving of time and money. In addition, the inadvertent use of mice without MUC may confound therapeutic studies by making treatments seem falsely efficacious. We assessed both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fecal biomarkers in Helicobacter- and sham-inoculated mice as methods of noninvasively detecting MUC before the predicted onset of disease. Non-contrast-enhanced MRI was able to detect lesions in 58% of mice with histologically confirmed MUC; however, serial imaging sessions produced inconsistent results. MRI was also a labor- and time-intensive technique requiring anesthesia. Alternatively, inflammatory biomarkers isolated from feces at early time points were correlated to later histologic lesions. Fecal expression of interleukin 1β, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted at 3 weeks PI correlated significantly with lesion severity at 9 weeks PI. For each biomarker, receiver-operator characteristic curves were also generated, and all three biomarkers performed well at 1 to 3 weeks PI, indicating that the development of MUC can be predicted based on the early expression of certain inflammatory mediators in feces.

  16. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7-1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects.

  17. Multiplex PCR and Next Generation Sequencing for the Non-Invasive Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas G Ward

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and specific urine-based tests to detect either primary or recurrent bladder cancer have proved elusive to date. Our ever increasing knowledge of the genomic aberrations in bladder cancer should enable the development of such tests based on urinary DNA.DNA was extracted from urine cell pellets and PCR used to amplify the regions of the TERT promoter and coding regions of FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, HRAS, KDM6A and RXRA which are frequently mutated in bladder cancer. The PCR products were barcoded, pooled and paired-end 2 x 250 bp sequencing performed on an Illumina MiSeq. Urinary DNA was analysed from 20 non-cancer controls, 120 primary bladder cancer patients (41 pTa, 40 pT1, 39 pT2+ and 91 bladder cancer patients post-TURBT (89 cancer-free.Despite the small quantities of DNA extracted from some urine cell pellets, 96% of the samples yielded mean read depths >500. Analysing only previously reported point mutations, TERT mutations were found in 55% of patients with bladder cancer (independent of stage, FGFR3 mutations in 30% of patients with bladder cancer, PIK3CA in 14% and TP53 mutations in 12% of patients with bladder cancer. Overall, these previously reported bladder cancer mutations were detected in 86 out of 122 bladder cancer patients (70% sensitivity and in only 3 out of 109 patients with no detectable bladder cancer (97% specificity.This simple, cost-effective approach could be used for the non-invasive surveillance of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers harbouring these mutations. The method has a low DNA input requirement and can detect low levels of mutant DNA in a large excess of normal DNA. These genes represent a minimal biomarker panel to which extra markers could be added to develop a highly sensitive diagnostic test for bladder cancer.

  18. Humane accomplishment of physicians and the philosophy of minimally-invasive and noninvasive medicine: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bin; Lang, Jinghe

    2015-11-01

    The highest realm in clinical medicine is the harmonious unity of medical sciences and the humanistic spirit. Given that the beauty of human nature resides in humanity, a competent medical practitioner should be a sage that personifies the rigorous scientific spirit and the humanity. It is essential for a medical practitioner to learn to seek answers to medical inquiries at the philosophical level. Important as it is to study the organs, the cells and the functions of the body, medical practitioners need to be well-versed in the utmost beauty of mankind. The central tenet of minimally-invasive therapeutic medicine is to minimize harm to patients while effectively managing the lesion. The radical changes brought about by minimally-invasive technologies, exemplified by the non-invasive high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery, are to change the face of traditional surgery.

  19. Noninvasive method for assessing the human circadian clock using hair follicle cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Makoto Akashi; Haruhiko Soma; Takuro Yamamoto; Asuka Tsugitomi; Shiko Yamashita; Takuya Yamamoto; Eisuke Nishida; Akio Yasuda; James K. Liao; Koichi Node; Joseph S. Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    .... This limitation has greatly hampered our understanding of human circadian rhythm. Here we report a convenient, reliable, and less invasive method for detecting human clock gene expression using biopsy samples of hair follicle cells from the head or chin...

  20. Non-invasive bleaching of the human lens by femtosecond laser photolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Kessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and impaired vision. Cataract surgery is an attractive treatment option but it remains unavailable in sufficient quantity for the vast majority of the world population living in areas without access to specialized health care. Reducing blindness from cataract requires solutions that can be applied outside operating theatres. Cataract is a protein conformational disease characterized by accumulation of light absorbing, fluorescent and scattering protein aggregates. The aim of the study was to investigate whether these compounds were susceptible to photobleaching by a non-invasive procedure and whether this would lead to optical rejuvenation of the lens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine human donor lenses were treated with an 800 nm infra-red femtosecond pulsed laser in a treatment zone measuring 1x1x0.52 mm. After laser treatment the age-induced yellow discoloration of the lens was markedly reduced and the transmission of light was increased corresponding to an optical rejuvenation of 3 to 7 years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that the age-induced yellowing of the human lens can be bleached by a non-invasive procedure based on femtosecond laser photolysis. Cataract is a disease associated with old age. At the current technological stage, lens aging is delayed but with a treatment covering the entire lens volume complete optical rejuvenation is expected. Thus, femtosecond photolysis has the potential clinical value of replacing invasive cataract surgery by a non-invasive treatment modality that can be placed in mobile units, thus breaking down many of the barriers impeding access to treatment in remote and poor regions of the world.

  1. A non-invasive tool for detecting cervical cancer odor by trained scent dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Flores, Héctor; Apresa-García, Teresa; Garay-Villar, Ónix; Sánchez-Pérez, Alejandro; Flores-Villegas, David; Bandera-Calderón, Artfy; García-Palacios, Raúl; Rojas-Sánchez, Teresita; Romero-Morelos, Pablo; Sánchez-Albor, Verónica; Mata, Osvaldo; Arana-Conejo, Víctor; Badillo-Romero, Jesús; Taniguchi, Keiko; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical Cancer (CC) has become a public health concern of alarming proportions in many developing countries such as Mexico, particularly in low income sectors and marginalized regions. As such, an early detection is a key medical factor in improving not only their population’s quality of life but also its life expectancy. Interestingly, there has been an increase in the number of reports describing successful attempts at detecting cancer cells in human tissues or fluids using trai...

  2. Non-invasive assessment of bone quantity and quality in human trabeculae using scanning ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi

    Fractures and associated bone fragility induced by osteoporosis and osteopenia are widespread health threat to current society. Early detection of fracture risk associated with bone quantity and quality is important for both the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and consequent complications. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is an engineering technology for monitoring bone quantity and quality of humans on earth and astronauts subjected to long duration microgravity. Factors currently limiting the acceptance of QUS technology involve precision, accuracy, single index and standardization. The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy and precision of an image-based QUS technique for non-invasive evaluation of trabecular bone quantity and quality by developing new techniques and understanding ultrasound/tissue interaction. Several new techniques have been developed in this dissertation study, including the automatic identification of irregular region of interest (iROI) in bone, surface topology mapping (STM) and mean scattering spacing (MSS) estimation for evaluating trabecular bone structure. In vitro results have shown that (1) the inter- and intra-observer errors in QUS measurement were reduced two to five fold by iROI compared to previous results; (2) the accuracy of QUS parameter, e.g., ultrasound velocity (UV) through bone, was improved 16% by STM; and (3) the averaged trabecular spacing can be estimated by MSS technique (r2=0.72, p<0.01). The measurement errors of BUA and UV introduced by the soft tissue and cortical shells in vivo can be quantified by developed foot model and simplified cortical-trabecular-cortical sandwich model, which were verified by the experimental results. The mechanisms of the errors induced by the cortical and soft tissues were revealed by the model. With developed new techniques and understanding of sound-tissue interaction, in vivo clinical trail and bed rest study were preformed to evaluate the performance of QUS in

  3. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  4. Towards non-invasive diagnostic techniques for early detection of acute renal transplant rejection: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hollis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The kidney is a very important complicated filtering organ of the body. When the kidney reaches stage 5 chronic kidney disease, end stage renal failure, the preeminent therapy is renal transplantation. Although it is the best form of treatment, lack of kidney donors is still challenging. Therefore, all efforts should be employed to prolong the survival rate of the transplanted kidney. However, graft dysfunction (e.g., acute rejection is one of the serious barriers to long term kidney transplant survival. Currently, graft dysfunction’s gold standard of diagnosis is renal biopsy. Although renal biopsy is helpful, it is not preferred due to its invasive nature, high morbidity rates, and expensiveness. Therefore, noninvasive imaging techniques have become the subject of extensive research and interest, giving a strong promise to replace, or at least to decrease, biopsy usage in diagnosing graft dysfunction. This survey will discuss not only the current diagnosis and treatment of graft dysfunction but also the state-of-the-art imaging techniques in detecting acute renal transplant rejection.

  5. Development of low cost instrumentation for non-invasive detection of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannath, A.; Rutt, H. N.

    2007-02-01

    A new clinical diagnostic instrument for urea breath test (UBT) based non-invasive detection of Helicobacter Pylori is presented here. Its compact and low cost design makes it an economical and commercial alternative for the more expensive Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS). The instrument is essentially a two channel non-dispersive IR spectrometer that performs high precision ratio measurements of the two carbon isotopomers ( 12CO II and 13CO II) present in exhaled breath. A balanced absorption system configuration was designed where the two channel path lengths would roughly be in the ratio of their concentrations. Equilibrium between the transmitted channel intensities was maintained by using a novel feedback servo mechanism to adjust the length of the 13C channel cell. Extensive computational simulations were performed to study the effect of various possible interferents and their results were considered in the design of the instrument so as to achieve the desired measurement precision of 1%. Specially designed gas cells and a custom made gas filling rig were also developed. A complete virtual interface for both instrument control and data acquisition was implemented in LABVIEW. Initial tests were used to validate the theory and a basic working device was demonstrated.

  6. Active concentric ring electrode for non-invasive detection of intestinal myoelectric signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats-Boluda, Gema; Garcia-Casado, Javier; Martinez-de-Juan, Jose L; Ye-Lin, Yiyao

    2011-05-01

    Although the surface electroenterogram (EEnG) is a weak signal contaminated by strong physiological interference, such as ECG and respiration, abdominal surface recordings of the EEnG could provide a non-invasive method of studying intestinal activity. The goal of this work was to develop a modular, active, low-cost and easy-to-use sensor to obtain a direct estimation of the Laplacian of the EEnG on the abdominal surface in order to enhance the quality of bipolar surface monitoring of intestinal activity. The sensor is made up of a set of 3 concentric dry Ag/AgCl ring electrodes and a battery-powered signal-conditioning circuit. Each section is etched on a different printed circuit board (PCB) and the sections are joined to each other by surface mount technology connectors. This means the sensing electrodes can be treated independently for purposes of maintenance and replacement and the signal conditioning circuit can be re-used. A total of ten recording sessions were carried out on humans. The results show that the surface recordings of the EEnG obtained by the active sensor present significantly less ECG and respiration interference than those obtained by bipolar recordings. In addition, bioelectrical sources whose frequency fitted with the slow wave component of the EEnG (SW) were identified by parametric spectral analysis in the surface signals picked up by the active sensors.

  7. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  8. Conscious brain-to-brain communication in humans using non-invasive technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Grau

    Full Text Available Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI. These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B communication between subjects (hyperinteraction. Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues.

  9. Conscious brain-to-brain communication in humans using non-invasive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues.

  10. Myocardial bridging detection by non-invasive multislice spiral computed tomography: comparison with intravascular ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-hui; ZHANG Feng; Raimund Erbel; GE Jun-bo; SUN Ai-jun; QIAN Ju-ying; LING Qing-zhi; ZENG Meng-su; GE Lei; WANG Ke-qiang; FAN Bing; YAN Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is current dlagnostic Standard for myocardial bridging (MB).Non-invasive multislice computerized tomography coronary angiography (MSCT) technique has provided a good anatomical view of the tunnel arten/ now.Methods A total of 51 consecutive patients with atypical or typical angina scheduled for IVUS were enrolled in this study and MSCT was performed 7 days before IVUS. Coronary imaging was quantified using IVUS and MSCT. Four main vessels (left main artery (LMA), left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX), right coronary artery (RCA)) were examined.Results Forty-one out of 51 (80%) patients received metaprolol (25 mg) before the MSCT scan and 25 of them were current beta-blocker users. The mean heart rate was (64±3) beats per minute. A total of 51 patients underwent IVUS examination (30 with MB and 21 without MB) were chosen for this study. Twenty-eight out of 30 MB cases were correctly diagnosed by MSCT and 2 patients with MB were not detected. Comparison with IVUS, the sensitivity of detection by MSCT was 93%, specificity was 100%. The lumen diameter of the tunnel artery derived from MSCT and IVUS significantly decreased from (2.9±0.3) mm to (2.4±0.4) mm (P<0.001) and from (3.3±0.3) mm to (2.6±0.5) mm (P<0.001),respectively. Minimal and maximal diameters of MB derived from MSCT were significantly smaller than those from IVUS ((2.4±0.4) mm vs (2.6±0.5) mm, P<0.05 and (2.9±0.3) mm vs (3.3±0.3) mm, P<0.05), respectively.Conclusions MSCT offers a reliable non-invasive method for MB in LAD and atherosclerosis diagnosis with diagnostic accuracy comparable with invasive IVUS.

  11. Non-invasive prenatal detection of trisomy 21 using tandem single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujana Ghanta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Screening tests for Trisomy 21 (T21, also known as Down syndrome, are routinely performed for the majority of pregnant women. However, current tests rely on either evaluating non-specific markers, which lead to false negative and false positive results, or on invasive tests, which while highly accurate, are expensive and carry a risk of fetal loss. We outline a novel, rapid, highly sensitive, and targeted approach to non-invasively detect fetal T21 using maternal plasma DNA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Highly heterozygous tandem Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP sequences on chromosome 21 were analyzed using High-Fidelity PCR and Cycling Temperature Capillary Electrophoresis (CTCE. This approach was used to blindly analyze plasma DNA obtained from peripheral blood from 40 high risk pregnant women, in adherence to a Medical College of Wisconsin Institutional Review Board approved protocol. Tandem SNP sequences were informative when the mother was heterozygous and a third paternal haplotype was present, permitting a quantitative comparison between the maternally inherited haplotype and the paternally inherited haplotype to infer fetal chromosomal dosage by calculating a Haplotype Ratio (HR. 27 subjects were assessable; 13 subjects were not informative due to either low DNA yield or were not informative at the tandem SNP sequences examined. All results were confirmed by a procedure (amniocentesis/CVS or at postnatal follow-up. Twenty subjects were identified as carrying a disomy 21 fetus (with two copies of chromosome 21 and seven subjects were identified as carrying a T21 fetus. The sensitivity and the specificity of the assay was 100% when HR values lying between 3/5 and 5/3 were used as a threshold for normal subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, a targeted approach, based on calculation of Haplotype Ratios from tandem SNP sequences combined with a sensitive and quantitative DNA measurement technology can be used to accurately detect fetal

  12. Urinary peptidomics provides a noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Ericsson, Anette; Huang, Yufeng; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Mischak, Harald; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-11-01

    Nephropathy is among the most frequent complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Despite the success of novel drugs in animal models, the majority of the subsequent clinical trials employing those drugs targeting diabetic nephropathy failed. This lack of translational value may in part be due to an inadequate comparability of human disease and animal models that often capture only a few aspects of disease. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a multimolecular noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy based on urinary peptidomics. The disease-modified urinary peptides of 2 type 2 diabetic nephropathy mouse models were identified and compared with previously validated urinary peptide markers of diabetic nephropathy in humans to generate a classifier composed of 21 ortholog peptides. This classifier predicted the response to disease and treatment with inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in mice. The humanized classifier was significantly correlated with glomerular lesions. Using a human type 2 diabetic validation cohort of 207 patients, the classifier also distinguished between patients with and without diabetic nephropathy, and their response to renin-angiotensin system inhibition. Thus, a combination of multiple molecular features common to both human and murine disease could provide a significant change in translational drug discovery research in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Non-invasive short-term assessment of retinoids effects on human skin in vivo using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancrède-Bohin, E; Baldeweck, T; Decencière, E; Brizion, S; Victorin, S; Parent, N; Faugere, J; Souverain, L; Bagot, M; Pena, A-M

    2015-04-01

    The occlusive patch test developed for assessing topical retinoids activity in human skin has been extended as a short-term screening protocol for anti-ageing agents. In this model, biopsies are performed at the end of the occlusion period for morphological and immuno-histochemistry analysis. Multiphoton microscopy is a recent non-invasive imaging technique that combined with image processing tools allows the in vivo quantification of human skin modifications. To validate with gold standards of anti-ageing that are retinoids, the relevance of multiphoton microscopy for kinetic and quantitative assessment in this model. Twenty women, aged 50-65 years, were enrolled. Retinol 0.3% (RO) and Retinoic acid 0.025% (RA) were applied to the dorsal photo-damaged side of their forearm under occlusive patches for 12 days. A patch alone was applied to a third area as control. Evaluation was performed at day D0, D12 (end of treatment), D18 and D32 using multiphoton microscopy. Epidermal thickness, normalized area of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) and melanin density were estimated using 3D image processing tools. Main significant results are: Epidermal thickening at D12, D18 and D32 with RO and at D12, D18 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Increased DEJ undulation at D32 with RO and at D12 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Decreased melanin content with RO (at D12 and D18 vs. baseline and at D32 vs. baseline and vs. control) and with RA (at D12 vs. baseline). This study shows that multiphoton microscopy associated to specific 3D image processing tools allows cutaneous effects induced by topical retinoids in this in vivo model to be non-invasively detected, quantified and followed over time. This innovative approach could be applied to the evaluation of other active compounds. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. The biological basis of non-invasive strategies for selection of human oocytes and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lynette

    2003-01-01

    There is a need for more accurate embryo selection in human assisted reproduction, if the goal of reducing the number of embryos used in embryo transfer is to be realized. Furthermore, any selection strategy should be non-invasive if the embryos are to be used in embryo transfer. Currently, the strategy is selection by one to three parameters in the cleaving- and blastocyst-stage embryo, sometimes with additional pronuclear selection. It is clear that no one system is ideal, as the vast majority of transferred embryos do not implant. As the health of the embryo is largely dictated by the originating gametes, the very early events in oocyte development should be considered. This review will point to the early biological events in the unfertilized and fertilized oocyte that can be scored non-invasively and which can have a profound effect on the later developmental stages. Using a sequential scoring system, with emphasis on the oocyte, a system for selecting the most viable single embryo for transfer may hopefully be achieved.

  15. Non-invasive prenatal detection of trisomy 13 using a single nucleotide polymorphism- and informatics-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan P Hall

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine how a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP- and informatics-based non-invasive prenatal aneuploidy test performs in detecting trisomy 13. METHODS: Seventeen trisomy 13 and 51 age-matched euploid samples, randomly selected from a larger cohort, were analyzed. Cell-free DNA was isolated from maternal plasma, amplified in a single multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay that interrogated 19,488 SNPs covering chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and sequenced. Analysis and copy number identification involved a Bayesian-based maximum likelihood statistical method that generated chromosome- and sample-specific calculated accuracies. RESULTS: Of the samples that passed a stringent DNA quality threshold (94.1%, the algorithm correctly identified 15/15 trisomy 13 and 49/49 euploid samples, for 320/320 correct copy number calls. CONCLUSIONS: This informatics- and SNP-based method accurately detects trisomy 13-affected fetuses non-invasively and with high calculated accuracy.

  16. Noninvasive detection of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions by computed tomography enhanced with PEGylated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jinbao Qin,1,* Chen Peng,2,* Binghui Zhao,2,* Kaichuang Ye,1 Fukang Yuan,1 Zhiyou Peng,1 Xinrui Yang,1 Lijia Huang,1 Mier Jiang,1 Qinghua Zhao,3 Guangyu Tang,2 Xinwu Lu1,4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University, School of Medicine; 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University, School of Medicine; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; 4Vascular Center of Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Macrophages are becoming increasingly significant in the progression of atherosclerosis (AS. Molecular imaging of macrophages may improve the detection and characterization of AS. In this study, dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs with polyethylene glycol (PEG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI coatings were designed, tested, and applied as contrast agents for the enhanced computed tomography (CT imaging of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions. Cell counting kit-8 assay, fluorescence microscopy, silver staining, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the FI-functionalized Au DENPs are noncytotoxic at high concentrations (3.0 µM and can be efficiently taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. These nanoparticles were administered to apolipoprotein E knockout mice as AS models, which demonstrated that the macrophage burden in atherosclerotic areas can be tracked noninvasively and dynamically three-dimensionally in live animals using micro-CT. Our findings suggest that the designed PEGylated gold nanoparticles are promising biocompatible nanoprobes for the CT imaging of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions and will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of AS and other concerned inflammatory diseases. Keywords: atherosclerosis, CT, in vivo

  17. Postnatal and non-invasive prenatal detection of β-thalassemia mutations based on Taqman genotyping assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breveglieri, Giulia; Travan, Anna; D’Aversa, Elisabetta; Cosenza, Lucia Carmela; Pellegatti, Patrizia; Guerra, Giovanni; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The β-thalassemias are genetic disorder caused by more than 200 mutations in the β-globin gene, resulting in a total (β0) or partial (β+) deficit of the globin chain synthesis. The most frequent Mediterranean mutations for β-thalassemia are: β039, β+IVSI-110, β+IVSI-6 and β0IVSI-1. Several molecular techniques for the detection of point mutations have been developed based on the amplification of the DNA target by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), but they could be labor-intensive and technically demanding. On the contrary, TaqMan® genotyping assays are a simple, sensitive and versatile method suitable for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping affecting the human β-globin gene. Four TaqMan® genotyping assays for the most common β-thalassemia mutations present in the Mediterranean area were designed and validated for the genotype characterization of genomic DNA extracted from 94 subjects comprising 25 healthy donors, 33 healthy carriers and 36 β-thalassemia patients. In addition, 15 specimens at late gestation (21–39 gestational weeks) and 11 at early gestation (5–18 gestational weeks) were collected from pregnant women, and circulating cell-free fetal DNAs were extracted and analyzed with these four genotyping assays. We developed four simple, inexpensive and versatile genotyping assays for the postnatal and prenatal identification of the thalassemia mutations β039, β+IVSI-110, β+IVSI-6, β0IVSI-1. These genotyping assays are able to detect paternally inherited point mutations in the fetus and could be efficiently employed for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of β-globin gene mutations, starting from the 9th gestational week. PMID:28235086

  18. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  19. [Achievement of the noninvasive measurement for human blood glucose with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-yan; Ding, Dong; Song, Li-qiang; Gu, Lin-na; Yang, Peng; Tang, Yu-guo

    2005-06-01

    The noninvasive measurement of human blood glucose was achieved with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method. The thumb fingertip NIR diffusion reflectance spectra of six different age healthy volunteers were collected using Nexus-870 and its NIR fiber port smart accessory. The test was implemented with changing the blood glucose concentration for the limosis and satiation of every volunteer. The calibration model was set up using PLS method with the smoothing, baseline correction and first derivatives pretreatment spectrum in the 7500-8500 cm(-1) region for single volunteer, the same age combination and that of different age. When the spectrum was obtained, the actual blood glucose value of every spectrun sample was demarcated using ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The correlation between the calibration value and true value for single volunteer is better than that for the combination of volunteers, the correlative coefficients are all over 0.90471, RMSECs are all less than 0.171.

  20. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Lee [Boston University

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  1. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans.

  2. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (WM-DPAS) for noninvasive early cancer detection and tissue hypoxia monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin; Lashkari, Bahman; Kellnberger, Stephan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-04-01

    This study introduces a novel noninvasive differential photoacoustic method, Wavelength Modulated Differential Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (WM-DPAS), for noninvasive early cancer detection and continuous hypoxia monitoring through ultrasensitive measurements of hemoglobin oxygenation levels (StO2 ). Unlike conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy, WM-DPAS measures simultaneously two signals induced from square-wave modulated laser beams at two different wavelengths where the absorption difference between maximum deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin is 680 nm, and minimum (zero) 808 nm (the isosbestic point). The two-wavelength measurement efficiently suppresses background, greatly enhances the signal to noise ratio and thus enables WM-DPAS to detect very small changes in total hemoglobin concentration (CHb ) and oxygenation levels, thereby identifying pre-malignant tumors before they are anatomically apparent. The non-invasive nature also makes WM-DPAS the best candidate for ICU bedside hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Sensitivity tunability is another special feature of the technology: WM-DPAS can be tuned for different applications such as quick cancer screening and accurate StO2 quantification by selecting a pair of parameters, signal amplitude ratio and phase shift. The WM-DPAS theory has been validated with sheep blood phantom measurements. Sensitivity comparison between conventional single-ended signal and differential signal.

  3. Looking in the mouth for noninvasive gene expression-based methods to detect oral, oropharyngeal, and systemic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Guy R; Adami, Alexander J

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis, whether by sampling body fluids, body scans, or other technique, has the potential to simplify early cancer detection. A classic example is Pap smear screening, which has helped to reduce cervical cancer 75% over the last 50 years. No test is error-free; the real concern is sufficient accuracy combined with ease of use. This paper will discuss methods that measure gene expression or epigenetic markers in oral cells or saliva to diagnose oral and pharyngeal cancers, without requiring surgical biopsy. Evidence for lung and other distal cancer detection is also reviewed.

  4. Complementarity of variable-magnification and spectral-separation fluorescence imaging systems for noninvasive detection of metastasis and intravital detection of single cancer cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Ma, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Imaging of tumor growth, progression and metastasis with fluorescent proteins in mouse models is a powerful technology. A limit to fluorescent-protein imaging has been for non-invasive deep-seated tumors, such as those in the lung. In the present study, the Maestro spectral-separation fluorescence imaging system and the OV100 variable-magnification imaging system were compared for noninvasive detection of metastasis in fluorescent protein-expressing orthotopic lung, liver, pancreas, and colon cancer in nude mouse tumor models, as well as for intravital single-cell imaging. Sensitivity, multispectral capability, contrast, and single cell resolution were investigated. The Maestro system outperformed the OV100 for noninvasive imaging of primary and metastatic tumors. The Maestro system detected brain tumor metastasis five days earlier than did the OV100. The Maestro had greater depth of detection compared with the OV100. By separating skin and food autofluorescence, the Maestro provided high-contrast images. The Maestro system was able to produce composite images with more unmixed components and detected more different color signals simultaneously than did the OV100. However, the OV100 system had higher resolution and was able to detect single cells in vivo unlike the Maestro. The present study demonstrates that the two instruments are complementary for imaging of all stages of cancer in mice, including single-cell trafficking and the superiority of in vivo fluorescent-protein imaging over luciferase imaging.

  5. Preclinical Evaluation of Photoacoustic Imaging as a Novel Noninvasive Approach to Detect an Orthopaedic Implant Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yu; Thompson, John M; Ashbaugh, Alyssa G; Khodakivskyi, Pavlo; Budin, Ghyslain; Sinisi, Riccardo; Heinmiller, Andrew; van Oosten, Marleen; van Dijl, Jan M; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Francis, Kevin P; Bernthal, Nicholas M; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Miller, Lloyd S

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diagnosing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) poses significant challenges, and current modalities are fraught with low sensitivity and/or potential morbidity. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a novel ultrasound-based modality with potential for diagnosing PJI safely and noninvasively. MAT

  6. Entrainment of perceptually relevant brain oscillations by non-invasive rhythmic stimulation of the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eThut

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The notion of driving brain oscillations by directly stimulating neuronal elements with rhythmic stimulation protocols has become increasingly popular in research on brain rhythms. Induction of brain oscillations in a controlled and functionally meaningful way would likely prove highly beneficial for the study of brain oscillations, and their therapeutic control. We here review conventional and new non-invasive brain stimulation protocols as to their suitability for controlled intervention into human brain oscillations. We focus on one such type of intervention, the direct entrainment of brain oscillations by a periodic external drive. We review highlights of the literature on entraining brain rhythms linked to perception and attention, and point out controversies. Behaviourally, such entrainment seems to alter specific aspects of perception depending on the frequency of stimulation, informing models on the functional role of oscillatory activity. This indicates that human brain oscillations and function may be promoted in a controlled way by focal entrainment, with great potential for probing into brain oscillations and their causal role.

  7. Entrainment of perceptually relevant brain oscillations by non-invasive rhythmic stimulation of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thut, Gregor; Schyns, Philippe G; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The notion of driving brain oscillations by directly stimulating neuronal elements with rhythmic stimulation protocols has become increasingly popular in research on brain rhythms. Induction of brain oscillations in a controlled and functionally meaningful way would likely prove highly beneficial for the study of brain oscillations, and their therapeutic control. We here review conventional and new non-invasive brain stimulation protocols as to their suitability for controlled intervention into human brain oscillations. We focus on one such type of intervention, the direct entrainment of brain oscillations by a periodic external drive. We review highlights of the literature on entraining brain rhythms linked to perception and attention, and point out controversies. Behaviourally, such entrainment seems to alter specific aspects of perception depending on the frequency of stimulation, informing models on the functional role of oscillatory activity. This indicates that human brain oscillations and function may be promoted in a controlled way by focal entrainment, with great potential for probing into brain oscillations and their causal role.

  8. Phase contrast X-ray imaging for the non-invasive detection of airway surfaces and lumen characteristics in mouse models of airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, K.K.W. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Karen.Siu@sync.monash.edu.au; Morgan, K.S.; Paganin, D.M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Boucher, R. [CF Research and Treatment Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States); Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N. [SPring-8/JASRI, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Parsons, D.W. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Women' s and Children' s Hospital, South Australia 5006 (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5006 (Australia); Women' s and Children' s Health Research Institute, South Australia, 5006 (Australia)

    2008-12-15

    We seek to establish non-invasive imaging able to detect and measure aspects of the biology and physiology of surface fluids present on airways, in order to develop novel outcome measures able to validate the success of proposed genetic or pharmaceutical therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease. Reduction of the thin airway surface liquid (ASL) is thought to be a central pathophysiological process in CF, causing reduced mucociliary clearance that supports ongoing infection and destruction of lung and airways. Current outcome measures in animal models, or humans, are insensitive to the small changes in ASL depth that ought to accompany successful airway therapies. Using phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI), we have directly examined the airway surfaces in the nasal airways and tracheas of anaesthetised mice, currently to a resolution of {approx}2 {mu}m. We have also achieved high resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the small airways in mice using phase-contrast enhanced computed tomography (PC-CT) to elucidate the structure-function relationships produced by airway disease. As the resolution of these techniques improves they may permit non-invasive monitoring of changes in ASL depth with therapeutic intervention, and the use of 3D airway and imaging in monitoring of lung health and disease. Phase contrast imaging of airway surfaces has promise for diagnostic and monitoring options in animal models of CF, and the potential for future human airway imaging methodologies is also apparent.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibition increases levels of choline kinase α and phosphocholine facilitating noninvasive imaging in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloueche-Babari, Mounia; Arunan, Vaitha; Troy, Helen; te Poele, Robert H; te Fong, Anne-Christine Wong; Jackson, L Elizabeth; Payne, Geoffrey S; Griffiths, John R; Judson, Ian R; Workman, Paul; Leach, Martin O; Chung, Yuen-Li

    2012-02-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are currently approved for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and are in mid-late stage trials for other cancers. The HDAC inhibitors LAQ824 and SAHA increase phosphocholine (PC) levels in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenografts as observed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In this study, we show that belinostat, an HDAC inhibitor with an alternative chemical scaffold, also caused a rise in cellular PC content that was detectable by (1)H and (31)P MRS in prostate and colon carcinoma cells. In addition, (1)H MRS showed an increase in branched chain amino acid and alanine concentrations. (13)C-choline labeling indicated that the rise in PC resulted from increased de novo synthesis and correlated with an induction of choline kinase α expression. Furthermore, metabolic labeling experiments with (13)C-glucose showed that differential glucose routing favored alanine formation at the expense of lactate production. Additional analysis revealed increases in the choline/water and phosphomonoester (including PC)/total phosphate ratios in vivo. Together, our findings provide mechanistic insights into the impact of HDAC inhibition on cancer cell metabolism and highlight PC as a candidate noninvasive imaging biomarker for monitoring the action of HDAC inhibitors.

  10. NOTE: A preliminary study for non-invasive quantification of manganese in human hand bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A.; Chettle, D. R.; McNeill, F. E.; Pysklywec, M. W.; Oudyk, J.

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a nutrient essential for regulating neurological and skeletal functions in the human body, but it is also toxic when humans are excessively exposed to Mn. Blood (or serum/plasma) and other body fluids reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive measurement of Mn stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following feasibility studies, a first pilot study, using neutron activation analysis to measure Mn in the bones of the hand of ten healthy male human subjects, was conducted with the approval of the concerned research ethics boards. The participants of this study had no known history of exposure to Mn. Two volunteers were excluded from this study due to technical problems with their measurements. The inverse variance weighted mean value of Mn/Ca for the participants of this study is 0.12 ± 0.68 µg Mn/g Ca which is comparable within uncertainties with the estimated range of 0.16 0.78 µg Mn/g Ca and mean value of 0.63 ± 0.30 µg Mn/g Ca derived from cadaver data. It is recommended to investigate the use of the diagnostic technique for in vivo measurements of workers exposed occupationally to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. The technique needs further development to improve the precision of in vivo measurements in the non-exposed population.

  11. Non-invasive optical detection of glucose in cell culture nutrient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin the development of a non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose concentration in the output medium of cell cultures grown in a unique NASA bioreactor referred to as an integrated rotating-wall vessel (IRWV). The input, a bovine serum based nutrient media, has a known glucose concentration. The cells within the bioreactor digest a portion of the glucose. Thus, the non-invasive optical sensor is needed to monitor the decrease in glucose due to cellular consumption since the critical parameters for sustained cellular productivity are glucose and pH. Previous glucose sensing techniques have used chemical reactions to quantify the glucose concentration. Chemical reactions, however, cannot provide for continuous, real time, non-invasive measurement as is required in this application. Our effort while in the fellowship program was focused on the design, optical setup, and testing of one bench top prototype non-invasive optical sensor using a mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy technique. Glucose has a fundamental vibrational absorption peak in the mid-infrared wavelength range at 9.6 micron. Preliminary absorption data using a CO2 laser were collected at this wavelength for water based glucose solutions at different concentrations and one bovine serum based nutrient medium (GTSF) with added glucose. The results showed near linear absorption responses for the glucose-in-water data with resolutions as high at 108 mg/dl and as low as 10 mg/dl. The nutrient medium had a resolution of 291 mg/dl. The variability of the results was due mainly to thermal and polarization drifts of the laser while the decrease in sensitivity to glucose in the nutrient medium was expected due to the increase in the number of confounders present in the nutrient medium. A multispectral approach needs to be used to compensate for these confounders. The CO2 laser used for these studies was wavelength tunable (9.2 to 10.8 micrometers), however

  12. Non-invasive Presymptomatic Detection of Cercospora beticola Infection and Identification of Early Metabolic Responses in Sugar Beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Nadja; Backhaus, Andreas; Döll, Stefanie; Fischer, Sandra; Seiffert, Udo; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cercospora beticola is an economically significant fungal pathogen of sugar beet, and is the causative pathogen of Cercospora leaf spot. Selected host genotypes with contrasting degree of susceptibility to the disease have been exploited to characterize the patterns of metabolite responses to fungal infection, and to devise a pre-symptomatic, non-invasive method of detecting the presence of the pathogen. Sugar beet genotypes were analyzed for metabolite profiles and hyperspectral signatures. Correlation of data matrices from both approaches facilitated identification of candidates for metabolic markers. Hyperspectral imaging was highly predictive with a classification accuracy of 98.5–99.9% in detecting C. beticola. Metabolite analysis revealed metabolites altered by the host as part of a successful defense response: these were L-DOPA, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-β-D-glucoside, pantothenic acid, and 5-O-feruloylquinic acid. The accumulation of glucosylvitexin in the resistant cultivar suggests it acts as a constitutively produced protectant. The study establishes a proof-of-concept for an unbiased, presymptomatic and non-invasive detection system for the presence of C. beticola. The test needs to be validated with a larger set of genotypes, to be scalable to the level of a crop improvement program, aiming to speed up the selection for resistant cultivars of sugar beet. Untargeted metabolic profiling is a valuable tool to identify metabolites which correlate with hyperspectral data. PMID:27713750

  13. A new non-invasive statistical method to assess the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Cerutti, C; Najem, R; Cuisinaud, G; Laville, M; Pozet, N; Paultre, C Z

    1995-06-01

    1. A new method was developed to evaluate cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. The association of a high systolic blood pressure with a low heart rate or the converse is considered to be under the influence of cardiac baroreflex activity. This method is based on the determination of the statistical dependence between systolic blood pressure and heart rate values obtained non-invasively by a Finapres device. Our computerized analysis selects the associations with the highest statistical dependence. A 'Z-coefficient' quantifies the strength of the statistical dependence. The slope of the linear regression, computed on these selected associations, is used to estimate baroreflex sensitivity. 2. The present study was carried out in 11 healthy resting male subjects. The results obtained by the 'Z-coefficient' method were compared with those obtained by cross-spectrum analysis, which has already been validated in humans. Furthermore, the reproducibility of both methods was checked after 1 week. 3. The results obtained by the two methods were significantly correlated (r = 0.78 for the first and r = 0.76 for the second experiment, P < 0.01). When repeated after 1 week, the average results were not significantly different. Considering individual results, test-retest correlation coefficients were higher with the Z-analysis (r = 0.79, P < 0.01) than with the cross-spectrum analysis (r = 0.61, P < 0.05). 4. In conclusion, as the Z-method gives results similar to but more reproducible than the cross-spectrum method, it might be a powerful and reliable tool to assess baroreflex sensitivity in humans.

  14. Relativistic Quantum Noninvasive Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bednorz, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum weak, noninvasive measurements are defined in the framework of relativity. Invariance with respect to reference frame transformations of the results in different models is discussed. Surprisingly, the bare results of noninvasive measurements are invariant for certain class of models, but not the detection error. Consequently, any stationary quantum realism based on noninvasive measurements will break, at least spontaneously, relativistic invariance and correspondence principle at zero temperature.

  15. Value of two noninvasive methods to detect progression of fibrosis among HCV carriers with normal aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletta, Cosimo; Smirne, Carlo; Fabris, Carlo; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Rapetti, Rachele; Minisini, Rosalba; Pirisi, Mario

    2005-10-01

    The course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection carriers with normal/near-normal aminotransferases (NALT) is usually mild; however, in a few, fibrosis progression occurs. We aimed to verify whether monitoring by liver biopsy might be replaced by noninvasive methods and to identify factors associated with fibrosis progression in patients with persistently normal alanine aminotransferases. We studied 40 untreated HCV-RNA-positive subjects (22 male; median age, 44 years), who underwent two liver biopsies, with a median interval of 78.5 months, during which alanine aminotransferase concentrations (median number of determinations: 12) never exceeded 1.2 times the upper normal limit. Within 9 months from the second biopsy, they were tested by the shear elasticity probe (Fibroscan) and the artificial intelligence algorithm FibroTest. METAVIR fibrosis scores were analyzed in relationship to demographic, clinical, and viral parameters. Weighted kappa analysis was used to verify whether the results of noninvasive methods agreed with histology. Significant fibrosis (> or = F2), present at the first biopsy in only one patient (2.5%), was observed at the second biopsy in 14 patients (35%). At multivariate analysis, excess alcohol consumption in the past (>20 g/d; P = .017) and viral load (>8.0 x 10(6) copies/mL; P = .021) were independent predictors of progression. In identifying patients with significant fibrosis, inter-rater agreement was excellent for Fibroscan (weighted kappa = 1.0), and poor for FibroTest (weighted kappa = -0.041). In conclusion, among HCV carriers with NALT, Fibroscan is superior to the FibroTest in the noninvasive identification of fibrosis, for which excess alcohol consumption in the past and high viral load represent risk factors.

  16. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  17. Noninvasive Detection of the Gases Inside the Sealed Batteries by the On-line Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Rong ZHOU; Pei Fang LIU; Lin ZHUANG; Jun Tao LU

    2004-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is connected through an adaptor to a sealed small battery to probe the gas phase changes inside the battery. The factors influencing the response time are analyzed with a simplified model. The feasibility of the new technique is demonstrated with a Ni-Cd battery, showing different profiles of MS intensities for O2 and H2. Compared with gas chromatography, this technique has the advantage of being noninvasive and should be useful for the study and diagnostic examination of small sealed batteries.

  18. Control of a two-dimensional movement signal by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; McFarland, Dennis J.

    2004-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can provide communication and control to people who are totally paralyzed. BCIs can use noninvasive or invasive methods for recording the brain signals that convey the user's commands. Whereas noninvasive BCIs are already in use for simple applications, it has been widely assumed that only invasive BCIs, which use electrodes implanted in the brain, can provide multidimensional movement control of a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis. We now show that a noninvasive BCI that uses scalp-recorded electroencephalographic activity and an adaptive algorithm can provide humans, including people with spinal cord injuries, with multidimensional point-to-point movement control that falls within the range of that reported with invasive methods in monkeys. In movement time, precision, and accuracy, the results are comparable to those with invasive BCIs. The adaptive algorithm used in this noninvasive BCI identifies and focuses on the electroencephalographic features that the person is best able to control and encourages further improvement in that control. The results suggest that people with severe motor disabilities could use brain signals to operate a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis without needing to have electrodes implanted in their brains. brain-machine interface | electroencephalography

  19. Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Weng, Guo-Xing; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapidly non-invasive technique with great potential for biomedical research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on two groups of saliva samples: one group from patients (n=30) with confirmed AMI and the other group from healthy controls (n=31). The diagnostic performance for differentiating AMI saliva from normal saliva was evaluated by multivariate statistical analysis. The combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) of the measured Raman spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps, rendering the sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 80.6%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy of human saliva can serve as a potentially clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  20. Non-invasive detection of iron deficiency by fluorescence measurement of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin in the lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Georg; Homann, Christian; Teksan, Ilknur; Hasbargen, Uwe; Hasmüller, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca M; Khaled, Nadia; Sroka, Ronald; Stauch, Thomas; Stepp, Herbert; Vogeser, Michael; Brittenham, Gary M

    2016-02-17

    Worldwide, more individuals have iron deficiency than any other health problem. Most of those affected are unaware of their lack of iron, in part because detection of iron deficiency has required a blood sample. Here we report a non-invasive method to optically measure an established indicator of iron status, red blood cell zinc protoporphyrin, in the microcirculation of the lower lip. An optical fibre probe is used to illuminate the lip and acquire fluorescence emission spectra in ∼1 min. Dual-wavelength excitation with spectral fitting is used to distinguish the faint zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence from the much greater tissue background fluorescence, providing immediate results. In 56 women, 35 of whom were iron-deficient, the sensitivity and specificity of optical non-invasive detection of iron deficiency were 97% and 90%, respectively. This fluorescence method potentially provides a rapid, easy to use means for point-of-care screening for iron deficiency in resource-limited settings lacking laboratory infrastructure.

  1. A Kalman Filtering and Nonlinear Penalty Regression Approach for Noninvasive Anemia Detection with Palpebral Conjunctiva Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive medical procedures are usually preferable to their invasive counterparts in the medical community. Anemia examining through the palpebral conjunctiva is a convenient noninvasive procedure. The procedure can be automated to reduce the medical cost. We propose an anemia examining approach by using a Kalman filter (KF and a regression method. The traditional KF is often used in time-dependent applications. Here, we modified the traditional KF for the time-independent data in medical applications. We simply compute the mean value of the red component of the palpebral conjunctiva image as our recognition feature and use a penalty regression algorithm to find a nonlinear curve that best fits the data of feature values and the corresponding levels of hemoglobin (Hb concentration. To evaluate the proposed approach and several relevant approaches, we propose a risk evaluation scheme, where the entire Hb spectrum is divided into high-risk, low-risk, and doubtful intervals for anemia. The doubtful interval contains the Hb threshold, say 11 g/dL, separating anemia and nonanemia. A suspect sample is the sample falling in the doubtful interval. For the anemia screening purpose, we would like to have as less suspect samples as possible. The experimental results show that the modified KF reduces the number of suspect samples significantly for all the approaches considered here.

  2. Neurosonological examination: A non-invasive approach for the detection of cerebrovascular impairment in AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora eUrbanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing interest in vascular impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This interest was stimulated by the findings of higher incidence of vascular risk factors in AD. Signs of vascular impairment were investigated notably in the field of imaging methods. Our aim was to explore ultrasonographic studies of extra- and intracranial vessels in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI and define implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease. The most frequently studied parameters with extracranial ultrasound are intima-media thickness in common carotid artery, carotid atherosclerosis, and total cerebral blood flow. The transcranial ultrasound concentrates mostly on flow velocities, pulsatility indices, cerebrovascular reserve capacity, cerebral microembolization. Studies suggest there is morphological and functional impairment of cerebral circulation in AD compared to healthy subjects. Ultrasound as a non-invasive method could be potentially useful in identifying individuals in a higher risk of progression of cognitive decline.

  3. Non-invasive detection of murals with pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Minjie; Sun, Wenfeng; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Qunxi; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Pulsed terahertz reflected imaging technology has been expected to have great potential for the non-invasive analysis of artworks. In this paper, three types of defects hidden in the plaster used to simulate the cases of defects in the murals, have been investigated by a pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system. These preset defects include a circular groove, a cross-shaped slit and a piece of "Y-type" metal plate built in the plaster. With the terahertz reflective tomography, information about defects has been determined involving the thickness from the surface of sample to the built-in defect, the profile and distribution of the defect. Additionally, three-dimensional analyses have been performed in order to reveal the internal structure of defects. Terahertz reflective imaging can be applied to the defect investigation of the murals.

  4. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  5. Noninvasive MRI thermometry with the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method: in vivo results in human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Poorter, J; De Wagter, C; De Deene, Y

    1995-01-01

    The noninvasive thermometry method is based on the temperature dependence of the proton resonance frequency (PRF). High-quality temperature images can be obtained from phase information of standard gradient-echo sequences with an accuracy of 0.2 degrees C in phantoms. This work was focused...

  6. Noninvasive Prenatal Detection of Trisomy 21 by Targeted Semiconductor Sequencing: A Technical Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yanwei; Arbabi, Aryan; McNaughton, Amy J M; Hamilton, Alison; Hull, Danna; Perras, Helene; Chiu, Tillie; Morrison, Shawna; Goldsmith, Claire; Creede, Emilie; Anger, Gregory J; Honeywell, Christina; Cloutier, Mireille; Macchio, Natasha; Kiss, Courtney; Liu, Xudong; Crocker, Susan; Davies, Gregory A; Brudno, Michael; Armour, Christine M

    2017-05-17

    To develop an alternate noninvasive prenatal testing method for the assessment of trisomy 21 (T21) using a targeted semiconductor sequencing approach. A customized AmpliSeq panel was designed with 1,067 primer pairs targeting specific regions on chromosomes 21, 18, 13, and others. A total of 235 samples, including 30 affected with T21, were sequenced with an Ion Torrent Proton sequencer, and a method was developed for assessing the probability of fetal aneuploidy via derivation of a risk score. Application of the derived risk score yields a bimodal distribution, with the affected samples clustering near 1.0 and the unaffected near 0. For a risk score cutoff of 0.345, above which all would be considered at "high risk," all 30 T21-positive pregnancies were correctly predicted to be affected, and 199 of the 205 non-T21 samples were correctly predicted. The average hands-on time spent on library preparation and sequencing was 19 h in total, and the average number of reads of sequence obtained was 3.75 million per sample. With the described targeted sequencing approach on the semiconductor platform using a custom-designed library and a probabilistic statistical approach, we have demonstrated the feasibility of an alternate method of assessment for fetal T21. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Detection of retroviral super-infection from non-invasive samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeelia S Goffe

    Full Text Available While much attention has been focused on the molecular epidemiology of retroviruses in wild primate populations, the correlated question of the frequency and nature of super-infection events, i.e., the simultaneous infection of the same individual host with several strains of the same virus, has remained largely neglected. In particular, methods possibly allowing the investigation of super-infection from samples collected non-invasively (such as faeces have never been properly compared. Here, we fill in this gap by assessing the costs and benefits of end-point dilution PCR (EPD-PCR and multiple bulk-PCR cloning, as applied to a case study focusing on simian foamy virus super-infection in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. We show that, although considered to be the gold standard, EPD-PCR can lead to massive consumption of biological material when only low copy numbers of the target are expected. This constitutes a serious drawback in a field in which rarity of biological material is a fundamental constraint. In addition, we demonstrate that EPD-PCR results (single/multiple infection; founder strains can be well predicted from multiple bulk-PCR clone experiments, by applying simple statistical and network analyses to sequence alignments. We therefore recommend the implementation of the latter method when the focus is put on retroviral super-infection and only low retroviral loads are encountered.

  8. Improved non-invasive Optical Coherence Tomography detection of different engineered nanoparticles in food-mimicking matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombe, Ringo; Kirsten, Lars; Mehner, Mirko; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Koch, Edmund

    2016-12-01

    Food industry and regulators require fast and reliable analytical methods for quality control. This especially counts for the detection of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in food products. Respective EU regulation is in force, but the development of appropriate methods is still underway. This paper updates the scope of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for ENM/food matrix analysis. A range of nanomaterials and composites - Au@SiO2, Ag, Ag@SiO2 and SiO2 - in a simplified food matrix was investigated. The earlier finding of linear dependencies between concentration in the dispersion and light responses could be reproduced. Being able to analyse non-invasively for a relevant industrial compound such as SiO2, makes OCT an excellent candidate for screening purposes.

  9. A dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system for noninvasive sentinel lymph node detection: preliminary clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Krumholz, Arie; Ke, Haixin; Maslov, Konstantin; Appleton, Catherine; Margenthaler, Julie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has emerged as an accurate, less invasive alternative to axillary lymph node dissection, and it has rapidly become the standard of care for patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) hypothesis states that the pathological status of the axilla can be accurately predicted by determining the status of the first (i.e., sentinel) lymph nodes that drain from the primary tumor. Physicians use radio-labeled sulfur colloid and/or methylene blue dye to identify the SLN, which is most likely to contain metastatic cancer cells. However, the surgical procedure causes morbidity and associated expenses. To overcome these limitations, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system to noninvasively detect SLNs based on the accumulation of methylene blue dye. Ultimately, we aim to guide percutaneous needle biopsies and provide a minimally invasive method for axillary staging of breast cancer. The system consists of a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, a commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22), and a multichannel data acquisition system which displays co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound images in real-time. Our clinical results demonstrate that real-time photoacoustic imaging can provide sensitive and specific detection of methylene blue dye in vivo. While preliminary studies have shown that in vivo detection of SLNs by using co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging is feasible, further investigation is needed to demonstrate robust SLN detection.

  10. Towards a noninvasive approach to malaria diagnosis: detection of parasite DNA in body secretions and surface mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A-Elgayoum, Salwa M E; El-Rayah, El-Amin; Giha, Hayder A

    2010-01-01

    Invasive procedures for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes bear a relative risk of transmission of serious blood-borne infectious disease. In this study, a noninvasive approach to malaria diagnosis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of parasite DNA in saliva, buccal mucosa and urine (alternative samples) was examined. Saliva, buccal mucosa and urine samples were collected simultaneously with blood samples from 93 patients with microscopically confirmed Plasmodium falciparum infection. Species-specific primers detected the parasite DNA only in blood samples. However, when the PCR analysis was repeated using MSP1 and MSP2 primers in a subgroup of 21 complete sets of samples, the parasite DNA was detected in all except 3 samples, which were found to be negative with the MSP2 primers. Parasite density, body temperature or patient age did not influence the PCR results. In conclusion, P. falciparum parasite DNA was detected equally in saliva, buccal mucosa and urine of malaria patients, regardless of their ages, body temperatures or parasite density. Surprisingly, the parasite DNA was not amplified by species-specific primers in the alternative samples whereas it was in the blood samples.

  11. Noninvasive detection of vertebral artery stenosis: a comparison of contrast-enhanced MR angiography, CT angiography, and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sofia; Rich, Philip; Clifton, Andrew; Markus, Hugh S

    2009-11-01

    Vertebral stenosis is associated with a high risk of recurrent stroke, but noninvasive imaging techniques to identify it have lacked sensitivity. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CT angiography have been recently developed and appear to have better sensitivity. However, no prospective studies have compared both of these techniques with ultrasound against the gold standard of intra-arterial angiography in the same group of patients. Forty-six patients were prospectively recruited in whom intra-arterial angiography was being performed. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography, CT angiography, and duplex ultrasound were also performed. Angiographic images were analyzed blinded to patient identity by 2 experienced neuroradiologists. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography had the highest sensitivity and specificity (Radiologist 1, 0.83 and 0.91, respectively; Radiologist 2, 0.89 and 0.87) for detecting >or=50% stenosis. CT angiography had good sensitivity (Radiologist 1, 0.68; Radiologist 2, 0.58) and excellent specificity (Radiologist 1, 0.92; Radiologist 2, 0.93), whereas duplex had low sensitivity (0.44) but excellent specificity (0.95). For vertebral origin stenosis >or=50%, sensitivities were similar for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (Radiologist 1, 0.91; Radiologist 2, 0.82) but relatively higher for CT angiography (Radiologist 1, 0.82; Radiologist 2, 0.82) and duplex (0.67). Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is the most sensitive noninvasive technique to detect vertebral artery stenosis and also has high specificity. CT angiography has good sensitivity and high specificity. In contrast, ultrasound has low sensitivity and will miss many vertebral stenoses.

  12. Noninvasive detection of temozolomide in brain tumor xenografts by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Y.; Holm, David Alberg; Okollie, B.;

    2010-01-01

    detection of drug directly in the tumor can be critically important for accessing, predicting, and eventually improving effectiveness of therapy. In this study, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to detect an anticancer agent, temozolomide (TMZ), in vivo in murine xenotransplants of U87...

  13. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Rapacchia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panorama Plus (Natera, a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP- based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks’ gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and an ultrasound aimed to detect the features associated with the syndrome. A right aortic arch and suspect of thymus atrophy were detected, but not other severe malformations typical of the disease. The patient terminated the pregnancy at 17 weeks. NIPT allowed an early screening of Di George syndrome. As the patient was at low risk, it is likely that an ultrasound would have missed the condition.

  14. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Lapucci, Cristina; Pittalis, Maria Carla; Youssef, Aly; Farina, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Panorama Plus (Natera), a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP-) based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks' gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and an ultrasound aimed to detect the features associated with the syndrome. A right aortic arch and suspect of thymus atrophy were detected, but not other severe malformations typical of the disease. The patient terminated the pregnancy at 17 weeks. NIPT allowed an early screening of Di George syndrome. As the patient was at low risk, it is likely that an ultrasound would have missed the condition. PMID:26346617

  15. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppina Rapacchia; Cristina Lapucci; Maria Carla Pittalis; Aly Youssef; Antonio Farina

    2015-01-01

    Panorama Plus (Natera), a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP-) based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks’ gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent ...

  16. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in healthy humans reduces sympathetic nerve activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, JA; Mary, DA; Witte, KK; Greenwood, JP; Deuchars, SA; Deuchars, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently used to treat refractory epilepsy and is being investigated as a potential therapy for a range of conditions, including heart failure, tinnitus, obesity and Alzheimer's disease. However, the invasive nature and expense limits the use of VNS in patient populations and hinders the exploration of the mechanisms involved. Objective: We investigated a non-invasive method of VNS through electrical stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagu...

  17. Entrainment of Perceptually Relevant Brain Oscillations by Non-Invasive Rhythmic Stimulation of the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Thut, Gregor; Schyns, Philippe G.; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The notion of driving brain oscillations by directly stimulating neuronal elements with rhythmic stimulation protocols has become increasingly popular in research on brain rhythms. Induction of brain oscillations in a controlled and functionally meaningful way would likely prove highly beneficial for the study of brain oscillations, and their therapeutic control. We here review conventional and new non-invasive brain stimulation protocols as to their suitability for controlled intervention in...

  18. Development of a dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Gall', L. N.; Sachenko, V. M.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2013-06-01

    A dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori using the isotope respiratory test is developed. A low-aberration mass analyzer is calculated, an input system that makes it possible to eliminate the memory effects is developed, and a small-size ion detector is constructed. The mass spectrometer is created, and the tests are performed. The measurement accuracy of the 13C/12C and 16O/18O isotope ratios are 1.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. Preliminary medical tests show that the spectrometer can be employed for the desired diagnostics.

  19. Non-invasive in-vivo Raman spectroscopic measurement of the dynamics of the antioxidant substance lycopene in the human skin after a dietary supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Albrecht, H.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2007-05-01

    A non-invasive optical method based on resonance Raman spectroscopy was used for the in vivo detection of the concentration of the carotenoid antioxidant substance lycopene in the human skin. The physiological variation of the level of lycopene in the skin during a 6 month period was measured daily in 7 volunteers. It was shown that all volunteers had a different individual level of lycopene in the skin, depending on the lifestyle of volunteers. It was shown that the supplementation of the foodstuffs containing lycopene, such as tomato products and some fruits, increases the level of lycopene in the skin. The increase in the lycopene level can be usually observed on the next day after the supplementation. The present results demonstrate that a diet rich in products containing a high amount of carotenoids, such as lycopene, can be an efficient strategy to increase the carotenoid level of the skin.

  20. Rapid noninvasive detection of experimental atherosclerotic lesions with novel 99mTc-labeled diadenosine tetraphosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaleh, David R.; Narula, Jagat; Babich, John W.; Petrov, Artiom; Fischman, Alan J.; Khaw, Ban-An; Rapaport, Eliezer; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a noninvasive imaging procedure for identifying atherosclerotic lesions is extremely important for the clinical management of patients with coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease. Although numerous radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for this purpose, none has demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy required to replace invasive angiography. In this report, we used the radiolabeled purine analog, 99mTc diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A; AppppA, P1,P4-di(adenosine-5′)-tetraphosphate) and its analogue 99mTc AppCHClppA for imaging experimental atherosclerotic lesions in New Zealand White rabbits. Serial gamma camera images were obtained after intravenous injection of the radiolabeled dinucleotides. After acquiring the final images, the animals were sacrificed, ex vivo images of the aortas were recorded, and biodistribution was measured. 99mTc-Ap4A and 99mTc AppCHClppA accumulated rapidly in atherosclerotic abdominal aorta, and lesions were clearly visible within 30 min after injection in all animals that were studied. Both radiopharmaceuticals were retained in the lesions for 3 hr, and the peak lesion to normal vessel ratio was 7.4 to 1. Neither of the purine analogs showed significant accumulation in the abdominal aorta of normal (control) rabbits. The excised aortas showed lesion patterns that were highly correlated with the in vivo and ex vivo imaging results. The present study demonstrates that purine receptors are up-regulated in experimental atherosclerotic lesions and 99mTc-labeled purine analogs have potential for rapid noninvasive detection of plaque formation. PMID:9435254

  1. Noninvasively decoding the contents of visual working memory in the human prefrontal cortex within high-gamma oscillatory patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanía, Rafael; Paulus, Walter; Nitsche, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    The temporal maintenance and subsequent retrieval of information that no longer exists in the environment is called working memory. It is believed that this type of memory is controlled by the persistent activity of neuronal populations, including the prefrontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. For a long time, it has been controversially discussed whether, in working memory, the PFC stores past sensory events or, instead, its activation is an extramnemonic source of top-down control over posterior regions. Recent animal studies suggest that specific information about the contents of working memory can be decoded from population activity in prefrontal areas. However, it has not been shown whether the contents of working memory during the delay periods can be decoded from EEG recordings in the human brain. We show that by analyzing the nonlinear dynamics of EEG oscillatory patterns it is possible to noninvasively decode with high accuracy, during encoding and maintenance periods, the contents of visual working memory information within high-gamma oscillations in the human PFC. These results are thus in favor of an active storage function of the human PFC in working memory; this, without ruling out the role of PFC in top-down processes. The ability to noninvasively decode the contents of working memory is promising in applications such as brain computer interfaces, together with computation of value function during planning and decision making processes.

  2. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  3. Non-invasive control interfaces for intention detection in active movement-assistive devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, J.; Kooren, P.N.; Stienen, A.H.A.; Herder, J.L.; Koopman, B.F.J.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Active movement-assistive devices aim to increase the quality of life for patients with neuromusculoskeletal disorders. This technology requires interaction between the user and the device through a control interface that detects the user’s movement intention. Researchers have explored a wide variet

  4. The Role of Infrared Thermography as a Non-Invasive Tool for the Detection of Lameness in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Alsaaod

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of infrared thermography for the identification of lameness in cattle has increased in recent years largely because of its non-invasive properties, ease of automation and continued cost reductions. Thermography can be used to identify and determine thermal abnormalities in animals by characterizing an increase or decrease in the surface temperature of their skin. The variation in superficial thermal patterns resulting from changes in blood flow in particular can be used to detect inflammation or injury associated with conditions such as foot lesions. Thermography has been used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also to evaluate routine farm management. Since 2000, 14 peer reviewed papers which discuss the assessment of thermography to identify and manage lameness in cattle have been published. There was a large difference in thermography performance in these reported studies. However, thermography was demonstrated to have utility for the detection of contralateral temperature difference and maximum foot temperature on areas of interest. Also apparent in these publications was that a controlled environment is an important issue that should be considered before image scanning.

  5. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; He, Quanze; Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing.

  6. Predictors of Occult Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Cryptogenic Strokes Detected by Long-Term Noninvasive Cardiac Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archit Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Paroxysmal Atrial fibrillation/Flutter (PAF detection rates in cryptogenic strokes have been variable. We sought to determine the percentage of patients with cryptogenic stroke who had PAF on prolonged non-invasive cardiac monitoring. Methods and Results. Sixty-two consecutive patients with stroke and TIA in a single center with a mean age of 61 (+/− 14 years were analyzed. PAF was detected in 15 (24% patients. Only one patient reported symptoms of shortness of breath during the episode of PAF while on monitoring, and 71 (97% of these 73 episodes were asymptomatic. A regression analysis revealed that the presence of PVCs (ventricular premature beats lasting more than 2 minutes (OR 6.3, 95% CI, 1.11–18.92; P=.042 and strokes (high signal on Diffusion Weighted Imaging (OR 4.3, 95% CI, 5–36.3; P=.041 predicted PAF. Patients with multiple DWI signals were more likely than solitary signals to have PAF (OR 11.1, 95% CI, 2.5–48.5, P<.01. Conclusion. Occult PAF is common in cryptogenic strokes, and is often asymptomatic. Our data suggests that up to one in five patients with suspected cryptogenic strokes and TIAs have PAF, especially if they have PVCs and multiple high DWI signals on MRI.

  7. Clinical application of a molecular assay for the detection of dermatophytosis and a novel non-invasive sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizny Gordon, Alice; McIver, Christopher; Kim, Minhee; Murrell, Dedee F; Taylor, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The dermatophytoses are the most common superficial fungal infections worldwide. Clinical diagnosis is not reliable as there are many differentials, and laboratory diagnosis is required to gain access to treatment in more severe disease. Traditional diagnostic methods are limited by suboptimal sensitivity, specificity and prolonged turnaround times. Molecular methods are being used increasingly in the diagnostic algorithm in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The aim of this study was to evaluate a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the chitin synthase 1 gene (CHS1) of dermatophytes for analytical specificity, and to assess its clinical application by comparing it to the current methods of microscopy and culture. We also assessed a novel non-invasive sample collection technique involving adhesive tape impressions of suspected lesions. The PCR was highly specific, being able to discern between cultures of dermatophytes and other microorganisms. It also proved to be more sensitive than traditional methods at detecting dermatophytes in clinical samples. Similar sensitivities were seen on the samples assessed by the adhesive tape technique. An internal control system allowed for the detection of inhibition in certain culture and clinical specimens. This rapid and cost-effective technique could be incorporated into the initial diagnostic algorithm for dermatophytosis in Australian laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing (MPS combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT. However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR and false positive rate (FPR in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1% in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples, suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing.

  9. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  10. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henze, E.; Malfertheiner, P.; Clausen, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Adam, W.E. (Univ. of Ulm (West Germany))

    1990-12-01

    A carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled {sup 14}C-labeled CO{sub 2} was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total {sup 14}C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the {sup 14}C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization.

  11. Design of a portable noninvasive photoacoustic glucose monitoring system integrated laser diode excitation with annular array detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lvming; Liu, Guodong; Yang, Diwu; Ren, Zhong; Huang, Zhen

    2008-12-01

    A near-infrared photoacoustic glucose monitoring system, which is integrated dual-wavelength pulsed laser diode excitation with eight-element planar annular array detection technique, is designed and fabricated during this study. It has the characteristics of nonivasive, inexpensive, portable, accurate location, and high signal-to-noise ratio. In the system, the exciting source is based on two laser diodes with wavelengths of 905 nm and 1550 nm, respectively, with optical pulse energy of 20 μJ and 6 μJ. The laser beam is optically focused and jointly projected to a confocal point with a diameter of 0.7 mm approximately. A 7.5 MHz 8-element annular array transducer with a hollow structure is machined to capture photoacoustic signal in backward mode. The captured signals excitated from blood glucose are processed with a synthetic focusing algorithm to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio and accurate location over a range of axial detection depth. The custom-made transducer with equal area elements is coaxially collimated with the laser source to improve the photoacoustic excite/receive efficiency. In the paper, we introduce the photoacoustic theory, receive/process technique, and design method of the portable noninvasive photoacoustic glucose monitoring system, which can potentially be developed as a powerful diagnosis and treatment tool for diabetes mellitus.

  12. Future non-invasive imaging to detect vascular plaque instability and subclinical non-obstructive atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arnon Blum; Menachem Nahir

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies the major causes of death in the Western World. Our main goal is to detect early changes of atherosclerosis and to identify subjects at highest cardiovascular risk that may aid in the development of prevention approaches and better management that will decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The new methods that are of interest include the advanced vascular ultrasound methods, the infra red and near infra red imaging techniques, the EndoPat device that reflects peripheral arterial tone, the electron beam computed tomography, the magnetic resonance imaging, and the molecular imaging techniques. In this review we will focus on the future of advanced imaging techniques that are being developed to detect early (pre-clinical) development of atherosclerosis.

  13. Non-invasive method for in vivo detection of chlorophyll precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Khrouchtchova, Anastassia; Stenbæk, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally chlorophyll (Chl) and Chl precursors have been studied in vitro or in leaf tissue at low temperature. These methods are destructive and make it impossible to work with the same individual plant later on. In this paper we present a method for in vivo detection of Chl and its precursors...... is compared to current methods. Furthermore, we report on optimization of the spectral scanning method with the aim to minimize the excitation light-evoked photo-conversion of the chlorophyll precursors....

  14. Noninvasive fluorescence-based instrumentation for cancer and precancer detection and screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Katz, Alvin

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we review our research in the use of UV and visible native fluorescence emission and excitation spectroscopy for the detection of cancer and precancer. We discuss some of the spectroscopic signatures indicative of the presence of cancer and precancer. We describe three generations of instruments being developed to extent optical biopsy technology into the clinical environment as both a screening tool and as a diagnostic aide suitable for gynecological, gastro-intestinal tract, oral cavity, brain and breast.

  15. Noninvasive Label-Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics with Ultrasound-Guided Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging of Anatomical and Functional Indicators of Lymph Node Metastasis,” Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting...imaging system that will detect functional changes associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Our efforts in the first year have...imaging can be used to guide dissection . We have also successfully integrated a programmable ultrasound machine (Verasonics Vantage) and tunable pulsed

  16. Noninvasive detection of cardiac amyloidosis using delayed enhanced MDCT: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deux, Jean-François; Mihalache, Cristian-Ionut; Legou, François; Damy, Thibaud; Mayer, Julie; Rappeneau, Stéphane; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Luciani, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate myocardial enhancement of patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) using computed tomography (CT). Thirteen patients with CA and 11 control patients were examined with first-pass and delayed CT acquisition. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of images was performed. Myocardial attenuation, myocardial signal-to-noise ratio (SNRmyoc), blood pool SNR (SNRblood), contrast-to-noise ratio between blood pool and myocardium (CNRblood-myoc) and relative attenuation index (RAI) defined as variation of myocardial attenuation between delayed and first-pass acquisitions were calculated. Two false negative cases (15 %) and three false positive cases (27 %) were detected on qualitative analysis. SNRmyoc of patients with CA was significantly (p < 0.05) lower on first-pass (4.08 ± 1.9) and higher on delayed acquisition (7.10 ± 2.7) than control patients (6.1 ± 2.2 and 5.03 ± 1.8, respectively). Myocardial attenuation was higher in CA (121 ± 39 HU) than control patients (81 ± 17 HU) on delayed acquisition. CNRblood-myoc was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in CA (1.51 ± 0.7) than control patients (2.85 ± 1.2) on delayed acquisition. The RAI was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in CA (0.12 ± 0.25) than in control patients (-0.56 ± 0.21). Dual phase MDCT can detect abnormal myocardial enhancement in patients with CA. • CT can detect abnormal first-pass and delayed enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis. • Measurement of relative myocardial enhancement between acquisitions helps to detect cardiac amyloidosis. • CT may provide useful data to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis.

  17. Noninvasive Detection and Differentiation of Axonal Injury/Loss, Demyelination, and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    method using autopsy human MS spinal cord specimens as the example. Cervical spinal cord specimens were obtained following autopsy from three MS...segment of the three fixed MS cervical spinal cord tissues was placed in a 3-ml syringe with 10% formalin and was imaged using a custom-made solenoid...employed to acquire diffusion-weighted images of eight contiguous trans- verse slices covering T12 to L2 vertebrae . The acquisition param- eters were as

  18. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of Huntington disease: detection of the paternally inherited expanded CAG repeat in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, J.M. van den; Bijlsma, E.K.; Feenstra, I.; Muntjewerff, N.; Mathijssen, I.B.; Bakker, E. de; Belzen, M.J. van; Boon, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With a shift towards noninvasive testing, we have explored and validated the use of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for Huntington disease (HD). METHODS: Fifteen couples have been included, assessing a total of n = 20 pregnancies. Fetal paternally inherited CAG repeat length was det

  19. NONINVASIVE DETECTION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY VARIATION UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA BY EEG COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For a principal action of general anestheticagents takes place inthe brain,it wouldinduce EEGchange.It is reasonable to monitor the brain activityand esti mate the depth of anesthesia(DOA)byEEG[1].EEG signal was used to detect DOA since1940.Up to now,numerous efforts have beenmade to develop and test various EEG-derived pa-rameters in ti me-domain,frequency-domain,bis-pectral-domain etc.[2-3],but none of these methodshas beenshownto be sufficiently reliable for gener-al use for assessing DOAaccurately.Compl...

  20. In-situ non-invasive device for early detection of fouling in aquatic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2017-01-05

    An in-situ, non-destructive sensor device, system and method are provided to detect or assess fouling at a very early stage of development. They can be used to detect or assess fouling on a surface of an aquatic system. They can be used to obtain a depth profile of the fouling. Data concerning the depth profile can be extracted and used to assess the fouling on the surface, in one or more aspects, the method can include providing an optical tomography spectrometer; optically positioning the optical tomography spectrometer in association with a surface of an area to be assessed for fouling in an aqueous system; irradiating the surface; acquiring, from irradiating the surface, a plurality of signals as a function of a distance from the surface at different times; extracting data from the signals as a function of the distance to obtain a depth profile of the surface at the different times; and determining a change in the depth profile between the different times to assess fouling on the surface.

  1. The ATR noninvasive detection of transported medicinal ions and the performance of newly designed iontophoresis instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Toyotoshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Harue

    2005-02-01

    The attenuated total reflection and near-infrared diffusive-reflection methods are proposed as safe and powerful ways to detect and measure the quantity of medication transported by iontophoresis. Especially, the former method can evaluate the quantity of such negative ions as L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate in the top (horny) layer of epidermis (about 1 μm under the skin surface) using, respectively, characteristic ion's bands. Factors making iontophoresis more effective are discussed from the points of electric currents, duty ratio, frequency of superposing intermittent current, simultaneous supersonic perforation, etc. The use of intermittent direct current superposed by 40 kHz pulsed current and pulse irradiation of supersonic waves accelerated drastically the disappearing rate of transported ions from the horny layer with a life of 10 h to 1 min. This technique may be applied to a new and powerful drug delivery system into topical deep tissues.

  2. The feasibility study of non-invasive fetal trisomy 18 and 21 detection with semiconductor sequencing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Joo Jeon

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT technologies are based on next-generation sequencing (NGS. NGS allows rapid and effective clinical diagnoses to be determined with two common sequencing systems: Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. The majority of NIPT technology is associated with Illumina platform. We investigated whether fetal trisomy 18 and 21 were sensitively and specifically detectable by semiconductor sequencer: Ion Proton. METHODS: From March 2012 to October 2013, we enrolled 155 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects at Xiamen Maternal & Child Health Care Hospital (Xiamen, Fujian, China. Adapter-ligated DNA libraries were analyzed by the Ion Proton™ System (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY, USA with an average 0.3× sequencing coverage per nucleotide. Average total raw reads per sample was 6.5 million and mean rate of uniquely mapped reads was 59.0%. The results of this study were derived from BWA mapping. Z-score was used for fetal trisomy 18 and 21 detection. RESULTS: Interactive dot diagrams showed the minimal z-score values to discriminate negative versus positive cases of fetal trisomy 18 and 21. For fetal trisomy 18, the minimal z-score value of 2.459 showed 100% positive predictive and negative predictive values. The minimal z-score of 2.566 was used to classify negative versus positive cases of fetal trisomy 21. CONCLUSION: These results provide the evidence that fetal trisomy 18 and 21 detection can be performed with semiconductor sequencer. Our data also suggest that a prospective study should be performed with a larger cohort of clinically diverse obstetrics patients.

  3. Nanostructured zirconia decorated reduced graphene oxide based efficient biosensing platform for non-invasive oral cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suveen; Sharma, Jai Gopal; Maji, Sagar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-04-15

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of a non-invasive, label-free and an efficient biosensing platform for detection of the oral cancer biomarker (CYFRA-21-1). One step hydrothermal process was used for uniform decoration of nanostructured zirconia (average particle size 13 nm) on reduced graphene oxide (ZrO2-RGO) to avoid coagulation of the zirconia nanoparticles and to obtain enhanced electrochemical performance of ZrO2-RGO nanocomposite based biosensor. Further, ZrO2-RGO has been functionalized using 3-aminopropyl triethoxy saline (APTES) and electrophoretically deposited on the indium tin oxide coated glass substrate at a low DC potential.The APTES/ZrO2-RGO/ITO electrode exhibits improved heterogeneous electron transfer (more than two times) with respect to that of the APTES/ZrO2/ITO electrode indicating faster electron transfer kinetics. The -NH2 containing APTES/ZrO2-RGO/ITO platform is further biofunctionalized with anti-CYFRA-21-1. The structural and morphological investigations of the ZrO2-RGO based biosensing platform have been accomplished using X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrochemical, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) studies. This immunosensor exhibits a wider linear detection range (2-22 ng mL(-1)), excellent sensitivity (0.756 µA mL ng(-1)) and a remarkable lower detection limit of 0.122 ng mL(-1). The observed results have been validated via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  4. Noninvasive detection of cardiac amyloidosis using delayed enhanced MDCT: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, Jean-Francois [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, CNRS EAC 4396, Centre de Recherches Chirurgicales, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Mihalache, Cristian-Ionut; Legou, Francois; Luciani, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Damy, Thibaud [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Mayer, Julie [University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Cardiac MR Unit, Radiology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Rappeneau, Stephane [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine [Reseau Amylose Mondorien, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); University Paris Est Creteil, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Neurophysiology of Neurology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate myocardial enhancement of patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) using computed tomography (CT). Thirteen patients with CA and 11 control patients were examined with first-pass and delayed CT acquisition. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of images was performed. Myocardial attenuation, myocardial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR{sub myoc}), blood pool SNR (SNR{sub blood}), contrast-to-noise ratio between blood pool and myocardium (CNR{sub blood-myoc}) and relative attenuation index (RAI) defined as variation of myocardial attenuation between delayed and first-pass acquisitions were calculated. Two false negative cases (15 %) and three false positive cases (27 %) were detected on qualitative analysis. SNR{sub myoc} of patients with CA was significantly (p < 0.05) lower on first-pass (4.08 ± 1.9) and higher on delayed acquisition (7.10 ± 2.7) than control patients (6.1 ± 2.2 and 5.03 ± 1.8, respectively). Myocardial attenuation was higher in CA (121 ± 39 HU) than control patients (81 ± 17 HU) on delayed acquisition. CNR{sub blood-myoc} was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in CA (1.51 ± 0.7) than control patients (2.85 ± 1.2) on delayed acquisition. The RAI was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in CA (0.12 ± 0.25) than in control patients (-0.56 ± 0.21). Dual phase MDCT can detect abnormal myocardial enhancement in patients with CA. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasound for non-invasive fluid droplet detection inside a sealed container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S. W.; Good, M. S.; Roy, S.; Luzi, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound has long been known to be capable of measuring water level. Zero-degree ultrasound transducers may be used to send an L-wave through the fluid and receive a reflected signal from the fluid/gas interface surface. The level of the fluid is proportional to the sound wave time of flight to traverse the water path. This approach may even be used from outside the fluid containment wall by sending the wave through the tank or pipe bottom. The approach, however, does not work well if there is only a thin layer of fluid consisting of one or two millimeters or even only a few droplets. Surface waves are also known to be sensitive to the presence or absence of fluid on a surface. A surface wave may be transmitted a significant distance by a transmitting transducer and then received by a similar transducer. If the surface along the wave path is wet with even a few droplets of fluid, the surface wave may be significantly attenuated. Generating and measuring such a surface wave from the opposite side of a tank or pipe containment wall and separating the near-wall surface wave from the far-wall surface wave, however, is more challenging. The feasibility of an approach for producing a surface wave on the opposite side of a steel plate to sense the presence or absence of fluid is discussed. This approach is supported by 2-D finite element modeling of the measurement configuration and by empirical demonstration of the technique's sensitivity. This technique was developed for measurement of a very small amount of fluid that may condense within a used nuclear fuel canister after it cools for several years. Early detection of fluid would provide advance warning of potential degradation to internal components in time for mitigation or management of the waste inside that container. Other potential applications include non-intrusive detection of trace liquids within any sealed container, within inaccessible plena of aircrafts or within other inaccessible complex welded skin

  6. Heart rate detection in low amplitude non-invasive fetal ECG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Chris; Vullings, Rik; Bergmans, Jan; Oei, Guid; Wijn, Pieter

    2006-01-01

    Multi-electrode electrical measurements on the maternal abdomen may provide a valuable alternative to standard fetal monitoring. Removal of the maternal ECG from these recordings by means of subtracting a weighted linear combination of segments from preceding maternal ECG complexes, results in fetal ECG traces from which the fetal heart rate can be determined. Unfortunately, these traces often contain too much noise to determine the heart rate by R-peak detection. To overcome this limitation, an algorithm has been developed that calculates the heart rate based on cross-correlation. To validate the algorithm, noise was added to a fetal scalp ECG recording to simulate low amplitude abdominal recordings. Heart rates calculated by the algorithm were compared to the heart rates from the original scalp ECG. For simulated signals with a signal to noise ratio of 2, the coefficient of correlation was 0.99 (pheart rate, multi-electrode electrical measurements on the maternal abdomen now can be used for fetal monitoring in relatively early stages of pregnancy or other situations where ECG amplitudes are low or noise levels are high.

  7. Non-invasive detection of aflatoxin-contaminated figs using fluorescence and multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Habil; Güneş, Ali; Durmuş, Efkan; Kuşçu, Alper

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural products are prone to aflatoxin (AF)-producing moulds (Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus) during harvesting, drying, processing and also storage. AF is a mycotoxin that may cause liver cancer when consumed in amounts higher than allowed limits. Figs, like other agricultural products, are mostly affected by AF-producing moulds and these moulds usually produce kojic acid together with AF. Kojic acid is a fluorescent compound and exhibiting bright greenish yellow fluorescence (BGYF) under ultraviolet (UV) light. Using this fluorescence property, fig-processing plants manually select and remove the BGYF+ figs to reduce the AF level of the processed figs. Although manual selection is based on subjective criteria and strongly depends on the expertise level of the workers, it is known as the most effective way of removing AF-contaminated samples. However, during manual selection, workers are exposed to UV radiation and this brings skin health problems. In this study, we individually investigated the figs to measure their fluorescence level, surface mould concentration and AF levels and noted a strong correlation between mould concentration and BGYF and AF, and BGYF and surface. In addition to a pairwise correlation, we proposed a machine-vision and machine-learning approach to detect the AF-contaminated figs using their multispectral images under UV light. The figs were classified in two different approaches considering their surface mould and AF level with error rates of 9.38% and 11.98%, respectively.

  8. Non-invasive timing of gas gun projectiles with light detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, P. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Wu, M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of a gas gun launch tube in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore diameter single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos. A 655 nm pulsed diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~ 3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a velocity of 489 m/s prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The time-to-amplitude conversion electronics used enable the LIDAR data to be processed in real-time to generate trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target.

  9. Noninvasive Detection of Coronary Artery Stenosis Using 16-slice Spiral CT: a Comparison with Selective X-ray Coronary Angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Heshui; HAN Ping; KONG Xiangquan; FENG Gansheng; Martin HK Hoffmann

    2006-01-01

    The role of 16-slice spiral CT was evaluated in the diagnosis of coronary stenosis, with selective X-ray coronary angiography (SCA) serving as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients who were suspected of having coronary heart disease, without percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary bypass-grafting, were investigated using 16-slice CT. Eight patients with pre-scan heart rate of more than 80 beats/min were given β-blockers. After the retrospectively ECG-gated axial imaging reconstruction, volume redering (VR), multi-planar reconstruction (MPR), curved MPR and maximum intensity projection (MIP) were used to reconstruct. Every segment of coronary artery with a diameter ≥1.5 mm was assessed, and the presence on CT with a stenosis exceeding 50% diameter reduction was compared with that on SCA. The reasons which lead to some segments unevaluable were analysed. Compared with SCA, 93% coronary segments and 94 % main branches were evaluable. Residual cardiac motion artifacts, severe calcification and poor opacification made 58%, 28% and 14% of the remaining 60 segments unevaluable respectively. Without routine administration of β-blockers, good coronary imaging quality can be acquired using 16-slice spiral CT. It is a reliable noninvasive method for detection of obstructive coronary artery disease.

  10. Non-invasive analytical technology for the detection of contamination, adulteration, and authenticity of meat, poultry, and fish: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Mohammed; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    The requirement of real-time monitoring of food products has encouraged the development of non-destructive measurement systems. Hyperspectral imaging is a rapid, reagentless, non-destructive analytical technique that integrates traditional spectroscopic and imaging techniques into one system to attain both spectral and spatial information from an object that cannot be achieved with either digital imaging or conventional spectroscopic techniques. Recently, this technique has emerged as one of the most powerful and inspiring techniques for assessing different meat species and building chemical images to show the distribution maps of constituents in a direct and easy manner. After presenting a brief description of the fundamentals of hyperspectral imaging, this paper reviews the potential applications of hyperspectral imaging for detecting the adulteration, contamination, and authenticity of meat, poultry, and fish. These applications envisage that hyperspectral imaging can be considered as a promising non-invasive analytical technique for predicting the contamination, adulteration, and authenticity of meat, poultry, and fish in a real-time mode.

  11. The use of infrared thermography as a non-invasive method for fever detection in sheep infected with bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Diego, Ana C; Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Pedrera, Miriam; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Gómez-Villamandos, José C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M

    2013-10-01

    Fever, which is closely linked to viraemia, is considered to be both the main and the earliest clinical sign in sheep infected with bluetongue virus (BTV). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of infrared thermography (IRT) for early detection of fever in sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1) and serotype 8 (BTV-8). This would reduce animal stress during experimental assays and assist in the development of a screening method for the identification of fever in animals suspected of being infected with BTV. Rectal and infrared eye temperatures were collected before and after BTV inoculation. The two temperature measures were positively correlated (r=0.504, Psheep with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 97%. The results showed that eye temperature measured using IRT was a useful non-invasive method for the assessment of fever in sheep infected with BTV under experimental conditions. Further research is required to evaluate the use of IRT under field conditions to identify potentially infected animals in bluetongue surveillance programmes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Localization for the Non-Invasive Detecting Capsule in GI Tract Utilizing Permanent Magnet and Magnetoresistive Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wen-hui; YAN Guo-zheng; GUO Xu-dong

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports the localization principle and method for the capsule in the non-invasive detecting system of gastrointestinal (GI) tract utilizing one permanent and three magnetoresistive sensors. When the capsule is localized in practice, the permanent magnet is fixed inside the capsule, and the four magnetoresistive sensors are installed outside body. The permanent magnet's coordinate values can be solved by the magnetic dipole theory and optimum iterated method. The experiment shows the localization distance can reach 300 mm by employing the HMCI023 magnetoresistive sensors and the NdFeB45 φ9 mm × 5 mm permanent magnet, and the errors of single coordinate direction and radius vector are 0 - 58 mm and 0.1-62.9 mm respectively. The localization precision is acceptable basically, and it has some possibilities improving the precision and distance in the future. Moreover, the localization system makes the localization be reality because of decreasing the number of sensors, and it economizes the capsule's volume because of decreasing the permanent magnet's dimension, too.

  13. Long-term progression and therapeutic response of visceral metastatic disease non-invasively monitored in mouse urine using beta-human choriogonadotropin secreting tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Emmenegger, Urban; Lee, Christina R; Shaked, Yuval; Folkins, Christopher; Mossoba, Miriam; Medin, Jeffrey A; Man, Shan; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Kerbel, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Historically, the use of mouse models of metastatic disease to evaluate anticancer therapies has been hampered because of difficulties in detection and quantification of such lesions without sacrificing the mice, which in turn may also be dictated by institutional or ethical guidelines. Advancements in imaging technologies have begun to change this situation. A new method to non-invasively measure tumor burden, as yet untested to monitor spontaneous metastases, is the use of transplanted tumors expressing secretable human beta-chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) that can be measured in urine. We describe examples of beta-hCG-transfected tumor cell lines for evaluating the effect of different therapies on metastatic disease, which in some cases involved monitoring tumor growth for >100 days. We used beta-hCG-tagged mouse B16 melanoma and erbB-2/Her-2-expressing human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 models, and drug treatments included metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide chemotherapy with or without a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-targeting antibody (DC101) or trastuzumab, the erbB-2/Her-2-targeting antibody. Both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models were studied; in the latter case, an increase in urine beta-hCG always foreshadowed the development of lung, liver, brain, and kidney metastases. Metastatic disease was unresponsive to DC101 or trastuzumab monotherapy treatment, as assessed by beta-hCG levels. Our results also suggest that beta-hCG levels may be set as an end point for metastasis studies, circumventing guidelines, which have often hampered the use of advanced disease models. Collectively, our data indicates that beta-hCG is an effective noninvasive preclinical marker for the long term monitoring of untreated or treated metastatic disease.

  14. A comparative analysis of three non-invasive Human-Machine Interfaces for the disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram eRavindra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of rehabilitation robotics, a major role is played by theHuman-Machine Interface (HMI used to gather the patient's intent from biologicalsignals, and convert them into control signals for the robotic artifact. Surprisingly,decades of research haven't yet declared what the optimal HMI is in this context;in particular, the traditional approach based upon surface electromyography (sEMGstill yields unreliable results due to the inherent variability of the signal. Toovercome this problem, the scientific community has recently been advocating thediscovery, analysis and usage of novel HMIs to supersede or augment sEMG; a comparativeanalysis of such HMIs is therefore a very desirable investigation.In this paper we compare three such HMIs employed in the detection of finger forces,namely sEMG, ultrasound imaging and pressure sensing. The comparison is performed alongfour main lines: the accuracy in the prediction, the stability over time, the wearabilityand the cost. A psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects engaged ina simple finger-flexion task was set up. Our results show that, at least in thisexperiment, pressure sensing and sEMG yield comparably good prediction accuraciesas opposed to ultrasound imaging; and that pressure sensing enjoys a much better stabilitythan sEMG.Given that pressure sensors are as wearable as sEMG electrodes but way cheaper, we claimthat this HMI could represent a valid alternative /augmentation to sEMG to control amulti-fingered hand prosthesis.

  15. The neurophysiology of language: Insights from non-invasive brain stimulation in the healthy human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), a new decade in the study of language has started. NIBS allows for testing the functional relevance of language-related brain activation and enables the researcher to investigate how neural activation changes in response to focal perturbations. This review focuses on the application of NIBS in the healthy brain. First, some basic mechanisms will be introduced and the prerequisites for carrying out NIBS studies of language are addressed. The next section outlines how NIBS can be used to characterize the contribution of the stimulated area to a task. In this context, novel approaches such as multifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation and the condition-and-perturb approach are discussed. The third part addresses the combination of NIBS and neuroimaging in the study of plasticity. These approaches are particularly suited to investigate short-term reorganization in the healthy brain and may inform models of language recovery in post-stroke aphasia.

  16. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  17. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer E Bouchard

    Full Text Available A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial--especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics.

  18. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumanchipalli, Gopala K.; Dichter, Benjamin; Chaisanguanthum, Kris S.; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial—especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics. PMID:27019106

  19. Non-invasive and transdermal measurement of blood uric acid level in human by electroporation and reverse iontophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Kuei Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Kuei Lee1, Congo Tak-Shing Ching2–4, Tai-Ping Sun2,3, Chun-Lang Tsai2, Wei Huang5, Hsin-Hung Huang6, Jen-Fu Kuo7, Li-Hang Lai6, Mei-Ya Chien8, Hsin-Hui Tseng9, Hui-Tzu Pan10, Shiow-Yuan Huang4, Hsiu-Li Shieh3, Wei-Hao Liu2, Chia-Ming Liu2, Hsin-Wei Huang21Hopkins Health Management Center, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Graduate Institute of Biomedicine and Biomedical Technology, National Chi Nan University, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi Nan University, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Department of Photonics and Communication Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 6Family Medical Department, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 7Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 8Nutrition Department, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 9Aboriginal Health Care, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China; 10Department of Medical Research and Education, Puli Christian Hospital, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: The aim of this study was to find out the optimum combination of electroporation (EP and reverse iontophoresis (RI on noninvasive and transdermal determination of blood uric acid level in humans. EP is the use of high-voltage electric pulse to create nano-channels on the stratum corneum, temporarily and reversibly. RI is the use of small current to facilitate both charged and uncharged molecule transportation across the skin. It is believed that the combination of these two techniques has additional benefits on the molecules’ extraction across the human skin. In vitro studies using porcine skin and diffusion cell have indicated that the optimum mode for transdermal uric acid extraction is the

  20. Non-invasive plant growth measurements for detection of blue-light dose response of stem elongation in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig

    2012-01-01

    . In the present study a non-invasive plant growth sensor (PlantEye, Phenospex B.V, Heerlen, NL) was tested in analysing changes in diurnal stem elongation patterns and plant height in response to the spectral quality of the light environment. Plants were grown in four different LED supplemental lighting...... treatments with 0%, 12.5%, 18.5% and 22.5% blue light under greenhouse conditions in winter (18 h day/4 h night). The non-invasive measurements were carried out automatically every four hour with three repetitions, and supported by manual measurements of plant height every third day. A strong linear relation...... between the non-invasive measurements and manual measurements of plant height was achieved, and a blue-light dose-response showing a decrease in plant height in relation to an increase in blue light was demonstrated. However, the non-invasive plant growth sensor was not able to distinguish between diurnal...

  1. [Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord: non-invasive tool for activation of locomotor circuitry in human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnichev, R M; Pivovarova, E A; Pukhov, A; Moiseev, S A; Savokhin, A A; Moshonkina, T R; Shcherbakova, N A; Kilimnik, V A; Selionov, V A; Kozlovskaia, I B; Edgerton, V R; Gerasimenko, Iu P

    2012-01-01

    A new tool for locomotor circuitry activation in the non-injured human by transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) has been described. We show that continuous tSCS over T11-T12 vertebrae at 5-40 Hz induced involuntary locomotor-like stepping movements in subjects with their legs in a gravity-independent position. The increase of frequency of tSCS from 5 to 30 Hz augmented the amplitude of evoked stepping movements. The duration of cycle period did not depend on frequency of tSCS. During tSCS the hip, knee and ankle joints were involved in the stepping performance. It has been suggested that tSCS activates the locomotor circuitry through the dorsal roots. It appears that tSCS can be used as a non-invasive method in rehabilitation of spinal pathology.

  2. Noninvasive determination of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient of human skin tissues in vivo with oblique-incidence reflectometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Sun; Yu Wang; Xiaoli Mo; Jinghui Xie

    2008-01-01

    A spatial distribution of diffuse reflectance produced by obliquely incident light is not centered about the point of light entry. The value of shift in the center of diffuse reflectance is directly related to the absorption coefficient μa and the effective attenuation coefficient μeff. μa and the reduced scattering coefficient μ's of human skin tissues in vivo are measured by oblique-incidence reflectometry based on the two-source diffuse theory model. For ten Chinese volunteers aged 15-63 years, μa and μ's are noninvasively determined to be 0.029 - 0.075 and 0.52 - 0.97 mm-1, respectively.

  3. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Identification of serum microRNAs as novel non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-yang Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the potential of serum miRNAs as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer (GC, a population-based study was conducted in Linqu, a high-risk area of GC in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All subjects were selected from two large cohort studies. Differential miRNAs were identified in serum pools of GC and control using TaqMan low density array, and validated in individual from 82 pairs of GC and control, and 46 pairs of dysplasia and control by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The temporal trends of identified serum miRNA expression were further explored in a retrospective study on 58 GC patients who had at least one pre-GC diagnosis serum sample based on the long-term follow-up population. The miRNA profiling results demonstrated that 16 miRNAs were markedly upregulated in GC patients compared to controls. Further validation identified a panel of three serum miRNAs (miR-221, miR-744, and miR-376c as potential biomarkers for GC detection, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve-based risk assessment analysis revealed that this panel could distinguish GCs from controls with 82.4% sensitivity and 58.8% specificity. MiR-221 and miR-376c demonstrated significantly positive correlation with poor differentiation of GC, and miR-221 displayed higher level in dysplasia than in control. Furthermore, the retrospective study revealed an increasing trend of these three miRNA levels during GC development (P for trend<0.05, and this panel could classify serum samples collected up to 5 years ahead of clinical GC diagnosis with 79.3% overall accuracy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that serum miR-221, miR-376c and miR-744 have strong potential as novel non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of GC.

  5. Muscle oxygenation measurement in humans by noninvasive optical spectroscopy and Locally Weighted Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Lorilee S L; Schenkman, Kenneth A; Ciesielski, Wayne A; Shaver, Jeremy M

    2013-06-27

    We have developed a method to make real-time, continuous, noninvasive measurements of muscle oxygenation (Mox) from the surface of the skin. A key development was measurement in both the visible and near infrared (NIR) regions. Measurement of both oxygenated and deoxygenated myoglobin and hemoglobin resulted in a more accurate measurement of Mox than could be achieved with measurement of only the deoxygenated components, as in traditional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Using the second derivative with respect to wavelength reduced the effects of scattering on the spectra and also made oxygenated and deoxygenated forms more distinguishable from each other. Selecting spectral bands where oxygenated and deoxygenated forms absorb filtered out noise and spectral features unrelated to Mox. NIR and visible bands were scaled relative to each other in order to correct for errors introduced by normalization. Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) was used to estimate Mox from spectra within each data set collected from healthy subjects. A Locally Weighted Regression (LWR) model was built from calibration set spectra and associated Mox values from 20 subjects using 2562 spectra. LWR and Partial Least Squares (PLS) allow accurate measurement of Mox despite variations in skin pigment or fat layer thickness in different subjects. The method estimated Mox in five healthy subjects with an RMSE of 5.4%.

  6. [Design and application of noninvasive tissue recognition imaging in tomography of human skin and crystal structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-wen; Yang, Pao-keng; Chang, Yuan-shuo; Chen, Xin-chang; Shih, Wen-tse

    2010-09-01

    Cosmetic industry grows fast in recent years. To reveal the image of dermal structure, it is necessary to apply three-dimensional medical imaging technology. To reduce the invasiveness of laser source on tissues, tissue recognition imaging is proposed to retrieve the intrinsic optical property, namely, the reflection spectrum of every scanned point for imaging. The reflection spectra of main kinds of skin tissue, such as melanin, collagen and hemoglobin, were established as reference database. Broad-band rays were then employed to derive the reflection spectrum of each scanned sample element; the tissue type of the scanned point was identified by cross-correlation of the derived spectrum and the database. In imaging program, all scanned points were filled in with their corresponding tissue color, e.g., black for melanin, white for collagen, or red for hemoglobin, and finally the colored skin tomography resulted. Tissue recognition imaging has merits of easy configuration, low cost, color imaging, high resolution and real non-invasiveness. Substituting LED modules for its spectrometer, tissue recognition imaging is promising to be miniaturized as personal and portable skincare devices, which have great potential in future cosmetic market.

  7. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  8. Control of a humanoid robot by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christian J; Shenoy, Pradeep; Chalodhorn, Rawichote; Rao, Rajesh P N

    2008-06-01

    We describe a brain-computer interface for controlling a humanoid robot directly using brain signals obtained non-invasively from the scalp through electroencephalography (EEG). EEG has previously been used for tasks such as controlling a cursor and spelling a word, but it has been regarded as an unlikely candidate for more complex forms of control owing to its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we show that by leveraging advances in robotics, an interface based on EEG can be used to command a partially autonomous humanoid robot to perform complex tasks such as walking to specific locations and picking up desired objects. Visual feedback from the robot's cameras allows the user to select arbitrary objects in the environment for pick-up and transport to chosen locations. Results from a study involving nine users indicate that a command for the robot can be selected from four possible choices in 5 s with 95% accuracy. Our results demonstrate that an EEG-based brain-computer interface can be used for sophisticated robotic interaction with the environment, involving not only navigation as in previous applications but also manipulation and transport of objects.

  9. States of low pulmonary blood flow can be detected non-invasively at the bedside measuring alveolar dead space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusman, Gerardo; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Paez, Gabriel; Alvarez, Jorge; Bohm, Stephan H

    2012-06-01

    We tested whether the ratio of alveolar dead space to alveolar tidal volume (VD(alv)/VT(alv)) can detect states of low pulmonary blood flow (PBF) in a non-invasive way. Fifteen patients undergoing cardiovascular surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied. CPB is a technique that excludes the lungs from the general circulation. The weaning of CPB is a model that manipulates PBF in vivo because each time blood flow through the CPB decreases, expected PBF (ePBF) increases. Patients were liberated from CPB in steps of 20 % every 2' starting from 100 % CPB (very low ePBF) to 0 % CPB (100 % ePBF). During constant ventilation, volumetric capnograms were recorded and Bohr's dead space ratio (VD(Bohr)/VT), VD(alv)/VT(alv) and the ratio of airway dead space to tidal volume (VD(aw)/VT) were calculated. Before CPB, VD(Bohr)/VT was 0.36 ± 0.05, VD(aw)/VT 0.21 ± 0.04 and VD(alv)/VT(alv) 0.18 ± 0.06 (mean ± SD). During weaning from CPB, VD(aw)/VT remained unchanged while VD(Bohr)/VT and VD(alv)/VT(alv) decreased with increasing ePBF. At CPB of 80, 60, 40 and 20 % VD(Bohr)/VT was 0.64 ± 0.06, 0.55 ± 0.06, 0.47 ± 0.05 and 0.40 ± 0.04, respectively; p alveolar component of VD(Bohr)/VT increased in proportion to the deficit in lung perfusion.

  10. Noninvasive Detection of AR-FL/AR-V7 as a Predictive Biomarker for Therapeutic Resistance in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Accomplishments 4 4. Impact 9 5. Changes /Problems 11 6. Products 12 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations 15 8. Special Reporting...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0052 TITLE: Noninvasive Detection of AR-FL/AR-V7 as a Predictive Biomarker for Therapeutic Resistance in Men with...Metastatic Castration- Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen Plymate RECIPIENT: University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195

  11. Computer Vision Method in Human Motion Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li; FANG Shuai; XU Xin-he

    2007-01-01

    Human motion detection based on computer vision is a frontier research topic and is causing an increasing attention in the field of computer vision research. The wavelet transform is used to sharpen the ambiguous edges in human motion image. The shadow's effect to the image processing is also removed. The edge extraction can be successfully realized.This is an effective method for the research of human motion analysis system.

  12. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Gersonde, I [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Meinke, M [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Sterry, W [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-07

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar{sup +} laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm{sup -1}, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm{sup 2}. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  13. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2005-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar+ laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm-1, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm2. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  14. A new method for non-invasive estimation of human muscle fiber type composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Baguet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been established that excellence in sports with short and long exercise duration requires a high proportion of fast-twitch (FT or type-II fibers and slow-twitch (ST or type-I fibers, respectively. Until today, the muscle biopsy method is still accepted as gold standard to measure muscle fiber type composition. Because of its invasive nature and high sampling variance, it would be useful to develop a non-invasive alternative. METHODOLOGY: Eighty-three control subjects, 15 talented young track-and-field athletes, 51 elite athletes and 14 ex-athletes volunteered to participate in the current study. The carnosine content of all 163 subjects was measured in the gastrocnemius muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H-MRS. Muscle biopsies for fiber typing were taken from 12 untrained males. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A significant positive correlation was found between muscle carnosine, measured by (1H-MRS, and percentage area occupied by type II fibers. Explosive athletes had ∼30% higher carnosine levels compared to a reference population, whereas it was ∼20% lower than normal in typical endurance athletes. Similar results were found in young talents and ex-athletes. When active elite runners were ranked according to their best running distance, a negative sigmoidal curve was found between logarithm of running distance and muscle carnosine. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle carnosine content shows a good reflection of the disciplines of elite track-and-field athletes and is able to distinguish between individual track running distances. The differences between endurance and sprint muscle types is also observed in young talents and former athletes, suggesting this characteristic is genetically determined and can be applied in early talent identification. This quick method provides a valid alternative for the muscle biopsy method. In addition, this technique may also contribute to the diagnosis and monitoring of many conditions and

  15. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kasper; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the frst detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the tempor...

  16. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  17. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  18. Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopic pharmacodynamic markers of the choline kinase inhibitor MN58b in human carcinoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saffar, Nada M S; Troy, Helen; Ramírez de Molina, Ana; Jackson, Laura E; Madhu, Basetti; Griffiths, John R; Leach, Martin O; Workman, Paul; Lacal, Juan C; Judson, Ian R; Chung, Yuen-Li

    2006-01-01

    MN58b is a novel anticancer drug that inhibits choline kinase, resulting in inhibition of phosphocholine synthesis. The aim of this work was to develop a noninvasive and robust pharmacodynamic biomarker for target inhibition and, potentially, tumor response following MN58b treatment. Human HT29 (colon) and MDA-MB-231 (breast) carcinoma cells were examined by proton (1H) and phosphorus (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) before and after treatment with MN58b both in culture and in xenografts. An in vitro time course study of MN58b treatment was also carried out in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, enzymatic assays of choline kinase activity in cells were done. A decrease in phosphocholine and total choline levels (P < 0.05) was observed in vitro in both cell lines after MN58b treatment, whereas the inactive analogue ACG20b had no effect. In MDA-MB-231 cells, phosphocholine fell significantly as early as 4 hours following MN58b treatment, whereas a drop in cell number was observed at 48 hours. Significant correlation was also found between phosphocholine levels (measured by MRS) and choline kinase activities (r2 = 0.95, P = 0.0008) following MN58b treatment. Phosphomonoesters also decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in both HT29 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts with no significant changes in controls. 31P-MRS and 1H-MRS of tumor extracts showed a significant decrease in phosphocholine (P < or = 0.05). Inhibition of choline kinase by MN58b resulted in altered phospholipid metabolism both in cultured tumor cells and in vivo. Phosphocholine levels were found to correlate with choline kinase activities. The decrease in phosphocholine, total choline, and phosphomonoesters may have potential as noninvasive pharmacodynamic biomarkers for determining tumor response following treatment with choline kinase inhibitors.

  19. Structural health monitoring for bolt loosening via a non-invasive vibro-haptics human-machine cooperative interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekedis, Mahmut; Mascerañas, David; Turan, Gursoy; Ercan, Emre; Farrar, Charles R.; Yildiz, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    For the last two decades, developments in damage detection algorithms have greatly increased the potential for autonomous decisions about structural health. However, we are still struggling to build autonomous tools that can match the ability of a human to detect and localize the quantity of damage in structures. Therefore, there is a growing interest in merging the computational and cognitive concepts to improve the solution of structural health monitoring (SHM). The main object of this research is to apply the human-machine cooperative approach on a tower structure to detect damage. The cooperation approach includes haptic tools to create an appropriate collaboration between SHM sensor networks, statistical compression techniques and humans. Damage simulation in the structure is conducted by releasing some of the bolt loads. Accelerometers are bonded to various locations of the tower members to acquire the dynamic response of the structure. The obtained accelerometer results are encoded in three different ways to represent them as a haptic stimulus for the human subjects. Then, the participants are subjected to each of these stimuli to detect the bolt loosened damage in the tower. Results obtained from the human-machine cooperation demonstrate that the human subjects were able to recognize the damage with an accuracy of 88 ± 20.21% and response time of 5.87 ± 2.33 s. As a result, it is concluded that the currently developed human-machine cooperation SHM may provide a useful framework to interact with abstract entities such as data from a sensor network.

  20. Spread spectrum time-resolved diffuse optical measurement system for enhanced sensitivity in detecting human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Hasnain, Ali; Zhou, Xiaowei; Luo, Jianwen; Penney, Trevor B.; Chen, Nanguang

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging methods have been widely applied to noninvasive detection of brain activity. We have designed and implemented a low cost, portable, real-time one-channel time-resolved DOS system for neuroscience studies. Phantom experiments were carried out to test the performance of the system. We further conducted preliminary human experiments and demonstrated that enhanced sensitivity in detecting neural activity in the cortex could be achieved by the use of late arriving photons.

  1. Noninvasive Imaging of Protein Metabolic Labeling in Single Human Cells Using Stable Isotopes and Raman Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C−D stret

  2. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, H.J.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2008-01-01

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C−D

  3. The Noninvasive Measurement Research of Human Blood Parameters under Flow Control of Time Gate%血流控制下时间门的人体血液参数无创检测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴金鹏; 孙美秀; 康美玲; 李刚; 李迎新

    2013-01-01

    为了进一步提高人体血液成分无创伤测量的精度,从而达到临床的要求,提出了人体血液成分无创伤测量的一种新方法,这种方法是在血流受阻条件下,基于动力双波长时间分辨透射测量,将先进的时间门技术和拉普拉斯变换方法结合起来,对人体血液成分进行无创伤测量.该理论模拟了利用该方法在体测量人体血液参数,模拟结果显示当p>0,强调早期到达的光子的贡献时,能提高人体血液参数的检测灵敏度.%In order to further improve the noninvasive measurement precision of human blood components and achieve clinical requirements,we propose a new measurement method based on the dynamic dual wavelength time-resolved transmittance measurement,combined with the advanced time gate technology and Laplasse transform to detect human blood components noninvasively in the blocked blood flow conditions.Simulation results show that when p>O,emphasizing the importance of early arriving photons contribution can enhance the detection sensitivity of human body blood parameters.

  4. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  5. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  6. Human infections and detection of Plasmodium knowlesi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir; Daneshvar, Cyrus

    2013-04-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a malaria parasite that is found in nature in long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques. Naturally acquired human infections were thought to be extremely rare until a large focus of human infections was reported in 2004 in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Human infections have since been described throughout Southeast Asia, and P. knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium causing malaria in humans. The molecular, entomological, and epidemiological data indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis. Human infections were undiagnosed until molecular detection methods that could distinguish P. knowlesi from the morphologically similar human malaria parasite P. malariae became available. P. knowlesi infections cause a spectrum of disease and are potentially fatal, but if detected early enough, infections in humans are readily treatable. In this review on knowlesi malaria, we describe the early studies on P. knowlesi and focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical aspects, and treatment of knowlesi malaria. We also discuss the gaps in our knowledge and the challenges that lie ahead in studying the epidemiology and pathogenesis of knowlesi malaria and in the prevention and control of this zoonotic infection.

  7. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (pdiabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  8. Intracellular gold nanoparticles enhance non-invasive radiofrequency thermal destruction of human gastrointestinal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Priyabrata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel approaches to treat human cancer that are effective with minimal toxicity profiles are needed. We evaluated gold nanoparticles (GNPs in human hepatocellular and pancreatic cancer cells to determine: 1 absence of intrinsic cytotoxicity of the GNPs and 2 external radiofrequency (RF field-induced heating of intracellular GNPs to produce thermal destruction of malignant cells. GNPs (5 nm diameter were added to 2 human cancer cell lines (Panc-1, Hep3B. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and propidium iodide-fluorescence associated cell sorting (PI-FACS assessed cell proliferation and GNP-related cytotoxicity. Other GNP-treated cells were exposed to a 13.56 MHz RF field for 1, 2, or 5 minutes, and then incubated for 24 hours. PI-FACS measured RF-induced cytotoxicity. Results GNPs had no impact on cellular proliferation by MTT assay. PI-FACS confirmed that GNPs alone produced no cytotoxicity. A GNP dose-dependent RF-induced cytotoxicity was observed. For Hep3B cells treated with a 67 μM/L dose of GNPs, cytotoxicity at 1, 2 and 5 minutes of RF was 99.0%, 98.5%, and 99.8%. For Panc-1 cells treated at the 67 μM/L dose, cytotoxicity at 1, 2, and 5 minutes of RF was 98.5%, 98.7%, and 96.5%. Lower doses of GNPs were associated with significantly lower rates of RF-induced thermal cytotoxicity for each cell line (P Conclusion We demonstrate that GNPs 1 have no intrinsic cytotoxicity or anti-proliferative effects in two human cancer cell lines in vitro and 2 GNPs release heat in a focused external RF field. This RF-induced heat release is lethal to cancer cells bearing intracellular GNPs in vitro.

  9. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-12-15

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C-D stretching vibrational bands in these amino acids are observed in the 2100-2300 cm(-1) spectral region that is devoid of vibrational contributions from other, nondeuterated intracellular constituents. We found that incubation with deuterated amino acids for 8 h in cell culture already led to clearly detectable isotope-related signals in Raman spectra of HeLa cells. As expected, the level of isotope incorporation into proteins increased with incubation time, reaching 55% for deuterated phenylalanine after 28 h. Raman spectral imaging of HeLa cells incubated with deuterium-labeled amino acids showed similar spatial distributions for both isotope-labeled and unlabeled proteins, as evidenced by Raman ratio imaging. The SILAC-Raman methodology presented here combines the strengths of stable isotopic labeling of cells with the nondestructive and quantitative nature of Raman chemical imaging and is likely to become a powerful tool in both cell biology applications and research on tissues or whole organisms.

  10. Comparison of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Isothermal Micro-calorimetry for Non-invasive Detection of Microbial Growth in Media Fills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, David; Roesti, David; Zuber, Ulrich Georg; Schmidt, Rainer; Kraehenbuehl, Stefan; Bonkat, Gernot; Braissant, Olivier

    2016-06-10

    Two methods were investigated for non-invasive microbial growth-detection in intact glass vials as possible techniques for automated inspection of media-filled units. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to determine microbially induced changes in O2 and CO2 concentrations within the vial headspaces. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) allowed the detection of metabolic heat production. Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus salivarius were chosen as test organisms. Parameters as robustness, sensitivity, comparability and time to detection (TtD) were evaluated to assess method adequacy. Both methods robustly detected growth of the tested microorganisms within less than 76 hours using an initial inoculum of TDLAS the latter is proposed for automating the media-fill inspection, as larger throughput can be achieved. For routine use either TDLA or a combination of TDLA and TDLA should be considered. IMC may be helpful for replacing the sterility assessment of commercial drug products before release.

  11. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of β-thalassemia by detection of the cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Mandana; Kosaryan, Mehrnoush; Gill, Pooria; Alipour, Abbass; Shiran, Mohammadreza; Jalalli, Hossein; Banihashemi, Ali; Fatahi, Fatemeh

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of fetal DNA (f-DNA) opens the possibility of early non-invasive procedure for detection of paternally inherited mutation of beta-thalassemia. Since 2002, some studies have examined the sensitivity and specificity of this method for detection of paternally inherited mutation of thalassemia in pregnant women at risk of having affected babies. We conducted a systematic review of published articles that evaluated using this method for early detection of paternally inherited mutation in maternal plasma. A sensitive search of multiple databases was done in which nine studies met our inclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity was 99 and 99 %, respectively. The current study found that detection of paternally inherited mutation of thalassemia using analysis of cell-free fetal DNA is highly accurate. This method could replace conventional and invasive methods.

  12. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) is observed in the rates of change between healing and nonhealing wounds. Differences in the variability of DPDW measurements over time are observed between healing and nonhealing wounds, and this variance may also be a useful indicator of nonhealing wounds. Our results demonstrate that DPDW methodology with a frequency domain NIR device can differentiate healing from nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  13. Multi-modal human aggression detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, J. F. P.; Liem, M. C.; Krijnders, J. D.; Andringa, T. C.; Gavrila, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a smart surveillance system named CASSANDRA, aimed at detecting instances of aggressive human behavior in public environments. A distinguishing aspect of CASSANDRA is the exploitation of complementary audio and video cues to disambiguate scene activity in real-life environments.

  14. Nonpulsed sinusoidal electromagnetic fields as a noninvasive strategy in bone repair: the effect on human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, Mario; D'Emilia, Enrico; Giuliani, Livio; Marchese, Rodolfo; Foletti, Alberto; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In vivo control of osteoblast differentiation is an important process needed to maintain the continuous supply of mature osteoblast cells for growth, repair, and remodeling of bones. The regulation of this process has also an important and significant impact on the clinical strategies and future applications of cell therapy. In this article, we studied the effect of nonpulsed sinusoidal electromagnetic field radiation tuned at calcium-ion cyclotron frequency of 50 Hz exposure treatment for bone differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) alone or in synergy with dexamethasone, their canonical chemical differentiation agent. Five days of continuous exposure to calcium-ion cyclotron resonance affect hMSC proliferation, morphology, and cytoskeletal actin reorganization. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also observed an increase of osteoblast differentiation marker expression such as Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and osteopontin (OPN) together with the osteoprotegerin mRNA modulation. Moreover, in these cells, the increase of the protein expression of OPN and ALP was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate bone commitment of hMSCs through a noninvasive and biocompatible differentiating physical agent treatment and highlight possible applications in new regenerative medicine protocols.

  15. Non-Invasive Intra-cardiac Pressure Measurements Using Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation: Proof of Concept in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Kulkarni, Sushmita V; Pangaonkar, Purva P; Stanczak, Maria; McDonald, Maureen E; Cohen, Ira S; Mehrotra, Praveen; Savage, Michael P; Walinsky, Paul; Ruggiero, Nicholas J; Fischman, David L; Ogilby, David; VanWhy, Carolyn; Lombardi, Matthew; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-08-11

    This study evaluated the feasibility of employing non-invasive intra-cardiac pressure estimation using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in humans. This institutional review board-approved proof-of-concept study included 15 consenting patients scheduled for left and right heart catheterization. During the catheterization procedure, Definity was infused intra-venously at 4-10 mL/min. Ultrasound scanning was performed with a Sonix RP using pulse inversion, three incident acoustic output levels and 2.5-MHz transmit frequency. Radiofrequency data were processed and subharmonic amplitudes were compared with the pressure catheter data. The correlation coefficient between subharmonic signals and pressure catheter data ranged from -0.3 to -0.9. For acquisitions with optimum acoustic output, pressure errors between the subharmonic technique and catheter were as low as 2.6 mmHg. However, automatically determining optimum acoustic output during scanning for each patient remains to be addressed before clinical applicability can be decided. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid noninvasive detection of experimental atherosclerotic lesions with novel 99mTc-labeled diadenosine tetraphosphates

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The development of a noninvasive imaging procedure for identifying atherosclerotic lesions is extremely important for the clinical management of patients with coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease. Although numerous radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for this purpose, none has demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy required to replace invasive angiography. In this report, we used the radiolabeled purine analog, 99mTc diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A; AppppA, P1,P4-di(adenosine-5′...

  17. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  18. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D; Stærkind, Hans C; Müller, Jörg H; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  19. Using Noninvasive Wearable Computers to Recognize Human Emotions from Physiological Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasoz Fatma

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the strong relationship between affect and cognition and the importance of emotions in multimodal human computer interaction (HCI and user modeling. We introduce the overall paradigm for our multimodal system that aims at recognizing its users' emotions and at responding to them accordingly depending upon the current context or application. We then describe the design of the emotion elicitation experiment we conducted by collecting, via wearable computers, physiological signals from the autonomic nervous system (galvanic skin response, heart rate, temperature and mapping them to certain emotions (sadness, anger, fear, surprise, frustration, and amusement. We show the results of three different supervised learning algorithms that categorize these collected signals in terms of emotions, and generalize their learning to recognize emotions from new collections of signals. We finally discuss possible broader impact and potential applications of emotion recognition for multimodal intelligent systems.

  20. Using Noninvasive Wearable Computers to Recognize Human Emotions from Physiological Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisetti, Christine Lætitia; Nasoz, Fatma

    2004-12-01

    We discuss the strong relationship between affect and cognition and the importance of emotions in multimodal human computer interaction (HCI) and user modeling. We introduce the overall paradigm for our multimodal system that aims at recognizing its users' emotions and at responding to them accordingly depending upon the current context or application. We then describe the design of the emotion elicitation experiment we conducted by collecting, via wearable computers, physiological signals from the autonomic nervous system (galvanic skin response, heart rate, temperature) and mapping them to certain emotions (sadness, anger, fear, surprise, frustration, and amusement). We show the results of three different supervised learning algorithms that categorize these collected signals in terms of emotions, and generalize their learning to recognize emotions from new collections of signals. We finally discuss possible broader impact and potential applications of emotion recognition for multimodal intelligent systems.

  1. Anomalous human behavior detection: an adaptive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Coen; Halma, Arvid; Schutte, Klamer

    2013-05-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous behavior in videos from DARPA's Mind's Eye program, containing a variety of human activities. In this semi-unsupervised task a set of normal instances is provided for training, after which unknown abnormal behavior has to be detected in a test set. The features extracted from the video data have high dimensionality, are sparse and inhomogeneously distributed in the feature space making it a challenging task. Given these characteristics a distance-based method is preferred, but choosing a threshold to classify instances as (ab)normal is non-trivial. Our novel aproach, the Adaptive Outlier Distance (AOD) is able to detect outliers in these conditions based on local distance ratios. The underlying assumption is that the local maximum distance between labeled examples is a good indicator of the variation in that neighborhood, and therefore a local threshold will result in more robust outlier detection. We compare our method to existing state-of-art methods such as the Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and the Local Distance-based Outlier Factor (LDOF). The results of the experiments show that our novel approach improves the quality of the anomaly detection.

  2. Feasibility of noninvasive quantitative measurements of intrarenal R(2) ' in humans using an asymmetric spin echo echo planar imaging sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, Xiaoying; An, Hongyu; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of an asymmetric spin echo (ASE) single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence for the noninvasive quantitative measurement of intrarenal R(2) ' in humans within 20 s. The reproducibility of R(2) ' measurements with the ASE-EPI sequence was assessed in nine healthy young subjects in repeated studies conducted over three consecutive days. Moreover, we also evaluated whether the ASE-EPI sequence-measured R(2) ' reflected the intrarenal oxygenation changes induced by furosemide in another group of normal human subjects (n = 10). Different flow attenuation gradients (b = 0, 40 and 80 s/mm(2) ) were utilized to examine the impact of the intravascular signal contribution on the estimation of intrarenal R(2) '. In the absence of flow dephasing gradients (b = 0 s/mm(2) ), the computed coefficient of variation (CV) of R(2) ' was 21.31 ± 4.52%, and the estimated R(2) ' value decreased slightly, but not statistically significantly (p > 0.05), after the administration of furosemide in the medullary region. However, CV of R(2) ' was much smaller in the presence of flow dephasing gradients (9.68 ± 3.58% with b = 40 s/mm(2) and 10.50 ± 3.62% with b = 80 s/mm(2) ). Moreover, a significant reduction in R(2) ' in the renal medulla was obtained (p R(2) ' measurements did not differ between the b = 40 s/mm(2) and b = 80 s/mm(2) scans, suggesting that small diffusion gradients were sufficient to minimize the intravascular signal contribution. In summary, we have demonstrated that renal R(2) ' can be obtained rapidly using an ASE-EPI sequence. The measurement was highly reproducible and reflected the expected intrarenal oxygenation changes induced by furosemide.

  3. Non-invasive imaging of the crystalline structure within a human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Cai, Biao; Zandbergen, Mathijs W; Lee, Peter D; Beale, Andrew M; Cernik, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The internal crystalline structure of a human molar tooth has been non-destructively imaged in cross-section using X-ray diffraction computed tomography. Diffraction signals from high-energy X-rays which have large attenuation lengths for hard biomaterials have been collected in a transmission geometry. Coupling this with a computed tomography data acquisition and mathematically reconstructing their spatial origins, diffraction patterns from every voxel within the tooth can be obtained. Using this method we have observed the spatial variations of some key material parameters including nanocrystallite size, organic content, lattice parameters, crystallographic preferred orientation and degree of orientation. We have also made a link between the spatial variations of the unit cell lattice parameters and the chemical make-up of the tooth. In addition, we have determined how the onset of tooth decay occurs through clear amorphization of the hydroxyapatite crystal, and we have been able to map the extent of decay within the tooth. The described method has strong prospects for non-destructive probing of mineralized biomaterials.

  4. New imaging methods for non-invasive assessment of mechanical, structural and biochemical properties of Human Achilles tendon: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fouré

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon’s mechanical, structural and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon’s structural and, indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI.

  5. Monitoring therapeutic response of human ovarian cancer to 17-DMAG by noninvasive PET imaging with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Gang; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Zibo [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Keck School of Medicine, USC Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, has been intensively investigated for cancer therapy and is undergoing clinical trials. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is one of the client proteins of Hsp90 and its expression is decreased upon 17-DMAG treatment. In this study, we aimed to noninvasively monitor the HER-2 response to 17-DMAG treatment in xenografted mice. The sensitivity of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells to 17-DMAG in vitro was measured by MTT assay. HER-2 expression in SKOV-3 cells was determined by flow cytometry. Nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumors were treated with 17-DMAG and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by tumor size measurement. Both treated and control mice were imaged with microPET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab and {sup 18}F-FDG. Biodistribution studies and immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the microPET results. SKOV-3 cells are sensitive to 17-DMAG treatment, in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC{sub 50} value of 24.72 nM after 72 h incubation. The tumor growth curve supported the inhibition effect of 17-DMAG on SKOV-3 tumors. Quantitative microPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab had prominent tumor accumulation in untreated SKOV-3 tumors, which was significantly reduced in 17-DMAG-treated tumors. There was no uptake difference detected by FDG PET. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the significant reduction in tumor HER-2 level upon 17-DMAG treatment. The early response to anti-Hsp90 therapy was successfully monitored by quantitative PET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab. This approach may be valuable in monitoring the therapeutic response in HER-2-positive cancer patients under 17-DMAG treatment. (orig.)

  6. Oximetry: a new non-invasive method to detect metabolic effects induced by a local application of mechanical vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, A.; Trombetta, C.; Abundo, P.; Foti, C.; Rosato, N.

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical vibrations application is increasingly common in clinical practice due to the effectiveness induced by these stimuli on the human body. Local vibration (LV) application allows to apply and act only where needed, focusing the treatment on the selected body segment. An experimental device for LV application was used to generate the vibrations. The aim of this study was to detect and analyze the metabolic effects induced by LV on the brachial bicep muscle by means of an oximeter. This device monitors tissue and muscle oxygenation using NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) and is able to determine the concentration of haemoglobin and oxygen saturation in the tissue. In a preliminary stage we also investigated the effects induced by LV application, by measuring blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and temperature. These data confirmed that the effects induced by LV application are actually localized. The results of the measurements obtained using the oximeter during the vibration application, have shown a variation of the concentrations. In particular an increase of oxygenate haemoglobin was shown, probably caused by an increased muscle activity and/or a rise in local temperature detected during the application.

  7. In Vivo Non-Invasive Measurement of Young's Modulus of Elasticity in Human Eyes: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Arthur J; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Kazemi, Arash; McLaren, Jay W; Pruet, Christopher M; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-08-28

    Abnormal ocular biomechanical properties may be important for understanding the risk of glaucoma. However, there are no clinical methods for measuring standard material properties in patients. In this feasibility study we demonstrated proof-of-principle for a novel method, ultrasound surface wave elastography (USWE), to determine the in vivo Young's modulus of elasticity of corneas in normal human eyes. Twenty eyes of 10 healthy subjects (mean age 51.4±7.2;±SD, range 43-64 y) were studied. A spherical-tipped probe (3-mm diameter) was placed on closed eyelids and generated a gentle harmonic vibration at 100 Hz for 0.1 second. Wave speed propagation in the cornea was measured by USWE, and Young's modulus was calculated from the wave speed. Associations between Young's modulus and intraocular pressure (IOP), age, central corneal thickness, and axial length were explored by Pearson correlation. Statistical significance was determined by using generalized estimating equation models to account for possible correlation between fellow eyes. Mean IOP was 12.8±2.7 mm Hg. Mean wave speed in the cornea was 1.82±0.10 m/s. Young's modulus of elasticity was 696±113 kPa and was correlated with IOP (r=0.57; P=0.004), but none of the other variables (P>0.1). USWE is a novel non-invasive technique for measuring ocular biomechanical properties. Corneal Young's modulus in normal eyes is associated with IOP, consistent with measurements in cadaver eyes. Further work is needed to determine elasticity in other ocular tissues, particularly the sclera, and if elasticity is altered in glaucoma patients.

  8. [Application of wavelet transform on improving detecting precision of the non-invasive blood components measurement based on dynamic spectrum method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Men, Jian-Long; Sun, Zhao-Min; Wang, Hui-Quan; Lin, Ling; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Bao-Ju

    2011-02-01

    Time-varying noises in spectra collection process have influence on the prediction accuracy of quantitative calibration in the non-invasive blood components measurement which is based on dynamic spectrum (DS) method. By wavelet transform, we focused on the absorbance wave of fingertip transmission spectrum in pulse frequency band. Then we increased the signal to noise ratio of DS data, and improved the detecting precision of quantitative calibration. After carrying out spectrum data continuous acquisition of the same subject for 10 times, we used wavelet transform de-noising to increase the average correlation coefficient of DS data from 0.979 6 to 0.990 3. BP neural network was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' blood components concentration values against dynamic spectrum data of 110 volunteers. After wavelet transform de-noising, the correlation coefficient of prediction set increased from 0.677 4 to 0.846 8, and the average relative error was decreased from 15.8% to 5.3%. Experimental results showed that the introduction of wavelet transform can effectively remove the noise in DS data, improve the detecting precision, and accelerate the development of non-invasive blood components measurement based on DS method.

  9. Detection of fetal chromosomal anomalies: does nuchal translucency measurement have added value in the era of non-invasive prenatal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenbelt, K D; Diemel, B D M; Koster, M P H; Manten, G T R; Siljee, J; Schuring-Blom, G H; Page-Christiaens, G C M L

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine what percentage of fetal chromosomal anomalies remains undetected when first trimester combined testing is replaced by non-invasive prenatal testing for trisomies 13, 18, and 21. We focused on the added clinical value of nuchal translucency (NT) measurement. Data on fetal karyotype, ultrasound findings, and pregnancy outcome of all pregnancies with an NT measurement ≥3.5 mm were retrospectively collected from a cohort of 25,057 singleton pregnancies in which first trimester combined testing was performed. Two hundred twenty-five fetuses (0.9 %) had an NT ≥3.5 mm. In 24 of these pregnancies, a chromosomal anomaly other than trisomy 13, 18, or 21 was detected. Eleven resulted in fetal demise, and ten showed fetal ultrasound anomalies. In three fetuses with normal ultrasound findings, a chromosomal anomaly was detected, of which one was a triple X. In three out of 25,057 pregnancies (0.01%), non-invasive prenatal testing and fetal ultrasound would have missed a chromosomal anomaly that would have been identified by NT measurement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Urinary metabolomics for noninvasive detection of borderline and acute T cell-mediated rejection in children after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blydt-Hansen, T D; Sharma, A; Gibson, I W; Mandal, R; Wishart, D S

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of urinary metabolomics for noninvasive diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Urine samples (n = 277) from 57 patients with surveillance or indication kidney biopsies were assayed for 134 unique metabolites by quantitative mass spectrometry. Samples without TCMR (n = 183) were compared to borderline tubulitis (n = 54) and TCMR (n = 30). Partial least squares discriminant analysis identified distinct classifiers for TCMR (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.892; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.827-0.957) and borderline tubulitis (AUC = 0.836; 95% CI 0.781-0.892), respectively. Application of the TCMR classifier to borderline tubulitis samples yielded a discriminant score (-0.47 ± 0.33) mid-way between TCMR (-0.20 ± 0.34) and No TCMR (-0.80 ± 0.32) (p metabolomics is a sensitive, specific and noninvasive tool for TCMR identification that is superior to serum creatinine, with minimal confounding by other allograft injury processes. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. A Fusion Approach for Efficient Human Skin Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Wei Ren; Chan, Chee Seng; Yogarajah, Pratheepan; Condell, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A reliable human skin detection method that is adaptable to different human skin colours and illu- mination conditions is essential for better human skin segmentation. Even though different human skin colour detection solutions have been successfully applied, they are prone to false skin detection and are not able to cope with the variety of human skin colours across different ethnic. Moreover, existing methods require high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a novel human skin de- ...

  12. Human Activity Detection from RGBD Images

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, Jaeyong; Selman, Bart; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    Being able to detect and recognize human activities is important for making personal assistant robots useful in performing assistive tasks. The challenge is to develop a system that is low-cost, reliable in unstructured home settings, and also straightforward to use. In this paper, we use a RGBD sensor (Microsoft Kinect) as the input sensor, and present learning algorithms to infer the activities. Our algorithm is based on a hierarchical maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM). It considers a person's activity as composed of a set of sub-activities, and infers the two-layered graph structure using a dynamic programming approach. We test our algorithm on detecting and recognizing twelve different activities performed by four people in different environments, such as a kitchen, a living room, an office, etc., and achieve an average performance of 84.3% when the person was seen before in the training set (and 64.2% when the person was not seen before).

  13. Gamna-Gandy bodies of the spleen detected with susceptibility weighted imaging: maybe a new potential non-invasive marker of esophageal varices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuquan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Portal hypertension (PH is a clinical sequelae of liver cirrhosis, and bleeding from esophageal varices (EV is a serious complication of PH with significant morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to assess the ability of 2D multislice breath-hold susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI to detect Gamna-Gandy bodies (GGBs in the spleens of patients with PH and to evaluate the potential role of GGB number as a non-invasive marker of PH and EV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: T1-, T2- and T2(*-weighted imaging and SWI were performed on 135 patients with PH and on 37 control individuals. Platelet counts were collected from all PH patients. Two radiologists analyzed all magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, and measured the portal vein diameter, splenic index (SI, and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio. The numbers of patients with GGBs in the spleen were determined, and the numbers of GGB were counted in the four MRI sequences in GGB-positive patients. The portal vein diameter, SI, platelet count, and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio of control individuals were compared with those of GGB-negative and GGB-positive patients on SWI images. The correlations among GGB numbers, the portal vein diameter, the SI, the platelet count, and the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio were analyzed. RESULTS: The GGB detection rate and the detected GGB number by using SWI were significantly greater than those by using T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted images. The number of GGBs in the SWI images correlated positively with the portal vein diameter and SI and correlated negatively with the platelet count and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio. CONCLUSION: SWI provided more accurate information of GGBs in patients with PH. The number of GGB may be a non-invasive predictor of improving the selection for endoscopic screening of PH patients at risk of EV.

  14. Non-invasive tumor detection in small animals using novel functional Pluronic nanomicelles conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Chueng; Roy, Indrajit; Hu, Rui; Wu, Fang; Zhao, Weiwei; Huang, Kun; Erogbogbo, Folarin; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2011-04-01

    In this study QDs were encapsulated in carboxylated PluronicF127 (F127COOH) triblock polymeric micelles and conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibody for the purpose of alleviating potential toxicity, enhancing the stability and improving targeting efficiency of CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in tumors. The amphiphilic triblock polymer of F127COOH contains hydrophilic carboxylated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) units. After encapsulating QDs into carboxylated F127 (F127COOH-QD) micelles, the particles were conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibodies to allow targeting of cancerous areas. The size of the monodispersed spherical QD-containing micelles was determined to be ~120 nm by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was estimated to be 4.7 × 10-7 M. In an in vitro study, the anti-methoselin antibody conjugated F127COOH (Me-F127COOH-QD) nanomicelles showed negligible cytotoxicity to pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the Me-F127COOH-QD nanomicelles were taken up more efficiently by Panc-1cells, due to antibody mediated targeting. An in vivo imaging study showed that Me-F127COOH-QD nanomicelles accumulated at the pancreatic tumor site 15 min after intravenous injection. In addition, the low in vivo toxicity of the nanomicellar formulation was evaluated by pathological assays. These results suggest that anti-mesothein antibody conjugated carboxylated F127 nanomicelles may serve as a promising nanoscale platform for early human pancreatic cancer detection and targeted drug delivery.

  15. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW's are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  16. Electrocardiologic and related methods of non-invasive detection and risk stratification in myocardial ischemia: state of the art and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeck, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrocardiographic methods still provide the bulk of cardiovascular diagnostics. Cardiac ischemia is associated with typical alterations in cardiac biosignals that have to be measured, analyzed by mathematical algorithms and allegorized for further clinical diagnostics. The fast growing fields of biomedical engineering and applied sciences are intensely focused on generating new approaches to cardiac biosignal analysis for diagnosis and risk stratification in myocardial ischemia. Objectives: To present and review the state of the art in and new approaches to electrocardiologic methods for non-invasive detection and risk stratification in coronary artery disease (CAD and myocardial ischemia; secondarily, to explore the future perspectives of these methods. Methods: In follow-up to the Expert Discussion at the 2008 Workshop on "Biosignal Analysis" of the German Society of Biomedical Engineering in Potsdam, Germany, we comprehensively searched the pertinent literature and databases and compiled the results into this review. Then, we categorized the state-of-the-art methods and selected new approaches based on their applications in detection and risk stratification of myocardial ischemia. Finally, we compared the pros and cons of the methods and explored their future potentials for cardiology. Results: Resting ECG, particularly suited for detecting ST-elevation myocardial infarctions, and exercise ECG, for the diagnosis of stable CAD, are state-of-the-art methods. New exercise-free methods for detecting stable CAD include cardiogoniometry (CGM; methods for detecting acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation are Body Surface Potential Mapping, functional imaging and CGM. Heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses, microvolt T-wave alternans and signal-averaged ECG mainly serve in detecting and stratifying the risk for lethal arrythmias in patients with myocardial ischemia or previous myocardial infarctions

  17. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibition increases levels of choline kinase alpha and phosphocholine facilitating non-invasive imaging in human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are currently approved for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and are in mid-late stage trials for other cancers. The HDAC inhibitors LAQ824 and SAHA increase phosphocholine (PC) levels in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenografts as observed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In this study, we show that belinostat, an HDAC inhibitor with an alternative chemical scaffold, also caused a rise in cellular PC content that was detectable by 1H and 31P MRS in...

  19. Communication—Microelectrode Detection of Cholesterol Efflux from the Human Buccel Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaochun; Kelley, Thomas J.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    It has previously demonstrated that cholesterol efflux from the cell plasma membrane is increased in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to a wild-type control. A noninvasive means of characterizing plasma membrane cholesterol efflux at the surface of airway tissue of CF patients is needed to extend the trends found in animal models of CF to the human disease state. Microelectrode-induced cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of cells at the surface of tissue is proposed as a strategy to demonstrate increased cholesterol efflux for CF in human subjects. Data demonstrating detection of cholesterol efflux from the human buccal mucosa is reported as proof-of-concept for an in vivo diagnostic assay. PMID:27546897

  20. Noninvasive detection of unevenly magnetized permanent magnet of a brushless dc motor by characterizing back electromotive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. I.; Jang, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    Uneven magnetization of permanent magnets (PMs) is one of the major sources of unbalanced magnetic force and torque ripple, which excite a brushless dc (BLDC) motor. This paper investigates the frequency contents of the back electromotive force (BEMF) due to the unevenly magnetized PMs in a BLDC motor. The magnetic field of a BLDC motor is solved by using the finite element method, and the BEMF is calculated by differentiating the flux linkage with respect to time. The characteristics of BEMF are investigated by using the spectral analysis. Magnetic flux density of the ideally magnetized PMs has the harmonics of the pole-pair number, but unevenly magnetized PMs generate the additional harmonics. This research shows numerically and experimentally that the frequency components of the BEMF are determined by the least common multiple between the frequency contents of magnetic flux density from the PMs and the slot number per phase. It also shows that the magnetized status of the PMs of a BLDC can be noninvasively identified by monitoring the frequencies and the amplitudes of BEMF.

  1. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy as method of choice for non-invasive and automated detection of microbial growth in media fills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, David; Roesti, David; Zuber, Ulrich; Sacher, Meik; Duncan, Derek; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-05-15

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was evaluated on its potential to detect bacterial growth of contaminated media fill vials. The target was a replacement/ automation of the traditional visual media fill inspection. TDLAS was used to determine non-invasively O2 and/or CO2 changes in headspaces of such vials being induced by metabolically active microorganisms. Four different vial formats, 34 microorganisms (inoculation volumeTDLAS functionality for a replacement of the visual media fill inspection is given and that investing in further validation and implementation studies is valuable. Nevertheless, some small but vincible challenges remain to have this technology in practical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Noninvasive detection of cancer-associated genome-wide hypomethylation and copy number aberrations by plasma DNA bisulfite sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. Allen; Jiang, Peiyong; Chan, Carol W. M.; Sun, Kun; Wong, John; Hui, Edwin P.; Chan, Stephen L.; Chan, Wing Cheong; Hui, David S. C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Chan, Henry L. Y.; Wong, Cesar S. C.; Ma, Brigette B. Y.; Chan, Anthony T. C.; Lai, Paul B. S.; Sun, Hao; Chiu, Rossa W. K.; Lo, Y. M. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    We explored the detection of genome-wide hypomethylation in plasma using shotgun massively parallel bisulfite sequencing as a marker for cancer. Tumor-associated copy number aberrations (CNAs) could also be observed from the bisulfite DNA sequencing data. Hypomethylation and CNAs were detected in the plasma DNA of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, smooth muscle sarcoma, and neuroendocrine tumor. For the detection of nonmetastatic cancer cases, plasma hypomethylation gave a sensitivity and specificity of 74% and 94%, respectively, when a mean of 93 million reads per case were obtained. Reducing the sequencing depth to 10 million reads per case was found to have no adverse effect on the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection, giving respective figures of 68% and 94%. This characteristic thus indicates that analysis of plasma hypomethylation by this sequencing-based method may be a relatively cost-effective approach for cancer detection. We also demonstrated that plasma hypomethylation had utility for monitoring hepatocellular carcinoma patients following tumor resection and for detecting residual disease. Plasma hypomethylation can be combined with plasma CNA analysis for further enhancement of the detection sensitivity or specificity using different diagnostic algorithms. Using the detection of at least one type of aberration to define an abnormality, a sensitivity of 87% could be achieved with a specificity of 88%. These developments have thus expanded the applications of plasma DNA analysis for cancer detection and monitoring. PMID:24191000

  3. Comparison of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Isothermal Micro-calorimetry for Non-invasive Detection of Microbial Growth in Media Fills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, David; Roesti, David; Zuber, Ulrich Georg; Schmidt, Rainer; Kraehenbuehl, Stefan; Bonkat, Gernot; Braissant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were investigated for non-invasive microbial growth-detection in intact glass vials as possible techniques for automated inspection of media-filled units. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to determine microbially induced changes in O2 and CO2 concentrations within the vial headspaces. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) allowed the detection of metabolic heat production. Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus salivarius were chosen as test organisms. Parameters as robustness, sensitivity, comparability and time to detection (TtD) were evaluated to assess method adequacy. Both methods robustly detected growth of the tested microorganisms within less than 76 hours using an initial inoculum of IMC, as some false negative results were observed. Compared to the visual media-fill examination of spiked samples, the investigated techniques were slightly slower regarding TtD. Although IMC showed shorter TtD than TDLAS the latter is proposed for automating the media-fill inspection, as larger throughput can be achieved. For routine use either TDLA or a combination of TDLA and TDLA should be considered. IMC may be helpful for replacing the sterility assessment of commercial drug products before release. PMID:27282661

  4. Noninvasive detection of coronary vasospastic angina using a double-acquisition coronary CT angiography protocol in the presence and absence of an intravenous nitrate: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Dong Won; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Lee, Ki-Nam [Dong-A University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hyun; Jin, Cai De [Dong-A University, Department of Cardiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Dong-A University Hospital, Global Clinical Trial Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeongmin; Park, Tae-Ho [Dong-A University, Department of Cardiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of a double-acquisition coronary CT angiography (CCTA) protocol in the presence and absence of an intravenous (IV) vasodilator infusion for detecting vasospastic angina. Twenty patients with a high clinical probability of vasospastic angina were enrolled. All subjects underwent baseline CCTA without a vasodilator in the early morning followed by a catheterized coronary angiography with ergonovine provocation test. Within 3 days, all subjects underwent repeat CCTA during a continuous IV infusion of nitrate. Vasospastic angina as detected by CCTA was defined as significant stenosis (≥50 %) with negative remodelling without definite plaques or diffuse small diameter (<2 mm) of a major coronary artery with a beaded appearance on baseline CT that completely dilated on IV nitrate CT. The CCTA results were compared to the catheterized ergonovine provocation test as the reference standard. Among 20 patients, the catheterized ergonovine provocation test detected vasospasm in 15 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of CCTA in a per-patient-based analysis were 73, 100, 100 and 56 %, respectively. Double-acquisition CCTA in the presence and absence of IV infusion of nitrate allows noninvasive detection of vasospastic angina with moderate sensitivity and high specificity. (orig.)

  5. Take Only Photographs, Leave Only Footprints: Novel Applications of Non-Invasive Survey Methods for Rapid Detection of Small, Arboreal Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Mills

    Full Text Available The development of appropriate wildlife survey techniques is essential to promote effective and efficient monitoring of species of conservation concern. Here, we demonstrate the utility of two rapid-assessment, non-invasive methods to detect the presence of elusive, small, arboreal animals. We use the hazel dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, a rodent of conservation concern, as our focal species. Prevailing hazel dormouse survey methods are prolonged (often taking months to years to detect dormice, dependent on season and habitat, and/or have low detection rates. Alternatives would be of great use to ecologists who undertake dormouse surveys, especially those assessing the need for mitigation measures, as legally required for building development projects. Camera traps and footprint tracking are well-established tools for monitoring elusive large terrestrial mammals, but are rarely used for small species such as rodents, or in arboreal habitats. In trials of these adapted methods, hazel dormice visited bait stations and were successfully detected by both camera traps and tracking equipment at each of two woodland study sites, within days to weeks of installation. Camera trap images and footprints were of adequate quality to allow discrimination between two sympatric small mammal species (hazel dormouse and wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus. We discuss the relative merits of these methods with respect to research aims, funds, time available and habitat.

  6. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  7. A matter of collection and detection for intraoperative and noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging: To see or not to see?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.Sevick@uth.tmc.edu [Center for Molecular Imaging, The Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Although fluorescence molecular imaging is rapidly evolving as a new combinational drug/device technology platform for molecularly guided surgery and noninvasive imaging, there remains no performance standards for efficient translation of “first-in-humans” fluorescent imaging agents using these devices. Methods: The authors employed a stable, solid phantom designed to exaggerate the confounding effects of tissue light scattering and to mimic low concentrations (nM–pM) of near-infrared fluorescent dyes expected clinically for molecular imaging in order to evaluate and compare the commonly used charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems employed in preclinical studies and in human investigational studies. Results: The results show that intensified CCD systems offer greater contrast with larger signal-to-noise ratios in comparison to their unintensified CCD systems operated at clinically reasonable, subsecond acquisition times. Conclusions: Camera imaging performance could impact the success of future “first-in-humans” near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent studies.

  8. Potential role of blood microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis in obese children with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed; Elimam, Dalia; He, Fang; Peng, Jing; Yin, Fei

    2012-12-01

    The pandemic of the childhood obesity represent a major public health problem all over the world. This leads to detection of many health conditions that were previously considered an adulthood diseases. The rise in the prevalence of the obesity and overweight among children means that the world will face an explosion in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS), which increases the risk of atherosclerotic disease and death in adulthood. The atherosclerotic process has proved to develop silently for decades during childhood and adolescence before the cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke occur. This means that obese children especially with MS could have heart attacks and suffer from heart disease in an age when they should be very healthy, but most of these data either derived from autopsy findings or studies that confirmed the presence of peripheral atherosclerosis. Very early detection of coronary atherosclerosis in obese children with metabolic syndrome through a non invasive method will be of great importance, allowing for early therapeutic intervention. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) is considered a major scientific breakthrough in the last years; recent studies have suggested a potentially important role of miRNAs in the control of diversity aspects of cardiac functions in health and disease including coronary atherosclerosis. Moreover, circulating miRNAs profiles recently used as a non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of multiple cardiovascular diseases. The identification of distinct circulating miRNA profiles may impact the development of specific miRNAs as biomarkers in pediatric cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we postulate that some of these circulating miRNAs may be a potential biomarker for early non-invasive diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in very early asymptomatic stage in obese children with metabolic syndrome, giving an excellent chance to fight against the first killer in the adult population in

  9. The detection and treatment of human African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouteille B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Bouteille,1 Alain Buguet21Laboratory of Parasitology, Dupuytren University Hospital of Limoges, France; 2Polyclinic Marie-Louise Poto-Djembo, Pointe-Noire, CongoAbstract: Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by the injection of Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense by Glossina, the tsetse fly. Three historical eras followed the exclusive clinical approach of the 19th century. At the turn of the century, the “initial research” era was initiated because of the dramatic spread of HAT throughout intertropical Africa, and scientists discovered the agent and its vector. Two entities, recurrent fever and sleeping sickness, were then considered a continuum between hemolymphatic stage 1 and meningoencephalitic stage 2. Treatments were developed. Soon after World War I, specific services and mobile teams were created, initiating the “epidemiological” era, during which populations were visited, screened, and treated. As a result, by 1960, annual new cases were rare. New mass screening and staging tools were then developed in a third, “modern” era, especially to counter a new epidemic wave. Currently, diagnosis still relies on microscopic detection of trypanosomes without (wet and thick blood films or with concentration techniques (capillary tube centrifugation, miniature anion-exchange centrifugation technique. Staging is a vital step.Stage 1 patients are treated on site with pentamidine or suramin. However, stage 2 patients are treated in specialized facilities, using drugs that are highly toxic and/or that require complex administration procedures (melarsoprol, eflornithine, or nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy. Suramin and melarsoprol are the only medications active against Rhodesian HAT. Staging still relies on cerebrospinal fluid examination for trypanosome detection and white blood cell counts: stage 1, absence of trypanosomes, white blood cell counts ≤ 5/µL; stage 2, presence of

  10. Noninvasive Imaging of Acute Renal Allograft Rejection by Ultrasound Detection of Microbubbles Targeted to T-lymphocytes in Rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabner, A.; Kentrup, D.; Mühlmeister, M.; Pawelski, H.; Biermann, C.; Bettinger, T.; Pavenstadt, H.; Schlatter, E.; Tiemann, K.; Reuter, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We propose CD3-antibody-mediated contrast-enhanced ultrasonography using human T-lymphocytes for image-based diagnosis of acute allograft rejection (AR) established in a rat renal transplantation model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 15 minutes after tail vein injection of 30 x 10(6) human T-lympho

  11. Toward noninvasive optical human brain mapping: improvements of the spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution of near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heekeren, Hauke R.; Wenzel, Rudiger; Obrig, Hellmuth; Ruben, Jan; Ndayisaba, J.-P.; Luo, Qingming; Dale, A.; Nioka, Shoko; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Villringer, Arno; Chance, Britton

    1997-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can detect changes in cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation in response to motor, visual or cognitive stimulation. This study explored potential improvements for functional human brain mapping with NIRS: (1) So far, only primary cortical areas, like motor cortex or primary visual areas were studied. We tested the feasibility of identifying an extrastriate visual motion area (MT) with single site NIRS. (2) The temporal resolution of commercial systems is on the order of seconds and their spectral resolution is poor. We tested the feasibility of the detection of cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation changes during visual stimulation at high temporal (100 ms) and spectral resolution (5 nm) using a whole spectrum approach (CCD-NIRS). (3) The spatial resolution of commercial systems is poor. In this study we used a 16 channel functional NIRS-imaging device to test the feasibility of mapping changes in cortical blood volume during visual stimulation (over primary and secondary areas). We show that (1) even conventional single site NIRS allows to identify secondary visual areas, (2) a CCD-NIRS system affords a high temporal (100 ms) and spectral (5 nm) resolution for the detection of changes in cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation during visual stimulation, (3) functional NIRS- imaging can localize focal blood volume changes over both primary and secondary cortical areas.

  12. 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Tetrafluoroborate Film as a Highly Selective Sensing Material for Non-Invasive Detection of Acetone Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Tao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breath acetone serves as a biomarker for diabetes. This article reports 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4], a type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, as a selective sensing material for acetone. The RTIL sensing layer was coated on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM for detection. The sensing mechanism is based on a decrease in viscosity and density of the [bmim][BF4] film due to the solubilization of acetone leading to a positive frequency shift in the QCM. Acetone was detected with a linear range from 7.05 to 750 ppmv. Sensitivity and limit of detection were found to be 3.49 Hz/ppmv and 5.0 ppmv, respectively. The [bmim][BF4]-modified QCM sensor demonstrated anti-interference ability to commonly found volatile organic compounds in breath, e.g., isoprene, 1,2-pentadiene, d-limonene, and dl-limonene. This technology is useful for applications in non-invasive early diabetic diagnosis.

  13. 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Tetrafluoroborate Film as a Highly Selective Sensing Material for Non-Invasive Detection of Acetone Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wenyan; Lin, Peng; Liu, Sili; Xie, Qingji; Ke, Shanming; Zeng, Xierong

    2017-01-01

    Breath acetone serves as a biomarker for diabetes. This article reports 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]), a type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), as a selective sensing material for acetone. The RTIL sensing layer was coated on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for detection. The sensing mechanism is based on a decrease in viscosity and density of the [bmim][BF4] film due to the solubilization of acetone leading to a positive frequency shift in the QCM. Acetone was detected with a linear range from 7.05 to 750 ppmv. Sensitivity and limit of detection were found to be 3.49 Hz/ppmv and 5.0 ppmv, respectively. The [bmim][BF4]-modified QCM sensor demonstrated anti-interference ability to commonly found volatile organic compounds in breath, e.g., isoprene, 1,2-pentadiene, d-limonene, and dl-limonene. This technology is useful for applications in non-invasive early diabetic diagnosis. PMID:28117697

  14. Recent developments in human biomonitoring: non-invasive assessment of target tissue dose and effects of pneumotoxic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, A.; Corradi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Tobacco smoke and polluted environments substantially increase the lung burden of pneumotoxic chemicals, particularly pneumotoxic metallic elements. To achieve a better understanding of the early events between exposure to inhaled toxicants and the onset of adverse effects on the lung, the characterization of dose at the target organ would be extremely useful. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC), obtained by cooling exhaled air under conditions of spontaneous breathing, is a novel technique that could provide a non-invasive assessment of pulmonary pathobiology. Considering that EBC is water practically free of interfering solutes, it represents an ideal biological matrix for elemental characterization. Published data show that several toxic metals and trace elements are detectable in EBC, raising the possibility of using this medium to quantify the lung tissue dose of pneumotoxic substances. This novel approach may represent a significant advance over the analysis of alternative media (blood, serum, urine, hair), which are not as reliable (owing to interfering substances in the complex matrix) and reflect systemic rather than lung (target tissue) levels of both toxic metals and essential trace elements. Data obtained among workers occupationally exposed to either hard metals or chromium (VI) and in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are reviewed to show that – together with biomarkers of exposure – EBC also allows the simultaneous quantification of biomarkers of effect directly sampled from the epithelial lining fluid, thus providing novel insights on both kinetic and dynamic aspects of metal toxicology. Riassunto «Recenti sviluppi nel biomonitoraggio umano: valutazione non invasiva della dose a livello dell’organo bersaglio e degli effetti pneumotossici». L’esposizione cronica a fumo di tabacco ed ad altri inquinati ambientali determina un accumulo polmonare di sostanze pneumotossiche, soprattutto metalli. Allo scopo

  15. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis: Development and Evaluation of Two Urine-Based Immunoassays for Detection of Leishmania donovani Infection in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejazi, Sarfaraz Ahmad; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Bakhteyar, Md. Asjad Karim; Mumtaz, Aquil Ahmad; Pandey, Krishna; Das, Vidya Nand Ravi; Das, Pradeep; Rahaman, Mehebubar; Goswami, Rama Prosad; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), a severe parasitic disease, could be fatal if diagnosis and treatment is delayed. Post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL), a skin related outcome, is a potential reservoir for the spread of VL. Diagnostic tests available for VL such as tissue aspiration are invasive and painful although they are capable of evaluating the treatment response. Serological tests although less invasive than tissue aspiration are incompetent to assess cure. Parasitological examination of slit-skin smear along with the clinical symptoms is routinely used for diagnosis of PKDL. Therefore, a noninvasive test with acceptable sensitivity and competency, additionally, to decide cure would be an asset in disease management and control. Methodology/principal findings We describe here, the development of antibody-capture ELISA and field adaptable dipstick test as noninvasive diagnostic tools for VL and PKDL and as a test of cure in VL treatment. Sensitivity and specificity of urine-ELISA were 97.94% (95/97) and 100% (75/75) respectively, for VL. Importantly, dipstick test demonstrated 100% sensitivity (97/97) and specificity (75/75) in VL diagnosis. Degree of agreement of the two methods with tissue aspiration was 98.83% (κ = 0.97) and 100% (κ = 1), for ELISA and dipstick test, respectively. Both the tests had 100% positivity for PKDL (14/14) cases. ELISA and dipstick test illustrated treatment efficacy in about 90% (16/18) VL cases when eventually turned negative after six months of treatment. Conclusions/significance ELISA and dipstick test found immensely effective for diagnosis of VL and PKDL through urine samples thus, may substitute the existing invasive diagnostics. Utility of these tests as indirect methods of monitoring parasite clearance can define infected versus cured. Urine-based dipstick test is simple, sensitive and above all noninvasive method that may help not only in active VL case detection but also to ascertain treatment response

  16. Survey on Human Motion Detection In Static Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Merin Kuriakose

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, computer vision has increasingly focused on building systems for observing humans and understanding their looks, activity, and behavior providing advanced interfaces for interacting with human beings, and creating models of humans for various purposes. For any of the system to function, it requires methods for detecting people from a given input video or a image. Visual analysis of human motion is presently one of the most active research topics in computer vision. Here the moving human body detection is the most important part of the human body motion analysis, thus the need of human body motion detection is to detect the moving human body from the background image in video sequences, and for the follow-up treatment like target classification, human motion tracking and behavior understanding and its effective detection plays an important role. Human motion analyses are concerned with the detection, tracking and recognition of human behaviors. According to the result of human motion detection research on video sequences, this paper presents a new algorithm for detecting human motion from a static background based on background subtraction.

  17. Noninvasive screening tools for Down syndrome: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Meagan Smith, Jeannie Visootsak Emory University, Department of Human Genetics, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Down syndrome is the leading cause of prenatal chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 53% of all reported chromosome conditions. Testing strategies, guidelines, and screening options have expanded from their conception in the 1970s, and now include such options as anatomical ultrasound, maternal serum screening, and noninvasive prenatal testing. This review summarizes all currently available noninvasive diagnostic techniques for the detection of Down syndrome. By understanding fully each technology and the possible alternatives, the physician will be able to provide their patients with all the information necessary to make an informed decision regarding their medical management. Keywords: Down syndrome, noninvasive screening, diagnostic techniques

  18. Human Body Image Edge Detection Based on Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 付小莉

    2003-01-01

    Human dresses are different in thousands way.Human body image signals have big noise, a poor light and shade contrast and a narrow range of gray gradation distribution. The application of a traditional grads method or gray method to detect human body image edges can't obtain satisfactory results because of false detections and missed detections. According to tte peculiarity of human body image, dyadic wavelet transform of cubic spline is successfully applied to detect the face and profile edges of human body image and Mallat algorithm is used in the wavelet decomposition in this paper.

  19. Non-invasive detection of somatic mutations using next-generation sequencing in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanilles, Maxime; Marguet, Florent; Bohers, Élodie; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Dubois, Sydney; Bertrand, Philippe; Camus, Vincent; Mareschal, Sylvain; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Lepretre, Stéphane; Veresezan, Elena-Liana; Derrey, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Laquerrière, Annie; Jardin, Fabrice

    2017-07-18

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) have recurrent genomic alterations. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate that targeted sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released by PCNSL at the time of diagnosis could identify somatic mutations by next-generation sequencing (NGS). PlasmacfDNA and matched tumor DNA (tDNA) from 25 PCNSL patients were sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (Life Technologies®). First, patient-specific targeted sequencing of identified somatic mutations in tDNA was performed. Then, a second sequencing targeting MYD88 c.T778C was performed and compared to plasma samples from 25 age-matched control patients suffering from other types of cancer. According to the patient-specific targeted sequencing, eight patients (32% [95% CI 15-54%]) had detectable somatic mutations in cfDNA. Considering MYD88 sequencing, six patients had the specific c.T778C alteration detected in plasma. Using a control group, the sensitivity was 24% [9-45%] and the specificity was 100%. Tumor volume or deep brain structure involvement did not influence the detection of somatic mutations in plasma. This pilot study provided evidence that somatic mutations can be detected by NGS in the cfDNA of a subset of patients suffering from PCNSL.

  20. Noninvasive Detection of Latent Fingerprints Using Ultraviolet Laser%紫外激光无损检测潜在指印技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红霞; 钮洁青; 黄云刚; 毛林杰; 陈敬蓉

    2011-01-01

    Detection of latent fingerprints is one of the key problems in the forensic science area, and ultraviolet (UV) photography technology is an important method of latent fingerprints noninvasive detection. The 266 nm UV solid state laser is used as the excitation light source. According to the special absorption, reflection, scattering and fluorescence characteristics of fingerprint ridge residuals to UV light, and by using reflection photography and fluorescence photography technologies, fresh and old latent fingerprints on the surface of four types of non-absorbent objects (magazine cover, glass, back of cellular phone, wood desktop paintwork), and two types of absorbing objects (manila envelope and notebook paper) are noninvasively detected and revealed. The results have identification value.%潜在指印的显现是物证检验技术中的关键问题之一,而紫外(UV)照相技术是显现潜在指印等隐性痕迹物证的重要技术手段.采用266 nm紫外固体激光器为激发光源,利用人体指印固有物质成分对紫外光具有特殊的吸收、反射、散射及荧光特性,减弱或消除指印背景上的图案和其他细节干扰,增加指印纹线与背景的亮度反差,显出或增强潜在指印.通过紫外反射照相及紫外固有荧光照相技术,分别实现了对彩色杂志纸张、玻璃、电话背面、木纹桌面油漆面4种非渗透性物证检材及牛皮纸信封、便签纸2种渗透性物证检材表面遗留的新鲜及陈旧潜在指印的无损检测显现,并具有鉴定价值.

  1. Ultrasonography as a non-invasive tool for detection of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in overweight/obese Egyptian children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Koofy, Nehal [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Karaksy, Hanaa, E-mail: hanaakaraksy@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Akel, Wafaa [Tropical Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Helmy, Heba; Anwar, Ghada; El-Sayed, Rokaya [Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University (Egypt); El-Hennawy, Ahmad [Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: Liver biopsy, although a gold standard in diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is an invasive and expensive tool. Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal ultrasound in detecting NAFLD among a group of overweight/obese children having one or more liver abnormality (clinical hepatomegaly, raised ALT or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound). Methods: Seventy-eight overweight/obese children were referred to the Pediatric Hepatology Unit, Cairo University Pediatric Hospital, Egypt, for assessment for hepatic abnormalities. Out of the 78 children, 34 had one or more abnormality in the form of clinical hepatomegaly, raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and/or echogenic liver parenchyma by ultrasound. All 34 cases underwent liver biopsy for evaluation for NAFLD. Results: Histological NAFLD was detected in 15 cases; 8 simple steatosis and 7 nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sonographic evaluation of hepatic parenchymal echogenicity revealed: 11 with grade 1 echogenicity, 12 with grade 2 and 9 with grade 3 while only 2 had normal liver echopattern. Ultrasonography was 100% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting histological NAFLD, while the positive predictive value (PPV) was 47% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 11%. After consolidating the included children into 2 groups: the first including normal and grade 1 echogenicity and the second including grades 2 and 3, the sensitivity of ultrasonography in detecting histological NAFLD was still 100%, while negative predictive value increased to 100% with an accuracy of 82%. Conclusion: We conclude that ultrasonography is an important non invasive tool in assessment for NAFLD. Normal or grade 1 hepatic echogenicity can soundly exclude histological NAFLD and obviates the need for liver biopsy.

  2. Earliest Detection of Oral Cancer Using Non-Invasive Brush Biopsy Including DNA-Image-Cytometry: Report on Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten W. Remmerbach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We describe four patients presenting early oral cancers, detected cytologically on non‐invasive brush biopsies including DNA‐image cytometry as an adjunctive method before histology on scalpel biopsies confirmed the evidence of malignancy. Methods: Brush biopsies were performed and smears thereof investigated cytologically. After Feulgen restaining, DNA‐measurements were performed using a DNA‐Image‐Cytometer. Case reports: Oral squamous cell carcinomas were diagnosed cytologically in macroscopically suspicious lesions and malignancy confirmed by DNA‐cytometry. The initially performed scalpel biopsies did neither supply evidence of oral cancer nor of severe dysplasia. After at least one to 15 months the occurrence of cancer was finally proven histologically on a second scalpel biopsy each (three microinvasive and one in situ carcinoma. Conclusion: Non‐invasive brush biopsies are a suitable instrument for early cytologic detection of cancer of the mouth. DNA‐image‐cytometry, as an adjunctive method, can be used to confirm the cytologic diagnosis or suspicion of cancer in patients with doubtful lesions (dysplasias. DNA‐aneuploidy is a marker for (prospective malignancy in smears of the oral cavity, which may detect malignancy months prior to histology. In future this method could be used as a mass screening tool in dentists practise. Colour figures can be viewed on http://www.esacp.org/acp/2003/25‐4/remmerbach.htm.

  3. Noninvasive brain stimulation to suppress craving in substance use disorders: review of human evidence and methodological considerations for future work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone-Blanchet, Antoine; Ciraulo, Domenic A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fecteau, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) can be viewed as a pathology of neuroadaptation. The pharmacological overstimulation of neural mechanisms of reward, motivated learning and memory leads to drug-seeking behavior. A critical characteristic of SUDs is the appearance of craving, the motivated desire and urge to use, which is a main focus of current pharmacological and behavioral therapies. Recent proof-of-concept studies have tested the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on craving. Although its mechanisms of action are not fully understood, this approach shows interesting potential in tuning down craving and possibly consumption of diverse substances. This article reviews available results on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in SUDs, specifically tobacco, alcohol and psychostimulant use disorders. We discuss several important factors that need to be addressed in future works to improve clinical assessment and effects of non-invasive brain stimulation in SUDs. Factors discussed include brain stimulation devices and parameters, study designs, brain states and subjects’ characteristics. PMID:26449761

  4. Anomalous human behavior detection: An Adaptive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, C. van; Halma, A.; Schutte, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous

  5. Anomalous human behavior detection: An Adaptive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, C. van; Halma, A.; Schutte, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous b

  6. Utility of the microculture method for Leishmania detection in non-invasive samples obtained from a blood bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sezen Canim; Bagirova, Malahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kocazeybek, Bekir; Kosan, Erdogan

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the role of donor blood has taken an important place in epidemiology of Leishmaniasis. According to the WHO, the numbers of patients considered as symptomatic are only 5-20% of individuals with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. In this study for detection of Leishmania infection in donor blood samples, 343 samples from the Capa Red Crescent Blood Center were obtained and primarily analyzed by microscopic and serological methods. Subsequently, the traditional culture (NNN), Immuno-chromatographic test (ICT) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were applied to 21 samples which of them were found positive with at least one method. Buffy coat (BC) samples from 343 blood donors were analyzed: 15 (4.3%) were positive by a microculture method (MCM); and 4 (1.1%) by smear. The sera of these 343 samples included 9 (2.6%) determined positive by ELISA and 7 (2%) positive by IFAT. Thus, 21 of (6.1%) the 343 subjects studied by smear, MCM, IFAT and ELISA techniques were identified as positive for leishmaniasis at least one of the techniques and the sensitivity assessed. According to our data, the sensitivity of the methods are identified as MCM (71%), smear (19%), IFAT (33%), ELISA (42%), NNN (4%), PCR (14%) and ICT (4%). Thus, with this study for the first time, the sensitivity of a MCM was examined in blood donors by comparing MCM with the methods used in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. As a result, MCM was found the most sensitive method for detection of Leishmania parasites in samples obtained from a blood bank. In addition, the presence of Leishmania parasites was detected in donor bloods in Istanbul, a non-endemic region of Turkey, and these results is a vital importance for the health of blood recipients.

  7. A noninvasive technique for real-time detection of bruises in apple surface based on machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Zhang, Leilei; Sasao, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Apple is one of the highly consumed fruit item in daily life. However, due to its high damage potential and massive influence on taste and export, the quality of apple has to be detected before it reaches the consumer's hand. This study was aimed to develop a hardware and software unit for real-time detection of apple bruises based on machine vision technology. The hardware unit consisted of a light shield installed two monochrome cameras at different angles, LED light source to illuminate the sample, and sensors at the entrance of box to signal the positioning of sample. Graphical Users Interface (GUI) was developed in VS2010 platform to control the overall hardware and display the image processing result. The hardware-software system was developed to acquire the images of 3 samples from each camera and display the image processing result in real time basis. An image processing algorithm was developed in Opencv and C++ platform. The software is able to control the hardware system to classify the apple into two grades based on presence/absence of surface bruises with the size of 5mm. The experimental result is promising and the system with further modification can be applicable for industrial production in near future.

  8. Correlations Between 48 Human Actions Improve Their Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouts, G.J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    Many human actions are correlated, because of compound and/or sequential actions, and similarity. Indeed, human actions are highly correlated in human annotations of 48 actions in the 4,774 videos from visint.org. We exploit such correlations to improve the detection of these 48 human actions, rangi

  9. Two-layer optical model of skin for early, non-invasive detection of wound development on the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Foot ulceration is a debilitating comorbidity of diabetes that may result in loss of mobility and amputation. Optical detection of cutaneous tissue changes due to inflammation and necrosis at the preulcer site could constitute a preventative strategy. A commercial hyperspectral oximetry system was used to measure tissue oxygenation on the feet of diabetic patients. A previously developed predictive index was used to differentiate preulcer tissue from surrounding healthy tissue with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 80%. To improve prediction accuracy, an optical skin model was developed treating skin as a two-layer medium and explicitly accounting for (i) melanin content and thickness of the epidermis, (ii) blood content and hemoglobin saturation of the dermis, and (iii) tissue scattering in both layers. Using this forward model, an iterative inverse method was used to determine the skin properties from hyperspectral images of preulcerative areas. The use of this information in lowering the false positive rate was discussed.

  10. Circulating MicroRNAs as Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Early Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena B Wozniak

    Full Text Available Detection of lung cancer at an early stage by sensitive screening tests could be an important strategy to improving prognosis. Our objective was to identify a panel of circulating microRNAs in plasma that will contribute to early detection of lung cancer.Plasma samples from 100 early stage (I to IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and 100 non-cancer controls were screened for 754 circulating microRNAs via qRT-PCR, using TaqMan MicroRNA Arrays. Logistic regression with a lasso penalty was used to select a panel of microRNAs that discriminate between cases and controls. Internal validation of model discrimination was conducted by calculating the bootstrap optimism-corrected AUC for the selected model.We identified a panel of 24 microRNAs with optimum classification performance. The combination of these 24 microRNAs alone could discriminate lung cancer cases from non-cancer controls with an AUC of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87-0.95. This classification improved to an AUC of 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97 following addition of sex, age and smoking status to the model. Internal validation of the model suggests that the discriminatory power of the panel will be high when applied to independent samples with a corrected AUC of 0.78 for the 24-miRNA panel alone.Our 24-microRNA predictor improves lung cancer prediction beyond that of known risk factors.

  11. Maintenance energy requirements of odor detection, explosive detection and human detection working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Rebecca A; Witzel, Angela L; Price, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Despite their important role in security, little is known about the energy requirements of working dogs such as odor, explosive and human detection dogs. Previous researchers have evaluated the energy requirements of individual canine breeds as well as dogs in exercise roles such as sprint racing. This study is the first to evaluate the energy requirements of working dogs trained in odor, explosive and human detection. This retrospective study evaluated twenty adult dogs who maintained consistent body weights over a six month period. During this time, the average energy consumption was [Formula: see text] or two times the calculated resting energy requirement ([Formula: see text]). No statistical differences were found between breeds, age or sex, but a statistically significant association (p = 0.0033, R-square = 0.0854) was seen between the number of searches a dog performs and their energy requirement. Based on this study's population, it appears that working dogs have maintenance energy requirements similar to the 1974 National Research Council's (NRC) maintenance energy requirement of [Formula: see text] (National Research Council (NRC), 1974) and the [Formula: see text] reported for young laboratory beagles (Rainbird & Kienzle, 1990). Additional research is needed to determine if these data can be applied to all odor, explosive and human detection dogs and to determine if other types of working dogs (tracking, search and rescue etc.) have similar energy requirements.

  12. Establishment of rules for interpreting ultraviolet autofluorescence microscopy images for noninvasive detection of Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bevin; Urayama, Shiro; Saroufeem, Ramez M. G.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Demos, Stavros G.

    2012-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of autofluorescence (AF) microscopy under ultraviolet (UV) excitation is explored using ex vivo human specimens. The aim is to establish optical patterns (the rules for interpretation) that correspond to normal and abnormal histologies of the esophagus, spanning from early benign modifications (Barrett's esophagus) to subsequent dysplastic change and progression toward carcinoma. This was achieved by developing an image library categorized by disease progression. We considered morphological changes of disease as they are compared with histological diagnosis of the pathological specimen, as well as control samples of normal esophagus, proximal stomach, and small intestine tissue. Our experimental results indicate that UV AF microscopy could provide real-time histological information for visualizing changes in tissue microstructure that are currently undetectable using conventional endoscopic methods.

  13. The Double Sensor-A non-invasive device to continuously monitor core temperature in humans on earth and in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunga, H-C; Werner, A; Stahn, A; Steinach, M; Schlabs, T; Koralewski, E; Kunz, D; Belavý, D L; Felsenberg, D; Sattler, F; Koch, J

    2009-10-01

    The objective of our study was to establish whether rectal temperature recordings in humans could be replaced by a non-invasive skin temperature sensor combined with a heat flux sensor (Double Sensor) located at the forehead to monitor core body temperature changes due to circadian rhythms. Rectal and Double Sensor data were collected continuously for 24h in seven men undertaking strict head-down tilt bed-rest. Individual differences between the two techniques varied between -0.72 and +0.55 degrees C. Nonetheless, when temperature data were approximated by cosinor analysis in order to compare circadian rhythm profiles between methods, it was observed that there were no significant differences between mesor, amplitude, and acrophase (P>0.310). It was therefore concluded that the Double Sensor technology is presently not accurate enough for performing single individual core body temperature measurements under resting conditions at normal ambient room temperature. Yet, it seems to be a valid, non-invasive alternative for monitoring circadian rhythm profiles.

  14. Noninvasive and real-time monitoring of molecular targeting therapy for lymph node and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colorectal cancer cells tagged with GFP and DsRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hayao; Hara, Masayasu; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-02-01

    We have developed an in vivo imaging system consisting of GFP- and DsRed-tagged human colonic cancer cell line, which has peritoneal and lymph node metastatic potential and show high sensitivity to EGFR targeting drugs, and convenient detection devices for GFP and DsRed. The latter includes a small handy fluorescence detection device for external monitoring of the therapeutic effect of the drug and a convenient stereo fluorescent microscope for internal visualization of micrometastases. We applied this imaging system to investigate anti-metastatic effects of EGFR targeting drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa). This system allowed sensitive detection of the development of peritoneal and lymph node metastases from the micrometastasis stage at the cellular level and also permited noninvasive, non-anesthetic monitoring of anti-metastatic effect of the drug in an animal facility without any pretreatment. Significant decreases in the intraabdominal metastatic tumor growth and prevention of inguinal lymph node metastasis by gefitinib treatment could be clearly monitored. These results suggest that convenient, low-cost, true real-time monitoring of therapeutic effect using such a fluorescence-mediated whole body imaging system seems to enhance the speed of preclinical study for novel anti-cancer agents and will allow us to understand the action mechanism of molecular targeting drugs.

  15. Laser Raman detection of platelet as a non-invasive approach for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P.; Tian, Q.; Baek, S. J.; Shang, X. L.; Park, A.; Liu, Z. C.; Yao, X. Q.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, X. H.; Cheng, Y.; Peng, J.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a problem that puzzled many doctors. Reliable markers in easy-assembling samples are of considerable clinical diagnostic value. In this work, laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) was developed a new method that potentially allows early and differential diagnosis of AD from the platelet sample. Raman spectra of platelets isolated from different ages of AD transgenic mice and non-transgenic controls were collected and analyzed. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) classification method was used to classify spectra and establish the diagnostic models. For differential diagnosis, spectra of platelets isolated from AD, Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD) mice were also discriminated. Two notable spectral differences at 740 and 1654 cm-1 were revealed in the mean spectrum of platelets isolated from AD transgenic mice and the controls. MLP displayed a powerful ability in the classifying of early, advanced AD and the control group, and in differential diagnosis of PD and advanced AD, as well as VD and advanced AD. The results suggest that platelet detecting by LRS coupled with MLP analysis appears to be an easy and accurate method for early and differential diagnosis of AD. This technique could be rapidly promoted from laboratory to the hospital.

  16. Non-invasive determination of glucose directly in raw fruits using a continuous flow system based on microdialysis sampling and amperometric detection at an integrated enzymatic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, E; Ruiz, M A; Campuzano, S; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2016-03-31

    A non-destructive, rapid and simple to use sensing method for direct determination of glucose in non-processed fruits is described. The strategy involved on-line microdialysis sampling coupled with a continuous flow system with amperometric detection at an enzymatic biosensor. Apart from direct determination of glucose in fruit juices and blended fruits, this work describes for the first time the successful application of an enzymatic biosensor-based electrochemical approach to the non-invasive determination of glucose in raw fruits. The methodology correlates, through previous calibration set-up, the amperometric signal generated from glucose in non-processed fruits with its content in % (w/w). The comparison of the obtained results using the proposed approach in different fruits with those provided by other method involving the same commercial biosensor as amperometric detector in stirred solutions pointed out that there were no significant differences. Moreover, in comparison with other available methodologies, this microdialysis-coupled continuous flow system amperometric biosensor-based procedure features straightforward sample preparation, low cost, reduced assay time (sampling rate of 7 h(-1)) and ease of automation.

  17. Detection of Multiple Stationary Humans Using UWB MIMO Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulai Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been achieved in the detection of single stationary human. However, restricted by the mutual interference of multiple humans (e.g., strong sidelobes of the torsos and the shadow effect, detection and localization of the multiple stationary humans remains a huge challenge. In this paper, ultra-wideband (UWB multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO radar is exploited to improve the detection performance of multiple stationary humans for its multiple sight angles and high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capacity. A signal model of the vital sign considering both bi-static angles and attitude angle of the human body is firstly developed, and then a novel detection method is proposed to detect and localize multiple stationary humans. In this method, preprocessing is firstly implemented to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the vital signs, and then a vital-sign-enhanced imaging algorithm is presented to suppress the environmental clutters and mutual affection of multiple humans. Finally, an automatic detection algorithm including constant false alarm rate (CFAR, morphological filtering and clustering is implemented to improve the detection performance of weak human targets affected by heavy clutters and shadow effect. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can get a high-quality image of multiple humans and we can use it to discriminate and localize multiple adjacent human targets behind brick walls.

  18. Hyperspectral hybrid method classification for detecting altered mucosa of the human larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ron

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of earth observation, hyperspectral detector systems allow precise target detections of surface components from remote sensing platforms. This enables specific land covers to be identified without the need to physically travel to the areas examined. In the medical field, efforts are underway to develop optical technologies that detect altering tissue surfaces without the necessity to perform an excisional biopsy. With the establishment of expedient classification procedures, hyperspectral imaging may provide a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows determination of pathological tissue with high reliability. In this study, we examined the performance of a hyperspectral hybrid method classification for the automatic detection of altered mucosa of the human larynx. Materials and methods Hyperspectral Imaging was performed in vivo and 30 bands from 390 to 680 nm for 5 cases of laryngeal disorders (2x hemorrhagic polyp, 3x leukoplakia were obtained. Image stacks were processed with unsupervised clustering (linear spectral unmixing, spectral signatures were extracted from unlabeled cluster maps and subsequently applied as end-members for supervised classification (spectral angle mapper of further medical cases with identical diagnosis. Results Linear spectral unmixing clearly highlighted altered mucosa as single spectral clusters in all cases. Matching classes were identified, and extracted spectral signatures could readily be applied for supervised classifications. Automatic target detection performed well, as the considered classes showed notable correspondence with pathological tissue locations. Conclusions Using hyperspectral classification procedures derived from remote sensing applications for diagnostic purposes can create concrete benefits for the medical field. The approach shows that it would be rewarding to collect spectral signatures from histologically different lesions of laryngeal disorders in

  19. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemiological analysis of infection clusters in human households is of key importance. Infection clusters may arise from transmission events from (i the animal reservoir, (ii humans who were infected by animals (primary human-to-human transmission, or (iii humans who were infected by humans (secondary human-to-human transmission. Here we propose a method of analysing household infection data to detect changes in the transmissibility of avian influenza viruses in humans at an early stage. The method is applied to an outbreak of H7N7 avian influenza virus in The Netherlands that was the cause of more than 30 human-to-human transmission events. The analyses indicate that secondary human-to-human transmission is plausible for the Dutch household infection data. Based on the estimates of the within-household transmission parameters, we evaluate the effectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, and conclude that it is unlikely that all household infections can be prevented with current antiviral drugs. We discuss the applicability of our method for the detection of emerging human-to-human transmission of avian influenza viruses in particular, and for the analysis of within-household infection data in general.

  20. Noninvasive near-infrared live imaging of human adult mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossolasco P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available P Bossolasco1,*, L Cova2,*, G Levandis3, V Diana2, S Cerri3, G Lambertenghi Deliliers1, E Polli1, V Silani2,4, F Blandini3, MT Armentero31Fondazione Matarelli, Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Chemioterapia e Tossicologia Medica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Neurology and Laboratory of Neuroscience-IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Cusano Milanino, 3Laboratory of Functional Neurochemistry, Interdepartmental Research Centre for Parkinson’s Disease, IRCCS National Institute of Neurology “C Mondino”, Pavia, 4Department of Neurology and Laboratory of Neuroscience, Centro “Dino Ferrari” Università degli Studi di Milano-IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: We have previously shown that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can reduce toxin-induced neurodegeneration in a well characterized rodent model of Parkinson’s disease. However, the precise mechanisms, optimal cell concentration required for neuroprotection, and detailed cell tracking need to be defined. We exploited a near-infrared imaging platform to perform noninvasive tracing following transplantation of tagged hMSCs in live parkinsonian rats.Methods: hMSCs were labeled both with a membrane intercalating dye, emitting in the near-infrared 815 nm spectrum, and the nuclear counterstain, Hoechst 33258. Effects of near-infrared dye on cell metabolism and proliferation were extensively evaluated in vitro. Tagged hMSCs were then administered to parkinsonian rats bearing a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway, via two alternative routes, ie, intrastriatal or intranasal, and the cells were tracked in vivo and ex vivo using near-infrared technology.Results: In vitro, NIR815 staining was stable in long-term hMSC cultures and did not interfere with cell metabolism or proliferation. A significant near-infrared signal was detectable in vivo, confined around the injection

  1. Direct analysis of carbohydrates in animal plasma by ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and pulsed amperometric detection for use as a non-invasive diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik, Darja; Smidovnik, Andrej; Jazbec-Križman, Petra; Križman, Mitja; Prošek, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    The present paper demonstrates that electrochemical detection (ECD) coupled to ion chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ECD-ESI/MS/MS) can be used to rapidly estimate some indications of the health status of organisms. The lactulose to mannitol ratio (L/M) is used as a non-invasive assay to investigate small intestinal absorption pathways and mucosal integrity. In the present study, an evaluation of the negative effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam perorally administrated to a group of dogs was carried out by determining the lactulose/mannitol index using the IC-ECD-ESI/MS/MS hyphenated technique. According to the results of the study, meloxicam altered gastrointestinal permeability. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) was tested to determine if it could prevent meloxicam induced gastrointestinal damage and it was found that CoQ(10) could be an effective preventive treatment. Furthermore, plasma glucose concentration level was determined to be an indirect indicator of the oxidative state in the blood. To find out the beneficial effects of a double antioxidant combination (α-lipoic acid (ALA) and CoQ(10)) on the total glucose level in chickens, ALA and CoQ(10) were provided as food additives in factory farm raised chicken. The results of the pilot study indicate that the glucose level in the plasma of chickens group fed with CoQ(10) and ALA was significantly decreased compared to the control group. Ion chromatography (IC) utilizing pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) was compared to ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as an analytical tool for monitoring the carbohydrate level in biological fluids. In electrochemical detection, the newly developed two-pulse waveform successfully withstands matrix effects in biological samples. Continuous on-line desalting of the high salt concentrations used as the eluent for carbohydrate separation from the anion-exchange column allows coupling of IC and MS

  2. Noninvasive label-free monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in human skin using nonlinear optical microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, nonlinear optical microscopy has seen a dramatic rise in its use in research settings due to its noninvasiveness, enhanced penetration depth, intrinsic optical sectioning, and the ability to probe chemical compounds with molecular specificity without exogenous contrast agents. Nonlinear optical techniques including two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), second harmonic generation (SHG), coherent anti-Stokes and stimulated Raman scattering (CARS and SRS, respectively), as well as transient and sum frequency absorption (TA and SFA, respectively), have been widely used to explore the physiology and microanatomy of skin. Recently, these modalities have shed light on dermal processes that could not have otherwise been observed, including the spatiotemporal monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. However, a challenge quickly arises when studying such chemicals in a dermatological context: many exogenous compounds have optical signatures that can interfere with the signals that would otherwise be acquired from intact skin. For example, oily solvents exhibit strong signals when probing CH2 vibrations with CARS/SRS; chemical sun filters appear bright in 2PEF microscopy; and darkly colored compounds readily absorb light across a broad spectrum, producing strong TA/SFA signals. Thus, this discussion will first focus on the molecular contrast in skin that can be probed using the aforementioned nonlinear optical techniques. This will be followed by an overview of strategies that take advantage of the exogenous compounds' optical signatures to probe spatiotemporal dynamics while preserving endogenous information from skin.

  3. The role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging as a noninvasive surveillance method of human heart transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nardo, D.; Scibilia, G.; Macchiarelli, A.G.; Cassisi, A.; Tonelli, E.; Papalia, U.; Gallo, P.; Antolini, M.; Pitucco, G.; Reale, A. (Universita degli Studi di Roma I La Sapienza Policlinico Umberto I (Italy))

    1989-09-01

    The identification of rejection after heart transplantation in patients receiving cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy requires the endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive method associated with a finite morbidity. To evaluate the role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) scintigraphy as a noninvasive surveillance method of heart transplant rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111 was administered intravenously in 30 scintigraphic studies to 10 consecutive heart transplant recipients. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained 72 hours after each scintigraphic study. Nineteen scintigraphic studies had negative findings; no false negative finding was obtained. Eleven antimyosin scintigraphic studies had positive findings, and in these studies endomyocardial biopsy revealed mild rejection in two cases, moderate acute rejection with myocyte necrosis in two cases, myocyte necrosis as a consequence of ischemic injury in six cases, and possibly cytotoxic damage in one case. Antimyosin scintigraphy may represent a reliable screening method for the surveillance of heart transplant patients. In the presence of a negative finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, it may be possible to avoid endomyocardial biopsy. Conversely, in patients who have a positive finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, the endomyocardial biopsy is mandatory to establish the definitive diagnosis by histologic examination of the myocardium.

  4. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection...

  5. Maintenance energy requirements of odor detection, explosive detection and human detection working dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Mullis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite their important role in security, little is known about the energy requirements of working dogs such as odor, explosive and human detection dogs. Previous researchers have evaluated the energy requirements of individual canine breeds as well as dogs in exercise roles such as sprint racing. This study is the first to evaluate the energy requirements of working dogs trained in odor, explosive and human detection. This retrospective study evaluated twenty adult dogs who maintained consistent body weights over a six month period. During this time, the average energy consumption was $136\\pm 38~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$136±38kcal⋅BWkg0.75 or two times the calculated resting energy requirement ($\\mathrm{RER}=70~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$RER=70kcal⋅BWkg0.75. No statistical differences were found between breeds, age or sex, but a statistically significant association (p = 0.0033, R-square = 0.0854 was seen between the number of searches a dog performs and their energy requirement. Based on this study’s population, it appears that working dogs have maintenance energy requirements similar to the 1974 National Research Council’s (NRC maintenance energy requirement of $132~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$132kcal⋅BWkg0.75 (National Research Council (NRC, 1974 and the $139\\pm 42~\\mathrm{kcal}\\cdot {\\mathrm{BW}}_{\\mathrm{kg}}^{0.75}$139±42kcal⋅BWkg0.75 reported for young laboratory beagles (Rainbird & Kienzle, 1990. Additional research is needed to determine if these data can be applied to all odor, explosive and human detection dogs and to determine if other types of working dogs (tracking, search and rescue etc. have similar energy requirements.

  6. Statistical Anomaly Detection for Monitoring of Human Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of human dynamics has drawn attention to various areas. Due to the wide spread of positioning technologies that use GPS or public Wi-Fi, location information can be obtained with high spatial-temporal resolution as well as at low cost. By collecting set of individual location information in real time, monitoring of human dynamics is recently considered possible and is expected to lead to dynamic traffic control in the future. Although this monitoring focuses on detecting anomalous states of human dynamics, anomaly detection methods are developed ad hoc and not fully systematized. This research aims to define an anomaly detection problem of the human dynamics monitoring with gridded population data and develop an anomaly detection method based on the definition. According to the result of a review we have comprehensively conducted, we discussed the characteristics of the anomaly detection of human dynamics monitoring and categorized our problem to a semi-supervised anomaly detection problem that detects contextual anomalies behind time-series data. We developed an anomaly detection method based on a sticky HDP-HMM, which is able to estimate the number of hidden states according to input data. Results of the experiment with synthetic data showed that our proposed method has good fundamental performance with respect to the detection rate. Through the experiment with real gridded population data, an anomaly was detected when and where an actual social event had occurred.

  7. Reorganizing the intrinsic functional architecture of the human primary motor cortex during rest with non-invasive cortical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Polanía

    Full Text Available The primary motor cortex (M1 is the main effector structure implicated in the generation of voluntary movements and is directly involved in motor learning. The intrinsic horizontal neuronal connections of M1 exhibit short-term and long-term plasticity, which is a strong substrate for learning-related map reorganization. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied for few minutes over M1 has been shown to induce relatively long-lasting plastic alterations and to modulate motor performance. Here we test the hypothesis that the relatively long-lasting synaptic modification induced by tDCS over M1 results in the alteration of associations among populations of M1 neurons which may be reflected in changes of its functional architecture. fMRI resting-state datasets were acquired immediately before and after 10 minutes of tDCS during rest, with the anode/cathode placed over the left M1. For each functional dataset, grey-matter voxels belonging to Brodmann area 4 (BA4 were labelled and afterwards BA4 voxel-based synchronization matrices were calculated and thresholded to construct undirected graphs. Nodal network parameters which characterize the architecture of functional networks (connectivity degree, clustering coefficient and characteristic path-length were computed, transformed to volume maps and compared before and after stimulation. At the dorsolateral-BA4 region cathodal tDCS boosted local connectedness, while anodal-tDCS enhanced long distance functional communication within M1. Additionally, the more efficient the functional architecture of M1 was at baseline, the more efficient the tDCS-induced functional modulations were. In summary, we show here that it is possible to non-invasively reorganize the intrinsic functional architecture of M1, and to image such alterations.

  8. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: diagnostic accuracy of a non-invasive screening technique for early detection of malignant changes in the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, J L; Nisha, G U; Manju, S; Philip, E K; Jeemon, P; Baiju, K V; Beena, V T

    2011-01-01

    Background Strong proof-of-principle for utilisation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, a non-invasive tool for early detection of malignant changes, has emerged recently. The potential of this technique in distinguishing normal tissue from hyperplastic and dysplastic tissues was explored. Methods Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra in the 400–700 nm region were obtained from the buccal mucosa of 96 patients and 34 healthy volunteers. The DR spectral data were compared against the gold standard biopsy and histopathology results. A principal-component analysis was performed for dimensional reduction in the normalised spectral data with linear discriminant analysis as the classifying technique. The receiver operator characteristic curve technique was employed for evaluating the performance of the diagnostic test. Results DR spectral features for different lesions, such as normal/healthy, hyperplastic, dysplastic and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), varied significantly according to the intensity of oxygenated haemoglobin absorption. While the classification based on discriminant scores provided an overall sensitivity of 98.5% and specificity of 96.0% for distinguishing SCC from dysplasia, they were 100.0% and 95.0%, respectively, for distinguishing dysplasia from hyperplasia. Similarly, the analysis yielded a sensitivity of 95.0% and specificity of 100.0% for distinguishing hyperplasia from healthy tissue. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.98 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.00) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.00) for distinguishing dysplasia from SCC and hyperplasia from dysplasia, respectively. Conclusion DR spectral data efficiently discriminate healthy tissue from oral malignant lesions. Diagnostic accuracies obtained in this study highlight the potential use of this method for routine clinical practice. PMID:22021749

  9. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ping Xu

    Full Text Available The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure.Artificial DNA mixture samples (360, with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction.A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B.A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability.

  10. Multilevel depth and image fusion for human activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bingbing; Pei, Yong; Moulin, Pierre; Yan, Shuicheng

    2013-10-01

    Recognizing complex human activities usually requires the detection and modeling of individual visual features and the interactions between them. Current methods only rely on the visual features extracted from 2-D images, and therefore often lead to unreliable salient visual feature detection and inaccurate modeling of the interaction context between individual features. In this paper, we show that these problems can be addressed by combining data from a conventional camera and a depth sensor (e.g., Microsoft Kinect). We propose a novel complex activity recognition and localization framework that effectively fuses information from both grayscale and depth image channels at multiple levels of the video processing pipeline. In the individual visual feature detection level, depth-based filters are applied to the detected human/object rectangles to remove false detections. In the next level of interaction modeling, 3-D spatial and temporal contexts among human subjects or objects are extracted by integrating information from both grayscale and depth images. Depth information is also utilized to distinguish different types of indoor scenes. Finally, a latent structural model is developed to integrate the information from multiple levels of video processing for an activity detection. Extensive experiments on two activity recognition benchmarks (one with depth information) and a challenging grayscale + depth human activity database that contains complex interactions between human-human, human-object, and human-surroundings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed multilevel grayscale + depth fusion scheme. Higher recognition and localization accuracies are obtained relative to the previous methods.

  11. Detection of Unauthorized Human Entity in Surveillance Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Radha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available With the ever growing need for video surveillance in various fields, it has become very important to automate the entire process in order to save time, cost and achieve accuracy. In this paper we propose a novel and rapid approach to detect unauthorized human entity for the video surveillance system. The approach is based on bottom-up visual attention model using extended Itti Koch saliency model. Our approach includes three modules- Key frame extraction module, Visual attention model module, Human detection module. This approach permits detection and separation of the unauthorized human entity with higher accuracy than the existing Itti Koch saliency model.

  12. [Evaluation of heart impact in the 100 m extreme intensity sport using near-infrared non-invasive muscle oxygen detecting device and sports heart rate detection technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Yong; Long, Fei-Xiao; Fu, Lan-Ying; Li, Yue; Ding, Hai-Shu; Qu, An-Lian; Zhou, Xiao-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Using continuous two wavelength near-infrared technology to detect the variation in the consistency of oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle and the sports heart rate wireless real time collection technology, we devised the real time muscle tissue oxygenation and instantaneous heart rate experiment scheme and implemented it for the process of the 100 m run with two parameters given simultaneously. The experiment shows that the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle tissue continues decreasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin attains the minimum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (6.65 +/- 1.10) sec; while the heart rate continues increasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the heart rate attains the maximum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (8.00 +/- 1.57) sec. The results show that the two wavelength near-infrared tissue oxygenation detection technology and the sports heart rate real time collection equipment can accurately measure the sports tissue oxygenation and the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport, and reveal the process of muscle oxygen transportation and consumption and its dynamic character with the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport.

  13. Raman detection of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2000-04-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel, non- invasive, in-vivo optical technique to measure the concentration of carotenoid pigment in the human retina. Using argon laser excitation we are able to measure two strong carotenoid resonance Raman signals at 1159 and 1525 wave numbers, respectively. The required laser power levels are within the limits given by safety standards for ocular exposure. Of the approximately ten carotenoid pigment found in normal human serum, the species lutein and zeaxanthin are concentrated in high amounts in the cells of the human macula, which is an approximately 5 mm diameter area of the retina in which the visual acuity is highest. These carotenoids give the macula a characteristic yellow coloration, and it is speculated that these molecules function as filter to attenuate photochemical damage and/or image degradation under bright UV/blue light exposures. In addition, they are thought to act as free-radical scavenging antioxidants. Studies have shown that there may be a link between macular degenerative diseases, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the US, and the presence or absence of the carotenoids. We describe an instrument capable of measuring the macular carotenoids in human subjects in a non-invasive, rapid and quantitative way.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Detection of human telomerase reverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    carcinomas and 3 cases were squamous cell carcinoma) with bladder cancer and 22 non cancer ... Conclusion: In this pilot study, detection of hTERT expression in urine has shown to be a ..... narinib G, Sellib C, Orlando C. New insights in ...

  15. Detection and identification of human targets in radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Sevgi Z.; Melvin, William L.; Williams, Douglas B.

    2007-04-01

    Radar offers unique advantages over other sensors, such as visual or seismic sensors, for human target detection. Many situations, especially military applications, prevent the placement of video cameras or implantment seismic sensors in the area being observed, because of security or other threats. However, radar can operate far away from potential targets, and functions during daytime as well as nighttime, in virtually all weather conditions. In this paper, we examine the problem of human target detection and identification using single-channel, airborne, synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Human targets are differentiated from other detected slow-moving targets by analyzing the spectrogram of each potential target. Human spectrograms are unique, and can be used not just to identify targets as human, but also to determine features about the human target being observed, such as size, gender, action, and speed. A 12-point human model, together with kinematic equations of motion for each body part, is used to calculate the expected target return and spectrogram. A MATLAB simulation environment is developed including ground clutter, human and non-human targets for the testing of spectrogram-based detection and identification algorithms. Simulations show that spectrograms have some ability to detect and identify human targets in low noise. An example gender discrimination system correctly detected 83.97% of males and 91.11% of females. The problems and limitations of spectrogram-based methods in high clutter environments are discussed. The SNR loss inherent to spectrogram-based methods is quantified. An alternate detection and identification method that will be used as a basis for future work is proposed.

  16. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang WANG; Jun ZHAO; Jin ZENG; Kai-jie WU; Yu-le CHEN; Xin-ya ng WANG; Luke S CHANG; Da-lin HE

    2011-01-01

    Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detectbladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively.The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair.Methods:Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed,which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family.Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637,253J and T24,as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined.Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.For assays using dual FRET MBs,the excitation wavelength was 488 nm,and the emission detection wavelengths were 520+20 nm and 560+20 nm,respectively.Results:The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals.In contrast,no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs.Conclusion:The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer.

  17. Semantic aspects of novelty detection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklinger, A; Opitz, B; Friederici, A D

    1997-10-10

    The ability to detect unusual and novel events is an important prerequisite for storage of information in memory. Non-tonal novel sounds that deviate from an ongoing auditory environment elicit a positive event-related potential (ERP) component, the so-called novel P3. Though there is converging evidence on the neuronal network engaged in novelty detection, little attention has been paid to the properties of novel sounds, such as their typicality or relationship to mental concepts. Here we report the ERPs evoked by two types of generically novel stimuli, namely identifiable (meaningful) and non-identifiable (non-meaningful) novel sounds. The ERP analysis revealed a novel P3 for both types of sounds. However, when subjects actively attended to the stimuli only identifiable novel sounds evoked a right-lateralized negativity (N4) that peaked shortly after the novel P3. We conclude that novelty detection not only includes the registration of deviancy but also fast access and identification of related semantic concepts.

  18. Middle ear influence on otoacoustic emissions. I : Noninvasive investigation of the human transmission apparatus and comparison with model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avan, P; Buki, B; Maat, B; Dordain, M; Wit, HP

    2000-01-01

    Evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOAEs) are generated within the cochlea in response to external sounds, and they can be acoustically detected in the external auditory meatus after backward propagation through the middle ear. In addition to being used to probe the cochlear mechanisms, they are expected

  19. Noninvasive spectroscopic diagnosis of superficial ocular lesions and corneal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.; Shimada, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gritz, D.C.; Storey-Held, K. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    1994-02-01

    The potential of a rapid noninvasive diagnostic system to detect tissue abnormalities on the surface of the eye has been investigated. The optical scatter signal from lesions and normal areas on the conjunctival sclera of the human eye were measured in vivo. It is possible to distinguish nonpigmented pingueculas from other lesions. The ability of the system to detect malignancies could not be tested because none of the measured and biopsied lesions were malignant. Optical scatter and fluorescence spectra of bacterial and fungal suspensions, and corneal irritations were also collected. Both scattering and fluorescence show potential for diagnosing corneal infections.

  20. Urine antigen detection for the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Yesenia; Rodriguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Brandt, Jef; Van Hul, Anke; Silva, Maria; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Portocarrero, Mylagritos; Melendez, D Paolo; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of seizures and epilepsy. Diagnosis is based on brain imaging, supported by immunodiagnosis in serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Lumbar puncture is invasive and painful. Blood sampling is slightly painful and poorly accepted. Urine antigen detection has been used for other parasites and tried in NCC with suboptimal performance. We used a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to detect Taenia solium antigens in urine from 87 Peruvian neurocysticercosis patients (viable cysts, N = 34; subarachnoid cysticercosis, N = 10; degenerating parasites, N = 7; calcified lesions, N = 36) and 32 volunteers from a non-endemic area of Peru. Overall sensitivity of urine antigen detection for viable parasites was 92%, which decreased to 62.5% in patients with a single cyst. Most patients (30/36, 83%) with only calcified cysticercosis were urine antigen negative. Antigen levels in paired serum/urine samples (evaluated in 19 patients) were strongly correlated. Non-invasive urine testing for T. solium antigens provides a useful alternative for NCC diagnosis.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of sympathetic vasoconstriction in human and rodent skeletal muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy and Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Paul J; Keller, David M; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Raven, Peter B; Thomas, Gail D

    2004-04-01

    The precise role of the sympathetic nervous system in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise has been challenging to define in humans, partly because of the limited techniques available for measuring blood flow in active muscle. Recent studies using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to measure changes in tissue oxygenation have provided an alternative method to evaluate vasomotor responses in exercising muscle, but this approach has not been fully validated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sympathetic activation would evoke parallel changes in tissue oxygenation and blood flow in resting and exercising muscle. We simultaneously measured tissue oxygenation with NIR spectroscopy and blood flow with Doppler ultrasound in skeletal muscle of conscious humans (n = 13) and anesthetized rats (n = 9). In resting forearm of humans, reflex activation of sympathetic nerves with the use of lower body negative pressure produced graded decreases in tissue oxygenation and blood flow that were highly correlated (r = 0.80, P blood flow velocity that were highly correlated (r = 0.93, P blood flow evoked by sympathetic activation were significantly attenuated (P < 0.05 vs. rest) but remained highly correlated in both humans (r = 0.80, P < 0.006) and rats (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001). These data indicate that, during steady-state metabolic conditions, changes in tissue oxygenation can be used to reliably assess sympathetic vasoconstriction in both resting and exercising skeletal muscle.

  2. Detection of glucose in the human brain with (1) H MRS at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lana G; Hirokazu, Kawaguchi; Fukunaga, Masaki; B Matson, Gerald

    2016-12-01

    A new method is proposed for noninvasive detection of glucose in vivo using proton MR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla. The proposed method utilizes J-difference editing to uncover the resonance of beta-glucose (β-glc) at 3.23 ppm, which is strongly overlapped with choline. Calculations using the density matrix formalism are used to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the β-glc resonance at 3.23 ppm. The calculations are verified using phantom and in vivo data collected at 7 Tesla. The proposed method allows observation of the glucose signal at 3.23 ppm in the human brain spectrum. Additional co-edited resonances of N-acetylaspartylglutamatate and glutathione are also detected in the same experiment. The proposed method does not require carbon ((13) C)- labeled glucose injections and (13) C hardware; as such, it has a potential to provide valuable information on intrinsic glucose concentration in the human brain in vivo. Magn Reson Med 76:1653-1660, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Recommendations for multimodal noninvasive and invasive screening for detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: a position statement of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivadinov, Robert; Bastianello, Stefano; Dake, Michael D; Ferral, Hector; Haacke, E Mark; Haskal, Ziv J; Hubbard, David; Liasis, Nikolaos; Mandato, Kenneth; Sclafani, Salvatore; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Simka, Marian; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Under the auspices of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease (ISNVD), four expert panel committees were created from the ISNVD membership between 2011 and 2012 to determine and standardize noninvasive and invasive imaging protocols for detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). The committees created working groups on color Doppler ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, catheter venography (CV), and intravascular US. Each group organized a workshop focused on its assigned imaging modality. Non-ISNVD members from other societies were invited to contribute to the various workshops. More than 60 neurology, radiology, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology experts participated in these workshops and contributed to the development of standardized noninvasive and invasive imaging protocols for the detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of CCSVI. This ISNVD position statement presents the MR imaging and intravascular US protocols for the first time and describes refined color Doppler US and CV protocols. It also emphasizes the need for the use of for noninvasive and invasive multimodal imaging to diagnose adequately and monitor extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of CCSVI for open-label or double-blinded, randomized, controlled studies.

  4. BiSpectral Index (BIS monitoring may detect critical hypotension before automated non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP measurement during general anaesthesia; a case report. [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2oi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient undergoing general anaesthesia for neurosurgery exhibited an unexpected sudden decrease in the BiSpectral Index (BIS value to near-zero. This prompted the detection of profound hypotension using non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP measurement and expedited urgent assessment and treatment, with the patient making a full recovery. Widely regarded as a ‘depth of anaesthesia’ monitor, this case demonstrates the potential extra clinical benefit BIS may have in the detection of critical incidents such as anaphylaxis during general anaesthesia.

  5. Assessment of disease activity in muscular dystrophies by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Katie K; Lim, Leland; Speedy, Sedona; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a class of disorders that cause progressive muscle wasting. A major hurdle for discovering treatments for the muscular dystrophies is a lack of reliable assays to monitor disease progression in animal models. We have developed a novel mouse model to assess disease activity noninvasively in mice with muscular dystrophies. These mice express an inducible luciferase reporter gene in muscle stem cells. In dystrophic mice, muscle stem cells activate and proliferate in response to muscle degeneration, resulting in an increase in the level of luciferase expression, which can be monitored by noninvasive, bioluminescence imaging. We applied this noninvasive imaging to assess disease activity in a mouse model of the human disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B), caused by a mutation in the dysferlin gene. We monitored the natural history and disease progression in these dysferlin-deficient mice up to 18 months of age and were able to detect disease activity prior to the appearance of any overt disease manifestation by histopathological analyses. Disease activity was reflected by changes in luciferase activity over time, and disease burden was reflected by cumulative luciferase activity, which paralleled disease progression as determined by histopathological analysis. The ability to monitor disease activity noninvasively in mouse models of muscular dystrophy will be invaluable for the assessment of disease progression and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.

  6. Noninvasively measuring oxygen saturation of human finger-joint vessels by multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zijian; Li, Changhui

    2016-06-01

    Imaging small blood vessels and measuring their functional information in finger joint are still challenges for clinical imaging modalities. In this study, we developed a multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and successfully imaged human finger-joint vessels from ˜1 mm to anatomical and functional information of individual finger-joint vessels with different sizes, which might help the study of finger-joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Detection of fetal chromosomal anomalies : Does nuchal translucency measurement have added value in the era of non-invasive prenatal testing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, K. D.; Diemel, B. D M; Koster, M. P H; Manten, G. T R; Siljee, J.; Schuring-Blom, G. H.; Page-Christiaens, G. C M L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to determine what percentage of fetal chromosomal anomalies remains undetected when first trimester combined testing is replaced by non-invasive prenatal testing for trisomies 13, 18, and 21. We focused on the added clinical value of nuchal translucency

  8. Non-invasive prenatal molecular detection of a fetal point mutation for congenital adrenal hyperplasia using co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Juan; ZOU Xin; PAN Yi; LI Shuang-fei; LU Guang-xiu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Conventional prenatal diagnosis relies on invasive chorionic biopsy or amniocentesis, which increases the risk of miscarriage, and is undertaken at 11-20 weeks gestation.1 The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has, however, offered a new strategy for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis.2

  9. Accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA for detection of Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Freeman, Karoline; Geppert, Julia; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Uthman, Olalekan A; Madan, Jason; Clarke, Angus; Quenby, Siobhan; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-01-18

    To measure test accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes using cell-free fetal DNA and identify factors affecting accuracy. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and the Cochrane Library published from 1997 to 9 February 2015, followed by weekly autoalerts until 1 April 2015. English language journal articles describing case-control studies with ≥ 15 trisomy cases or cohort studies with ≥ 50 pregnant women who had been given NIPT and a reference standard. 41, 37 and 30 studies of 2012 publications retrieved were included in the review for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. Quality appraisal identified high risk of bias in included studies, funnel plots showed evidence of publication bias. Pooled sensitivity was 99.3% (95% CI 98.9% to 99.6%) for Down, 97.4% (95.8% to 98.4%) for Edwards, and 97.4% (86.1% to 99.6%) for Patau syndrome. The pooled specificity was 99.9% (99.9% to 100%) for all three trisomies. In 100,000 pregnancies in the general obstetric population we would expect 417, 89 and 40 cases of Downs, Edwards and Patau syndromes to be detected by NIPT, with 94, 154 and 42 false positive results. Sensitivity was lower in twin than singleton pregnancies, reduced by 9% for Down, 28% for Edwards and 22% for Patau syndrome. Pooled sensitivity was also lower in the first trimester of pregnancy, in studies in the general obstetric population, and in cohort studies with consecutive enrolment. NIPT using cell-free fetal DNA has very high sensitivity and specificity for Down syndrome, with slightly lower sensitivity for Edwards and Patau syndrome. However, it is not 100% accurate and should not be used as a final diagnosis for positive cases. CRD42014014947. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Non-Invasive Detection of Protein Content in Several Types of Plant Feed Materials Using a Hybrid Near Infrared Spectroscopy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xia; Tang, Shichuan; Li, Guozhen; Zhou, Xingfan

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with chemometrics was applied to construct a hybrid model for the non-invasive detection of protein content in different types of plant feed materials. In total, 829 samples of plant feed materials, which included corn distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS), corn germ meal, corn gluten meal, distillers’ dried grains (DDG) and rapeseed meal, were collected from markets in China. Based on the different preprocessed spectral data, specific models for each type of plant feed material and a hybrid model for all the materials were built. Performances of specific model and hybrid model constructed with full spectrum (full spectrum model) and selected wavenumbers with VIP (variable importance in the projection) scores value bigger than 1.00 (VIP scores model) were also compared. The best spectral preprocessing method for this study was found to be the standard normal variate transformation combined with the first derivative. For both full spectrum and VIP scores model, the prediction performance of the hybrid model was slightly worse than those of the specific models but was nevertheless satisfactory. Moreover, the VIP scores model obtained generally better performances than corresponding full spectrum model. Wavenumbers around 4500 cm-1, 4664 cm-1 and 4836 cm-1 were found to be the key wavenumbers in modeling protein content in these plant feed materials. The values for the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and the relative prediction deviation (RPD) obtained with the VIP scores hybrid model were 1.05% and 2.53 for corn DDGS, 0.98% and 4.17 for corn germ meal, 0.75% and 6.99 for corn gluten meal, 1.54% and 4.59 for DDG, and 0.90% and 3.33 for rapeseed meal, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the protein content in several types of plant feed materials can be determined using a hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy model. And VIP scores method can be used to improve the general predictability of

  11. Noninvasive Imaging of Myocardial Inflammation in Myocarditis using 68Ga-tagged Mannosylated Human Serum Albumin Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Pyo; Im, Hyung-Jun; Kang, Shinae; Chung, Seock-Jin; Cho, Ye Seul; Kang, Hyejeong; Park, Ho Seon; Hwang, Do-Won; Park, Jun-Bean; Paeng, Jin-Chul; Cheon, Gi-Jeong; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Yong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of myocarditis traditionally relies on invasive endomyocardial biopsy but none of the imaging studies so far are specific for infiltration of the inflammatory cells itself. We synthesized 68Ga-2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) mannosylated human serum albumin (MSA) by conjugating human serum albumin with mannose, followed by conjugation with NOTA and labeling it with 68Ga. The efficacy of 68Ga-NOTA-MSA positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging myocardial inflammation was tested in a rat myocarditis model. A significant number of mannose receptor-positive inflammatory cells infiltrated the myocardium in both human and rat myocarditis tissue. 68Ga-NOTA-MSA uptake was upregulated in organs of macrophage accumulation, such as liver, spleen, bone marrow and myocardium (0.32 (0.31~0.33) for normal versus 1.02 (0.86~1.06) for myocarditis (median (range), SUV); n=4~6 per group, p-value=0.01). 68Ga-NOTA-MSA uptake in the left ventricle was upregulated in myocarditis compared with normal rats (2.29 (1.42~3.40) for normal versus 4.18 (3.43~6.15) for myocarditis (median (range), average standard uptake value ratio against paraspinal muscle); n=6 per group, p-valuerats with cyclosporine-A treated myocarditis (3.69 (2.59~3.86) for myocarditis versus 2.28 (1.76~2.60) for cyclosporine-A treated myocarditis; n=6 per group, p-valueechocardiography. These results demonstrate the potential utility of visualizing infiltration of mannose receptor-positive macrophages with 68Ga-NOTA-MSA PET in the early diagnosis of as well as in the monitoring of treatment response of myocarditis. PMID:28042344

  12. Non-invasive MRI biomarkers for the early assessment of iron overload in a humanized mouse model of β-thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Laurence H.; Vlachodimitropoulou, Evangelia; Shangaris, Panicos; Roberts, Thomas A.; Ryan, Thomas M.; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E.; David, Anna L.; Porter, John B.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Stuckey, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    β-thalassemia (βT) is a genetic blood disorder causing profound and life threatening anemia. Current clinical management of βT is a lifelong dependence on regular blood transfusions, a consequence of which is systemic iron overload leading to acute heart failure. Recent developments in gene and chelation therapy give hope of better prognosis for patients, but successful translation to clinical practice is hindered by the lack of thorough preclinical testing using representative animal models and clinically relevant quantitative biomarkers. Here we demonstrate a quantitative and non-invasive preclinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) platform for the assessment of βT in the γβ0/γβA humanized mouse model of βT. Changes in the quantitative MRI relaxation times as well as severe splenomegaly were observed in the heart, liver and spleen in βT. These data showed high sensitivity to iron overload and a strong relationship between quantitative MRI relaxation times and hepatic iron content. Importantly these changes preceded the onset of iron overload cardiomyopathy, providing an early biomarker of disease progression. This work demonstrates that multiparametric MRI is a powerful tool for the assessment of preclinical βT, providing sensitive and quantitative monitoring of tissue iron sequestration and cardiac dysfunction- parameters essential for the preclinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:28240317

  13. In Vivo, Non-Invasive Characterization of Human Bone by Hybrid Broadband (600-1200 nm) Diffuse Optical and Correlation Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliazzi, Marco; Negredo, Eugènia; Martelli, Fabrizio; Farina, Andrea; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Lindner, Claus; Farzam, Parisa; Pérez-Álvarez, Núria; Puig, Jordi; Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo diffuse optical characterization of human bone opens a new possibility of diagnosing bone related pathologies. We present an in vivo characterization performed on seventeen healthy subjects at six different superficial bone locations: radius distal, radius proximal, ulna distal, ulna proximal, trochanter and calcaneus. A tailored diffuse optical protocol for high penetration depth combined with the rather superficial nature of considered tissues ensured the effective probing of the bone tissue. Measurements were performed using a broadband system for Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (TRS) to assess mean absorption and reduced scattering spectra in the 600–1200 nm range and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) to monitor microvascular blood flow. Significant variations among tissue constituents were found between different locations; with radius distal rich of collagen, suggesting it as a prominent location for bone related measurements, and calcaneus bone having highest blood flow among the body locations being considered. By using TRS and DCS together, we are able to probe the perfusion and oxygen consumption of the tissue without any contrast agents. Therefore, we predict that these methods will be able to evaluate the impairment of the oxygen metabolism of the bone at the point-of-care. PMID:27997565

  14. Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Pharmacodynamic Markers of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, LAQ824, in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells and Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen-Li Chung

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS to investigate the pharmacodynamic effects of LAQ824, a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor. Human HT29 colon carcinoma cells were examined by 31P MRS after treatment with LAQ824 and another HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. HT29 xenografts and tumor extracts were also examined using 31P MRS, pre- and post-LAQ824 treatment. Histone H3 acetylation was determined using Western blot analysis, and tumor microvessel density by immunohistochemical staining of CD31. Phosphocholine showed a significant increase in HT29 cells after treatment with LAQ824 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. In vivo, the ratio of phosphomonoester/total phosphorus (TotP signal was significantly increased in LAQ824-treated HT29 xenografts, and this ratio was inversely correlated with changes in tumor volume. Statistically significant decreases in intracellular pH, β-nucleoside triphosphate (β-NTP/TotP, and β-NTP/inorganic phosphate (Pi and an increase in Pi/TotP were also seen in LAQ824-treated tumors. Tumor extracts showed many significant metabolic changes after LAQ824 treatment, in parallel with increased histone acetylation and decreased microvessel density. Treatment with LAQ824 resulted in altered phospholipid metabolism and compromised tumor bioenergetics. The phosphocholine and phosphomonoester increases may have the potential to act as pharmacodynamic markers for noninvasively monitoring tumor response after treatment with LAQ824 or other HDAC inhibitors.

  15. Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopic pharmacodynamic markers of a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, LAQ824, in human colon carcinoma cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yuen-Li; Troy, Helen; Kristeleit, Rebecca; Aherne, Wynne; Jackson, L Elizabeth; Atadja, Peter; Griffiths, John R; Judson, Ian R; Workman, Paul; Leach, Martin O; Beloueche-Babari, Mounia

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS) to investigate the pharmacodynamic effects of LAQ824, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Human HT29 colon carcinoma cells were examined by (31)P MRS after treatment with LAQ824 and another HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. HT29 xenografts and tumor extracts were also examined using (31)P MRS, pre- and post-LAQ824 treatment. Histone H3 acetylation was determined using Western blot analysis, and tumor microvessel density by immunohistochemical staining of CD31. Phosphocholine showed a significant increase in HT29 cells after treatment with LAQ824 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. In vivo, the ratio of phosphomonoester/total phosphorus (TotP) signal was significantly increased in LAQ824-treated HT29 xenografts, and this ratio was inversely correlated with changes in tumor volume. Statistically significant decreases in intracellular pH, beta-nucleoside triphosphate (beta-NTP)/TotP, and beta-NTP/inorganic phosphate (Pi) and an increase in Pi/TotP were also seen in LAQ824-treated tumors. Tumor extracts showed many significant metabolic changes after LAQ824 treatment, in parallel with increased histone acetylation and decreased microvessel density. Treatment with LAQ824 resulted in altered phospholipid metabolism and compromised tumor bioenergetics. The phosphocholine and phosphomonoester increases may have the potential to act as pharmacodynamic markers for noninvasively monitoring tumor response after treatment with LAQ824 or other HDAC inhibitors.

  16. An Improved Moving Multi-Human Target Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng-Mei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the detection of moving multi-human targets, the major problems existing lie in the detection speed and precision. Fortunately, the HOG feature presents a very considerable effect on the detection accuracy. However, the problem of low detecting speed caused by its large amount of calculation prevents the HOG feature from being well applied in scenes where the real-time requirements are needed. Given this problem, this paper presents a method which combines the Gaussian mixture background model and HOG feature. This method solved firstly by the Gaussian mixture background model to detect the moving foreground in the video. And then use HOG+SVM to handle the moving foreground that has been detected. As a result, the amount of computation is reduced considerably and the real-time performance of the HOG algorithm is improved greatly. Verified by the experiment, the detection accuracy of this algorithm can reach 94%.

  17. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of human intestinal spirochetosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Oda, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2016-12-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is a colorectal infection by Brachyspira species of spiral bacteria. Immunohistochemical cross-reaction to an antibody for Treponema pallidum aids its histologic diagnosis. This study's aim was to analyze the immunohistochemical characteristics of HIS. In this analysis, on 223 specimens from 83 HIS cases, we focused on so-called fringe formation (a histologic hallmark of HIS), spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts, and strong immunopositive materials in the mucosa, together with their location and the types of lesions. Fringe formation was found in 81.6% of all specimens and spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts in 97.3% and 57.0%, respectively. Strong immunopositive materials were observed in the surface epithelial layer in 87.9%, in the subepithelial layer in 94.6%, and in deeper mucosa in 2.2% of all specimens. The positive rates in conventional adenomas (24.0%, n = 146) and hyperplastic nodules (100%, n = 17) were each different from that found in inflammation (70.8%, n = 24), and spiral organisms were seen more frequently in the right-side large intestine than in the left (within mucus, 100%, n = 104 versus 95.0%, n = 119; within crypts, 65.4%, n = 104 versus 49.6%, n = 119). Thus, immunohistochemistry was effective not only in supporting the diagnosis of HIS but also in highlighting spiral organisms within mucus or crypts that were invisible in routine histology. Possibly, these spiral organisms may spread throughout the entire large intestine, although there is a potential problem with antibody specificity.

  19. Detection of Unusual Human Activities Based on Behavior Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Hiraishi, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A type of services that require human physical actions and intelligent decision making exists in various real fields, such as nursing in hospitals and caregiving in nursing homes. In this paper, we propose new formalism for modeling human behavior in such services. Behavior models are estimated from event-logs, and can be used for analysis of human activities. We show two analysis methods: one is to detect unusual human activities that appear in event-logs, and the other is to find staffs tha...

  20. Rationale and methods of the integrated biomarker and imaging study (IBIS): combining invasive and non-invasive imaging with biomarkers to detect subclinical atherosclerosis and assess coronary lesion biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mieghem, Carlos A G; Bruining, Nico; Schaar, Johannes A; McFadden, Eugene; Mollet, Nico; Cademartiri, Filippo; Mastik, Frits; Ligthart, Jurgen M R; Granillo, Gaston A Rodriguez; Valgimigli, Marco; Sianos, Georgios; van der Giessen, Willem J; Backx, Bianca; Morel, Marie-Angele M; Van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Sawyer, Jonathon D; Kaplow, June; Zalewski, Andrew; van der Steen, Anton F W; de Feyter, Pim; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-08-01

    Death or myocardial infarction, the most serious clinical consequences of atherosclerosis, often result from plaque rupture at non-flow limiting lesions. Current diagnostic imaging with coronary angiography only detects large plaques that already impinge on the lumen and cannot accurately identify those that have a propensity to cause unheralded events. Accurate evaluation of the composition or of the biomechanical characteristics of plaques with invasive or non-invasive methods, alone or in conjunction with assessment of circulating biomarkers, could help identify high-risk patients, thus providing the rationale for aggressive treatments in order to reduce future clinical events. The IBIS (Integrated Biomarker and Imaging Study) study is a prospective, single-center, non-randomized, observational study conducted in Rotterdam. The aim of the IBIS study is to evaluate both invasive (quantitative coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and palpography) and non-invasive (multislice spiral computed tomography) imaging techniques to characterize non-flow limiting coronary lesions. In addition, multiple classical and novel biomarkers will be measured and their levels correlated with the results of the different imaging techniques. A minimum of 85 patients up to a maximum of 120 patients will be included. This paper describes the study protocol and methodological solutions that have been devised for the purpose of comparisons among several imaging modalities. It outlines the analyses that will be performed to compare invasive and non-invasive imaging techniques in conjunction with multiple biomarkers to characterize non-flow limiting subclinical coronary lesions.

  1. Experimental setup and analytical methods for the non-invasive determination of volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde and NO{sub x} in exhaled human breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, Ulrich; Tegtbur, Uwe [Hannover Medical School, Sports Physiology and Sports Medicine, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Fauck, Christian; Fuhrmann, Frank; Markewitz, Doreen [Fraunhofer WKI, Department of Material Analysis and Indoor Chemistry, Bienroder Weg 54 E, 38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Salthammer, Tunga, E-mail: tunga.salthammer@wki.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer WKI, Department of Material Analysis and Indoor Chemistry, Bienroder Weg 54 E, 38108 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-06-11

    Different analytical devices were tested and evaluated for their suitability of breath gas analysis by examining the physiological parameters and chemical substances in the exhaled breath of ten healthy probands during light cycling in dependence of methanol-rich nutrition. The probands exercised under normal breathing conditions on a bicycle ergometer. Breath air was exhaled into a glass cylinder and collected under steady-state conditions. Non-invasively measured parameters were pulse rate, breath frequency, temperature, relative humidity, NO{sub x}, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC{sub PAS}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), formaldehyde, methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Methanol rich food and beverages strongly influenced the concentration of methanol and other organic substances in human breath. On the other hand, nutrition and smoking had no clear effect on the physical conditions of the probands. The proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) method was found to be very suitable for the analysis of breath gas but the m/z 31, if assigned to formaldehyde, is sensitive to interferences. The time vs. concentration curves of nitric oxide showed sudden peaks up to 120 ppb in most of the measurements. In one case a strong interference of the NO{sub x} signal was observed. The time resolved analysis of exhaled breath gas is of high capability and significance for different applications if reliable analytical techniques are used. Some compounds like nitric oxide (NO), methanol, different VOCs as well as sum parameters like TVOC{sub PAS} are especially suitable as markers. Formaldehyde, which is rapidly metabolized in the human body, could be measured reliably as a trace component by the acetylacetone (acac) method but not by PTR-MS.

  2. Using Noninvasive Brain Measurement to Explore the Psychological Effects of Computer Malfunctions on Users during Human-Computer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M. Hirshfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s technologically driven world, there is a need to better understand the ways that common computer malfunctions affect computer users. These malfunctions may have measurable influences on computer user’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses. An experiment was conducted where participants conducted a series of web search tasks while wearing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and galvanic skin response sensors. Two computer malfunctions were introduced during the sessions which had the potential to influence correlates of user trust and suspicion. Surveys were given after each session to measure user’s perceived emotional state, cognitive load, and perceived trust. Results suggest that fNIRS can be used to measure the different cognitive and emotional responses associated with computer malfunctions. These cognitive and emotional changes were correlated with users’ self-report levels of suspicion and trust, and they in turn suggest future work that further explores the capability of fNIRS for the measurement of user experience during human-computer interactions.

  3. Neural Network Classifier for Automatic Detection of Invasive Versus Noninvasive Airway Management Technique Based on Respiratory Monitoring Parameters in a Pediatric Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Jalali, Ali; Ahumada, Luis; Simpao, Allan F; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    Children undergoing general anesthesia require airway monitoring by an anesthesia provider. The airway may be supported with noninvasive devices such as face mask or invasive devices such as a laryngeal mask airway or an endotracheal tube. The physiologic data stored provides an opportunity to apply machine learning algorithms distinguish between these modes based on pattern recognition. We retrieved three data sets from patients receiving general anesthesia in 2015 with either mask, laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube. Patients underwent myringotomy, tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy or inguinal hernia repair procedures. We retrieved measurements for end-tidal carbon dioxide, tidal volume, and peak inspiratory pressure and calculated statistical features for each data element per patient. We applied machine learning algorithms (decision tree, support vector machine, and neural network) to classify patients into noninvasive or invasive airway device support. We identified 300 patients per group (mask, laryngeal mask airway, and endotracheal tube) for a total of 900 patients. The neural network classifier performed better than the boosted trees and support vector machine classifiers based on the test data sets. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for neural network classification are 97.5%, 96.3%, and 95.8%. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of support vector machine are 89.1%, 92.3%, and 88.3% and with the boosted tree classifier they are 93.8%, 92.1%, and 91.4%. We describe a method to automatically distinguish between noninvasive and invasive airway device support in a pediatric surgical setting based on respiratory monitoring parameters. The results show that the neural network classifier algorithm can accurately classify noninvasive and invasive airway device support.

  4. Towards quantitative SERS detection of hydrogen cyanide at ppb level for human breath analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    ) at ppb level has been reported to be a PA biomarker. For early PA detection in CF children not yet chronically lung infected a non-invasive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based breath nanosensor is being developed. The triple bond between C and N in cyanide, with its characteristic band...

  5. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  6. Human Rights Event Detection from Heterogeneous Social Media Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Neill, Daniel B

    2015-03-01

    Human rights organizations are increasingly monitoring social media for identification, verification, and documentation of human rights violations. Since manual extraction of events from the massive amount of online social network data is difficult and time-consuming, we propose an approach for automated, large-scale discovery and analysis of human rights-related events. We apply our recently developed Non-Parametric Heterogeneous Graph Scan (NPHGS), which models social media data such as Twitter as a heterogeneous network (with multiple different node types, features, and relationships) and detects emerging patterns in the network, to identify and characterize human rights events. NPHGS efficiently maximizes a nonparametric scan statistic (an aggregate measure of anomalousness) over connected subgraphs of the heterogeneous network to identify the most anomalous network clusters. It summarizes each event with information such as type of event, geographical locations, time, and participants, and provides documentation such as links to videos and news reports. Building on our previous work that demonstrates the utility of NPHGS for civil unrest prediction and rare disease outbreak detection, we present an analysis of human rights events detected by NPHGS using two years of Twitter data from Mexico. NPHGS was able to accurately detect relevant clusters of human rights-related tweets prior to international news sources, and in some cases, prior to local news reports. Analysis of social media using NPHGS could enhance the information-gathering missions of human rights organizations by pinpointing specific abuses, revealing events and details that may be blocked from traditional media sources, and providing evidence of emerging patterns of human rights violations. This could lead to more timely, targeted, and effective advocacy, as well as other potential interventions.

  7. Modeling Human Visual Perception for Target Detection in Military Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Human Visual Perception, Visual Attention, Eye Movements, Eye Tracking , Human Behavior Modeling, Target Detection, Visual Search, Semantic Relevance...pertaining my eye - tracking experiment, and also for understand- ing that I considered their eye-tracker to be mine, Tim Chung for the excellent...is through the target, and top-down processing is solely engaged through pre-specifying the target features. Eye - tracking data captured in previous

  8. Detection of human taeniases in Tibetan endemic areas, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiaoying; Chen, Xingwang; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Wang, Hao; Long, Changping; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Munehir; Wu, Yunfei; Giraudoux, Patrick; Raoul, Francis; Nkouawa, Agathe; Nakao, Minoru; Craig, Philip S; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Detection of taeniasis carriers of Taenia solium is essential for control of cysticercosis in humans and pigs. In the current study, we assessed the positive detection rate of a self-detection tool, stool microscopy with direct smear and coproPCR for taeniasis carriers in endemic Tibetan areas of northwest Sichuan. The self-detection tool through questioning about a history of proglottid expulsion within the previous one year showed an overall positive detection rate of more than 80% for Taenia saginata, T. solium and T. asiatica. The positive detection rate was similar for T. saginata and T. solium. In 132 taeniid tapeworm carriers, 68 (51·5%) were detected by microscopy and 92 (69·7%) were diagnosed by coproPCR. A combination of microscopy and coproPCR increased the positive detection rate to 77·3%. There remained 10 cases (7·6%) coproPCR negative but microscopy positive. Due to the high cost and complicated process, coproPCR is required for the identification of Taenia species only when necessary, though it had a significant higher positive detection rate than microscopy. Combined use of self-detection and stool microscopy are recommended in community-based mass screening for taeniases in this Tibetan area or in other situation-similar endemic regions.

  9. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  10. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  11. Noninvasive in vivo plasma volume and hematocrit in humans: observing long-term baseline behavior to establish homeostasis for intravascular volume and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Paul; Deng, Bin; Goodisman, Jerry; Peterson, Charles M.; Narsipur, Sriram; Chaiken, J.

    2016-04-01

    A new device incorporating a new algorithm and measurement process allows simultaneous noninvasive in vivo monitoring of intravascular plasma volume and red blood cell volume. The purely optical technique involves probing fingertip skin with near infrared laser light and collecting the wavelength shifted light, that is, the inelastic emission (IE) which includes the unresolved Raman and fluorescence, and the un-shifted emission, that is, the elastic emission (EE) which includes both the Rayleigh and Mie scattered light. Our excitation and detection geometry is designed so that from these two simultaneous measurements we can calculate two parameters within the single scattering regime using radiation transfer theory, the intravascular plasma volume fraction and the red blood cell volume fraction. Previously calibrated against a gold standard FDA approved device, 2 hour monitoring sessions on three separate occasions over a three week span for a specific, motionless, and mostly sleeping individual produced 3 records containing a total of 5706 paired measurements of hematocrit and plasma volume. The average over the three runs, relative to the initial plasma volume taken as 100%, of the plasma volume±1σ was 97.56+/-0.55 or 0.56%.For the same three runs, the average relative hematocrit (Hct), referenced to an assumed initial value of 28.35 was 29.37+/-0.12 or stable to +/-0.4%.We observe local deterministic circulation effects apparently associated with the pressure applied by the finger probe as well as longer timescale behavior due to normal ebb and flow of internal fluids due to posture changes and tilt table induced gravity gradients.

  12. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  13. The Effect of Polyhexanide, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, and Tea Tree Oil as Topical Antiseptic Agents on In Vivo Microcirculation of the Human Skin: A Noninvasive Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Jens; Krauss, Sabrina; Tschumi, Christian; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Held, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Antiseptics are indispensable for wound management and should focus not only on the efficacy in reducing the bacterial burden but also on how much they interfere in wound healing. In this study, the authors analyzed the direct effect of topical antiseptic agents on the microcirculation of intact human skin. The perfusion dynamics were assessed before, and 10 minutes after, the volunteers' fingers of the right hand (n = 20) were immersed in the following solutions - octenidine dihydrochloride, polyhexanide, tea tree oil, and saline solution. The authors used the Oxygen to See (LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Giessen, Germany) diagnostic device for noninvasive determination of oxygen supply in microcirculation of blood perfused tissues, which combines a laser light to determine blood flow, as well as white light to determine hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin. Tea tree oil (÷19.0%) (B. Braun Melsungen AG, Melsungen, Germany) and polyhexanide (÷12.4%) (Lavanid, Serag Wiessner GmbH, Naila, Germany) caused a significant increase in blood flow compared to the negative control (-25.6%). Octenidine (Octenisept, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) showed a nonsignificant trend towards an increase in blood flow (÷7.2%). There were alterations in the values of hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin, but these were not significant. Perfusion is an important factor for wound healing. Therefore, it might be advantageous if antiseptic agents would increase blood flow. Tea tree oil and polyhexanide have a positive effect on skin blood flow and can therefore be used especially in critically perfused wounds, provided the adverse reactions and the antimicrobial efficacy are comparable.

  14. Pose estimation based on human detection and segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; ZHENG EnLiang; LIU YunCai

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of 3D human pose estimation in a single real scene image. Normally, 3D pose estimation from real Image needs background subtraction to extract the appropriate features. We do not make such assumption. In this paper, a two-step approach is proposed, first, Instead of applying background subtraction to get the segmentation of human, we combine the segmentation with human detection using an ISM-based detector. Then, silhouette feature can be extracted and 3D pose estimation Is solved as a regression problem. RVMs and ridge regression method are applied to solve this problem. The results show the robustness and accuracy of our method.

  15. Noninvasive prenatal molecular karyotyping from maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Y Yu

    Full Text Available Fetal DNA is present in the plasma of pregnant women. Massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA has been used to detect fetal trisomies 21, 18, 13 and selected sex chromosomal aneuploidies noninvasively. Case reports describing the detection of fetal microdeletions from maternal plasma using massively parallel sequencing have been reported. However, these previous reports were either polymorphism-dependent or used statistical analyses which were confined to one or a small number of selected parts of the genome. In this report, we reported a procedure for performing noninvasive prenatal karyotyping at 3 Mb resolution across the whole genome through the massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA. This method has been used to analyze the plasma obtained from 6 cases. In three cases, fetal microdeletions have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In two cases, fetal microduplications have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In the remaining case, the plasma DNA sequencing result was consistent with the pregnant mother being a carrier of a microduplication. Simulation analyses were performed for determining the number of plasma DNA molecules that would need to be sequenced and aligned for enhancing the diagnostic resolution of noninvasive prenatal karyotyping to 2 Mb and 1 Mb. In conclusion, noninvasive prenatal molecular karyotyping from maternal plasma by massively parallel sequencing is feasible and would enhance the diagnostic spectrum of noninvasive prenatal testing.

  16. Proof of principle: non-invasive sampling for early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in wild boar using a rope-in-a-bait sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchantat, Susan; Haas, Bernd; Böhle, Wolfgang; Globig, Anja; Lange, Elke; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Depner, Klaus

    2014-08-06

    In this study we describe the use of a rope-in-a-bait sampling method ("pSWAB": pathogen sampling wild animals with baits) for non-invasive saliva sampling aimed at the detection of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viral genome in wild boar. The pSWABs are produced in the form of a standardized product by embedding a 10 cm long cotton rope in a cereal-based bait matrix. To assess the general suitability of this novel sampling technique an animal experiment was conducted to detect FMD viral genome in saliva of infected wild boar. Two juvenile animals were inoculated in the bulb of the heel with a recent wild boar FMD virus isolate and kept together with three noninoculated wild boar of the same age. Over a period of 29 days, the animals were sampled by using five pSWABs per day in addition to the collection of blood and conventional saliva swabs taken every three to four days. Viral RNA in pSWABs was identified already 24 h after infection during the incubation period and until 23 dpi. Comparison of the results of pSWAB sampling with those of conventional saliva swabs or serum samples showed satisfactory sensitivity. These experimental data demonstrate the suitability of non-invasive sampling of wild boar by using pSWABs as a sensitive, cheap and feasible sample collection technique independent of hunting activities. In addition, the use of non-invasive sampling in an appropriate surveillance strategy is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of cardiac activity changes from human speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Voznak, Miroslav; Mikulec, Martin; Mehic, Miralem

    2015-05-01

    Impact of changes in blood pressure and pulse from human speech is disclosed in this article. The symptoms of increased physical activity are pulse, systolic and diastolic pressure. There are many methods of measuring and indicating these parameters. The measurements must be carried out using devices which are not used in everyday life. In most cases, the measurement of blood pressure and pulse following health problems or other adverse feelings. Nowadays, research teams are trying to design and implement modern methods in ordinary human activities. The main objective of the proposal is to reduce the delay between detecting the adverse pressure and to the mentioned warning signs and feelings. Common and frequent activity of man is speaking, while it is known that the function of the vocal tract can be affected by the change in heart activity. Therefore, it can be a useful parameter for detecting physiological changes. A method for detecting human physiological changes by speech processing and artificial neural network classification is described in this article. The pulse and blood pressure changes was induced by physical exercises in this experiment. The set of measured subjects was formed by ten healthy volunteers of both sexes. None of the subjects was a professional athlete. The process of the experiment was divided into phases before, during and after physical training. Pulse, systolic, diastolic pressure was measured and voice activity was recorded after each of them. The results of this experiment describe a method for detecting increased cardiac activity from human speech using artificial neural network.

  18. Detection of human metapneumovirus from children with acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Watanabe, Oshi; Okamoto, Michiko; Endo, Hiroko; Yano, Hisakazu; Suetake, Mitsuko; Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2005-07-01

    Nasal and middle ear specimens collected from children with acute otitis media were subjected to viral isolation and bacteria culture. All virus-negative specimens underwent reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to detect human metapneumovirus. Three of 126 middle ear specimens were positive by this assay.

  19. Corner Detection Based on Human Visual System Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaoguang; ZHOU Jie

    2001-01-01

    Corners are useful features in computer vision tasks.In this paper,we present an algorithm for corner detection based on a human visual system model.Experimental results proved that it ismore effective than conventional corner detector under uneven illumination conditions.

  20. Human visual system-based smoking event detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetallah, Amjad D.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2012-06-01

    Human action (e.g. smoking, eating, and phoning) analysis is an important task in various application domains like video surveillance, video retrieval, human-computer interaction systems, and so on. Smoke detection is a crucial task in many video surveillance applications and could have a great impact to raise the level of safety of urban areas, public parks, airplanes, hospitals, schools and others. The detection task is challenging since there is no prior knowledge about the object's shape, texture and color. In addition, its visual features will change under different lighting and weather conditions. This paper presents a new scheme of a system for detecting human smoking events, or small smoke, in a sequence of images. In developed system, motion detection and background subtraction are combined with motion-region-saving, skin-based image segmentation, and smoke-based image segmentation to capture potential smoke regions which are further analyzed to decide on the occurrence of smoking events. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. As well, the developed method is capable of detecting the small smoking events of uncertain actions with various cigarette sizes, colors, and shapes.

  1. Human minisatellite alleles detectable only after PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that a proportion of alleles at two human minisatellite loci is undetected by standard Southern blot hybridization. In each case the missing allele(s) can be identified after PCR amplification and correspond to tandem arrays too short to detect by hybridization. At one locus, there is only one undetected allele (population frequency 0.3), which contains just three repeat units. At the second locus, there are at least five undetected alleles (total population frequency 0.9) containing 60-120 repeats; they are not detected because these tandem repeats give very poor signals when used as a probe in standard Southern blot hybridization, and also cross-hybridize with other sequences in the genome. Under these circumstances only signals from the longest tandemly repeated alleles are detectable above the nonspecific background. The structures of these loci have been compared in human and primate DNA, and at one locus the short human allele containing three repeat units is shown to be an intermediate state in the expansion of a monomeric precursor allele in primates to high copy number in the longer human arrays. We discuss the implications of such loci for studies of human populations, minisatellite isolation by cloning, and the evolution of highly variable tandem arrays.

  2. A HYBRID APPROACH TO HUMAN SKIN REGION DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vijayanandh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is important in research areas like machine vision and complex security systems. Skin region detection is a vital factor for processing in such systems. Hence the proposed paper focuses on isolating the regions of an image corresponding to human skin region through the hybrid method. This paper intends to combine the skin region detected from RGB and YCbCr color spaces image by the explicit skin color conditions and the skin label cluster identified from CIEL*a*b color space image, which is clustered by Hillclimbing segmentation with K-Means clustering algorithm. Then the resultant image is dilated by arbitrary shape and filtered by the median filter, in order to enhance the skin region and to avoid the noise respectively. The proposed method has been tested on various real images, which contain one or more human beings and the performance of skin region detection is found to be quite satisfactory.

  3. Human ear detection in the thermal infrared spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the problem of human ear detection in the thermal infrared (IR) spectrum is studied in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the most important steps of ear-based biometrics that can operate in day and night time environments. The main contributions of this work are two-fold: First, a dual-band database is assembled that consists of visible and thermal profile face images. The thermal data was collected using a high definition middle-wave infrared (3-5 microns) camera that is capable of acquiring thermal imprints of human skin. Second, a fully automated, thermal imaging based ear detection method is developed for real-time segmentation of human ears in either day or night time environments. The proposed method is based on Haar features forming a cascaded AdaBoost classifier (our modified version of the original Viola-Jones approach1 that was designed to be applied mainly in visible band images). The main advantage of the proposed method, applied on our profile face image data set collected in the thermal-band, is that it is designed to reduce the learning time required by the original Viola-Jones method from several weeks to several hours. Unlike other approaches reported in the literature, which have been tested but not designed to operate in the thermal band, our method yields a high detection accuracy that reaches ~ 91.5%. Further analysis on our data set yielded that: (a) photometric normalization techniques do not directly improve ear detection performance. However, when using a certain photometric normalization technique (CLAHE) on falsely detected images, the detection rate improved by ~ 4%; (b) the high detection accuracy of our method did not degrade when we lowered down the original spatial resolution of thermal ear images. For example, even after using one third of the original spatial resolution (i.e. ~ 20% of the original computational time) of the thermal profile face images, the high ear detection accuracy of our method

  4. [Performance and indications of noninvasive prenatal testing using cell free circulating fetal DNA (cffDNA) for the detection of fetal trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benachi, A; Letourneau, A; Kleinfinger, P; Senat, M-V; Gautier, E; Favre, R; Bidat, L; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Querol, V; Bouyer, J; Costa, J-M

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate de performances of noninvasive prenatal testing using cell free circulating fetal DNA (cffDNA) for the detection of fetal trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in a French population. cffDNA analysis was performed by massive parallel sequencing during a multicenter, non interventional, prospective study and the results were compared with a standard fetal karyotype. Results were available for 886 patients who have been classified as high- or moderate-risk depending on the presence of fetal abnormalities on ultrasound examination. For the high-risk group (n=376), the sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100% and 99.9% for trisomy 21, 88% and 99.9% for trisomy 18 and 100% and 99.9% for trisomy 13. The rate of other pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities with a negative NIPT was 7.9%. In the low-risk group (n=510), the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity 99.8% for trisomy 21, and only 0.4% of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities were revealed by fetal karyotyping but not detected by cffDNA analysis. Noninvasive prenatal testing using cffDNA for high risk patients without fetal anomalies at ultrasound could be recommended in France after counseling on the possible risk of undiagnosed anomalies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The Detection of Human Spreadsheet Errors by Humans versus Inspection (Auditing) Software

    CERN Document Server

    Aurigemma, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Previous spreadsheet inspection experiments have had human subjects look for seeded errors in spreadsheets. In this study, subjects attempted to find errors in human-developed spreadsheets to avoid the potential artifacts created by error seeding. Human subject success rates were compared to the successful rates for error-flagging by spreadsheet static analysis tools (SSATs) applied to the same spreadsheets. The human error detection results were comparable to those of studies using error seeding. However, Excel Error Check and Spreadsheet Professional were almost useless for correctly flagging natural (human) errors in this study.

  6. Early indices of deviance detection in humans and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Sabine; Escera, Carles; Nelken, Israel

    2016-04-01

    Detecting unexpected stimuli in the environment is a critical function of the auditory system. Responses to unexpected "deviant" sounds are enhanced compared to responses to expected stimuli. At the human scalp, deviance detection is reflected in the mismatch negativity (MMN) and in an enhancement of the middle-latency response (MLR). Single neurons often respond more strongly to a stimulus when rare than when common, a phenomenon termed stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). Here we compare stimulus-specific adaptation with scalp-recorded deviance-related responses. We conclude that early markers of deviance detection in the time range of the MLR could be a direct correlate of cortical SSA. Both occur at an early level of cortical activation, both are robust findings with low-probability stimuli, and both show properties of genuine deviance detection. Their causal relation with the later scalp-recorded MMN is a key question in this field.

  7. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  8. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  9. Non-invasive tracking of human haemopoietic CD34{sup +} stem cells in vivo in immunodeficient mice by using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemeyer, Markus; Jacobs, Volker R.; Timmer, Sebastian; Kiechle, Marion [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Gynaecology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Hippauf, Sandra; Bekker-Ruz, Viktoria [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kremer, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Baurecht, Hansjoerg [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Statistics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig, Georg; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Piontek, Guido [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    To assess migration of CD34{sup +} human stem cells to the bone marrow of athymic mice by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Resovist, a contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. All animal and human procedures were approved by our institution's ethics committee, and women had given consent to donate umbilical cord blood (UCB). Balb/c-AnN Foxn1{sup nu}/Crl mice received intravenous injection of 1 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3), 5 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3) or 1 x 10{sup 7} (n = 3) human Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells; control mice received Resovist (n = 3). MR imaging was performed before, 2 and 24 h after transplantation. Signal intensities of liver, muscle and bone marrow were measured and analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Student's t tests. MR imaging data were verified by histological and immunological detection of both human cell surface markers and carboxydextran-coating of the contrast agent. CD34{sup +} cells were efficiently labelled by Resovist without impairment of functionality. Twenty-four hours after administration of labelled cells, MR imaging revealed a significant signal decline in the bone marrow, and histological and immunological analyses confirmed the presence of transplanted human CD34{sup +} cells. Intravenously administered Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells home to bone marrow of mice. Homing can be tracked in vivo by using clinical 1.5-T MR imaging technology. (orig.)

  10. Detection of Plastic Explosive Traces in the Human Thermal Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowadia, Huban A.; Settles, Gary S.

    1998-11-01

    Aviation security requires the detection of explosive devices which terrorists, posing as passengers, may conceal beneath their clothing. Our goal is to understand the generation, transport, and collection of trace signals from such concealed explosives, which are found in the natural convective plume produced by the human body. Previous work (APS/DFD96, CG10) has visualized this plume and shown that concealed volatile explosives (e.g. TNT) produce a detectable vapor signal therein. Plastic explosives, on the other hand, have vanishingly low vapor pressures and are thus considered very difficult to detect. Present experiments use a dispersal chamber to collect and sample the plumes of human subjects wearing concealed gauze patches containing milligrams of RDX, the primary component of plastic explosives such as C-4. These experiments address the effects of agitation, clothing, temperature and humidity on trace detectability. Further experiments address the effects of oily vs. dry skin, contaminated clothing vs. gauze patches, and residual contamination left on skin previously in contact with RDX. The key role of airborne contaminated textile fibers is noted. Knowledge thus gained contributes to the design of an explosive detection portal for aviation security screening. (Research supported by FAA Grant 93-G-052.)

  11. Detecting Underlying Stance Adopted When Human Construe Behavior of Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kazunori; Ono, Kouhei; Ito, Akira

    Whether or not humans can construe the behaviors of entities depends on their psychological stance. The philosopher Dennett proposed human cognitive strategies (three stances) in which humans construe the behavior of other animated objects, including other humans, artifacts, and physical phenomena:‘intentional’, ‘design’ and ‘physical’ stances. Detecting the psychological stance taken toward entities is difficult, because such mental state attribution is a subjective cognitive process and hard to measure. In the present study, we proposed a novel method for detecting underlying stance adopted when human construe behavior of entities. In our method the subject was asked to select the most suitable action sequence shown in three movies each of which representing Dennett’s three stances. To valid our method we have conducted an experiment in which the subjects were presented thirty short videos and asked to compare them to the three movies. The result indicated that the subjects did not focused on prior knowledge about the entity but could focused on motion characteristics per se, owing to simple and typical motion of an abstract shaped object.

  12. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  13. Non-invasive (89)Zr-Transferrin PET Shows Improved Tumor Targeting Compared to (18)F-FDG PET in MYC-overexpressing Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kelly E; Dilling, Thomas R; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Edwards, Kimberly J; Evans, Michael J; Lewis, Jason S

    2017-08-28

    The current standard for breast positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). The heterogeneity of (18)F-FDG uptake in breast cancer limits its utility, varying greatly among receptor status, histopathological subtypes, and proliferation markers. (18)F-FDG PET often exhibits non-specific internalization and low specificity and sensitivity, especially with tumors triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Increased surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) is a downstream event of MYC upregulation, and has been validated as a clinically relevant target for molecular imaging. Transferrin (Tf) labeled with zirconium-89 ((89)Zr) has successfully identified MYC status in many cancer subtypes preclinically, and been shown to predict response and changes in oncogene status via treatment with small molecule inhibitors that target MYC and PI3K signaling pathways. We hypothesized that (89)Zr-Tf PET will non-invasively detect MYC and TfR and improve upon the current standard of (18)F-FDG PET for MYC-overexpressing TNBC. Methods: In this study, (89)Zr-Tf and (18)F-FDG imaging were compared in preclinical models of TNBC. TNBC cells (MDA-MB-157, MBA-MB-231, and Hs578T) were treated with bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) inhibitors JQ1 and OTX015 (0.5-1 μM). Cell proliferation, gene expression, and protein expression were assayed to explore the effects of these inhibitors on MYC and TfR. Results: Head-to-head comparison showed that (89)Zr-Tf targets TNBC tumors significantly better (P F-FDG through PET imaging and biodistribution studies in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 xenografts and a patient-derived xenograft model of TNBC. MYC and TfR gene expression were decreased upon treatment with BRD4 inhibitors and c-MYC small interfering RNA (siRNA) (P F-FDG, as shown through PET imaging and biodistribution studies. (89)Zr-Tf is a useful tool to interrogate MYC via TfR-targeted PET imaging in TNBC. This data could lead to investigations of

  14. Image enhancement using thermal-visible fusion for human detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaihidee, Ezrinda Mohd; Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Zuki Saleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    An increased interest in detecting human beings in video surveillance system has emerged in recent years. Multisensory image fusion deserves more research attention due to the capability to improve the visual interpretability of an image. This study proposed fusion techniques for human detection based on multiscale transform using grayscale visual light and infrared images. The samples for this study were taken from online dataset. Both images captured by the two sensors were decomposed into high and low frequency coefficients using Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT). Hence, the appropriate fusion rule was used to merge the coefficients and finally, the final fused image was obtained by using inverse SWT. From the qualitative and quantitative results, the proposed method is more superior than the two other methods in terms of enhancement of the target region and preservation of details information of the image.

  15. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  16. DETECTION AND QUANTITATION OF FALLOUT PARTICLES IN A HUMAN LUNG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEGST, A V; PELLETIER, C A; WHIPPLE, G H

    1964-02-28

    Portions of an adult human lung were studied by autoradiography in order to detect the presence of fallout particles. The radioactivity in the remainder of the tissue was determined with a gamma-ray spectrometer. Four particles were found and their activities were determined. From the measurement for total-fission-product activity in the lung tissue it was calculated that there were approximately 264 particles in the right lung at the time of death.

  17. Electrochemical Methods for Human Growth Hormone Doping Detection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Human Growth Hormone (GH) is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and promotes growth of tissue through direct uptake at target tissue sites, or alternatively, by regulating production of insulin-like growth factor-1. The World Anti-Doping Agency considers GH a performance enhancing substance, so the use of GH by athletes is prohibited in most sports. The current immunoassay for GH detection is suboptimal for routine screening of blood samples because of the large resources required for c...

  18. 监护仪无创血压质量检测的评估与推广%Evaluation and Popularization of Non-invasive Blood Pressure quality Detection for Monitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方河炎; 刘曼芳; 郑峰

    2013-01-01

    目的 对监护仪无创血压示值质量进行评估,(设置输出80/50(60) mmhg、100/65(75) mmhg、120/80(93) mmhg、150/100(116) mmhg及200/150(166) mmHg等5组mmhg参数;设定心率80次/min,评估出各个范围的质量状态.方法使用FLUKE BP Pump2无创血压模拟器内置袖带的质量检测方案,随机抽取南方医院15台HP MP20监护仪和15台GE Dash2500监护仪进行质量检测,采用平均差与标准方差进行分析.结果两种监护仪的实际血压值与设定血压值均存在差异.结论利用血压模拟器对监护仪无创血压质量检测,并结合数理统计学知识分析,此方案具有可行性,可推广到呼吸机流量、输液泵流速及除颤/起搏仪的质量检测与评估.%Objective To evaluate quality of non-invasive blood pressure value of monitors, set the output 80/50 (60), 100/65 (75), 120/80 (93), 150/100 (116) and 200/150 (166) and heart rate 80 beats/min, to assess the quality status of each range. Methods To use the FLUKE BP Pump2 non-invasive blood pressure simulator, the built-in cuff quality detection program, randomly select 15 HP MP20 monitors and 15 GE Dash2500 monitor from Nanfang Hospital to carry out quality detection. The mean difference and standard deviation are analyzed. Results The actual blood pressure value and set blood pressure value of the two monitors are different. Conclusion The program which uses a pressure simulator to test quality of non-invasive blood pressure for monitors, and analysis based on the knowledge of mathematical statistics, can be extended to the ventilator flow, infusion pump flow rate and quality detection and evaluation of defibrillator/pacemaker.

  19. Rapid and Noninvasive Detection of Skin Cholesterol with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Technology%漫反射光谱技术快速无创检测皮肤胆固醇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    候华毅; 董美丽; 王贻坤; 朱灵; 马祖长; 刘勇

    2016-01-01

    method,pig skin which is similar to human skin was taken as the experimental subj ect,and cholesterol samples of gradient concentration were achieved through the extraction.After that the spectroscopy measurement system was adopted to detect the cholesterol concentration.The experiment result showed that,relative diffuse reflectance can distinguish the cholesterol samples with different concentrations,and the diffuse reflectance intensity factor can quantity the concentrations of cholesterol at charac-teristic wavelengths (442,450 and 463 nm)and characteristic wavelength band of 442~500 nm.Linear fitting curves were ob-tained with the determination coefficient R2 were 0.960,0.959,0.958 and 0.958,respectively.The study has shown that, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy technology can realize noninvasive rapid detection of skin cholesterol,and applying it to the risk assessment of atherosclerotic diseases would contribute to the prevention and control of such diseases significantly.

  20. Detection of non-papillary, non-invasive transitional cell G1 carcinoma as revealed by increased DNA instability and other cancer markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hirose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The method to reveal DNA-instability as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-cytidine antibody after acid hydrolysis (DNA-instability test was used as a marker of malignancy. The test was applied to paraffin-embedded sections taken from l5 urinary bladders, renal pelvic cavities, and ureters bearing multiple carcinoma in situ (CIS and totally 31 papillary urothelial cancers. The serial sections of the same tissues were also subjected to immunohistochemical staining for PCNA, p53, DFF45, and VEGF. The DNA-instability test was positive in 100% cancer lesions irrespective of the grades, and apparently normal urothelium, and hyperplastic and dysplastic urothelial lesions also showed the areas with clones positively stained with DNA-instability testing, and the percent numbers of positive areas in them were 28.3%, 37.7%, and 6l.5%, respectively. These clones, which were present in apparently normal urothelium and in hyperplastic and dysplastic urothelial lesions, showed higher percent values of PCNA-positivecells, in comparison to the values estimated in the areas with negatively stained DNA-instability testing, and the former values were statistically not different from those in carcinoma lesions. Furthermore, the percent numbers of areas positive for p53, DFF45, and VEGF, with positive DNA-instability testing were also much higher than those with negative DNA-instability testing in apparently normal urothelium, and hyperplastic and dysplastic urothelial lesions, and the former values were again comparable to those in cancer lesions with no statistical differences. These clones were regarded as already being malignant and should be the direct precursors of progressed cancer lesions. They will make progression through two different pathways, one to papillary non-invasive Gl cancers by neovascularization induced by paracrine secretion of VEGF, and another to flat CIS G2 without secretion of VEGF; thus the clones should be regarded as

  1. “Review on Human Face Detection based on Skin Color and Edge Information”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh S. Gondaliya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human face detection system is gradually used for the tracking a human face. Face detection system is mainly used in face reorganization system for detecting human face. Here in this review paper we have describe how face detection system works and where it is useful in real world environment. We have describes different technique like template matching, skin color and edge information based on face detection from skin region, symmetry based face detection and etc.

  2. Noninvasive Detection of Endothelial Function in Normal Subjects,Asymptomatic Patients at Risk of Atherosclerosis and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rajabzadeh

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The endothelial dysfunction is associated with atherosclerosis. The dilatory reaction of atherosclerotic vessels in response to occlusion is reduced. This reduction could be of value in atherosclerosis determination. This study aimed at comparing brachial artery response to occlusion and administration of nitroglycerine in three groups: coronary artery disease patients, individuals with corona ry disease risk factors but no coronary disease,and normal subjects. Patients and Methods: The participants included 23 healthy individuals, 22 subjects with cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperte nsion or hypercholesterolemia ,and 57 angiographically proven coronary pati ents. The brachial artery diameter was measured by color Doppler ultrasound at rest, 5 min utes after inflation of the cuff, and 5 minutes after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine pearl. Results: The vessel’s diameter increased the least in the coronary artery disease and coronary risk factor groups in comparison to nor mal subjects (p=0.003 and 0.048, respectively. Vessel dilatation in response to nitroglycerine did not differ in healthy individuals from the coronary patients or the risk factor group (p=0.96 and 0.77, respectively. Conclusion: Doppler ultrasound may be used as a noninvasive method to identify subjects with endothelial dysfunction at high risk of coronary artery disease who need intervention or more invasive procedures.

  3. A multimodal emotion detection system during human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Malfaz, María; Sequeira, João; Gorostiza, Javier F; Salichs, Miguel A

    2013-11-14

    In this paper, a multimodal user-emotion detection system for social robots is presented. This system is intended to be used during human-robot interaction, and it is integrated as part of the overall interaction system of the robot: the Robotics Dialog System (RDS). Two modes are used to detect emotions: the voice and face expression analysis. In order to analyze the voice of the user, a new component has been developed: Gender and Emotion Voice Analysis (GEVA), which is written using the Chuck language. For emotion detection in facial expressions, the system, Gender and Emotion Facial Analysis (GEFA), has been also developed. This last system integrates two third-party solutions: Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition Engine (SHORE) and Computer Expression Recognition Toolbox (CERT). Once these new components (GEVA and GEFA) give their results, a decision rule is applied in order to combine the information given by both of them. The result of this rule, the detected emotion, is integrated into the dialog system through communicative acts. Hence, each communicative act gives, among other things, the detected emotion of the user to the RDS so it can adapt its strategy in order to get a greater satisfaction degree during the human-robot dialog. Each of the new components, GEVA and GEFA, can also be used individually. Moreover, they are integrated with the robotic control platform ROS (Robot Operating System). Several experiments with real users were performed to determine the accuracy of each component and to set the final decision rule. The results obtained from applying this decision rule in these experiments show a high success rate in automatic user emotion recognition, improving the results given by the two information channels (audio and visual) separately.

  4. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber and ...

  5. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  6. Role of Non-Invasive Detection of DNA in Prenatal Screening for Down's Syndrome%无创DNA检测在唐氏综合征产前筛查中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯朝晖; 刘华平; 陈冰; 李秀军; 任东平; 任力; 郭晓东

    2013-01-01

    目的:通过比较无创DNA检测和孕中期血清学筛查两种方法的筛查阳性率,从而肯定无创DNA检测在唐氏综合征产前筛查中的实用价值.方法:对500例单胎孕妇进行血清标记物(AFP+β-HCG)-联指标检测,应用配套软件计算唐氏综合征风险;对496例孕妇外周血中的游离DNA片段(含胎儿游离DNA)进行高通量测序,并将测序结果进行生物信息学分析,得出胎儿发生染色体非整倍体的风险率,并追踪胎儿和孕妇的情况.结果:唐氏综合征血清筛查组高危孕妇22例、阳性率为4.4%,假阳性率4.2%;无创DNA检测组筛查阳性孕妇3例,阳性率为0.6%,唐氏综合征检出率为100%.两种方法用于唐氏综合征产前筛查的差异有显著性(P<0.01).结论:无创DNA检测适用范围广、准确率高,是产前筛查是唐氏综合征的有效方法.%Objective: To compare the non-invasive detection of DNA and second trimester serum screening positive rate of screening of two methods, which must be non-invasive detection of DNA in prenatal screening for Down's syndrome practical value. Methods: 500 cases single fetal pregnant women were detected respectively serum mark object ( afp+ beta -hcg ), using software to calculate the risk of Down's syndrome. 496 cases of pregnant women were chosen to detect the free DNA fragment of peripheral blood ( with fetal free DNA) was sequenced and analyzed, then fetal chromosome aneuploid of risk rate was obtained, and followed up fetal and pregnant women. Results: Serum screening for Down's syndrome group of 22 patients with high risk pregnant women, the positive rate was 4.4%, a false positive rate of 4.2%; non-invasive detection of DNA groups screen-positive pregnant women in 3 cases, the positive rate was 0.6%, Down's syndrome detection rates was 100%. There were significant differences of prenatal screening for Down' s syndrome by these two methods (P<0.01 ). Conclusions: Non - invasive detection of DNA

  7. Neural Dynamics Underlying Target Detection in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Arjun K.; Madhavan, Radhika; Agam, Yigal; Golby, Alexandra; Madsen, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory signals must be interpreted in the context of goals and tasks. To detect a target in an image, the brain compares input signals and goals to elicit the correct behavior. We examined how target detection modulates visual recognition signals by recording intracranial field potential responses from 776 electrodes in 10 epileptic human subjects. We observed reliable differences in the physiological responses to stimuli when a cued target was present versus absent. Goal-related modulation was particularly strong in the inferior temporal and fusiform gyri, two areas important for object recognition. Target modulation started after 250 ms post stimulus, considerably after the onset of visual recognition signals. While broadband signals exhibited increased or decreased power, gamma frequency power showed predominantly increases during target presence. These observations support models where task goals interact with sensory inputs via top-down signals that influence the highest echelons of visual processing after the onset of selective responses. PMID:24553944

  8. Occlusion Handling via Random Subspace Classifiers for Human Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Javier; Vázquez, David; López, Antonio M; Amores, Jaume; Kuncheva, Ludmila I

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a general method to address partial occlusions for human detection in still images. The random subspace method (RSM) is chosen for building a classifier ensemble robust against partial occlusions. The component classifiers are chosen on the basis of their individual and combined performance. The main contribution of this work lies in our approach's capability to improve the detection rate when partial occlusions are present without compromising the detection performance on non occluded data. In contrast to many recent approaches, we propose a method which does not require manual labeling of body parts, defining any semantic spatial components, or using additional data coming from motion or stereo. Moreover, the method can be easily extended to other object classes. The experiments are performed on three large datasets: the INRIA person dataset, the Daimler Multicue dataset, and a new challenging dataset, called PobleSec, in which a considerable number of targets are partially occluded. The different approaches are evaluated at the classification and detection levels for both partially occluded and non-occluded data. The experimental results show that our detector outperforms state-of-the-art approaches in the presence of partial occlusions, while offering performance and reliability similar to those of the holistic approach on non-occluded data. The datasets used in our experiments have been made publicly available for benchmarking purposes.

  9. Frequency-based similarity detection of structures in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Dave I.; Siadat, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-03-01

    Advancements in 3D scanning and volumetric imaging methods have motivated researchers to tackle new challenges related to storing, retrieving and comparing 3D models, especially in medical domain. Comparing natural rigid shapes and detecting subtle changes in 3D models of brain structures is of great importance. Precision in capturing surface details and insensitivity to shape orientation are highly desirable properties of good shape descriptors. In this paper, we propose a new method, Spherical Harmonics Distance (SHD), which leverages the power of spherical harmonics to provide more accurate representation of surface details. At the same time, the proposed method incorporates the features of a shape distribution method (D2) and inherits its insensitivity to shape orientation. Comparing SHD to a spherical harmonics based method (SPHARM) shows that the performance of the proposed method is less sensitive to rotation. Also, comparing SHD to D2 shows that the proposed method is more accurate in detecting subtle changes. The performance of the proposed method is verified by calculating the Fisher measure (FM) of extracted feature vectors. The FM of the vectors generated by SHD on average shows 27 times higher values than that of D2. Our preliminary results show that SHD successfully combines desired features from two different methods and paves the way towards better detection of subtle dissimilarities among natural rigid shapes (e.g. structures of interest in human brain). Detecting these subtle changes can be instrumental in more accurate diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning.

  10. The non-invasive 13C-methionine breath test detects hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction as a marker of disease activity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banasch M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the general pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, increasing the risk of developing steatosis and subsequent hepatocellular inflammation. We aimed to assess hepatic mitochondrial function by a non-invasive 13C-methionine breath test (MeBT in patients with histologically proven NAFLD. Methods 118 NAFLD-patients and 18 healthy controls were examined by MeBT. Liver biopsy specimens were evaluated according to the NASH scoring system. Results Higher grades of NASH activity and fibrosis were independently associated with a significant decrease in cumulative 13C-exhalation (expressed as cPDR(%. cPDR1.5h was markedly declined in patients with NASH and NASH cirrhosis compared to patients with simple steatosis or borderline diagnosis (cPDR1.5h: 3.24 ± 1.12% and 1.32 ± 0.94% vs. 6.36 ± 0.56% and 4.80 ± 0.88% respectively; p 13C-exhalation further declined in the presence of advanced fibrosis which was correlated with NASH activity (r = 0.36. The area under the ROC curve (AUROC for NASH diagnosis was estimated to be 0.87 in the total cohort and 0.83 in patients with no or mild fibrosis (F0-1. Conclusion The 13C-methionine breath test indicates mitochondrial dysfunction in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and predicts higher stages of disease activity. It may, therefore, be a valuable diagnostic addition for longitudinal monitoring of hepatic (mitochondrial function in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS as a new non-invasive tool to detect oxidative skeletal muscle impairment in children survived to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Lanfranconi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Separating out the effects of cancer and treatment between central and peripheral components of the O2 delivery chain should be of interest to clinicians for longitudinal evaluation of potential functional impairment in order to set appropriate individually tailored training/rehabilitation programmes. We propose a non-invasive method (NIRS, near infrared spectroscopy to be used in routine clinical practice to evaluate a potential impairment of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity during exercise in children previously diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of skeletal muscle to extract O2 in 10 children diagnosed with ALL, 1 year after the end of malignancy treatment, compared to a control group matched for gender and age (mean±SD = 7.8±1.5 and 7.3±1.4 years, respectively. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants underwent an incremental exercise test on a treadmill until exhaustion. Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text], heart rate (HR, and tissue oxygenation status (Δ[HHb] of the vastus lateralis muscle evaluated by NIRS, were measured. The results showed that, in children with ALL, a significant linear regression was found by plotting [Formula: see text] vs Δ[HHb] both measured at peak of exercise. In children with ALL, the slope of the HR vs [Formula: see text] linear response (during sub-maximal and peak work rates was negatively correlated with the peak value of Δ[HHb]. CONCLUSIONS: The present study proves that the NIRS technique allows us to identify large inter-individual differences in levels of impairment in muscle O2 extraction in children with ALL. The outcome of these findings is variable and may reflect either muscle atrophy due to lack of use or, in the most severe cases, an undiagnosed myopathy.

  12. Detecting multiple DNA human profile from a mosquito blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Moura, R R; Brandão, L A C; Crovella, S

    2016-08-26

    Criminal traces commonly found at crime scenes may present mixtures from two or more individuals. The scene of the crime is important for the collection of various types of traces in order to find the perpetrator of the crime. Thus, we propose that hematophagous mosquitoes found at crime scenes can be used to perform genetic testing of human blood and aid in suspect investigation. The aim of the study was to obtain a single Aedes aegypti mosquito profile from a human DNA mixture containing genetic materials of four individuals. We also determined the effect of blood acquisition time by setting time intervals of 24, 48, and 72 h after the blood meal. STR loci and amelogenin were analyzed, and the results showed that human DNA profiles could be obtained from hematophagous mosquitos at 24 h following the blood meal. It is possible that hematophagous mosquitoes can be used as biological remains at the scene of the crime, and can be used to detect human DNA profiles of up to four individuals.

  13. Detection of Nonverbal Synchronization through Phase Difference in Human Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jinhwan; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Ono, Eisuke; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nonverbal communication is an important factor in human communication, and body movement synchronization in particular is an important part of nonverbal communication. Some researchers have analyzed body movement synchronization by focusing on changes in the amplitude of body movements. However, the definition of "body movement synchronization" is still unclear. From a theoretical viewpoint, phase difference is the most important factor in synchronization analysis. Therefore, there is a need to measure the synchronization of body movements using phase difference. The purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative definition of the phase difference distribution for detecting body movement synchronization in human communication. The phase difference distribution was characterized using four statistical measurements: density, mean phase difference, standard deviation (SD) and kurtosis. To confirm the effectiveness of our definition, we applied it to human communication in which the roles of speaker and listener were defined. Specifically, we examined the difference in the phase difference distribution between two different communication situations: face-to-face communication with visual interaction and remote communication with unidirectional visual perception. Participant pairs performed a task supposing lecture in the face-to-face communication condition and in the remote communication condition via television. Throughout the lecture task, we extracted a set of phase differences from the time-series data of the acceleration norm of head nodding motions between two participants. Statistical analyses of the phase difference distribution revealed the characteristics of head nodding synchronization. Although the mean phase differences in synchronized head nods did not differ significantly between the conditions, there were significant differences in the densities, the SDs and the kurtoses of the phase difference distributions of synchronized head nods. These

  14. Detection of Nonverbal Synchronization through Phase Difference in Human Communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhwan Kwon

    Full Text Available Nonverbal communication is an important factor in human communication, and body movement synchronization in particular is an important part of nonverbal communication. Some researchers have analyzed body movement synchronization by focusing on changes in the amplitude of body movements. However, the definition of "body movement synchronization" is still unclear. From a theoretical viewpoint, phase difference is the most important factor in synchronization analysis. Therefore, there is a need to measure the synchronization of body movements using phase difference. The purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative definition of the phase difference distribution for detecting body movement synchronization in human communication. The phase difference distribution was characterized using four statistical measurements: density, mean phase difference, standard deviation (SD and kurtosis. To confirm the effectiveness of our definition, we applied it to human communication in which the roles of speaker and listener were defined. Specifically, we examined the difference in the phase difference distribution between two different communication situations: face-to-face communication with visual interaction and remote communication with unidirectional visual perception. Participant pairs performed a task supposing lecture in the face-to-face communication condition and in the remote communication condition via television. Throughout the lecture task, we extracted a set of phase differences from the time-series data of the acceleration norm of head nodding motions between two participants. Statistical analyses of the phase difference distribution revealed the characteristics of head nodding synchronization. Although the mean phase differences in synchronized head nods did not differ significantly between the conditions, there were significant differences in the densities, the SDs and the kurtoses of the phase difference distributions of synchronized head

  15. The Effects of Soil Texture on the Ability of Human Remains Detection Dogs to Detect Buried Human Remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Michael B; Hodges, Theresa K; Wescott, Daniel J; Aitkenhead-Peterson, Jacqueline A

    2016-05-01

    Despite technological advances, human remains detection (HRD) dogs still remain one of the best tools for locating clandestine graves. However, soil texture may affect the escape of decomposition gases and therefore the effectiveness of HDR dogs. Six nationally credentialed HRD dogs (three HRD only and three cross-trained) were evaluated on novel buried human remains in contrasting soils, a clayey and a sandy soil. Search time and accuracy were compared for the clayey soil and sandy soil to assess odor location difficulty. Sandy soil (p < 0.001) yielded significantly faster trained response times, but no significant differences were found in performance accuracy between soil textures or training method. Results indicate soil texture may be significant factor in odor detection difficulty. Prior knowledge of soil texture and moisture may be useful for search management and planning. Appropriate adjustments to search segment sizes, sweep widths and search time allotment depending on soil texture may optimize successful detection. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. A gold nanohole array based surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for detection of silver(i) and mercury(ii) in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Jurevic, Richard; Cushing, Scott K.; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-06-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids.A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02142a

  17. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu André L P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC.

  18. Validation of an immunodiagnostic assay for detection of 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-specific polysaccharides in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Michael W; Huijts, Susanne M; Wu, Kangjian; Souza, Victor; Passador, Sherry; Tinder, Chunyan; Song, Esther; Elfassy, Arik; McNeil, Lisa; Menton, Ronald; French, Roger; Callahan, Janice; Webber, Chris; Gruber, William C; Bonten, Marc J M; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2012-08-01

    To improve the clinical diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in bacteremic and nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a Luminex technology-based multiplex urinary antigen detection (UAD) diagnostic assay was developed and validated. The UAD assay can simultaneously detect 13 different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capturing serotype-specific S. pneumoniae polysaccharides (PnPSs) secreted in human urine. Assay specificity is achieved by capturing the polysaccharides with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on spectrally unique microspheres. Positivity for each serotype was based on positivity cutoff values calculated from a standard curve run on each assay plate together with positive- and negative-control urine samples. The assay is highly specific, since significant signals are detected only when each PnPS was paired with its homologous MAb-coated microspheres. Validation experiments demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. The UAD assay and corresponding positivity cutoff values were clinically validated by assessing 776 urine specimens obtained from patients with X-ray-confirmed CAP. The UAD assay demonstrated 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity using samples obtained from patients with bacteremic, blood culture-positive CAP. Importantly, the UAD assay identified Streptococcus pneumoniae (13 serotypes) in a proportion of individuals with nonbacteremic CAP, a patient population for which the pneumococcal etiology of CAP was previously difficult to assess. Therefore, the UAD assay provides a specific, noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tool to support vaccine efficacy as well as epidemiological evaluation of pneumococcal disease, including CAP, in adults.

  19. Infrared thermography in the detection of brown adipose tissue in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Christina; Jalapu, Sandya; Thuzar, Moe; Law, Phillip W; Jeavons, Susanne; Barclay, Johanna L.; Ho, Ken K.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PET‐CT using 18F‐FDG is employed for detecting brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans. Alternative methods are needed because of the radiation and cost of PET‐CT imaging. The aim was to evaluate the accuracy of infrared thermography (IRT) in detecting human BAT benchmarked to PET‐CT imaging. Seventeen individuals underwent a total of 29 PET‐CT scans, 12 of whom were studied twice, after 2 h of cold stimulation at 19°C, in parallel with measurement of skin temperatures overlying the supraclavicular (SCV) fossa and the lateral upper chest (control), before and after cold stimulation. Of the 29 scans, 20 were BAT positive after cold stimulation. The mean left SCV temperature tended to be higher in the BAT‐positive group before and during cooling. It was significantly higher (P =0.04) than the temperature of the control area, which fell significantly during cooling in the BAT‐positive (−1.2 ± 0.3°C, P =0.002) but not in the negative (−0.2 ± 0.4°C) group. The temperature difference (Δtemp) between left SCV and chest increased during cooling in the BAT‐positive (1.2 ± 0.2 to 2.0 ± 0.3°C, P <0.002) but not in the negative group (0.6 ± 0.1 to 0.7 ± 0.1°C). A Δtemp of 0.9°C conferred a positive predictive value of 85% for SCV BAT, superior to that of SCV temperature. The findings were similar on the right. In conclusion, the Δtemp is significantly and consistently greater in BAT‐positive subjects. The Δtemp quantified by IRT after 2‐h cooling shows promise as a noninvasive convenient technique for studying SCV BAT function. PMID:25413316

  20. Early and Non-Invasive Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Feces by Real-Time Quaking Induced Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yo Ching; Hannaoui, Samia; John, Theodore R.; Dudas, Sandor; Czub, Stefanie; Gilch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of wild and captive cervids in North America. Prions are infectious agents composed of a misfolded version of a host-encoded protein, termed PrPSc. Infected cervids excrete and secrete prions, contributing to lateral transmission. Geographical distribution is expanding and case numbers in wild cervids are increasing. Recently, the first European cases of CWD have been reported in a wild reindeer and two moose from Norway. Therefore, methods to detect the infection early in the incubation time using easily available samples are desirable to facilitate effective disease management. We have adapted the real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay, a sensitive in vitro prion amplification method, for pre-clinical detection of prion seeding activity in elk feces. Testing fecal samples from orally inoculated elk taken at various time points post infection revealed early shedding and detectable prion seeding activity throughout the disease course. Early shedding was also found in two elk encoding a PrP genotype associated with reduced susceptibility for CWD. In summary, we suggest that detection of CWD prions in feces by RT-QuIC may become a useful tool to support CWD surveillance in wild and captive cervids. The finding of early shedding independent of the elk’s prion protein genotype raises the question whether prolonged survival is beneficial, considering accumulation of environmental prions and its contribution to CWD transmission upon extended duration of shedding. PMID:27829062

  1. Towards a non-invasive method for early detection of testicular neoplasia in semen samples by identification of fetal germ cell-specific markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Carlsen, E; Jorgensen, N

    2007-01-01

    was detected in 50% of participants with CIS and in 33.9% of TGCT patients before treatment (non-seminomas: 56.6%, seminomas: 17.4%). OCT-3/4 results were similar to those of AP-2gamma, whereas NANOG and PLAP stainings were unsuitable. Sensitivity was 54.5% for participants harbouring pre-invasive CIS...

  2. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  3. Thermal imaging to detect physiological indicators of stress in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Carl B.; Skipper, Julie A.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2013-05-01

    Real-time, stand-off sensing of human subjects to detect emotional state would be valuable in many defense, security and medical scenarios. We are developing a multimodal sensor platform that incorporates high-resolution electro-optical and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras and a millimeter-wave radar system to identify individuals who are psychologically stressed. Recent experiments have aimed to: 1) assess responses to physical versus psychological stressors; 2) examine the impact of topical skin products on thermal signatures; and 3) evaluate the fidelity of vital signs extracted from thermal imagery and radar signatures. Registered image and sensor data were collected as subjects (n=32) performed mental and physical tasks. In each image, the face was segmented into 29 non-overlapping segments based on fiducial points automatically output by our facial feature tracker. Image features were defined that facilitated discrimination between psychological and physical stress states. To test the ability to intentionally mask thermal responses indicative of anxiety or fear, subjects applied one of four topical skin products to one half of their face before performing tasks. Finally, we evaluated the performance of two non-contact techniques to detect respiration and heart rate: chest displacement extracted from the radar signal and temperature fluctuations at the nose tip and regions near superficial arteries to detect respiration and heart rates, respectively, extracted from the MWIR imagery. Our results are very satisfactory: classification of physical versus psychological stressors is repeatedly greater than 90%, thermal masking was almost always ineffective, and accurate heart and respiration rates are detectable in both thermal and radar signatures.

  4. Evaluation of a novel assay for detection of the fetal marker RASSF1A: facilitating improved diagnostic reliability of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of cell free fetal (cff DNA in maternal plasma is used routinely for non invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD of fetal sex determination, fetal rhesus D status and some single gene disorders. True positive results rely on detection of the fetal target being analysed. No amplification of the target may be interpreted either as a true negative result or a false negative result due to the absence or very low levels of cffDNA. The hypermethylated RASSF1A promoter has been reported as a universal fetal marker to confirm the presence of cffDNA. Using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes hypomethylated maternal sequences are digested leaving hypermethylated fetal sequences detectable. Complete digestion of maternal sequences is required to eliminate false positive results. METHODS: cfDNA was extracted from maternal plasma (n = 90 and digested with methylation-sensitive and insensitive restriction enzymes. Analysis of RASSF1A, SRY and DYS14 was performed by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Hypermethylated RASSF1A was amplified for 79 samples (88% indicating the presence of cffDNA. SRY real time PCR results and fetal sex at delivery were 100% accurate. Eleven samples (12% had no detectable hypermethylated RASSF1A and 10 of these (91% had gestational ages less than 7 weeks 2 days. Six of these samples were male at delivery, five had inconclusive results for SRY analysis and one sample had no amplifiable SRY. CONCLUSION: Use of this assay for the detection of hypermethylated RASSF1A as a universal fetal marker has the potential to improve the diagnostic reliability of NIPD for fetal sex determination and single gene disorders.

  5. A unique role for the human amygdala in novelty detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Jennifer Urbano; Buckholtz, Joshua W; Avery, Suzanne N; Zald, David H

    2010-04-15

    Previous research indicates that the amygdala and hippocampus are sensitive to novelty; however, two types of novelty can be distinguished - stimuli that are ordinary, but novel in the current context, and stimuli that are unusual. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined blood oxygen dependent level (BOLD) response of the human amygdala and hippocampus to novel, commonly seen objects versus novel unusual objects. When presented with the novel common stimuli, the BOLD signal increased significantly in both the amygdala and hippocampus. However, for the novel unusual stimuli, only the amygdala showed an increased response compared to the novel common stimuli. These findings suggest that the amygdala is distinctly responsive to novel unusual stimuli, making a unique contribution to the novelty detection circuit.

  6. Gazing-detection of human eyes based on SVM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Su-mei; ZHANG Yan-xin; CHANG Sheng-jiang; SHEN Jin-yuan

    2005-01-01

    A method for gazing-detection of human eyes using Support Vector Machine (SVM) based on statistic learning theory (SLT) is proposed.According to the criteria of structural risk minimization of SVM,the errors between sample-data and model-data are minimized and the upper bound of predicting error of the model is also reduced.As a result,the generalization ability of the model is much improved.The simulation results show that,when limited training samples are used,the correct recognition rate of the tested samples can be as high as 100%,which is much better than some previous results obtained by other methods.The higher processing speed enables the system to distinguish gazing or not-gazing in real-time.

  7. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  8. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  9. A micro amperometric immunosensor for detection of human immunoglobulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuanyuan; XIA Shanhong; BIAN Chao; CHEN Shaofeng

    2006-01-01

    A novel amperometric immunosensor based on the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, using protein A and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for the orientation-controlled immobilization of antibodies, has been developed. Using MEMS technology, an "Au, Pt, Pt" three-microelectrode system enclosed in a SU-8 micro pool was fabricated. Employing SAMs, a monolayer of protein A was immobilized on the cysteamine modified Au electrode to achieve the orientation-controlled immobilization of the human immunoglobulin (HIgG) antibody. The immunosensor aimed at low unit cost, small dimension, high level of integration and the prospect of a biosensor system-on-a-chip. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were conducted to characterize the immunosensor. Compared with the traditional immunosensor using bulky gold electrode or screen-printed electrode and the procedure directly binding protein A to electrode for immobilization of antibodies, it had attractive advantages, such as miniaturization, compatibility with CMOS technology, fast response (30 s), broad linear range (50-400μg/L) and low detection limit (10μg/L) for HIgG. In addition, this immunosensor was easy to be designed into micro array and to realize the simultaneously multi-parameter detection.

  10. Comparative analysis of gingival phenotype in animal and human experimental models using optical coherence tomography in a non-invasive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Fernandes, Luana O.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Feitosa, Daniela S.; Cimões, Renata; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging methods are widely used in diagnostic and among the diversity of modalities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is nowadays commercially available and considered the most innovative technique used for imaging applications, in both medical and non-medical applications. In this study, we exploit the OCT technique in the oral cavity for identification and differentiation between free and attached gingiva, as well as determining the gingival phenotype, an important factor to determination of periodontal prognosis in patients. For the animal studies, five porcine jaws were analyzed using a Swept Source SS-OCT system operating at 1325nm and stereomicroscope, as gold pattern. The SSOCT at 1325nm was chosen due to the longer central wavelength, that allows to deeper penetration imaging, and the faster image acquisition, an essential factor for clinical setting. For the patient studies, a total of 30 males and female were examined using the SS-OCT at 1325nm and computer controlled periodontal probing. 2D and 3D images of tooth/gingiva interface were performed, and quantitative measurements of the gingival sulcus could be noninvasively obtained. Through the image analysis of the animals jaws, it was possible to quantify the free gingiva and the attached gingiva, the calculus deposition over teeth surface and also the subgingival calculus. For the patient's studies, we demonstrated that the gingival phenotype could be measured without the periodontal probe introduction at the gingival sulcus, confirming that OCT can be potentially useful in clinic for direct observation and quantification of gingival phenotype in a non-invasive approach.

  11. Detection of Buried Human Remains Using Bioreporter Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vass, A. Dr.; Singleton, G. B.

    2001-10-01

    The search for buried human remains is a difficult, laborious and time-consuming task for law enforcement agencies. This study was conducted as a proof of principle demonstration to test the concept of using bioreporter microorganisms as a means to cover large areas in such a search. These bioreporter microorganisms are affected by a particular component of decaying organic matter that is distinct from decaying vegetation. The diamino compounds cadaverine and putrescine were selected as target compounds for the proof-of-principle investigation, and a search for microorganisms and genes that are responsive to either of these compounds was conducted. One recombinant clone was singled out for characterization based on its response to putrescine. The study results show that small concentrations of putrescine increased expression from this bioreporter construct. Although the level of increase was small (making it difficult to distinguish the signal from background), the results demonstrate the principle that bioreporters can be used to detect compounds resulting from decaying human remains and suggest that a wider search for target compounds should be conducted.

  12. NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, William

    1981-01-01

    This book includes all of the papers presented at the NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures held at Roskilde, Denmark on August 4-8, 1980. The Symposium was sponsored by the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO and the Rise National Laboratory of Denmark. The goal of the Symposium was to continue the tradition initiated by the NATO Symposium on Monitoring Behavior and Supervisory Control held in Berchtesgaden, F .R. Germany in 1976 and the NATO Symposium on Theory and Measurement of Mental Workload held in Mati, Greece in 1977. To this end, a group of 85 psychologists and engineers coming from industry, government, and academia convened to discuss, and to generate a "state-of-the-art" consensus of the problems and solutions associated with the human IS ability to cope with the increasing scale of consequences of failures within complex technical systems. The Introduction of this volume reviews their findings. The Symposium was organized to include brief formal presentations of pape...

  13. Detection of hypercholesterolemia using hyperspectral imaging of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-07-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high blood levels of cholesterol and is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Xanthelasma is a subcutaneous lesion appearing in the skin around the eyes. Xanthelasma is related to hypercholesterolemia. Identifying micro-xanthelasma can thereforeprovide a mean for early detection of hypercholesterolemia and prevent onset and progress of disease. The goal of this study was to investigate spectral and spatial characteristics of hypercholesterolemia in facial skin. Optical techniques like hyperspectral imaging (HSI) might be a suitable tool for such characterization as it simultaneously provides high resolution spatial and spectral information. In this study a 3D Monte Carlo model of lipid inclusions in human skin was developed to create hyperspectral images in the spectral range 400-1090 nm. Four lesions with diameters 0.12-1.0 mm were simulated for three different skin types. The simulations were analyzed using three algorithms: the Tissue Indices (TI), the two layer Diffusion Approximation (DA), and the Minimum Noise Fraction transform (MNF). The simulated lesions were detected by all methods, but the best performance was obtained by the MNF algorithm. The results were verified using data from 11 volunteers with known cholesterol levels. The face of the volunteers was imaged by a LCTF system (400- 720 nm), and the images were analyzed using the previously mentioned algorithms. The identified features were then compared to the known cholesterol levels of the subjects. Significant correlation was obtained for the MNF algorithm only. This study demonstrates that HSI can be a promising, rapid modality for detection of hypercholesterolemia.

  14. Noninvasive sensors in critical care medicine: near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection of altered microvascular blood flow in severe sepsis and septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, J. Matthias; Soller, Babs; Soyemi, Olusola; Yang, Ye; Landry, Michelle; Heard, Stephen O.

    2006-10-01

    It is estimated that 750,000 cases of severe sepsis occur in the United States annually, at least 225,000 of which are fatal, resulting in significant utilization of healthcare resources and expenses. Significant progress in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of this condition has been made lately. Among the newer treatment strategies for critically ill patients are the administration of early goal directed therapy, and Recombinant Human Activated Protein C (Drotrecogrin alfa (activated) [DTAA]) for severe sepsis. However, mortality remains unacceptably high.

  15. Noninvasive detection by ATR and NIR-DR methods for skin-care ionic materials transported into the skin by iontophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Toyotoshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Akao, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Harue

    2003-12-01

    Two analytical methods without damage to the skin were proposed in order to detect and measure the quantity of the medication transported into the skin by the iontophoresis. The infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) method was proven to be able to evaluate the content of such a substance as sodium all- trans-retinoate or magnesium ℓ-ascorbyl-2-phosphate in the top (horny) layer of epidermis (about 1 μm under the skin surface), using characteristic bands to the above ion. Another method of near-infrared diffusive-reflection (NIR-DR) technique was shown probably to detect it in the dermis (1 mm under the surface), based on the shift of frequency and the change in intensity for the vibrational combination band of water molecules hydrating the ion. The quantity of the above material decreased monotonically in the horny layer for several hours after the treatment, while in the dermis it increased at first and then decreased via the maximum value.

  16. Non-invasive detection of biliary leaks using Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR cholangiography: comparison with T2-weighted MR cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantarci, Mecit; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Ogul, Hayri; Kizrak, Yesim; Eren, Suat [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Erzurum (Turkey); Yilmaz, Sinan [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the added role of T1-weighted (T1w) gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) compared with T2-weighted MRC (T2w-MRC) in the detection of biliary leaks. Ninety-nine patients with suspected biliary complications underwent routine T2w-MRC and T1w contrast-enhanced (CE) MRC using Gd-EOB-DTPA to identify biliary leaks. Two observers reviewed the image sets separately and together. MRC findings were compared with those of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiopancreatography. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the techniques in identifying biliary leaks were calculated. Accuracy of locating biliary leaks was superior with the combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC and T2w-MRC (P < 0.05).The mean sensitivities were 79 % vs 59 %, and the mean accuracy rates were 84 % vs 58 % for combined CE-MRC and T2w-MRC vs sole T2w-MRC. Nineteen out of 21 patients with biliary-cyst communication, 90.4 %, and 12/15 patients with post-traumatic biliary extravasations, 80 %, were detected by the combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC and T2w-MRC images, P < 0.05. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC yields information that complements T2w-MRC findings and improves the identification and localisation of the bile extravasations (84 % accuracy, 100 % specificity, P < 0.05). We recommend Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC in addition to T2w-MRC to increase the preoperative accuracy of identifying and locating extravasations of bile. (orig.)

  17. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

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    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  18. Object Detection and Tracking-Based Camera Calibration for Normalized Human Height Estimation

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    Jaehoon Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a normalized human height estimation algorithm using an uncalibrated camera. To estimate the normalized human height, the proposed algorithm detects a moving object and performs tracking-based automatic camera calibration. The proposed method consists of three steps: (i moving human detection and tracking, (ii automatic camera calibration, and (iii human height estimation and error correction. The proposed method automatically calibrates camera by detecting moving humans and estimates the human height using error correction. The proposed method can be applied to object-based video surveillance systems and digital forensic.

  19. Measuring ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting early-stage type 2 diabetes: A step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Van Wijk, Eduard; Koval, Slavik; Van Wijk, Roeland; He, Min; Wang, Mei; Hankemeier, Thomas; van der Greef, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is estimated to reach 4.4% by 2030, placing a significant burden on our healthcare system. Therefore, the ability to identify patients in early stages of the disease is essential for both prevention and effective management, and diagnostic methods based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be suitable for identifying patients with early-stage type 2 diabetes. Here, a panel of three physicians trained in TCM classified 44 pre-diabetic subjects into three syndrome subtypes using TCM-based diagnostics. In addition, ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) was measured at four anatomical sites in each subject. Ten properties encompassing 40 parameters were then extracted from the UPE time series. Statistical analyses, including multinomial logistic regression, were performed using the results of each parameter measured at the four sites. Sixteen UPE parameters were then selected and used to discriminate between the three subtypes of pre-diabetic subjects. Next, Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to quantify the correlation between the 16 UPE parameters and the TCM-based diagnoses. The resulting correlation networks accurately reflected the differences between the three syndrome subtypes. These results suggest that UPE is a suitable tool for detecting subtypes in early-stage type 2 diabetes. In addition, our results provide evidence that TCM may represent an important step toward personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved amplification efficiency on stool samples by addition of spermidine and its use for non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Roperch, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-29

    Background Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QM-MSP) is a promising method for colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis from stool samples. Difficulty in eliminating PCR inhibitors of this body fluid has been extensively reported. Here, spermidine is presented as PCR facilitator for the detection of stool DNA methylation biomarkers using QM-MSP. We examined its effectiveness with NPY, PENK and WIF1, three biomarkers which we have previously shown to be of relevance to CRC. Results We determined an optimal window for the amplification of the albumin (Alb) gene (100 ng of bisulfite-treated stool DNA added of 1 mM spermidine) at which we report that spermidine acts as a PCR facilitator (AE = 1680%) for SG RT-PCR. We show that the amplification of methylated PENK, NPY and WIF1 is considerably facilitated by QM-MSP as measured by an increase of CMI (Cumulative Methylation Index, i.e. the sum of the three methylation values) by a factor of 1.5 to 23 fold in individual samples, and of 10 fold in a pool of five samples. Conclusions We contend that spermidine greatly reduces the problems of PCR inhibition in stool samples. This observed feature, after validation on a larger sampling, could be used in the development of stool-based CRC diagnosis tests.

  1. Noninvasive visualization of adenovirus replication with a fluorescent reporter in the E3 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hidetaka A; Le, Long P; Davydova, Julia G; Gavrikova, Tatyana; Yamamoto, Masato

    2005-11-15

    To overcome the inefficacy and undesirable side effects of current cancer treatment strategies, conditionally replicative adenoviruses have been developed to exploit the unique mechanism of oncolysis afforded by tumor-specific viral replication. Despite rapid translation into clinical trials and the established safety of oncolytic adenoviruses, the in vivo function of these agents is not well understood due to lack of a noninvasive detection system for adenovirus replication. To address this issue, we propose the expression of a reporter from the adenovirus E3 region as a means to monitor replication. Adenovirus replication reporter vectors were constructed with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene placed in the deleted E3 region under the control of the adenoviral major late promoter while retaining expression of the adenovirus death protein to conserve the native oncolytic capability of the virus. Strong EGFP fluorescence was detected from these vectors in a replication-dependent manner, which correlated with viral DNA replication. Fluorescence imaging in vivo confirmed the ability to noninvasively detect fluorescent signal during replication, which generally corresponded with the underlying level of viral DNA replication. EGFP representation of viral replication was further confirmed by Western blot comparison with the viral DNA content in the tumors. Imaging reporter expression controlled by the adenoviral major late promoter provides a viable approach to noninvasively monitor adenovirus replication in preclinical studies and has the potential for human application with clinically relevant imaging reporters.

  2. First detection of ethylphenidate in human fatalities after ethylphenidate intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, J; Sachs, H; Musshoff, F; Dame, T; Schaeper, J; Schwerer, M; Graw, M; Roider, G

    2014-10-01

    Methylphenidate, a psychostimulant drug from the group of amphetamines is, among others, established in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. It is also known to have a certain potential of abuse. In combination with alcohol, the metabolite ethylphenidate was detected in human plasma in small amounts. However, ethylphenidate is sold as "research chemical" via the Internet. It was put under German narcotics law in July 2013. In a recent case, where a deceased person was found in his apartment, the police seized a plastic bag with the inscription "ethylphenidate". An autopsy of the 32-year-old man yielded a mitral valve endocarditis, which must have persisted a while before death, in combination with a pneumonia. At the Forensic Toxicological Centre (FTC) in Munich femoral blood, liver, pericardium fluid, urine, stomach content and hair of the deceased were analyzed for ethylphenidate after sample preparation by an LC-Triple TOF 5600. Calibration curves were spiked with a methanolic 1mg/mL solution of ethylphenidate (substance provided by the State Office of Criminal Investigation in Munich) in whole blood in comparison to liver and femoral blood, in serum in comparison to pericardium fluid and in urine in comparison to urine and stomach content, respectively. Ethylphenidate was detected in all analyzed matrices. The spectrums of the human specimen were compared to those obtained from the calibration curves and identified as ethylphenidate. The measured concentrations were for femoral blood 110ng/mL, for liver 180ng/g, for pericardium fluid 131ng/mL, for urine 987ng/mL and for stomach content 20.7ng/mL, respectively. The stomach contained 200mL of a brownish-coloured liquid, resulting in a total amount of 4000ng ethylphenidate. The lowest calibrator for whole blood and serum was 1ng/mL and for urine 10ng/mL. As far as it is known to the authors, these are the first ethylphenidate levels measured in a case of ethylphenidate intake

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by the hybrid capture assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Maria Odete O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is the main cause of cervical cancers and cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN worldwide. Consequently, it would be useful to evaluate HPV testing to screen for cervical cancer. Recently developed, the second-generation Hybrid Capture (HCA II test is a non-radioactive, relatively rapid, liquid hybridization assay designed to detect 18 HPV types, divided into high and low-risk groups. We evaluated 1055 women for HPV infection with the HCA II test. Five hundred and ten (48.3% of these women had HPV infection; 60 (11.8% had low cancer-risk HPV DNA; 269 (52.7% had high-risk HPV types and 181 (35.5% had both groups. Hence, 450 women (88.2% in this HPV-infected group had at least one high risk HPV type, and were therefore considered to be at high risk for cancer. Among the group with Papanicolaou (Pap test results, the overall prevalence of HPV DNA was 58.4%. Significant differences in HPV infection of the cervix were detected between Pap I (normal smears and Pap IV (carcinomas (p<0.0001. Values of HPV viral load obtained for Pap I and SILs were significantly different, with an upward trend (p<0.0001, suggesting a positive correlation between high viral load values and risk of SIL. Because of the high costs of the HCA II test, its use for routine cervical mass screening cannot be recommended in poor countries. Nevertheless, it is a useful tool when combined with cytology, diagnosing high-risk infections in apparently normal tissues. Use of this technique could help reduce the risk of cancer.

  4. Human papillomavirus detection in moroccan patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

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    Belghmi Khalid

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a malignant tumor which arises in surface epithelium of the posterior wall of the nasopharynx. There's is evidence that Epstein Barr virus (EBV is associated to NPC development. However, many epidemiologic studies point to a connection between viral infections by the human papillomavirus (HPV and NPC. Method Seventy Moroccan patients with NPC were screened for EBV and HPV. EBV detection was performed by PCR amplification of BZLF1 gene, encoding the ZEBRA (Z Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Activator protein, and HPV infection was screened by PCR amplification with subsequent typing by hybridization with specific oligonucleotides for HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45 and 59. Results The age distribution of our patients revealed a bimodal pattern. Sixty two cases (88.9% were classified as type 3 (undifferentiated carcinoma, 6 (8.6% as type 2 (non keratinizing NPC and only 2 (2.9% cases were classified as type 1 (keratinizing NPC. EBV was detected in all NPC tumors, whereas HPV DNA was revealed in 34% of cases (24/70. Molecular analysis showed that 20.8% (5/24 were infected with HPV31, and the remaining were infected with other oncogenic types (i.e., HPV59, 16, 18, 33, 35 and 45. In addition, statistical analysis showed that there's no association between sex or age and HPV infection (P > 0.1. Conclusion Our data indicated that EBV is commonly associated with NPC in Moroccan patients and show for the first time that NPC tumours from Moroccan patients harbour high risk HPV genotypes.

  5. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demura, Takayoshi; Sakashita, Shigeo; Takamura, Takao; Kuroda, Kazuhide (Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 ..mu..l of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (/sup 3/H-DHT). The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to receptors was demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17..beta..-estradiol. No binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of /sup 3/H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observations are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography.

  6. Specific detection of CD133-positive tumor cells with iron oxide nanoparticles labeling using noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YW

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Wen Chen,1,2 Gunn-Guang Liou,3 Huay-Ben Pan,4,5 Hui-Hwa Tseng,5,6 Yu-Ting Hung,4 Chen-Pin Chou4,5,7,8 1National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 2Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 3Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 4Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, 5School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 6Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, 7Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, 8School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan Background: The use of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles to visualize cells has been applied clinically, showing the potential for monitoring cells in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO conjugated with anti-CD133 antibodies (USPIO-CD133 Ab that recognize the CD133 molecule, a cancer stem cell marker in a variety of cancers, was studied as a novel and potent agent for MRI contrast enhancement of tumor cells. Materials and methods: Anti-CD133 antibodies were used to conjugate with USPIO via interaction of streptavidin and biotin for in vivo labeling of CD133-positive cells in xenografted tumors and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced brain tumors. The specific binding of USPIO-CD133 Ab to CD133-positive tumor cells was subsequently detected by Prussian blue staining and MRI with T2-weighted, gradient echo and multiple echo recombined gradient echo images. In addition, the cellular toxicity of USPIO-CD133 Ab was determined by analyzing cell proliferation, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species production. Results: USPIO-CD133 Ab specifically recognizes in vitro and labels CD133-positive cells, as validated using Prussian blue staining and MRI. The assays of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and

  7. Moving human full body and body parts detection, tracking, and applications on human activity estimation, walking pattern and face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a new way for detection and tracking of human full-body and body-parts with color (intensity) patch morphological segmentation and adaptive thresholding for security surveillance cameras. An adaptive threshold scheme has been developed for dealing with body size changes, illumination condition changes, and cross camera parameter changes. Tests with the PETS 2009 and 2014 datasets show that we can obtain high probability of detection and low probability of false alarm for full-body. Test results indicate that our human full-body detection method can considerably outperform the current state-of-the-art methods in both detection performance and computational complexity. Furthermore, in this paper, we have developed several methods using color features for detection and tracking of human body-parts (arms, legs, torso, and head, etc.). For example, we have developed a human skin color sub-patch segmentation algorithm by first conducting a RGB to YIQ transformation and then applying a Subtractive I/Q image Fusion with morphological operations. With this method, we can reliably detect and track human skin color related body-parts such as face, neck, arms, and legs. Reliable body-parts (e.g. head) detection allows us to continuously track the individual person even in the case that multiple closely spaced persons are merged. Accordingly, we have developed a new algorithm to split a merged detection blob back to individual detections based on the detected head positions. Detected body-parts also allow us to extract important local constellation features of the body-parts positions and angles related to the full-body. These features are useful for human walking gait pattern recognition and human pose (e.g. standing or falling down) estimation for potential abnormal behavior and accidental event detection, as evidenced with our experimental tests. Furthermore, based on the reliable head (face) tacking, we have applied a super-resolution algorithm to enhance

  8. Noninvasive diagnosis of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Hye Ran Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Because nonalcoholic steatohepatitis can progress towards cirrhosis even in children, early detection of hepatic fibrosis and accurate diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD are important. Although liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard of diagnosis, its clinical application is somewhat limited in children due to its invasiveness. Noninvasive diagnostic methods, including imaging studies, biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, hepatic apoptosis, hepatic fibrosis, and noninvasive hepatic fibrosis scores have recently been developed for diagnosing the spectrum of NAFLD, particularly the severity of hepatic fibrosis. Although data and validation are still lacking for these noninvasive modalities in the pediatric population, these methods may be applicable for pediatric NAFLD. Therefore, noninvasive imaging studies, biomarkers, and hepatic fibrosis scoring systems may be useful in the detection of hepatic steatosis and the prediction of hepatic fibrosis, even in children with NAFLD.

  9. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  10. A Scale and Pose Invariant Algorithm for Fast Detecting Human Faces in a Complex Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Xin; SHEN Lansun; JIA Kebin

    2001-01-01

    Human face detection is an interesting and challenging task in computer vision. A scale and pose invariant algorithm is proposed in this paper.The algorithm is able to detect human faces in a complex background in about 400ms with a detection rate of 92%. The algorithm can be used in a wide range of applications such as human-computer interface, video coding, etc.

  11. Comparative Study of Statistical Skin Detection Algorithms for Sub-Continental Human Images

    CERN Document Server

    Tabassum, Mirza Rehenuma; Kamal, Md Mostafa; Muctadir, Hossain Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Shakir, Asif Khan; Imran, Asif; Islamm, Saiful; Rabbani, Md Golam; Khaled, Shah Mostafa; Islam, Md Saiful; Begum, Zerina; 10.3923/itj.2010.811.817

    2010-01-01

    Object detection has been a focus of research in human-computer interaction. Skin area detection has been a key to different recognitions like face recognition, human motion detection, pornographic and nude image prediction, etc. Most of the research done in the fields of skin detection has been trained and tested on human images of African, Mongolian and Anglo-Saxon ethnic origins. Although there are several intensity invariant approaches to skin detection, the skin color of Indian sub-continentals have not been focused separately. The approach of this research is to make a comparative study between three image segmentation approaches using Indian sub-continental human images, to optimize the detection criteria, and to find some efficient parameters to detect the skin area from these images. The experiments observed that HSV color model based approach to Indian sub-continental skin detection is more suitable with considerable success rate of 91.1% true positives and 88.1% true negatives.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of human blood glucose under flow control of time gate%血流控制下时间门的人体血糖无创实验测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁渊; 孙美秀; 姜琛昱; 龚智勇; 杨基春

    2014-01-01

    Objective In order to further improve the noninvasive measurement precision of human blood glucose and achieve clinical requirements,experiments were conducted to measure human blood glucose by a novel measurement method our group proposed.Methods The blood flow of the tested parts was stopped by pressure,and dynamic distribution of transmission spectra was measured by time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technology under the dual wavelength light incident.Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted on three human subjects,and the early arriving photons were selected by Laplace transform.Meanwhile,the human blood glucose concentration was measured using the Roche glucose meter.Results The best curve fitting was got when the Laplace parameter was 1Gs-1 (determining parameter R2=0.0922).Conclusions The experimental results showed that better measurement accuracy can be obtained by selecting appropriate Laplace parameter,and noninvasive measurement of human blood glucose under flow control of time gate was feasible.%目的 为了进一步提高人体血糖无创伤测量的精度,从而达到临床的要求,对本课题组提出的人体血糖无创伤测量的新方法进行实验测量.方法 在利用压力停止受测部分血流条件下,采用时间相关单光子计数技术测量双波长光入射下透射光谱的动态分布.对3例人体进行了口服葡萄糖耐量试验(OGTT),用拉普拉斯变换选取早期到达的光子,同时用罗氏血糖仪对人体血糖浓度进行读数.结果 当拉普拉斯参数取1Gs-1时,实验测得的参数斜率(PS)随人体血糖浓度变化曲线的拟合度最好(决定系数R2=0.0922).结论 实验测量结果显示,选取合适的拉普拉斯参数可以得到更好的测量准确性,基于血流控制下的时间门技术用于无创伤测量人体血糖浓度是可行的.

  13. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Koopmans, M.; Du Ry van Beest Holle, M.; Meijer, Adam; Klinkenberg, D.; Donnelly, C.A.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemio

  14. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum: applications in diagnostic techniques for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahan PB

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peter B Gahan Anatomy and Human Sciences Department, King's College London, London Bridge, London, UK Abstract: The analysis of fetal nucleic acids in maternal blood 13 years ago has led to the initiation of noninvasive methods for the early determination of fetal gender, rhesus D status, and a number of aneuploid disorders and hemoglobinopathies. Subsequently, a comparatively large quantity of fetal DNA and RNA has been demonstrated in amniotic fluid as well as small amounts in premature infant saliva. The DNA and RNA in amniotic fluid has permitted an analysis of core transcriptomes, whilst the DNA and RNA in saliva allows the early detection and treatment monitoring of fetal developmental problems. These aspects are discussed together with the methodology and limits of analysis for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis in predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. Keywords: fetal circulating DNA/RNA, amniotic fluid, saliva, aneuploidy, thalassemias

  15. Round-robin comparison of methods for the detection of human enteric viruses in lettuce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guyader, Francoise S.; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Haugarreau, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Five methods that detect human enteric virus contamination in lettuce were compared. To mimic multiple contaminations as observed after sewage contamination, artificial contamination was with human calicivirus and poliovirus and animal calicivirus strains at different concentrations. Nucleic acid...

  16. Human Movement Detection and Identification Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseok Yun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric infrared (PIR sensors are widely used as a presence trigger, but the analog output of PIR sensors depends on several other aspects, including the distance of the body from the PIR sensor, the direction and speed of movement, the body shape and gait. In this paper, we present an empirical study of human movement detection and identification using a set of PIR sensors. We have developed a data collection module having two pairs of PIR sensors orthogonally aligned and modified Fresnel lenses. We have placed three PIR-based modules in a hallway for monitoring people; one module on the ceiling; two modules on opposite walls facing each other. We have collected a data set from eight subjects when walking in three different conditions: two directions (back and forth, three distance intervals (close to one wall sensor, in the middle, close to the other wall sensor and three speed levels (slow, moderate, fast. We have used two types of feature sets: a raw data set and a reduced feature set composed of amplitude and time to peaks; and passage duration extracted from each PIR sensor. We have performed classification analysis with well-known machine learning algorithms, including instance-based learning and support vector machine. Our findings show that with the raw data set captured from a single PIR sensor of each of the three modules, we could achieve more than 92% accuracy in classifying the direction and speed of movement, the distance interval and identifying subjects. We could also achieve more than 94% accuracy in classifying the direction, speed and distance and identifying subjects using the reduced feature set extracted from two pairs of PIR sensors of each of the three modules.

  17. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Arterial bifurcations are commonly the sites of developing atherosclerotic plaque that lead to arterial occlusions and plaque rupture (myocardial infarctions and strokes). Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy provides an effective nondestructive method supplying spectral information on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition, specifically collagen and elastin. Purpose: To investigate regional differences in the ECM proteins -- collagen I, III and elastin in unstable plaque by analyzing data from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Methods: Gels of ECM protein extracts (elastin, collagen types I & III) were measured as reference spectra and internal thoracic artery segments (extra tissue from bypass surgery) were used as tissue controls. Arterial segments and the endarterectomy specimens (n=21) were cut into 5mm cross-sectional rings. Ten fluorescence spectra per sampling area were then recorded at 5 sites per ring with argon laser excitation (357nm) with a penetration depth of 200 μm. Spectra were normalized to maximum intensity and analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Tissue rings were fixed in formalin (within 3 hours of surgery), sectioned and stained with H&E or Movat's Pentachrome for histological analysis. Spectroscopy data were correlated with immunohistology (staining for elastin, collagen types I, III and IV). Results: Quantitative fluorescence for the thoracic arteries revealed a dominant elastin component on the luminal side -- confirmed with immunohistology and known artery structure. Carotid endarterectomy specimens by comparison had a significant decrease in elastin signature and increased collagen type I and III. Arterial spectra were markedly different between the thoracic and carotid specimens. There was also a significant elevation (pcollagen type I distal to the bifurcation compared to proximal tissue in the carotid specimens. Conclusion: Fluorescence spectroscopy

  18. Detection and location of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Lian Tang; Run-Liang Gan; Bi-Hua Dong; Ri-Chen Jiang; Rong-Jun Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To define the infection status of Helicobacter pylori in 109 patients with gastric cancers and Hpylorilocalization in gastric carcinoma tissues in South China.METHODS: The incidence of Hpyloriinfection in gastric carcinomas was estimated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), simultaneously; both morphological features and the localization of H pylori in gastric carcinomas were demonstrated by Warthin-Starry (WS) staining. The relationships between Hpylori infection and the clinicalpathologic factors of gastric carcinomas were analyzed by software SPSS10.0.RESULTS: Hpyloriwas found in 42 (39.03%) and 58(53.21%) cases of 109 patients with gastric carcinomas by PCRand WS, respectively. H pyloriinfection rate detected in gastric carcinomas by WS was higher than that by PCR (x2 = 9.735,P<0.005<0.01). WS stain showed that H pylori existed in the gastric antrum mucus, mucosal gland of normal tissues adjacent to gastric carcinomas and the gland, mucus pool of cancer tissues. The positive rate of H pyloriin normal tissues adjacent to carcinomas was higher than that in cancer tissues (x2 = 15.750, P<0.005<0.01). No significant differences in age, sex, site,histological types and lymph node metastasis were found between H pylorFpositive gastric carcinomas and H pylorinegative cases by both methods, but there were statistically significant differences of H pylori positive rate between early and advanced stage of gastric carcinomas (x2=4.548or 5.922, P = 0.033 or 0.015<0.05).CONCLUSION: These results suggested that H pylori infection might play a certain role in the early stage of carcinogenesis of human gastric mucosa epithelia.

  19. Tele-operated search robot for human detection using histogram of oriented objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Febus Reidj G.; Avendaño, Glenn O.; Manlises, Cyrel O.; Avellanosa, James Jason G.; Abina, Jyacinth Camille F.; Masaquel, Albert M.; Siapno, Michael Lance O.; Chung, Wen-Yaw

    2017-02-01

    Disasters such as typhoons, tornadoes, and earthquakes are inevitable. Aftermaths of these disasters include the missing people. Using robots with human detection capabilities to locate the missing people, can dramatically reduce the harm and risk to those who work in such circumstances. This study aims to: design and build a tele-operated robot; implement in MATLAB an algorithm for the detection of humans; and create a database of human identification based on various positions, angles, light intensity, as well as distances from which humans will be identified. Different light intensities were made by using Photoshop to simulate smoke, dust and water drops conditions. After processing the image, the system can indicate either a human is detected or not detected. Testing with bodies covered was also conducted to test the algorithm's robustness. Based on the results, the algorithm can detect humans with full body shown. For upright and lying positions, detection can happen from 8 feet to 20 feet. For sitting position, detection can happen from 2 feet to 20 feet with slight variances in results because of different lighting conditions. The distances greater than 20 feet, no humans can be processed or false negatives can occur. For bodies covered, the algorithm can detect humans in cases made under given circumstances. On three positions, humans can be detected from 0 degrees to 180 degrees under normal, with smoke, with dust, and with water droplet conditions. This study was able to design and build a tele-operated robot with MATLAB algorithm that can detect humans with an overall precision of 88.30%, from which a database was created for human identification based on various conditions, where humans will be identified.

  20. Molecular Detection of Rickettsia amblyommii in Amblyomma americanum Parasitizing Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Maeda, K, Markowitz, N, Hawley, RC, Ristic, M, et al. Human infection with Ehrlichia canis , a leukocytic rickettsia. N Eng! J Med 1987; 316:853-856...lone star tick human pathogens Ehrlichia chaffenesis (human monocytic ehrlichiosis [HMEJ) and Ehrlichia ezoingii (E. ezoingii ehrlichiosis [EWE...Paddock, CD, et al. Ehrlichia ewingii, a newly recognized agent of human ehrlichiosis. N Engl J Med 1999; 341:148-155. Burgdorfer, W, Hayes, S

  1. Calibration Experiments Conducted for Noninvasive Blood Glucose Sensing Through the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Bockle, Stefan; Suh, Kwang I.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2004-01-01

    There are more than 16 million diabetics in the United States and more than 100 million worldwide. Diabetes can lead to severe complications over time such as blindness, renal and cardiovascular diseases, and peripheral neuropathy in the limbs. Poor blood circulation in diabetics can lead to gangrene and the subsequent amputation of extremities. In addition, this pathology is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The most effective way to manage diabetes is frequent blood glucose monitoring performed by the patients themselves. However, because of pain, inconvenience, and the fear of developing infections from finger-prick blood tests or implants, many patients monitor their blood glucose levels less frequently than is recommended by their physicians. Therefore, a noninvasive, painless, and convenient method to monitor blood glucose would greatly benefit diabetics. Likewise, detecting, preventing, and treating the untoward effects of prolonged space travel (e.g., a human mission to Mars) in real-time requires the development of noninvasive diagnostic technologies that are compact and powerful. As a "window to the body," the eye offers the opportunity to use light in various forms to detect ocular and systemic abnormalities long before clinical symptoms appear and to help develop preventative and therapeutic countermeasures early. The noninvasive feature of these technologies permits frequent repetition of tests, enabling an evaluation of the response to therapy.

  2. Non-invasive detection of genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in early and advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma by sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA: a technical proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas; Dehaspe, Luc; Dierickx, Daan; Verheecke, Magali; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Bechter, Oliver; Delforge, Michel; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Brison, Nathalie; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Legius, Eric; Amant, Frederic; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-02-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most common lymphoid neoplasms in young adults, but the low abundance of neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the tumour hampers the elucidation of its pathogenesis, biology, and diversity. After an incidental observation that genomic aberrations known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma were detectable in circulating cell-free DNA, this study was undertaken to investigate whether circulating cell-free DNA can be informative about genomic imbalances in Hodgkin's lymphoma. We applied massive parallel sequencing to circulating cell-free DNA in a prospective study of patients with biopsy proven nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma. Genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells were investigated by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) on tumour specimens. By non-invasive prenatal testing, we observed several genomic imbalances in circulating cell-free DNA of a pregnant woman, who was subsequently diagnosed with early-stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma stage IIA during gestation. FISH on tumour tissue confirmed corresponding genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. We prospectively studied circulating cell-free DNA of nine nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma cases: eight at first diagnosis and one at first relapse. Seven patients had stage IIA disease and two had stage IVB disease. In eight, genomic imbalances were detected, including, among others, gain of chromosomes 2p and 9p, known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma. These gains and losses in circulating cell-free DNA were extensively validated by FISH on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in biopsy samples. Initiation of chemotherapy induced normalisation of circulating cell-free DNA profiles within 2-6 weeks. The cell cycle indicator Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 were detected in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells by immunohistochemistry, suggesting high turnover of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. In early and advanced stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma, genomic

  3. Noninvasive prenatal detection of genetic defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, Jessica Maria Elisabeth van den

    2016-01-01

    Current prenatal diagnostics is mainly based on obtaining fetal DNA through invasive procedures such as chorionic villi sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis. These procedures are associated with a small, but significant risk of fetal loss. The discovery of the presence of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in

  4. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  5. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  6. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  7. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Gerard J Nuovo; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V.; Burk, Robert D.; Prystowsky, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas to a “gold standard” human papillomavirus PCR assay. One hundred-and-ten prospectively collected, formalin fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarr...

  8. First detection of human dirofilariasis in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnee Moodley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans are occasionally inadvertently infected with dirofilariae, the zoonotic nematodes. We report two cases of human dirofilariasis in South Africa, an area apparently non-endemic for this infection. Dirofilariasis is frequently misdiagnosed, so increased awareness of this entity in areas that are non-endemic is essential for prevention of inappropriate investigations and invasive therapy.

  9. Error detection in spoken human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahmer, E.; Swerts, M.; Theune, Mariet; Weegels, M.

    Given the state of the art of current language and speech technology, errors are unavoidable in present-day spoken dialogue systems. Therefore, one of the main concerns in dialogue design is how to decide whether or not the system has understood the user correctly. In human-human communication,

  10. Error detection in spoken human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahmer, E.; Swerts, M.; Theune, M.; Weegels, M.

    2001-01-01

    Given the state of the art of current language and speech technology, errors are unavoidable in present-day spoken dialogue systems. Therefore, one of the main concerns in dialogue design is how to decide whether or not the system has understood the user correctly. In human-human communication, dial

  11. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  12. Human Location Detection System Using Micro-Electromechanical Sensor for Intelligent Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnin, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presented the development of sensory system for detection of both the presence and the location of human in a room spaces using MEMS Thermal sensor. The system is able to detect the surface temperature of occupants by a non-contact detection at the maximum of 6 meters far. It can be integrated to any swing type of electrical appliances such as standing fan or a similar devices. Differentiating human from other moving and or static object by heat variable is nearly impossible since human, animals and electrical appliances produce heat. The uncontrollable heat properties which can change and transfer will add to the detection issue. Integrating the low cost MEMS based thermal sensor can solve the first of human sensing problem by its ability to detect human in stationary. Further discrimination and analysis must therefore be made to the measured temperature data to distinguish human from other objects. In this project, the fan is properly designed and program in such a way that it can adapt to different events starting from the human sensing stage to its dynamic and mechanical moving parts. Up to this stage initial testing to the Omron D6T microelectromechanical thermal sensor is currently under several experimental stages. Experimental result of the sensor tested on stationary and motion state of human are behaviorally differentiable and successfully locate the human position by detecting the maximum temperature of each sensor reading.

  13. Non-invasive predictors of human cortical bone mechanical properties: T(2-discriminated H NMR compared with high resolution X-ray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Adam Horch

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have enabled clinical imaging of human cortical bone, providing a potentially powerful new means for assessing bone health with molecular-scale sensitivities unavailable to conventional X-ray-based diagnostics. To this end, (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and high-resolution X-ray signals from human cortical bone samples were correlated with mechanical properties of bone. Results showed that (1H NMR signals were better predictors of yield stress, peak stress, and pre-yield toughness than were the X-ray derived signals. These (1H NMR signals can, in principle, be extracted from clinical MRI, thus offering the potential for improved clinical assessment of fracture risk.

  14. Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Pharmacodynamic Markers of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, LAQ824, in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells and Xenografts1

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) to investigate the pharmacodynamic effects of LAQ824, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Human HT29 colon carcinoma cells were examined by 31P MRS after treatment with LAQ824 and another HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. HT29 xenografts and tumor extracts were also examined using 31P MRS, pre- and post-LAQ824 treatment. Histone H3 acetylation was determined using Western blot analysis, and...

  15. Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Pharmacodynamic Markers of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, LAQ824, in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells and Xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) to investigate the pharmacodynamic effects of LAQ824, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Human HT29 colon carcinoma cells were examined by 31P MRS after treatment with LAQ824 and another HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. HT29 xenografts and tumor extracts were also examined using 31P MRS, pre- and post-LAQ824 treatment. Histone H3 acetylation was determined using Western blot analysis, and...

  16. Functionalized Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Selectively Binds to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on Activated Human Platelets under Flow Conditions and Is Detectable at Clinically Relevant Field Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von zur Mühlen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides the opportunity to image cells and cellular receptors using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs. However, imaging targets on vessel walls remains challenging owing to the quantity of contrast agents delivered to areas of interest under shear stress conditions. We evaluated ex vivo binding characteristics of a functional MRI contrast agent to ligand-induced binding sites (LIBSs on activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors of human platelets, which were lining rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques and could therefore facilitate detection of platelet-mediated pathology in atherothrombotic disease. MPIOs were conjugated to anti-LIBS single-chain antibodies (LIBS-MPIO or control antibodies (control MPIO. Ex vivo binding to human platelet-rich clots in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner and by histology (p < .05 for LIBS-MPIO vs control MPIO. By using a flow chamber setup, significant binding of LIBS-MPIO to a platelet matrix was observed under venous and arterial flow conditions, but not for control MPIO (p < .001. A newly generated MRI contrast agent detects activated human platelets at clinically relevant magnetic field strengths and binds to platelets under venous and arterial flow conditions, conveying high payloads of contrast to specific molecular targets. This may provide the opportunity to identify vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques via noninvasive MRI.

  17. Detection and location of metal fragments in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. L.; Neuschaefer, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    Portable electronic device, based on the design of an eddy current gage, detects ferrous and nonferrous metal fragments. Device is more easily transported than X-ray equipment and does not present a radiation hazard.

  18. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK IN FACE DETECTION HUMAN ON DIGITAL IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdusamad Al-Marghilani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Method itself is proposed to be formed by series of filters. Each filter is an independent method of detection and allows you to cut off quickly the regions that do not contain the face’s areas. For this purpose some of the different characteristics of the object are used in addition each subsequent part processes only promising areas of image which were obtained from the previous parts of the method. It has been tested by means of CMU/MIT test set. Analogy of speed and quality detection. There are two modifications to the classic use of neural networks in face detection. First the neural network only tests candidate regions for the face, thus dropping the search space. Secondly the window size is used in network scanning the input image is adaptive and depends on the size of the region of the candidate are implemented in Using Mat lab. The analysis of detection quality of a new method in comparison with the algorithm. The experimental results show that the proposed method the detection method, based on rectangular primitives, in quality. The proposed method, tested on a standard Test set, has surpassed all known methods in speed and quality of detection. Our approach without pre-treatment is not required because the normalization is enabled directly in the weights of the input network.

  19. Human papillomavirus detection in moroccan patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laantri, Nadia; Attaleb, Mohammed; Kandil, Mostafa; Naji, Fadwa; Mouttaki, Tarik; Dardari, R'kia; Belghmi, Khalid; Benchakroun, Nadia; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Khyatti, Meriem

    2011-01-01

    .... There's is evidence that Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is associated to NPC development. However, many epidemiologic studies point to a connection between viral infections by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and NPC...

  20. MELAS综合征无创性基因突变分析方法研究%Identification of an ideal noninvasive method to detect A3243G gene mutation in MELAS syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马祎楠; 戚豫; 方方; 杨艳玲; 张英; 王松涛; 许玉凤; 裴珮; 袁云; 卜定方

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究携带A3243G突变的线粒体脑病-乳酸酸中毒-卒中样发作(MELAS)综合征患者及其母系亲属的外周血、尿、毛囊、唾液和部分患者的肌肉组织A3243G基因突变率,找到用于检测突变率更敏感的组织,建立更佳的、无创性的检查手段.方法 收集25例MELAS患者及其母系亲属33例的外周血、尿、毛囊、唾液和部分患者的肌肉组织提取DNA,利用聚合酶链反应-限制性片段长度多态性(PCR-RFLP)技术检测各组织中A3243G突变,根据酶切产物电泳条带密度值问的比例计算突变型线粒体DNA的含量,比较各组织A3243G突变率的差异.结果 25例患者外周血、尿、毛囊、唾液均榆测到A3243G突变,尿液中A3243G突变率(62%±9%)明显高于外周血巾的突变率(36%±10%)(t=-11.13,P<0.01).5例患者进行了肌活检,肌肉突变率44.9%~75.1%,尿液中A3243G突变率和肌肉中A3243G突变率存在正相关,(r=0.900,P=0.037).33例母系亲属中有28例在至少一种组织中检测到A3243G突变,尿液中A3243G突变率33.0%(5.O%-70.4%)明显高于外周血中的突变率8.0%(0-33.3%)(z=-4.197,P<0.01).患者及其母系亲属唾液和毛囊组织中A3243G突变率与外周血相比筹别均不大.结论 在MELAS患者及其母系亲属巾,尿液中A3243G突变率均明显高于外周血,尿液A3243G突变率分析可能是优于外周血线粒体分析的一种无创性方法.%objeetive To identify a better non.invasive method to detect the carrier of mitochondrial A3243G mutation,a cause of mitochondfial encephalopathy-lactic acidosis.stroke like episode (MELAS)syndrome.Methotis DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood,urine,hair follicle,and saliva of 25 MELAS syndrome patients carrying A3243G mutation and their mothers and other maternal relatives,33 persons in number,and the muscle tissues from 5 patients obtained by biopsy.A3243G mutation was detected by PCR-RFLP method,and the A3243G mutation ratio was identified by

  1. A Paradigm Shift: Detecting Human Rights Violations Through Web Images

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliatakis, Grigorios; Ehsan, Shoaib; McDonald-Maier, Klaus D.

    2017-01-01

    The growing presence of devices carrying digital cameras, such as mobile phones and tablets, combined with ever improving internet networks have enabled ordinary citizens, victims of human rights abuse, and participants in armed conflicts, protests, and disaster situations to capture and share via social media networks images and videos of specific events. This paper discusses the potential of images in human rights context including the opportunities and challenges they present. This study d...

  2. 应用巢式PCR检测母体尿液中胎儿遗传信息%Detection of targeted fetal DNA in urine with nested PCR for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤冬玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the application of fetal DNA in urine for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. Methods: The DNA template was extracted by QIAamp Blood DNA midi kit from 41 maternal (39 ±2weeks) urine. Using the nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the 130 bp SRY gnne-specific sequence and the 261 bp ATL1 gene-specific sequence were amplified simultaneously. The results were confirmed by examination of newborns after delivery. Results: In 19 samples from female-bearing pregnant women, the SRY gene was not detected in any cases, with a false-positive rate of 0 while 22 samples from male-bearing pregnant women, the SRY gene was detected in 8 cases. The positive rate of detection of SRY gene was 36. 33% (8/22) and the false negative rate was 55.55% while false positive rate was 0. 6 out of the 8 cases with positive results showed positive for 2 times and two out of the 8 cases only showed positive at the second time. Conclusion: Circulating fetal DNA in urine can be used as a possible alternative tool in detection of fetal sex, however, still with a rather low positive rate.%目的 依据孕妇血浆中存在游离胎儿DNA的理论,评价从母体尿液中分离游离胎儿DNA的可行性及其在临床应用的可行性.方法 提取41例健康孕妇尿液标本中游离胎儿DNA,经巢式PCR扩增其性别决定基因(sex-determining region Y,SRY),并引入X染色体上特异的内参照基因序列ATL1,同时以其丈夫及未孕女性的外周血作对照分析.结果 41例孕妇所孕胎儿22例为男性,19例为女性.22例怀有男胎孕妇尿液标本经SRY扩增后,8例为阳性,其中6例第1、2次扩增均为阳性,2例第2次扩增后方出现阳性扩增带;其余14例怀有男胎孕妇和19例怀有女胎孕妇尿液标本扩增结果均为阴性.结论 孕妇尿液中的确存在着游离胎儿DNA,需进一步提高其检出阳性率.

  3. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test as the primary diagnostic investigation for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection compared to invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. There is a risk factor for gastric or duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue-Lymphomas. There are several invasive and non-invasive methods available for the diagnosis of H. pylori. The 13C-urea breath test is a non-invasive method recommended for monitoring H. pylori eradication therapy. However, this test is not yet used for primary assessment of H. pylori in Germany. Objectives: What are the clinical and health economic benefits of the 13C-urea breath test in the primary assessment of H. pylori compared to other invasive and non-invasive methods? Methods: A systematic literature search including a hand search was performed for studies investigating test criteria and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test in comparison to other methods used in the primary assessment of H. pylori. Only studies that directly compared the 13C-urea breath test to other H. pylori-tests were included. For the medical part, biopsy-based tests were used as the gold standard. Results: 30 medical studies are included. Compared to the immunoglobulin G (IgG test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in twelve studies, lower in six studies and one study reports no differences. The specificity is higher in 13 studies, lower in three studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the stool antigen test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in nine studies, lower in three studies and one study reports no difference. The specificity is higher in nine studies, lower in two studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the urease test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in four studies, lower in three studies and four studies report no differences. The specificity is higher in five studies, lower in five studies and one study reports no difference. Compared

  4. Effect of the Nicotinic α4β2-receptor Partial Agonist Varenicline on Non-invasive Brain Stimulation-Induced Neuroplasticity in the Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Grundey, Jessica; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Nicotine alters cognitive functions in animals and humans most likely by modification of brain plasticity. In the human brain, it alters plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and paired associative stimulation (PAS), probably by interference with calcium-dependent modulation of the glutamatergic system. We aimed to test this hypothesis further by exploring the impact of the α4β2-nicotinic receptor partial agonist varenicline on focal and non-focal plasticity, induced by PAS and tDCS, respectively. We administered low (0.1 mg), medium (0.3 mg), and high (1.0 mg) single doses of varenicline or placebo medication before PAS or tDCS on the left motor cortex of 25 healthy non-smokers. Corticospinal excitability was monitored by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potential amplitudes up to 36 h after plasticity induction. Whereas low-dose varenicline had no impact on stimulation-induced neuroplasticity, medium-dose abolished tDCS-induced facilitatory after-effects, favoring focal excitatory plasticity. High-dose application preserved cathodal tDCS-induced excitability diminution and focal excitatory PAS-induced facilitatory plasticity. These results are comparable to the impact of nicotine receptor activation and might help to further explain the involvement of specific receptor subtypes in the nicotinic impact on neuroplasticity and cognitive functions in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric diseases.

  5. Human Pheromone Detection by the Vomeronasal Organ: Unnecessary for Mate Selection?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Foltan and Sedy proposed a hypothesis stating that the adult human VNO is integral to the prevention of inappropriate mate selection. In this commentary, we address the authors’ assumption that humans have a functional VNO, that pheromones are detected exclusively by the VNO, and that human pheromones are responsible for negative stimuli during mate selection. After examining the published literature on human vomeronasal function, we argue that their hypothesis is critically flawed....

  6. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  7. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leferink, Anne M; Fratila, Raluca M; Koenrades, Maaike A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs.

  8. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Leferink

    Full Text Available Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate-poly(butylene terephthalate (PEOT/PBT scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs.

  9. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother's bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5-1% risk of fetal loss...

  10. Towards quantitative SERS detection of hydrogen cyanide at ppb level for human breath analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    ) at ppb level has been reported to be a PA biomarker. For early PA detection in CF children not yet chronically lung infected a non-invasive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based breath nanosensor is being developed. The triple bond between C and N in cyanide, with its characteristic band...... at ∼2133 cm-1, is an excellent case for the SERS-based detection due to the infrequent occurrence of triple bonds in nature. For demonstration of direct HCN detection in the gas phase, a gold-coated silicon nanopillar substrate was exposed to 5 ppm HCN in N2. Results showed that HCN adsorbed on the SERS......). Lower KCN concentrations of 10 and 100 nM (corresponding to 0.18 and 1.8 ppb) produced SERS intensities that were relatively similar to the reference signal. Since HCN concentration in the breath of PA colonized CF children is reported to be ∼13.5 ppb, the detection of cyanide is within the required...

  11. Non-invasive bone competence analysis by high-resolution pQCT: an in vitro reproducibility study on structural and mechanical properties at the human radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas L; Stauber, Martin; Kohler, Thomas; Eckstein, Felix; Müller, Ralph; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2009-02-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength. Bone strength depends, among others, on bone density, bone geometry and its internal architecture. With the recent introduction of a new generation high-resolution 3D peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) system, direct quantification of structural bone parameters has become feasible. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that bone mechanical competence can be derived from HR-pQCT based micro-finite element modeling (microFE). However, reproducibility data for HR-pQCT-derived mechanical indices is not well-known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify reproducibility of HR-pQCT-derived indices. We measured 14 distal formalin-fixed cadaveric forearms three times and analyzed three different regions for each measurement. For each region cortical and trabecular parameters were determined. Reproducibility was assessed with respect to precision error (PE) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Reproducibility values were found to be best in all three regions for the full bone compartment with an average PE of 0.79%, followed by the cortical compartment (PE=1.19%) and the trabecular compartment with an average PE of 2.31%. The mechanical parameters showed similar reproducibility (PE=0.48%-2.93% for bone strength and stiffness, respectively). ICC showed a very high reproducibility of subject-specific measurements, ranging from 0.982 to 1.000, allowing secure identification of individual donors ranging from healthy to severely osteoporotic subjects. From these in vitro results we conclude that HR-pQCT derived morphometric and mechanical parameters are highly reproducible such that differences in bone structure and strength can be detected with a reproducibility error smaller than 3%; hence, the technique has a high potential to become a tool for detecting bone quality and bone competence of individual subjects.

  12. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  13. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Munoz

    Full Text Available Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204 were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R. HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58 and two low-risk (LR-HPV (HPV-6/11 types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine followed by HPV-31(47.2% in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7% in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  14. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaram, Prashanth; Owens, Dawn; Aceros, Juan

    2014-04-21

    Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring.

  15. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Makaram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring.

  16. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging