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Sample records for humanities leiden university

  1. Psychology students from Leiden University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    We are glad to share with our department that a group of 41 Psychology students from Leiden university, Holland were on a three hours visit to RUC Psychology department on Friday , 10.3.2017. The department is a valuable partner for students’ exchange , almost every semester there are RUC students...... travelling to Leiden. The trip was planned by Study Association Labyrint Leiden, and consisted of students at all levels from the bachelor as well as masters programs. A group of RUC psychology students Wiebke Sandermann; Emma Stinne Engstrøm; Mikkel Brilner Lund were in the organising group along...... with the study director Hans Sønderstrup Hansen and Rashmi Singla. It was an enriching experience for the RUC organizing group. International coordinator for Psychology Dieuwerke de Groot in Leiden reciprocated by writing: “A very enthusiastic mail from our students telling me they had such a wonderful time...

  2. Indigenous Peoples: Local Impacts of International Rights. Valedictory Lecture Leiden University

    OpenAIRE

    Persoon, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Valedictory lecture given by Prof.dr. Gerard A. Persoon Professor of Environment and Development and in particular Indigenous Peoples in Southeast Asia at Leiden University on Monday, October 23 2017Museum Volkenkunde / Ethnographic Museum

  3. Indigenous Peoples : Local Impacts of International Rights. Valedictory Lecture Leiden University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Valedictory lecture given by Prof.dr. Gerard A. Persoon Professor of Environment and Development and in particular Indigenous Peoples in Southeast Asia at Leiden University on Monday, October 23 2017Museum Volkenkunde / Ethnographic Museum

  4. History and highlights of the teratological collection in the Museum Anatomicum of Leiden University, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Lucas L.; Boek, Peter L. J.; van Dam, Andries J.; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2018-01-01

    The anatomical collection of the Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center (historically referred to as Museum Anatomicum Academiae Lugduno-Batavae) houses and maintains more than 13,000 unique anatomical, pathological and zoological specimens, and include the oldest teratological

  5. Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617–1740

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Collins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice.

  6. Key Inflammatory Processes in Human NASH Are Reflected in Ldlr-/-.Leiden Mice: A Translational Gene Profiling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Martine C; Kleemann, Robert; van Koppen, Arianne; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Verschuren, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: It is generally accepted that metabolic inflammation in the liver is an important driver of disease progression in NASH and associated matrix remodeling/fibrosis. However, the exact molecular inflammatory mechanisms are poorly defined in human studies. Investigation of key pathogenic mechanisms requires the use of pre-clinical models, for instance for time-resolved studies. Such models must reflect molecular disease processes of importance in patients. Herein we characterized inflammation in NASH patients on the molecular level by transcriptomics and investigated whether key human disease pathways can be recapitulated experimentally in Ldlr -/- .Leiden mice, an established pre-clinical model of NASH. Methods: Human molecular inflammatory processes were defined using a publicly available NASH gene expression profiling dataset (GSE48452) allowing the comparison of biopsy-confirmed NASH patients with normal controls. Gene profiling data from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed Ldlr -/- .Leiden mice (GSE109345) were used for assessment of the translational value of these mice. Results: In human NASH livers, we observed regulation of 65 canonical pathways of which the majority was involved in inflammation (32%), lipid metabolism (16%), and extracellular matrix/remodeling (12%). A similar distribution of pathways across these categories, inflammation (36%), lipid metabolism (24%) and extracellular matrix/remodeling (8%) was observed in HFD-fed Ldlr -/- .Leiden mice. Detailed evaluation of these pathways revealed that a substantial proportion (11 out of 13) of human NASH inflammatory pathways was recapitulated in Ldlr -/- .Leiden mice. Furthermore, the activation state of identified master regulators of inflammation (i.e., specific transcription factors, cytokines, and growth factors) in human NASH was largely reflected in Ldlr -/- .Leiden mice, further substantiating its translational value. Conclusion: Human NASH is characterized by upregulation of specific

  7. Key Inflammatory Processes in Human NASH Are Reflected in Ldlr−/−.Leiden Mice: A Translational Gene Profiling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Martine C.; Kleemann, Robert; van Koppen, Arianne; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Verschuren, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: It is generally accepted that metabolic inflammation in the liver is an important driver of disease progression in NASH and associated matrix remodeling/fibrosis. However, the exact molecular inflammatory mechanisms are poorly defined in human studies. Investigation of key pathogenic mechanisms requires the use of pre-clinical models, for instance for time-resolved studies. Such models must reflect molecular disease processes of importance in patients. Herein we characterized inflammation in NASH patients on the molecular level by transcriptomics and investigated whether key human disease pathways can be recapitulated experimentally in Ldlr−/−.Leiden mice, an established pre-clinical model of NASH. Methods: Human molecular inflammatory processes were defined using a publicly available NASH gene expression profiling dataset (GSE48452) allowing the comparison of biopsy-confirmed NASH patients with normal controls. Gene profiling data from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed Ldlr−/−.Leiden mice (GSE109345) were used for assessment of the translational value of these mice. Results: In human NASH livers, we observed regulation of 65 canonical pathways of which the majority was involved in inflammation (32%), lipid metabolism (16%), and extracellular matrix/remodeling (12%). A similar distribution of pathways across these categories, inflammation (36%), lipid metabolism (24%) and extracellular matrix/remodeling (8%) was observed in HFD-fed Ldlr−/−.Leiden mice. Detailed evaluation of these pathways revealed that a substantial proportion (11 out of 13) of human NASH inflammatory pathways was recapitulated in Ldlr−/−.Leiden mice. Furthermore, the activation state of identified master regulators of inflammation (i.e., specific transcription factors, cytokines, and growth factors) in human NASH was largely reflected in Ldlr−/−.Leiden mice, further substantiating its translational value. Conclusion: Human NASH is characterized by upregulation of specific

  8. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  9. Report on the International Workshop “The Golden Horde in a Global Perspective: Imperial Strategies”, Leiden University, May 7–8, 2015 »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Hautala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article contains a report on the international conference organized by the University of Leiden in May 2015. According to its organizers, this conference has become the first Western European symposium dedicated to the study of the long history of the Golden Horde. The conference became a fruitful meeting place of the leading Russian and Tatar historians and archaeologists with their Western colleagues from the Netherlands, United Kingdom, United States of America, Hungary, Poland, and Finland. International participants of the Leiden conference discussed the most topical issues of historiography associated with eventful history of the Golden Horde. In particular, the conference participants paid special attention to the study of the administration of the ulus of Jochi that naturally combined governmental models of the Mongol Empire of the Chingizids with local administrative elements. A separate section of the conference was devoted to the analysis of the religious policy of the Golden Horde khans, where special attention was paid to the historiographical debate on the Islamization of the ulus of Jochi. The conference participants also paid considerable attention to the consideration of the material culture of the Golden Horde known both from written sources and, above all, from the materials of archaeological findings. Also, a number of reports of the confe­rence was devoted to foreign and domestic policies of the Golden Horde rulers, at the same time reflecting the central geopolitical role of the ulus of Jochi on the Eurasian continent and the high level of civilization of the Golden Horde. The main achievement of the Leiden conference was a statement on the need of deeper study of the Golden Horde history in order to overcome a number of stereotypes regarding misconceptions of the ulus of Jochi represented as backward and parasitic State formation. The conference participants agreed in general opinion about the necessity of similar

  10. The Trouble with Opium. Taste, Reason and Experience in Late Galenic Pharmacology with Special Regard to the University of Leiden (1575-1625).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerk, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, the discrepancy between the taste of some drugs and their effects on the body was used to criticize Galenic medicine. In this paper, I argue that such contradictions were brought to light by the sixteenth-century study of drug properties within the Galenic tradition itself. Investigating how the taste of a drug corresponded to the effects it had on the body became a core problem for maintaining a medical practice that was both rational and effective. I discuss four physicians, connected to the University of Leiden, who attempted to understand drug properties, including taste, within a Galenic framework. The sixteenth-century discussions about the relationship between the senses, reason and experience, will help us understand the seventeenth-century criticism of Galenic medicine and the importance of discussions about materia medica for ideas regarding the properties of matter proposed in this period.

  11. Key Inflammatory Processes in Human NASH Are Reflected in Ldlr−/−.Leiden Mice: A Translational Gene Profiling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, R.; Koppen, A. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Verschuren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: It is generally accepted that metabolic inflammation in the liver is an important driver of disease progression in NASH and associated matrix remodeling/fibrosis. However, the exact molecular inflammatory mechanisms are poorly defined in human studies. Investigation of key pathogenic

  12. Scavenger receptor deficiency leads to more complex atherosclerotic lesions in APOE3Leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, M.P.J. de; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Dijk, K.W. van; Gorp, P.J.J. van; Suzuki, H.; Kodama, T.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E3Leiden is a dysfunctional apo E variant associated with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia in humans. Transgenic mice carrying the APOE3Leiden gene develop hyperlipidemia and are highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. An early step in atherosclerosis is foam cell

  13. Factor V Leiden mutation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Normal maternal adaptation to pregnancy significantly increases the risk for thrombus formation. Inherited thrombophilias further increase risk for deep venous thrombosis and adverse outcome in pregnancy. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited thrombophilia, occurring in approximately 5% of the White and 1% of the Black populations. Nurses should be knowledgeable about screening for and diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation, risk reduction counseling, recommended care of the affected patient, and implications of anticoagulant therapy during the perinatal period.

  14. Mechanisms of the factor V Leiden paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stralen, K. J.; Doggen, C. J. M.; Bezemer, I. D.; Pomp, E. R.; Lisman, T.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective-Carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation (FVL-carriers) have a substantially increased risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), whereas the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is only mildly increased compared with noncarriers. So far few studies have investigated possible mechanisms for this

  15. Frequency of factor V Leiden mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiruddin; Ali, W.; Rehman, Z.; Anwar, M.; Ayyub, M.; Ali, W.; Ahmed, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation. Design: Observational study. Patients and Methods: Two hundred subjects each of apparently healthy and unrelated Punjabi and Pathan origins were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected in EDTA and DNA extracted by phenol- chloroform extraction method. DNA analysis was done by PCR for restriction fragment length polymorphism. The product was digested overnight with Mn/1 and electrophoresed on acrylamide gel to detect 67 and 153 base pair fragments of factor V Leiden against 37, 67 and 116 base pair fragments of normal factor V. Results: In the 400 subjects studied, only 5 cases of heterozygotes for factor V Leiden were detected. The overall carrier rate was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2-2.2%). The carrier rate in Punjabis and Pathans was 1 % and 1.5% respectively. Conclusion: This study confirms that the prevalence of factor V Leiden is low in Asians and Africans as compared to the European population. (author)

  16. Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2012-01-01

    Albert Einstein accepted a “special” visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation

  17. Universe, human immortality and future human evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This book debates the universe, the development of new technologies in the 21st century and the future of the human race. Dr Bolonkin shows that a human soul is only the information in a person's head. He offers a new unique method for re-writing the main brain information in chips without any damage to the human brain. This is the scientific prediction of the non-biological (electronic) civilization and immortality of the human being. Such a prognosis is predicated upon a new law, discovered by the author, for the development of complex systems. According to this law, every self-copying system tends to be more complex than the previous system, provided that all external conditions remain the same. The consequences are disastrous: humanity will be replaced by a new civilization created by intellectual robots (which Dr Bolonkin refers to as "E-humans" and "E-beings"). These creatures, whose intellectual and mechanical abilities will far exceed those of man, will require neither food nor oxygen to sustain their...

  18. Effects of up to 15 years of recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement on bone metabolism in adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD): the Leiden Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Claessen, Kim M J A; Hamdy, Neveen A T; Pereira, Alberto M; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adulthood may be associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD), a decreased bone mineral content (BMC) and an increased fracture risk. Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement induces a progressive increase in BMD for up to 5-7 years of treatment. Data on longer follow-up are, however, scarce. Two hundred and thirty-adult GHD patients (mean age 47·1 years, 52·6% female), of whom 88% patients had adult-onset (AO) GHD, receiving rhGH replacement for ≥5 years were included in the study. Most patients had multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Bone turnover markers, BMC and BMD and T-scores at the lumbar spine and femoral neck were evaluated at baseline, and after 5, 10 and 15 years of rhGH replacement. In addition, clinical fracture incidence was assessed. Mean lumbar spine BMD, lumbar spine BMC and T-scores gradually increased during the first 10 years of rhGH replacement and remained stable thereafter. Largest effects of rhGH supplementation were found in men. In the small subset of patients using bisphosphonates, use of bisphosphonates did not impact additional beneficial effects in the long term. Low baseline BMD positively affected the change in BMD and BMC over time, but there was a negative effect of high GH dose at 1 year on the change in BMD and BMC over time. Clinical fracture incidence during long-term rhGH replacement was 20.1/1000 py. Fifteen years of rhGH replacement in GHD adults resulted in a sustained increase in BMD values at the lumbar spine, particularly in men, and stabilization of BMD values at the femoral neck. Clinical fracture incidence was suggested not to be increased during long-term rhGH replacement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Polychaeten aus den Zoologischen Museen von Leiden und Amsterdam I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augener, H.

    1933-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Untersuchung eines sehr umfangreichen Polychaeten-Materials niedergelegt, das mir von Herrn Prof. Dr. E. D. van Oort in Leiden und Herrn Prof. Dr. L. F. de Beaufort in Amsterdam zur Bearbeitung übergeben wurde. Von diesem Material ist der dem Museum in Leiden

  20. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landorf, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    A study of human rights prepares students for their role as global citizens and their study of practices in the world's countries that relate to the rights of human beings. Today, when one talks of human rights it is usually with reference to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). It is the task of teachers to give students the…

  1. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein decreases high-density lipoprotein and severely aggravates atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, M.; Hoogt, C.C. van der; Haan, W. de; Offerman, E.H.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the development of atherosclerosis is still undergoing debate. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of human CETP expression on atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice with a humanized lipoprotein profile. METHODS AND RESULTS -

  2. Leiden Mutation and the Course of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ershov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of Leiden mutation on the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Subjects and methods. One hundred and twelve people were examined. Group 1 comprised 50 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis without coagulation factor V (Leiden mutation. Group 2 included 42 patients with severe acute pancreatitis who were found to have Leiden mutation. Acute pancreatitis was first diagnosed in both groups. Group 3 consisted of 20 apparently healthy individuals (a control group. The severity of the underlying disease was determined in accordance with the clinical and laboratory parameters recommended by the I. I. Dzhanelidze Saint Petersburg Research Institute of Emergence Care. Results. This investigation revealed an association of Leiden mutation with trends in the development of acute pancreatitis. Group 2 exhibited a more severe disease: large focal pancreatic necrosis was twice more common and infectious complications developed more frequently; more aggressive and radical treatments were more often used. The patients with Leiden mutation had higher mortality rates (33% in the Leiden mutation group and 24% in the non-mutation group. Conclusion. The findings should be kept in mind in elaborating new diagnostic methods and principles in the treatment of the underlying disease and in the prevention of its complications in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Key words: acute pancreatitis, Leiden mutation.

  3. A Prelinguistic Gestural Universal of Human Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszkowski, Ulf; Brown, Penny; Callaghan, Tara; Takada, Akira; de Vos, Conny

    2012-01-01

    Several cognitive accounts of human communication argue for a language-independent, prelinguistic basis of human communication and language. The current study provides evidence for the universality of a prelinguistic gestural basis for human communication. We used a standardized, semi-natural elicitation procedure in seven very different cultures…

  4. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mens, T E; Joensen, U N; Bochdanovits, Z; Takizawa, A; Peter, J; Jørgensen, N; Szecsi, P B; Meijers, J C M; Weiler, H; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Repping, S; Middeldorp, S

    2017-11-01

    Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. FVL has a high prevalence in Caucasians despite detrimental health effects. Carriers have been shown to have higher fecundity, which might partly explain this evolutionary paradox. We determined FVL status in two cohorts (Dutch, n = 627; Danish, n = 854) of consecutively included men without known causes for spermatogenic failure, and performed an individual patient data meta-analysis of these two cohorts together with one previously published (Dutch, n = 908) cohort. We explored possible biological underpinnings for the relation between sperm count and FVL, by use of a FVL-mouse model and investigations of genetic linkage. Participants were male partners of subfertile couples (two Dutch cohorts) and young men from the general population (Danish cohort): FVL carrier rate was 4.0%, 4.6% and 7.3%, respectively. There were differences in smoking, abstinence time and age between the cohorts. We corrected for these in the primary analysis, which consisted of a mixed linear effects model, also incorporating unobjectified population differences. In public haplotype data from subjects of European descent, we explored linkage disequilibrium of FVL with all known single nucleotide polymorphisms in a 1.5 MB region around the F5 gene with an R2 cutoff of 0.8. We sequenced exons of four candidate genes hypothesized to be linked to FVL in a subgroup of FVL carriers with extreme sperm count values. The animal studies consisted of never mated 15-18-week-old C57BL/J6 mice heterozygous and homozygous for FVL and wild-type mice. We compared spermatogenesis parameters (normalized internal genitalia weights, epididymis sperm content and sperm motility) between FVL and wild-type mice. Human FVL carriers have a higher total sperm

  5. HOW UNIVERSAL ARE THE UNIVERSAL HUMAN RIGHTS TODAY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia-Alexandra BALTADOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to contribute to a constructive debate on human rights. The two World Wars of the last century brought about the creation of the United Nations aimed “to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small”. Only three years later the Universal Declaration of the Human Rights was elaborated and promoted by the UN, considered to be the foundation of international human rights law. Today, as globalization brings all closer together in a “global village”, one can see that there are many ways to perceive and guarantee human rights, in different states, but also within different states. Poverty, illiteracy, censorship, cruel treatment and even the lack of guarantee for the right to life are, unfortunately, the norm for many people of the world. Such observations bring up questions regarding the legitimacy, universality and coherence of human rights.

  6. Effects of dietary fish oil on serum lipids and VLDL kinetics in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E*3-Leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Mensink, R.P.; Hof, H.B. van 't; Offermans, R.F.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Studying the effects of dietary fish oil on VLDL metabolism in humans is subject to both large intra- and interindividual variability. In the present study we therefore used hyperlipidentic apolipoprotein (APO) E*3-Leiden mice, which have impaired chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein (VDL)

  7. Impact of the factor V Leiden mutation on the outcome of pneumococcal pneumonia: a controlled laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Marcel; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris Jth; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation results in resistance of activated FV to inactivation by activated protein C and thereby in a prothrombotic phenotype. Human heterozygous FVL carriers have been

  8. Human Research Ethics Committees in Technical Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koepsell, D.R.; Brinkman, W.P.; Pont, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although

  9. Basics of teaching Latin at Humanities University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragova Arina Mikhailovna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the goals, tasks, methods, and results of teaching Latin at Humanities University. The article points out that the basis of teaching is analytical reading with elements of discursive analysis. In Humanities University teaching is being provided through the interdisciplinary approach. The educational process includes interactive exercises, the use various forms of control, for example, lingual-didactic testing in a virtual learning environment. The results of current and final control are formed with the help of the point-rating system of assessing knowledge.

  10. Human research ethics committees in technical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the world shows that, where not specifically mandated by law, most technical universities do not employ ethics committees to review human studies. As the domains of basic and applied sciences expand, ethics committees are increasingly needed to guide and oversee all such research regardless of legal requirements. We offer as examples, from our experience as an ethics committee in a major European technical university, ways in which such a committee provides needed services and can help ensure more ethical studies involving humans outside the standard medical context. We provide some arguments for creating such committees, and in our supplemental article, we provide specific examples of cases and concerns that may confront technical, engineering, and design research, as well as outline the general framework we have used in creating our committee. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Revisiting Kant's universal law and humanity formulas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyholm, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    This book offers new readings of Kant’s "universal law" and "humanity" formulations of the categorical imperative. It shows how, on these readings, the formulas do indeed turn out being alternative statements of the same basic moral law, and in the process responds to many of the standard objections

  12. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Human Rights Year, so designated by the United Nations, is now coming to an end. The full text of the Universal Declaration, proclaimed in 1946, is given as a reminder of its ideals. In 1966 Covenants for acceptance by States were drawn up and opened for signature. (author)

  13. Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas L; Dahl, Mortens; Nordestgaard, Borge G

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.......The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial....

  14. 21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems....7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification. Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are devices that consist of different reagents and...

  15. A prelinguistic gestural universal of human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszkowski, Ulf; Brown, Penny; Callaghan, Tara; Takada, Akira; de Vos, Conny

    2012-01-01

    Several cognitive accounts of human communication argue for a language-independent, prelinguistic basis of human communication and language. The current study provides evidence for the universality of a prelinguistic gestural basis for human communication. We used a standardized, semi-natural elicitation procedure in seven very different cultures around the world to test for the existence of preverbal pointing in infants and their caregivers. Results were that by 10-14 months of age, infants and their caregivers pointed in all cultures in the same basic situation with similar frequencies and the same proto-typical morphology of the extended index finger. Infants' pointing was best predicted by age and caregiver pointing, but not by cultural group. Further analyses revealed a strong relation between the temporal unfolding of caregivers' and infants' pointing events, uncovering a structure of early prelinguistic gestural conversation. Findings support the existence of a gestural, language-independent universal of human communication that forms a culturally shared, prelinguistic basis for diversified linguistic communication. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Scaling and universality in the human voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Jordi; Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2015-04-06

    Speech is a distinctive complex feature of human capabilities. In order to understand the physics underlying speech production, in this work, we empirically analyse the statistics of large human speech datasets ranging several languages. We first show that during speech, the energy is unevenly released and power-law distributed, reporting a universal robust Gutenberg-Richter-like law in speech. We further show that such 'earthquakes in speech' show temporal correlations, as the interevent statistics are again power-law distributed. As this feature takes place in the intraphoneme range, we conjecture that the process responsible for this complex phenomenon is not cognitive, but it resides in the physiological (mechanical) mechanisms of speech production. Moreover, we show that these waiting time distributions are scale invariant under a renormalization group transformation, suggesting that the process of speech generation is indeed operating close to a critical point. These results are put in contrast with current paradigms in speech processing, which point towards low dimensional deterministic chaos as the origin of nonlinear traits in speech fluctuations. As these latter fluctuations are indeed the aspects that humanize synthetic speech, these findings may have an impact in future speech synthesis technologies. Results are robust and independent of the communication language or the number of speakers, pointing towards a universal pattern and yet another hint of complexity in human speech. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mens, T. E.; Joensen, U. N.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Takizawa, A.; Peter, J.; Jørgensen, N.; Szecsi, P. B.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Weiler, H.; Rajpert-de Meyts, E.; Repping, S.; Middeldorp, S.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? SUMMARY ANSWER: Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. WHAT IS

  18. Apolipoprotein E*3-Leiden transgenic mice mode for hypolipidaemic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Pearce, N.J.; Bergö, M.; Staels, B.; Yates, J.W.; Gribble, A.D.; Bond, B.C.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Groot, P.H.E.

    1998-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APO) E*3-Leiden mice with impaired chylomicron and VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) remnant metabolism display hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. In the present study, these mice were used for testing the hypolipidaemic effect of two marketed agents, lovastatin (CAS 75330-75-5)

  19. Human language reveals a universal positivity bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Clark, Eric M; Desu, Suma; Frank, Morgan R; Reagan, Andrew J; Williams, Jake Ryland; Mitchell, Lewis; Harris, Kameron Decker; Kloumann, Isabel M; Bagrow, James P; Megerdoomian, Karine; McMahon, Matthew T; Tivnan, Brian F; Danforth, Christopher M

    2015-02-24

    Using human evaluation of 100,000 words spread across 24 corpora in 10 languages diverse in origin and culture, we present evidence of a deep imprint of human sociality in language, observing that (i) the words of natural human language possess a universal positivity bias, (ii) the estimated emotional content of words is consistent between languages under translation, and (iii) this positivity bias is strongly independent of frequency of word use. Alongside these general regularities, we describe interlanguage variations in the emotional spectrum of languages that allow us to rank corpora. We also show how our word evaluations can be used to construct physical-like instruments for both real-time and offline measurement of the emotional content of large-scale texts.

  20. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Only a Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    Explains provisions contained within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, tracing historical beginnings of human rights to 1945, detailing events after 1945 up to the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations, and explaining essential terminology used in describing human rights instruments that have been…

  1. Note sur les Buprestides du Museum de Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thery, A.

    1935-01-01

    M. le Dr. H. C. Blöte, entomologiste du Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie à Leiden (Hollande) m'a confié l'étude de matériaux indéterminés appartenant aux collections de cet établissement, parmi ceux-ci j'ai trouvé quelques espèces nouvelles dont je donne ci-dessous la description. Les types de

  2. Learning about Factor V Leiden Thrombophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Genomic Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for ...

  3. Building Human Resources Management Capacity for University Research: The Case at Four Leading Vietnamese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    At research-intensive universities, building human resources management (HRM) capacity has become a key approach to enhancing a university's research performance. However, despite aspiring to become a research-intensive university, many teaching-intensive universities in developing countries may not have created effective research-promoted HRM…

  4. Die Leiden des jungen Werthers: Den unge Werthers lidelser

    OpenAIRE

    Wibe, Henriette Nøddebo; Mathiassen, Jonas Bundgaard; Villadsen, Line Møgelvang; Aeppli, Jon Marius Brogaard; Hvidtfeldt, Sidi Sami Idrissi; Jakobsen, Mathias Simonsen

    2013-01-01

    This project investigate the philosophical influence of Jean-Jaques Rousseau’s Discours sur I’origine et les fondemens de I’inégalité parmi les hommes on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Die Leiden des jungen Werthers. The concepts of the natural and conscious man that are set forth in the second Discours are compared to Werthers dualistic selfhood and the influence this has on the understanding of the narrative of Werther. Furthermore the project assesses the extent to which the revised 1787 ver...

  5. Academic Specialization and Contemporary University Humanities Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, Martine W.

    2012-01-01

    Given the academic specialization endemic today in humanities disciplines, some of the most important work of humanities centers has become promoting education about the humanities in general. After charting the rise of humanities centers in the US, three characteristics of centers that enable their advancement of larger concerns of the humanities…

  6. Clashes of discourses: Humanists and Calvinists in seventeenth-century academic Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2016-01-01

    Using Michel Foucault's concept of discursive change and Stephen Greenblatt's ideas about social poetics and self-fashioning, 'Clashes of Discourses: Calvinists and Humanists in Seventeenth-Century Academic Leiden' explains developments in the literary works of leading Leiden humanists against the

  7. Progression and regression of atherosclerosis in APOE3-Leiden transgenic mice : An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, M.J.J.; Cammen, M. van der; Laan, L.J.W. van der; Emeis, J.J.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Kraal, G.

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE3-Leiden) transgenic mice develop hyperlipidemia and are highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We have studied the progression and regression of atherosclerosis using immunohistochemistry. Female transgenic mice were fed a moderate fat diet to study

  8. Weldenkende burgers en Oranjeliefhebbers. Patriotten en Prinsgezinden in Leiden, 1775-1795

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, E.H.

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the conflicts between Patriots and Orangists in Leiden, which will be assessed with the help of the theory of collective action by the American sociologist Charles Tilly. The urban economy in Leiden was dominated by a textile industry that concentrated on exports and was very

  9. Sensitized mutagenesis screen in Factor V Leiden mice identifies thrombosis suppressor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Randal J; Tomberg, Kärt; Siebert, Amy E; Zhu, Guojing; Winn, Mary E; Dobies, Sarah L; Manning, Sara L; Brake, Marisa A; Cleuren, Audrey C; Hobbs, Linzi M; Mishack, Lena M; Johnston, Alexander J; Kotnik, Emilee; Siemieniak, David R; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun Z; Saunders, Thomas L; Ginsburg, David

    2017-09-05

    Factor V Leiden ( F5 L ) is a common genetic risk factor for venous thromboembolism in humans. We conducted a sensitized N -ethyl- N -nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen for dominant thrombosuppressor genes based on perinatal lethal thrombosis in mice homozygous for F5 L ( F5 L/L ) and haploinsufficient for tissue factor pathway inhibitor ( Tfpi +/- ). F8 deficiency enhanced the survival of F5 L/L Tfpi +/- mice, demonstrating that F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality is genetically suppressible. ENU-mutagenized F5 L/L males and F5 L/+ Tfpi +/- females were crossed to generate 6,729 progeny, with 98 F5 L/L Tfpi +/- offspring surviving until weaning. Sixteen lines, referred to as "modifier of Factor 5 Leiden ( MF5L1-16 )," exhibited transmission of a putative thrombosuppressor to subsequent generations. Linkage analysis in MF5L6 identified a chromosome 3 locus containing the tissue factor gene ( F3 ). Although no ENU-induced F3 mutation was identified, haploinsufficiency for F3 ( F3 +/- ) suppressed F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality. Whole-exome sequencing in MF5L12 identified an Actr2 gene point mutation (p.R258G) as the sole candidate. Inheritance of this variant is associated with suppression of F5 L/L Tfpi +/- lethality ( P = 1.7 × 10 -6 ), suggesting that Actr2 p.R258G is thrombosuppressive. CRISPR/Cas9 experiments to generate an independent Actr2 knockin/knockout demonstrated that Actr2 haploinsufficiency is lethal, supporting a hypomorphic or gain-of-function mechanism of action for Actr2 p.R258G Our findings identify F8 and the Tfpi/F3 axis as key regulators in determining thrombosis balance in the setting of F5 L and also suggest a role for Actr2 in this process.

  10. Are (Should) Human Rights (Be) Universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rhoda E.

    1998-01-01

    Believes that the purpose of human rights is to change many culturally ingrained habits and customs that violate the dignity of the individual. Expounds the differences between cultural relativism and cultural absolutism. States that "weak" cultural relativism is sometimes an appropriate response to human-rights violations. (CMK)

  11. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mens, T E; Joensen, U N; Bochdanovits, Z

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? SUMMARY ANSWER: Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY: FVL has a high prevalence in Caucasians despite detrimental health effects. Carriers have been shown to have higher fecundity, which might partly explain this evolutionary paradox. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: We determined FVL status in two cohorts (Dutch, n = 627; Danish, n = 854....... There were differences in smoking, abstinence time and age between the cohorts. We corrected for these in the primary analysis, which consisted of a mixed linear effects model, also incorporating unobjectified population differences. In public haplotype data from subjects of European descent, we explored...

  12. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY AGENCY: National Park... Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains and associated funerary... the human remains was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository...

  13. Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David; Bromley, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Research on the human rights movement emphasizes direct changes in nation-states, focusing on the efficacy of treaties and the role of advocacy in mitigating immediate violations. However, more than 140 universities in 59 countries established academic chairs, research centers, and programs for human rights from 1968-2000, a development that…

  14. The Birth of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the history of the ideals and enactment of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Includes a discussion of the origins of the concept of human rights, the impact of World War II, the role of nongovernmental organizations, and the process of drafting and adopting the UDHR. (DSK)

  15. Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 40th Anniversary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Juanita, Ed.

    December 10, 1988, marks the 40th anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration represents the first comprehensive, global statement on basic human rights, embracing many of the values long held by U.S. citizens; and it urges all peoples and all nations to promote respect for the…

  16. Gewenst beleid tegen ongewenst gedrag : onveiligheid binnen de organisatie kan leiden tot ziekteverzuim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, E.J. van; Nuyens, M.

    2005-01-01

    Indimidatie en agressie en geweld op het werk kunnen leiden tot gevoelens van onveiligheid en ziekteverzuim. Bepalingen in de Arbowet hebben onvoldoende effect op beleidsvorming ter voorkoming van ongewenste omgangsvormen. Goede praktijkvoorbeelden van beleid tegen ongewenst gedrag kunnen

  17. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY AGENCY: National Park... in the possession and control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains... made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in...

  18. Universal bursty behaviour in human violent conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoli, S.; Castillo-Mussot, M. Del; Ribeiro, H. V.; Lenzi, E. K.; Mendes, R. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and processes underlying the dynamics of collective violence is of considerable current interest. Recent studies indicated the presence of robust patterns characterizing the size and timing of violent events in human conflicts. Since the size and timing of violent events arises as the result of a dynamical process, we explore the possibility of unifying these observations. By analyzing available catalogs on violent events in Iraq (2003-2005), Afghanistan (2008-2010) and Northern Ireland (1969-2001), we show that the inter-event time distributions (calculated for a range of minimum sizes) obeys approximately a simple scaling law which holds for more than three orders of magnitude. This robust pattern suggests a hierarchical organization in size and time providing a unified picture of the dynamics of violent conflicts.

  19. Sensitive Dual Color in vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Using a New Red Codon Optimized Firefly Luciferase and a Green Click Beetle Luciferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Bologna, Italy, 2 Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, 3 Department of...and approved by the Bioethics Committee of Leiden University, The Netherlands (Animal protocol 08158). Allanimals received humane care in compliance

  20. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Patrick E; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    Music has been called "the universal language of mankind." Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation.

  1. Human rights – local value or universal norm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory Gutner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article argues for the universal character of human rights. It is demonstrated that they are not of specific value of Western culture but are a universal norm. This norm is valid not only for political practices but, first of all, for the morality and practice of argumentation. Human rights are strictly correlated with Kantian Categorical Imperative and can be substantiated by means of transcendental­pragmatic argument (K.­O. Apel. The difference between values and norms are also considered. It is demonstrated that values are always subjective and arbitrary meanwhile final justification is possible for norms.  

  2. Reconciling female genital circumcision with universal human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John-Stewart

    2017-09-18

    One of the most challenging issues in cross-cultural bioethics concerns the long-standing socio-cultural practice of female genital circumcision (FGC), which is prevalent in many African countries and the Middle East as well as in some Asian and Western countries. It is commonly assumed that FGC, in all its versions, constitutes a gross violation of the universal human rights of health, physical integrity, and individual autonomy and hence should be abolished. This article, however, suggests a mediating approach according to which one form of FGC, the removal of the clitoris foreskin, can be made compatible with the high demands of universal human rights. The argument presupposes the idea that human rights are not absolutist by nature but can be framed in a meaningful, culturally sensitive way. It proposes important limiting conditions that must be met for the practice of FGC to be considered in accordance with the human rights agenda. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Learning History through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landorf, Hilary; Pineda, Martha Fernanda

    2007-01-01

    Although adolescent students often do not have knowledge of specific laws, they usually have a keen sense of justice and fairness. In this article, the author discusses the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a powerful tool to channel students' sense of fairness into visible actions. Adopted in December 1948 by the General Assembly of…

  4. Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe: Advanced Search ... Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses); Search for an exact phrase by ...

  5. Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia is a bi-annual journal of the University of Zimbabwe. Its focus is humanities in Zimbabwe and the surrounding region but specialist articles of a more general interest are also published. Vol 32, No 1 (2005). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  6. Maintaining excellence in teaching of human anatomy: University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measures to address these challenges have resulted in wide disparities in curriculum design teaching methods, number and composition of instructors. Inspite of the challenges, the Department of Human Anatomy of the University of Nairobi (UON) maintained excellence of teaching for over 40yrs. This article describes the ...

  7. The United States and the universality of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, N

    1999-01-01

    The United States takes a highly relativistic stance toward the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It regards the socio-economic rights and the right to development as without status; exempts itself from all provisions of the Declaration by failing to sign the conventions designed to implement these provisions; and unilaterally qualifies its support of civil and political rights. Leading recipients of U.S. aid have traditionally included regimes with atrocious human rights records. Those struggling for human rights should have no illusions about the systems of power and their servants.

  8. Medical humanities and philosophy: is the universe expanding or contracting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2007-12-01

    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered as a distinct field of study has suffered as a result. Indeed, consensus on whether the philosophy of medicine even constitutes a legitimate field of study is lacking. This paper presents an argument for the importance of a broad conception of the philosophy of medicine and the central role it should play in organizing and interpreting the various fields of study that make up the metamedical multiverse.

  9. Solidarity and the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunson, Darryl

    2009-06-01

    Recent work has stressed the importance of the concept of solidarity to bioethics and social philosophy generally. But can and should it feature in documents such as the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights as anything more than a vague notion with multiple possible interpretations? Although noting the tension between universality and particularity that such documents have to deal with, and also noting that solidarity has a political content, the paper explores the suggestion that solidarity should feature more centrally in international regulations. The paper concludes with the view that when solidarity is seen aright, the UDBHR is an implicitly solidaristic document.

  10. On the universal structure of human lexical semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hyejin; Sutton, Logan; Smith, Eric; Moore, Cristopher; Wilkins, Jon F; Maddieson, Ian; Croft, William; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2016-02-16

    How universal is human conceptual structure? The way concepts are organized in the human brain may reflect distinct features of cultural, historical, and environmental background in addition to properties universal to human cognition. Semantics, or meaning expressed through language, provides indirect access to the underlying conceptual structure, but meaning is notoriously difficult to measure, let alone parameterize. Here, we provide an empirical measure of semantic proximity between concepts using cross-linguistic dictionaries to translate words to and from languages carefully selected to be representative of worldwide diversity. These translations reveal cases where a particular language uses a single "polysemous" word to express multiple concepts that another language represents using distinct words. We use the frequency of such polysemies linking two concepts as a measure of their semantic proximity and represent the pattern of these linkages by a weighted network. This network is highly structured: Certain concepts are far more prone to polysemy than others, and naturally interpretable clusters of closely related concepts emerge. Statistical analysis of the polysemies observed in a subset of the basic vocabulary shows that these structural properties are consistent across different language groups, and largely independent of geography, environment, and the presence or absence of a literary tradition. The methods developed here can be applied to any semantic domain to reveal the extent to which its conceptual structure is, similarly, a universal attribute of human cognition and language use.

  11. Global-minded Human Resources and Expectations for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi

    Under the globalized economy, Japanese corporations compete with rivals of the western countries and emerging economies. And domestically, they face with deflation, falling birth-rate, an aging society, and shrinking market. So they need to foster and retain global-minded human resources who can play an active role in global business, and who can drive innovation. What Japanese corporations expect for global-minded human resources are ability to meet challenges, ability to think independently free from conventional wisdom, communication skills in foreign languages, interests in foreign cultures and different values, and so on. In order to foster global-minded human resources, Keidanren work with the 13 universities selected under the Japanese Government‧s “Global 30” projects to undertake “Global-minded Human Resources Development Projects” .

  12. Prevalentie van chronische-vermoeidheidsyndroom in 4 huisartspraktijken in de regio Leiden [Prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in four general practices in Leyden region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, R.G.J.A.; Waal, M.W.M. de; Opmeer, C.; Petri, H.; Springer, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Doel. De prevalentie vaststellen van chronische-vermoeidheidsyndroom (CVS) in de huisartspraktijk. Opzet. Descriptief. Plaats. Huisartspraktijken in Leiden en omstreken. Methode. Het geanonimiseerde geautomatiseerde databestand van het Registratie Netwerk Universitaire Huisartspraktijken Leiden en

  13. Differential effects of amlodipine and atorvastatin treatment and their combination on atherosclerosis in ApoE*3-Leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsing, D.J.; Jukema, J.W.; van de Wiel, M.A.; Emeis, J.; van der Laarse, A.; Havekes, L.M.; Princen, H.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential antiatherosclerotic effects of the calcium antagonist amlodipine as compared with the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor atorvastatin and the combination of both in ApoE*3-Leiden transgenic mice. Four groups of 15 ApoE*3-Leiden mice were put on a

  14. Human Rights and the Political Economy of Universal Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health system financing is a critical factor in securing universal health care and achieving equity in access and payment. The human rights framework offers valuable guidance for designing a financing strategy that meets these goals. This article presents a rights-based approach to health care financing developed by the human right to health care movement in the United States. Grounded in a human rights analysis of private, market-based health insurance, advocates make the case for public financing through progressive taxation. Financing mechanisms are measured against the twin goals of guaranteeing access to care and advancing economic equity. The added focus on the redistributive potential of health care financing recasts health reform as an economic policy intervention that can help fulfill broader economic and social rights obligations. Based on a review of recent universal health care reform efforts in the state of Vermont, this article reports on a rights-based public financing plan and model, which includes a new business tax directed against wage disparities. The modeling results suggest that a health system financed through equitable taxation could produce significant redistributive effects, thus increasing economic equity while generating sufficient funds to provide comprehensive health care as a universal public good. PMID:28559677

  15. Human Rights Here and Now: Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Nancy, Ed.

    Although December 10, 1998, marked the 50th anniversary of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), most people living in the United States remain unaware of this document, the foundation stone of all human rights. Intended for use by both community groups and teachers in elementary and secondary schools, this educational…

  16. Association analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 axis parameters with survival and functional status in nonagenarians of the Leiden Longevity Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Spoel, Evie; Rozing, Maarten P; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J

    2015-01-01

    Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling has been associated with longevity in various model organisms. However, the role of insulin/IGF-1 signaling in human survival remains controversial. The aim of this study was to test whether circulating IGF-1 axis parameters associate...... with old age survival and functional status in nonagenarians from the Leiden Longevity Study. This study examined 858 Dutch nonagenarian (males≥89 years; females≥91 years) siblings from 409 families, without selection on health or demographic characteristics. Nonagenarians were divided over sex...

  17. Increased sperm count may account for high population frequency of factor V Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohn, D. M.; Repping, S.; Büller, H. R.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Middeldorp, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Factor V Leiden (FVL) increases the risk of venous thrombosis and pregnancy loss in carriers. Nevertheless, this relatively old mutation is prevalent in Caucasion populations, which could be explained by positive selection pressure. Men with FVL have previously been found to have higher

  18. CETP does not affect triglyceride production or clearance in APOE*3-Leiden mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijland, S.; Berg, S.A.A. van den; Voshol, P.J.; Hoek, A.M. van den; Princen, H.M.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Dijk, K.W. van

    2010-01-01

    The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) facilitates the bidirectional transfer of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides (TG) between HDL and (V)LDL. By shifting cholesterol in plasma from HDL to (V)LDL in exchange for VLDL-TG, CETP aggravates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic APOE*3-Leiden

  19. Orthopterological notes I : On the Lesini of the Leiden Museum (Tettigoniidae, Copiphorinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de C.

    1942-01-01

    When rearranging a part of the collections of Orthoptera in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden I found a number of specimens belonging to this tribus, which by former authors is considered as a separate subfamily with the name Eumegalodontinae (Kirby, 1906, p. 289; Caudell, 1927, p.

  20. PXR agonism decreases plasma HDL levels in ApoE*3-Leiden.CETP mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, W. de; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Mol, I.M.; Hoekstra, M.; Romijn, J.A.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Princen, H.M.G.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2009-01-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonism has been shown to affect multiple steps in both the synthesis and catabolism of HDL, but its integrated effect on HDL metabolism in vivo remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the net effect of PXR agonism on HDL metabolism in ApoE*3-Leiden (E3L) and

  1. Verzeichnis der Echiuridae, Sipunculidae und Priapulidae des Naturhistorichen Reichsmuseums in Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiasny, G.

    1930-01-01

    Die vorliegende Mitteilung ist das Ergebnis der Bearbeitung zumeist älteren Materiales an Echiuriden, Sipunculiden und Priapuliden des Naturhistorischen Reichs-Museums in Leiden. Obwohl die Sammlung nach Anzahl der Exemplare nicht umfangreich ist, zeigt sie einen überraschenden Reichtum an Formen

  2. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  3. The Association of Factor V Leiden Mutation with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashif, M.; Saeed, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of factor V Leiden mutation with recurrent pregnancy loss. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January to June 2012, and comprised women of 18 to 45 years of age who had a history of recurrent pregnancy loss, and controls with no history of pregnancy loss. All the subjects belonged to Punjabi ethnic group. Three ml blood was taken from cases and controls and deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted. In order to identify Factor V Leiden mutation, polymerase chain reaction method was utilised combined with the amplification refractory mutation system. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 112 subjects, 56(50 percent) were in each of the two groups. The presence of factor V Leiden mutation among the cases was 3(5.4 percent) while it was absent among the controls. The mutation was significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (p=0.017).Recurrent pregnancy loss was higher in cases than controls (p=0.001). Conclusion: Factor V Leiden mutation was significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. It should be considered one of the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. (author)

  4. On some Hymenoptera from the collection of Guerin-Méneville in the Leiden museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecht, van der J.

    1957-01-01

    About thirty years ago, while studying the Sphecinae of the Leiden Museum, I found two species of Sphex, described by F. E. Guérin-Méneville, represented here by specimens originating from the collection of this author. A note on these species, Sphex lanierii Guérin and Sphex paulinieri Guérin, was

  5. Plasma hepcidin levels and anemia in old age. The Leiden 85-Plus Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen, W.P. den; Craen, A.J. de; Wiegerinck, E.T.G.; Westendorp, R.G.J.; Swinkels, D.W.; Gussekloo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin, an important regulator of iron homeostasis, is suggested to be causally related to anemia of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the role of plasma hepcidin in anemia among older persons from the general population. The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a population-based study of

  6. Die Scyphomedusen-Sammlung des Naturhistorischen Reichsmuseums in Leiden : II. Stauromedusae, Coronatae, Semaeostomeae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiasny, G.

    1919-01-01

    ALLGEMEINER TEIL. Die Bearbeitung der umfangreichen Scyphomedusen-Sammlung im Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie in Leiden ist nunmehr so weit vorgeschritten, dass sich eine Übersicht über dieselbe gewinnen lässt. In einer früheren Mitteilung wurde über die Cubomedusen berichtet, eine weitere zur

  7. A half century of abstracting at the African Studies Centre Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van M.C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the history of the abstracts and indexing journal originally known as 'Documentatieblad,' which was renamed to 'African Studies Abstracts (ASA)' and later to 'African Studies Abstracts Online' (ASAO), published by the African Studies Centre (ASC) in Leiden, the Netherlands

  8. Anécdotas castellanas en escritura hebraica. Apuntes paremiológicos conservados en las anotaciones hebreas de Alfonso de Zamora (Ms. Leiden Or. 645

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Fontela, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Problems of translation and interpretation are addressed in this presentation of Alfonso de Zamora’s Hebrew and Hebrew “Aljamiado” Spanish notes (ca. 1530 from Leiden University Library Ms. Or. 645 (ol. Warner 65 containing anecdotes, sayings and short tales. Additional notes dealing with a manuscript copy of the Targum to the Prophets comissioned by the University of Salamanca are also discussed.

    Este artículo estudia algunas notas manuscritas de Alfonso de Zamora en hebreo y en aljamía hebraico-castellana datadas hacia 1530, y procedentes del ms. Or. 645 (ol. Warner 65 de la Biblioteca de la Universidad de Leiden. Dichas notas contienen anécdotas, refranes y «cuentecillos», tales como las anécdotas «de fray Palomo», «de un portugués», y «de lo que dijo el gallego». Otras anotaciones de Zamora tratan de un trabajo de copia del Targum a los Profetas por encargo de la Universidad de Salamanca.

  9. Teaching Humanities at the National University of la Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Leopoldo E

    2003-10-01

    In this article the author begins by giving a brief history of medical education in Argentina, then provides some background information on the National University of La Plata. He describes two major initiatives at La Plata: a new and pioneering admission policy (implemented in 1993) and a change in the number of hours and years in the curriculum. He then looks back to the introduction in 1976 of La Plata's medical humanities program. Over its 20 year existence, the program has undergone a number of changes in response both to students' interests and financial concerns. The revised humanities curriculum now consists of four elective courses: medicine and literature, anthropology, history of medicine, and "medical kalology" (which focuses on music and dance). Unfortunately, the program, while it has been well received by both students and faculty and has inspired programs at other Argentinean schools, is threatened by Argentina's economic crisis.

  10. Identity and the Hegemony of Universal Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rights are commonly portrayed as a narrative that passes through several chapters before reaching its inevitable conclusion. This narrative begins with the horror of Nazism, moves to the centrality of human rights in the UN Charter, eulogizes the Universal Declaration, celebrates the achievements of standard setting as set out in the major covenants, offers detailed analysis of methods of monitoring and, finally, speculates on the future of compliance. This narrative is sustained, firstly, by ‘naturalist’ foundationalism and, secondly, by a widely held assumptions about the move towards ‘settled norms’ in the contemporary world order. Although some pessimism is voiced over continued reports of torture, genocide, structural economic deprivation, disappearances, ethnic cleansing, political prisoners, the suppression of trade union rights, gender inequality, religious persecution, and many other violations of internationally agreed human rights, most commentators and activists tacitly adopt an optimistic stance that envisages a future rights based international order. The still prevalent naturalist account of human rights, together with a narrative that boasts ‘settled norms’, suggests that the human rights regime represents a final ‘truth’ about the essential nature of all humankind; a common identity that describes the individual in an increasingly globalized world. This paper interrogates the ‘naturalist-settled norm’ account of human rights from the perspective of power and knowledge. It begins by distinguishing between the international human rights regime and the global discourse of human rights. The former adopts a legal approach, where the neutral, value-free, unbiased and impartial nature of the law is tacitly accepted. The latter refers to human rights as social, political and economic practice, and must therefore include an account of power. From this perspective, the discourse of human rights might be said to

  11. Our cosmic future : humanity's fate in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2000-04-01

    What is humankind's ultimate fate and destiny in the Universe? Can human life and intelligence go on forever? This captivating and unparalleled book explores the future of the human race in the Universe, for centuries, millennia, and eons to come. Nikos Prantzos, distinguished astrophysicist and popular science writer, focuses not on what will be done, but on what could be done in light of our current knowledge and the speculations of eminent scientists. While he employs many concepts from physics, Prantzos also provides historical accounts of such ideas as terraforming, asteroid mining, interstellar travel, astroengineering, and eschatology, discussing their philosophical and social implications. Moreover, he uses the work of well known science and science-fiction writers--including Verne, Wells, Clarke, Tsiolkovsky, and Dyson--to illustrate many possibilities and concepts. Our Cosmic Future offers compelling answers to such intriguing questions as: Should we return to the Moon and eventually colonize Mars and other planets in our solar system? Why haven't we encountered an extraterrestrial civilization up to this time in our history? How can we avoid various cosmic threats, such as asteroid collisions and supernova explosions? Could we escape the remote, yet certain, death of the Sun? What will eventually happen to stars, our Galaxy, distant galaxies, and the Universe itself? With its artful blend of historical, scientific accounts and themes from classic works of science fiction, Our Cosmic Future is a spellbinding work that will enchant all readers interested in space travel and colonization, cosmology, and humankind's future prospects in the Cosmos.

  12. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  13. Human Rights, Fundamental Freedoms and Universal Values in International Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev S. Voronkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes the evolution of human rights and fundamental freedoms in domestic political life of individual states and in international relations as well over the latest two centuries. The article traces the role of struggle for liberal political human rights and civilian freedoms in the dismantling of the feudal-absolutist regimes as well as the challenges of radical left-wing (communist and far right-wing (national-socialistic threats to be met by the supporters of liberal political rights and civil freedoms in the interwar period. The list of human rights and fundamental freedoms had constantly been updating in the postwar period, including by the efforts of the UNO and other international organizations, and fixing in different international documents. The author emphasizes the import role of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE in transforming the issues of human rights and fundamental freedoms into the essential element of public diplomacy of contemporary states. He traces the process of the increasing utilization of liberal political rights and civilian freedoms, which are usually the effective tools for domestic democratic transformation, within the framework of diplomatic practice of European and North-American states, aimed at ensuring their political and economic interests on the world stage. In this regard the author addresses the attempts of Western countries to legalize "humanitarian"interventions in circumvention of the UN Security Council. The article emphasizes the necessity to replenish the understanding of universal human rights and freedoms by the values, developed both by the international community within the framework of implementing the Millennium Development Goals and by various countries and peoples, which in sum constitute the modern international civilizational baggage.

  14. 75 FR 5108 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY AGENCY: National Park Service... funerary objects in the possession and control of the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository professional staff in consultation with...

  15. Prostaglandins - universal biological regulators in the human body (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Tymoshchuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers of different industries pay great attention to the problem of prostaglandins. Objective: to study and systematize the basic questions of structure, biological action and metabolism of prostaglandins in the human body and using their analogues in pharmacy through the domestic and foreign literature data analysis. Prostaglandins – biologically active substances which are similar in effect to hormones, but are synthesized in cells of different tissues. Prostaglandins as universal cellular mediators are widely distributed in the body, synthesized in small amounts in almost all tissues, have both local and systemic effects. For each prostaglandin there is a target organ. On chemical structure they are small molecules related to eicosanoids - a group of fat-like substances (lipids. Depending on the chemical structure prostaglandins are divided into series (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J and three groups (1–3; type F isomers are to be indicated by additional letters α and β. Prostaglandins have an extremely wide range of physiological effects in the body and have three main functions: supporting, molecular, neurotransmitter. Most prostaglandins interact with specific receptors of plasma membranes, but some prostaglandins (group A can act without receptors. There is no stock of prostaglandins in the body, their life cycle is short, and they are quickly produced in response to biological stimulants exposure, have their effect in extremely small quantity and are rapidly inactivated in the bloodstream. Due to the extremely rapid breakdown of prostaglandins in the body they work near their place of secretion. Preparations of prostaglandins and their derivatives are used in experimental and clinical medicine for abortion and induction of labor, treatment of stomach ulcers, asthma, certain heart diseases, congenital heart defects in newborns, glaucoma, atherosclerosis, rheumatic and neurological diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes

  16. Human body donation in Thailand: Donors at Khon Kaen University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techataweewan, N; Panthongviriyakul, C; Toomsan, Y; Mothong, W; Kanla, P; Chaichun, A; Amarttayakong, P; Tayles, N

    2018-03-01

    Culture, society and spirituality contribute to variability in the characteristics of human body donors and donation programmes worldwide. The donors and the body donation programme at Khon Kaen University, northeast Thailand, reflect all these aspects of Thailand, including the status accorded to the donors and the ceremonial acknowledgement of the donors and their families. Data from the programme records and from surveys of samples of currently registering donors and recently received donor bodies are analysed to define the characteristics of both registering and received donors, including motivation, demography, socio-economic status, health, and use of the bodies. The body donation programme at Khon Kaen University currently has a very high rate of registration of body donors, with gender and age differences in the patterns of donation. Registrants include more females than males, a long-standing pattern, and are an average age of 50 years. The bodies of 12% of registrants are received after death and include more males than females. Both sexes are of an average age of 69 years. Males had registered their donation eight years prior to death and females ten years prior. Current registrants identified altruistic motives for their decision to donate, although the coincidence of body donation by a highly revered monk with a surge in donations in 2015 suggests that Buddhism plays a primary role in motivation. The opportunity to make merit for donors and their families, and respect shown to donors and the nature of the ceremonies acknowledging the donors and their families, including the use of the Royal Flame at the cremation ceremony, all contribute to decisions to donate. The characteristics of body donors and the body donation programme at Khon Kaen University are reflective of Thai society and the centrality of Buddhism to Thai culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Hoving; Margreet R. de Vries; Rob C. M. de Jong; Saeed Katiraei; Amanda Pronk; Paul H. A. Quax; Vanessa van Harmelen; Ko Willems van Dijk

    2018-01-01

    The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce...

  18. Ein Werther der DDR : Plenzdorfs Neue Leiden des jungen W. im gespaltenen Deutschland

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Die neuen Leiden des jungen W. wurden »bewußt auf Auslegbarkeit geschrieben« und irritierten die Kritiker durch »die ungeheure Breite der Assoziationsmöglichkeiten«. Durch die vier »strukturtragenden Schichten« oder Informationsebenen des Textes kommt es zu interferierenden Perspektiven: 1. die voranstehenden Dokumente (Zeitungsnotiz, drei Todesanzeigen), 2. »die szenisch-dialogisch objektivierte Erinnerungsperspektive der Eltern und Arbeitskollegen«, 3. die Kommentare Edgars »von jenseits de...

  19. Universal Humanism – A Globalization Context is the Classroom of Unheard Options ... how to Become More Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Svetelj

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of multi-cultural and multi-religious society, embedded in the process of globalization, a traditional understanding of humanism offers insufficient frameworks for an adequate comprehension of human flourishing and human search for meaning. In addition, modernity frames and evaluates in many aspects insufficiently the incomparable worth of the human person. This article offers some guidelines for further philosophical, theological and pedagogical reflection on a humanism that is more suitable for our life in the process of globalization and modernity. Such humanism continually moves us toward a better comprehension of what “human” means within a universe of divergent cultures, religions, traditions, and races. This humanism is called universal humanism , based on the Greek word kaqolou , comprising both universality and wholeness. The first part of this article analyzes some of the main characteristics of humanism in the Greek and Roman contexts, which provide historical and theoretical frameworks for universal humanism. The second part justifies the relevance and usefulness of such humanism: it helps us to transcend singular cultures, nations, political systems, religions, and, by default, to discover or explore anew the meaning of the human person on a global level. The last part of this article suggests some pedagogical attitudes that will help us to embrace and remain in a dialogical relationship with all of humanity, in order to enrich our comprehension of the incomparable worth of the human person, this time from a universal perspective.

  20. Imagination and the Humanities in Honors across the Disciplines at a Jesuit University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Not every student has done honors work in the humanities, but all students experience research at a human level that necessarily recalls the work of the humanities. This article describes how Joe Kraus, a professor of literature at the University of Scranton, was inspired to see applied humanities in stories of human experiences, which helped him…

  1. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  2. Human Resources Management in Educational Faculties of State Universities in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Sevim

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the human resources management in the faculties of education of state universities in Turkey within the context of Human Resources Management Principles. The study population consisted of 40 academic members in the faculties of education of 20 different state universities and 10 academic unit administrators at different…

  3. The University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education: Its History, Purpose, and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott D.; Martinez, Reynaldo L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article features the University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education, a nonprofit organization representing leading United States universities that offer graduate programs in career and technical education (CTE) and human resource development (HRD). The mission of the Council is to be a recognized force in shaping the future of…

  4. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

  5. In Search of a Universal Human Rights Metaphor: Moral Conversations across Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2018-01-01

    This article takes up the educational challenge of the framers of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Specifically, the author explores the question of: how can we talk about a universal conception of human rights in a way that both respects the need for cultural pluralism and the necessity to protect those rights and freedoms that all…

  6. The Significance of UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on the Human Genome & Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn H.E. Harmon

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern medical research, particularly genetic research, is changing the nature of medicine. Concerns surrounding these changes and their potential negative impact on human rights led UNESCO to spearhead collaboration by experts in the creation of an international instrument intended to provide guidance for the promotion of bioethics and the protection of human rights in the genetic context. The result was the Universal Declaration of the Human Genome and Human Rights. This article briefly highlights the scientific and social setting into which the Declaration was injected. This is followed by a consideration of the drafting body (the IBC so as to assess whether UNESCO was the appropriate body to lead this project. The process by which the Declaration was created is also considered so as to assess whether it represents an example of ethical and democratic drafting. Finally, the substantive content of the Declaration is considered and measured against the pre-existing regime so as to assess whether it represents an intelligible and coherent response to the concerns raised capable of offering guidance now and into the future. By assessing these procedural and substantive matters, one can draw some tentative conclusions about the utility and significance of the Declaration.

  7. Human Space Exploration and Human Space Flight: Latency and the Cognitive Scale of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Dan; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    The role of telerobotics in space exploration as placing human cognition on other worlds is limited almost entirely by the speed of light, and the consequent communications latency that results from large distances. This latency is the time delay between the human brain at one end, and the telerobotic effector and sensor at the other end. While telerobotics and virtual presence is a technology that is rapidly becoming more sophisticated, with strong commercial interest on the Earth, this time delay, along with the neurological timescale of a human being, quantitatively defines the cognitive horizon for any locale in space. That is, how distant can an operator be from a robot and not be significantly impacted by latency? We explore that cognitive timescale of the universe, and consider the implications for telerobotics, human space flight, and participation by larger numbers of people in space exploration. We conclude that, with advanced telepresence, sophisticated robots could be operated with high cognition throughout a lunar hemisphere by astronauts within a station at an Earth-Moon Ll or L2 venue. Likewise, complex telerobotic servicing of satellites in geosynchronous orbit can be carried out from suitable terrestrial stations.

  8. Die Leiden des jungen Werthers à luz da história do conceito de subjetividade

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Felipe Vale da

    2013-01-01

    O artigo analisa os paralelos entre o retrato do 'sujeito moderno em crise' visto no romance Die Leiden des jungen Werthers de Goethe e, por outro lado, o perfil psicossocial do 'homem do sentimento' do século XVIII, fruto da cultura da Empfindsamkeit. Defendo a perspectiva de que, no romance, Goethe não apenas se utiliza do formato literário mais tradicional da Empfindsamkeit (o do romance epistolar), como também se apropria de topói e técnicas discursivas que lhe são próprias em registro ra...

  9. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ozcan Dag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST. Factor 5 leiden (FVL is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  10. The universality of human rights: some pending questions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sidi Omar

    Cultural relativism, in brief, is the assertion that human values, far from being ... that particular human rights are like ‗essentially contested concepts' in which there ... There are obviously enough philosophical, ethical and legal arguments for ...

  11. Plasma lipoproteins in familial dysbetalipoproteinemia associated with apolipoproteins E2 (Arg158 -->Cys), E3-Leiden, and E2 (Lys146-->Gln), and effects of treatment with simvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.P.; Smelt, A.H.; Maagdenberg, A.M. van den; Tol, A. van; Vroom T.F.; Gevers Leuven, J.A.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Laarse, A. van der; Hooft, F.M. van 't

    1994-01-01

    Using a density-gradient ultracentrifugation technique, we analyzed in detail the plasma lipoprotein profiles of 18 patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD) who had apolipoprotein (apo) E2(Arg158-->Cys) homozygosity (the E2-158 variant, n = 6), apoE3-Leiden heterozygosity (the E3-Leiden

  12. In the absence of endogenous mouse apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein E*2(Arg-158 → Cys) transgenic mice develop more severe hyperlipoproteinemia than apolipoprotein E*3-Leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Dijk, K.W. van; Hof, H.B. van 't; Gorp, P.J.J. van; Zee, A. van der; Boom, H. van der; Breuer, M.L.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekesf, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E*2(Arg-155 → Cys) (APOE*2) transgenic mice were generated and compared to the previously generated apolipoprotein E*3- Leiden (APOE*3-Leiden) transgenic mice to study the variable expression of hyperlipoproteinemia associated with these two APOE variants. In the presence of the

  13. Reversal of hypercholesterolemia in apolipoprotein E2 and apolipoprotein E3-Leiden transgenic mice by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of the VLDL receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Zee, A. van der; Hof, B. van 't; Boom, H. van der; Kobayashi, K.; Chan, L.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of apolipoprotein E2(Arg158- Cys) (apoE2) and apolipoprotein E3Leiden (apoE3-Leiden) with the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor in vivo and in vitro to define the possible role of this receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis. The in vivo

  14. Anti-Foundationalism, Deliberative Democracy and Universal Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Trifiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper argues that an approach to democracy that combines an anti-foundationalist epistemology and a deliberative political and moral stance will enable us to solve the increasing tensions between the universalistic claims of human rights and the particularistic claims to autonomy coming from different cultural groups. The anti-foundationalist conception of normative authority I put forth is centered on the distinction between universal grounds for and universal scope of normativity. It maintains that the universalistic normative force of our norms and practices remains uncompromised by the acknowledgment of the ultimate circularity of our justifications, thus eschewing the pitfalls of both foundationalism and relativism. My main contention is that only by ensuring inclusive and self-reflexive practices of collective decision-making we will be able to address the tensions between universalism and cultural relativism, and produce more flexible models of democratic governance, citizenship and cultural membership suitable to face the challenges of the global processes of integration and differentiation. این مقاله استدلال می‌نماید که رویکردی به دموکراسی که معرفت‌شناسی ضد مبناگرایانه را با دیدگاه اخلاقی و سیاسی مشورتی ترکیب می‌نماید، ما را قادر خواهد ساخت تنش‌های فزآینده بین مطالبات عام‌گرایانه حقوق بشر و مطالبات خاص‌گرایانه استقلال را که از سوی گروه‌های مختلف فرهنگی مطرح می گردد، حل و فصل نماییم. برداشت ضد مبناگرایانه از اعتبار اقتدار هنجاری که من ارائه می‌نمایم، حول محور تمایز بین زمینه‌های جهانی هنجار محوری و گسترة جهانی آن می‌گردد. این ایده معتقد است که

  15. Growth in The Hague versus decline in Leiden. A comparison of spatial development in two Dutch cities between 1700 and 1870

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer van der Zweep

    2017-04-01

    1830–1870 The Hague underwent considerable densification inside the canal ring as well as extensions north and south of the city. The number of new tenements built on inner yards in The Hague can give a distorted impression, as can the number of demolished buildings in Leiden, because the 1870 maps were much more detailed. In Leiden the advent of new factories prompted new construction on the former city walls. The Hague, too, became a major industrial player, while continuing to profit from its function as the centre of government. In 1870, The Hague had almost twoand-a-half times as many inhabitants as Leiden (92,000 versus 39,000, but within the canal girdle Leiden was still more densely built up. Between 1700 and 1870, The Hague developed into one of the Netherlands’ biggest cities, which it still is. Leiden plummeted from second place to the middle bracket, where it continues to sit today.

  16. Attitudes of University of Botswana Faculty of Humanities students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We administered a questionnaire to undergraduate students at the University of Botswana to find out the languages the students speak, and their attitudes towards minority languages spoken in their country as well as to determine what their views were towards including the said languages in the curriculum. We found out ...

  17. Factor V G1691A (Leiden is a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawhida Y. Abdel Ghaffar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a multifactorial disease in which several prothrombotic disorders may predispose patients to the development of thrombosis at this uncommon location (hepatic veins. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of inherited thrombophilia in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients.Materials and Methods: The study included 47 Budd-Chiari syndrome patients (20 children and 27 adults. Genotyping of Factor V G1691A (Leiden, prothrombin G20210A (PT, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were performed using real-time PCR and fluorescence melting curve detection analysis.Results: Factor V Leiden was observed in 29 patients (61.7%. It is the only factor that caused Budd-Chiari syndrome in 18 of the patients and in 5 of the patients with inferior vena cava involvement. Myeloproliferative disease was noted in 12 (25.5% patients, antiphospholipid syndrome in 5 (10.6%, and Behcet’s disease in 3 (6.4%. Interestingly, 3 of the children with Budd-Chiari syndrome had lipid storage disease.Conclusion: Factor V Leiden was a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients, which may have been related to the high frequency of this mutation in the study region. Factor V Leiden was also a strong thrombophilic factor and the leading cause of inferior vena cava thrombosis in these patients. Lipid storage disease should be included as a risk factor for Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  18. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated...

  19. Has one of Captain Cook’s possums landed in Leiden? The possible holotype of Pseudocheirus peregrinus (Boddaert, 1785)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, C.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of an old female specimen of Pseudocheirus peregrinus (Boddaert, 1785) in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, is discussed and the early descriptions and nomenclatural history of the species are reviewed. The assumption by Temminck (1824) and Jentink (1888) that the animal

  20. Charles Darwin’s lost Cinereous Harrier found in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouw, van H.; Steinheimer, F.D.

    2008-01-01

    During reorganisation of the Leiden bird collection a mounted harrier was found what seemed to be one of the still lost specimens collected by Darwin. After closer research it turned out it was indeed the last missing harrier of the Darwin collection.

  1. The original Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium monoclonal antibody recognizes a vascular endothelial growth factor binding site within neuropilin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaalouk, Diana E.; Ozawa, Nfichael G.; Sun, Jessica; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2007-01-01

    For two decades, the antigen recognized by the Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium (PAL-E) monoclonal antibody, a standard vascular endothelial cell marker, has remained elusive. Here, we used a combinatorial phage display-based approach ("epitope mapping") to select peptides binding to the

  2. Relative validity of the food frequency questionnaire used to assess dietary intake in the Leiden Longevity Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Meyboom, S.; Beekman, M.; Craen, A.J.M.; Slagboom, P.E.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Invalid information on dietary intake may lead to false diet-disease associations. This study was conducted to examine the relative validity of the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used to assess dietary intake in the Leiden Longevity Study. Methods - A total of 128 men and women

  3. Increase of Universality in Human Brain during Mental Imagery from Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different complex systems behave in a similar way near their critical points of phase transitions which leads to an emergence of a universal scaling behaviour. Universality indirectly implies a long-range correlation between constituent subsystems. As the distributed correlated processing is a hallmark of higher complex cognition, I investigated a measure of universality in human brain during perception and mental imagery of complex real-life visual object like visual art. METHODO...

  4. Meta-analysis of factor V Leiden and ischemic stroke in young adults: the importance of case ascertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2010-08-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Whether it is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, however, is uncertain. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies of ischemic stroke in adults 50 years of age and younger published before June 2009. Across all studies, factor V Leiden was detected in 154 of 2045 cases (7.5%) and 217 of 5307 controls (4.1%), yielding a fixed-effect odds ratio of 2.00 (95% CI, 1.59-2.51). However, further analyses revealed substantial heterogeneity among these studies (P=0.005 for Q-test of heterogeneity). Hypothesizing that this heterogeneity could be related to differences among studies in case selection criteria, we stratified the meta-analysis into studies for which case samples were enriched or not enriched to include cases having an increased likelihood of prothrombotic genetic involvement ("selected" ischemic stroke studies, n=9) and those that recruited cases from consecutive neurology referrals or hospitalizations ("unselected" ischemic stroke studies, n=8). Among the 9 "selected" ischemic stroke studies, factor V Leiden was more strongly associated with stroke (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.98-3.75), whereas among the 8 "unselected" ischemic stroke studies, the association between factor V Leiden and stroke was substantially weaker (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.998-1.95). This difference was found to be statistically significant (P=0.003 for Woolf test for heterogeneity). We conclude that factor V Leiden is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in patient populations in which there is an increased clinical suspicion of prothrombotic state.

  5. What We Have Learned from San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment and Leiden Manifesto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Ming-Li Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the research performance evaluation of members of the academic community conducted by government or institutions has been applied with multiple indicators and peer review, however, there are many controversies about the design and application of research evaluation indicators. This article aims to introduce the development process of San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA and Leiden Manifesto and summarize their contents of guidelines and attempts to compare the differences between these two documents. It hopes that this article can arise the attention and reflection of research evaluation indicators and relevant issues from Taiwan academic community to reach consensus of utilization of research evaluation indicators. It will be beneficial to develop the version of declaration with local characteristics in the future.

  6. Die Leiden des jungen Werthers à luz da história do conceito de subjetividade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vale da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa os paralelos entre o retrato do 'sujeito moderno em crise' visto no romance Die Leiden des jungen Werthers de Goethe e, por outro lado, o perfil psicossocial do 'homem do sentimento' do século XVIII, fruto da cultura da Empfindsamkeit. Defendo a perspectiva de que, no romance, Goethe não apenas se utiliza do formato literário mais tradicional da Empfindsamkeit (o do romance epistolar, como também se apropria de topói e técnicas discursivas que lhe são próprias em registro radicalmente heterodoxo. A argumentação nos ligará a uma dedução da visão do conceito de subjetividade moderna com que Goethe trabalha em sua fase final do Sturm und Drang, e que o situa como importante nome do discurso filosófico da modernidade.

  7. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 50 Years Old but Still Coming of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Highlights the events of the past 50 years concerning the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is the first document in human history to codify rights that apply to every person regardless of citizenship in a particular country. Explains why the United States does not comprehend the value of the declaration. (CMK)

  8. Do Colleges and Universities Increase Their Region's Human Capital? Staff Report No. 401

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Jaison R.; Deitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We investigate whether the degree production and research and development (R&D) activities of colleges and universities are related to the amount and types of human capital present in the metropolitan areas where the institutions are located. We find that degree production has only a small positive relationship with local stocks of human capital,…

  9. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  10. Human rights & intellectual property for universal access to new essential medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perehudoff, Katrina; 't Hoen, Elisabeth; Babar, Zaheer

    2018-01-01

    This chapter illustrates how human rights principles can help governments, even those with the most modest budgets, scale-up universal access to expensive essential medicines. The key message is that governments have legally binding human rights obligations to immediately take steps to provide

  11. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumburgh, G.P.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  12. Reconciling Universality and Particularity through a Cosmopolitan Outlook on Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Adami

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human rights are today criticized as not compatible with different cultural values and the debate has circulated around Asian values and Islamic values as in dichotomy with human rights as universal ethics (Ignatieff, 2003. The theoretical dichotomy between universality and particularity is questioned pragmatically in this paper through a historical study. The working process of drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR in 1946-48, which included thousands of people, is explored as a cosmopolitan space in which individuals from different cultural contexts met to negotiate human rights through cultural narratives. The process where particular values were negotiated with universal notion on human rights resulted in a common proclamation (UDHR without a common philosophical or ideological ground. This paper puts forth a thesis that human rights discourse can work as a cosmopolitan space, in which particular value systems meet in processes characterized by conflict and cohesion. Hence human rights can be understood as a master narrative compatible with different conflicting cultural narratives (Gibson & Somers, 1994.

  13. Reputation, a universal currency for human social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinski, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Decision rules of reciprocity include ‘I help those who helped me’ (direct reciprocity) and ‘I help those who have helped others’ (indirect reciprocity), i.e. I help those who have a reputation to care for others. A person's reputation is a score that members of a social group update whenever they see the person interacting or hear at best multiple gossip about the person's social interactions. Reputation is the current standing the person has gained from previous investments or refusal of investments in helping others. Is he a good guy, can I trust him or should I better avoid him as a social partner? A good reputation pays off by attracting help from others, even from strangers or members from another group, if the recipient's reputation is known. Any costly investment in others, i.e. direct help, donations to charity, investment in averting climate change, etc. increases a person's reputation. I shall argue and illustrate with examples that a person's known reputation functions like money that can be used whenever the person needs help. Whenever possible I will present tests of predictions of evolutionary theory, i.e. fitness maximizing strategies, mostly by economic experiments with humans. PMID:26729939

  14. Human rights on the thin red line between universality and relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Dragutin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rights represent an open legal and political concept with a very wide value variable. Academic discussions on human rights nature have mostly commenced after the World War II during the trend of human rights internationalization, reaching their climax after the Cold war. This paper examines actual theories on human rights, from those accepting them as universal, up to those marking another pole, favoring idea of absolute relativity of human rights. The author asserts that the most acceptable should be a middle solution, standing of moderate relativism or position of relative universalism of human rights. He claims that only a very limited circle of basic, 'substantial' human rights, having been accepted through an intercultural consensus, may pretend to be treated as universal. Out of that narrow sphere, there are many other human rights whose meaning and interpretation depend strongly upon concrete cultural context. The author points that in those cases it is important to respect a relativistic discourse and that the only solution should be explored within an intercultural and inter-civilizational dialogue, where non-western values should be equally treated as the western ones.

  15. A Human Right to Identity Formation? Identity, Politics, and the Universality of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Peterson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will build on ideas I presented at the previous conference (in 2003 on human rights at Mofid University. In that paper, I argued that it is a mistake to view human rights as the expression of a specific culture or historical identity (e.g., that of the “West”. Instead, human rights are better understood as historically emergent universals created in the conflict and interaction of various social groups with contrasting interests, cultural understandings, and identities. The aim of preserving a specific culture, religion, or historical identity against cultural imperialism or other kinds of domination can be supported by appealing to a human right to the formation of distinctive identities. Therefore this human right can contribute to a plurality of identities within the global network of societies that is emerging today. The aim of this paper is to develop this idea of a human right to identity formation دراین مقاله مخالفت خود را با تردید در جهان‌شمولی حقوق بشر اعلام کرده‌ام. این تردید، بر این باور مبتنی است که حقوق بشر، امری تحمیلی ازسوی غرب می‌باشد. من دلایلی برای انکار این نظر که حقوق بشر تماماً غربی است ارائه کرده، به وجوهی اشاره کردم که در واقع خیزش حقوق بشر، دست کم تا حدودی، ناشی از مبارزاتی است که با سلطة قدرت‌های غربی صورت می‌گیرد. این شیوه از استدلال، نیازمند انکار این مطلب نیست که زبان حقوق بشر گاه شکل سیاست‌هایی را گرفته که تمایز فرهنگ‌های دیگر را نمی‌توانند بفهمند (تشخیص دهند و از نابرابری جهانی ثروت و قدرت غفلت کرده‌اند، یا حتی از آن به نحو تلویحی حمایت

  16. International Cooperation of Izmail State University for Humanities in 2015-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Kapliienko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the state and perspectives of international cooperation of Izmail State University for Humanities with academic partners abroad. Special attention is given to the participation of the University in European research networks for educational and curricula quality promotion, as well as to improvement of academic staff professional qualification in view of social and regional needs for sustainable economic and social development.

  17. [Towards an universal biolaw? Biolaw in action and funcionalization of human life's value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the question of the universal biolaw from the point of view of the biojuridical praxis. The main problems concerning life's protection are found in the process of interpretation and re-creation of the norms (not in their literal texts) regulating the right to life and new rights, as personal autonomy. But it is also at this sphere where the possibilities of an universal biolaw founded on the funcionalization of the human life value are to be found.

  18. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  19. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  20. Exploring the Role of Human Capital Management on Organizational Success: Evidence from Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odunayo Paul SALAU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for higher education in Nigeria has been considered as not only an investment in human capital, but also a pre-requisite for economic development. Consequent upon the expansion of higher education in Nigeria, quite a number of institutions have suffered decay due to poor work environments, inadequate educational facilities and poor funding which have resulted into unabated brain drain, strike and turnover. However, the need to develop talents is no longer hidden, what remains controversial is knowing the best method for managing human capacity especially in Nigerian State owned universities. Thus, this study examined the relationship between human capital management and organizational success using three State owned universities in Southwest, Nigeria. These universities (Ekiti State University (EKSU, Lagos State University (LASU, Tai Solarin University of Education (TASUED were chosen for their uniqueness. Survey research design was adopted with 398 respondents (staff. Self-administered questionnaire was adopted and analyzed with the adoption of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. However, the results indicated that adequate leadership practices; learning capacity; workforce optimization; knowledge accessibility; workplace culture and; mentorship are significant predictors of organizational success in higher education.

  1. Republic of Letters, Academies and Scientific Societies in the 18th Century: Leiden jar and science in teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Tadeu Jardim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the panorama that underpins the construction of the first electric condenser, known as the Leiden Jar, will be presented. Besides, the themes about the construction of science which are relevant to be discussed in Physics classes that concerns the development of this apparatus will be pointed. For this purpose, a historical narrative was constructed from primary and secondary sources, and it was inspired by the historiographical strand called Cultural History of Science. Thus, we seek to emphasize how ways of spreading knowledge in the context of Scientific Academies, Scientific Societies and what has been called Republic of Letters in the eighteenth century, constitute substantial extra-laboratory scientific practices for an understanding of the development of the Leiden Jar. Finally, in accordance with results from researches in the area of Science Teaching, we present some thoughts upon which elements of this narrative could be taken to the classroom.

  2. Plasma and liver lipidomics response to an intervention of rimonabant in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiu Hu

    Full Text Available Lipids are known to play crucial roles in the development of life-style related risk factors such as obesity, dyslipoproteinemia, hypertension and diabetes. The first selective cannabinoid-1 receptor blocker rimonabant, an anorectic anti-obesity drug, was frequently used in conjunction with diet and exercise for patients with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2 with associated risk factors such as type II diabetes and dyslipidaemia in the past. Less is known about the impact of this drug on the regulation of lipid metabolism in plasma and liver in the early stage of obesity.We designed a four-week parallel controlled intervention on apolipoprotein E3 Leiden cholesteryl ester transfer protein (ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice with mild overweight and hypercholesterolemia. A liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometric approach was employed to investigate plasma and liver lipid responses to the rimonabant intervention. Rimonabant was found to induce a significant body weight loss (9.4%, p<0.05 and a significant plasma total cholesterol reduction (24%, p<0.05. Six plasma and three liver lipids in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice were detected to most significantly respond to rimonabant treatment. Distinct lipid patterns between the mice were observed for both plasma and liver samples in rimonabant treatment vs. non-treated controls. This study successfully applied, for the first time, systems biology based lipidomics approaches to evaluate treatment effects of rimonabant in the early stage of obesity.The effects of rimonabant on lipid metabolism and body weight reduction in the early stage obesity were shown to be moderate in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP mice on high-fat diet.

  3. Universal jurisdiction: state of affairs and ways ahead. : A policy paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zegveld (Liesbeth); J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOn 17 September 2010, the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Leiden University and ICCO organised an expert meeting at the ISS on universal jurisdiction (UJ). The meeting was chaired in the morning by Professor John Dugard and in the afternoon by Professor Karin Arts. The

  4. LGBT rights versus Asian values: de/re-constructing the universality of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Po-Han

    2016-01-01

    Law, especially from the international human rights regime, is a direct reference on which minority groups rely when it comes to ‘non-discrimination’. Drawing upon LGBT rights in Taiwan, as well as Hong Kong and Singapore, this article – through an application of K.H. Chen’s (2010) Asia as Method – critically reviews how global LGBT politics interact with local societies influenced by Confucianism. Along a perpetual competition between the universalism and cultural relativism of human rights,...

  5. Human rights from the grassroots up: Vermont's campaign for universal health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Mariah

    2012-06-15

    In 2008, the Vermont Workers' Center launched the "Healthcare Is a Human Right Campaign," a grassroots campaign to secure the creation of a universal health care system in Vermont. Campaign organizers used a human rights framework to mobilize thousands of voters in support of universal health care. In response to this extraordinary grassroots effort, the state legislature passed health care legislation that incorporates human rights principles into Vermont law and provides a framework for universal health care. The United States has often lagged behind other nations in recognizing economic, social, and cultural (ESC) rights, including the right to health. Nonetheless, activists have begun to incorporate ESC rights into domestic advocacy campaigns, and state and local governments are beginning to respond where the federal government has not. Vermont serves as a powerful example of how a human rights framework can inform health care policy and inspire grassroots campaigns in the United States. This three-part article documents the Vermont Workers' Center campaign and discusses the impact that human rights activity at the grassroots level may have on attitudes towards ESC rights in the United States. The first part describes the Vermont health care crisis and explains why the center adopted international human rights principles for their campaign. The article then goes on to discuss the three-year campaign and analyze the health care reform bill that the Vermont legislature passed. Finally, the article discusses the campaign's local and national impact. Copyright © 2012 McGill.

  6. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Lisa R; de Vries, Margreet R; de Jong, Rob C M; Katiraei, Saeed; Pronk, Amanda; Quax, Paul H A; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Willems van Dijk, Ko

    2018-02-03

    The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden ( E3L ) mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce accelerated atherosclerosis. At week 5, vascular pathology was determined by lesion thickness, vascular remodeling, and lesion composition. Throughout the study, plasma lipids were measured and in week 5, blood monocyte subtypes were determined using flow cytometry analysis. In contrast to our hypothesis, inulin exacerbated atherosclerosis development, characterized by increased lesion formation and outward vascular remodeling. The lesions showed increased number of macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and collagen content. No effects on blood monocyte composition were found. Inulin significantly increased plasma total cholesterol levels and total cholesterol exposure. In conclusion, inulin aggravated accelerated atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic E3L mice, accompanied by adverse lesion composition and outward remodeling. This process was not accompanied by differences in blood monocyte composition, suggesting that the aggravated atherosclerosis development was driven by increased plasma cholesterol.

  7. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Hoving

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden (E3L mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1% diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce accelerated atherosclerosis. At week 5, vascular pathology was determined by lesion thickness, vascular remodeling, and lesion composition. Throughout the study, plasma lipids were measured and in week 5, blood monocyte subtypes were determined using flow cytometry analysis. In contrast to our hypothesis, inulin exacerbated atherosclerosis development, characterized by increased lesion formation and outward vascular remodeling. The lesions showed increased number of macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and collagen content. No effects on blood monocyte composition were found. Inulin significantly increased plasma total cholesterol levels and total cholesterol exposure. In conclusion, inulin aggravated accelerated atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic E3L mice, accompanied by adverse lesion composition and outward remodeling. This process was not accompanied by differences in blood monocyte composition, suggesting that the aggravated atherosclerosis development was driven by increased plasma cholesterol.

  8. Factor V Leiden does not have a role in cryptogenic ischemic stroke among Iranian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Meraj; Amini, Gilda; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Different risk factors have been suggested for ischemic stroke in young adults. In a group of these patients despite of extensive diagnostic work-up, the primary cause remains unknown. Coagulation tendency is accounted as a possible cause in these patients. Previous studies on factor V Leiden (FVL) as the main cause of inherited thrombophilia for clarifying the role of FVL in stroke have resulted in controversial findings. The current study investigates the role of this factor in ischemic stroke among Iranians. This case-control study was performed between September 2007 and December 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The case group comprised of 22 patients of which 15 were males and 7 were females with age range of ≤50 years, diagnosed as ischemic stroke without classic risk factors and the control group consisted of 54 healthy young adults. After filling consent form, venous blood samples were obtained and sent to the laboratory for genetic examination. No FVL mutation was found in the case group. There was one carrier of the mutation as heterozygous in the control group (relative frequency = 1.85%). Based on our study, FVL might not be considered as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in Iranian individuals who are not suffering from other risk factors of ischemic stroke.

  9. Factor V leiden and ischemic stroke risk: the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, Oscar C; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study. A population-based case control study identified 354 women and 476 men 15 to 49 years of age with first-ever ischemic stroke and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-5.1%) and nonstroke controls (3.8%; 95% CI 2.7%-5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%; 95% CI 2.6%-6.4%). Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between FVL and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. University-Firm Interactions in Brazil: Beyond Human Resources and Training Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapini, Marcia Siqueira; Chiarini, Tulio; Bittencourt, Pablo Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this article comes from the proposition in the literature that Latin American universities are detached from the research needs of the productive sector and that they limit their role to the human resources and training missions. The authors investigated the Brazilian scenario, using data from a survey conducted in 2008-2009…

  11. Open Letter Regarding the University of Minnesota's Program on Human Sexuality and Sexual Attitude Reassessment Seminars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, William C.; Nelson, James

    1976-01-01

    This article contains a letter which questions the value and ethics of the Program on Human Sexuality (University of Minnesota) and also contains the response to the letter by a member of the Theological-Ethical Task Force which sponsors the program. (Author)

  12. Humanism's Sisyphean Task: Curricular Reform at Brown University during the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwancher, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In the midst of a curricular debate at Brown University during the Second World War, the faculty's humanists seized the opportunity to pen their views on the nature and purpose of higher education. This investigation reveals humanism as a fragmented force, at once principal and peripheral to the American academy. The central argument of this study…

  13. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, A Lay Version for the Common Man, Woman and Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankard, Alice Doumanian

    This lay version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (the original version was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948) has been written in simplified vocabulary to make it understandable to a wider range of ages and reading abilities. The declaration consists of a preamble followed by a listing of 30 goals common to…

  14. Teaching the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in a U.S. Government Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a vehicle for learning democratic and humanistic values. Provides goals for instruction about the Declaration. Compares the Declaration to U.S. Supreme Court cases and congressional acts, and suggests classroom activities using it. Includes an appendix on Supreme Court cases and…

  15. The Impact of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the Study of History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Baets, Antoon

    There is perhaps no text with a broader impact on our lives than the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). It is strange, therefore, that historians have paid so little attention to the UDHR. I argue that its potential impact on the study of history is profound. After asking whether the

  16. Universities and a Human Development Ethics: A Capabilities Approach to Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This article takes up the challenge of curriculum change in relation to the contested purposes of universities. It argues for an expansive, public good understanding, rather than the thin market exchange norms which currently drive higher education policies. The paper suggests that a human capital approach to curriculum is then insufficient to…

  17. The Ecology of Arts and Humanities Education: Bridging the Worlds of Universities and Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Porzio, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, colleges and universities have been talking seriously about civic learning, but other stakeholders, particularly public arts, culture, and humanities institutions, must be part of the conversation in order to create a context for learning that develops the skills of graduates in robust ways that reflect the full promise of liberal…

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis and genital human papillomavirus infections in female university students in Honduras.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Zelaya, A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Ferrera, A.

    2005-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections are a serious health problem in Honduras. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases. To determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis and HPV in young women, 100 female university students in Honduras were

  19. Unravelling 21st Century Riddles – Universal Network Visions from a Human Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, N.; Van Belleghem, N.; Van Boven, E.; De Korte, A.

    2006-01-01

    Networks are omnipresent and universal. Mankind, for example, forms a social network. Today, information and communications technology (ICT) exponentially accelerates the interaction between the human nodes of this global social network. In that way, ICT appears to evoke a phase transformation,

  20. Human Rights in Thick and Thin Societies : The Universal Declaration and Bridging the Gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaplan, Seth Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In an increasingly diverse and multi-polar world, the international human rights field risks losing its legitimacy because of its focus on a particular set of values—autonomy, individualism, equality, choice, secularity, and rationality—that are not necessarily universally shared. There was once a

  1. Getting Pole Position: Research Strategies in the Humanities at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study research strategies in the Humanities in Sweden. The Swedish higher education sector is under transformation and a new funding system has been proposed. The study investigates the university strategy processes, mainly at the dean's level. The results show that most institutions are active in order to be well…

  2. Favorable glucose tolerance and lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome in offspring without diabetes mellitus of nonagenarian siblings: the Leiden longevity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozing, Maarten P; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Craen, Anton J M; Frölich, Marijke; de Goeij, Moniek C M; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Beekman, Marian; Wijsman, Carolien A; Mooijaart, Simon P; Blauw, Gerard-Jan; Slagboom, P Eline; van Heemst, Diana

    2010-03-01

    To explore measures of metabolic syndrome and glucose metabolism in families with exceptional longevity. Case-control study. A university hospital in Leiden, the Netherlands. One hundred twenty-one offspring of nonagenarian siblings, who were enriched for familial factors promoting longevity, and 113 of their partners. No subject had diabetes mellitus. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program. Glucose tolerance was assessed according to a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. The offspring of nonagenarians siblings had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (P=.03), similar body composition, lower mean fasting blood glucose levels (4.99 vs 5.16 mmol/L; P=.01), lower mean fasting insulin levels (5.81 vs 6.75 mU/L; P=.04), a higher mean homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (0.78 vs 0.65; P=.02), and a more-favorable glucose tolerance (mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for glucose (13.2 vs 14.3; P=.007) than their partners. No significant differences were observed between the offspring and their partners in beta-cell function (insulogenic index 13.6 vs 12.5; P=.38). Despite similar body composition, the offspring of nonagenarian siblings showed a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome and better glucose tolerance than their partners, centralizing the role of favorable glucose metabolism in familial longevity.

  3. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  4. Quantum leap from Dirac and Feynman, across the universe, to human body and mind

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G

    2008-01-01

    This is a unique 21st-century monograph that reveals a basic, yet deep understanding of the universe, as well as the human mind and body - all from the perspective of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.This book starts with both non-mathematical and mathematical preliminaries. It presents the basics of both non-relativistic and relativistic quantum mechanics, and introduces Feynman path integrals and their application to quantum fields and string theory, as well as some non-quantum applications. It then describes the quantum universe in the form of loop quantum gravity and quantum cosm

  5. Familial longevity is marked by better cognitive performance at middle age: the Leiden Longevity Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjon Stijntjes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Decline in cognitive performance is a highly prevalent health condition in elderly. We studied whether offspring of nonagenarian siblings with a familial history of longevity, perform better on cognitive tests compared to their partners as controls. This is relevant since it could provide insights into determinants underlying decline in cognitive performance. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis within the longitudinal cohort of the Leiden Longevity Study consisting of middle-aged offspring of nonagenarian siblings together with their partners (n = 500, mean age (SD 66.3 (6.1 and 65.7 (7.2 years, respectively as controls. Memory function, attention and processing speed were tested using the 15-Picture Learning Test, Stroop test and Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Data were analyzed with regression adjusted for age, gender, years of education and additionally for diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, alcohol use, smoking, inflammatory markers and apolipoprotein E genotype. Robust standard errors were used to account for familial relationships among the offspring. RESULTS: Cognitive performance was worse at higher calendar age (p<0.001, all except Stroop test part 1. The offspring performed better compared to their partners on trial 3 (p = 0.005, the immediate (p = 0.016 and delayed (p = 0.004 recall of the 15-Picture Learning Test as well as on the interference and combined interference score of the Stroop test (p = 0.014 and p = 0.036, respectively in the fully adjusted model. The difference between offspring and partners was estimated to be more than three years according to the observed difference in calendar age. CONCLUSIONS: Offspring of nonagenarian siblings with a familial history of longevity have better cognitive performance compared to the group of their partners of comparable age. This effect is independent of age-related diseases and known possible confounders. Possible explanations might be differences in subclinical

  6. Thromboembolic events in Fabry disease and the impact of factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Malte; Karabul, Nesrin; Duning, Thomas; Schmitz, Boris; Schelleckes, Michael; Mesters, Rolf; Hense, Hans-Werner; Beck, Michael; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2015-03-10

    Although several reports suggest an increased thromboembolic event rate, especially regarding strokes and TIAs at early age in patients with Fabry disease (FD), the risk for patients with FD to experience these events, the clinical relevance of additional risk factors including the concurrence of factor V Leiden (FVL), and the benefit of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) regarding these events remain unclear. Three hundred four consecutively recruited patients with FD were evaluated for their lifetime occurrence of thromboembolic events such as stroke, TIA, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The thromboembolic risk was determined in patients with FD and concurrent FVL, and the impact of ERT was assessed. The 304 patients with FD had a median age of 41 years and 53 (17.4%) had experienced at least one thromboembolic event during their lifetime. Among 226 patients with FD screened for FVL, 16 gene carriers were identified (7.1%). The occurrence of thromboembolic events in patients with FD and concurrent FVL was significantly increased compared to those without FVL (hazard ratio = 5.45, 95% confidence interval 2.29-12.99; p risk of thromboembolic events compared to those without ERT (hazard ratio = 0.362, 95% confidence interval 0.132-0.992; p = 0.0422). This observational study confirms that patients with FD have a high risk of clinically relevant thromboembolic events, which could be aggravated by a concurrence of FVL. ERT might be of benefit in preventing vascular events in patients with FD. The latter observation needs confirmation, however, by randomized and controlled clinical trials. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. A human(e 'uni-versity': resisting scientism, technicism, and economism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Venter

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the issue of dehumanising knowledgegenerating procedures in the contemporary university. For this purpose different practical examples are analysed. It is argued that these dehumanising practices are rooted in present-day techno-scientistic elitism that has gone beyond the distinction between good and evil, and has developed into capitalistic pragmatism. Furthermore it is argued that these practices suppress critical reflection and creative alternatives in favour of gainful advantage within paradigmatic limitations. Real postmodern relativism thus does not exist; it is rather the absolutism of the economy and the market that determine the nature of knowledge-building processes.

  8. Evaluation of home collection performed by a human milk bank in a university hospital in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glória Menezes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluation of procedures during household milking and transport of human milk associated with their quality control. Materials and methods. 48 donors registered in the Human Milk Bank of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University at Uberlândia. Observations were made during home visits. A checklist was elaborated according to the technical standards for human milk banks, been associated with  physical-chemical, and microbiological controls. The chi-square test, logistic regression and Spearman test (p menor que 0.05 were used for data analysis. Results. The results suggest that most donors assimilated the guidelines of the milk bank staff and procedures were satisfactorily performed. Conclusion. It could be demonstrated that milking and home collection are safe and effective ways for obtaining donated human milk.

  9. Study of an investigation on factors influencing human resources productivity in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human resources development is one of the most important components of any organization and detecting important factors influencing human resources management plays an essential role in the success of the firms. In this study, we investigated different factors influencing human resources productivity of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences staff. Method: The present research was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was calculated 208 individuals. To access information about the human resource productivity, a valid and reliable questionnaire was used. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis of the data (p=0.05. Results:The results showed that there was a statistically significant relationship (p-value<0.001 between human resources productivity and factors affecting the productivity of human resources (motivational factors, leadership style, creativity and innovation, general and applied education, and competitive spirit. Motivational factors (r =0.89 and general education (r =0.65 had the most and the least effects on human resources productivity. Conclusion: Considering the fact that motivational factors were the most effective factors on human resource productivity, we recommend that managers should care more than before about this factor; also, in order to motivate the employees, they should consider the staff’s individual differences.

  10. Implementation of the human talent management through competencies model in a university in Metropolitan Lima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a work proposal that aims to describe the methodology proposed by the Management of Personnel Management from a university in Lima, to implement a management model based on competencies which traceability involves various technical HR processes practiced in the organization and is aligned to institutional outcomes defined in the balance score card. In order to do it, various literature sources were consulted, and the websites of the top ten universities worldwide to identify benchmarks were visited. Generic skills, competencies level, specific skills, competencies dictionary and graduation for each of the managements, occupational categories and administrative headquarters of the University: as a result, the following definitions and elements were obtained. In this way, the institution develops a tool to guide how and to what extent human resources should have and develop skills to achieve specific organizational results

  11. The quantum theory of time, the block universe, and human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Joan A

    2018-07-13

    Advances in our understanding of the physical universe have dramatically affected how we view ourselves. Right at the core of all modern thinking about the universe is the assumption that dynamics is an elemental feature that exists without question. However, ongoing research into the quantum nature of time is challenging this view: my recently introduced quantum theory of time suggests that dynamics may be a phenomenological consequence of a fundamental violation of time reversal symmetry. I show here that there is consistency between the new theory and the block universe view. I also discuss the new theory in relation to the human experience of existing in the present moment, able to reflect on the past and contemplate a future that is yet to happen.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society'. © 2018 The Authors.

  12. Beyond the galaxy how humanity looked beyond our milky way and discovered the entire Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    A look up at the night sky reveals a treasury of wonders. Even to the naked eye, the Moon, stars, planets, the Milky Way and even a few star clusters and nebulae illuminate the heavens. For millennia, humans struggled to make sense of what's out there in the Universe, from all we can see to that which lies beyond the limits of even our most powerful telescopes. Beyond the Galaxy traces our journey from an ancient, Earth-centered Universe all the way to our modern, 21st century understanding of the cosmos. Touching on not only what we know but also how we know it, Ethan Siegel takes us to the very frontiers of modern astrophysics and cosmology, from the birth of our Universe to its ultimate fate, and everything in between.

  13. The politics of universalism. Strategic uses of human rights discourses in early modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen-Margrethe Simonsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the political function of human rights in 16th-century Spain just after the conquest of America. It claims that the study of this period of early globalization is relevant for an understanding of the function of human rights discourses today, at the “end” of globalization. Historically speaking, human rights are closely connected with globalization, but at the same time, they raise the question about the foundation of globalization: is there a universal community or only economic and political power-relations? This article argues that the political use of human rights discourses is split down the middle: it serves both as a critique of power and as an extension of power, and the disclosure of this split helps us understand the inner politics of human rights. The article discusses the trial in Valladolid in 1550 when the rights of the barbarian Indians of America were put on trial. It focuses mainly on the arguments made by Bartolomé de las Casas and on the reasons why the King allowed las Casas’ fierce critique of the conquest to be published in a period of otherwise severe censorship. This article is inspired by Etienne Balibar's idea of “politics of universalism,” “political autonomy,” and “equaliberty.”.

  14. Measuring human betterment through avoidable mortality: a case for universal health care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisnanick, J J; Coddington, D A

    1995-10-01

    The USA system of health care has begun a monumental change that will affect everyone, irrespective of their socioeconomic status, professional status or pre-existing health insurance status. Whatever type of plan is finally implemented through the legislative process, there will need to be a way to evaluate its success (or failure). One way to evaluate the plan's effectiveness is through its impact on human betterment as viewed by a reduction in 'avoidable mortality' for those most in need of health care; the poor and uninsured. For one USA minority population, universal health care has improved human betterment by reducing avoidable mortality, even in the face of a severe burden of poverty.

  15. STUDENTS’ EVALUATION OF EDUCATION QUALITY IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AREA: CASE OF PRIVATE CZECH UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNOUČKOVÁ, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of education, lessons, subjects and teachers perceived by students is currently often discussed topic regarding strategic management of universities. Assessment of higher education learning outcomes represents internalization of a higher education competition. The aim of the article is to evaluate perception of education quality of lectures, subjects and teachers by university students in the area of human resource management in private Czech university and to identify main approaches to academic staff. The data were collected by quantitative survey by questionnaire data collection (n=218. Students state that subjects, lessons and teachers in the area of human resource management lessons mostly satisfied their expectations (average value between 1.09 and 1.97. The students emphasised that the staff creates positive atmosphere and gives the opportunity to express an opinion which is very important for students at the university. Research outcomes show there is a dependency between the effort of teacher, student understanding and teachers’s willingness to give students an opportunity to express an opinion. The paper is extension of conference paper presented on ERIE conference 2016.

  16. Phenotypic presentation of thrombophilia in double heterozygote for factor v leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians usually do not suspect pulmonary thromboembolism in younger patients except in those who have thrombophilia. In those latter patients some special conditions such as trauma or surgery may provoke the disease. In some adult persons, thrombophilia may still remain unrecognized, until appearance of additional conditions influence development of thrombosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian female, non-smoker, experienced sudden chest pain and hemoptysis without chest trauma. History taking revealed type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. She was overweight with body mass index 29.0. The review of the family history revealed that her father and mother died of brain infarction, while her 22-year-old son and 24-year-old daughter were healthy. Due to suspicion for thrombosis, multi-slice computerized tomography thorax scan was done and pulmonary embolism was diagnosed. Although without clear risk factor for thrombosis in our patient, we performed laboratory investigation for congenital thrombophilia. Genetic analysis showed double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations. Congenital thrombophilia was risk factor for thrombosis in our patient but haemostatic imbalance was not previously clinically recognized. She had two pregnancies without complications. Appearance of other associative factors such as endocrine disorders - hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome with diabetes type 2, and overweigh were additional potential triggers for clinical manifestation of pulmonary thromboembolism in her adult age. Her children underwent genetic analysis, too. The son was also double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations, while daughter was heterozygous for factor V Leiden, and none had clinical signs of thrombosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175081 i br. ON 175091

  17. The human touch our part in the creation of a Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Frayn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    MF will talk about his new book The Human Touch, in which he argues that our understanding of the universe is based upon a paradox. On the one hand, we all agree that humankind is a tiny and insignificant local anomaly. On the other hand, it is impossible to have any concept of the universe except through the constructions that human beings have placed upon it. Without human beings there would be no words or language. Would there still be numbers, if there were no one to count them? Or scientific laws, if there were no words or numbers in which to express them? Would the universe even be vast, without the very fact of our smallness and insignificance to give it scale? Could it have any expression in space and time at all, except in relation to our being where we are when we are? Some of these questions are no longer purely abstract, but are becoming of practical interest to cosmologists and physicists. About the speaker: Michael Frayn is the acclaimed author of Copenhagen, the theatre play that describes Heis...

  18. Human Rights and the Political Economy of Universal Health Care: Designing Equitable Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiger, Anja

    2016-12-01

    Health system financing is a critical factor in securing universal health care and achieving equity in access and payment. The human rights framework offers valuable guidance for designing a financing strategy that meets these goals. This article presents a rights-based approach to health care financing developed by the human right to health care movement in the United States. Grounded in a human rights analysis of private, market-based health insurance, advocates make the case for public financing through progressive taxation. Financing mechanisms are measured against the twin goals of guaranteeing access to care and advancing economic equity. The added focus on the redistributive potential of health care financing recasts health reform as an economic policy intervention that can help fulfill broader economic and social rights obligations. Based on a review of recent universal health care reform efforts in the state of Vermont, this article reports on a rights-based public financing plan and model, which includes a new business tax directed against wage disparities. The modeling results suggest that a health system financed through equitable taxation could produce significant redistributive effects, thus increasing economic equity while generating sufficient funds to provide comprehensive health care as a universal public good.

  19. The Geneva University Global Health and Human Rights Summer School: A 5-Year Intercultural Collaborative Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, Philippe; Mpinga, Emmanuel K

    2018-01-01

    Education and training in human rights has been set as a priority by the United Nations. Health and human rights are closely related. Training professionals from various backgrounds in human rights might ultimately contribute to improve the health of individuals and communities. We present the 5 years' experience with a 3-week residential Global Health and Human Rights Course developed at the University of Geneva and implemented with the support/participation of international organizations (IOs) and non-governmental organizations active in the health and human rights sector. Over the years, roughly 150 students from 43 nationalities, with many different educational backgrounds, attended the course. The male/female ratio was 1/5. The adopted educational approach was multifold and comprised lectures from academics and experts with field experience, group work, individual case studies, journal clubs, and site visits. Evaluation data show that site visits at IOs were highly appreciated as well as networking opportunities among students, with academics and experts with field experience. The variety of topics discussed was, at times, "too much"; yet, it allowed students to measure the extent of the challenges the field is facing. The adopted active learning approach facilitated the exchange of experiences among students and allowed them to get acquainted with different cultural sensitivities. The Global Health and Human Rights Summer-School of the University of Geneva allowed its participants, coming from all over the world, to identify challenges of the interlinked fields of health and human rights, reflect upon their underlying causes, and imagine possible solutions. Sharing our experience will hopefully help passionate educators around the world to develop similar programs.

  20. The Geneva University Global Health and Human Rights Summer School: A 5-Year Intercultural Collaborative Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Chastonay

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Education and training in human rights has been set as a priority by the United Nations. Health and human rights are closely related. Training professionals from various backgrounds in human rights might ultimately contribute to improve the health of individuals and communities. We present the 5 years’ experience with a 3-week residential Global Health and Human Rights Course developed at the University of Geneva and implemented with the support/participation of international organizations (IOs and non-governmental organizations active in the health and human rights sector. Over the years, roughly 150 students from 43 nationalities, with many different educational backgrounds, attended the course. The male/female ratio was 1/5. The adopted educational approach was multifold and comprised lectures from academics and experts with field experience, group work, individual case studies, journal clubs, and site visits. Evaluation data show that site visits at IOs were highly appreciated as well as networking opportunities among students, with academics and experts with field experience. The variety of topics discussed was, at times, “too much”; yet, it allowed students to measure the extent of the challenges the field is facing. The adopted active learning approach facilitated the exchange of experiences among students and allowed them to get acquainted with different cultural sensitivities. The Global Health and Human Rights Summer-School of the University of Geneva allowed its participants, coming from all over the world, to identify challenges of the interlinked fields of health and human rights, reflect upon their underlying causes, and imagine possible solutions. Sharing our experience will hopefully help passionate educators around the world to develop similar programs.

  1. Malaysia's Human Rights Performance: Assessment of its First Session of Universal Periodic Review in the United Nations Human Rights Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hooi Khoo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, the Universal Periodic Review (UPR has been subjected to a substantial amount of criticism. The mechanism began functioning in 2008, however there have been little made known about the roles and functions of the UPR. This article explicitly examines the first UPR process of Malaysia in 2009, in order to illustrate how the mechanism operates in practice by highlighting the engagement of Malaysia government with the stakeholders, the follow-up process and the main issues concerned. This article argues that in spite of the excellent diplomacy skills that portrayed by the Malaysian government in the UPR session, the human rights situation in the country has not been improved much. This paper seeks to determine how effective the UPR has been at encouraging human rights reforms nationally by analyzing and assessing the implementation actions of Malaysian government in response to their accepted UPR recommendations.

  2. [Cultural diversity and pluralism in the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2011-01-01

    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights represents a significant milestone in the history of Law, particularly in the application of International Law to an important area of human activity, namely the medical sciences, the life sciences and the technologies which, linked to both, can be applied to human relations. In parallel with this, and as will be analysed in this article, the Declaration has involved adopting a clear position regarding cultural diversity and pluralism in relation to Biomedicine. In this paper the author highlights the fact that perspectives have been opened which have hardly been explored concerning Biomedicine, such as the recognition of the value and respect which cultural diversity (multiculturalism), economic and social diversity deserve in relation to the issues covered by the Declaration, and the acceptance that the owners of the rights are not only individuals, but can also be groups.

  3. Coagulopathy triggered autoimmunity: experimental antiphospholipid syndrome in factor V Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated interactions between genetically and autoimmune-mediated coagulopathies by inducing experimental antiphospholipid syndrome (eAPS) in mice carrying the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Methods eAPS was induced in heterozygous and homozygous FVL transgenic mice (C57BL/6 background) by immunization with β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI). Autoantibody levels were measured at 1 and 5 months post-immunization. Mice were tested at 4 months post-immunization for behavior and cognitive function in the staircase, elevated plus-maze, and swim T-maze tests. Brains were removed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for inflammatory markers and neurodegenerative processes. Results A single immunization with β2-GPI induced significantly higher and longer-lasting immune responses, and this was dependent on the number of FVL alleles. At 1 and 5 months post-immunization, levels of antibodies rose from 1.17 ± 0.07 to 1.62 ± 0.17 (optical density units; ODU) in homozygous FVL mice, compared with stable levels of 0.59 ± 0.17 and 0.48 ± 0.16 ODU in heterozygous FVL mice and a drop from 1.62 ± 0.21 to 0.61 ± 0.13 ODU in wild-type mice. Behavioral and cognitive clinical features of eAPS were also correlated with FVL allele load, as assessed by the elevated plus-maze (altered anxiety), staircase (hyperactivity and higher exploration), and swim T-maze (impaired learning) tests. Histological studies identified significant neurodegenerative changes in both grey and white matter in the eAPS-FVL brains. In spite of the potential interaction of two prothrombotic disease states, there were no ischemic lesions seen in this group. Conclusions The results indicate that genetically mediated coagulopathies increase the risk of developing coagulation-targeted autoimmune responses, and suggest the importance of antibody-mediated neurodegenerative processes in the brain in APS. PMID:23566870

  4. THE MANAGEMENT AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita, ANDONE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the management of the human resources it is provided the necessity of the workforce in an institution, on staff categories with the view of achieving the activities and the obtaining of the expected results. The descentralization of the budget institutions makes the obtaining of some principles of the human resources management to be essential so that they create the conditions of involving and participating in the institution activity, as we wish to live in a society where the fundamental values are creativity, liberty, pluralism and tolerance. The pre-university education institution(kindergartens, schools and high schools are not provided with a human resources manager. The descentralized management of the human resources level of the School County Inspectorate, the lack of a clear policy in the domain of the human resources ( at the level of the School County Inspectorate even if there is a management department of the human resources, those who work in this department do not have the necessary qualification, being selected teaching staff on certain criteria, and the unprofessional involvement of the local authorities, these being disruptive factors of the training-educational process.

  5. THE MANAGEMENT AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita, ANDONE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through the management of the human resources it is provided the necessity of the workforce in an institution, on staff categories with the view of achieving the activities and the obtaining of the expected results. The descentralization of the budget institutions makes the obtaining of some principles of the human resources management to be essential so that they create the conditions of involving and participating in the institution activity, as we wish to live in a society where the fundamental values are creativity, liberty, pluralism and tolerance. The pre-university education institution(kindergartens, schools and high schools are not provided with a human resources manager. The descentralized management of the human resources level of the School County Inspectorate, the lack of a clear policy in the domain of the human resources ( at the level of the School County Inspectorate even if there is a management department of the human resources, those who work in this department do not have the necessary qualification, being selected teaching staff on certain criteria, and the unprofessional involvement of the local authorities, these being disruptive factors of the training-educational process.

  6. Knowledge and attitude of Iranian University students toward human papilloma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Azar, Zahra Fardi; Saleh, Parviz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Azar, Nastaran Ghodratnezhad

    2012-01-01

    Increasing prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and its association with cervical cancer as a leading cause of death make it necessary to evaluate and improve the public knowledge, especially of university students, about this cause of disease. A cross-sectional study of knowledge and attitude of a total 669 students from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences was therefore performed with a modified validated questionnaire, arranged into 5 parts and containing 55 questions, in July 2011. Questions were directed to study socio-demographic characteristics of the participant, knowledge about HPV disease, transmission route, relationship with cervical cancer, predisposing factors, and participants attitude toward people with HPV infection. All of the participants were Moslem with a mean age 25.6±5.33 years of age. All of the participants had heard of HPV, and acquired their knowledge through university courses (90.6%); the majority of them knew that HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and a potential cause for genital warts but general knowledge about details was not high. Mean knowledge score of residents and post graduate midwifery and nursing students was high as compared to other groups (Plevel (β=0.21, Pknowledge. Moderate level of knowledge about HPV among medical university students makes it necessary to set effective national public health efforts on HPV education and prevention considering he excess of young population in Iran vulnerable to cervical cancer.

  7. The University Rover Challenge: A competition highlighting Human and Robotic partnerships for exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heather; Duncan, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    The University Rover Challenge began in 2006 with 4 American college teams competing, now in it's 10th year there are 63 teams from 12 countries registered to compete for the top rover designed to assist humans in the exploration of Mars. The Rovers compete aided by the University teams in four tasks (3 engineering and 1 science) in the Mars analog environment of the Utah Southern Desert in the United States. In this presentation we show amazing rover designs with videos demonstrating the incredible ingenuity, skill and determination of the world's most talented college students. We describe the purpose and results of each of the tasks: Astronaut Assistant, Rover Dexterity, Terrain maneuvering, and Science. We explain the evolution of the competition and common challenges faced by the robotic explorers

  8. Assessing the quality of VA Human Research Protection Programs: VA vs. affiliated University Institutional Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen; Brooks, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We compared the Human Research Protection Program (HRPP) quality indicator data of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities using their own VA institutional review boards (IRBs) with those using affiliated university IRBs. From a total of 25 performance metrics, 13 did not demonstrate statistically significant differences, while 12 reached statistically significance differences. Among the 12 with statistically significant differences, facilities using their own VA IRBs performed better on four of the metrics, while facilities using affiliate IRBs performed better on eight. However, the absolute difference was small (0.2-2.7%) in all instances, suggesting that they were of no practical significance. We conclude that it is acceptable for facilities to use their own VA IRBs or affiliated university IRBs as their IRBs of record.

  9. Astronomy through the ages the story of the human attempt to understand the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Sir Robert

    2003-01-01

    From an historical perspective, this text presents an entirely non- mathematical introduction to astronomy from the first endeavours of the ancients to the current developments in research enabled by cutting edge technological advances. Free of mathematics and complex graphs, the book nevertheless explains deep concepts of space and time, of relativity and quantum mechanics, and of origin and nature of the universe. It conveys not only the intrinsic fascination of the subject, but also the human side and the scientific method as practised by Kepler, defined and elucidated by Galileo, and then demonstrated by Newton.

  10. MetaPro-IQ: a universal metaproteomic approach to studying human and mouse gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Ning, Zhibin; Mayne, Janice; Moore, Jasmine I; Li, Jennifer; Butcher, James; Deeke, Shelley Ann; Chen, Rui; Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Wen, Ming; Mack, David; Stintzi, Alain; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-06-24

    The gut microbiota has been shown to be closely associated with human health and disease. While next-generation sequencing can be readily used to profile the microbiota taxonomy and metabolic potential, metaproteomics is better suited for deciphering microbial biological activities. However, the application of gut metaproteomics has largely been limited due to the low efficiency of protein identification. Thus, a high-performance and easy-to-implement gut metaproteomic approach is required. In this study, we developed a high-performance and universal workflow for gut metaproteome identification and quantification (named MetaPro-IQ) by using the close-to-complete human or mouse gut microbial gene catalog as database and an iterative database search strategy. An average of 38 and 33 % of the acquired tandem mass spectrometry (MS) spectra was confidently identified for the studied mouse stool and human mucosal-luminal interface samples, respectively. In total, we accurately quantified 30,749 protein groups for the mouse metaproteome and 19,011 protein groups for the human metaproteome. Moreover, the MetaPro-IQ approach enabled comparable identifications with the matched metagenome database search strategy that is widely used but needs prior metagenomic sequencing. The response of gut microbiota to high-fat diet in mice was then assessed, which showed distinct metaproteome patterns for high-fat-fed mice and identified 849 proteins as significant responders to high-fat feeding in comparison to low-fat feeding. We present MetaPro-IQ, a metaproteomic approach for highly efficient intestinal microbial protein identification and quantification, which functions as a universal workflow for metaproteomic studies, and will thus facilitate the application of metaproteomics for better understanding the functions of gut microbiota in health and disease.

  11. Right to Development and Right to the City : A Proposal of Human Rights Categories Universal as assumptions Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Danielle Carneiro dos Santos Hilário

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the Right to the City, in a conceptual dimension and wide, and his dialectical relationship with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 and its universalism and cultural relativism categories. The Right to the City (RtC is capitula- ted as one of the categories of the Human Right to Development from the compartments on Human Rights to descend from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Linked to this assumption, the discussion of universalism and cultural relativism theories bring to the fore important questions and considerations as to RtC condition, since in its current design and trampled by an evil legacy of neoliberalism, this right has demonstrated the need for authoritative action of the State, given the nature of fundamental human right of the third dimension. Through RtC, boasts up of economic, social and cultural rights, requiring a positive action of the state as compliance guarantee this human right. In this bias, relevant are discussions about the concept of law, morality, liberalism, effectiveness and universality of human rights theories and cultural relativism in dialectic with the RtC and its complexity. It starts from the assumption that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other statements which have descended universality (despite criticism, however, this har- vest, it is imperative closer examination of the concept, forecast, guarantee and effective- ness fundamental human rights, which may lead to a mixed application of universalistic and relativistic theories when analyzed from the perspective of these institutes. The Hu- man Right to Development (RtD presupposes notions of environmental sustainability and economic democracy, with qualified participation of social subjects (wide citizenship, seen continuous and articulated perspective as guiding the development process.

  12. Realizing Universal Health Coverage in East Africa: the relevance of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Alicia Ely; Maleche, Allan

    2017-08-03

    Applying a robust human rights framework would change thinking and decision-making in efforts to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC), and advance efforts to promote women's, children's, and adolescents' health in East Africa, which is a priority under the Sustainable Development Agenda. Nevertheless, there is a gap between global rhetoric of human rights and ongoing health reform efforts. This debate article seeks to fill part of that gap by setting out principles of human rights-based approaches (HRBAs), and then applying those principles to questions that countries undertaking efforts toward UHC and promoting women's, children's and adolescents' health, will need to face, focusing in particular on ensuring enabling legal and policy frameworks, establishing fair financing; priority-setting processes, and meaningful oversight and accountability mechanisms. In a region where democratic institutions are notoriously weak, we argue that the explicit application of a meaningful human rights framework could enhance equity, participation and accountability, and in turn the democratic legitimacy of health reform initiatives being undertaken in the region.

  13. A Tale of Many Cities: Universal Patterns in Human Urban Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulas, Anastasios; Scellato, Salvatore; Lambiotte, Renaud; Pontil, Massimiliano; Mascolo, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The advent of geographic online social networks such as Foursquare, where users voluntarily signal their current location, opens the door to powerful studies on human movement. In particular the fine granularity of the location data, with GPS accuracy down to 10 meters, and the worldwide scale of Foursquare adoption are unprecedented. In this paper we study urban mobility patterns of people in several metropolitan cities around the globe by analyzing a large set of Foursquare users. Surprisingly, while there are variations in human movement in different cities, our analysis shows that those are predominantly due to different distributions of places across different urban environments. Moreover, a universal law for human mobility is identified, which isolates as a key component the rank-distance, factoring in the number of places between origin and destination, rather than pure physical distance, as considered in some previous works. Building on our findings, we also show how a rank-based movement model accurately captures real human movements in different cities. PMID:22666339

  14. A tale of many cities: universal patterns in human urban mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Noulas

    Full Text Available The advent of geographic online social networks such as Foursquare, where users voluntarily signal their current location, opens the door to powerful studies on human movement. In particular the fine granularity of the location data, with GPS accuracy down to 10 meters, and the worldwide scale of Foursquare adoption are unprecedented. In this paper we study urban mobility patterns of people in several metropolitan cities around the globe by analyzing a large set of Foursquare users. Surprisingly, while there are variations in human movement in different cities, our analysis shows that those are predominantly due to different distributions of places across different urban environments. Moreover, a universal law for human mobility is identified, which isolates as a key component the rank-distance, factoring in the number of places between origin and destination, rather than pure physical distance, as considered in some previous works. Building on our findings, we also show how a rank-based movement model accurately captures real human movements in different cities.

  15. The natural antibody repertoire of sharks and humans recognizes the potential universe of antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Miranda K; Schluter, Samuel F; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-02-01

    In ancestral sharks, a rapid emergence in the evolution of the immune system occurred, giving jawed-vertebrates the necessary components for the combinatorial immune response (CIR). To compare the natural antibody (NAb) repertoires of the most divergent vertebrates with the capacity to produce antibodies, we isolated NAbs to the same set of antigens by affinity chromatography from two species of Carcharhine sharks and from human polyclonal IgG and IgM antibody preparations. The activities of the affinity-purified anti-T-cell receptor (anti-TCR) NAbs were compared with those of monoclonal anti-TCR NAbs that were generated from a systemic lupus erythematosus patient. We report that sharks and humans, representing the evolutionary extremes of vertebrate species sharing the CIR, have NAbs to human TCRs, Igs, the human senescent cell antigen, and to numerous retroviral antigens, indicating that essential features of the combinatorial repertoire and the capacity to recognize the potential universe of antigens is shared among all jawed-vertebrates.

  16. Knowledge, perception and attitude towards human papillomavirus among pre-university students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang, Ng Beng; Yee, Choy Mun; Shan, Lim Pei; Teik, Chew Kah; Chandralega, Kampan Nirmala; Abdul Kadir, Abdul Karim

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge, perception and attitudes towards human papilloma virus (HPV) among pre-university students in Malaysia. In this cross sectional study, between November 2013 to March 2014, in a public university, a convenient sampling method was used. A total of 716 respondents were recruited and interviewed with a set of standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, perception and attitudes towards HPV and predictor variables associated with level of knowledge. Almost half (48.9%) of the respondents scored less than 5 and were categorised as having poor knowledge. Three hundred and twelve (43.6%) respondents had moderate knowledge and only 54 (7.5%) respondents exhibited good knowledge with the score of 11 and above. Only 142 (20%) students perceived themselves to be vulnerable to HPV infection though 560 (78.2%) students thought that HPV infection is a serious disease. Perceived benefits and desire to be vaccinated were significantly associated with gender (p=0.000) and knowledge of HPV vaccine and cervical cancer (p=0.000). The level of knowledge regarding HPV among the pre-university students was low. However, student intention for vaccination increased with increasing level of knowledge. Thus, efforts to improve knowledge and awareness should be prioritised to increase uptake of the HPV vaccination programme and hence reduce morbidity and mortality from consequences of HPV infection, including cervical carcinoma.

  17. List of the primary types of social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) deposited in the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden, and the Zoölogisch Museum, Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kojima, J.; Achterberg, van C.

    1997-01-01

    The primary types of social wasp subfamilies Vespinae, Polistinae and Stenogastrinae housed in the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum in Leiden and the Zoölogisch Museum in Amsterdam are listed. Their complete label data are given unless they are available elsewhere. Lectotypes of Polistes snelleni

  18. China Back in the Frame. A comparative study of Canton, Whampoa and Macao harbour views in the Leiden Museum of Ethnology and in the Guangzhou Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der R.H.M.; Groenendijk, E.; Viallé, C.; Blussé, L.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of research results deriving from the investigation of a group of 18th and 19th century export oil paintings from China in the collection of the National Museum of Ethnology n Leiden. The oils were compared with a group of reverse glass paintings in the same

  19. Prothrombin 20210 G: a mutation and Factor V Leiden mutation in women with a history of severe preeclampsia and (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Koopman, M. M.; van den Ende, A.; Buller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    The 20210 G-A prothrombin gene variant and the Factor V Leiden mutation are mutations associated with venous thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of these specific mutations in women with a history of preeclampsia or hemolysis elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet

  20. The Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) Survey of Galactic HI : Final data release of the combined LDS and IAR surveys with improved stray-radiation corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaberla, P.M.W.; Burton, W.B.; Hartmann, L.; Arnal, E.M.; Bajaja, E.; Morras, R.; Pöppel, W.G.L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the final data release of observations of ?21-cm emission from Galactic neutral hydrogen over the entire sky, merging the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey (LDS: Hartmann & Burton 1997, Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen) of the sky north of ? = ?30? with the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía

  1. Enhancement by factor V Leiden mutation of risk of deep-vein thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives containing a third-generation progestagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemenkamp, K. W.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Helmerhorst, F. M.; Büller, H. R.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Recent concern about the safety of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) with third-generation progestagens prompted an examination of data from a population-based case-control study (Leiden Thrombophilia Study). We compared the risk of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) during use of the newest OCs,

  2. An early 'handwritten' shell exchange catalogue of the Leiden Museum, with notes on the collectors Rethaan Macaré and Tischbein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    2013-01-01

    A ‘handwritten’ (lithographed) shell exchange catalogue of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden (The Netherlands), dated 1850 and containing 864 nominal taxa (861 molluscs and 3 brachiopods), is discussed in the context of the history of the museum. This catalogue must have been

  3. Assessing university students' sexual risk behaviors as predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Rebecca L; Adjei Boakye, Eric; Christopher, Kara M; Geneus, Christian J; Walker, Ronald J; Varvares, Mark A; Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba

    2018-05-09

    There exists a significant gap in vaccine coverage of the human papillomavirus (HPV) among college-aged students. This study assessed sexual risk-taking behavior among university students and analyzed predictors of HPV vaccine initiation and completion in this population. Data (n = 746) were from an anonymous online, cross-sectional survey distributed to university students, between the ages of 19-26 years, at a private Midwestern university. Both chi-square and multivariable logistics regression models estimated the association between sociodemographic characteristics and sexual risk factors (including number of vaginal sexual partners, number of oral sexual partners, initiation of oral sex, and initiation of vaginal sex), with HPV vaccine initiation and completion. A significant number of participants (40%) had not received a single dose of the HPV vaccine series. Of those who initiated the series, more than half (51%) did not achieve completion. Additionally, a greater number of participants have had multiple (4 or more) oral sexual partners than vaginal sexual partners (25.7% vs. 20.3%). After adjusting for covariates, it was found that sexual risk factors were not significantly associated with HPV vaccine initiation or completion. HPV vaccine initiation and completion rates are suboptimal among university students. High levels of sexual-risk taking behaviors associated with HPV infection persist, yet are not significant predictors of HPV vaccine behaviors in this age group. To increase uptake among 18-26-year-old students, future public health interventions should focus on HPV vaccine education and uptake across the entire population, irrespective of sexual risk profile. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of the Use of Electronic Human Resource Management (EHRM Within Human Resource Management (HRM Functions at Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux Gervase Iwu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to examine the effect of e-hrm systems in assisting human resource practitioners to execute their duties and responsibilities. In comparison to developed economies of the world, information technology adoption in sub-Saharan Africa has not been without certain glitches. Some of the factors that are responsible for these include poor need identification, sustainable funding, and insufficient skills. Besides these factors, there is also the issue of change management and users sticking to what they already know. Although, the above factors seem negative, there is strong evidence that information systems such as electronic human resource management present benefits to an organization. To achieve this, a dual research approach was utilized. Literature assisted immensely in both the development of the conceptual framework upon which the study hinged as well as in the development of the questionnaire items. The study also made use of an interview checklist to guide the participants. The findings reveal a mix of responses that indicate that while there are gains in adopting e-hrm systems, it is wiser to consider supporting resources as well as articulate the needs of the university better before any investment is made.

  5. STUDI KOMPARATIF ANTARA UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS 1948 DAN THE CAIRO DECLARATION ON HUMAN RIGHTS IN ISLAM 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunaryo Sunaryo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Diskusi Hak Asasi Manusia (HAM merupakan salah satu topik yang tetap aktual dan mengglobal di samping masalah demokrasi dan lingkungan hidup. Manusia sebagai makhluk Tuhan dan makhluk sosial memiliki hak-hak asasi yang mesti dihormati dan dilindungi oleh siapapun. Di dalam Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 (UDHR dan di dalam The Cairo Declaration on Human Rights In Islam 1990 (CD, berbagai macam hak-hak asasi dimaksud telah diatur secara general dan komprehensif. Meskipun demikian, di antara kedua deklarasi tersebut di samping mempunyai persamaan juga memiliki perbedaan. Perbedaan-perbedaan tersebut antara lain tentang asal atau sumber dari masing-masing deklarasi yang tidak sama, hak atas kebebasan beragama dan hak untuk menikah, serta hak atas kewarganegaraan seseorang. Sementara itu ada juga ketentuan-ketentuan yang diatur di dalam CD tetapi tidak diatur dalam UDHR atau sebaliknya, seperti tentang riba (Pasal 14 CD tidak diatur di dalam UDHR, sebaliknya ketentuan tentang kebebasan berserikat dan berkumpul (Pasal 20 UDHR tidak diatur di dalam CD

  6. Assessment of Morphological Variations and its Specific Location on the Surface of Adult Human Liver in Ethiopian Cadavers University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsegaye Mehare

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver is the second largest organ next to skin and located in right hypochondrium, epigastrium and may extend to left hypochondrium in upper abdominal cavity. It accounts 2% to 3% of total body weight of individual. Land marking for interpreting different diagnostic image and localizing lesions in the liver is commonly done by major fissures. Sound knowledge about different morphological variations which are found on the surface of liver is mandatory to have safe surgical outcome. Segments of liver were extensively researched but there are only few studies dealt with the surface variation of the liver. Therefore, this study aims to assess morphological variations and its specific location on the surface of adult human liver in Ethiopian cadaver. Methodology: Institutional based cross sectional descriptive study design was conducted in 33 formalin fixed Ethiopian cadaveric livers in the Anatomy department of University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University. Results: 45.45% of the liver was normal but 54.55% showed one or more variations. Additional fissures and very small left lobe with deep costal impressions were seen 27.27% and 21.21% cases respectively. Pons hepatis connecting left lobe with quadrate lobe and very deep renal impression with corset constriction were noted in 9.09% cases each. Additional lobes and absence of quadrate lobes were found in 6.06% cases each. Conclusion and Recommendation: Morphological variations on the liver surface were accessory fissure, very small left lobe with deep costal impressions, pons hepatis, shape variation and absence of quadrate lobe. The most common one among the variations was accessory fissure on the visceral and diaphragmatic surface.

  7. Influence of Factor V Leiden on susceptibility to and outcome from critical illness: a genetic association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Ejrnæs, Karen; Juul, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Disturbance of the pro-coagulatant and anti-coagulant balance is associated with a poor outcome from critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine whether the Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation is associated with susceptibility to or death from critical illness....... METHODS: A genetic association study involving four case cohorts comprising two Gram negative sepsis, one invasive pneumococcal disease and one intensive care unit cohort with a total of 1,249 patients. Controls were derived from a population-based cohort study (N = 8,147). DNA from patients and controls...... not appear to increase the risk of admission due to severe invasive infections. Nevertheless, in the subgroup of patients admitted to intensive care an increased risk and a poorer long-term outcome for individuals with critical illness were observed for FVL mutation carriers....

  8. Scalable Generation of Universal Platelets from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Feng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide a potentially replenishable source for the production of transfusable platelets. Here, we describe a method to generate megakaryocytes (MKs and functional platelets from iPSCs in a scalable manner under serum/feeder-free conditions. The method also permits the cryopreservation of MK progenitors, enabling a rapid “surge” capacity when large numbers of platelets are needed. Ultrastructural/morphological analyses show no major differences between iPSC platelets and human blood platelets. iPSC platelets form aggregates, lamellipodia, and filopodia after activation and circulate in macrophage-depleted animals and incorporate into developing mouse thrombi in a manner identical to human platelets. By knocking out the β2-microglobulin gene, we have generated platelets that are negative for the major histocompatibility antigens. The scalable generation of HLA-ABC-negative platelets from a renewable cell source represents an important step toward generating universal platelets for transfusion as well as a potential strategy for the management of platelet refractoriness.

  9. Cultural variation is part of human nature : Literary universals, context-sensitivity, and "shakespeare in the bush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michelle Scalise

    2003-12-01

    In 1966, Laura Bohannan wrote her classic essay challenging the supposition that great literary works speak to universal human concerns and conditions and, by extension, that human nature is the same everywhere. Her evidence: the Tiv of West Africa interpret Hamlet differently from Westerners. While Bohannan's essay implies that cognitive universality and cultural variation are mutually exclusive phenomena, adaptationist theory suggests otherwise. Adaptive problems ("the human condition") and cognitive adaptations ("human nature") are constant across cultures. What differs between cultures is habitat: owing to environmental variation, the means and information relevant to solving adaptive problems differ from place to place. Thus, we find differences between cultures not because human minds differ in design but largely because human habitats differ in resources and history. On this view, we would expect world literature to express both human universals and cultural particularities. Specifically, we should expect to find literary universality at the macro level (e.g., adaptive problems, cognitive adaptations) and literary variation at the micro level (e.g., local solutions to adaptive problems).

  10. On the tenth anniversary of the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, C

    2015-01-01

    In 2005 the representatives of 191 states meeting for the General Conference of UNESCO unanimously approved the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights". The Declaration is the only instrument of its kind: it was the first document adopted by a global organisation that addressed the whole range of issues with which bioethics is concerned and that is a legal instrument. Many of the principles affirmed in the Declaration had already been amply absorbed into the discipline of bioethics. All of them can be traced to the dignity and equality of every individual. The most evident novelty is to be found less in the content of the principles than in the balancing of individual and societal perspectives. Also in evidence are several compromises that were adopted in order to promote dialogue and mutual understanding.

  11. The Global Governance of Bioethics: Negotiating UNESCO's Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Adèle

    2011-01-01

    UNESCO's Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (2005) was drawn up by an independent panel of experts (the International Bioethics Committee) and negotiated by member states. UNESCO aimed for a participatory and transparent drafting process, holding national and regional consultations and seeking the views of various interest groups, including religious and spiritual ones. Furthermore, reflecting UNESCO's broad interpretation of bioethics, the IBC included medics, scientists, lawyers and philosophers among its membership. Nevertheless, several potential stakeholders-academic scientists and ethicists, government policy-makers and NGO representatives-felt they had not been sufficiently consulted or even represented during the Declaration's development. Better communications and understanding within and between national, regional and international layers of governance would help to avoid a recurrence of this problem in future negotiations.

  12. Honey From Maggots: Aura, Sacrifice, and the Human Universe in Charles Olson's "The Kingfishers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roethle, Christopher James

    In this thesis, I contend that some form of aura can be recovered from the ravages of technological reproduction described in Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility (Third Version)." Recovering this aura, however, may require adopting an aesthetic of immediacy through destruction and even wanton disposability (what Georges Bataille in his general economic theory calls "nonproductive expenditure") to ensure that, though routinely diluted and discarded, the split-second authenticity of a work remains, its radical ephemerality and formal irreproducibility opposing the enslaving, commodifying powers of the copy. The poetry and poetic theory of American poet Charles Olson, especially in his long poem "The Kingfishers" and his essays "Projective Verse" and "Human Universe," serves as an example of how an author might inscribe auratic energy along nonproductive, general economic lines.

  13. Assessing the universal health coverage target in the Sustainable Development Goals from a human rights perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2016-12-15

    The UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted in September 2015, include a comprehensive health goal, "to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being at all ages." The health goal (SDG 3) has nine substantive targets and four additional targets which are identified as a means of implementation. One of these commitments, to achieve universal health coverage (UHC), has been acknowledged as central to the achievement of all of the other health targets. As defined in the SDGs, UHC includes financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services, and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all. This article evaluates the extent to which the UHC target in the SDGs conforms with the requirements of the right to health enumerated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and other international human rights instruments and interpreted by international human rights bodies. It does so as a means to identify strengths and weaknesses in the framing of the UHC target that are likely to affect its implementation. While UHC as defined in the SDGs overlaps with human rights standards, there are important human rights omissions that will likely weaken the implementation and reduce the potential benefits of the UHC target. The most important of these is the failure to confer priority to providing access to health services to poor and disadvantaged communities in the process of expanding health coverage and in determining which health services to provide. Unless the furthest behind are given priority and strategies adopted to secure their participation in the development of national health plans, the SDGs, like the MDGs, are likely to leave the most disadvantaged and vulnerable communities behind.

  14. Human resources department in crisis: A case of a university in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethuel Sibongiseni Ngcamu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human Resources (HR departments in previously disadvantaged higher education institutions (HEI in South Africa have contributed to the crisis that has led them to be governed by appointed Administrators assigned by the Ministry of Higher Education and Training. The malfunctioning of HR departments persists even in the post-Administrator’s era, with a prevalence of personal, interpersonal and operational challenges. This study aimed at interrogating challenges faced by the HR Department of the university concerned post the appointed Administrator era and its negative effects. This study adopted a qualitative research approach whereby in-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 10 HR Department staff members. Focus group discussions were also carried out with 20 academic and non-academic university leaders. Further data was also collected through ethnographic observation and secondary data was also used. The non-probability purposive sampling was used for qualitative analysis and NVivo was used for organizing and analyzing data gleaned from the in-depth interviews. The study findings consistently revealed unclear roles and responsibilities, outmoded recruitment and selection processes and poor interpersonal relations amongst the HR department staff members as some of the challenges that still persist post the Administrator’s era, all of which have contributed to the paralysis of organizational culture. University leaders can use the study findings as a tool to devise and implement radical change management interventions aiming at re-engineering HR departments that are operating abnormally, as well as for designing a responsive HR Strategic Architect. This study will contribute to the body of knowledge in the HR fraternity as there is a dearth of published studies on the internal challenges faces by HR Departments (both interpersonal and operational, which have the potential to hamper smooth operations of higher education institutions.

  15. Proposing a Universal Framework for Resilience: Optimizing Risk and Combating Human Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Arunima

    2017-04-01

    strengthen and optimize the decision making skill and platform for a better sustainable society. The resilience framework provides a cross-sector and multi-level analysis to tackle the vulnerabilities which can be caused to essential utilities like power, water, transport and various machineries that are essential for human sustainability. The direction of resilience framework focuses on prevention of damage and disruption of disaster, mitigate the loss caused to human society and provide the best response for disaster resilience. Thus, the basic pillars which are important for the implementation of resilience is proper governance framework and transparency which takes into account various cost and risk analysis. Thus a common and universal framework for resilience is the main requirement for mass accessibility. The aim of resilience framework focuses on universal adaptability, coherence and validation. A mixed method analysis has been undertaken in this research paper which focuses on the following issues: • Legal, Institutional and community framework for integrating resilience framework of global north and global south. • Spatial as well as statistical analysis to structuralize disaster risk and resilient framework for disaster management. • Early warning system and emergency response in a comparative scale to analyse the various models of risk and resilience framework implemented in USA, China, Nepal and India for proposing an integrated resilience strategy.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, and perception towards human papillomavirus among university students in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Mehmood Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study comprises a questionnaire-based survey regarding knowledge about human papillomavirus and its vaccine among students in different educational fields at public and private universities in the city of Lahore in Pakistan. A 26-item questionnaire was used to attain the objective of this study. The reliability of this tool was assessed using Cronbach's alpha (0.79 and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin value was 0.827. The response rate to the survey was 78.0%, of whom the majority (74.9% were females and 308 (79% were single (median age=23 years. While assessing the respondents' knowledge about HPV, 223(57% students reported that they had already heard of HPV (human papillomavirus and nearly 215 (55% reported that HPV causes cervical cancer and can infect both men and women. Gender and field of study were two main factors found influencing the respondents' knowledge about HPV. Moreover, students' understanding about the mode of transmission of HPV was cursory: 40.51% said they did not know how HPV is transmitted, 133 (34.10% stated that HPV spreads through the exchange of bodily fluids, and 22 (5.64% selected cough/sneezing. In terms of prevention, 175 (44.87% students stated that HPV can be prevented by vaccination, 30.0% reported sexual abstinence, 21.54% using condoms, and nearly 5.38% disclosed use of antibiotics. Addressing the knowledge of students regarding HPV vaccine, nearly 53% stated there is no vaccine against HPV and almost 64% rejected the statement that HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer. In addition, students reported that they will be more than willing to get vaccinated for HPV if their physician recommend them (RII=0.74 followed by parents (RII=0.69. The results of this study revealed a poor understanding among respondents about the health problems associated with HPV, its prevention, modes of transmission and arability of HPV vaccine in Pakistan. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, Vaccine, Knowledge, Attitude

  17. Development of a Centralized Human Resource Information System of Cavite State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey F. Papa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focused in the automation and improvement of the Human Resource services. This includes managing of employees’ records, facilitating requests and processing of leave credits in accordance to the Civil Service Commission (CSC rules and regulation, tracking the employees' performance and skills, generating reports needed, and analyzing of employee information that will help in the decision making. This also includes attendance monitoring using biometrics, calculation of tardiness and absences of employees, and processing and printing of payroll. The system is developed using Visual Basic.Net, as the main programming language, SQL Server 2008 for back end database, MS Word and MS Excel for all needed reports. Two (2 units of computers that served as server and client, network devices and finger print biometric scanner completed the set-up of the developed system. The developed system consists of three (3 major application software or modules such as the Human Resource Information System, the Fingerprint Attendance System and the Payroll Alert System. The Human Resource Information System is used in the processing of employee records of the HR office. The Fingerprint Attendance System is used for getting the employee’s time-in and time-out for their attendance. The Payroll Alert System is used in notifying the accounting staff to generate the payroll on time. Test results based on efficiency in terms of CPU and memory usage, processing speed and accuracy of data, and consistency of outputs turned out favorable to the system. Forty respondents composed of faculty and administrative personnel of Cavite State University rated the system as “Excellent” with an overall mean of 4.73. It signifies that the developed system is acceptable and functions according to its preferred specifications.

  18. A General Education Course in Cultural Astronomy: Exploring the Universe Through Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Astronomy courses for non-science majors (often referred to as Astro 101) are the bread and butter of the general education service obligation of astronomy faculty and programs across the US. Their content has traditionally been a general survey of the solar system, stars and galaxies, or even the entire universe. However, because the audience is students who will not be continuing on in astronomy, there is actually no need to cover a broad range of specific topics. Rather, it is more important to concentrate on the scientific process, and hopefully leave the student with an understanding of the relevance of science in everyday life, regardless of his or her major. As a result, some faculty prefer a more interdisciplinary focus for their Astro 101 classes, for example courses on the search for extraterrestrial life. Another option for general education astronomy courses is what has become known as cultural astronomy. Cultural astronomy focuses on the ways in which astronomical knowledge and belief influences human behavior and social structures. Under this umbrella fall two important areas of study, archaeoastronomy (concentrating on ancient cultures) and enthoastronomy (focusing on extant cultures). Such interdisciplinary courses draw heavily upon archaeology, history, anthropology, art, and other fields more traditionally aligned with the humanities and social sciences than the natural sciences, and therefore can be attractive to students in these non-science majors. In such courses, students experience the “humanity” of science: the important connections between science and the human experience, and how experts in myriad fields contribute in meaningful ways to our understanding of how astronomical knowledge has been constructed and disseminated across time and space. This poster describes the content and pedagogy of a general education course in cultural astronomy for non-science majors that stresses hands-on and experiential learning, including the use of

  19. The relation between flexibility of human resources and performance indexes of selected hospitals of Tehran Medical Sciences University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Alibakhshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, flexibility has turned to one of important issues in management theories and policies and most current discussions about flexibility patterns focus on management policies, so that these patterns are one of important aspects of human resources strategic management. This study was performed with the aim of assessing the flexibility rate of human resources and performance indexes of Tehran Medical Sciences University hospitals and determining the possible relation between these variables. The present study is descriptive – analytical which was conducted in cross-sectional form in 2015. The statistical population was selected by stratifies random sampling method as 317 persons from nursing, administrative and financial personnel of 5 hospitals of Tehran Medical Sciences University. Data collecting toll was hospitals performance indexes form and Wright & Snell flexibility questionnaire of human resources. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 18 software and with the aid of descriptive statistical indexes and linear regression analysis. The results showed that personnel ( human resources had high flexibility = 4.16.\tthere was a significant relation between total flexibility and the index of bed circulation so that by one unit increase in bed circulation space, normally, the average of total flexibility decreased 0.64 units ( p-value<0.05. The results showed that human resources of Tehran Medical Sciences University hospitals have high flexibility, so authorities and policy makers are suggested to adopt policies of human resources management for creating flexibility in human resources and improving hospitals performance and amending hospitals status.

  20. [Sexual risk behaviours and PAP testing in university women vaccinated against human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Feito, Ana; Antón-Fernández, Raquel; Paz-Zulueta, María

    2018-05-01

    To estimate the association between the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and sexual risk behaviour, as well as the participation in the Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP). Cross-sectional study. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Law, and School of Economics and Business (University of Oviedo). Female university students. Information was collected about contraceptive methods, sexual behaviours, HPV knowledge, and participation in the CCSP. Furthermore, proportions and odds ratio (OR) were estimated with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Approximately two-thirds (67.7%) of the sample was vaccinated against HPV, and 216 women (65.3%) were sexually active. Barrier contraceptive methods were used by 67.6% during their current intimate relationships, being less frequent in non-vaccinated women (54.9% vs. 75.4% in vaccinated female students) (P=.002). The risk of having at least one sexual risk behaviour was higher in non-vaccinated women: OR2.29 (95%CI: 1.29-4.07). In addition, the probability of having a PAP test within the CCSP was higher in non-vaccinated women: OR2.18 (95%CI: 1.07-4.47). The prevalence of sexual risk behaviours in non-vaccinated women is elevated, and it is related to the lack of use of barrier contraceptive methods. The vaccination against HPV could affect sexual behaviours and the participation in the CCSP. Therefore, the information received by young people about contraceptive methods, sexually transmitted diseases, and cancer prevention should be reinforced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Human decomposition and the reliability of a 'Universal' model for post mortem interval estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockle, Diane L; Bell, Lynne S

    2015-08-01

    one region to any other region. These results also suggest that there are other variables, apart from temperature and humidity that may impact the rate of human decomposition. These variables, or complex of variables, are considered regionally specific. Neither of the Universal Formulae performed well, and our results do not support the proposition of Universality for PMI estimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An early (1850) 'handwritten' shell exchange catalogue of the Leiden Museum, with notes on the collectors Rethaan Macaré and Tischbein

    OpenAIRE

    Bruggen, van, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    A ‘handwritten’ (lithographed) shell exchange catalogue of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden (The Netherlands), dated 1850 and containing 864 nominal taxa (861 molluscs and 3 brachiopods), is discussed in the context of the history of the museum. This catalogue must have been distributed in a limited edition to shell collectors interested in the exchange of specimens. Among the exchange partners of the museum were the well-known 19th century Dutch collector Lady (later Dowager) F...

  3. Clinical gait analysis : A review of research at the Interdepartmental Research group of Kinesiology in Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H. A M

    1990-01-01

    In this article the methodology used in the Interdepartmental Research Group of Kinesiology to quantify (clinical) human gait is elaborated upon. Four methods are described: analysis of temporal parameters, goniometry, accelerometry and electromyography. A correct representation of electromyographic

  4. Macht, machinaties en musea. Jan van der Hoeven, Hermann Schlegel en hun strijd om het Rijksmuseum van natuurlijke historie te Leiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. de Jonge

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Might, machinations and museums. Jan van der Hoeven, Hermann Schlegel and their battle over the National Museum for Natural History in LeidenMuseums had a central place in nineteenth-century natural history. Aside from being important places for carrying out research into nature, they were also powerful vehicles for transmitting and communicating scientific knowledge. That is why, in the nineteenth century, natural history museums were frequently battlegrounds for rival scientists. Often, clashes over scientific matters were at the same time conflicts about power and space. After all, the naturalist who could get control over a museum’s collection and decide how the specimens should be classified and exhibited ultimately had the power to dictate which scientific knowledge was communicated; which story was told by a collection of specimens. This article is about the power struggle over the directorate of the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden that broke out between Jan van der Hoeven, Professor of Natural History and Comparative Anatomy at Leiden and Herman Schlegel, the museum’s chief curator. Both were rooted in very different natural historical traditions and had completely different views on the role of the museum and how the collection should be arranged and exhibited. In this article, we follow the two scientists in their attempts to gain support for their nominations. In this way, we also get a picture of nineteenth century Dutch political culture and the role scientists could play in it.

  5. Social Cognitive Theory Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions of College Men at a Southeastern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Hannah M; Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use social cognitive theory to predict human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intentions of college men attending a large, southeastern university. Data collection comprised two phases. Phase I established face and content validity of the instrument by a panel of six experts. Phase II assessed internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha and predicted behavioral intentions applying multiple linear regression. HPV knowledge, expectations, self-efficacy to get HPV vaccine, situational perception, self-efficacy in overcoming barriers to get HPV vaccine, and self-control to get HPV vaccine were regressed on behavioral intentions. Situational perception and self-control to get HPV vaccine were significant predictors, accounting for 22% of variance in behavioral intentions to get vaccinated within the next 6 months. Overall, college men reported low behavioral intentions to getting vaccinated. Future interventions should target situational perception and self-control to increase HPV vaccination intentions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Structures of the major capsid proteins of the human Karolinska Institutet and Washington University polyomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Ursula; Wang, Jianbo; Macejak, Dennis; Garcea, Robert L; Stehle, Thilo

    2011-07-01

    The Karolinska Institutet and Washington University polyomaviruses (KIPyV and WUPyV, respectively) are recently discovered human viruses that infect the respiratory tract. Although they have not yet been linked to disease, they are prevalent in populations worldwide, with initial infection occurring in early childhood. Polyomavirus capsids consist of 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein viral protein 1 (VP1), which determines antigenicity and receptor specificity. The WUPyV and KIPyV VP1 proteins are distant in evolution from VP1 proteins of known structure such as simian virus 40 or murine polyomavirus. We present here the crystal structures of unassembled recombinant WUPyV and KIPyV VP1 pentamers at resolutions of 2.9 and 2.55 Å, respectively. The WUPyV and KIPyV VP1 core structures fold into the same β-sandwich that is a hallmark of all polyomavirus VP1 proteins crystallized to date. However, differences in sequence translate into profoundly different surface loop structures in KIPyV and WUPyV VP1 proteins. Such loop structures have not been observed for other polyomaviruses, and they provide initial clues about the possible interactions of these viruses with cell surface receptors.

  7. Equality Hypocrisy, Inconsistency, and Prejudice: The Unequal Application of the Universal Human Right to Equality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In Western culture, there appears to be widespread endorsement of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (which stresses equality and freedom). But do people really apply their equality values equally, or are their principles and application systematically discrepant, resulting in equality hypocrisy? The present study, conducted with a representative national sample of adults in the United Kingdom (N = 2,895), provides the first societal test of whether people apply their value of “equality for all” similarly across multiple types of status minority (women, disabled people, people aged over 70, Blacks, Muslims, and gay people). Drawing on theories of intergroup relations and stereotyping we examined, relation to each of these groups, respondents’ judgments of how important it is to satisfy their particular wishes, whether there should be greater or reduced equality of employment opportunities, and feelings of social distance. The data revealed a clear gap between general equality values and responses to these specific measures. Respondents prioritized equality more for “paternalized” groups (targets of benevolent prejudice: women, disabled, over 70) than others (Black people, Muslims, and homosexual people), demonstrating significant inconsistency. Respondents who valued equality more, or who expressed higher internal or external motivation to control prejudice, showed greater consistency in applying equality. However, even respondents who valued equality highly showed significant divergence in their responses to paternalized versus nonpaternalized groups, revealing a degree of hypocrisy. Implications for strategies to promote equality and challenge prejudice are discussed. PMID:25914516

  8. The University of Surrey database of elemental composition of human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, W.J.; Akanle, O.A.; Admans, L.L.; Beasley, D.; Butler, C.; Spyrou, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    The elemental composition of human hair obtained from different studies at Surrey University over a period of 25 years has been recorded and forms part of a database, for biological and environmental samples, which is being developed. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (IAA), using reactor neutrons, was the principal method employed and from which reported data are presented. Elemental concentrations of Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, F, Fe, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, V and Zn were obtained and recorded in the database. Chronological variations in two sets of subjects separated by a period of time of 16 years are also given. Variations in the concentration values of some elements related to the state of health and disease were reported for hair samples collected from subjects suffering from manic depression, senile dementia and breast cancer. Concentration values of some elements with relation to the nationality of subjects from Bulgaria, England, Kenya, Nigeria and Wales are presented and compared. This study is part of on-going research in the analysis of biomedical and bioenvironmental materials. The database is still in its infancy. (author)

  9. Equality Hypocrisy, Inconsistency, and Prejudice: The Unequal Application of the Universal Human Right to Equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dominic; Houston, Diane M; Van de Vyver, Julie; Vasiljevic, Milica

    2015-02-01

    In Western culture, there appears to be widespread endorsement of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (which stresses equality and freedom). But do people really apply their equality values equally, or are their principles and application systematically discrepant, resulting in equality hypocrisy? The present study, conducted with a representative national sample of adults in the United Kingdom ( N = 2,895), provides the first societal test of whether people apply their value of "equality for all" similarly across multiple types of status minority (women, disabled people, people aged over 70, Blacks, Muslims, and gay people). Drawing on theories of intergroup relations and stereotyping we examined, relation to each of these groups, respondents' judgments of how important it is to satisfy their particular wishes, whether there should be greater or reduced equality of employment opportunities, and feelings of social distance. The data revealed a clear gap between general equality values and responses to these specific measures. Respondents prioritized equality more for "paternalized" groups (targets of benevolent prejudice: women, disabled, over 70) than others (Black people, Muslims, and homosexual people), demonstrating significant inconsistency. Respondents who valued equality more, or who expressed higher internal or external motivation to control prejudice, showed greater consistency in applying equality. However, even respondents who valued equality highly showed significant divergence in their responses to paternalized versus nonpaternalized groups, revealing a degree of hypocrisy. Implications for strategies to promote equality and challenge prejudice are discussed.

  10. The City as a Focus for Human Capital Migration: Towards a Dynamic Analysis of University Human Capital Contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Herbst, Mikolaj

    2015-01-01

    Universities' contributions to urban development frequently focus on their micro- or macro-scale effects, ignoring the meso-scale effects they have on inter-territorial relationships. Although universities are seen as an essential part of the recipe for successful urban development, there is a

  11. The right of public access to legal information : A proposal for its universal recognition as a human right

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitee, Leesi Ebenezer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: This Article examines the desirability of the universal recognition of the right of public access to legal information as a human right and therefore as part of a legal framework for improving national and global access to legal information. It discusses the right of public access to legal

  12. Pomp and Circumstance: University Presidents and the Role of Human Capital in Determining Who Leads U.S. Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    While there is wide agreement that leaders matter, little is known regarding the role that human capital plays in determining who becomes one. We exploit unique attributes of the higher education industry to examine if training and academic ability affect the placement of university presidents within the research hierarchy of U.S. institutions.…

  13. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  14. Intravenous Remifentanil Analgaesia for an Obstetric Patient with Type I Neurofibromatosis and a Factor V Leiden Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Gálvez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I neurofibromatosis is characterised by altered skin pigmentation and the growth of benign tumours, particularly along the peripheral nerves and central nervous system. We report a 36-year-old primigravida woman in labour who was admitted to the obstetric suite of the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain, in 2007 with hypothyroidism, type I neurofibromatosis and a factor V Leiden mutation. Due to a lack of cranial and spinal imaging data, an epidural was not indicated; instead, continuous intravenous remifentanil analgaesia was administered. The remifentanil infusion was self-titrated by the patient using a visual analogue scale, with the dosage ranging from 0.01 to 0.25 μg/kg/minute. Due to rotational dystocia, Kjelland-type forceps were used during the delivery. After birth, the infant was found to have Apgar scores of 9 and 10, with no maternal or neonatal adverse effects observed. Although still controversial, remifentanil may be a successful alternative for analgaesia in similar cases; however, the specific risks and benefits for each patient should be considered prior to administration.

  15. [A clinical case of young, oral combined contraceptive using women, heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden) which revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S; Ramshev, K; Ramsheva, Z; Ivanov, A; Ganovska, A

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophilia is associated with increased risks of venous thrombosis in women taking oral contraceptive preparations. Universal thrombophilia screening in women prior to prescribing oral contraceptive preparations is not supported by current evidence. The case is presented of a 23 year-old women with a personal history of interruption and on the same day started with oral contraceptive (0.03 microg ethynil estradiol - 0.075 microg gestodene), which due on a 18 pill/day to acute headache, increasing vomiting and speaking defects. Physical/neurologic/gynecologic examinations observed a normal status. The MRI and CT revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke. The acute therapy of thrombotic findings was accompanied with many tests. The thrombophilia PCR-Real time - test finds heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden). This case shows the need of large prospective studies that should be undertaken to refine the risks and establish the associations of thrombophilias with venous thrombosis among contraceptive users. The key to a prompt diagnosis is to know the risk factors. The relative value of a thrombophilia screening programme before contraceptive using needs to be established.

  16. Handgrip strength at midlife and familial longevity : The Leiden Longevity Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, Carolina H.Y.; De Craen, Anton J.M.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Low handgrip strength has been linked with premature mortality in diverse samples of middle-aged and elderly subjects. The value of handgrip strength as marker of "exceptional" human longevity has not been previously explored. We postulated that the genetic influence on extreme survival might also

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and perception towards human papillomavirus among university students in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Buksh, Malik Allah; Rehman, Inayat Ur; Saleem, Ahsan

    2016-12-01

    This cross-sectional study comprises a questionnaire-based survey regarding knowledge about human papillomavirus and its vaccine among students in different educational fields at public and private universities in the city of Lahore in Pakistan. A 26-item questionnaire was used to attain the objective of this study. The reliability of this tool was assessed using Cronbach's alpha (0.79) and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin value was 0.827. The response rate to the survey was 78.0%, of whom the majority (74.9%) were females and 308 (79%) were single (median age=23 years). While assessing the respondents' knowledge about HPV, 223(57%) students reported that they had already heard of HPV (human papillomavirus) and nearly 215 (55%) reported that HPV causes cervical cancer and can infect both men and women. Gender and field of study were two main factors found influencing the respondents' knowledge about HPV. Moreover, students' understanding about the mode of transmission of HPV was cursory: 40.51% said they did not know how HPV is transmitted, 133 (34.10%) stated that HPV spreads through the exchange of bodily fluids, and 22 (5.64%) selected cough/sneezing. In terms of prevention, 175 (44.87%) students stated that HPV can be prevented by vaccination, 30.0% reported sexual abstinence, 21.54% using condoms, and nearly 5.38% disclosed use of antibiotics. Addressing the knowledge of students regarding HPV vaccine, nearly 53% stated there is no vaccine against HPV and almost 64% rejected the statement that HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer. In addition, students reported that they will be more than willing to get vaccinated for HPV if their physician recommend them (RII=0.74) followed by parents (RII=0.69). The results of this study revealed a poor understanding among respondents about the health problems associated with HPV, its prevention, modes of transmission and arability of HPV vaccine in Pakistan. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. [People, the environment and health: the "Oneness" of human health from the perspective of universal life presented in "Changes"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke-Ping

    2008-12-01

    This paper aimed to expand the paradigm of nursing and expand the essential factors of nursing theories beyond "environment" to encompass universal life. While individuals live between the sky and earth, we are an inseparable part of the universe. "Health" is derived from a oneness that embraces the body, mind and spirit. The human body contains the wisdom of the universe, known in Chinese philosophy as the wisdom of "Changes". The body has its own consciousness and possesses great powers of self-healing. Healthiness is the original condition of life. Modern medicine assumes sickness to be a natural phenomenon, with the essential nature of "Changes" neglected as a universal law for maintaining health. Dr. Sun, a renowned physician from the Tang Dynasty, was quoted as saying "Knowing Changes is the prerequisite of knowing medicine." Another saying holds that, "Every word and every sentence in the Book of Changes is an indicator of medicine." Much emphasis has been placed on the relationship between "Changes" and "medicine" in the past. This paper elaborates the relationship between nature and human health in order to provide a clear understanding of the nature of true health, described from the perspectives of medicine and "Changes", an evaluation of modern medical science and the oneness of body-mind-spirit, which is the reality of health. The human body is thus a reflection of the mind and spirit, while the mind and spirit is the "inner body". The body is a highly intelligent organism that truly reflects our inner world. Our inner world is also displayed through physical symptoms. As human suffering is caused by separation from our inner life, the only path to enjoying a healthy and joyful life is to achieve a oneness between our body-mind-spirit. Such is a universal law, which is called "Changes" or "Oneness".

  19. Who's afraid of Patterns?: The Particular versus the Universal and the Meaning of Humanities 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rens Bod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of Digital Humanities has enabled scholars to identify previously unknown patterns in the arts and letters; but the notion of pattern has also been subject to debate. In my response to the authors of this Forum, I argue that ‘pattern’ should not be confused with universal pattern. The term pattern itself is neutral with respect to being either particular or universal. Yet the testing and discovery of patterns – be they local or global – is greatly aided by digital tools. While such tools have been beneficial for the humanities, numerous scholars lack a sufficient grasp of the underlying assumptions and methods of these tools. I argue that in order to criticise and interpret the results of digital humanities properly, scholars must acquire a good working knowledge of the underlying tools and methods. Only then can digital humanities be fully integrated (humanities 3.0 with time-honoured (humanities 1.0 tools of hermeneutics and criticism.

  20. Human Identities and Nation Building: Comparative Analysis, Markets, and the Modern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejo Pérez, David; Hernández Ulloa, Abel; Martínez Ruiz, Xicoténcatl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the dilemma of the multi-university in sustainable education, research, and outreach by addressing some of the ways in which universities, must generate actions that seek to address these challenges, develop strategic relationships, and maximize their potential in the areas of teaching, research and…

  1. Who Matters to Universities? A Stakeholder Perspective on Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Valorisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benneworth, Paul; Jongbloed, Ben W.

    2010-01-01

    Valorisation is at the centre of many debates on the future of academic research. But valorisation has largely become narrowly understood in terms of universities' economic contributions through patenting, licensing, spin-off formation and technology transfer. This emergent restrictive definition of universities' societal impacts is a worrying…

  2. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  3. Development of a Medical Humanities Program at Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1992-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jock

    2003-10-01

    The Medical Humanities Program at Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Nova Scotia, Canada, was initiated in 1992 to incorporate the medical humanities into the learning and experiences of medical students. The goal of the program was to gain acceptance as an integral part of the medical school. The program assumed a broad concept of the medical humanities that includes medical history, literature, music, art, multiculturalism, philosophy, epistemology, theology, anthropology, professionalism, history of alternative therapies, writing, storytelling, health law, international medicine, and ethics. Phase I of the program has provided the same elective and research opportunities in the medical humanities that are available to the students in clinical and basic sciences, and has encouraged and legitimized the involvement of the humanities in the life and learning of the medical student through a wide array of programs and activities. Phase II will focus on further incorporation of the humanities into the curriculum. Phase III will be the development of a graduate program in medical humanities to train more faculty who will incorporate the humanities into their teaching and into the development of education programs.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  5. "Global Human Resource Development" and Japanese University Education: "Localism" in Actor Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Aya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the actions of various actors involved in "global human resource development" and to clarify whether discussions on global human resources are based on local perspectives. The results of the analysis are as follows: 1) after the year 2000 began, industry started discussions on global human resources in…

  6. Knowledge of Saudi female university students regarding cervical cancer and acceptance of the human papilloma virus vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer K.; Almussaed, Eman M.; Fayed, Amel A.; Khan, Farida H.; Syed, Sadiqa B.; Al-Tamimi, Tahani N.; Elmorshedy, Hala N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer and the acceptance of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine among Saudi female students in health colleges. Methods: This cross-sectional study of a convenient sample encompassed 1400 students in Health Colleges at Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Data collected in...

  7. Development of a sensitive and specific epitope-blocking ELISA for universal detection of antibodies to human enterovirus 71 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6 that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. CONCLUSION: The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera.

  8. Identities, Differences and Universality of Human Rights Based on Iranian Religious and Ethnic Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Naderpour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “Human rights” is the main signifier of the discourse of international community. Despite its growing use, widespread resonance and hegemony, there are different approaches and debates for its understanding ranging from universalism to relativism. In recent decades, the issue of human rights has seriously promoted and encouraged universal respect and observance especially from the perspective of “minority rights” including all fundamental freedoms for all, without any discrimination, as well as safeguarding religious, cultural and ethnic identities. This paper referring to the understanding of the concept of “minority” argues and investigates the stand of human and minority rights from two dimensions of international documents and Islam. Then, it focuses on the issue of minority rights in Islam reviewing indiscrimination, fundamental freedoms and rights as well as religious, cultural and ethnic identities of the minorities considered in Islam. The concepts like freedom, equal rights, no torture and mistreatment, and participation right of the minority groups included in the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran are the next issues discussed by the researcher. At the end, the fruits and challenges of the rights of the religious and ethnic minorities are discussed at the national and international levels and the obligations of legal-political management and the official duties and commitments of the Islamic Republic of Iran are mentioned. حقوق بشر دال مرکزی گفتمان جامعه بین المللی است. علیرغم غلبه گفتمانی این دال؛ رویکردها و قرائت های متفاوتی در فهم و اجراء آن وجود دارد که در دو سر طیف آن می توان از جهان گرایان و نسبیت گرایان قرار دارند. در دهه های اخیر در چارچوب پذیرش و احترام به تفاوت های دینی و قومی

  9. Extent of Implementing Accreditation and Quality Assurance Standards in Azal University of Human Development from the Faculty Members’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zain Saleh ALSadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to find out how far accreditation and quality assurance standards in Azal University for human development are implemented from the perspective of faculty members. To achieve this objective, to the researchers adopted descriptive analytical approach techniques. The research population was all the teaching staff at the university; and the sample consisted of (94 faculty members, (48.45 % of the total number of the population. A questionnaire was designed to collect data relevant to the testing of the research objectives. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: the first included the personal data, while the second part included the standards of accreditation and quality assurance. The study revealed the following results: The mean of implementing standards as a whole was (3.44, the standard deviation (0.76, and the extent of the using the standards was (high. There were no significant differences between the research participants’ responses about the extent of using the standards due to the variables (gender – Qualification – college type – years of teaching experience. In light of the results of the study, a set of recommendations were presented, including the need to provide the necessary requirements for implementing accreditation and quality assurance standards, whether material, human or financial resources, and creating a positive conducive learning environment to be suitable and ready for a complete implementation of quality standards. One of the main suggestions made by the research was to conduct a similar study on government and private universities and community colleges in Yemen. Keywords: Quality Assurance and accreditation; Azal University of Human Development.

  10. Normative foundations of technology transfer and transnational benefit principles in the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas Alured; Nasu, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    The United Nations Scientific, Education, and Cultural Organization Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) expresses in its title and substance a controversial linkage of two normative systems: international human rights law and bioethics. The UDBHR has the status of what is known as a "nonbinding" declaration under public international law. The UDBHR's foundation within bioethics (and association, e.g., with virtue-based or principlist bioethical theories) is more problematic. Nonetheless, the UDBHR contains socially important principles of technology transfer and transnational benefit (articles 14, 15, and 21). This paper is one of the first to explore how the disciplines of bioethics and international human rights law may interact in the UDBHR to advance the policy relevance and health impact of such principles. It investigates their normative ancestry in the UDBHR, as well as relevant conceptual differences between bioethics and public international law in this respect, and how these may be relevant to their conceptual evolution and application.

  11. Why we need to find time for digital humanities: presenting a new partnership model at the University of Sussex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Harvell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing that academic libraries should develop and nurture strong, mutually beneficial relationships with researchers in digital humanities, the authors believe it is strategically important to invest time and resources exploring ideas and partnering with academic colleagues on projects. This approach can provide many unforeseen benefits to both the Library service and to the workforce. The article is based on our experience as Core Associates of the Sussex Humanities Lab at the University of Sussex. It outlines the impact this collaboration has had, including influencing working practices and culture within the Library, involvement in research bids, informing the development of new services, and addressing library questions using digital humanities methods. Most importantly, it exemplifies a new model of the librarian as equal partner in the research process.

  12. Efficient coding explains the universal law of generalization in human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Chris R

    2018-05-11

    Perceptual generalization and discrimination are fundamental cognitive abilities. For example, if a bird eats a poisonous butterfly, it will learn to avoid preying on that species again by generalizing its past experience to new perceptual stimuli. In cognitive science, the "universal law of generalization" seeks to explain this ability and states that generalization between stimuli will follow an exponential function of their distance in "psychological space." Here, I challenge existing theoretical explanations for the universal law and offer an alternative account based on the principle of efficient coding. I show that the universal law emerges inevitably from any information processing system (whether biological or artificial) that minimizes the cost of perceptual error subject to constraints on the ability to process or transmit information. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Role of a University of Technology in Human Capital Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedeji, A. O.; Adepoju, O. O.

    2011-01-01

    The greatness of nations appears to be based on the level of their human capital development as the world continues its march in the knowledge economy. It has become imperative for Nigeria to remain competitive in the comity of nations in the production, transfer and utilisation of knowledge. The realisation of the importance of human capital…

  14. Balancing the principles: why the universality of human rights is not the Trojan horse of moral imperialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semplici, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the 'global' level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the basis for the most relevant international declarations and documents, is not exempt from the charge. However, the refusal of a top-down conception of the universal as a sort of product for exportation should not be confused with a relativistic landscape, where all the cows can be indifferently black or white. This contribution aims at outlining an approach, which reconciles universalism as enshrined in founding human rights declarations with respect for cultural diversity. In order to do so, two conceptual frameworks are discussed: the 'tool-kit' model and the morals/ethics difference. The example of the right to quality health care confirms the argument that striking a balance between cherishing pluralism and defending some fundamental rights and obligations does not amount to an assertion of moral imperialism.

  15. The role of the humanities in the Bologna idea of a university: learning from the American model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Eckhardt Larsen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Humboldtian idea of a university has, for better or for worse, served as a blueprint for the past two centuries of university development in large parts of Europe. It entails the idea of a unity between research and personal cultivation (Bildung that indeed has its shortcomings. Since the advent of a strong specialization and theorization the humanities have largely abandoned the more educational function, Bildung in its educational and ethical sense.The American liberal arts college- and university tradition on the other hand,particularly at the bachelor level, has traditionally separated the purely educational readings of a humanities ‘canon’ from the more scholarly pursuits of the humanities. Recent debates on the humanities show these differences across the Atlantic. While the highly specialized humanities in Europe have great problems proving their relevance in a modern society and job-market, the humanities in America are mostly discussed in terms of their educational accountability. Could the Bologna process be an occasionfor the European bachelor to be remodelled along the lines of the American liberal arts model? Could the humanities prove their relevance to non specialists in European higher education?La idea humboldtiana de la universidad ha sido, para bien o para mal, una referencia para el desarrollo universitario en una gran parte de Europa durante los dos siglos pasados. Implica un concepto de unión entre investigación y formación (Bildung que, efectivamente, tiene sus defectos. Desde la llegada de una fuerte especialización y teorización, las Humanidades han abandonado, en su mayor medida, la función educacional, Bildung en su sentido ético. Por otra parte, la tradición universitaria de las Artes Liberales americanas, particularmente a nivel de Licenciatura, ha diferenciado la lectura puramente educacional del «canon», del meramente académico. Debates recientes han mostrado la existencia de esta diferenciaci

  16. A Multi-Objective Method to Align Human Resource Allocation with University Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Universities are currently under considerable pressure to reach their stakeholders' expectations. Management tools that use strategic plans, key performance indicators and quality assurance methods are increasingly deployed. This paper aims to demonstrate how resource allocation can be aligned with institutional strategic plans with a very simple…

  17. Teaching and Learning about Universal Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law: Digital Resources and Global Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rosemary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Today's education for civic engagement requires a global dimension. To live responsibly in their own communities, young people need to situate their personal and local interests in the context of their global interconnections. Bridging the personal, local, and global begins with an awareness of the universal aspirations for dignity and human…

  18. Characteristic Features of Innovation Project Management Aimed at University Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Yungblud, Valery T.; Khodyreva, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the studied issue is based on the need to develop theoretical approaches to project management at a higher educational institution taking into consideration the specifics of the subject area of the projects that ensure finding the "growth points" and addressing the long-term objectives of a university in the field of…

  19. Students' Perceptions of a University Access (Bridging) Programme for Social Science, Commerce and Humanities: Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quayle, Michael; Essack, Zaynab

    2007-01-01

    Universities in South Africa face the challenge of redressing past (and continuing) inequalities in higher education by increasing accessibility to previously (and currently) disadvantaged students. One means of doing so is through 'access' or 'bridging' programmes. This article explores successful students' perceptions of one such programme at…

  20. Implementation of the Human Talent Management through Competencies Model in a University in Metropolitan Lima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This article is a work proposal that aims to describe the methodology proposed by the Management of Personnel Management from a university in Lima, to implement a management model based on competencies which traceability involves various technical HR processes practiced in the organization and is aligned to institutional outcomes defined in the…

  1. BODIL BEGTRUP AND THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS Individual agency, transnationalism and intergovernmentalism in early UN human rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    The article investigates the individual agency of the little studied transnational, Bodil Begtrup, in the subfields of women's and minority rights, and refugee and asylum policy. Begtrup fulfilled many roles - as state representative, expert advisor, member of the United Nations' Commission...... on the Status of Women, and president of a national NGO. This article shows how Begtrup enjoyed wide room for manoeuvre in the subfield of women's rights, and acted in this as a transnational norm entrepreneur and process entrepreneur advocating women's rights as an integral part of human rights and forging...... the change of the institutional design of the UN human rights institutions. In the subfield of minority rights, refugee and asylum policy, Begtrup acted under tight governmental control because the issue at hand was subject to national interest and domestic party politics. Her agency in the two subfields...

  2. Universal Declaration of Human Rights: English, French, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba

    OpenAIRE

    Soyinka, Wole

    2013-01-01

    PREAMBLE Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom justice and peace in the world. Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common p...

  3. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M; Ostini, Remo; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was compared with that of students in non-animal related disciplines of human medicine and arts. All students (n = 531) completed a moral reasoning test, the VetDIT, with animal and human scenarios. When compared with reasoning on human ethics issues, the combined group of students evaluating animal ethics issues showed higher levels of Universal Principles reasoning, lower levels of Personal Interest reasoning and similar levels of Maintaining Norms reasoning. Arts students showed more personal interest reasoning than students in most animal-related programs on both animal and human ethics issues, and less norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues. Medical students showed more norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues than all of the animal-related groups. There were no differences in principled reasoning on animal ethics issues between program groups. This has implications for animal-related professions and education programs showing that students' preference for principled reasoning on animal ethics issues is not unique to animal-related disciplines, and highlighting the need to develop student (and professional) capacity to apply principled reasoning to address ethics issues in animal industries to reduce the risk of moral distress.

  4. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M.; Ostini, Remo; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was compared with that of students in non-animal related disciplines of human medicine and arts. All students (n = 531) completed a moral reasoning test, the VetDIT, with animal and human scenarios. When compared with reasoning on human ethics issues, the combined group of students evaluating animal ethics issues showed higher levels of Universal Principles reasoning, lower levels of Personal Interest reasoning and similar levels of Maintaining Norms reasoning. Arts students showed more personal interest reasoning than students in most animal-related programs on both animal and human ethics issues, and less norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues. Medical students showed more norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues than all of the animal-related groups. There were no differences in principled reasoning on animal ethics issues between program groups. This has implications for animal-related professions and education programs showing that students’ preference for principled reasoning on animal ethics issues is not unique to animal-related disciplines, and highlighting the need to develop student (and professional) capacity to apply principled reasoning to address ethics issues in animal industries to reduce the risk of moral distress. PMID:26934582

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000532 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, and Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherland...ty Medical Center, Leiden, and Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherl...ands Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, and Interuniversity Cardiology...University Medical Center, Leiden, and Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of th... Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, and Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Nethe

  6. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Technology. Each of the above six NSERC-UNENE Industrial Research Chairs are tenured positions, funded at 2.0 M dollars or more for first five years. The Chairs may be subsequently renewed. A large number of graduate students are already enrolled with Professors Holt, Jiang and Pandey. In anticipation of receiving Ontario Council of Graduate Studies accreditation for the course-based M. Eng. Degree in Nuclear Engineering, the following courses have already been offered to a typical class of 20 students: Reactor Physics; Nuclear Plant Systems and Operations; Nuclear Reactor Safety Design; Thermal Hydraulics. In addition to these, courses to be offered in near future include: Engineering Risk Analysis; Reactor Chemistry and Corrosion; Nuclear Materials; Control, Instrumentation and Electrical Power Systems; Nuclear Waste Management; Fuel Management; Health Physics/Radiation Protection; Power Plant Thermodynamics; Codes, Standards and Jurisdictions; and Business Management. M.Eng. Courses are delivered in flexible format to suit distant faculty and part-time students. UNENE, an industry driven partnership of nuclear industry, universities and governments, created to address the future challenge of research, education and human resources in Canada, has made an impressive start. (author)

  7. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  8. A universal system for highly efficient cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells that eliminates interline variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Burridge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great promise for patient-specific cardiotoxicity drug testing, disease modeling, and cardiac regeneration. However, existing protocols for the differentiation of hiPSC to the cardiac lineage are inefficient and highly variable. We describe a highly efficient system for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and hiPSC to the cardiac lineage. This system eliminated the variability in cardiac differentiation capacity of a variety of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC, including hiPSC generated from CD34(+ cord blood using non-viral, non-integrating methods.We systematically and rigorously optimized >45 experimental variables to develop a universal cardiac differentiation system that produced contracting human embryoid bodies (hEB with an improved efficiency of 94.7±2.4% in an accelerated nine days from four hESC and seven hiPSC lines tested, including hiPSC derived from neonatal CD34(+ cord blood and adult fibroblasts using non-integrating episomal plasmids. This cost-effective differentiation method employed forced aggregation hEB formation in a chemically defined medium, along with staged exposure to physiological (5% oxygen, and optimized concentrations of mesodermal morphogens BMP4 and FGF2, polyvinyl alcohol, serum, and insulin. The contracting hEB derived using these methods were composed of high percentages (64-89% of cardiac troponin I(+ cells that displayed ultrastructural properties of functional cardiomyocytes and uniform electrophysiological profiles responsive to cardioactive drugs.This efficient and cost-effective universal system for cardiac differentiation of hiPSC allows a potentially unlimited production of functional cardiomyocytes suitable for application to hPSC-based drug development, cardiac disease modeling, and the future generation of clinically-safe nonviral human cardiac cells for regenerative medicine.

  9. The human power amplifier technology at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerooni, H

    1996-01-01

    A human's ability to perform physical tasks is limited by physical strength, not by intelligence. We define "extenders" as a class of robot manipulators worn by humans to augment human mechanical strength, while the wearer's intellect remains the central control system for manipulating the extender. Our research objective is to determine the ground rules for the design and control of robotic systems worn by humans through the design, construction, and control of several prototype experimental direct-drive/non-direct-drive multi-degree-of-freedom hydraulic/electric extenders. The design of extenders is different from the design of conventional robots because the extender interfaces with the human on a physical level. Two sets of force sensors measure the forces imposed on the extender by the human and by the environment (i.e., the load). The extender's compliances in response to such contact forces were designed by selecting appropriate force compensators. This paper gives a summary of some of the selected research efforts related to Extender Technology, carried out during 1980s. The references, at the end of this article, give detailed description of the research efforts.

  10. Perceptions of the Veterinary Profession among Human Health Care Students before an Inter-Professional Education Course at Midwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Show-Ridgway, Alyssa; Noah, Donald L; Appelt, Erin; Kosinski, Ross

    2017-11-03

    Conflicts among health care professionals often stem from misperceptions about each profession's role in the health care industry. These divisive tendencies impede progress in multidisciplinary collaborations to improve human, animal, and environmental health. Inter-professional education (IPE) may repair rifts between health care professions by encouraging students to share their professional identities with colleagues in unrelated health care disciplines. An online survey was conducted at Midwestern University (MWU) to identify baseline perceptions about veterinary medicine among entry-level human health care students before their enrollment in an inter-professional course. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. The survey included Likert-type scales and free-text questions. Survey participants expressed their interest in and respect for the discipline of veterinary medicine, but indicated that their unfamiliarity with the profession hindered their ability to collaborate. Twenty percent of human health care students did not know the length of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program and 27.6% were unaware that veterinarians could specialize. Although 83.2% of participants agreed that maintaining the human-animal bond is a central role of the veterinary profession, veterinary contributions to stem cell research, food and water safety, public health, environmental conservation, and the military were infrequently recognized. If IPE is to successfully pave the way for multidisciplinary collaboration, it needs to address these gaps in knowledge and broaden the definition of veterinary practice for future human health care providers.

  11. A genetic study of Factor V Leiden (G1691A) mutation in young ischemic strokes with large vessel disease in a South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadure, Ravi; Christopher, Rita; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Narayanan, Coimbatore

    2017-10-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been, by far, the most investigated gene mutation, with 26 studies to date, on its role in arterial strokes. Overall, a meta-analysis of all these studies taken together showed that carriers of the Factor V Leiden allele were 1.33times more likely to develop arterial strokes when compared to controls. We subjected a highly select subset of young strokes, with large vessel infarcts, to genetic analysis for FVL mutation and compared them with matched healthy controls to look for a statistically significant association. In this prospective study, 6/120 cases (5%) and 2/120 controls (1.6%) were positive for heterozygous FVL (G1691A) mutation. The higher prevalence of FVL mutation in cases (5%) compared to controls (1.6%) did not show statistical significance with a Pearson's Chi square P value of 0.15. The Odds Ratio (OR) for risk of large vessel disease in FVL positive cases was 3.10 (95% CI of 0.61-15.7). FVL mutation (G1691A) in young Indian subjects with ischemic strokes does not seem to be significantly associated with large vessel disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of the University in the context of Inclusive Education Policy: reflections about human resources formation and knowledge production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Glat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present text aims to discuss and present, briefly action lines about the role of University in the promotion of psicossocial and educational development of people with handicap and other special needs. Taking the framework of specialized literature, it brings different questions dealing with human resources formation, specially, teacher formation, and the production of knowledge in the area of Special Education, obtained through research and extension projects, done, preferentially, in partnership with the educational agents that work in the field. It also analyses how these actions may influence the implementation of policies regarding school, labor, and social inclusion of people with handicap and other developmental disorders.

  13. [Human remains in museums: research, preservation and communication. The experience of Turin University Museum of Anthropology and Etnography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Rosa; Grilletto, Renato; Rabino Massa, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The creation of large scientific collections has been an important development for anthropological and paleopathological research. Indeed the biological collections are irreplaceable reference systems for the biological reconstruction of past population. They also assume the important role of anthropological archives and, in the global description of man, permit the integration of historical data with those from bio-anthropolgical research. Thinking about the role of mummies and bones as scientific resources, best practice of preservation of ancient specimens should be of high priority for institution and researchers. By way of example, the authors mention their experience regarding ancient human remains preserved in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography at the University of Turin.

  14. Personnel of human anatomy department of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky as the participants of the Great Patriotic War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshkina O.Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides evidence on participation of assistants who worked at the Department of Human Anatomy of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky and took part in the Great Patriotic War.

  15. Role of International Study Experiences in the Personal and Professional Development of University Lecturers in the Humanities and Social Sciences Fields in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaowiwattanakul, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of international experience on personal and professional development of university academic staff in the Humanities and Social Sciences fields in Thailand. The participants were 23 lecturers from nine universities in Thailand. A semi-structured face-to-face interviewing method was employed. The findings reveal that…

  16. Neoliberal Universities and the Education of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Rdar M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the neoliberal impacts on higher education in Bangladesh, how market-driven policies might limit the education of arts, humanities and social sciences, and whether or not this phenomenon may have consequences for the future of democracy in the country. First, the author focuses on the privatisation of higher…

  17. Human Rights in a Pluralist, Unequal Globe: Contributions of Jesuit Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, David

    2011-01-01

    Globalization has made human rights both increasingly important as the normative standards that seek to shape the diverse religious, cultural, political, and economic interactions of the world, and also increasingly controversial in the face of the realities of cultural diversity and economic inequality. Over the past half century, hopes that…

  18. Challenges Implementing Work-Integrated Learning in Human Resource Management University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The examination of work-integrated learning (WIL) programs in the undergraduate Human Resource Management (HRM) curriculum is an area under-represented in the Australian literature. This paper identifies the challenges faced in implementing WIL into the HRM undergraduate curriculum. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 38…

  19. Congratulations or Condolences? The Role of Human Capital in the Cultivation of a University Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, John; Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Stater, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Administrative skill is essential to organizational effectiveness. Yet, few studies examine how human capital investments over a career affect selection into administration. We use panel data for economists to estimate the probability of choosing administration over a pure academic track. The results show that, while research-specific human…

  20. The Medical Humanities Effect: a Pilot Study of Pre-Health Professions Students at the University of Rochester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Clayton J; Shaw, Margie Hodges; Mooney, Christopher J; Daiss, Susan Dodge-Peters; Clark, Stephanie Brown

    2017-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative research on the impact of medical and health humanities teaching in baccalaureate education is sparse. This paper reviews recent studies of the impact of medical and health humanities coursework in pre-health professions education and describes a pilot study of baccalaureate students who completed semester-long medical humanities courses in the Division of Medical Humanities & Bioethics at the University of Rochester. The study format was an email survey. All participants were current or former baccalaureate students who had taken one or more courses in literature and narrative in medicine, bioethics, history of medicine, and/or visual arts and healthcare during the past four years. The survey gathered numerical data in several areas: demographic information, career plans, self-reported influence of coursework on educational and career plans, and self-reported influence of coursework on intellectual skills and abilities. It also gathered narrative commentary that elaborated on students' responses to the numerically-based questions. Notable findings from preliminary analysis of the data include higher scores of self-reported impact of the coursework on specific habits of mind and on preparedness for intended career rather than on gaining admission to future educational programs. Discussion of the results focuses on several potential future directions this type of study might take, including multi-center, longitudinal, and sequential approaches.

  1. [Sexual behaviour and human immunodeficiency virus testing in university students from Cuzco (Peru)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, M Paz; Ramiro, M Teresa; Teva, Inmaculada; Ramiro-Sánchez, Tamara; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    To analyse sexual behaviour, HIV testing, HIV testing intentions and reasons for not testing for HIV in university students from Cuzco (Peru). The sample comprised 1,377 university students from several institutions from Cuzco (Peru). The size of the sample was set according to a maximum 3% error estimation and a 97% confidence interval. Ages ranged from 16 to 30 years old. The data were collected through a self-administered, anonymous and voluntary questionnaire regarding sexual behaviour and HIV testing. The data were collected in classrooms during teaching hours. A higher percentage of males than females reported having had vaginal, anal and oral sex, a higher number of sexual partners and an earlier age at first vaginal and oral sex. A higher percentage of females than males did not use condoms when they first had anal sex and had a higher anal sex-risk index. Most of the participants had never been HIV tested. The main reason was that they were sure that they were not HIV infected. It seems that there was a low HIV risk perception in these participants despite the fact that they had been involved in sexual risk behaviours. Prevention campaigns focused on the general population as well as the at-risk populations and young people are needed. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  3. Development of a Centralized Human Resource Information System of Cavite State University

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey F. Papa

    2016-01-01

    This study focused in the automation and improvement of the Human Resource services. This includes managing of employees’ records, facilitating requests and processing of leave credits in accordance to the Civil Service Commission (CSC) rules and regulation, tracking the employees' performance and skills, generating reports needed, and analyzing of employee information that will help in the decision making. This also includes attendance monitoring using biometrics, calculation of ...

  4. Deepest Infrared View of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    VLT Images Progenitors of Today's Large Galaxies Summary An international team of astronomers [2] has made the deepest-ever near-infrared Ks-band image of the sky, using the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope. For this, the VLT was pointed for more than 100 hours under optimal observing conditions at the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) and obtained images in three near-infrared filters. The resulting images reveal extremely distant galaxies, which appear at infrared wavelengths, but are barely detected in the deepest optical images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Astronomer Marijn Franx from the University of Leiden and leader of the team concludes: "These results demonstrate that very deep observations in the near-infrared are essential to obtain a proper census of the earliest phases of the universe. The new VLT images have opened a new research domain which has not been observationally accessible before". The HDF-S is a tiny field on the sky in the southern constellation Tucana (The Toucan) - only about 1% of the area of the full moon. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed it with a total exposure time of about 1 week, yielding the deepest optical images ever taken of the sky, similar to those made earlier on the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N). The VLT infrared images of the same field were obtained in the course of a major research project, the Faint InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (FIRES). They were made at wavelengths up to 2.3 µm where the HST is not competitive. Ivo Labbé, another team member from the University of Leiden, is certain: "Without the unique capabilities of the VLT and ISAAC we would never have been able to observe these very remote galaxies. In fact, the image in the Ks-band is the deepest which has ever been made at that wavelength". The optical light emitted by the distant galaxies has been redshifted to the near-infrared spectral region [3]. Indeed, some of the galaxies found in the new

  5. Height preferences in humans may not be universal: evidence from the Datoga people of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokowski, P; Butovskaya, M L

    2012-09-01

    Many studies in Western societies have shown that women prefer relatively taller men as potential partners, whereas men prefer women who are slightly shorter than themselves. Here, we discuss possible limitations of previous results within the context of the stimuli used (i.e., differences in the perceived body size of female silhouettes). Our results show that, at least in a Polish sample (N=231), modified stimuli did not essentially change the observed male-taller preferences. In contrast, we report height preferences in a traditional ethnic group, the Datoga people from Tanzania (N=107), in which men and women preferred extreme sexual dimorphism in stature (SDS) sets (i.e., men and women chose women much taller or much shorter than themselves). Thus, our data do not accord with the suggestion of a universal preference for taller men, but rather suggests that height preferences may be influenced by cultural, environmental, and ecological conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathways for retaining human capital in academic departments of a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyanda Dube

    2013-07-01

    Objective: The study intends to profile knowledge assets in CHS, determine retention strategies and offer suggestions about regenerating knowledge retention initiatives. Research methodology: A quantitative approach, more specifically the informetrics technique of data mining, was adopted to profile academics in CHS at UNISA. Results: The results confirm the assertion that there is a discrepancy between senior academics who are probably due to leave the university in the next few years, and entrants who will replace them. The issue is worsened by the lack of an institutional framework to guide, standardise, strengthen or prioritise the process of knowledge retention. Conclusion: The study recommends the prioritisation, formalisation and institutionalisation of knowledge retention through the implementation of a broad range of knowledge retention strategies.

  7. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Meinardi, J. R.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Uum, S. H.; Haagsma, E. B.; van der Meer, F. J.; van Hattum, J.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Adang, R. P.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van Hoek, B.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS

  8. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis : results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Meinardi, [No Value; Vleggaar, FP; van Uum, SHM; Haagsma, EB; van der Meer, FJM; van Hattum, J; Chamuleau, RAFM; Adang, RP; Vandenbroucke, JP; van Hoek, B; Rosendaal, FR

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT), We compared 43 BCS

  9. Arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid-supplemented diet in early life reduces body weight gain, plasma lipids, and adiposity in later life in ApoE*3 Leiden mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielinga, P.Y.; Harthoorn, L.F.; Verschuren, L.; Schoemaker, M.H.; Jouni, Z.E.; Tol, E.A.F. van; Kleemann, R.; Kooistra, T.

    2012-01-01

    Scope: This study addresses whether early life arachidonic acid (ARA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/DHA (Omacor) supplementation affects body weight gain, lipid metabolism, and adipose tissue quantity and quality in later life in ApoE*3Leiden-transgenic

  10. Teaching the Transformative Agenda of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian MacNaughton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neoliberalism has dominated the world for over three decades and now permeates our laws, policies and practices at the international, national and local levels. The International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the European Union, the United States and China all support trade liberalization, privatization of public services and the primacy of markets over people. Indeed, neoliberalism has become so ingrained that it has become invisible and many of us no longer notice when new agendas conflict with international human rights laws and principles to which almost all countries in the world have committed themselves. Adopted in 1948, immediately after World War II, to implement one of the four goals of the new United Nations Organization, the norms and aspirations elaborated in the UDHR provide a framework for a radically different world than the one we have today. In this article, we revisit the content of the UDHR, beginning with the right to a social and international order in which everyone’s rights can be realized, and consider other key provisions that conflict with neoliberalism, including the rights to the benefits of science, to full employment and decent work, to progressive realization of free higher education, to nondiscrimination on the grounds of economic status and to solidarity. We also share some activities that we use in the classroom and online to make the transformative agenda of the UDHR visible to students and demonstrate how far we have strayed from the aspiration of a world in which everyone enjoys their human rights.  The article concludes that teaching a holistic vision of the UDHR in a neoliberal world is a radical human rights curriculum.

  11. Implementation of universal rapid human immunodeficiency virus screening on labor and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Stacia; Huang, Chun-Chih; Fries, Melissa; Scott, Rachel K

    2018-03-01

    A case of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV at a medical center in Washington, DC, resulted in the implementation of universal opt-out rapid testing of patients admitted for delivery. This article evaluates the policy's efficacy and implementation. We evaluated the implementation using the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. We could not evaluate decrease in MTCT rate secondary to low sample size ( n  = 3324) and no true-positive results. Patients not tested ( n  = 458) were predominately secondary to physician omission (93.7%) and were more likely to be White ( p  < 0.01) and older ( p  < 0.01). There was a negative relationship with physician omission over time. The policy was successfully implemented with decreasing proportions of patients not tested. Earlier inclusion of testing into standard admission orders and nurse-based approach may have expedited adoption. Given the low incidence of new HIV diagnosis in labor, we were unable to assess decrease in MTCT.

  12. Beyond the Letter of the Law: Accessibility, Universal Design, and Human-Centered Design in Video Tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Clossen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates how Universal and Human-Centered Design approaches can be applied to the process of library video tutorial creation in order to enhance accessibility. A series of questions that creators should consider in order to focus their design process is discussed. These questions break down various physical and cognitive limitations that users encounter, providing a framework for future video creation that is not dependent on specific software. By approaching accommodations more holistically, videos are created with accessibility in mind from their conception. Working toward the ideal of a video tutorial that is accessible to every user leads to the creation of more clearly worded, effective learning objects that are much more inclusive, making instructional concepts available to users of all abilities.

  13. Blood group AB and factor V Leiden as risk factors for pre-eclampsia: a population-based nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Leena M; Laivuori, Hannele; Rautanen, Anna; Kaaja, Risto; Kere, Juha; Krusius, Tom; Paunio, Mikko; Rasi, Vesa

    2009-06-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Its etiology is still unknown. Clinical symptoms correlate with activation of coagulation and inherited thrombophilia has been associated with pre-eclampsia. ABO blood group has been associated with thrombotic disorders and pre-eclampsia. We assessed ABO blood group, seven thrombophilia associated polymorphisms, and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies as risk factors for pre-eclampsia. We performed a population-based nested case-control study of 100,000 consecutive pregnancies in Finland. Cases and controls were identified by combining national registers and medical records were reviewed. We studied 248 cases fulfilling strict criteria for pre-eclampsia and 679 controls. Severe pre-eclampsia, early pre-eclampsia, and pre-eclampsia with intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) were analyzed separately. Blood group AB increased the risk for pre-eclampsia as a whole (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and in the three subgroups (OR 2.3, 3.8, 3.4; 95% CI 1.3-3.9, 2.0-7.1, 1.6-7.1). FV Leiden increased the risk as a whole (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.8-3.9), and in the three subgroups, although not statistically significantly. Anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies were not associated with pre-eclampsia. High body mass index, diabetes, first pregnancy, and twin pregnancy increased the risk from 1.5-fold to 8.2-fold. Our results confirm and extend the prior observation of blood group AB being a risk factor for pre-eclampsia. ABO blood group is known from all pregnant women. The value of blood group as risk factor for pre-eclampsia should be further assessed in prospective studies. In this study, FV Leiden was not statistically significant risk factor.

  14. The relationship of the factor V Leiden mutation or the deletion-deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme to postoperative thromboembolic events following total joint arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Carrie

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although all patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty are subjected to similar risk factors that predispose to thromboembolism, only a subset of patients develop this complication. The objective of this study was to determine whether a specific genetic profile is associated with a higher risk of developing a postoperative thromboembolic complication. Specifically, we examined if the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation or the deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene increased a patient's risk for postoperative thromboembolic events. The FVL mutation has been associated with an increased risk of idiopathic thromboembolism and the deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene has been associated with increased vascular tone, attenuated fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation. Methods The presence of these genetic profiles was determined for 38 patients who had a postoperative symptomatic pulmonary embolus or proximal deep venous thrombosis and 241 control patients without thrombosis using molecular biological techniques. Results The Factor V Leiden mutation was present in none of the 38 experimental patients and in 3% or 8 of the 241 controls (p = 0.26. Similarly there was no difference detected in the distribution of polymorphisms for the ACE gene with the deletion-deletion genotype present in 36% or 13 of the 38 experimental patients and in 31% or 74 of the 241 controls (p = 0.32. Conclusions Our results suggest that neither of these potentially hypercoaguable states are associated with an increased risk of symptomatic thromboembolic events following total hip or knee arthroplasty in patients receiving pharmacological thromboprophylaxis.

  15. Internet’s Affects on the Human and Communicational Capitals of the Faculty Members and the PhD and MA Students in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Montazerghaem

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Internet and other modern communication technologies have affected all aspects of the gathering, combining, and transforming knowledge, especially in scientific-educational and research organizations. These processes are parts of the whole intellectual capital in any organization. Intellectual capital is the hidden and intangible property which is oriented toward organizational goals. In the present study, I attempt to reflect on the affects internet has on some particular dimensions of intellectual capital, namely the human and the communicational, in Iran’s universities. According to the theoretical basis, it is shown that internet usage is an important factor in developing organizational intellectual capital (here, in the universities. Results show that human and communicational capitals are differently distributed in various universities. On the other hand, internet accessibility and consumption (type and quantity, as the independent variables of the study, have meaningful affects on human and communicational capitals in all universities. Furthermore, it is noteworthy to say that there are some other factors, as the ranking of the university, department, educational level (for students, and degree (for faculty members, and gender, which intervene in the process. Results show that internet usage, besides other factors as age, gender, marital status, could guide in explanation of the human and communicational capitals’ changes in the universities.

  16. Effect of Brain Drain (Human Capital Flight of Librarians on Service Delivery in Some Selected Nigerian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Chinyere Okoro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to describe and analyze the challenges occasioned by brain drain or human capital flight of librarians on service delivery in Nigerian Universities. The research adopted a descriptive survey design. A purposive sampling technique was used to select two geopolitical zones (South-South and South-West from the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria. Total enumeration was used because the population under study was considered appropriate for the research. The instrument used for data collection was questionnaire. Sixty copies of the instrument were distributed to 60 librarians in the two selected geopolitical zones. Copies of all the questionnaires were completed, retrieved, and found usable, thus giving a response rate of 100%. Survey results indicated that 315 librarians emigrated to foreign lands for various reasons, including unstable academic calendar and prospects for further training among others. This loss of personnel in the university libraries has a negative impact on service delivery as qualified information professionals and Information and Communication Technology (ICT experts are limited to mentor the younger professionals. Shift duties in academic libraries are also scaled down for lack of manpower. Based on the findings, the researchers recommend that the Federal Government of Nigeria should, as a matter of urgency, robustly fund tertiary education to enhance productivity. As they do this, the National Universities Commission (NUC is to empower academic libraries by ensuring that the staff development policy is strictly adhered to. This will translate into self-enhancement for staff, positive job attitude, and retention of professionals in the system.

  17. Environmental Waste Management in a School Hospital and in a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Lusa Manfredini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and professional activities developed in a Hospital School and a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a university can generate parallel, chemical residues from various degrees of angerousness, which may require physical treatment and / or suitable chemical, before being sent to final destination. The General Hospital (GH generates monthly 10 L of xylenes and 50 L of glutaraldehyde to provide ass instance to their patients. Already the Laboratory of Human Anatomy of University de Caxias do Sul (AL-UCS uses more than 10,000 liters for preserving corpses in tanks. The present study aims to analyze the chemical waste management of the GH and the AL-UCS and propose techniques for recovery and reuse of chemicals formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and xylenes, minimizing the impacts generated by the use, often indispensable and sometimes questionable, of such waste. So far two sets of samples were collected (in March and April 2013 of xylene, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde in the GH and also at the AL-UCS and it is intended to repeat the collections with monthly periodicity, in the next two semesters. Partial results show that, comparing the relationship of area and the medium areas of the chromatographic (in µV.s of patterns with compounds of interest, an increase in the percentage of formaldehyde relative to the samples in standard formalin (121.84% may be due to contamination with organic compounds with a retention time close to the compound of interest, the xylene was little degradation in the samples, indicating that this compound can be reused in the common procedures of healthcare institutions, with respect to glutaraldehyde significant degradation was observed for the compound in samples represents only 61.88% of the chromatographic peak area of the standard, therefore the reuse of these compounds may require the use of purification methods such as simple distillation and fractional distillation

  18. Clinical Benefit of Ablating Localized Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation: The Indiana University FIRM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M; Kalra, Vikas; Das, Mithilesh K; Jain, Rahul; Garlie, Jason B; Brewster, Jordan A; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2017-03-14

    Mounting evidence shows that localized sources maintain atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear in unselected "real-world" patients if sources drive persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LPeAF), or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF); if right atrial sites are important; and what the long-term success of source ablation is. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of rotors and focal sources in a large academic registry of consecutive patients undergoing source mapping for AF. One hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years, 79% men) with PAF (37%), PeAF (31%), or LPeAF (32%). Of these, 73 (43%) had undergone at least 1 prior ablation attempt (mean 1.9 ± 0.8; range: 1 to 4). Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) with an endocardial basket catheter was used in all cases. FIRM analysis revealed sources in the right atrium in 85% of patients (1.8 ± 1.3) and in the left atrium in 90% of patients (2.0 ± 1.3). FIRM ablation terminated AF to sinus rhythm or atrial flutter or tachycardia in 59% (PAF), 37% (PeAF), and 19% (LPeAF) of patients, with 15 of 67 terminations due to right atrial ablation. On follow-up, freedom from AF after a single FIRM procedure for the entire series was 95% (PAF), 83% (PeAF), and 82% (LPeAF) at 1 year and freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was 77% (PAF), 75% (PeAF), and 57% (LPeAF). In the Indiana University FIRM registry, FIRM-guided ablation produced high single-procedure success, mostly in patients with nonparoxysmal AF. Data from mapping, acute terminations, and outcomes strongly support the mechanistic role of biatrial rotors and focal sources in maintaining AF in diverse populations. Randomized trials of FIRM-guided ablation and mechanistic studies to determine how rotors form, progress, and regress are needed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parasitic, fungal and prion zoonoses: an expanding universe of candidates for human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akritidis, N

    2011-03-01

    Zoonotic infections have emerged as a burden for millions of people in recent years, owing to re-emerging or novel pathogens often causing outbreaks in the developing world in the presence of inadequate public health infrastructure. Among zoonotic infections, those caused by parasitic pathogens are the ones that affect millions of humans worldwide, who are also at risk of developing chronic disease. The present review discusses the global effect of protozoan pathogens such as Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma sp., and Toxoplasma sp., as well as helminthic pathogens such as Echinococcus sp., Fasciola sp., and Trichinella sp. The zoonotic aspects of agents that are not essentially zoonotic are also discussed. The review further focuses on the zoonotic dynamics of fungal pathogens and prion diseases as observed in recent years, in an evolving environment in which novel patient target groups have developed for agents that were previously considered to be obscure or of minimal significance. © 2011 The Author. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Human Papilloma Virus and HPV vaccine knowledge among Mustafa Kemal University Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Keskin Kurt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV is regarded as the main cause in the etiology of cervical cancer. The purpose of our study is to assess the knowledge of medical students about HPV vaccine and to evaluate their opinion on this subject.   Material and Method: The study population consisted of 488 medical students. The survey was composed of questions intended   to obtain information about transmission route of HPV, types of HPV, role of HPV in cervical cancer, whether HPV is treatable or not, which types of HPV the HPV vaccine prevents, the age groups HPV vaccine is administered, the opinions on HPV vaccine and sufficiency of public health, whether female students have underwent vaccination and if not what their drawbacks are.   Results: Mean age of the students participating in the study was 21±4 and 58 % of the patients were female. Out of 448 medical students, 60% of them did not know that HPV was a sexually transmitted disease. Only 55% students knew about the association of HPV with cervical cancer and 52% participants stated that HPV vaccine could not be preventive against cervical cancer. None of female students had been immunized and 67% of female students did not consider getting immunized. Among those who did not consider getting immunized, 70% said they had worries about the safety of the vaccine. Conclusion: Our study results revealed that the knowledge of medical students about HPV is satisfactory, however their knowledge about HPV vaccine, immunization status and desire to be immunized were little.

  1. How universal are human mate choices? Size does not matter when Hadza foragers are choosing a mate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sear, Rebecca; Marlowe, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    It has been argued that size matters on the human mate market: both stated preferences and mate choices have been found to be non-random with respect to height and weight. But how universal are these patterns? Most of the literature on human mating patterns is based on post-industrial societies. Much less is known about mating behaviour in more traditional societies. Here we investigate mate choice by analysing whether there is any evidence for non-random mating with respect to size and strength in a forager community, the Hadza of Tanzania. We test whether couples assort for height, weight, body mass index (BMI), per cent fat and grip strength. We test whether there is a male-taller norm. Finally, we test for an association between anthropometric variables and number of marriages. Our results show no evidence for assortative mating for height, weight, BMI or per cent fat; no evidence for a male-taller norm and no evidence that number of marriages is associated with our size variables. Hadza couples may assort positively for grip strength, but grip strength does not affect the number of marriages. Overall we conclude that, in contrast to post-industrial societies, mating appears to be random with respect to size in the Hadza. PMID:19570778

  2. CURRENT SITUATION OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN ROMANIAN PRE-UNIVERSITY EUCATION CONTEXT OF E.U. INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Claudia CORBU

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present development of human resource in the process of accession to the European Union took into account the standards proposed by the European Union, as formulated at the level of principles and objectives, the Single European Act and the Treaty on European Union, including the Treaty Amsterdam, then the sequence of documents developed by the European Commission. It is expected that documents the evolution of education and training in the European Union around concepts such as: further education, knowledge society, knowledge - skills - competitiveness, globalization, discrimination and inequality etc. Around this concept formulated a strategy for workforce training to meet European standards and to escape from captivity regional. But this process of convergent evolution of the labor force for the European market has gone from multiple realities. One of these areas, with its own legacy in terms of human resources and how to perceive its specific educational objectives proposed by Europe was Romania. Knowing one of the toughest centralized systems, the labor market was absorbing all graduates of vocational education, high school and university, after 1989, Romania was confronted with a massive disturbance of the labor market. This dimension has been linked to a certain inadequacies supply training system Romanian, which itself on the one hand, a transformation natural caused by seclusion has been maintained for several years, on the other hand, in a process of adaptation to European standards.

  3. Thirty Years of Pancreas Transplantation at Leiden University Medical Center : Long-Term Follow-Up in a Large Eurotransplant Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopp, Wouter H; Verhagen, Merel J J; Blok, Joris J; Huurman, Volkert A L; de Fijter, Johan W; de Koning, Eelco J; Putter, Hein; Baranski, Andzrej G; Schaapherder, Alexander F M; Braat, Andries E; Ringers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An overview of 30 years of pancreas transplantation at a high volume center. Analysis of patient survival- and graft survival-associated risk factors. METHODS: All pancreas transplantations performed in our center from January 1, 1984, till December 31, 2012, were evaluated. Covariates

  4. Legal capacity as a universal human right and a determinant of social status of people with mental disability

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    Marković Milan M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of the UN Convention on the Right of Persons with Disabilities (2006 brought about a core shift to how the international community and human rights law see and treat human disability in general. This paradigm shift materilizes itself in a number of provisions ranging from those which catalogue the proclaimed human rights as they are in the context of special implementation and protection of people with disabilities, to those that introduce a level of specificity in light of their holders' particular needs. But the strongest presence of the shift to this regard can be found in the Article 12 CRPD that sheds new light on the concept of (legal capacity of people with (mental disabilites. According to this norm and put quite simply - there should be no difference in observing and treating capacity of a person with disabilities to that of any other person. This is not only the matter of prohibiting discrimination on grounds of mental impairments, but furthermore preventing the system from establishing a classification in which a person with psychosocial or intellectual impairment would be a second-rate citizen, an object of law or a victim of legal, social and family abuse, someone who is a burden to his entire environment, someone who does not have a say in any case concerning his own life and wellbeing. Legal capacity should not be a goal to be fighting for, but a universal human right. Of course and unfortunatelly, such a shift is purely a formal one, when not causing due reform within the national systems and without proper implementation in the member states. What is thought urgently needed and directly required by the given provision is removing the system features that allow deprivation of legal capacity on the bases of mental impairments and introducing a humane and human rights oriented model in which the decision making of these people would be autonomous and supported, and with only very restricted exceptions, done by them and not

  5. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among voluntary counseling and testing clients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinku Y

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yohannes Sinku,1,2 Takele Gezahegn,1 Yalewayiker Gashaw,1 Meseret Workineh,1 Tekalign Deressa1 1School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, 2Diagnostic Laboratory Case Team, University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: The epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in Ethiopia varies with regions, study population, and time. Thus, timely information on HIV epidemiology is critical for the combat of the epidemic. In this study, we aim to update HIV prevalence and risk factors among voluntary counseling and testing (VCT clients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.Methods: A total of 2,120 VCT clients’ records from September 2007 to August 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Bivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant predictors. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Statistical significance was set at P-value <0.05.Results: Of 2,120 VCT clients, 363 (17.1% were seropositive for HIV. A higher rate of HIV positivity was observed among female clients (20.4% than that in male clients (14.0% (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.26–1.98, P=0.00. Widowed (95% CI 10.42–34.92, P=0.00, married (95% CI 3.42–5.94, P=0.00, divorced (95% CI 2.79–5.32, P=0.00, and illiterate (95% CI 2.33–5.47, P=0.00 clients were associated with HIV infection with the odds ratios of 19.07, 4.51, 3.85, and 3.57, respectively. Clients within the age category of 35–49 years (OR 5.03, 95% CI 3.56–7.12, P=0.00 and above the age of 50 years (OR 4.99, 95% CI 2.67–9.34, P=0.00 were more likely to be infected with HIV.Conclusion: HIV is still the major concern of public health in the Gondar area as evidenced by our data. Being female, widowed, married, illiterate, and older age were the identified risk factors for HIV infection. Thus, consideration of these factors in future intervention and

  6. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh; Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh; Aghdami, Nasser; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Baharvand, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, α-globulin, and γ-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

  7. Restoring a reputation: invoking the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights to bear on pharmaceutical pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    In public health, the issue of pharmaceutical pricing is a perennial problem. Recent high-profile examples, such as the September 2015 debacle involving Martin Shkreli and Turing Pharmaceuticals, are indicative of larger, systemic difficulties that plague the pharmaceutical industry in regards to drug pricing and the impact it yields on their reputation in the eyes of the public. For public health ethics, the issue of pharmaceutical pricing is rather crucial. Simply, individuals within a population require pharmaceuticals for disease prevention and management. In order to be effective, these pharmaceuticals must be accessibly priced. This analysis will explore the notion of corporate social responsibility in regards to pharmaceutical pricing with an aim of restoring a positive reputation upon the pharmaceutical industry in the public eye. The analysis will utilize the 2005 United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) to establish implications regarding the societal responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in a global context. To accomplish this, Article 14 of the UDBHR-social responsibility and health-will be articulated in order to advocate a viewpoint of socially responsible capitalism in which pharmaceutical companies continue as profit-making ventures, yet establish moral concern for the welfare of all their stakeholders, including the healthcare consumer.

  8. Knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV) related oral cancers among oral health professionals in university setting-A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shelly; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Squier, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Scientific literature suggests that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may be associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, knowledge regarding HPV-OSCC link among oral health professionals (OHP) has been insufficient. So, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge about HPV associated OSCC among OHP working in dental faculties in Malaysia. Ethical committee of the University approved this study. A validated, pre-tested questionnaire was sent electronically to 224 OHP. Questionnaire collected information regarding demography, knowledge about HPV-OSCC link, HPV vaccine, and willingness to educate patients about HPV OSCC link among the participants of this cross-sectional study. Data collected was analysed using "Stata/IC-13" and was summarised using descriptive statistics like frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation. Out of 179 participants, around 39% of the participant's opined virus was not a causative factor for OSCC. Around, 44% replied posterior portion of the tongue/oro-pharynx was the commonest site for HPV related OSCC, whereas 29% replied that lateral border of the tongue was the common site for HPV related OSCC. Forty one percent educated patients regarding HPV infection being a causative factor for OSCC. HPV vaccine can prevent OSCC was stated by 70% OHP. Only 12% were aware of the availability of HPV vaccine in Malaysia. Majority (99%), agreed that there is a need to offer continuing education programmes to dentists highlighting advances and preventive strategies in the fight against OSCC. Substantial increase in awareness is required among OHP regarding HPV-OSCC link.

  9. The Tedeschi collection: A collection of documented and undocumented human skeletal remains at the Museum of Anthropology, Padua University (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Nicola; Scaggion, Cinzia; Holland, Emily

    2018-04-01

    Documented and undocumented skeletal collections offer unique windows into life in the past and are integral for research in biological anthropology. The objective of this article is to describe the documented and undocumented collections curated by the Museum of Anthropology at Padua University (Italy) to demonstrate their potential for research and encourage researchers to consider them for future projects. The collection was established by Prof. Enrico Tedeschi at the beginning of 20th century, and dates to the late 19th and early 20th century. The collection consists primarily of individuals excavated from cemeteries, ossarios, or unclaimed individuals donated by hospitals or other institutions. Both documented and undocumented human skeletal remains are included in the collection, totalling 1,580 individuals. Associated documented information including age at death, date of death, sex, occupation, and cause of death is available in different combinations for 293 individuals of varying completeness (188 crania only, 93 crania and postcranial, 12 postcranial only). Origin and chronological period are known for the remaining 1,287 individuals. Overall, this little studied collection could be particularly useful for researchers interested in craniometrics, dentition, and 19th and 20th century health and demography in Italy. The documented skeletons will be especially useful for forensic anthropological research. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Theoretical and Methodological Foundations of Reverse Inclusion: The Experience of Moscow State University of Humanities and Economics

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    Bairamov V.D.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the model of “reverse inclusion” in the interconnection of sociostructural, sociocultural and spatial aspects. In addition to these aspects, the paper describes the socio-legal and socio-pedagogical foundations of the model. Along with the key category of inclusion the following categories are revealed: “disability”, “disabled person”, “social barrier”, “inclusive social strategy”, and “inclusive strategy in education”. “Reverse inclusion” is opposed to the dominant model of direct inclusion. Due to the fact that the article is of a theoretical and methodological nature, factual data play an illustrative role. The empirical base is represented by secondary data, as well as by some references to the authors’ research of 2016 conducted by the staff of the research laboratory of the Moscow State University of Humanities and Economics for purposes of vocational guidance; in this research a series of 27 in-depth interviews were carried out with students with musculoskeletal disorders studying at MSUHE.

  11. Knowledge of Saudi female university students regarding cervical cancer and acceptance of the human papilloma virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer K; Almussaed, Eman M; Fayed, Amel A; Khan, Farida H; Syed, Sadiqa B; Al-Tamimi, Tahani N; Elmorshedy, Hala N

    2014-10-01

    To assess the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer and the acceptance of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine among Saudi female students in health colleges. This cross-sectional study of a convenient sample encompassed 1400 students in Health Colleges at Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Data collected included socio-demographic data, knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and clinical presentation, Pap smear, and HPV vaccine acceptance. The questionnaire reliability as tested by Cronbach's alpha was 0.82. The response rate was 89.9%, and data analysis revealed that 95.7% of students had poor knowledge level. The Pap smear was poorly recognized as a screening tool, with 46.7% of students having heard of the test. Senior and medical students had a significantly higher knowledge score. Father's health profession, high monthly income, and presence of cervical cancer among family members or friends increased the level of knowledge. Vaccine acceptance is influenced by its price, approximately 80% of students thought that an affordable vaccine price should not exceed 300 Saudi Riyals. Perceived barriers to the vaccine were fear of injections and vaccine side effects. There is a lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding cervical cancer, Pap smear, and HPV as a major risk factor for cancer of the cervix. These data can be used as a benchmark to formulate effective awareness programs. 

  12. Procurement of Human Tissues for Research Banking in the Surgical Pathology Laboratory: Prioritization Practices at Washington University Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernock, Rebecca D.; Leach, Tracey A.; Kahn, Ajaz A.; Yip, James H.; Rossi, Joan; Pfeifer, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Academic hospitals and medical schools with research tissue repositories often derive many of their internal human specimen acquisitions from their site's surgical pathology service. Typically, such acquisitions come from appropriately consented tissue discards sampled from surgical resections. Because the practice of surgical pathology has patient care as its primary mission, competing needs for tissue inevitably arise, with the requirement to preserve adequate tissue for clinical diagnosis being paramount. A set of best-practice gross pathology guidelines are summarized here, focused on the decision for tissue banking at the time specimens are macroscopically evaluated. These reflect our collective experience at Washington University School of Medicine, and are written from the point of view of our site biorepository. The involvement of trained pathology personnel in such procurements is very important. These guidelines reflect both good surgical pathology practice (including the pathologic features characteristic of various anatomic sites) and the typical objectives of research biorepositories. The guidelines should be helpful to tissue bank directors, and others charged with the procurement of tissues for general research purposes. We believe that appreciation of these principles will facilitate the partnership between surgical pathologists and biorepository directors, and promote both good patient care and strategic, value-added banking procurements. PMID:23386925

  13. Cerebral infarction and femoral venous thrombosis detected in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis and heterozygous factor V Leiden G1691A and PAI-1 4G/5G mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroglu Kazanci, Selcen; Yesilbas, Osman; Ersoy, Melike; Kihtir, Hasan Serdar; Yildirim, Hamdi Murat; Sevketoglu, Esra

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral infarction is one of the serious neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Especially in patients who are genetically prone to thrombosis, cerebral infarction may develop due to inflammation, dehydration, and hyperviscocity secondary to DKA. A 6-year-old child with DKA is diagnosed with cerebral infarction after respiratory insufficiency, convulsion, and altered level of consciousness. Femoral and external iliac venous thrombosis also developed in a few hours after central femoral catheter had been inserted. Heterozygous type of factor V Leiden and PAI-14G/5G mutation were detected. In patients with DKA, cerebral infarction may be suspected other than cerebral edema when altered level of consciousness, convulsion, and respiratory insufficiency develop and once cerebral infarction occurs the patients should also be evaluated for factor V Leiden and PAI-14G/5G mutation analysis in addition to the other prothrombotic risk factors.

  14. The Study of Scientific Outputs Status of Faculty Members of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences Faculties of State Universities of Iran during 2000-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated scientific outputs status of faculty members of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences faculties of state universities of Iran that indexed in A&HCI and SSCI during 2000 to 2008. Descriptive and analytical method was used to conduct this research. Findings showed that Tehran University with 38/73% and then Shiraz University with 15.65% had the greatest value of scientific outputs, while in other universities the status of scientific outputs was not satisfying. Article with 76.42% was the most published format and then meeting abstract, book review, proceeding paper are next in rank . 65.65% of scientific outputs were collective and 34.34% individual. Scientific outputs development process in universities during the investigated period was ascending. Scientific outputs of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences faculties of state universities were published in167 titles and through these 135 titles (80.83% were indexed in Journal Citation Reports and among these the impact factor of 74 journals (54.81% range from 0 to 1 and the other 61 (45.18% journals’ impact factors value more than one.

  15. Wer sich den Göttern widersetzt, der stirbt jung : Untersuchung der Unvermeidbarkeit des Suizids in Die Leiden des jungen Werthers hinsichtlich der Strömung des „Sturm und Drang“

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Der Ausgang des Romans Die Leiden des Jungen Werther (1774, von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe) wird beim ersten Anblick oft als tragische Folge einer unglücklichen und unerwiderten Liebe zu Lotte angesehen. In dieser vorliegenden Arbeit wird der weit erforschten Frage der Unvermeidbarkeit des Suizids im Werk eine alternative Deutung geliefert. Diese ist außerhalb des Romans angesiedelt, und zeigt, dass der Suizid schon in der Epoche angelegt ist.

  16. Question of Drug Workers under the Prism Theory of Axel Honneth recognition . Human Right to Work and his pretension of Universal Validity

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cecília Máximo Teodoro; Sabrina Colares Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Relate the theme regarding the Theory of Recognition Axel Honnet, the human right to work as a human right to claim to universal validity, from the perspective of the Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work ILO, for purposes of setting parameters and recognition of social (re) integration of chemical class dependent workers is the main goal of this article. We will analyze the theoretical framework in which the pursuit of human dignity at work is the goal of the state to whic...

  17. The association of factor V G1961A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Bosnian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusić, Amela; Balić, Devleta; Avdić, Aldijana; Pođanin, Maja; Balić, Adem

    2018-08-01

    Aim To investigate association of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Bosnian women. Methods A total of 60 women with two or more consecutive miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation with the same partners and without history of known causes or recurrent pregnancy loss were included. A control group included 80 healthy women who had one or more successful pregnancies without history of any complication which could be associated with miscarriages. Genotyping of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms were performed by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragments length polymorphism method (PCR/RFLP). Results Both factor V Leiden and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms were significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) in Bosnian women while prothrombin G20210A and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms did not show strongly significant association. Conclusion The presence of thrombophilic polymorphisms may predispose women to recurrent pregnancy loss. Future investigation should be addressed in order to find when carriers of those mutations, polymorphisms should be treated with anticoagulant therapy. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  18. A prepared speech in front of a pre-recorded audience: subjective, physiological, and neuroendocrine responses to the Leiden Public Speaking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, P Michiel; Bokhorst, Caroline L; Miers, Anne C; Sumter, Sindy R; Kallen, Victor L; van Pelt, Johannes; Blöte, Anke W

    2009-10-01

    This study describes a new public speaking protocol for youth. The main question asked whether a speech prepared at home and given in front of a pre-recorded audience creates a condition of social-evaluative threat. Findings showed that, on average, this task elicits a moderate stress response in a community sample of 83 12- to 15-year-old adolescents. During the speech, participants reported feeling more nervous and having higher heart rate and sweatiness of the hands than at baseline or recovery. Likewise, physiological (heart rate and skin conductance) and neuroendocrine (cortisol) activity were higher during the speech than at baseline or recovery. Additionally, an anticipation effect was observed: baseline levels were higher than recovery levels for most variables. Taking the anticipation and speech response together, a substantial cortisol response was observed for 55% of participants. The findings indicate that the Leiden Public Speaking Task might be particularly suited to investigate individual differences in sensitivity to social-evaluative situations.

  19. Lower blood pressure and apathy coincide in older persons with poorer functional ability: the Discontinuation of Antihypertensive Treatment in Elderly People (DANTE) Study Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, Justine E F; Bertens, Anne Suzanne; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Smit, Roelof A J; van der Grond, Jeroen; de Craen, Anton J M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Mast, Roos C

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association between blood pressure (BP) measures and symptoms of apathy and depression in older adults with various levels of functional ability. Cross-sectional study using baseline data from the Discontinuation of Antihypertensive Treatment in Elderly people (DANTE) Study Leiden. Primary care setting, the Netherlands. Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 and older (N = 430). Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured during home visits. Symptoms of apathy and depression were assessed using the Apathy Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), respectively. Stratified linear regression was performed in participants with better and worse functional ability according to the median of the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale. In participants with lower functional ability, each 10-mmHg lower SBP, DBP, and MAP was associated with higher Apathy Scale scores (0.63, 0.92, and 0.94 points, respectively, all P < .005) but not with GDS-15 scores. In participants with higher functional ability, BP measures were not associated with Apathy Scale or GDS-15 scores. In older participants with poorer functional ability, lower BP was associated with more symptoms of apathy but not depression. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Apostolova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote.

  1. Knowledge of Saudi female university students regarding cervical cancer and acceptance of the human papilloma virus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer K.; Almussaed, Eman M.; Fayed, Amel A.; Khan, Farida H.; Syed, Sadiqa B.; Al-Tamimi, Tahani N.; Elmorshedy, Hala N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer and the acceptance of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine among Saudi female students in health colleges. Methods: This cross-sectional study of a convenient sample encompassed 1400 students in Health Colleges at Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Data collected included socio-demographic data, knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and clinical presentation, Pap smear, and HPV vaccine acceptance. The questionnaire reliability as tested by Cronbach’s alpha was 0.82. Results: The response rate was 89.9%, and data analysis revealed that 95.7% of students had poor knowledge level. The Pap smear was poorly recognized as a screening tool, with 46.7% of students having heard of the test. Senior and medical students had a significantly higher knowledge score. Father’s health profession, high monthly income, and presence of cervical cancer among family members or friends increased the level of knowledge. Vaccine acceptance is influenced by its price, approximately 80% of students thought that an affordable vaccine price should not exceed 300 Saudi Riyals. Perceived barriers to the vaccine were fear of injections and vaccine side effects. Conclusion: There is a lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding cervical cancer, Pap smear, and HPV as a major risk factor for cancer of the cervix. These data can be used as a benchmark to formulate effective awareness programs. PMID:25316467

  2. The Universal Islamic Declaration on Human Rights and the Problem of Inequalities of Rights between Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan Eslami

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Islamic Declaration on Human Rights (the UIDHR is the most important official replication to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (the UDHR by Islamic countries, and based on that, it has been attempted to provide a declaration containing the benefits of the UDHR and at the same time devoid of its faults. However, a detailed study of the UIDHR makes us uncertain in achieving these objectives. In this study, after a brief introduction of the history and development of the provisions of the UIDHR, incompatible cases with the provisions of the UDHR are reported, some inequalities of rights between men and women are recognized and arguments in favor of it are mentioned, interpreted and analyzed. It appears that the UIDHR, as an universal document, which seeks to ensure human rights, carries three major drawbacks; first, implicit approval of some of inequalities of rights between men and women based on gender and religion; second, fluid and variable interpretative sources; third, lack of sanction. These three problems have diminished the reputation of this declaration and changed it to a number of non-binding ethical recommendations. اعلامیه اسلامی حقوق بشر، مهم‌ترین پاسخ رسمی کشورهای اسلامی به اعلامیه جهانی حقوق بشر به شمار می‌رود و تلاش شده است تا بر اساس آن متنی دارای فوائد آن اعلامیه و در همان حال تهی از نقائص آن به دست داده شود. با این همه، خوانش دقیق این اعلامیه، ما را در تحقق این اهداف مردد می‌سازد. در این نوشته، پس از مقدمه‌ای کوتاه از تاریخچه شکل‌گیری و مواد این اعلامیه، مواردی که با مفاد اعلامیه جهانی حقوق بشر ناسازگار است و برخی از نابرابری‌ها را به رسمیت

  3. Atorvastatin increases HDL cholesterol by reducing CETP expression in cholesterol-fed APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, W. de; Hoogt, C.C. van der; Westerterp, M.; Hoekstra, M.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Princen, H.M.G.; Romijn, J.A.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In addition to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, statins modestly increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol in humans and decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass and activity. Our aim was to determine whether the increase in HDL depends on CETP

  4. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of the Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. (author)

  5. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS AND ITS VACCINE AMONG PHARMACY STUDENTS OF TERTIARY TEACHING UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Raghupathi Mahitha; T. S. Arunprasath

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical cancer in women can be effectively prevented by HPV vaccine. Healthcare professionals including pharmacists have a role in creating awareness about this vaccine to public. In this context, it was decided to study awareness level about HPV among pharmacy students. The aim of the study is to study the knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus and it’s vaccine among pharmacy students of tertiary teaching university hospital in South India. MATERIA...

  6. Mobility in the academic careers at the Flemish universities: Results from the Human Resources in Research database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debacker, N.; Vandevelde, K.

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide mobility of researchers is generally correlated with an enhancement of the continuous interchange of ideas and is therefore highly stimulated. Flemish universities have occasionally been criticized for providing limited career opportunities for foreign researchers. However, presently no reliable data is available on researchers’ mobility in Flanders. For the five Flemish universities a full dataset is available at the ECOOM Centre for R&D Monitoring, containing all academic appointments and PhD’s awarded since 1990-1991. This dataset allows for prospective analyses within the Flemish university system as well as retrospective analyses and provides information on international and interuniversity recruitment and academic inbreeding. The present results confirm that the academic system in Flanders is indeed recognized by a tradition of internal recruitment. However specific differences between the universities and the scientific disciplines are observed calling for a more complex study of researchers’ mobility and of the relationship between mobility and research excellence. (Author)

  7. Corporal Punishment of Children: an instance of the Challenge of Cultural Relativism and the Universality of Human Rights of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hamzeh Zeinali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Today many countries have taken measures to recognize the values, principles, rules and norms of human rights, adopting appropriate mechanisms to ensure their implementation and monitoring through a set of documents, doctrines, practices and institutions which are known as the international system of human rights. Under this system, in light of all rules of international law related to human rights, a protection system has been established which with all its principles and institutions seeks the ways to provide general public to benefit from the common global values ​​and to ensure respect for the human beings. The development of this system and consensus on the values, principles, rules and norms of human rights provide grounds for the universality of human rights which has its roots in inherent human dignity of people all over the world more than anything else. Thereupon the development of the international system of human rights of children, special protection of children in general and against acts that violate their rights in particular, has been recognized and universally accepted. This principle has been written into the constitutions of many countries but the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran is yet to integrate it. Mandatory family responsibilities, differential criminalization and passing specific penalization for behaviors that violate the rights of children, are the most important illustrations of the principle of special protection of children in public welfare, civil and criminal laws. People who are involved in the child's life the most are parents. Hence, the family is the most important factor in child protection. But can such a role and relation be considered as a justification for granting special rights and privileges to parents and other caregivers and consequently pave the way for deviating from the universal principle of prohibiting discrimination against children? Striking a balance between parental rights

  8. Las plantas vasculares de la Península Ibérica en la obra de Clusio: envíos de semillas de Sevilla a Leiden

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    Menéndez de Luarca, Luis Ramón-Laca

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Before 1575 Carolus Clusius visited Spain and Portugal, in what can be considered the first extensive botanical collection trip for the Iberian Peninsula. He published in 1576 Rariorum aliquot stirpium per Hispanias observatarum historia, mainly based on materials collected during that expedition. The content of this book was later merged with additional information to créate a more comprehensive work dealing with the whole European flora, Rariorum plantarum historiae, published in 1601. An important element in the generation of this second book was the collaboration of Simón de Tovar, from Seville, who contributed with shipments of seeds and bulbs to Clusius. Thanks to Tovar, the number of plants recorded in Rar. stirp. hispan, hist, was increased with some remarkable examples in Rar. pl. hist. It is particularly interesting to note that at that moment American plants were a great novelty and Seville was the gate for the introduction of most of them, i.e. Sprekelia formosissima (L. Herbert [• Amaryllis formosissima L.] or Psidium guajava L. A reconstruction of Clusius itinerary based on the collection localities is given in this paper. A discussion of the correspondence between both botanists, including a critical list of the plants sent to Leiden by Tovar is presented.Carolus Clusius, o sencillamente Clusio, visitó España y Portugal antes de 1575, en lo que puede considerarse la primera herborización sistemática de la Península Ibérica. En 1576 fue publicada en Amberes la obra Rariorum aliquot stirpium per Hispanias observatarum historia, basada fundamentalmente en el material colectado durante este viaje. Esta obra fue refundida posteriormente con información adicional en Rariorum plantarían historiae, publicada en 1601, que trataba de abarcar el conjunto de la flora europea. Un elemento importante en la génesis de esta segunda obra fue la colaboración del sevillano Simón de Tovar, quien contribuyó con envíos de semillas

  9. Predictive value of a profile of routine blood measurements on mortality in older persons in the general population: the Leiden 85-plus Study.

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    Anne H van Houwelingen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various questionnaires and performance tests predict mortality in older people. However, most are heterogeneous, laborious and a validated consensus index is not available yet. Since most older people are regularly monitored by laboratory tests, we compared the predictive value of a profile of seven routine laboratory measurements on mortality in older persons in the general population with other predictors of mortality; gait speed and disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Within the Leiden 85-plus Study, a prospective population-based study, we followed 562 participants aged 85 years for mortality over five years. At baseline (age 85 years high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, albumin, alanine transaminase, hemoglobin, creatinin clearance, C-reactive protein and homocysteine were measured. Participants were stratified based on their number of laboratory abnormalities (0, 1, 2-4 and 5-7. The predictive capacity was compared with gait speed (6-meter walking test and disability in IADL (Groningen Activity Restriction Scale by C-statistics. At baseline, 418 (74% 85-year old participants had at least one laboratory abnormality. All cause mortality risk increased with increasing number of laboratory abnormalities to a hazard ratio of 5.64 [95% CI 3.49-9.12] for those with 5-7 laboratory abnormalities (p<0.001 compared to those without abnormalities. The c-statistic was 0.66 [95% CI 0.59-0.69], similar to that of gait speed and disability in IADL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the general population of oldest old, the number of abnormalities in seven routine laboratory measurements predicts five-year mortality as accurately as gait speed and IADL disability.

  10. Impact of valvular heart disease on activities of daily living of nonagenarians: the Leiden 85-plus study a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmel, Thomas; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Blauw, Gerard J; Westendorp, Rudi G; Holman, Eduard R

    2010-04-01

    Data on the prevalence of valvular heart disease in very old individuals are scarce and based mostly on in-hospital series. In addition, the potential detrimental effect of valvular heart disease on the activities of daily living is unknown. The present study evaluated the prevalence of significant valvular heart disease and the impact of valvular heart disease on the activities of daily living in community dwelling nonagenarians. Nested within the Leiden 85-plus study, a population based follow-up study of the oldest old, a sample of 81 nonagenarians was recruited. The left ventricular (LV) dimensions, function and the presence and severity of heart valvular disease were evaluated by echocardiography. Significant valvular heart disease included any mitral or aortic stenosis severity, moderate or severe mitral regurgitation, moderate or severe aortic regurgitation and moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS). LV cavity diameters (end-diastolic diameter 47 +/- 8 mm, end-systolic diameter 30 +/- 8 mm) and systolic LV function (LV ejection fraction 66 +/- 13%) were within normal for the majority of the participants. Significant valvular disease was present in 57 (70%) individuals, with mitral regurgitation and aortic regurgitation as the most frequent valve diseases (49% and 28% respectively). The GARS score between individuals with and without significant valvular heart disease was similar (36.2 +/- 9.2 vs. 34.4 +/- 13.2, p = 0.5). Nonagenarian, outpatient individuals have a high prevalence of significant valvular heart disease. However, no relation was observed between the presence of significant valvular heart disease and the ability to perform activities of daily living.

  11. Evaluation of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphisms in retinopathy of prematurity in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Hatip; Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Gunay, Betul Onal; Aydin, Umeyye Taka; Karaman, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To assess Factor V Leiden (FVL) (rs6025), Prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963), MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), and MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131) gene mutations as risk factors in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A total of 105 children were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups. The study group consisted of 55 infants with a history of ROP and the control group comprised 50 healthy infants with term birth. All subjects were screened for the presence of certain mutations (FVL, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C) by Real-Time PCR at 1 year of age. The mean gestational age (GA) and birth weight (BW) of the study group were, 28.65 ± 2.85 weeks and 1171 ± 385.74 g, respectively. There were no significant differences of genotype and allele frequency of Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR A1298C and MTHFR C677T between the study and control groups (p > 0.05). Eight children (14.5 %) had heterozygous and one child (1.8%) had homozygous FVL mutation in the study group. One child (2%) in the control group had heterozygous FVL mutation. There was statistically significant differences of FVL allele and genotype frequencies between the groups (p < 0.05). The prevalence of FVL polymorphism (16.3 %) was higher in ROP patients than control subjects in this Turkish cohort. We suggest a possible association of FVL mutation with ROP at the end of the study.

  12. Effect of discontinuation of antihypertensive medication on orthostatic hypotension in older persons with mild cognitive impairment: the DANTE Study Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, Justine E F; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Grond, Jeroen; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Mast, Roos C

    2016-03-01

    University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Legal capacity as a universal human right and a determinant of social status of people with mental disability

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Milan M.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of the UN Convention on the Right of Persons with Disabilities (2006) brought about a core shift to how the international community and human rights law see and treat human disability in general. This paradigm shift materilizes itself in a number of provisions ranging from those which catalogue the proclaimed human rights as they are in the context of special implementation and protection of people with disabilities, to those that introduce a level of specificity in light of th...

  14. Organization of educational process at the department of human anatomy of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaeva I0

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human anatomy is one of the basic disciplines in the system of medical education. Knowledge in this area is necessary for the development of related theoretical subjects and constitutes a basis for studying clinical disciplines. Therefore the priority task of department of human anatomy is qualitative training of students at the modern level using classical and innovative pedagogical and computer technologies, being based on competence-based approach to training. In the article the features of organization of educational process at department of Human Anatomy of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky, within the Federal state educational standard of the 3rd generation which key differences are considered: acquisition by students of cultural and professional competences.

  15. Thrombophilic Genetic Factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A in Noncirrhotic Portal Vein Thrombosis and Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Caucasian Population

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    Mario D’Amico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A were studied as risk factors in 235 Caucasian subjects: 85 patients with abdominal thrombosis (54 with portal vein thrombosis (PVT and 31 with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma and 150 blood bank donors. Seventy-five patients with PVT/BCS showed associated disease or particular clinical status (46 PVT/29 BCS: 37 myeloproliferative neoplasm (20 PVT/17 BCS, 12 abdominal surgery (10 PVT/2 BCS, 10 contraception or pregnancy (6 PVT/4 BCS, 7 abdominal acute disease (6 PVT/1 BCS, and 9 chronic disease (4 PVT/5 BCS; ten patients did not present any association (8 PVT/2 BCS. PAI-14G-4G, MTHFR677TT, and V Leiden 506Q were significantly frequent (OR 95% CI and χ2 test with P value in abdominal thrombosis; in these patients PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT distributions deviated from that expected from a population in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (PAI-1: χ2=13.8, P<0.001; MTHFR677: χ2=7.1, P<0.01, whereas the equilibrium was respected in healthy controls. V Leiden Q506 and Prothrombin 20210A were in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium both in patients with abdominal thrombosis and healthy controls. Our study shows an important role of PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT in abdominal thrombosis without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Postgraduate fellows as teaching assistants in human anatomy: an experimental teaching model at a Chinese research university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao; Wang, Lin; Guo, Kaihua; Liu, Shu; Li, Feng; Chu, Guoliang; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Postgraduate fellowship training programs are expanding at Chinese universities. This growing cadre of advanced trainees calls for the development of new learning and training models wherein postgraduate fellows have an ample opportunity to teach more junior learners, thereby expanding their own knowledge base and competitiveness for future employment. Educational reform at Sun Yat-Sen University has recently allowed postgraduate fellows to act as teaching assistants for undergraduate anatomy courses. This model is common in western countries but is novel in China. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. The Role of Education in Upholding the Development of Human Rights Regimes: The Case of the Palestinian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuibat, Mohammad; Abu Samra, Mahmoud; Shuibat, Nida

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a historical background of the Palestinian education. It outlines a theoretical basis for the development of Human Rights Regimes. The paper tackles the views of some philosophers like Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant who laid down the foundations for the development of Human Rights Regimes. The paper illustrates that Human…

  18. Human resources needs for universal access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a time and motion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontelez, J.A.C.; Newell, M.L.; Bland, R.M.; Munnelly, K.; Lessells, R.J.; Barnighausen, T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although access to life-saving treatment for patients infected with HIV patients in South Africa has improved substantially since 2004, treating all eligible patients (universal access) remains elusive. As the prices of antiretroviral drugs have dropped over the past years,

  19. Discursive Mechanisms and Human Agency in Language Policy Formation: Negotiating Bilingualism and Parallel Language Use at a Swedish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källkvist, Marie; Hult, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the enactment of Sweden's Language Act in 2009 and in the face of the growing presence of English, Swedish universities have been called upon by the Swedish Higher Education Authority to craft their own language policy documents. This study focuses on the discursive negotiation of institutional bilingualism by a language policy…

  20. South African Universities and Human Development: Towards a Theorisation and Operationalisation of Professional Capabilities for Poverty Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie; McLean, Monica; Dison, Arona; Peppin-Vaughan, Rosie

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project investigating the role of universities in South Africa in contributing to poverty reduction through the quality of their professional education programmes. The focus here is on theorising and the early operationalisation of multi-layered, multi-dimensional transformation based on ideas from Amartya Sen's…

  1. The Role of the Theological Ethical Task Force in the University of Minnesota Program in Human Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Wilson

    1976-01-01

    Describes the evolution of the Committee on Religion and Ethics, an interdisciplinary committee of theological and medical professors at the University of Minnesota. Its Sexual Attitude Reassessment seminars are the subject of much controversy. This article explains the purpose of the seminars. (HMV)

  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV infection and vaccines: Knowledge, attitude and perception among female students at the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Chigozie Makwe

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The knowledge of and the perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and HPV-related diseases among female students in the University of Lagos were generally low. The need for a well-designed HPV-educational program to bridge the knowledge gap cannot be overemphasized.

  3. Managing the Risky Humanity of Academic Workers: Risk and Reciprocity in University Work-Life Balance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Randell-Moon, Holly

    2015-01-01

    University work-life balance policies increasingly offer academic workers a range of possible options for managing the competing demands of work, family, and community obligations. Flexible work arrangements, family-friendly hours and campus facilities, physical well-being and mental health programs typify strategies for formally acknowledging the…

  4. Kyoto University-National Taiwan University International Symposium "Social Cognitive Biology on Representation of Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Sponsored by Kyoto University, National Taiwan University; Cosponsored by Unit for Advanced Studies of the Human Mind, Kyoto University, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Supported by Supporting Program for InteRaction-based Initiative Team Studies (SPIRITS), Kyoto University

  5. A study of the relationship between variables from the model of human occupation and subjective well-being among university students in jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farzaneh; Jibril, Musa; Kielhofner, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The occupational role of a university student can create challenges that negatively affect subjective well-being. Cultural factors can make these problems particularly acute for students from Arab backgrounds. This study examined the relationship between variables derived from the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) and Jordanian university students' subjective well-being. Using cluster sampling, a total of 670 participants were recruited from the undergraduate student body at the University of Jordan. Data were collected from these students using the Role checklist, the Occupational Self-Assessment, the Affectometer 2, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. As hypothesized, reported roles, valuation of roles, perceived competence in volition, habituation, performance capacity/skills, and the environment were significantly correlated with subjective well-being. A discriminant analysis using the most strongly correlated items significantly classified students into known groups of high and low subjective well-being. Overall, MOHO-based variables offered an effective explanation of factors that influence subjective well-being in Jordanian university students.

  6. Question of Drug Workers under the Prism Theory of Axel Honneth recognition . Human Right to Work and his pretension of Universal Validity

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    Maria Cecília Máximo Teodoro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Relate the theme regarding the Theory of Recognition Axel Honnet, the human right to work as a human right to claim to universal validity, from the perspective of the Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work ILO, for purposes of setting parameters and recognition of social (re integration of chemical class dependent workers is the main goal of this article. We will analyze the theoretical framework in which the pursuit of human dignity at work is the goal of the state to which we treat below the dignity of man as a right whose claim to universal validity is based on the recognition of the theory of Axel Honneth . That said, we analyze the possible dignity of man at work in a global context from the recognition of new rights, especially with regard to the category of workers who occupy the social portion of chemical-dependent, whose participation in the social process is prevented, creating a category of workers socially excluded, which is intended to overcome.

  7. The Implementation of the Idea in Development of Future Specialists Professional Mobility in the Practice-Oriented Training in the Izmail State University for Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iaroslav Kichuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The European integration processes in the Ukrainian educational field actualized practiceoriented training of students aimed at the implementation of such principles as the mobility of educational space parties, the attractiveness of educational services, employment opportunities. In this context Izmail State University for Humanities initiates interactive forms of participation in international programmes of such projects TEMPUS-TACIS as «Сreation of All-Ukrainian System of Regional Advisory Items ECNS» and «Development of Strategy of Ukrainian Students International Mobility within the Framework of ECNS».

  8. The expanding universe of cohesin functions: a new genome stability caretaker involved in human disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Menga, Stefania; Musio, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Cohesin is responsible for sister chromatid cohesion, ensuring the correct chromosome segregation. Beyond this role, cohesin and regulatory cohesin genes seem to play a role in preserving genome stability and gene transcription regulation. DNA damage is thought to be a major culprit for many human diseases, including cancer. Our present knowledge of the molecular basis underlying genome instability is extremely limited. Mutations in cohesin genes cause human diseases such as Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia, and all the cell lines derived from affected patients show genome instability. Cohesin mutations have also been identified in colorectal cancer. Here, we will discuss the human disorders caused by alterations of cohesin function, with emphasis on the emerging role of cohesin as a genome stability caretaker.

  9. [Study of work accidents related to human body fluids exposure among health workers at a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Ana Cristina; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2006-01-01

    This descriptive and exploratory study from a quantitative approach aimed to characterize workers who were victims of work accidents related to human body fluids exposure and to evaluate the accident victim care protocol. The population consisted of 48 workers who were victims of work accidents involving exposure to human body fluids, from July 2000 to June 2001. Data were collected through a form and interviews. Results showed that nursing workers presented higher accident risk levels and that 87.50% involved piercing and cutting material, such as needles and butterflies (70%). As to the accident-related situation/activity, the workers indicated that 25% were due to an "inadequate act during the procedure"; 19.64% mentioned that "it happened" and 29.17% answered that they did not have any suggestion. This study provided important tools to review and elaborate strategies to prevent accidents involving exposure to human body fluids.

  10. C. Walker-Said and J. D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whelan, Glen

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Charlotte Walker-Said and John D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp.......Book review of: Charlotte Walker-Said and John D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp....

  11. The Importance of Human Needs during Retrospective Peacetime and the Persian Gulf War: University Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Tang, Theresa Li-Na

    The importance of human needs during the retrospective peacetime in 1990 and the Persian Gulf War in 1991 was examined among 564 college students in the United States. Results of factor analyses showed that during peacetime, two factors (higher-order and lower-order needs) were identified. During the war, all needs were rated as more important and…

  12. Trends Affecting Ohio State University Extension in the 21st Century and the Implications for Human Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Graham R.; Ferrari, Theresa M.; Chen, Claire Yueh-Ti

    2012-01-01

    Research with a diverse array of organizations in the public and private sectors has documented a common set of trends affecting organizations and their human capital in the 21st century. Similar trends have been identified as important for Extension organizations and the Cooperative Extension System. It is important to determine if such trends…

  13. Effect of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination among Pre-University Students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang, Ng Beng; Mahayudin, Tasneem; Yien, Hii Ling; Abdul Karim, Abdul Kadir; Teik, Chew Kah; Shan, Lim Pei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Studies evaluating the effect of health education on knowledge and perception of cervical cancer have generated conflicting results. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of educational intervention towards knowledge of HPV vacccination for cervical cancer prevention among pre-university students in Malaysia. This was an experimental before and after study performed between October 2014 and March 2015. Five hundred and eighty students were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. All were required to complete both pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaires. Those in the intervention group were given an information leaflet to read before answering the post-intervention questionnaire. Almost half (48.3%) of the students had poor knowledge, with a score less than 5, and only 51 (8.8%) exhibited good knowledge, with a score of 11 and above. After educational intervention, the number of students with poor knowledge was reduced to 177 (29.3%) and the number of students who exhibited good knowledge increased to 148 (25.5%). Students from the intervention group demonstrated significant higher total scores in knowledge regarding 'HPV infection and cervical cancer' (p=0.000) and 'HPV vaccination and cervical cancer prevention' (p=0.000) during post-intervention as compared to the control group. Knowledge on HPV infection and vaccination is low among pre-university students. Educational intervention in the form of information leaflets appears effective in creating awareness and improving knowledge.

  14. Identification and Assessment of Human Errors in Postgraduate Endodontic Students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences by Using the SHERPA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Dastaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human errors are the cause of many accidents, including industrial and medical, therefore finding out an approach for identifying and reducing them is very important. Since no study has been done about human errors in the dental field, this study aimed to identify and assess human errors in postgraduate endodontic students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences by using the SHERPA Method. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed during year 2014. Data was collected using task observation and interviewing postgraduate endodontic students. Overall, 10 critical tasks, which were most likely to cause harm to patients were determined. Next, Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA was conducted and human errors in each task were identified by the Systematic Human Error Reduction Prediction Approach (SHERPA technique worksheets. Results: After analyzing the SHERPA worksheets, 90 human errors were identified including (67.7% action errors, (13.3% checking errors, (8.8% selection errors, (5.5% retrieval errors and (4.4% communication errors. As a result, most of them were action errors and less of them were communication errors. Conclusions: The results of the study showed that the highest percentage of errors and the highest level of risk were associated with action errors, therefore, to reduce the occurrence of such errors and limit their consequences, control measures including periodical training of work procedures, providing work check-lists, development of guidelines and establishment of a systematic and standardized reporting system, should be put in place. Regarding the results of this study, the control of recovery errors with the highest percentage of undesirable risk and action errors with the highest frequency of errors should be in the priority of control

  15. Human security and the quest for peace in the Middle East, 24 October 2006, University of Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M

    2006-10-24

    In his talk about 'Human Security And The Quest For Peace In The Middle East' Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, first looked at the international security landscape and then focused on the Middle East as a case in point. According to a recent report on human security, there has been a sharp decline since the early 1990s in civil wars and other forms of armed conflict. The number of refugees has also gone down, and human rights abuses have decreased. These statistics indicate that the world is becoming more peaceful. Yet at the same time, the collective sense of insecurity is higher than at any time before, because the forces that drive insecurity remain persistent and pervasive. These drivers of insecurity fit into four categories: poverty (poverty-related insecurities, for the billions who lack access to reliable food supplies, safe drinking water, adequate health care, and modern energy supplies), the lack of good governance, the sense of injustice (resulting from the imbalance between the 'haves' and the 'have nots' and the artificial polarization along religious or ethnic lines. The modern age demands that we think in terms of human security - a concept of security that is people centered and without borders. A concept that acknowledges the inherent linkages between economic and social development, respect for human rights, and peace. This is the basis on which we must 're-engineer' security. UN bodies have succeeded in setting norms and overseeing many important aspects of our life - such as labour relations, global health, civil aviation, food and agriculture, and trade. Despite these achievements, however the system often fails short in addressing threats to international peace and security. To understand the urgency of reforming our system for maintaining international peace and security, we must also look critically at situations where it has not been able to adequately fulfill its function. Three aspects in that regard are to be

  16. Human security and the quest for peace in the Middle East, 24 October 2006, University of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    In his talk about 'Human Security And The Quest For Peace In The Middle East' Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, first looked at the international security landscape and then focused on the Middle East as a case in point. According to a recent report on human security, there has been a sharp decline since the early 1990s in civil wars and other forms of armed conflict. The number of refugees has also gone down, and human rights abuses have decreased. These statistics indicate that the world is becoming more peaceful. Yet at the same time, the collective sense of insecurity is higher than at any time before, because the forces that drive insecurity remain persistent and pervasive. These drivers of insecurity fit into four categories: poverty (poverty-related insecurities, for the billions who lack access to reliable food supplies, safe drinking water, adequate health care, and modern energy supplies), the lack of good governance, the sense of injustice (resulting from the imbalance between the 'haves' and the 'have nots' and the artificial polarization along religious or ethnic lines. The modern age demands that we think in terms of human security - a concept of security that is people centered and without borders. A concept that acknowledges the inherent linkages between economic and social development, respect for human rights, and peace. This is the basis on which we must 're-engineer' security. UN bodies have succeeded in setting norms and overseeing many important aspects of our life - such as labour relations, global health, civil aviation, food and agriculture, and trade. Despite these achievements, however the system often fails short in addressing threats to international peace and security. To understand the urgency of reforming our system for maintaining international peace and security, we must also look critically at situations where it has not been able to adequately fulfill its function. Three aspects in that regard are to be

  17. Determination of knowledge levels, attitude and behaviors of female university students concerning cervical cancer, human papiloma virus and its vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yörük, Selda; Açıkgöz, Ayla; Ergör, Gül

    2016-08-03

    The purpose of the study is to investigate knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccine of female students studying at a university in a health related department and explore variables affecting taking the vaccine. The research group consists of female students attending a health related department in Balıkesir University. The data of this cross-sectional research was collected via surveys. The average total knowledge score of the students concerning risks, symptoms and screening methods of cervical cancer and HPV vaccines was 14.15 ± 6.7. The HPV knowledge score of the students attending the faculty of medicine was higher compared to the students attending other departments and their HPV vaccine knowledge score was higher compared to the students attending nursing and paramedics students. The HPV vaccine knowledge score of the students attending the department of midwifery was significantly higher compared to other students. Only 0.9 % of the students took the vaccine. One third of the students who did not take the vaccine did not know that the vaccine was available in our country. In terms of the department that they attended, the students with a higher total knowledge score compared to the average (OR:1.5) and students with history of cancer in their families (OR:1.6) were more likely to consider taking the vaccine. Research group's knowledge on risk factors of cervical cancer, Pap smear test, symptoms and prevention ways of cancer, HPV and HPV vaccine was low.

  18. The "GeneTrustee": a universal identification system that ensures privacy and confidentiality for human genetic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Leslie; Barlow-Stewart, Kris; Proos, Anné L; Aizenberg, Harry

    2003-05-01

    This article describes a generic model for access to samples and information in human genetic databases. The model utilises a "GeneTrustee", a third-party intermediary independent of the subjects and of the investigators or database custodians. The GeneTrustee model has been implemented successfully in various community genetics screening programs and has facilitated research access to genetic databases while protecting the privacy and confidentiality of research subjects. The GeneTrustee model could also be applied to various types of non-conventional genetic databases, including neonatal screening Guthrie card collections, and to forensic DNA samples.

  19. Pre-implementation studies of a workforce planning tool for nurse staffing and human resource management in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Ubbink, Dirk T; Mens, Marian A; Pompe, Edwin A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the reliability, validity and feasibility of the RAFAELA workforce planning system (including the Oulu patient classification system - OPCq), before deciding on implementation in Dutch hospitals. The complexity of care, budgetary restraints and demand for high-quality patient care have ignited the need for transparent hospital workforce planning. Nurses from 12 wards of two university hospitals were trained to test the reliability of the OPCq by investigating the absolute agreement of nursing care intensity (NCI) measurements among nurses. Validity was tested by assessing whether optimal NCI/nurse ratio, as calculated by a regression analysis in RAFAELA, was realistic. System feasibility was investigated through a questionnaire among all nurses involved. Almost 67 000 NCI measurements were performed between December 2013 and June 2014. Agreement using the OPCq varied between 38% and 91%. For only 1 in 12 wards was the optimal NCI area calculated judged as valid. Although the majority of respondents was positive about the applicability and user-friendliness, RAFAELA was not accepted as useful workforce planning system. Nurses' performance using the RAFAELA system did not warrant its implementation. Hospital managers should first focus on enlarging the readiness of nurses regarding the implementation of a workforce planning system. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Epidemiological profile of 290 cases of human cystic echinococcosis diagnosed in the Mustapha University Hospital (Algiers) from 2006 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zait, H; Achir, I; Guerchani, M K; Hamrioui, B

    2013-10-01

    This study reports a series of 290 cases of hydatidosis confirmed by the surgery and/or the imagery with a positive immuno-diagnosis collected between 1st January 2006 and 31 March 2011 at parasitology-mycology laboratory of hospital university center of Mustapha of Algiers. Our aim is to specify, through the listed cases, the epidemiological aspects of this affection and compared with those obtained in two previous Algerian epidemiological investigations carried out, between 1963-1964 and 1966-1975. It is a retrospective (2006-2008) and prospective (2008-2011) study. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by the direct macroscopic and/or microscopic identification of the parasite and indirect diagnosis based on four techniques: passive hemagglutination, Elisa IgG "Echinococcus granulosus", Western Blot IgG "Echinococcus" and electrophoresis. The study shows that this affection is still prerogative of the young adult. It bring out also in this study that the child of school age (ten years), in particular the boy, pays a heavy tribute. At the child, the preferential pulmonary seat of the hydatic disease is not devoid of risk. At adult, this parasitic disease mainly affect the active woman. Generally, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics join the endemic countries data and confirmed the row of our country among them. The transmission seems as strong as in the past, in spite of a much better social educational level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Seroprevalence of human papillomavirus immunoglobulin G antibodies among women presenting at the reproductive health clinic of a university teaching hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminu M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available M Aminu,1 JZ Gwafan,1 HI Inabo,1 AO Oguntayo,2 EE Ella,1 AK Koledade21Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ahmadu Bello University, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, NigeriaBackground: Human papillomavirus (HPV is the cause of 90%–95% of squamous cell cancers. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV can lead to development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in 5%–10% of infected women, and can progress to invasive cervical cancer 15–20 years later. This study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of HPV immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies among women of reproductive age attending a reproductive health clinic at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria.Methods: The study was descriptive, cross-sectional, and experimental, combining the use of a structured questionnaire and analysis of serum samples obtained from 350 consecutive consenting women. The serum samples were analyzed for IgG antibodies to HPV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: We found a seroprevalence of 42.9% (150/350 for IgG antibodies to HPV in these women. Women aged 45–49 years and those who had their sexual debut aged 20–23 years had the highest HPV seroprevalence, ie, 50% (57/114 and 51.1% (46/90, respectively. Presence of antibodies varied according to sociodemographic factors, but was significantly associated with educational status, tribe, and religion (P<0.05. Human papillomavirus infection was not significantly associated with the reproductive characteristics and sexual behavior of the women. Antibodies to HPV were detected in 50.0% (9/18 of women with a family history of cervical cancer and in 30.8% (4/13 of those with a history or signs of WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, myelokathexis syndrome as a genetic disorder (P>0.05.Conclusion: Further studies are needed to determine the HPV serotypes and evaluate the risk of natural development

  2. Availability and Quantity of Human and Material Resources of Nigerian Universities' HIV Youth Friendly Centres: Implication for Policy Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Akintomide

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the availability and quality of human and material resources at the Campus-based Youth Friendly Centres in Southwestern Nigeria. The survey research design was adopted and the study was carried out among ten counsellors and centre coordinators of Youth Friendly Centres in four higher institutions of learning in Southwest Nigeria using interview guide and observation checklist to collect data. The result revealed that there were no enough counsellors at the YFCs and some of the counsellors available at the centres did not have enough qualification to render HIV counselling. It was also revealed that material resources were moderately available at most of the centres but not up to the require standard stipulated by the World Health Organization.

  3. Attitudes, knowledge and risky practices facing with the human inmunodeficiency virus between the university population of Chontales (Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando López-Noguero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a study between the university population of Centro Regional Chontales in Universidad Nacional Autónoma of Nicaragua is presented. The attitudes facing with the HIV are analyzed and the knowledge that the lecturers and students have about this topic, also the risky practices that they usually realize.Method:Only one ad hoc questionnaire was used with questions about sexual orientation, sexual habits and birth control, knowledge about HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, attitudes, perceptions and risky practices. A proportional stratified sampling was used to select the samples. Descriptive analysis (percentage, correlation analysis (correlation coefficient and contrast of the non-parametric hypothesis bymeans of the correlation coefficient test. Results: Fromthe analysis realized we can deduce that there is still a lack of awareness about the transmission routes of the disease (just the 14,57 % of the students and the 8,43 % of the lecturers knows that the spread is possible by blood transfusion in certain conditions. There are problems by means of attitudes and risky practices (almost the 59 % of the students states that they do not use any type of birth control in their sexual relations also the persistency of social discrimination elements (almost the 42%of the students states that theywould not livewith a person with AIDS or they say that they do not know if they would do it or not due to fear of transmission.Conclusions: It has been considered necessary to develop social and educational initiatives of healthy promotion in this environment, a multisectorial questions approach facing with the HIV, where the social and educational has a prevailing place

  4. Human immuno-deficiency virus antibody seroprevalence among pregnant women at booking at a university teaching hospital in South-Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeudo, C; Ezem, B U; Ojiyi, E C

    2012-01-01

    In Africa, human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to be progressively feminized. This has led to an increase in the number of paediatric HIV infections reported due to increased risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV during pregnancy, labour and breastfeeding. The objective of the study was to determine the HIV positive sero-prevalence at booking among pregnant women at the Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu. A retrospective analysis of the case records of women who booked and were screened for Human Immune-deficiency Virus at the Imo State University Teaching Hospital (IMSUTH), Orlu from 1st March 2008 to 28th February 2010 was done. Data on age, parity, educational status, gestational age at booking, and retroviral status were collected and analysed using spss version 13. Nine hundred and twenty one pregnant women were screened for the presence of HIV 1 & 2 antibodies in their serum. One hundred and six of them were positive, giving a sero-prevalence rate at booking of 11.5%. The highest sero prevalence rate of 45.2% occurred in the age group of 26-30 years. Petty traders contributed 97 (91.5%) of the HIV positive women, while multiparous (para 2-4) women contributed 50% of the positive pregnant women. Only 32 (30.2%) of the HIV positive women booked within the first trimester for antenatal care. Majority 53 (59.4%) of the HIV positive women had secondary education, while those that had no formal education contributed only 6 (5.7%) of the HIV positive women. There was a high HIV seroprevalence at booking among pregnant women at IMSUTH, Orlu. A lot more needs to be done in order to reduce vertical transmission of HIV in our environment.

  5. The Study of Relationship Religious Orientation and Disposition Critical Thinking with Coping Strategies with Stress in Girl Students of Faculty of Humanity of Yazd University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Alavi Langroody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction :the enjoyment of the religious belief and the idea of mental disorders and important role in reducing stress. So this study investigated the relationship between religious orientation and inclination to think critically and Coping with Stress in the Faculty of Humanities graduate students of Yazd University was conducted. Method: statistical community research includes 1617 students graduate from the University of Yazd, which according to Morgan- Krejci Table  the number of 300 students of faculty of humanity for example, chosen with equally classification random sampling method. to measure the research variables we used Allport religious oriented questionnaire, Ricketts questionnaire of disposition critical thinking and the coping Inventory for Stressful Situations of Andler and Parker. Data analysis using Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis . Results: first between internal religious orientation and second between external religious orientation with problem focused coping style and also observed a positive and medium correlation between disposition critical thinking and problem-focused coping style in students. Among the factors of disposition critical thinking, there was a significant and positive correlation between innovation and mental maturity factors with problem-focused ciping style, and mental occupation factor first with problem-focused coping style and then with avoidant coping style and in reverse there was a significant negative correlation between mental factor with avoidant and emotional coping styles. among five anticipant variables, respectively, there was a direct relationship between mental occupation, internal and external religious orientations in anticipation of problem-focused coping style, a reverse relationship between internal religious orientations and mental maturity in anticipation of emotional coping style, a direct relationship between external religious

  6. A universal model for predicting human migration under climate change: examining future sea level rise in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel Davis, Kyle; Bhattachan, Abinash; D’Odorico, Paolo; Suweis, Samir

    2018-06-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the habitability of many places around the world in significant and unprecedented ways in the coming decades. While previous studies have provided estimates of populations potentially exposed to various climate impacts, little work has been done to assess the number of people that may actually be displaced or where they will choose to go. Here we modify a diffusion-based model of human mobility in combination with population, geographic, and climatic data to estimate the sources, destinations, and flux of potential migrants as driven by sea level rise (SLR) in Bangladesh in the years 2050 and 2100. Using only maps of population and elevation, we predict that 0.9 million people (by year 2050) to 2.1 million people (by year 2100) could be displaced by direct inundation and that almost all of this movement will occur locally within the southern half of the country. We also find that destination locations should anticipate substantial additional demands on jobs (594 000), housing (197 000), and food (783 × 109 calories) by mid-century as a result of those displaced by SLR. By linking the sources of migrants displaced by SLR with their likely destinations, we demonstrate an effective approach for predicting climate-driven migrant flows, especially in data-limited settings.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination for adolescent girls in Punjab state: Implications for India's universal immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Faujdar, Dharmjeet Singh; Jyani, Gaurav; Srinivasan, Radhika; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Suri, Vanita; Singh, Mini P; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    Introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for adolescent girls is being considered in the Punjab state of India. However, evidence regarding cost-effectiveness is sought by policy makers when making this decision. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained with introduction of the HPV vaccine compared with a no-vaccination scenario. A static progression model, using a combination of decision tree and Markov models, was populated using epidemiological, cost, coverage, and effectiveness data to determine the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Using a societal perspective, lifetime costs and consequences (in terms of QALYs) among a cohort of 11-year-old adolescent girls in Punjab state were modeled in 2 alternate scenarios with and without vaccination. All costs and consequences were discounted at a rate of 3%. Although immunizing 1 year's cohort of 11-year-old girls in Punjab state costs Indian National Rupees (INR) 135 million (US dollars [USD] 2.08 million and International dollars [Int$] 6.25 million) on an absolute basis, its net cost after accounting for treatment savings is INR 38 million (USD 0.58 million and Int$ 1.76 million). Incremental cost per QALY gained for HPV vaccination was found to be INR 73 (USD 1.12 and Int$ 3.38). Given all the data uncertainties, there is a 90% probability for the vaccination strategy to be cost-effective in Punjab state at a willingness-to-pay threshold of INR 10,000, which is less than one-tenth of the per capita gross domestic product. HPV vaccination appears to be a very cost-effective strategy for Punjab state, and is likely to be cost-effective for other Indian states. Cancer 2017;123:3253-60. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  9. Talent Management for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  10. Molecularly imprinted microspheres synthesized by a simple, fast, and universal suspension polymerization for selective extraction of the topical anesthetic benzocaine in human serum and fish tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Lai, Jia-Ping; Chen, Fang; Zhu, De-Rong

    2015-02-01

    A simple, fast, and universal suspension polymerization method was used to synthesize the molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) for the topical anesthetic benzocaine (BZC). The desired diameter (10-20 μm) and uniform morphology of the MIMs were obtained easily by changing one or more of the synthesis conditions, including type and amount of surfactant, stirring rate, and ratio of organic to water phase. The MIMs obtained were used as a molecular-imprinting solid-phase-extraction (MISPE) material for extraction of BZC in human serum and fish tissues. The MISPE results revealed that the BZC in these biosamples could be enriched effectively after the MISPE operation. The recoveries of BZC on MIMs cartridges were higher than 90% (n = 3). Finally, an MISPE-HPLC method with UV detection was developed for highly selective extraction and fast detection of trace BZC in human serum and fish tissues. The developed method could also be used for the enrichment and detection of BZC in other complex biosamples.

  11. Imaginary on International Migrants’ Human Rights in the Legal System: Some Limitations to the Principle of Universality in the Case of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahí Patricia González

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze social representations of members of the legal system about human rights of international immigrants arrived to Argentina in the second half of 20th century. A qualitative methodological strategy was implemented; semistructured interviews to members of the legal institution of Buenos Aires metropolitan area were used. The interviews were transcribed and processed with qualitative criteria by implementing the Strauss and Corbin's (2002 methodology. This article analyses two relevant dimensions: citizens’ rights and migration policies. Among the main findings in the discourse of the subjects interviewed, it can be said that negative social representations about foreign people and their arrival to the country prevail. Even though there is a gradient of opinions whose extremes meet. On the one hand, there are those affirming equality (formal in the access to all rights for native and migrant population. On the other hand, there are those who propose the priority of access to these rights for native subjects. The principle of universality from a human rights perspective is dwarfed when compared to the position of those who consider the migration control, the restriction of the arrival of migrants, and the closure of national borders as essential

  12. The history and composition of the Raymond A. Dart Collection of Human Skeletons at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Manisha R; Kegley, Anthony D T; Strkalj, Goran; Bidmos, Mubarak A; Kuykendall, Kevin L

    2009-10-01

    The Raymond A. Dart Collection of Human Skeletons (Dart Collection) is housed in the School of Anatomical Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, and comprises one of the largest documented cadaver-derived human skeletal assemblages in the world. This collection originated in the early 1920s as a result of the efforts of Raymond Dart and continues to grow. The skeletons included represent varied indigenous and immigrant populations from southern Africa, Europe and Asia. This contribution documents the history of the collection and provides an updated inventory and demographic assessment of this valuable research collection. According to a recent inventory the Dart Collection currently comprises 2,605 skeletons representing individuals from regional SA African (76%), White (15%), Coloured (4%) and Indian (0.3%) populations. A large proportion of the skeletons (71%) represent males. The recorded ages at death range from the first year to over 100 years of age, but the majority of individuals died between the ages of 20 and 70. The Dart Collection has been affected by collection procedures based on availability. All of the cadavers collected before 1958, and large proportions subsequently, were derived from unclaimed bodies in regional South African hospitals. Some details of documentation (age at death, population group) are estimates and some aspects of the collection demographics (sex ratios) do not closely reflect any living South African population. Our inventory and analysis of the Dart Collection is aimed to assist researchers planning research on the materials from this collection.

  13. Biophysico-functional compatibility of Seoul National University (SNU) miniature pig cornea as xenocorneal graft for the use of human clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jaeyoung; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang

    2016-05-01

    Xenocorneal transplantation is one of the solutions for shortage of donor cornea, and remarkable advances have been made in pig-to-rhesus studies from the immunological perspective. Most successful preclinical trials have been carried out with corneas of the Seoul National University (SNU) miniature pig (SNU pig, genetically unmodified) as donor tissues; however, there has been no biophysico-functional evaluation of the SNU pig cornea as a substitute for human cornea. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biophysical and functional compatibility of SNU pig cornea for use in human clinical trials. Ninety-three eyeballs obtained from 51 SNU pigs were used to evaluate the physical properties and changes in porcine corneal endothelial cells (PCECs) depending on preservation time and storage condition before surgery, proliferative and functional characteristics of PCECs, and the microbiologic safety of porcine cornea. Corneal diameters and curvatures, axial length, anterior chamber depth, and central corneal thickness were measured and compared with previously reported human data. Corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) was serially measured with a confocal microscope during 7 days of preservation in the same storage solution used for human corneas. Corneal endothelial cell proliferation and immunofluorescence staining of Na- and K-dependent ATPase in PCECs were evaluated after 7 days of preservation. The corneoscleral rims of SNU pigs were cultured for gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and fungi to evaluate their microbiological safety. Corneal diameter and thickness in SNU pigs was larger than human and corneal curvature was flatter; however, they were within surgically operable ranges. Mean ECD (day 0) and ECD loss after 7 days of preservation were 2625 ± 81 cells/mm(2) and 7.60 ± 1.53%, respectively, which is comparable to human ECD and ECD loss in the same conditions. The ECD of SNU pigs was inversely decreased with aging (R(2) = 0.4034, P

  14. Human Cloning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Judith A; Williams, Erin D

    2006-01-01

    .... Scientists in other labs, including Harvard University and the University of California at San Francisco, intend to produce cloned human embryos in order to derive stem cells for medical research...

  15. Quality of life differences in patients with right- versus left-sided facial paralysis: Universal preference of right-sided human face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Nam Gyu; Lim, Byung Woo; Cho, Jae Keun; Kim, Jin

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether experiencing right- or left-sided facial paralysis would affect an individual's ability to recognize one side of the human face using hybrid hemi-facial photos by preliminary study. Further investigation looked at the relationship between facial recognition ability, stress, and quality of life. To investigate predominance of one side of the human face for face recognition, 100 normal participants (right-handed: n = 97, left-handed: n = 3, right brain dominance: n = 56, left brain dominance: n = 44) answered a questionnaire that included hybrid hemi-facial photos developed to determine decide superiority of one side for human face recognition. To determine differences of stress level and quality of life between individuals experiencing right- and left-sided facial paralysis, 100 patients (right side:50, left side:50, not including traumatic facial nerve paralysis) answered a questionnaire about facial disability index test and quality of life (SF-36 Korean version). Regardless of handedness or hemispheric dominance, the proportion of predominance of the right side in human face recognition was larger than the left side (71% versus 12%, neutral: 17%). Facial distress index of the patients with right-sided facial paralysis was lower than that of left-sided patients (68.8 ± 9.42 versus 76.4 ± 8.28), and the SF-36 scores of right-sided patients were lower than left-sided patients (119.07 ± 15.24 versus 123.25 ± 16.48, total score: 166). Universal preference for the right side in human face recognition showed worse psychological mood and social interaction in patients with right-side facial paralysis than left-sided paralysis. This information is helpful to clinicians in that psychological and social factors should be considered when treating patients with facial-paralysis. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The frequency of β-globin gene haplotypes, α-thalassemia and genetic polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, factor V Leiden and prothrombin genes in children with sickle cell disease in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Frequência dos haplótipos da globina beta, da talassemia alfa e dos polimorfismos genéticos dos genes da metilenotetrahidrofolato redutase, do fator V Leiden e da protrombina em crianças com doença falciforme no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac L. Silva Filho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A freqüência dos haplótipos beta S e beta C do gene da globina e a prevalência de talassemia alfa e de mutações nos genes da metilenotetrahidrofolato redutase (MTHFR-C677T, do fator V de Leiden e da protrombina (G20210A foi estudada em crianças com doença falciforme do Rio de Janeiro. O haplótipo Bantu foi o mais freqüente (65,9%, 21,2% das crianças (18% heterozigotas e 3% homozigotas apresentam talassemia com mutação alfa 3.7kb, ao contrário da mutação alfa 4.2kb que não foi encontrada. Os alelos 677CT e 677TT da MTHFR foram observados em 20,2% e 4,8%, respectivamente. Os haplótipos Camarões, Árabe-Indiano e Senegal não foram detectados na amostra estudada, bem como mutações no gene do fator V de Leiden e da protrombina. Somente o haplótipo beta C CI foi observado. Esse é o primeiro estudo realizado em uma amostra proveniente do Programa de Triagem Neonatal para Hemoglobinopatias do estado do Rio de Janeiro. Apesar do Rio de Janeiro ser a segunda maior cidade brasileira e seus habitantes expressarem o elevado grau de miscigenação ocorrida no país, nossos resultados ainda coincidem com os registros históricos dos fluxos migratórios do gene beta S para o Brasil, bem como refletem a forte influência de indivíduos de origem africana na população do Rio de Janeiro.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing universal human papillomavirus vaccination of girls aged 11 years into the National Immunization Program in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; de Soárez, Patrícia Coelho; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo; Ayres, Andreia; Itria, Alexander; Rama, Cristina Helena; Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Clark, Andrew D; Resch, Stephen

    2015-05-07

    To evaluate the impact and cost-effectiveness of introducing universal human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into the National Immunization Program (NIP) in Brazil. The Excel-based CERVIVAC decision support model was used to compare two strategies: (1) status quo (with current screening program) and (2) vaccination of a cohort of 11-year-old girls. National parameters for the epidemiology and costs of cervical cancer were estimated in depth. The estimates were based on data from the health information systems of the public health system, the PNAD 2008 national household survey, and relevant scientific literature on Brazil. Costs are expressed in 2008 United States dollars (US$), and a 5% discount rate is applied to both future costs and future health benefits. Introducing the HPV vaccine would reduce the burden of disease. The model estimated there would be 229 deaths avoided and 6677 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted in the vaccinated cohort. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) per DALY averted from the perspectives of the government (US$ 7663), health system (US$ 7412), and society (US$ 7298) would be considered cost-effective, according to the parameters adopted by the World Health Organization. In the sensitivity analysis, the ICERs were most sensitive to variations in discount rate, disease burden, vaccine efficacy, and proportion of cervical cancer caused by types 16 and 18. However, universal HPV vaccination remained a cost-effective strategy in most variations of the key estimates. Vaccine introduction could contribute additional benefits in controlling cervical cancer, but it requires large investments by the NIP. Among the essential conditions for attaining the expected favorable results are immunization program sustainability, equity in a population perspective, improvement of the screening program, and development of a surveillance system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghdami, Nasser [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahbazi, Ebrahim [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdi, Reza Salman [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini, E-mail: Salekdeh@royaninstitute.org [Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Systems Biology, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baharvand, Hossein, E-mail: Baharvand@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, {alpha}-globulin, and {gamma}-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

  19. Detecting Human Hydrologic Alteration from Diversion Hydropower Requires Universal Flow Prediction Tools: A Proposed Framework for Flow Prediction in Poorly-gauged, Regulated Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, K. M.; Alipour, M.

    2016-12-01

    Achieving the universal energy access Sustainable Development Goal will require great investment in renewable energy infrastructure in the developing world. Much growth in the renewable sector will come from new hydropower projects, including small and diversion hydropower in remote and mountainous regions. Yet, human impacts to hydrological systems from diversion hydropower are poorly described. Diversion hydropower is often implemented in ungauged rivers, thus detection of impact requires flow analysis tools suited to prediction in poorly-gauged and human-altered catchments. We conduct a comprehensive analysis of hydrologic alteration in 32 rivers developed with diversion hydropower in southwestern China. As flow data are sparse, we devise an approach for estimating streamflow during pre- and post-development periods, drawing upon a decade of research into prediction in ungauged basins. We apply a rainfall-runoff model, parameterized and forced exclusively with global-scale data, in hydrologically-similar gauged and ungauged catchments. Uncertain "soft" data are incorporated through fuzzy numbers and confidence-based weighting, and a multi-criteria objective function is applied to evaluate model performance. Testing indicates that the proposed framework returns superior performance (NSE = 0.77) as compared to models parameterized by rote calibration (NSE = 0.62). Confident that the models are providing `the right answer for the right reasons', our analysis of hydrologic alteration based on simulated flows indicates statistically significant hydrologic effects of diversion hydropower across many rivers. Mean annual flows, 7-day minimum and 7-day maximum flows decreased. Frequency and duration of flow exceeding Q25 decreased while duration of flows sustained below the Q75 increased substantially. Hydrograph rise and fall rates and flow constancy increased. The proposed methodology may be applied to improve diversion hydropower design in data-limited regions.

  20. A study of knowledge beliefs and attitudes regarding aids and human sexuality among medical college, engineering college and university Undergraduates of gorakhpur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Misra

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Research Problem: i What is the level of knowledge and altitude of undergraduates about AIDS and human sexuality? ii What arc the preferred modes of obtaining such knowledge?.Objectives: To assess the knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of undergraduate students regarding AIDS and human sexuality.Study Design: Self administered questionnaire.Setting and Participants: 1289 undergraduates from B.R.D. Medical College., M. M. M. Engineering College and University of Gorakhpur.                                                                  .Study Variables: Knowledge, beliefs and attitudes regarding AIDS and sexuality.Outcome Variables: Proportion of students having correct knowledge and positive attitudes.Statistical Analysis: By proportions.Result: l.evcl of knowledge about AIDS was generally high. Most of the students obtained knowledge about it through mass media. Few students had misconceptions about transmission of 1IIV infection. Knowledge about sex was obtained mainly from friends (36% and books (31.31%. Most of the students preferred doctors (44.15% and friends (43.66% for asking something about sex. and not their parents (4.37% or teachers (4.61%. 59.13% of boys and 34.49% of girls thought that students of their age had sex.Conclusion and Recommendations: The most peculiar fact in (his study is that students have no reliable means of obtaining correct information about subjects related to sex. Medical profession contributed very little in providing such knowledge. Most of them relied on their friends for such information. So. emphasis is to be given on recommending proper education material for the youth.

  1. Factors Associated With Medical School Entrants' Interest in Military Financial Assistance in Exchange for a Service Obligation: The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienko, Dean G; Oberst, Kathleen

    2017-07-01

    The U.S. military offers comprehensive scholarships to medical students to help offset costs in exchange for either reserve or active duty service commitments. Our goal was to describe to what degree newly admitted students to Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine were aware of and interested in these opportunities. We surveyed 176 newly admitted students at the beginning and immediately following a presentation on military medicine opportunities. We collected anonymous paper surveys from program attendees and entered the data into Stata v13.1. The project was submitted for institutional review board review and deemed to not involve human subjects. Tests of association were performed using Chi-square test of independence and Fisher's exact test where needed. Our cohort was 49% female, 51% male, and over 90% were less than 30 years of age. Only 14% reported having family involved in the military. Our results indicated that over 90% of students were aware of these programs but less than 3% took advantage of the offerings. Despite 65% reporting somewhat or significant concerns over debt, financial concerns were not statistically associated with scholarship interest level. Instead, having a family member in the military was the most significant positive predictor of interest (47% compared with 17%, p benefits of military service aside from financial support. Career vignettes and summaries may offer better insight into the service experience for those lacking familiarity thereby potentially increasing interest and applications. Focus groups with current scholarship awardees may inform recruitment strategies. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Exploring the Composite Trace of Research Outputs of Humanities and Social Sciences Scholars: A Case Study of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences at National Taiwan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hua Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used the citation data from four databases (THCI, ACI, WOS and Scopus and one social media, Mendeley, to examine the composite traces of humanities and social sciences scholars’ research outputs. Using the researchers of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences in National Taiwan University as subjects, this study compared how the scholars’ publications were cited in Taiwan’s and international academic journals as well as used in the social Web. It found that most of the subjects’ publications were in Chinese, and the impact of the publications was domestic rather than international. Taiwan’s citation databases, unsurprisingly, saw more citations to their research outputs. However, when only the English publications were observed, it was found that the citation performances in international databases and Mendeley were highly correlated. This suggests that Mendeley is a valid altmetric citation source for observing the international impact of Taiwan’s scholars. [Article content in Chinese

  3. Serological study of Human Fasciolosis in Patients Referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryaeipour, Mojgan; Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Heidari, Zahra; Sayyad Talaie, Zahra; Rokni, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a zoonotic disease of livestock and human caused by Fasciola species. Here in, the results of serological evaluation of fascioliasis in people referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2014 are presented. Demographic characterizations, symptoms and eosinophil rate were registered for every patient. Using somatic antigen of Fasciola, ELISA was performed and the results were analyzed. Data of questioners were analyzed as well. Among 206 applicants, 24.8% were seropositive for fascioliasis, included 21% female and 28.3% male. Mean range of age of patients was between 13 to 67 yr. The highest rate of seropositivity was found among 20-30 yr old patients. Most of the patients had hypereosinophilia. All patients had history of eating raw vegetables, or drinking unsafe water. Patients were referring from different provinces of Iran, including Gilan, Mazandaran, Tehran, Ardabil, Khuzestan, Lorestan, North Khorasan, Kermanshah, Azerbaijan, Fars, Kordestan, Hamedan and Markazi. During recent years, variety of provinces in Iran, where patients with fascioliasis are referred, has been increased. Patients coming from Gilan and Mazandaran provinces were referred early after the onset of their symptoms. Most probably, physicians in Gilan and Mazandaran are more alert on fascioliasis than other provinces. Previous wrong diagnosis was more common among patients referring from other provinces than Gilan and Mazandaran provinces.

  4. Knowledge about infection with human papiloma virus among students and teachers from the School of Microbiology at the University of Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid M. Bedoya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of knowledge on human papillomavirus (hpv among students and teachers of the School of Microbiology of the University of Antioquia. Methodology: cross-sectional descriptive study. A total amount of 220 students and 35 professors were surveyed. The students were selected by random sampling. Knowledge was measured through a previously validated questionnaire. An analysis of variance identified factors related to level of knowledge. Results: 70% of students showed a low awareness on hvp, 46% knew its modes of transmission and 9% knew about risk factors. The academic curriculum and the academic level were both related to the level of knowledge of students. A total percentage of 34,3% of professors showed low knowledge. Discussion: there is a global lack of knowledge among both students and professors about the modes of transmission, the prevention and the causes for hpv. In pursuit of the benefits of primary prevention of this virus, it is necessary to implement educational campaigns to raise awareness of people about it.

  5. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Goveia Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in oral carcinogenesis is still controversial as detection rates of the virus in oral cavity reported in the literature varies greatly. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. Material and Methods We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Results Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3, five carcinomas (5/6, one hyperplasia (1/1 and nine dysplasia cases (9/11. Conclusion Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions.

  6. Serological study of Human Fasciolosis in Patients Referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sci¬ences, Tehran, Iran during 2008-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan ARYAEIPOUR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fascioliasis is a zoonotic disease of livestock and human caused by Fasciola species. Here in, the results of serological evaluation of fascioliasis in peo­ple referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sci­ences during 2008-2014 are presented.Methods: Demographic characterizations, symptoms and eosinophil rate were registered for every patient. Using somatic antigen of Fasciola, ELISA was per­formed and the results were analyzed. Data of questioners were analyzed as well.Results: Among 206 applicants, 24.8% were seropositive for fascioliasis, included 21% female and 28.3% male. Mean range of age of patients was between 13 to 67 yr. The highest rate of seropositivity was found among 20-30 yr old patients. Most of the patients had hypereosinophilia. All patients had history of eating raw vegeta­bles, or drinking unsafe water. Patients were referring from different provinces of Iran, including Gilan, Mazandaran, Tehran, Ardabil, Khuzestan, Lorestan, North Khorasan, Kermanshah, Azerbaijan, Fars, Kordestan, Hamedan and Markazi.Conclusion: During recent years, variety of provinces in Iran, where patients with fascioliasis are referred, has been increased. Patients coming from Gilan and Mazanda­ran provinces were referred early after the onset of their symptoms. Most probably, physicians in Gilan and Mazandaran are more alert on fascioliasis than other provinces. Previous wrong diagnosis was more common among patients refer­ring from other provinces than Gilan and Mazandaran provinces.

  7. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS AND ITS VACCINE AMONG PHARMACY STUDENTS OF TERTIARY TEACHING UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

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    Raghupathi Mahitha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cervical cancer in women can be effectively prevented by HPV vaccine. Healthcare professionals including pharmacists have a role in creating awareness about this vaccine to public. In this context, it was decided to study awareness level about HPV among pharmacy students. The aim of the study is to study the knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus and it’s vaccine among pharmacy students of tertiary teaching university hospital in South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cross sectional, questionnaire-based study among pharmacy students. RESULTS 229 pharmacy students participated in the study. The mean total knowledge score among participants was 2.69 (SD=2.260 out of the possible maximum of 11 and the mean total attitude score was 2.67 (SD=2.437 out of the possible maximum of 10. Lack of knowledge about vaccine was the main reason for not taking the vaccine. Knowledge about the vaccines improves the attitude towards it (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION There is a need to design education program for pharmacy students to increase awareness about HPV, which in turn will increase the awareness among public positively.

  8. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

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    Okoye AE

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Augustine Ejike Okoye,1 Obike Godswill Ibegbulam,2 Robinson Chukwudi Onoh,3 Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu,3 Ngozi I Ugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,3 Chukwudi Simon Anigbo,2 Charles E Nonyelu21Department of Haematology and Immunology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 2Department of Haematology and Immunology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH, Ituku-Ozalla, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, NigeriaBackground: Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17.Results: The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17. The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the

  9. Universal Alienation

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    David Harvey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a debate between David Harvey, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri. It takes Marx’s bicentenary as occasion for an update of his concept of alienation. The paper asks: how are we to interpret universal alienation and from whence does it come? Marx radically reformulated the concept of alienation in the Grundrisse. The humanism of the early Marx can be re-rooted and reconceptualised in the scientific mode proposed in the Grundrisse. In the Grundrisse, the universality of alienation is specific to capitalism’s historical evolution. Today, alienation exists almost everywhere. It exists at work in production, at home in consumption, and it dominates much of politics and daily life. Such trends intensify through the application of information technologies and artificial intelligence. Widespread alienation has resulted in Occupy movements as well as right-wing populism and bigoted nationalist and racist movements. Donald Trump is the President of alienation. The circulation of capital as totality consists of the three key moments of production, circulation and distribution. A lot of contemporary economic struggles are now occurring at the point of realisation rather than at the point of production. Protests are therefore today often expressions of broad-based discontent. Our future is dictated by the need to redeem our debts. Under such conditions democracy becomes a sham. The big question is what forms of social movement can help us get out of the state-finance nexus. The theory of objective alienation along with an understanding of its subjective consequences is one vital key to unlock the door of a progressive politics for the future.

  10. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  11. The effects of single dose TBI on hepatic and renal function in non-human primates and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Bakker, B.; Davelaar, J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Niemer-Tucker, M.M.B.; Noordijk, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are common procedures in the treatment of severe combined immune deficiency syndromes, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and other hematological disorders. Improved results following TBI and BMT have increased the number of patients in long term follow up. Late detrimental effects of TBI have been investigated in non-human primates and patients with emphasis on vital organs like liver and kidney. The response of monkeys to radiation is not significantly different from that in man. Long term effects of TBI could be studied by keeping 84 monkeys of different ages under continuous observation for a period up to 25 years. Effects on hepatic and renal function were demonstrated using serological and histological parameters. The values of the liver function parameters such as alkaline phosphatase and gamma glutamyl transferase in the irradiated group are significantly increased after TBI. Also the parameters of kidney dysfunction, e.g., Ht and urea show a significant change in the irradiated old aged cohort with respect to the controls. Between 1967 and 1993, 336 bone marrow transplantations were performed at the University Hospital Leiden. The present Study was restricted to those patients who survived at least 18 months after transplantation. This retrospective analysis consequently amounts to 120 patients. The monkey data indicated subclinical organ damage for postirradiation intervals exceeding 15 years. However, up to the present time, the human data do not support these findings since the follow up time is still restricted to a median survival of 4,5 years. Detrimental effects in liver and kidney function at a later stage can not be excluded yet, and careful examinations of the patients remain indicated

  12. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Augustine Ejike; Ibegbulam, Obike Godswill; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Ugwu, Ngozi I; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Anigbo, Chukwudi Simon; Nonyelu, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17. The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17). The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital was 0.5%, with a 95% confidence interval of 0%-2.8%. Some of the sociodemographic risk factors of HTLV-1 infection found to be applicable to the 31-year-old woman who tested positive included positive history of previous sexually transmitted diseases, high parity, low socioeconomic status, female sex, and age above 30 years. The pregnant women that participated in this study were exposed to risk

  13. Bιβλιοκρισία του: V. SYROS, Die Rezeption der aristotelischen politischen Philosophie bei Marsilius von Padua. Eine Untersuchung zur ersten Diktion des Defensor pacis [Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, ed. by A. C. Gow, v. 134], Leiden, 2007

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    Στυλιανός ΛΑΜΠΑΚΗΣ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   Βιβλιοκρισία του : V. SYROS, Die Rezeption der aristotelischen politischen Philosophie bei Marsilius von Padua. Eine Untersuchung zur ersten Diktion des Defensor pacis. [Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, edited by Andrew Colin Gow, volume 134], Brill, Leiden-Boston 2007, σελ. X+364, ISSN 1573-4188

  14. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonates cause alkyl chain length-dependent hepatic steatosis and hypolipidemia mainly by impairing lipoprotein production in APOE*3-leiden CETP mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijland, S.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Pieterman, E.J.; Maas, A.C.E.; Hoorn, J.W. van der; Erk, M.J. van; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Chang, S.C.; Ehresman, D.J.; Butenhoff, J.L.; Princen, H.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are stable perfluoroalkyl sulfonate (PFAS) surfactants, and PFHxS and PFOS are frequently detected in human biomonitoring studies. Some epidemiological studies have shown modest positive

  15. Seroprevalence of human papillomavirus immunoglobulin G antibodies among women presenting at the reproductive health clinic of a university teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminu, M; Gwafan, Jz; Inabo, Hi; Oguntayo, Ao; Ella, Ee; Koledade, Ak

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of 90%-95% of squamous cell cancers. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV can lead to development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in 5%-10% of infected women, and can progress to invasive cervical cancer 15-20 years later. This study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of HPV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies among women of reproductive age attending a reproductive health clinic at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria. The study was descriptive, cross-sectional, and experimental, combining the use of a structured questionnaire and analysis of serum samples obtained from 350 consecutive consenting women. The serum samples were analyzed for IgG antibodies to HPV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found a seroprevalence of 42.9% (150/350) for IgG antibodies to HPV in these women. Women aged 45-49 years and those who had their sexual debut aged 20-23 years had the highest HPV seroprevalence, ie, 50% (57/114) and 51.1% (46/90), respectively. Presence of antibodies varied according to sociodemographic factors, but was significantly associated with educational status, tribe, and religion (Pwomen. Antibodies to HPV were detected in 50.0% (9/18) of women with a family history of cervical cancer and in 30.8% (4/13) of those with a history or signs of WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, myelokathexis) syndrome as a genetic disorder (P>0.05). Further studies are needed to determine the HPV serotypes and evaluate the risk of natural development of HPV-related malignancies among women in the study area.

  16. Missed opportunities for catch-up human papillomavirus vaccination among university undergraduates: Identifying health decision-making behaviors and uptake barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Kathleen R; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Butler, Scott M; Omer, Saad B

    2018-01-04

    Suboptimal adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates in the US highlight the need for catch-up vaccination. When teenagers enter college, there may be a shift in healthcare decision-making from parents and guardians to the students themselves. Little is known about factors influencing college students' healthcare decision-making processes. We evaluated HPV vaccine decision-making among 18-to-26-year-old college students through a self-administered, anonymous, cross-sectional survey. This survey was distributed to a sample of men and women in classroom settings at two universities. Categorical data comparisons were conducted using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to model initiation of HPV vaccine and compute prevalence ratios while controlling for key influential covariates at the 0.05 alpha level. A total of 527 students participated (response proportion=93.1%). Overall, 55.8% of participants received the HPV vaccine. Encouraging conversations with doctors and/or parents/guardians were identified as one of the most influential factors to increase vaccine uptake. Among students who received encouragement from both a doctor and parent, 95.8% received the vaccine. Campaigns about cancer prevention were viewed as more influential than those that focus on preventing genital warts. Approximately one-third of students indicated they didn't know where to get the HPV vaccine. Women were more likely to report that their parents would not let them get the HPV vaccine compared to men (26.7% vs. 2.3%). The majority of students (77.3%) indicated their parents were sometimes, equally, or mostly involved in making decisions about receiving vaccines (other than flu). Students' decision-making is greatly influenced by their parents; therefore, interventions for this population should work to increase students' control over decision-making while also addressing parental concerns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. A legal text with a single “Dapat”: Looking for deontic modality in the Filipino translation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Ruel T. Cabazares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Filipino version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, only a single deontic modal marker is found, a curious absence given that such a category conveys the performative function crucial to the language used in laws. Regardless of the current attitude against seeking equivalence in translation analysis, questioning the semantics of the target text (TT is a necessary endeavour for the translation of legal texts, whether or not the relevant linguistic features of the TT language contribute to or facilitate the expression of any of the properties of deontic modality (DM. To this end, the paper analyzes the Filipino translation of the UDHR to look for this type of semantic category. The analysis of the TT focuses on three important points: [1] use of the prospective aspect does not contribute to the expression of the necessary features of DM, notwithstanding their shared notion of futurity; [2] volition, an essential part of DM, is implied by the transitivity triggered by the TT verb voice, but the source and perspective of the volition is different; and [3] use of the modal marker dapat (i.e., necessary carries the primary features of DM. The paper suggests that the consistent use of this modal marker can assign a performative function to the TT, a trait that helps define the source text (ST as a legal text. The study can offer helpful points to translators of legal documents and other forms of technical translation. The methods used can help future translation analyses by providing conceptual tools for the semantic comparison of the linguistic traits of an ST and TT, particularly the semantic representation of Filipino sentences including the transitivity of the verb and modality. Ultimately, the study hopes to contribute to quality translations of text as part of promoting the intellectualization of Filipino and other Philippine languages.

  18. Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS supplementation on intestinal and systemic markers of inflammation in ApoE*3Leiden mice consuming a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksaharju, Anna; Kooistra, Teake; Kleemann, Robert; van Duyvenvoorde, Wim; Miettinen, Minja; Lappalainen, Jani; Lindstedt, Ken A; Kovanen, Petri T; Korpela, Riitta; Kekkonen, Riina A

    2013-07-14

    A high-fat diet disturbs the composition and function of the gut microbiota and generates local gut-associated and also systemic responses. Intestinal mast cells, for their part, secrete mediators which play a role in the orchestration of physiological and immunological functions of the intestine. Probiotic bacteria, again, help to maintain the homeostasis of the gut microbiota by protecting the gut epithelium and regulating the local immune system. In the present study, we explored the effects of two probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii spp. shermanii JS (PJS), on high fat-fed ApoE*3Leiden mice by estimating the mast cell numbers and the immunoreactivity of TNF-α and IL-10 in the intestine, as well as plasma levels of several markers of inflammation and parameters of lipid metabolism. We found that mice that received GG and PJS exhibited significantly lower numbers of intestinal mast cells compared with control mice. PJS lowered intestinal immunoreactivity of TNF-α, while GG increased intestinal IL-10. PJS was also observed to lower the plasma levels of markers of inflammation including vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and also the amount of gonadal adipose tissue. GG lowered alanine aminotransferase, a marker of hepatocellular activation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that probiotic GG and PJS tend to down-regulate both intestinal and systemic pro-inflammatory changes induced by a high-fat diet in this humanised mouse model.

  19. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil with Natural Phenolic Content Exerts an Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Adipose Tissue and Attenuates the Severity of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Ldlr-/-.Leiden Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Sierra, Amparo; Alvarez-Amor, Leticia; Kleemann, Robert; Martín, Franz; Varela, Lourdes M

    2018-05-15

    The present study investigates the effect of olive oils with different phenolic content in high-fat diets (HFDs) on hypertrophy and inflammation in adipose tissue and associated atherosclerosis, in the context of obesity. Ldlr-/-.Leiden mice were fed three different HFDs for 32 weeks and were compared with mice fed the standard low-fat diet (LFD). The different fats provided in the HFDs were lard (HFD-L), extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO; 79 mg kg -1 of phenolic compounds, HFD-EVOO), or EVOO rich in phenolic compounds (OL, 444 mg kg -1 of phenolic compounds, HFD-OL). All HFD-fed mice became obese, but only HFD-L-induced adipocyte hypertrophy. HFD-EVOO mice exhibited the greatest levels of Adiponectin in adipose tissue and presented atherosclerotic lesions similar to the LFD group, with a very low count of monocyte/macrophage compared with HFD-L and HFD-OL mice. Enrichment of the phenolic content of olive oil reduced the secretion of nitrites/nitrates in the aorta, but atherosclerosis was not attenuated in HFD-OL mice compared to other HFD mice. Consumption of olive oil with a natural content of phenolic compounds attenuates adipose tissue hypertrophy and inflammation and exerts antiatherosclerotic effects in mice. A higher phenolic content of olive oil did not provide further benefits in the prevention of atherosclerosis. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  1. [Favorable current prognosis after HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation for children with required severe aplastic anemia; evaluation of 30 years of bone marrow transplantation at the Leiden University Medical Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steekelenburg, M. van; Weel-Sipman, M.H. van; Zwinderman, A.H.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Vossen, J.M.J.J.; Egeler, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of 30 years of allogeneic HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) as the treatment for children with acquired severe aplastic anaemia. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive. METHOD: Of all patients who underwent an HLA-identical sibling-donor BMT for severe

  2. The current situation of human resources for health in the province of Cabinda in Angola: is it a limitation to provide universal access to healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaia, Damas; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2017-12-28

    Angola is among sub-Saharan African countries dealing with a crisis of Human Resources for Health (HRH). The province of Cabinda, besides the efforts, still suffers from both HRH shortage and a badly distributed health workforce. In Cabinda, one can find urban concentration and rural shortages of healthcare professionals, many rural areas' healthcare facilities often secured only by basic or medium level HRH; and difficulties in developing HRH retention strategies in rural areas where most services are covered by foreign HRH. This study aims at analysing the situation of HRH in the province of Cabinda. It considers organizational issues, policies and practices resulting from the HRH strategy followed in the recent years, moreover the creation of a medical school. The context that affects the distribution of the health workforce is analysed to contribute to the development of evidence-based policies that promote a better HRH allocation in the poorest and distant villages in the province. A mixed-methods study was developed, combining a quantitative and qualitative approach to analyse HRH situation in the province of Cabinda. Data was collected from key informants, selected by intentional sampling from public and private health organizations, to respond to a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Quantitative and qualitative data was analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis respectively. The study was complemented by a comprehensive desk review. Results show a clear change in HRH data from 2011 to 2015 with significant fluctuations due to variations in retirement, migration and lack of regular public HRH recruitment tenders. HRH density is apparently better in rural when compared with urban areas. However, one should bear in mind that often HRH allocated to rural areas do not stay there, which leads to real geographical imbalances. Factors like lack of proper incentives for HRH retention and social support goes against

  3. [Hydatid fertility and protoscolex viability in humans: study of 78 hydatid samples collected between 2005 and 2012 and analyzed at the parasitology laboratory of the Mustapha University Hospital Center of Algiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zait, H; Boulahbel, M; Zait, F; Achir, I; Guerchani, M T; Chaouche, H; Ladjadje, Y; Hamrioui, B

    2013-05-01

    An analysis at the Mustapha University Hospital Center of Algiers examined 78 hydatid samples collected between 2005 and 2012 to determine the fertility rate of metacestodes and the viability of protoscolices. The fertility rate of the hydatid cysts in humans was 88.4% and the protoscolex viability rate 74.5%. The fertility and viability rates found here are high, despite the use of scolicides.

  4. Phonology without universal grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  5. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  6. In Defense of Soft Universalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2011-01-01

    improved considerably since the time of the natural rights theories and the enlightenment. As a consequence prevailing international human rights are not the only possible human rights, and soft universalism is therefore partially open as regards the content of human rights, even though non discrimination...... human rights is the emerging global society, and human rights law is therefore best understood as (part of) the law of this emerging society. Seen in this way, human rights are an attempt to cope with a (partly) new situation, based on knowledge of human beings and society, a knowledge which has...... and other elements have some naturalness to them....

  7. A Christian Critique of the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Charles Habib

    Views on the place and power of the university, the church's role in the university, and the sciences and humanities are presented. The secularization of western universities raises fundamental criticisms from the Christian point of view that the university atmosphere is not congenial to Christian spiritual values, and that higher education…

  8. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  9. The Demise of the Preformed Embryo: Edinburgh, Leiden, and the Physician-Poet Mark Akenside's Contribution to Re-Establishing Epigenetic Embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Seventeenth-century advances in microscopy prompted a shift in the dominant theory of human reproduction from one of epigenesis, derived from such ancient authorities as Aristotle, which posited that the mixing of male and female reproductive material generated a being which had not existed before, to one of preformation, whereby embryologists argued that the offspring of an animal already existed in miniature in the reproductive material. This chapter reveals that the poet, Mark Akenside, anticipated the Enlightenment's challenge to the prevailing preformationist orthodoxy when a medical student at Edinburgh in the late 1730s, as evident in his May 1744 thesis entitled De ortu et incremento foetus humani ('On the Origin and Growth of the Human Foetus'). What prompted Akenside to take such a bold step? Faced with a scarcity of biographical sources, Akenside's major poem on The Pleasures of Imagination (1744) suggests how the poet had been thinking about reproductive processes in innovative contexts and that his medical research informed his concept of poetic creation.

  10. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  11. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  12. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  13. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  14. The Historical Significance of the Universal Declaration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Asbjorn

    1998-01-01

    Explains the historical significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Focuses on the initiative for the Declaration and its elaboration, the precursors to modern human rights, the foundation of the Declaration, the rights contained in the Universal Declaration, three modes of human rights analysis, and global governance and human…

  15. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  16. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book challenges traditional approach to university autonomy which is based on four pillars: organisational, financial, human resource, and academic. The main thesis is that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a more holistic view of the complex inter-re...

  17. Costing human rights and community support interventions as a part of universal access to HIV treatment and care in a Southern African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Louisa; Akugizibwe, Paula; Clayton, Michaela; Amon, Joseph J; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Bennett, Rod; Stegling, Christine; Baggaley, Rachel; Kahn, James G; Holmes, Charles B; Garg, Navneet; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Mack, Christina DeFilippo; Williams, Phoebe; Smyth, Caoimhe; Vitoria, Marco; Crowley, Siobhan; Williams, Brian; McClure, Craig; Granich, Reuben; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-09-01

    Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has both individual health benefits and potential to decrease HIV incidence. Ensuring access to HIV services is a significant human rights issue and successful programmes require adequate human rights protections and community support. However, the cost of specific human rights and community support interventions for equitable, sustainable and non-discriminatory access to ART are not well described. Human rights and community support interventions were identified using the literature and through consultations with experts. Specific costs were then determined for these health sector interventions. Population and epidemic data were provided through the Statistics South Africa 2009 national mid-year estimates. Costs of scale up of HIV prevention and treatment were taken from recently published estimates. Interventions addressed access to services, minimising stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV, confidentiality, informed consent and counselling quality. Integrated HIV programme interventions included training for counsellors, 'Know Your Rights' information desks, outreach campaigns for most at risk populations, and adherence support. Complementary measures included post-service interviews, human rights abuse monitoring, transportation costs, legal assistance, and funding for human rights and community support organisations. Other essential non-health sector interventions were identified but not included in the costing framework. The annual costs for the human rights and community support interventions are United States (US) $63.8 million (US $1.22 per capita), representing 1.5% of total health sector HIV programme costs. Respect for human rights and community engagement can be understood both as an obligation of expanded ART programmes and as a critically important factor in their success. Basic rights-based and community support interventions constitute only a small percentage of overall programmes

  18. Costing Human Rights and Community Support Interventions as a Part of Universal Access to HIV Treatment and Care in a Southern African Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Louisa; Akugizibwe, Paula; Clayton, Michaela; Amon, Joseph J; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Bennett, Rod; Stegling, Christine; Baggaley, Rachel; Kahn, James G; Holmes, Charles B; Garg, Navneet; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Mack, Christina DeFilippo; Williams, Phoebe; Smyth, Caoimhe; Vitoria, Marco; Crowley, Siobhan; Williams, Brian; McClure, Craig; Granich, Reuben; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has both individual health benefits and potential to decrease HIV incidence. Ensuring access to HIV services is a significant human rights issue and successful programmes require adequate human rights protections and community support. However, the cost of specific human rights and community support interventions for equitable, sustainable and non-discriminatory access to ART are not well described. Human rights and community support interventions were identified using the literature and through consultations with experts. Specific costs were then determined for these health sector interventions. Population and epidemic data were provided through the Statistics South Africa 2009 national mid-year estimates. Costs of scale up of HIV prevention and treatment were taken from recently published estimates. Interventions addressed access to services, minimising stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV, confidentiality, informed consent and counselling quality. Integrated HIV programme interventions included training for counsellors, ‘Know Your Rights’ information desks, outreach campaigns for most at risk populations, and adherence support. Complementary measures included post-service interviews, human rights abuse monitoring, transportation costs, legal assistance, and funding for human rights and community support organisations. Other essential non-health sector interventions were identified but not included in the costing framework. The annual costs for the human rights and community support interventions are United States (US) $63.8 million (US $1.22 per capita), representing 1.5% of total health sector HIV programme costs. Respect for human rights and community engagement can be understood both as an obligation of expanded ART programmes and as a critically important factor in their success. Basic rights-based and community support interventions constitute only a small percentage of overall

  19. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  20. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book challenges traditional approach to university autonomy which is based on four pillars: organisational, financial, human resource, and academic. The main thesis is that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a more holistic view of the complex inter......-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and equally pull in opposite directions. The holistic view is expressed in a model of institutional university autonomy that brings together the traditional basic four pillars of autonomy, and five interfaces: government–university; university......–university staff; academic staff–students; university–business; and university–internationalisation. This model is explored through international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are complex, interactive and genuinely...

  1. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA). A team of scientists headed by Alison Murdoch at the University of Newcastle received permission...not yet reported success in isolating stem cells from a cloned human embryo. A research team headed by Ian Wilmut at the University of Edinburgh...research group, headed by Douglas Melton and Kevin Eggan, submitted their proposal to a Harvard committee composed of ethicists, scientists and public

  2. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  3. Cultural universals: So what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elaine Botha

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the elusive "cultural universal s” in a variety of academic disciplines has been motivated b y the spectre of relativism in its diverse guises. The problem of relativism has been thrust upon us inter alia by the inability of our epistemological models to account for social and cultural, moral and cognitive diversity and to provide us with criteria by means of which to judge aberrations like ideologies. Contrary to the general trend I would like to argue that it is not the spectre of relativism in its various guises which necessitates the search for cultural universals, nor is this the only motivation for a Christian to argue in favour of the recognition of cultural universals. Various authors have suggested that such universal structures do exist; that they condition human and societal behaviour and that it would in principle be possible to construct a theory of these structural universals or a "biogrammar" or "geography ” of the universal cultural acquisition device of humankind (cf. Harre,1976, 32; Johnson, 1987: xxxvii ; Tige r and Fox, 1974:17,30. Cross -cu ltural research in both psychology and anthropology has pointed to the existence of such traits, and in recent philosophical discussions Apel and others have pointed to the necessity of recognizing the existence of some sort of " transcendentalia" . These arguments emphasize elements that are common to diverse approaches to the problem of cultural universals. Christian scholars could accept most of these arguments as valid and yet argue in favour of a very specifically modified version of the notion of cultural universals. This essay attempts to develop such a position.

  4. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  5. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  6. Universality of accelerating change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2018-03-01

    On large time scales the progress of human technology follows an exponential growth trend that is termed accelerating change. The exponential growth trend is commonly considered to be the amalgamated effect of consecutive technology revolutions - where the progress carried in by each technology revolution follows an S-curve, and where the aging of each technology revolution drives humanity to push for the next technology revolution. Thus, as a collective, mankind is the 'intelligent designer' of accelerating change. In this paper we establish that the exponential growth trend - and only this trend - emerges universally, on large time scales, from systems that combine together two elements: randomness and amalgamation. Hence, the universal generation of accelerating change can be attained by systems with no 'intelligent designer'.

  7. Kant's universal law formula revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyholm, S.

    2015-01-01

    Kantians are increasingly deserting the universal law formula in favor of the humanity formula. The former, they argue, is open to various decisive objections; the two are not equivalent; and it is only by appealing to the human- ity formula that Kant can reliably generate substantive implications

  8. Life In The Universe!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 30 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists and astronomers have worked tirelessly to answer these questions. Yet just this past week at CERN students from all over Europe came to present their ideas on the subject and listen to the latest on extraterrestrial life from some of the world's most prestigious researchers.

  9. Monitoring, Human Health Risk Assessment and Optimized Management for Typical Pollutants in Indoor Air from Random Families of University Staff, Wuhan City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyao Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 31 workers at a university were randomly selected for indoor environmental monitoring in Wuhan. Two indicators, formaldehyde and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC, and using 139 monitoring points, monitored the indoor environment (including home and workplace as well as the interior space of the main furniture. This study carried out the environmental quality assessment for TVOC based on the dB index method and the health risk assessment of indoor formaldehyde for the university staff receptors and, then focused on health risk in home environment to carry out detailed environmental health management. The results showed that TVOC in the three types of home spaces exceeded about 80% of the national standard. The excessive formaldehyde ratios for kitchens (79%, bedrooms (77% and living rooms (74% were calculated. Formaldehyde health risks all exceeded the United States Environmental Protection Agency, (USEPA acceptable risk threshold. The formaldehyde concentrations in workplaces were about 0.03 mg·m−3. While the risk contribution of the home environment to the total average health risk (0.0014, whether male and female is about 96%. For the adapted and unadapted persons, 90% and 55% of the monitoring points were located within the long-term tolerable range of TVOC decibel application, respectively. Long-term exposure to such an environment can lead to the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS. On the other hand, through comparison of the concentration of pollutants in the interior spaces of furniture and home spaces, it was determined tentatively that the pollutants were mainly concentrated in rarely used furniture. In summary, the air pollution in the studied homes of university staff was much serious than that in workplaces, which showed a need to manage TVOC and formaldehyde pollution by the three means: the purchase of green products, removal of internal pollution from furniture, and creating a good indoor volatile diffusion

  10. Comparing humans and deep learning performance for grading AMD: A study in using universal deep features and transfer learning for automated AMD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlina, Philippe; Pacheco, Katia D; Joshi, Neil; Freund, David E; Bressler, Neil M

    2017-03-01

    When left untreated, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in people over fifty in the US. Currently it is estimated that about eight million US individuals have the intermediate stage of AMD that is often asymptomatic with regard to visual deficit. These individuals are at high risk for progressing to the advanced stage where the often treatable choroidal neovascular form of AMD can occur. Careful monitoring to detect the onset and prompt treatment of the neovascular form as well as dietary supplementation can reduce the risk of vision loss from AMD, therefore, preferred practice patterns recommend identifying individuals with the intermediate stage in a timely manner. Past automated retinal image analysis (ARIA) methods applied on fundus imagery have relied on engineered and hand-designed visual features. We instead detail the novel application of a machine learning approach using deep learning for the problem of ARIA and AMD analysis. We use transfer learning and universal features derived from deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN). We address clinically relevant 4-class, 3-class, and 2-class AMD severity classification problems. Using 5664 color fundus images from the NIH AREDS dataset and DCNN universal features, we obtain values for accuracy for the (4-, 3-, 2-) class classification problem of (79.4%, 81.5%, 93.4%) for machine vs. (75.8%, 85.0%, 95.2%) for physician grading. This study demonstrates the efficacy of machine grading based on deep universal features/transfer learning when applied to ARIA and is a promising step in providing a pre-screener to identify individuals with intermediate AMD and also as a tool that can facilitate identifying such individuals for clinical studies aimed at developing improved therapies. It also demonstrates comparable performance between computer and physician grading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Personal Capacity Building for the Human Services: The Roles of Curriculum and Individual Differences in Predicting Self-Concept in College/University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D.; Martin, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    While much research has outlined the importance of intra-psychic factors in predicting workplace success, it is rare that attention is given to the development of these factors in training for human service professions (e.g. psychology, clergy, nursing). Accordingly, the present study explores differences in self-concept, a key intra-psychic…

  12. The Centre for Early Human Behaviour (EHB) at the University of Bergen: A transdisciplinary exploration into the evolution of homo sapiens behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolowski, Stefan; Henshilwood, Christopher; Jansen, Eystein

    2017-04-01

    Homo sapiens was anatomically modern by 200 000 years ago in Africa, but there is no archaeological evidence to demonstrate that behaviour was modern at the time. Attributes of modern behaviour, perhaps inspired by changes in the human brain, are only recognizable after 100 000 years ago. Before we can study the process, we must critically define the criteria for the term 'modern behaviour' and then find a means to recognize such behavior in the record. This seemingly simple research statement involves complex exploration by a team of specialists. In this highly competitive research field our centre will, for the first time, be able to rise to the challenge by combining the skills of cutting-edge scientists in archaeology, climate reconstruction and modelling, and the cognitive and social sciences. Over the next decade we will integrate knowledge and methods from different disciplines to synthesize approaches and contribute to a sophisticated understanding of early human behaviour. Our highly ambitious research program will focus explicitly on rare, well preserved archaeological sites occupied in the period between 100-50 000 years ago because these contain the 'keys' for unlocking the past. A major competitive edge is the EHB Director's 25 years of archaeological experience and his long-term exclusive access, with permits, to a number of the best-preserved sites in the southern Cape, South Africa - a region regarded as a major locus for vital evidence that could inform on the behaviour of early humans. Our planned excavations at existing and new sites and our ground-breaking and innovative interdisciplinary approaches, including climate (The Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research) and cognitive research, to understanding the processes that shaped human cultures. Primarily, EHB will directly address unanswered, first order questions about Homo sapiens: a) what defines the switch to 'modern behaviour', exactly how should this term be defined and then, when, why and

  13. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  14. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  15. What Unites Us All: Establishing Special Education Teacher Education Universals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Sharon M.; Dukes, Charles; Hall, Kalynn

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical base that supports human universals served as a model for proposing special education teacher education universals. The human universals model is explained and put forth as a basis for identifying special education teacher education universals. Twenty-four English language journals from different countries representing four…

  16. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  17. Universalizing Core Human Rights in the 'New' ASEAN: A Reassessment of Culture and Development Justifications Against the Global Rejection of Impunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Desierto

    2009-02-01

    -pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

    This paper responds to the defences of “culture” and “development” rights as justifications for exceptionalism in human rights obligations in Southeast Asia, particularly against the context of the passage of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Charter. Under the new ASEAN Charter, Member States have the general obligation to abide by the Organizational Principles of “adherence to the rule of law, good governance, the principles of democracy and constitutional government”, as well as “respect for fundamental freedoms, the promotion and protection of human rights, and the promotion of social justice”. More importantly, it is now the specific obligation of ASEAN Member States to “take all necessary measures, including the enactment of appropriate domestic legislation, to effectively implement the provisions of the Charter and to comply with all obligations of membership”, including the above-stated Organizational Principles.

    The paper shows the normative, conceptual, and empirical weaknesses of the “culture” and “development” justifications for creating exceptions to the observance and protection of core human rights norms. Assessing the right to culture as an exception to human rights observance, the paper asserts the ideological imprecision of the “right to culture” as an exception to human rights observance, noting that the porous definition of “culture” should not be equally valued in its assertion against core human rights norms which form part of general international law (e.g. jus cogens prohibitions, crimes against humanity, war crimes, egregious violations of human rights, obligations erga omnes and which can be modified only by a subsequent norm of the same

  18. [Teaching human anatomy to the graduation course in Health Sciences of the Lisbon University: five years of a new educational experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Ivo A; Gonçalves Ferreira, Ana D; Gonçalves Ferreira, António J

    2013-01-01

    The authors make the balance of the first five years of teaching Anatomy to the Licensure in Health Sciences, of Lisbon University. Were studied 408 students, enrolled in the Curricular Unit of Anatomy (mandatory subject of the 1st semester) and 29 in the Curricular Unit of Neuroanatomy (optional subject of the 6th semester). It was performed the statistical analysis by Anova and t Student test. There was an annual growing influx of students enrolled in Curricular Unit of Anatomy, a stable number in Neuroanatomy and clear predominance of female students; ratio teacher / student variable between 1/9 and 1/17 in Anatomy and 1/8 in Neuroanatomy; high number of initial dropouts (15.69%) in Anatomy; approval levels of 95.93% in Anatomy and Neuroanatomy 100%; trend of improvement in the last two years, with statistical significance in the Curricular Unit of Anatomy (p = 0.0001) and equal academic performance of students of both genders; satisfaction scores of students of Anatomy, Good = 71% and Very Good = 8%; in Neuroanatomy, unanimous classification by students = Very Good. It was a very positive learning experience. The authors propose: the study of the causes and prevention of early dropout of incoming students, improving the ratio teacher / student, possible extension to a 2nd semester of the Curricular Unit of Anatomy and improving facilities that are already underway and includes the refurbishment and modernization of the anatomical theater of the Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon.

  19. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccination: Assessing the Level of Knowledge among Students of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Tirgu Mures, Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Septimiu Voidazan; Silviu-Horia Morariu; Monica Tarcea; Horațiu Moldovan; Minodora Dobreanu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection, a cause in the development of cervical cancer, remains a topic of great interest. About 80% of sexually active women are at risk of acquiring an HPV infection at some point in life, the peak incidence of infection having been identified in young women. The aim of the study was to assess medical students’ knowledge and attitudes about sexually transmitted diseases, HPV infection, HPV vaccinations, and the students’ sexual behaviour. Material...

  20. Embryonic cardiac morphometry in Carnegie stages 15-23, from the Complutense University of Madrid Institute of Embryology Human Embryo Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, L A; Turrero-Nogués, A; Marantos-Gamarra, D G

    2008-01-01

    We performed a morphometric study of cardiac development on human embryos to complement the scarce data on human embryonic cardiac morphometry and to attempt to establish, from these, algorithms describing cardiac growth during the second month of gestation. Thirty human embryos from Carnegie stages 15-23 were included in the study. Shrinkage and compression effects from fixation and inclusion in paraffin were considered in our calculations. Growth of the cardiac (whole heart) volume and volume of ventricular myocardium through the Carnegie stages were analysed by ANOVA. Linear correlation was used to describe the relationship between the ventricular myocardium and cardiac volumes. Comparisons of models were carried out through the R2 statistic. The relationship volume of ventricular myocardium versus cardiac volume is expressed by the equation: cardiac volume = 0.6266 + 2.4778 volume of ventricular myocardium. The relationship cardiac volume versus crown-rump length is expressed by the equation: cardiac volume = 1.3 e(0.126 CR length), where e is the base of natural logarithms. At a clinical level, these results can contribute towards the establishment of a normogram for cardiac development, useful for the design of strategies for early diagnosis of congenital heart disease. They can also help in the study of embryogenesis, for example in the discussion of ventricular trabeculation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Are university rankings useful to improve research? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Marlo M; Balas, E Andrew; Momani, Shaher

    2018-01-01

    Concerns about reproducibility and impact of research urge improvement initiatives. Current university ranking systems evaluate and compare universities on measures of academic and research performance. Although often useful for marketing purposes, the value of ranking systems when examining quality and outcomes is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate usefulness of ranking systems and identify opportunities to support research quality and performance improvement. A systematic review of university ranking systems was conducted to investigate research performance and academic quality measures. Eligibility requirements included: inclusion of at least 100 doctoral granting institutions, be currently produced on an ongoing basis and include both global and US universities, publish rank calculation methodology in English and independently calculate ranks. Ranking systems must also include some measures of research outcomes. Indicators were abstracted and contrasted with basic quality improvement requirements. Exploration of aggregation methods, validity of research and academic quality indicators, and suitability for quality improvement within ranking systems were also conducted. A total of 24 ranking systems were identified and 13 eligible ranking systems were evaluated. Six of the 13 rankings are 100% focused on research performance. For those reporting weighting, 76% of the total ranks are attributed to research indicators, with 24% attributed to academic or teaching quality. Seven systems rely on reputation surveys and/or faculty and alumni awards. Rankings influence academic choice yet research performance measures are the most weighted indicators. There are no generally accepted academic quality indicators in ranking systems. No single ranking system provides a comprehensive evaluation of research and academic quality. Utilizing a combined approach of the Leiden, Thomson Reuters Most Innovative Universities, and the SCImago ranking systems may provide

  2. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  3. [The concept of the organ, as a hierarchal unit of human body, and its place in teaching histology at the medical university and medical college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadelets, O D; Miadelets, N Ia; Miadelets, V O

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the methodological aspects of teaching histology at the medical university and medical college. The authors raise the issue of the necessity of teaching of the topic "Introduction to Special Histology" and the inclusion of the appropriate chapter into the textbooks. This is important for the students, as the formation of the general concepts of organ structure and function, components, and classification will aid in the further study of specific organs during the course of Special Histology. The authors describe their own experience in teaching of the section, dedicated to the general regularities of organ structure, present some definitions and classifications that are used by them for a number of years.

  4. [Almas delirantes (1925) by Luís Cebola: the poetics of the human psyche and the physician as mediator between the universe of mental illness and society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Denise

    2018-03-01

    Lúis Cebola's 1925 work Almas delirantes [Delusional Souls] presented various psychopathologies through metaphorical and lyrical portraits rather than from a medical/ scientific point of view, showing that he perceived his patients as more than objects of scientific study in a process of identification, empathy, and compassion. Cebola defined psychopathological states according to contrast with normality, but stressed that these diseases could arise in any individual, and the book simultaneously acted as a warning to readers. The text also publicized the Museum of Madness [Museu da Loucura], which he created at the Casa de Saúde do Telhal, and the art produced by his patients, positioning himself as a messenger between the closed universe of the psychiatric hospital and Portuguese society.

  5. Human variation and body mass index: a review of the universality of BMI cut-offs, gender and urban-rural differences, and secular changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascie-Taylor, C G Nicholas; Goto, Rie

    2007-03-01

    Use of BMI as a surrogate for body fat percentage is debatable and universal BMI cut-off points do not seem appropriate; lower cut-off points than currently recommended by WHO should be used in some populations, especially in Asia. The adult WHO BMI database indicates that, on average, women are more obese than men, while men are more likely to be pre-obese than women. Urban rates of overweight and obesity are generally higher than rural rates in both sexes. The trend in pre-obesity and obesity over time is generally upward, with very marked increases in the USA and UK in both sexes over the last 10 years.

  6. Liebe ohne Leiden? Love without Sorrows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Müller

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Im vorliegenden Sammelband werden unterschiedliche Zugänge und Herangehensweisen zum Thema ‚Liebe im Kapitalismus‘ nebeneinandergestellt. Die Idee der Liebe innerhalb der ‚Logik des Kapitalismus‘ soll genauer untersucht werden. Dafür werden Erfahrungen und Reflexionen aus Kunst, Literatur, Philosophie und Psychoanalyse sowie aus Datenerhebungen und Interviews herangezogen und analysiert. Die Beiträge gruppieren sich zumeist allerdings stärker um das Themenfeld der Liebe. Veränderungen der kapitalistischen Logik nachzuzeichnen, wird in den Ausführungen kaum angestrebt.The volume at hand compares varying approaches to the theme of ‘love under capitalism.’ The intention is to more closely examine the idea of love within the ‘logic of capitalism.’ In order to achieve this, experiences and reflections from art, literature, philosophy, and psychoanalysis as well as data collections and interviews are drawn out and analyzed. The contributions, however, are mostly grouped around the thematic of love. Most of the studies barely begin to sketch the changes of capitalist logic.

  7. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    Declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education (SHE) can be viewed as a piece of international regulation. Over the past 30 years research at universities has produced convincing data to warn about deterioration of the environment, resource scarcity and the need for sustainability. This in turn....... Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...

  8. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  9. Negotiating Universality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steven L Bjerregård

    rights research. The dissertation argues that the breakthrough for human rights and its historical trajectory, that made it a central part of international law and politics and of our global moral imagination, has been misdated and misunderstood. In this work, therefore, Jamaica and Liberia emerge...

  10. Post discharge formula fortification of maternal human milk of very low birth weight preterm infants: an introduction of a feeding protocol in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer El Sakka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the growth parameters and nutritional biochemical markers and complications of fortification of human milk by post discharge formula of preterm very low birth weight newborns (VLBW. Fifty preterm infants less than 37 weeks with weight less than 1500 g were enrolled in the study. They received parental nutrition and feeding according to our protocol. When enteral feeding reached 100 cc/kg/day, infants were randomized into two groups: group I, Cases, n=25, where post discharge formula (PDF was used for fortification, group II, Controls, n=25 with no fortification. Infants of both groups were given 50% of required enteral feeding as premature formula. This protocol was used until infants’ weight reached 1800 g. Daily weight, weekly length and head circumference were recorded. Hemoglobin, albumin (Alb, electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and clinical complications were documented. Human milk fortification with PDF resulted in better growth with increase in weight 16.8 and 13.78 g/kg/day (P=0.0430, length 0.76 and 0.58 cm/week (P=0.0027, and head circumference of 0.59 and 0.5 cm/week (P=0.0217 in cases and controls respectively. Duration of hospital stay was less in cases (22.76 versus 28.52 days in Controls, P=0.02. No significant changes were found in serum electrolytes, BUN, or Alb between both groups. Hemoglobin was significantly higher in Cases, P=0.04. There were no significant clinical complications. Our feeding protocol of fortification of human milk with PDF in preterm very low birth weight newborns resulted in better growth and decrease in length of hospital stay. The use of PDF could be an alternative option for fortification of mothers’ milk for preterm VLBW infants in developing countries with low resources.

  11. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 9 March 2009 COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Are We Descended From Heavy Neutrinos? Prof. Boris Kayser / Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Center, Geneva, Illinois, USA) Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe. The discovery that they have nonzero masses has raised a number of very interesting questions about them, and about their connections to other areas of physics and to cosmology. After briefly reviewing what has been learned about the neutrinos so far, we will identify the major open questions, explain why they are interesting, and discuss ideas and plans for answering them through future experiments. We will highlight a particularly intriguing question: Are neutrinos the key to understanding why the universe contains matter but almost no antimatter, making it s...

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  13. 76 FR 36152 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ...: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI; Correction AGENCY: National Park... human remains and associated funerary objects. Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology... may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human...

  14. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  15. Ética e direitos humanos na e pela pesquisa e extensão universitárias Human ethics and rights in the university research and extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Spanier Amador

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo discuto a ética e os direitos humanos na e pela pesquisa e extensão universitárias, transversalizando os conceitos de tempo e de subjetividade, sobretudo a partir das contribuições de Deleuze, Guattari e Foucault. Abordando a ética, os direitos humanos, a produção de conhecimento e a vida em sua instigante indiscernibilidade, convido a refletir sobre a assunção de uma postura, enquanto pesquisadores e extensionistas, em devir, ou seja, cedendo lugar à experimentação e acionando a diferença. Discuto sobre o tema no plano das epistemologias propondo a promoção da ética e dos direitos humanos na esfera mesma da produção de conhecimento.In this article ethics and the human rights are discussed in and through university research, crossing the concepts of time and subjectivity, following the theoretical references of Deleuze, Guattari and Foucault. Approaching ethics, human rights, "knowledge production" and life as intertwined notions, it proposes the possibility of the attitude of "researchers to be", which involves the possibility of working with experimentation and "difference". The discussion is carried out in the plan of epistemologies and proposes the promotion of ethics and human rights in the same sphere of "knowledge production".

  16. Knowledge and Acceptability of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination among Women Attending the Gynaecological Outpatient Clinics of a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunade, Kehinde S; Sunmonu, Oyebola; Osanyin, Gbemisola E; Oluwole, Ayodeji A

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine among women attending the gynaecology clinics of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). This was a descriptive cross-sectional study involving 148 consecutively selected women attending the gynaecology clinic of LUTH. Relevant information was obtained from these women using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The data was analysed and then presented by simple descriptive statistics using tables and charts. Chi-square statistics were used to test the association between the sociodemographical variables and acceptance of HPV vaccination. All significance values were reported at P < 0.05. The mean age of the respondents was 35.7 ± 9.7 years. The study showed that 36.5% of the respondents had heard about HPV infection while only 18.9% had knowledge about the existence of HPV vaccines. Overall, 81.8% of the respondents accepted that the vaccines could be administered to their teenage girls with the level of education of the mothers being the major determinant of their acceptability ( P = 0.013). Awareness of HPV infections and existence of HPV vaccines is low. However, the acceptance of HPV vaccines is generally high. Efforts should be made to increase the awareness about cervical cancer, its aetiologies, and prevention via HPV vaccination.

  17. The development of the learning video for the flipped classroom model on student of open university on human skeletal system and muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrini, V. S.

    2018-05-01

    The objectives of the research are to develop the learning video for the flipped classroom model for Open University’s student and to know the effectiveness of the video. The development of the video used Research and Development ADDIE design (Analyses, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation). The sampling used purposive sampling was 28 students in Open University of Nganjuk. The techniques of data collection were the observation data to know the problems of the students, and learning facilities, the test (pre-test and post-test) to know a knowledge aspect, a questionnaire to know advisability of video learning, a structured interview to confirm their answer. The result of the expert of matter and media showed that the average product score was 3.75 of 4 or very good, the small-scale test showed that the average score was 3.60 of 4 and the large-scale test showed that the average score was 3.80 of 4, it had a very good category. The t-test with paired sample test showed that sig. (2-tailed) video for flipped classroom was effective to be implemented.

  18. Universal mortality law and immortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  19. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  20. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  1. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 28 April 2008 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravity : an Emergent Perspective by Prof. Thanu Padmanabhan, Pune University Dean, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India I will motivate and describe a novel perspective in which gravity arises as an emergent phenomenon, somewhat like elasticity. This perspective throws light on several issues which are somewhat of a mystery in the conventional approach. Moreover it provides new insights on the dark energy problem. In fact, I will show that it is necessary to have such an alternative perspective in order to solve the cosmological constant problem.Information: http://theory.physics.unige.ch/~fiteo/seminars/COL/collist.html

  2. Atoms against the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, J.; Raul Vera, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Woody Allen's masterpiece Annie Hall the main character is worried about the expansion of the universe. Indeed, during a childhood visit to his psychiatrist, his mother admonishes him: ''You're here in Brooklyn! Brooklyn is not expanding!''. But is that really true? Relativists have attacked this naive question many times and have arrived at different answers. New light has now been thrown on the subject by William Bonnor from Queen Mary and Westfield College in London by considering the influence of the expanding universe on the size of the hydrogen atom (Class. Quantum Grav. 1999 16 1313). According to Bonner's calculations we can conclude that the cosmic expansion does not affect human-scale objects like laboratories and our bodies. In this article the authors explain the reasoning behind this research and its thought provoking consequences. (UK)

  3. Seroprevalence of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus infections among pregnant women who attend the University of Gondar teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endris, Mengistu; Deressa, Tekalign; Belyhun, Yeshambel; Moges, Feleke

    2015-03-03

    Syphilis and HIV infections in pregnancy result in a number of adverse outcomes including neonatal death and vertical transmission. Ethiopia is a country where these infections are highly prevalent. However, data on co-morbidities of syphilis and HIV among pregnant women in Gondar are scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of these infections and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care at the University of Gondar teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from February to June 2011. Structured interviews were used to collect socio-demographic and obstetric data. Sera against syphilis were screened by rapid plasma reagin test; and confirmed by Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay. HIV infection was detected by rapid HIV test kits following the national algorithms for HIV testing. Data were summarized by descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Of 385 pregnant women, reactive syphilis was noted in 11/385 (2.9%) and seroprevalence of HIV was 43/385 (11.2%). The prevalence of syphilis and HIV co-infection was 2/385(0.5%). High rate of syphilis was observed among the women with above 30 years of age (OR 3.69, 95% CI 0.83 - 16.82). Women with a history of miscarriage and stillbirth were more likely to be infected by syphilis (OR 2.22, 95% CI 0.54-9.60) and (OR 3.24, 95% CI 0.00-17.54), respectively. Our data indicated that syphilis and HIV infections are still important public health concerns among pregnant women in the Gondar area. Hence, we recommend strenuous screening of all pregnant women for these infections during antenatal care. Further, strengthening health education on the mode of transmission and prevention of HIV and syphilis is essential for effective control of these infections.

  4. The Challenge of University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, John; Turcan, Romeo V.; Bugaian, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduce the reader to the book, providing a historical perspective and a current understanding of university autonomy. While appreciating the central role of the four dimensions of university autonomy – organisational, financial, human resource, and academic – the authors conjecture...... that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a holistic view of the complex inter-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and, equally, pull in opposite directions. This holistic view is represented in a model of institutional university autonomy......, which is discussed at length in the chapter. The authors conclude by presenting international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are genuinely global....

  5. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in..., University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 3260 South...

  6. Explicit training in human values and social attitudes of future engineers in Spain : commentary on "preparing to understand and use science in the real world: interdisciplinary study concentrations at the technical University of Darmstadt".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Jaime

    2013-12-01

    In Spain before the 1990s there was no clear and explicit comprehensive training for future engineers with regard to social responsibility and social commitment. Following the Spanish university curricular reform, which began in the early 1990s, a number of optional subjects became available to students, concerning science, technology and society (STS), international cooperation, the environment and sustainability. The latest redefinition of the Spanish curriculum in line with the Bologna agreements has reduced the number of non-obligatory subjects, but could lead to improving preparation for social responsibility due to the requirement that the design of curricula and the assessment of students should be based on competencies, some of which include human values and attitudes.

  7. Treatment-Seeking for Tuberculosis-Suggestive Symptoms: A Reflection on the Role of Human Agency in the Context of Universal Health Coverage in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Kumwenda

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is highly infectious and one of the leading killers globally. Several studies from sub-Saharan Africa highlight health systems challenges that affect ability to cope with existing disease burden, including TB, although most of these employ survey-type approaches. Consequently, few address community or patient perspectives and experiences. At the same time, understanding of the mechanisms by which the health systems challenges translate into seeking or avoidance of formal health care remains limited. This paper applies the notion of human agency to examine the ways people who have symptoms suggestive of TB respond to and deal with the symptoms vis-à-vis major challenges inherent within health delivery systems. Empirical data were drawn from a qualitative study exploring the ways in which notions of masculinity affect engagement with care, including men's well-documented tendency to delay in seeking care for TB symptoms. The study was carried out in three high-density locales of urban Blantyre, Malawi. Data were collected in March 2011 -March 2012 using focus group discussions, of which eight (mixed sex = two; female only = three; male only = three were with 74 ordinary community members, and two (both mixed sex were with 20 health workers; and in-depth interviews with 20 TB patients (female = 14 and 20 un-investigated chronic coughers (female = eight. The research process employed a modified version of grounded theory. Data were coded using a coding scheme that was initially generated from the study aims and subsequently progressively amended to incorporate concepts emerging during the analysis. Coded data were retrieved, re-read, and broken down and reconnected iteratively to generate themes. A myriad of problems were described for health systems at the primary health care level, centring largely on shortages of resources (human, equipment, and drugs and unprofessional conduct by health care providers. Participants consistently

  8. [Human papilloma virus and Chlamydia trachomatis by number of sexual partners and time of sexual activity on university students in the Region of La Araucanía, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Angélica; Lagos, Nicole; Montenegro, Sonia; Orellana, Juan José; Vásquez, Ana María; Moreno, Sergio; Liempi, Sandra; Guzmán, Pablo; Fonseca-Salamanca, Flery

    2016-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs), among teenagers and young people, with risk factors: active sex life and multiple partners. Chlamydia trachomatis infection may favor HPV infection and this, the development of cervical cancer. Both infections can lead to consequences on sexual and reproductive health. To determine frequency of HPV and C. trachomatis in asymptomatic university women less than 25 years, associating them with number of sexual partners (n°SxP) and time of sexual activity (TSxA). Material andMethods: 151 cervical samples for HPV and C. trachomatis, were processed by conventional and in real time reaction polymerase chain. HPV 21, 8%, C. trachomatis 11, 2% and co-infection (HPV/C.trachomatis), 4.6%. Aimong HPV +, 80, 6% showed high risk HPV. The n°SxP was strongly associated with HPV. Aimong young coinfected HPV/C. trachomatis, 71.4% had 3 or more PSx. Chlamydia trachomatis was more frequent (64,7%) that HPV within range of 3-5 years according to the TSxA, Discussion: A high prevalence of HPV and C. trachomatis was observed. Young women with coinfection HPV/C. trachomatis could be a high-risk group need to monitor their infections. It suggests the implementation of university programs in education, counseling and prevention in sexual health.

  9. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 25 March 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Hunting for the Higgs with D0 at the Tevatron Prof. Gustaaf Brooijmans / Columbia University The search for the Higgs boson is one of the most important endeavors in current experimental particle physics. At the eve of the LHC start, the Tevatron is delivering record luminosity allowing both CDF and D0 to explore a new region of possible Higgs masses. In this seminar, the techniques used to search for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron will be explained, limiting factors will be examined, and the sensitivity in the various channels will be reviewed. The newly excluded values of the standard model Higgs mass will be presented. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : J.-S. Graulich

  10. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 6 avril 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR àt 17:00 – Auditoire Stückelberg Hospital superbugs, nanomechanics and statistical physics Prof. Dr G. Aeppli / University College London The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report silicon cantilever based studies of self-assembled monolayers of mucopeptides which model drug-sensitive and resistant bacterial walls. The underlying concepts needed to understand the measurements will simplify the design of cantilevers and coatings for biosensing and could even impact our understanding of drug action on bacteria themselves. (Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.) Organizer : Prof. Markus Büttiker ...

  11. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  13. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. 022 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 October 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Long-lived particle searches at colliders Dr. Philippe Mermod / Oxford University The discovery of exotic long-lived particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This talk will focus on searches for long-lived charged massive particles, where "charged" refers to the magnetic, electric or colour charge. Previous searches at the LEP and Tevatron Colliders allowed to put mass and cross section limits on various kinds of long-lived particles, such as Magnetic Monopoles and metastable leptons and up-type quarks. The new energy regime made available at the LHC will probe physics regions well beyond these limits. F...

  14. Universal algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, George

    1979-01-01

    Universal Algebra, heralded as ". . . the standard reference in a field notorious for the lack of standardization . . .," has become the most authoritative, consistently relied on text in a field with applications in other branches of algebra and other fields such as combinatorics, geometry, and computer science. Each chapter is followed by an extensive list of exercises and problems. The "state of the art" account also includes new appendices (with contributions from B. Jónsson, R. Quackenbush, W. Taylor, and G. Wenzel) and a well-selected additional bibliography of over 1250 papers and books which makes this a fine work for students, instructors, and researchers in the field. "This book will certainly be, in the years to come, the basic reference to the subject." --- The American Mathematical Monthly (First Edition) "In this reviewer's opinion [the author] has more than succeeded in his aim. The problems at the end of each chapter are well-chosen; there are more than 650 of them. The book is especially sui...

  15. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 April 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Search for spin-1 excited bosons at the LHC Mihail V. Chizhov (Physics Department, Sofia University, Bulgaria) I will discuss the resonance production of new type spin-1 excited bosons, Z*, at hadron colliders. They can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the invariant dilepton mass distribution in the same way as the well-known hypothetical gauge bosons, Z�. This makes them very interesting objects for early searches with the LHC first data. Moreover, they have unique signatures in transverse momentum and angular distributions, which allow to distinguish them from other resonances. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  16. Growth hormone secretion is diminished and tightly controlled in humans enriched for familial longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Spoel, Evie; Jansen, Steffy W; Akintola, Abimbola A

    2016-01-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) signaling has been consistently associated with increased health and lifespan in various mouse models. Here, we assessed GH secretion and its control in relation with human familial longevity. We frequently sampled blood over 24 h in 19 middle-aged offspring of long......-living families from the Leiden Longevity Study together with 18 of their partners as controls. Circulating GH concentrations were measured every 10 min and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) every 4 h. Using deconvolution analysis, we found that 24-h.......39-0.53)] compared with controls [0.66 (0.56-0.77)], indicating tighter control of GH secretion. No significant differences were observed in circulating levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP3 between offspring and controls. In conclusion, GH secretion in human familial longevity is characterized by diminished secretion rate...

  17. Radioecology. University textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This textbook of radioecology for university students consists of next chapters: (1) Radioecology as special part of ecology; (2) Radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) Radioactivity of atmosphere an factors influenced its value; (4) Radioactivity of waters and factors influenced its value; (5) Radioactivity of soil and its connection with mechanical structure and chemical composition of soil as well ass with used agricultural-technical and agricultural-chemical procedures; (6) Radioactivity of plants and factors influenced its value; (7) Radioactivity of animals and animal organs and factors influenced its value; (8) Ionisation radiation and human organism. Radioactivity of human tissues; (9) Behaviour of individual groups of radionuclide in the environment; (10) Determination of radionuclides in components of the environment; (11) Radioactive wastes; (12) Nullification of nuclear reactors; (13) Radionuclides in medicine; (14) Radionuclides in vegetal production and food processing; (15) Safety of work in nuclear scientific and technological disciplines; (16) Assessment and regulation of radiation risks for the environment

  18. Orientaciones metodológicas de la disciplina anatomía humana en las sedes universitarias municipales Methodological directions on human anatomy discipline in the municipal university venues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraida Hidalgo Gato Castillo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El proceso docente educativo en las sedes universitarias municipales se encuentran a cargo de médicos generales integrales, por lo que el colectivo de Anatomía Humana trazó orientaciones metodológicas que caracterizan la disciplina Anatomía Humana, explicando las formas de organización de la enseñanza a través de cinco sistemas: objetivos, conocimientos, habilidades, clases y evaluación. Se recomienda la bibliografía básica, complementaria, auxiliar y de consulta, así como el estudio independiente. De manera que garantizan la preparación metodológica de todos los facilitadores que están comprometidos con el proceso docente educativo del actual modelo de formación.The educative teaching process in the municipal university venues is in charge of the family doctors, so the teaching staff of Human Anatomy gave methodological directions characterizing the Human Anatomy discipline, explaining the ways of organization of Teaching by means of five systems: objectives, knowledge, training, classes and evaluation. The basic, complementary, auxiliary and consultation bibliography is recommended, as well as the individual study, so it will guarantee the methodological training of all the providers involved in the educative teaching process of the current training model.

  19. A survey on the prevalence of high-risk subtypes of human papilloma virus among women with cervical neoplasia in Isfahan University of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allameh, Tajossadat; Moghim, Sharareh; Asadi-Zeidabadi, Maryam

    2011-12-01

    Given the importance of epidemiological studies on the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and its subtypes to plan more effective strategies for cervical cancer prevention, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer in Isfahan. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, women referred to oncology clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital because of abnormal cytology of their cervices within the last year were studied. The 2001 Bethesda system was used for histologic classification. The distribution of different pathologies was as follows: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) 34.7%, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) 30.5%, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) 22.8%, atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASCUS) 8.4%, and adenocarcinoma (AC) 3.3%. There was no case of atypical glandular of undetermined significance or cases of adenocarcinoma associated with an early lesion. The presence of HPV infection and its subtypes including HPV 16, 18, 6 and 11 was assessed in different cytological categories of cervical neoplasia, by using polymerase chain reaction method. During this study, 130 patients were studied. Their median age was 52 years (range 29-73 years). HPV was detected in 118/130 patients (90.8%) with abnormal cervical cytology. The prevalence of positive HPV samples was 97.6, 80, 93.1, 92.3, and 66.6% in cases with SCC, AC, HSIL, LSIL, and ASCUS, respectively (P prevalence of HPV type 16 was not significantly different in various cytological categories of cervical neoplasia (P > 0.05). The prevalence of HPV type 16 and 18 was significantly higher than the HPV type 11 or 6 in cervical neoplastic lesions (P prevalence of HPV infection in all categories of cervical neoplasia. This emphasizes the importance of HPV screening and vaccination programs. In order to assess more effective screening programs in Isfahan and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of

  20. Black Holes in Our Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are humanity's high-technology windows onto the universe. For reasons that will ... instrument ever built; and it was the first direct ... gravity will drive it to collapse into a black hole. Indeed, in 2007, ... Given their large X-ray power, it has been ...

  1. University of Maryland MRSEC - Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    . University of Maryland Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Home About Us Leadership MRSEC Templates Opportunities Search Home » About Us » Leadership Leadership Reutt-Robey photo Janice from the College of Arts and Humanities at UMD. Historical Leadership Ellen Williams MRSEC Director

  2. Johannes Müller, Exile Memories and the Dutch Revolt: The Narrated Diaspora, 1550-1750

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. (Annemieke Romein

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Müller, Exile Memories and the Dutch Revolt: The Narrated Diaspora, 1550-1750 (Dissertation Leiden University 2014; Leiden/ Boston: Brill. 2016, 254 pp., ISBN 9789004315914.

  3. The Right to Education in the International Regulations on Protection of Human Rights and its regulation in the National Legal System : Preliminary Analysis from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Creusa de Araújo Borges

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, in this article, the question of the right to education, from the Univer- sal Declaration of Human Rights (1948 and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966. In the Brazilian national law, they are analyzed the Federal Constitution of 1988 and the Law of Guidelines and Bases of National Educa- tion, 1996, regarding the regulation of education matter, in coordination with the inter- national instruments in question. It is noteworthy that the regulation of the matter at the national level, is influenced by the recognition of this right in international norms, but advances in the recognition of the right to higher education of marginalized social groups, expanding the mandatory gratuity and beyond elementary school because in the Brazilian case, basic education is compulsory and the principle of free governs the entire education system in official establishments. Set up in this way, the existence of an essential core regarding the right to education, which is fully chargeable.

  4. Pain Assessment in Impaired Cognition (PAIC: content validity of the Dutch version of a new and universal tool to measure pain in dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dalen-Kok AH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Annelore H van Dalen-Kok,1 Wilco P Achterberg,1 Wieke E Rijkmans,1 Sara A Tukker-van Vuuren,1 Suzanne Delwel,2,3 Henrica CW de Vet,4 Frank Lobbezoo,2,5 Margot WM de Waal1 1Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, 2Department of Oral Kinesiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA, University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, 3Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, VU University, 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, 5MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Objectives: Detection and measurement of pain in persons with dementia by using observational pain measurement tools is essential. However, the evidence for the psychometric properties of existing observational tools remains limited. Therefore, a new meta-tool has been developed: Pain Assessment in Impaired Cognition (PAIC, as a collaborative EU action. The aim is to describe the translation procedure and content validity of the Dutch version of the PAIC.Methods: Translation of the PAIC into Dutch followed the forward-backward approach of the Guidelines for Establishing Cultural Equivalence of Instruments. A questionnaire survey was administered to clinical nursing home experts (20 physicians and 20 nurses to determine whether the PAIC items are indicative of pain and whether items are specific for pain or for other disorders (anxiety disorder, delirium, dementia, or depression. To quantify content validity, mean scores per item were calculated.Results: Eleven items were indicative of pain, for example, “frowning,” “freezing,” and “groaning.” Fifteen items were considered to be pain-specific, for example, “frowning,” “curling up,” and “complaining.” There were discrepancies between the notion of pain characteristics according to nurses

  5. A World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the mission and tasks of the World Nuclear University (WNU) established to build worldwide knowledge and support the effective use of nuclear techniques for solving the global human and environmental problems of 21 century and thereby support the global sustainable development. In this respect the WNU would build Human resources, Technical knowledge and Public Support. A Network of educational and research institutions with strong programmes in nuclear science and engineering will be created. The WNU Head quarters and Regional Centers will: 1) Facilitate agreement on curriculum and WNU certification curriculum 2) Develop and administer scholarships; 3) Foster educational exchanges within WNU family institutions; 4) Build core faculty for summer 1/2 year Masters degrees; 5) Co-ordinate research, grants and knowledge management research; 6) Operate think tank and public information service; 7) Emphasise key areas such as safeguards systems and the nuclear-renewable-hydrogen economy; 8) Oversee world-wide human resources pool; 9) Orchestrate alumni support for nuclear technology. The possible participants and possible location of the Regional Centres are given

  6. The Politics of Universalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the political function of human rights in the 16th Century in Spain just after the conquest of America. It claims that the study of this period of early globalization is relevant for the understanding of the function of human rights discourses to day, at the ‘end...... discourses is split down the middle: it serves both as a critique of power and as an extension of power, and the disclosure of this split helps us understand the inner politics of human rights. The article discusses the trial in Valladolid in 1550 when the rights of the barbarian Indians of America were put...... on trial. It focuses mainly on the arguments made by Bartolomé de las Casas and on the reasons why the King allowed las Casas’ fierce critique of the conquest to be published in a period of otherwise severe censorship. The article is inspired by Etienne Balibar’s idea of ‘politics of universalism...

  7. A biblioterapia na humanização da assistência hospitalar do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina – HU/UFSC/Bibliotherapy for the hospital care humanization in the university hospital of Santa Catarina Federal University – HU/UFSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Seitz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por finalidade apresentar resultados do estudo realizado com pacientes, acompanhantes e funcionários das Unidades de Internação Cirúrgica do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UIC/HU/UFSC. O foco central foi o de verificar até que ponto a prática biblioterapêutica e as atividades de lazer contribuem no processo de Humanização da Assistência Hospitalar dos pacientes internados nas (UIC/HU/UFSC, na percepção dos pacientes, acompanhantes, funcionários da enfermagem e assistentes sociais da referida unidade de internação. Foram entrevistados 16 pacientes, 11 acompanhantes e 13 funcionários da enfermagem e assistentes sociais. As atividades de lazer analisadas neste estudo foram a prática biblioterapêutica, as atividades do grupo Reaja e a dança. Trata-se de uma pesquisa quantitativa e qualitativa. Quanto ao procedimento técnico, a presente pesquisa é classificada como estudo de caso, no qual, utilizou-se, para a coleta dos dados a entrevista estruturada e, cujos resultados demonstram que as atividades contribuem muito na Humanização da Assistência Hospitalar dos pacientes internados na UIC/HU/UFSC. This article has for purpose to present resulted of the study carried through with patients, companions and employees of the Units of Surgical Internment of the University Hospital of the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UIC/HU/UFSC. The central focus was to verify until point the practical library-therapy and the activities of leisure contribute in the process of Humanization of the Hospital Assistance of the patients interned in (UIC/HU/UFSC, in the perception of the patients, companions, employees of the nursing and social assistants of the related unit of internment. 16 patients, 11 companions and 13 social employees of the nursing and assistants had been interviewed. The analyzed activities of leisure in this study had been the practical library-therapy, the activities of

  8. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase...

  9. Vulnerability, diversity and scarcity: on universal rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bryan Stanley; Dumas, Alex

    2013-11-01

    This article makes a contribution to the on-going debates about universalism and cultural relativism from the perspective of sociology. We argue that bioethics has a universal range because it relates to three shared human characteristics,--human vulnerability, institutional precariousness and scarcity of resources. These three components of our argument provide support for a related notion of 'weak foundationalism' that emphasizes the universality and interrelatedness of human experience, rather than their cultural differences. After presenting a theoretical position on vulnerability and human rights, we draw on recent criticism of this approach in order to paint a more nuanced picture. We conclude that the dichotomy between universalism and cultural relativism has some conceptual merit, but it also has obvious limitations when we consider the political economy of health and its impact on social inequality.

  10. an assessment of arrearage in nigerian universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    of Uyo and University of Calabar libraries were accessed on how promptly their resources are acquired and processed, so as to distribute them to users for capacity building and sustainable development. .... There is an urgent need for human.

  11. In Search of Cultural Universals: Translation Universals. Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DIMA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the world is disclosed under various shapes, among which language is the best representative. Specific to humans, it renders feelings and thoughts concerning different communication contexts where words become dynamic primitives endowed with meanings, which recreate themes and reconfigure space and time as universal coordinates. The main objective of the paper is to provide a tentative analysis of the way in which translation universals are manifest in translating proverbs and sayings in the short novels Popa Tanda (Pope Tanda and Moara cu Noroc (The Lucky Mill by Ioan Slavici.

  12. Communicabilité des droits de l’homme : la Déclaration Universelle et sa mise en texte Human Rights and Communicability: the Universal Declaration as Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Susana

    2010-04-01

    de l’homme, donc leur universalité possible.To what extent does the textual condition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 (UDHR affect its public status and the universal range of the question it raises, namely, the humanity in man and his rights? This article aims at exemplifying the contribution of a philosophy of communication (extended from dialogue to text to the field of discourse analysis and argumentation. We will apprehend the text of the UDHR as a communicative relationship established in the rhetorical framework of a message to an audience. After having shown the importance of the “duty of dialogue” for approaching human rights (Ethics of discussion; New Rhetoric, the article highlights the importance of integrating dialogical analysis into text analysis in order to restore their full size to the concepts of “meaning”, “dialogism” and “communicability”, quite limited in the dominant theories of discourse, but also to extend them to the text considered as virtual public communication. Textuality is thus understood as a relation of common questioning between an author and a reader invited to settle in the “world of the text”, based on categories stating what is to be sought for or promoted in the real world. The analysis is grounded on the assumption that the Declaration constitutes a communication in absentia between its pragmatic instances: a responsible Authority and a Readership extended to the dimension of humanity, questioned in the text as a “public matter” (res publica.  The article claims that the possible world built by the UDHR is based on the categorical question of an essential human reality, questioned in an existence always threatened by inhumanity, and to which an answer is brought by rights defined as categorical propositions. This textual form supports the declarative effect as well as the public communicability of human rights, therefore their possible universality.

  13. The Learning University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Glenys

    1999-01-01

    As universities make cross-sectoral alliances, various models for integrating postsecondary education into universities arise: contract, brokerage, collaborative, validation, joint program, dual-sector institution, tertiary university, metaphoric, and federal. The integrated, comprehensive university is the learning university of the 21st century.…

  14. Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  15. Learning Biases Predict a Word Order Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Legendre, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    How recurrent typological patterns, or universals, emerge from the extensive diversity found across the world's languages constitutes a central question for linguistics and cognitive science. Recent challenges to a fundamental assumption of generative linguistics--that universal properties of the human language acquisition faculty constrain the…

  16. Assessing academic potential for university admission: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Biographical Questionnaire (BQ) has been used in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of the Witwatersrand since the mid-80s, to identify potential to succeed at university among applicants who have not met the requirements for automatic admission. As the key instrument in a special admissions process, the

  17. Factors Influencing Academic Failure of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yousaf Ali; Ahamad, Zahoor; Kousar, Sadia

    2013-01-01

    There was a close link between education and development. Education played a vital role in human capital formation. Academic failure from university was a problem that had became a serious concern for higher education institutions. This study presented the result of a recent investigation at the University of Gujrat that attempted to identify the…

  18. El campus virtual como recurso útil: un estudio de estudiantes universitarios de carreras humanísticas [The virtual learning platform as a useful resource: a research among university students of humanistic degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Luján-García

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo, realizado con estudiantes universitarios de dos carreras humanísticas en la Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria: Filología Inglesa y Geografía, investiga el grado de familiaridad y utilidad del campus virtual en el mundo académico. Los resultados demuestran que es una herramienta útil, aunque percibida más como un apoyo a la enseñanza presencial que con validez en sí misma. La variable género revela que los hombres valoran mejor esta herramienta, mientras que los informantes de geografía perciben más positivamente el campus virtual que los de filología inglesa. Abstract:This paper presents the results of a study carried out among undergraduate students of English Language and Literature and Geography at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria to investigate their degree of familiarity with and the general usefulness of the virtual learning platform in Higher Education. The results show that whilst this is indeed a useful tool, it is used to best effect when seen as a supportive resource for regular education. The variation in responses from men and women reveals that men are more familiar with and value this tool more highly than women. It was also found that the Geography Undergraduates have a more positive view of virtual learning platforms than English Language and Literature Undergraduates.

  19. The prevalence and risk factors for Trichomonas vaginalis infection amongst human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women attending the antenatal clinics of a university teaching hospital in Lagos, South-Western, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijasan, Olaolopin; Okunade, Kehinde Sharafadeen; Oluwole, Ayodeji Ayotunde

    2018-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection is the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Interactions between this infection and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm labour, premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, low birth weight and post-abortal sepsis. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of T. vaginalis infection amongst HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal care at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos, Nigeria. This was an analytical cross-sectional study in which 320 eligible participants which included 160 HIV-positive (case group) and 160 HIV-negative (control group) pregnant women were recruited at the antenatal clinic of LUTH. A structured pro forma was used to collect data from consenting participants after which high vaginal swabs were collected, processed and examined for T. vaginalis. The association between categorical variables was tested using the Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test where applicable. All significances were reported at P women were 10% and 8.1%, respectively (P = 0.559). Significant risk factors for T. vaginalis infection in the HIV-positive pregnant women were early coitarche (P women for T. vaginalis infection as a tool of reducing HIV acquisition, especially in pregnancy, campaign to create better sexual health awareness should be commenced as a way to contributing to the reduction in T. vaginalis infection during pregnancy and perinatal transmission of HIV.

  20. Museums theme – Quest for Absolute Zero: A Human Story about Rivalry and Cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk van Delft

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 Rijksmuseum Boerhaave organised an exhibition on the occasion of the centennial of the liquefaction of helium by Kamerlingh Onnes in Leiden. Quest for Absolute Zero was the first major temporary exhibition aimed at new target groups. Therefore the focus was on the human scale and the colourful story behind the ‘man of Absolute Zero’. The fierce competition with James Dewar from the Royal Institution was also highlighted. The outcome of Quest for Absolute Zero was extremely positive for Rijksmuseum Boerhaave in terms of visitor numbers, media coverage, collaborations and side events. The project also proved to be a very useful lever for the renewal of the permanent exhibition, scheduled to open in December 2017.