WorldWideScience

Sample records for humane societal appreciation

  1. NANO SCENARIO: Role-Playing to Appreciate the Societal Effects of Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, Leslie; Keating, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a university-sponsored experiential-based simulation, the NANO SCENARIO, to increase the public's awareness and affect attitudes on the societal implications of nanoscience and nanotechnology by bringing together diverse stakeholders' perspectives in a participatory learning environment. Nanotechnology has the potential for…

  2. Humanities and the future notion of societal impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Bolette Rye

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author relates various areas such as Higher Education, social media, educational politics, society and humanistic research in regards to comment on the challenges faced by Humanities and its future notion of societal impact. It is argued that in order to identify and understand...... Education in Denmark is explored as an educational example of both the development and future of Humanities and its notion of impact. The specific study programme in question is a humanities-based Higher Educational programme called Humanistic Informatics at Aalborg University. The collective purpose...... of the article is therefore to look upon the recent development within this specific Higher Educational programme as an important and unique type of humanistic societal impact....

  3. Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Andrew P.; Svensson, Erik I.

    2017-01-01

    Humans have dramatic, diverse and far-reaching influences on the evolution of other organisms. Numerous examples of this human-induced contemporary evolution have been reported in a number of ‘contexts’, including hunting, harvesting, fishing, agriculture, medicine, climate change, pollution, eutrophication, urbanization, habitat fragmentation, biological invasions and emerging/disappearing diseases. Although numerous papers, journal special issues and books have addressed each of these contexts individually, the time has come to consider them together and thereby seek important similarities and differences. The goal of this special issue, and this introductory paper, is to promote and expand this nascent integration. We first develop predictions as to which human contexts might cause the strongest and most consistent directional selection, the greatest changes in evolutionary potential, the greatest genetic (as opposed to plastic) changes and the greatest effects on evolutionary diversification. We then develop predictions as to the contexts where human-induced evolutionary changes might have the strongest effects on the population dynamics of the focal evolving species, the structure of their communities, the functions of their ecosystems and the benefits and costs for human societies. These qualitative predictions are intended as a rallying point for broader and more detailed future discussions of how human influences shape evolution, and how that evolution then influences species traits, biodiversity, ecosystems and humans. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences’. PMID:27920373

  4. Situational Affordance - Appreciating human Interpretations in New Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, John Bang; Koch, Christian

    2009-01-01

    New Product Development (NPD) takes place within a web of connected actors who do not master fully the objects of the process, but rather they interpret the affordance - the enabling and constraining framing by objects such as sketches, drawings, specifications, mock-ups and prototypes. The article...... and the selected solution forms the basis of a new writing process. The cases also share the tension between and combination of hardness of some elements of the product and the malleability of others. Finally, the perception of an artefact is not an iso-lated and individualistic activity, but a process where human...... agency makes use of a net-work in which social and material factors constitute the interpretation. Our findings thus substantiate that artefacts frame the possibilities for action within NPD....

  5. Societal and ethical issues in human biomonitoring – a view from science studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human biomonitoring (HBM has rapidly gained importance. In some epidemiological studies, the measurement and use of biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and disease have replaced traditional environmental indicators. While in HBM, ethical issues have mostly been addressed in terms of informed consent and confidentiality, this paper maps out a larger array of societal issues from an epistemological perspective, i.e. bringing into focus the conditions of how and what is known in environmental health science. Methods In order to analyse the effects of HBM and the shift towards biomarker research in the assessment of environmental pollution in a broader societal context, selected analytical frameworks of science studies are introduced. To develop the epistemological perspective, concepts from "biomedical platform sociology" and the notion of "epistemic cultures" and "thought styles" are applied to the research infrastructures of HBM. Further, concepts of "biocitizenship" and "civic epistemologies" are drawn upon as analytical tools to discuss the visions and promises of HBM as well as related ethical problematisations. Results In human biomonitoring, two different epistemological cultures meet; these are environmental science with for instance pollution surveys and toxicological assessments on the one hand, and analytical epidemiology investigating the association between exposure and disease in probabilistic risk estimation on the other hand. The surveillance of exposure and dose via biomarkers as envisioned in HBM is shifting the site of exposure monitoring to the human body. Establishing an HBM platform faces not only the need to consider individual decision autonomy as an ethics issue, but also larger epistemological and societal questions, such as the mode of evidence demanded in science, policy and regulation. Conclusion The shift of exposure monitoring towards the biosurveillance of human populations involves fundamental

  6. Societal and Economic Elements of Trafficking in Human Beings into the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The European Union (EU is an early signatory of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. During the past decade, the EU has been undertaking various measures to conform to the "Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons". The mitigating strategy has been largely based on the enforcement of existing and new laws, inside as well as outside of the EU. To date, the results have been largely ineffective. Addressing the societal and economic elements of home and host countries could be a more enduring means to alleviate the problem of trafficking in human beings.

  7. Factors affecting the appreciation generated through applying human factors/ergonomics (HFE) principles to systems of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R H Y; Lam, S T

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study examined the levels of appreciation (applause) given by clients to Human Factors/Ergonomic (HFE) specialists after they have modified the systems of work. Thirteen non-academic projects were chosen because the HFE interventions involved changed the way workers work at their workplaces. Companies involved range from multi-national corporations and military organizations with thousands of employees to small trading companies with less than 10 employees. In 5 cases the HFE recommendations were fully adopted and well appreciated. In 4 they were largely ignored and not appreciated, with partial adoption and some appreciation in the other 4 cases. Three factors that predict appreciation were identified: (i) alignment between the benefits HFE can provide and the project's key performance indices; (ii) awareness of HFE among the client's senior management; and (iii) a team organization appropriate for applying HFE recommendations. Having an HFE specialist on the client's side can greatly increase levels of appreciation, but lack of such a specialist will not affect levels of appreciation. A clear contractual requirement for HFE intervention does not promote appreciation significantly, but its absence can greatly reduce levels of appreciation. These relationships are discussed using the Kano's model of quality. Means to generate greater appreciation of the benefits of HFE are discussed.

  8. Appreciative seminars. Appreciative teaching of Appreciative Inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Simona PONEA; Bianca VLASA

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of appreciative intervention methods at the organizational level as a discipline in the academic curriculum of the masters program “Supervision and Social Planning” is a starting point for the development of this methodology in various areas of social practice (Sandu, 2010). The experimental educational program “Appreciative Seminars” was implemented within the discipline Appreciative intervention methods at the organizational level in the program noted above. The initiative ...

  9. Appreciative seminars. Appreciative teaching of Appreciative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona PONEA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of appreciative intervention methods at the organizational level as a discipline in the academic curriculum of the masters program “Supervision and Social Planning” is a starting point for the development of this methodology in various areas of social practice (Sandu, 2010. The experimental educational program “Appreciative Seminars” was implemented within the discipline Appreciative intervention methods at the organizational level in the program noted above. The initiative came from Mr. Dr. Antonio Sandu, of the Faculty of Philosophy and Social and Political Sciences, “Al. I. Cuza” University in Iasi, who has supported in the academic year 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 the mentioned discipline in close collaboration with Mr. Assoc. Professor Ph. D. Stefan Cojocaru, head masters program and at the same time the one who introduced the appreciative methods in the academic curriculum from Romania.

  10. Good governance and good health: The role of societal structures in the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon-Johansson Anatole S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only governments sensitive to the demands of their citizens appropriately respond to needs of their nation. Based on Professor Amartya Sen's analysis of the link between famine and democracy, the following null hypothesis was tested: "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV prevalence is not associated with governance". Methods Governance has been divided by a recent World Bank paper into six dimensions. These include Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence, Government Effectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law and the Control of Corruption. The 2002 adult HIV prevalence estimates were obtained from UNAIDS. Additional health and economic variables were collected from multiple sources to illustrate the development needs of countries. Results The null hypothesis was rejected for each dimension of governance for all 149 countries with UNAIDS HIV prevalence estimates. When these nations were divided into three groups, the median (range HIV prevalence estimates remained constant at 0.7% (0.05 – 33.7% and 0.75% (0.05% – 33.4% for the lower and middle mean governance groups respectively despite improvements in other health and economic indices. The median HIV prevalence estimates in the higher mean governance group was 0.2% (0.05 – 38.8%. Conclusion HIV prevalence is significantly associated with poor governance. International public health programs need to address societal structures in order to create strong foundations upon which effective healthcare interventions can be implemented.

  11. Appreciative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jennifer L.; Hutson, Bryant L.; He, Ye; Konkle, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Appreciative education is presented as a framework for leading higher education institutions, delivering truly student-centered services, and guiding higher education professionals' interactions with students.

  12. Appreciative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jennifer L.; Hutson, Bryant L.; He, Ye; Konkle, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Appreciative education is presented as a framework for leading higher education institutions, delivering truly student-centered services, and guiding higher education professionals' interactions with students.

  13. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Liu Shuzhen, a woman worker, has a special feeling about scraps of fabric which she creatively turns into vital artistic works. In Liu’s eyes these scraps are like women’s warm skin, able to inspire appreciation

  14. SSH & the City. A Network Approach for Tracing the Societal Contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for Local Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson-Garcia, N.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Rafols, I.

    2016-07-01

    Current evaluation frameworks in research policy were designed to address: 1) life and natural sciences, 2) global research communities, and; 3) scientific impact. This is problematic, as they do not adapt well to SSH scholarship, to local interests, or to consider broader societal impacts. This paper discusses three different evaluation frameworks and proposes a methodology to operationalize them and capture societal interactions between social sciences and humanities (SSH) researchers and their local context. To capture such interactions, we propose the use of social media and web-link analysis to identify interactions between academics and local stakeholders. We consider that the power of these tools is not so much on understanding their meaning as ‘acts’ to develop impact or visibility metrics whenever a mention to a research article is made, but as proxies for personal interactions. We offer some examples of the expected social networks we aim at developing for two Spanish cities: Granada and Valencia. (Author)

  15. Human resource management practices in the multinational company: A test of system, societal, and dominance effects

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Paul K.; Sánchez-Mangas, Rocío; Tregaskis, Olga; Lévesque, Christian; McDonnell, Anthony; Quintanilla, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Does the use of HRM practices by multinational companies (MNCs) reflect their national origins or are practices similar regardless of context? To the extent that practices are similar, is there any evidence of global best standards? The authors use the system, societal, and dominance framework to address these questions through analysis of 1,100 MNC subsidiaries in Canada, Ireland, Spain, and the United Kingdom. They argue that this framework offers a richer account than alternatives such as ...

  16. Appreciating Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    ANOTHER Spring Festival was drawing near. From her college in Dalian, sophomore Zhou Tingting returned home to Nanjing—to the family that had given her life and affection, and perhaps most importantly, appreciation. Family indeed has special meaning for Zhou Tingting. She is a deaf girl who entered college at age of 16, but it

  17. Unsafe Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ After a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences(CASS)proposed a 10-percent increase in the Chinese currency to upgrade the industrial structure,many economists in China disputed his statement and pointed out the risks of abrupt renminbi(yuan)appreciation.

  18. Unitary appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W R

    2001-06-01

    Unitary appreciative inquiry is described as an orientation, process, and approach for illuminating the wholeness, uniqueness, and essence that are the pattern of human life. It was designed to bring the concepts, assumptions, and perspectives of the science of unitary human beings into reality as a mode of inquiry. Unitary appreciative inquiry provides a way of giving fullest attention to important facets of human life that often are not fully accounted for in current methods that have a heavier emphasis on diagnostic representations. The participatory, synoptic, and transformative qualities of the unitary appreciative process are explicated. The critical dimensions of nursing knowledge development expressed in dialectics of the general and the particular, action and theory, stories and numbers, sense and soul, aesthetics and empirics, and interpretation and emancipation are considered in the context of the unitary appreciative stance. Issues of legitimacy of knowledge and credibility of research are posed and examined in the context of four quality standards that are deemed important to evaluate the worthiness of unitary appreciative inquiry for the advancement of nursing science and practice.

  19. Art Appreciation and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Diane R.; Milam, Debora

    1985-01-01

    Presents examples of independent study units for gifted high school students in a resource room setting. Both art appreciation and technique are covered in activities concerned with media (basics of pencil, India ink, pastels, crayons, oil, acrylics, and watercolors), subject matter (landscapes, animals, the human figure), design and illustration…

  20. Life Is Getting Better: Societal Evolution and Fit with Human Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenhoven, Ruut

    2010-01-01

    Human society has changed much over the last centuries and this process of "modernization" has profoundly affected the lives of individuals; currently we live quite different lives from those forefathers lived only five generations ago. There is difference of opinion as to whether we live better now than before and consequently there is also…

  1. Life is getting better: Societal evolution and fit with human nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHuman society has changed much over the last centuries and this process of 'modernization' has profoundly affected the lives of individuals; currently we live quite different lives from those forefathers lived only five generations ago. There is difference of opinion as to whether we

  2. Interactions among human behavior, social networks, and societal infrastructures: A Case Study in Computational Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christopher L.; Bisset, Keith; Chen, Jiangzhuo; Eubank, Stephen; Lewis, Bryan; Kumar, V. S. Anil; Marathe, Madhav V.; Mortveit, Henning S.

    Human behavior, social networks, and the civil infrastructures are closely intertwined. Understanding their co-evolution is critical for designing public policies and decision support for disaster planning. For example, human behaviors and day to day activities of individuals create dense social interactions that are characteristic of modern urban societies. These dense social networks provide a perfect fabric for fast, uncontrolled disease propagation. Conversely, people’s behavior in response to public policies and their perception of how the crisis is unfolding as a result of disease outbreak can dramatically alter the normally stable social interactions. Effective planning and response strategies must take these complicated interactions into account. In this chapter, we describe a computer simulation based approach to study these issues using public health and computational epidemiology as an illustrative example. We also formulate game-theoretic and stochastic optimization problems that capture many of the problems that we study empirically.

  3. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match.

  4. Zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases in relation to human personality and societal values: support for the parasite-stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Randy; Fincher, Corey L; Murray, Damian R; Schaller, Mark

    2010-04-11

    The parasite-stress model of human sociality proposes that humans' ontogenetic experiences with infectious diseases as well as their evolutionary historical interactions with these diseases exert causal influences on human psychology and social behavior. This model has been supported by cross-national relationships between parasite prevalence and human personality traits, and between parasite prevalence and societal values. Importantly, the parasite-stress model emphasizes the causal role of non-zoonotic parasites (which have the capacity for human-to-human transmission), rather than zoonotic parasites (which do not), but previous studies failed to distinguish between these conceptually distinct categories. The present investigation directly tested the differential predictive effects of zoonotic and non-zoonotic (both human-specific and multihost) parasite prevalence on personality traits and societal values. Supporting the parasite-stress model, cross-national differences in personality traits (unrestricted sexuality, extraversion, openness to experiences) and in societal values (individualism, collectivism, gender equality, democratization) are predicted specifically by non-zoonotic parasite prevalence.

  5. Putting the Mind in the Brain: Promoting an Appreciation of the Biological Basis to Understanding Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A surprising number of students in psychology, behavioral science, and related social science classes fail to appreciate the importance of biological mechanisms to understanding behavior. To help teachers promote this understanding, this paper outlines six sources of evidence. These are (a) phylogenetic, (b) genetic/developmental, (c) clinical,…

  6. Putting the Mind in the Brain: Promoting an Appreciation of the Biological Basis to Understanding Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A surprising number of students in psychology, behavioral science, and related social science classes fail to appreciate the importance of biological mechanisms to understanding behavior. To help teachers promote this understanding, this paper outlines six sources of evidence. These are (a) phylogenetic, (b) genetic/developmental, (c) clinical,…

  7. Defining Art Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabolt, Betty Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the differences and goals of four areas: (1) art appreciation; (2) art history; (3) art aesthetics; and (4) art criticism. Offers a definition of art appreciation and information on how the view of art appreciation in education has changed over time. (CMK)

  8. Maimonides’ Appreciation for Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Gesundheit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moses Maimonides, the illustrious medieval rabbi and philosopher, dedicated the last decade of his life primarily to medicine. His strong interest in medicine was an integral component of his religious-philosophical teachings and world view. In this paper various sources from his rabbinic writings are presented that explain Maimonides’ motivation regarding and deep appreciation for medicine: (A The physician fulfills the basic biblical obligation to return lost objects to their owner, for with his knowledge and experience the physician can restore good health to his sick fellow human being; (B medicine provides a unique opportunity to practice imitatio dei, as it reflects the religious duty to maintain a healthy life-style; (C as an important natural science, medicine offers tools to recognize, love, and fear God. These three aspects address man’s relationship and obligation towards his fellow-man, himself and God. Biographical insights supported by additional sources from Maimonides’ writings are discussed.

  9. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  10. Appreciative Assessment: Inquire!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Mary-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Appreciative Inquiry builds on positive experiences to spark positive change; appreciative assessment is all about helping students find and build on their unique abilities and aptitudes by providing positive, supportive feedback with a focus on capabilities and possibilities. Positive stories and anecdotes about best learning practices are the…

  11. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  12. Children's proximal societal conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    2018-01-01

    This article will argue for and unfold the conceptualization of children’s proximal societal conditions. Through out different research project in which children’s everyday life in different day care settings and in schools has been studied, it becomes clear that ‘the societal’ is not something t...

  13. Appreciative Problem Solving

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, David

    2012-01-01

    Many industrial production work systems have increased in complexity, and their new business model scompete on innovation, rather than low cost.At a medical device production facility committed to Lean Production, a research project was carried out to use Appreciative Inquiry to better engage employee strengths in continuou simprovements of the work system. The research question was: “How can Lean problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry be combined for optimized work system innovation?”The r...

  14. Comments on "place and human development" by Paul Shepard and Yi-Fu Tuan's "experience and appreciation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence C. Ladd

    1977-01-01

    Paul Shepard presents a dazzling array of profound ideas about the nature of the relationship between early developmental stages and places experienced in a variety of cultures. Shepard's analysis is related to the schema presented in Spivack's (1973) paper, in which he identifies some basic requirements of the human species and the environmental conditions...

  15. Seek and Peruse Nature in Human Being--appreciate the theme in D.H.Lawrence’s works

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莲茹; 刘婷婷

    2013-01-01

    In Lawrence ’s writings, it is evident to find that he attempted to reveal the evil capitalization, which damages the natural environment and the harmony relationship, and to emphasize the spiritual crisis, the distorted character under the capitalization society. He was eager for the friendly rela He provoked the idea that only in the harmony relationship between the and the human beings can we obtain healthy development.

  16. Epistemology – the Theory of Knowledge or Knowing? Appreciating Gregory Bateson’s Contribution to the Cartography of Human Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzislaw Wasik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at a confrontation of two approaches to epistemology in order to answer the question posed in its title whether the theory of knowledge should focus on static or dynamic aspects of human cognition. In the first part, the author presents a metascientific understanding of epistemology defined in his own works as an ordered set of investigative perspectives, which practicing researchers have at their disposal when they are interested to attain a specific state of knowledge, or to support their beliefs about the nature of investigative domains with regard to the existence forms and accessibility of investigated objects. And, in the second, the subject matter of a more detailed presentation constitutes a psychophysiological approach to epistemology pertaining to the human organism preoccupied with sensorial and mental activities as a cognizing subject who aims at achieving a certain kind of information about reality. Common for both approaches to epistemology is the attainment of experiential knowledge. However, when the metascientific epistemology refers to a dispositional-perspectivistic state of knowledge acquired in cognition, the attention of the psychophysiological epistemology is paid to cognitive-constructivists activities of human organisms as subject acquiring their knowledge through personal experiences.

  17. Appreciative Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David

    2012-01-01

    employee strengths in continuou simprovements of the work system. The research question was: “How can Lean problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry be combined for optimized work system innovation?” The research project was carried out as a co-creation process with close cooperation between researcher......Many industrial production work systems have increased in complexity, and their new business model scompete on innovation, rather than low cost.At a medical device production facility committed to Lean Production, a research project was carried out to use Appreciative Inquiry to better engage...... and participants and was documented by qualitative methods. This paper presents an academic literature review on Appreciative Inquiry and problem solving for continuous improvements that did not reveal successful attempts in combining the two.Both the literature and the empirical study showed one of the main...

  18. Further computer appreciation

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, T F

    2014-01-01

    Further Computer Appreciation is a comprehensive cover of the principles and aspects in computer appreciation. The book starts by describing the development of computers from the first to the third computer generations, to the development of processors and storage systems, up to the present position of computers and future trends. The text tackles the basic elements, concepts and functions of digital computers, computer arithmetic, input media and devices, and computer output. The basic central processor functions, data storage and the organization of data by classification of computer files,

  19. The exodus of health professionals from sub-Saharan Africa: balancing human rights and societal needs in the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Linda; Mill, Judy E; Astle, Barbara; Fanning, Anne; Opare, Mary

    2007-06-01

    Increased international migration of health professionals is weakening healthcare systems in low-income countries, particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa. The migration of nurses, physicians and other health professionals from countries in sub-Saharan Africa poses a major threat to the achievement of health equity in this region. As nurses form the backbone of healthcare systems in many of the affected countries, it is the accelerating migration of nurses that will be most critical over the next few years. In this paper we present a comprehensive analysis of the literature and argue that, from a human rights perspective, there are competing rights in the international migration of health professionals: the right to leave one's country to seek a better life; the right to health of populations in the source and destination countries; labour rights; the right to education; and the right to non-discrimination and equality. Creative policy approaches are required to balance these rights and to ensure that the individual rights of health professionals do not compromise the societal right to health.

  20. Examining student understanding of the science of a societal issue in Botswana: Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suping, Shanah Mompoloki

    Science has had such an impact on our way of life that it has been at the centre of discussion for all issues of health, education, development, and the safe stewardship of the Earth's resources. Science has advanced so quickly in the last 50 years that the amount of knowledge generated by scientists is overwhelming. Science teachers who have persistently introduced children to science from a very young age, have been charged with a daunting task of presenting science knowledge to students in ways that not only make it easy to understand, but also make it relevant to them. The methods of how best they should go about this task have been debated from time immemorial. Due to the many concerns and demands placed on science teachers and science education programs in general, there have been a number of efforts to reform and redefine the science curriculum. Science education reform efforts in the US and elsewhere have examined all possible nucleotides in the building up of the reform DNA molecule. Many studies have measured people's level of understanding on given issues that affect their communities, but little attention has been given to conceptions and level of scientific literacy among students in developing countries. This study assessed Botswana school children's knowledge about ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and its effects on human health using a scientific literacy lens. Results show that students do not know as much as one would expect them to know, from public school through the first year in college. Exploratory factor analysis identified four indicators of knowledge about UVR. These are: (a) diseases related to UVR, (b) items that can be used for protections against UVR, (c) misconceptions held about UVR, and (d) general issues surrounding UVR. MANOVA analysis showed that whereas there are no differences in general based on school location, certain groups of students performed differently depending on the school type, type of science pursued at school and or

  1. Appreciation Under Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As the yuan appreciates against the dollar, Ba Shusong, Deputy Director of the Financial Research Institute under the Development Research Center of the State Council, a government think tank, casts some light on the underlying reason for the trend-there simply are too many greenbacks. The following is an excerpt of his article titled "The Dollar Is Like a 'Spoiled Child,'" originally published in the People's Daily Overseas Edition.

  2. Appreciating Johann M. Schepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Crous

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available As an expert leader in psychometrics, eminent scholar, gatekeeper, study leader and mentor, Johann M. Schepers has had a profound effect on the development of Psychology and Industrial Psychology in South Africa. By means of an appreciative inquiry the outstanding ability of this man has been highlighted in stories which resulted in a rich profile and a legacy that needs to be protected and nurtured.

  3. 绩效技术的范式变迁:走向价值探索%The Paradigm Shift for Human Performance Technology:Toward Appreciative Inquiry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于文浩

    2013-01-01

    绩效技术的传统范式是一个基于组织消极性、以问题为导向的范式。它通过努力缩短现状绩效和期望绩效之间的差距来实现绩效的改进,但往往由于员工的“习惯性防卫”而阻碍了组织变革的的进程,显露出诸多限制绩效技术进一步深入发展的缺陷。基于社会建构主义和积极心理学的价值探索范式不同于传统的“以问题为中心”的范式,秉持激发员工内在动机、实现其内心对成功渴望的价值取向,注重对组织积极核心的探索,强调集体、持续、共同创造的过程,是一种积极地探索组织“价值和优势”的方法。核心理念的差异使得两种绩效技术范式在理论假设、方法与过程等方面的表现大相径庭。在实践中,绩效改进人员选择积极还是消极的价值取向决定了绩效技术范式的本质差别。当然,价值探索范式为绩效改进带来“整体向阳性”、提供了新视角的同时,我们认为基于积极性的绩效观是对基于消极性的绩效观的补充,而不是取代。这两种范式的结合将为绩效改进提供更完整的图景。%The traditional paradigm of Human Performance Technology (HPT) is negative-based and problem-oriented, attempting to improve performance by reducing the gap between the actual level and the ideal level. This paradigm, however, gradually limits the development of the HPT research because of the employees' routine defense. The appreciative inquiry paradigm based on social constructivism and positive psychology is quite different from the traditional one. It focuses on the inspiration of employees' intrinsic motivation and craving for success, as well as the inquiry of the positive core of the organization, and emphasizes the collective, sustainable, and co-creative process. This paradigm is a methodology that seeks the strengths and values of an organization. Differences in their core concept result in

  4. Frequently used, highly appreciated?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Schrøder, Kim Christian

    Digitalization has made patterns of news consumption immensely more varied than before, complicating industry attempts to adapt to changing user habits. In such a rapidly changing landscape, it is unclear how news audiences negotiate this environment and what impact this may have on the possible......, gender, region and educational level. It finds that the news media perceived most important to consumers’ everyday lives are not necessarily those consumed most frequently, challenging the notion that frequency of use and appreciation of a medium necessarily relate. In terms of the rise of social media...... news mediums become valuable in everyday life and what factors underlie this sense of value for different members of the public....

  5. Learning the Languages of Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In his work with schools and other workplaces, psychologist Paul White has learned that many programs designed to appreciate employees fall flat because the appreciation is too generic or involves something the employees don't want (such as getting up in front of a group). Effective appreciation is (1) offered regularly, (2) valued by the…

  6. Learning the Languages of Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In his work with schools and other workplaces, psychologist Paul White has learned that many programs designed to appreciate employees fall flat because the appreciation is too generic or involves something the employees don't want (such as getting up in front of a group). Effective appreciation is (1) offered regularly, (2) valued by the…

  7. Effective Evaluation through Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators in the HPI field can improve their performance program results with effective evaluation through appreciative inquiry. Appreciative inquiry and evaluation have many similarities, and when combined they add value and effectiveness to the measurement of intervention results. Appreciative inquiry is beneficial in many evaluation contexts:…

  8. Nanotechnology: Societal Implications - Maximizing Benefit for Humanity. Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop Held in Arlington, Virginia on 3-5 December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    vision of few intelligent nanometer robots mentioned in science fiction literature (for example, the novel Prey by Michael Crichton ) leads to immediate...NSET.Societal.Implications/). THEME 2: FUTURE ECONOMIC SCENARIOS Moderators: Michael R. Darby (University of California, Los Angeles and National Bureau of Economic...organizational environments, Administrative Science Quarterly, 31, 439-465 (1986). THEME 3: THE QUALITY OF LIFE Moderators: Michael Heller

  9. Buckingham (1907): An appreciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-11-17

    Nearly a century ago, Edgar Buckingham (1907) published a seminal work on the movement of soil moisture which is part of the foundation of modern soil physics. It also constitutes a pioneering contribution in the study of multi-phase flow in porous media. A physicist, Buckingham took on an earth science issue of importance to society, and produced superb basic science as a byproduct. Buckingham impresses us with his ability to combine experiment and theory, and his capacity to intuitively explain difficult ideas to a wide audience. Science progresses both by gradual accretion of knowledge, and by sudden influx of ideas. Buckingham's contribution belongs in the latter category. After a brief, four-year rendezvous with soil science, he went on to pursue a long and distinguished career in physics with the National Bureau of Standards. This paper is an appreciation of Buckingham's contribution on soil moisture in the context of contemporary developments in diffusion theory, and the rapid growth of science in America at the turn of the twentieth century.

  10. Contextual information processing of brain in art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeko; Ejima, Yoshimichi

    2013-04-01

    A psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation will be an experimental discipline that may shed new light on the highest capacities of the human brain, yielding new scientific ways to talk about the art appreciation. The recent findings of the contextual information processing in the human brain make the concept of the art-historical context clear for empirical experimentation.

  11. Neural correlates of humor detection and appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Joseph M; Wig, Gagan S; Adams, Reginald B; Janata, Petr; Kelley, William M

    2004-03-01

    Humor is a uniquely human quality whose neural substrates remain enigmatic. The present report combined dynamic, real-life content and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to dissociate humor detection ("getting the joke") from humor appreciation (the affective experience of mirth). During scanning, subjects viewed full-length episodes of the television sitcoms Seinfeld or The Simpsons. Brain activity time-locked to humor detection moments revealed increases in left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortices, whereas brain activity time-locked to moments of humor appreciation revealed increases in bilateral regions of insular cortex and the amygdala. These findings provide evidence that humor depends critically upon extant neural systems important for resolving incongruities (humor detection) and for the expression of affect (humor appreciation).

  12. Ideas for Teaching Art Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitter, Lena

    1983-01-01

    Examples are given of ways in which elementary teachers can develop art appreciation among their learning disabled students. Activities described are based on techniques of M. Montessori and involve labeling pictures, building an art appreciation vocabulary, and going on a museum trip. (CL)

  13. Anyone Can Teach Art Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rhonda

    1996-01-01

    Provides a guide to a first-grade teacher's methods of teaching art appreciation. She began a weekly art appreciation study integrated across the curriculum that heightened students' awareness and critical-thinking skills and enhanced their creativity by allowing them to view and respond to art and then create their own. (SM)

  14. Appreciative inquiry research review & notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    This short article renews the emphasis on 'inquiry' in the appreciative/ inquiry equation, through a connection with the action research literature. Appreciative Inquiry was initially introduced as action research with the generative capacity to create knowledge for social innovation. If we look at

  15. Appreciative Leadership: Supporting Education Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Tracy; Cleveland-Innes, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Appreciative Leadership is unique among leadership theories both past and present. This uniqueness includes its strength-based practice, search for the positive in people and organizations, and the role this plays in organizational innovation and transformation. What follows is a summary of Appreciative Inquiry and the five main principles on…

  16. Appreciative Management – A Management based on Excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Simona PONEA

    2010-01-01

    Appreciative management support organizations, especially in the process of development of the human resources. Appreciative management considered as a management based on excellence, is based on the filosophy of appreciative inquiry. Any organization can apply this model starting with the process of recruitment. The process of employment requires each time a new beginning for the organization. New employees should be introduced carefully in the organizational culture and also must be provide...

  17. Objectification, Self-Objectification, and Societal Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen L. Zurbriggen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the ways in which the objectification of individuals and groups of people, as well as the self-objectification that typically develops from such treatment, is implicated in positive and negative societal change. Four areas are reviewed: (a objectification (including dehumanization, infra-humanization, dehumanized perception, sexualization, and colonialism, (b self-objectification (including double consciousness, internalized oppression, and colonial mentality, (c genocide and mass violence, and (c collective action. After reviewing theories in each area, a set of underlying constructs is presented, organized under higher-order categories. Finally, connections between objectification and genocide perpetration, as well as between self-objectification and collective action, are described. It is concluded that the objectification of other people contributes to societal change that runs counter to principles of equality and respect for others, threatens civil rights, and ultimately can result in genocide or mass killings. Furthermore, self-objectification impairs the ability of oppressed groups to act collectively on their own behalf. In contrast, the process of decolonization supports collective action and positive societal change, in part because it liberates oppressed people from self-objectification.

  18. Immagine e società

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio La Rocca

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quale rapporto esiste tra immagine e società? Questo numero cerca, attraverso i vari contributi, di illustrare questa relazione. Nella società postmoderna si sostiene che l’immagine occupi un ruolo importante di cui potremmo indicare due aspetti: da un lato essa serve a decifrare i fenomeni sociali, dall’altro è sempre più utilizzata come uno strumento metodologico che rileva il potenziale euristico delle immagini all’interno di un discorso epistemologico e di conoscenza.

  19. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2013-01-01

    The HSR Focus presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis....... In terms of methodology it revives the themes originally launched in FOS exactly ten years ago: "Subjectivity and Reflectivity in Qualitative Research" (Breuer, Mruck and Roth 2002; Mruck and Breuer 2003). This editorial introduction presents the intellectual background of the psycho-societal methodology...

  20. Appreciative Management – A Management based on Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona PONEA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Appreciative management support organizations, especially in the process of development of the human resources. Appreciative management considered as a management based on excellence, is based on the filosophy of appreciative inquiry. Any organization can apply this model starting with the process of recruitment. The process of employment requires each time a new beginning for the organization. New employees should be introduced carefully in the organizational culture and also must be provided with an confortable environment. Appreciative management provide an innovative way of development of any organization. Is very important as well that the manager know how to apply amoung with this the process of peer education and also peer supervision.

  1. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2013-01-01

    The HSR Focus presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis...

  2. Societal Development and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nderu-Boddington, Eulalee

    2008-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the theories of three major writers on societal change: Chirot discusses the economic power struggles within and among core, peripheral, and semiperipheral societies, Toffler exposes a future in which major power shifts could have cataclysmic results, and Bruner emphasizes the importance of education to temper…

  3. Nevill Mott reminiscences and appreciations

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, E A

    1998-01-01

    Sir Nevill Mott was Britain''s last Winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics. This is a tribute to the life and work of Nobel Laureate Nevill Mott, a hugely admired and appreciated man, and one of this countries greatest ever scientists. It includes contributions from over 80 of his friends, family and colleagues, full of anecdotes and appreciations for this collossus of modern physics.

  4. Despair: a unitary appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W Richard

    2004-01-01

    A unitary appreciative case study method was used to explicate unitary understandings of despair embedded in the unique personal life contexts of the participants. Fourteen women engaged in dialogical, appreciative interviews that led to the creation of profiles of the life pattern or course associated with despair for each woman. Three exemplar cases are detailed including the profiles that incorporate story, metaphor, music, and imagery. The voices of the women provide morphogenic knowledge of the contexts, nature, consequences, and contributions of despair as well as practical guidance for healthcare providers.

  5. Unitary appreciative inquiry: evolution and refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W Richard; Repede, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Unitary appreciative inquiry (UAI), developed over the past 20 years, provides an orientation and process for uncovering human wholeness and discovering life patterning in individuals and groups. Refinements and a description of studies using UAI are presented. Assumptions and conceptual underpinnings of the method distinguishing its contributions from other methods are reported. Data generation strategies that capture human wholeness and elucidate life patterning are proposed. Data synopsis as an alternative to analysis is clarified and explicated. Standards that suggest enhancing the legitimacy of knowledge and credibility of research are specified. Potential expansions of UAI offer possibilities for extending epistemologies, aesthetic integration, and theory development.

  6. A Psycho-Societal Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellon, Karsten

    This is a project about Danish vocational bachelor students admitted on the basis of an Individual Competency Assessment (VPL/IKV) in light of a Psycho-Societal Approach. The core idea of this paper is to present a PhD project which aims to contribute findings regarding students enrolled...... in a Danish vocational Bachelor’s education program (teachers program under the frame of University College) through Validation of Prior Learning by the use of an Individual Competencies Assessment (VPL/IKV)....

  7. Appreciative inquiry and leadership transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Maureen R; Pesut, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    In times of accelerated change accompanied by leadership transitions, appreciative inquiry (AI) and sensemaking skills are necessary. AI is a philosophy, a model of change, and a set of tools and techniques that support discovery, dreaming, design, and creation of a vision that inspires people in an organization to move toward a collective destiny. Sensemaking involves sizing up a situation to create a framework for decision-making, creating a context for communication, linking with others, and focusing on what is and what could be. Sensemaking can be facilitated by applying appreciative leadership techniques. In this article, the story of the University of Utah College of Nursing's and the faculty's experience with an AI process illustrates the application of the AI leadership strategy to navigating organizational change and a leadership transition.

  8. Critical Zone Science and Global Societal Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, M. B.; Banwart, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's Critical Zone (CZ) is the thin outer veneer of our planet from the top of the tree canopy to the bottom of our drinking water aquifers that supports almost all human activity. Despite its fundamental importance to terrestrial life, understanding of the operation of the coupled geologic, hydrologic, topographic, and biotic CZ processes across time and space is far from complete. These interactions are complex and they establish a mechanistic 'chain of impact' that transmits the effects of environmental change throughout the CZ. Characterization of these processes is made more urgent by the fact that globally, the CZ is experiencing ever-increasing pressure from growth in human population and wealth. Within the next four decades, demand for food and fuel is expected to double along with a more than 50% increase in demand for clean water. Understanding, predicting and managing intensification of land use and associated economic services, while mitigating and adapting to rapid climate change, is now one of the most pressing societal challenges of the 21st century. In this talk we summarize the profound global societal impacts to the Earth's near surface arising from exponential human population growth, increasing affluence, and technological advance, to provide context for discussions on constructing an array of CZ observatories to both characterize fundamental critical zone processes and forecast the effects of planetary change. We will suggest goals and options relevant to planning for a future international array of CZ observatories and a research agenda that matches the urgency of the projected resource demands and environmental pressures of the coming four decades.

  9. Anticipating societal collapse; Hints from the stone age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Few aspects of human history are as mindboggling as the sudden disintegration of advanced societies. It is tempting to seek common patterns or even draw some lessons for modern times from the many ancient cases of societal disintegration. In PNAS, Downey et al. (1) report that universal warning sign

  10. Appreciating the image of God in all humanity: Towards a pastoral response to skin lightening as image enhancement to exit dark skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah K. Tenai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The practice of skin lightening is prevalent amongst dark-skinned people globally. Various current studies that map this practice and that seek motivations behind the practice are examined. It is observed that through shrewd marketing, dark-skinned people are offered a promise of a better quality of life, obtained by a lighter skin, through the use of skin lighteners. In spite of the severe health risks involved, the promise is ostensibly irresistible to some dark-skinned persons. A pastoral response is offered that affirms the full personhood and complete humanity of dark-skinned people as fully human and whole in their dark skins.Keywords: Skin lightening, Dark skin, Image of God

  11. Applying Appreciative Inquiry Principles in the Restorative Justice Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona DAMIAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the convergence between appreciative ideology and the ideologies derived from the need of preserving human dignity is not complete, they can be seen in a single paradigm of affirmative action. Although restorative justice principles are not inspired by appreciative inquiry methodology, are at least converging with it, both of them focusing on human potential positivity. Moving the accent from the offense and its due retribution, on the recovery of prior state offense, both for the victim and the offender, this can be interpreted as waiving the deficiency paradigm, and integrating positive experiences resulting from mediation offender-victim relationship in an appreciative paradigm. Application of appreciative inquiry in restorative justice and in probation systems is a unique area in the world, it being applied only on an experimental level in some restorative justice programs.

  12. The Globalization of Higher Education as a Societal and Cultural Security Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samier, Eugenie A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I propose a theory of the globalization of higher education as societal and cultural security problems for many regions of the world. The first section examines the field of security studies for theoretical frameworks appropriate to critiquing globalized higher education, including critical human, societal and cultural security…

  13. The Globalization of Higher Education as a Societal and Cultural Security Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samier, Eugenie A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I propose a theory of the globalization of higher education as societal and cultural security problems for many regions of the world. The first section examines the field of security studies for theoretical frameworks appropriate to critiquing globalized higher education, including critical human, societal and cultural security…

  14. Musician earplugs: Appreciation and protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Bockstael

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recreational music exposure is a potential risk factor for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. Augmented hearing protectors have been designed with modified attenuation characteristics to combine hearing protection and listening comfort. However, to date, only a few independent studies have assessed the performance of those augmented protectors in realistic exposure conditions. This study compares the listening experience and temporary effects on cochlear status with different types of earplugs after exposure to contemporary club music. Five different types of commercially available hearing protectors were worn, all commonly used during leisure-time music exposure. Four of them were augmented premolded earplugs and the fifth type was an inexpensive, standard earplug frequently distributed for free at music events. During five different test sessions of 30 min each, participants not professionally involved in music wore one particular type of protector. Contemporary club music was played at sound pressure levels (SPLs representative of concerts and bars. After each listening session, a questionnaire on sound quality and general appreciation was completed. In addition, otoacoustic emissions (OAEs were measured directly before and after music exposure. The reported appreciation clearly differed depending on the addressed characteristics and the specific earplug type. In this test group, the reported appreciation mainly depended on comfort and looks, while differences in sound quality were less noticeable. The changes in OAE amplitude before and after noise exposure were small in terms of clinical standards. Nevertheless, the observed temporary shifts differed systematically for the different types of hearing protectors, with two types of musician earplug showing a more systematic decline than the others. Further research with respect to actual use and achieved protection for real, unsupervised music exposure is warranted.

  15. Cultural diversity, economic development and societal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, D.; Grace, J.B.; Choisy, M.; Cornell, H.V.; Guegan, J.-F.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation on ?? diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or ?? diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings. We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on ?? and ?? cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different type and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic ?? diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For ?? diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious ?? diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Conclusions. Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between, neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability.

  16. Public Leadership and processes of societal innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termeer, C.J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Societal actors can come against problems that cross the traditional boundaries of sectors, organisations and routines. Processes of societal innovation are started on the way to an unknown future, creating new solutions and new corporations. In this paper I focus on the question how public leaders

  17. 24 CFR 206.23 - Shared appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shared appreciation. 206.23 Section... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgages § 206.23 Shared appreciation. (a) Additional interest based on net appreciated value. Any mortgage for which the mortgagee has chosen...

  18. Societal acceptance of unnecessary evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Jamie W.; Mundzir, Ibnu; Patt, Anthony; Rosemary, Rizanna; Safrina, Lely; Mahdi, Saiful; Daly, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainties in forecasting extreme events force an unavoidable tradeoff between false alarms and misses. The appropriate balance depends on the level of societal acceptance of unnecessary evacuations, but there has been little empirical research on this. Intuitively it may seem that an unnecessary evacuation would make people less likely to evacuate again in the future, but our study finds no support for this intuition. Using new quantitative (n=800) and qualitative evidence, we examine individual- and household-level evacuation decisions in response to the strong 11-Apr-2012 earthquake in Aceh, Indonesia. This earthquake did not produce a tsunami, but the population had previously experienced the devastating 2004 tsunami. In our sample, the vast majority of people (86%) evacuated in the 2012 earthquake, and nearly all (94%) say they would evacuate again if a similar earthquake happened in the future. Self-reported level of fear at the moment of the 2012 earthquake explains more of the variance in evacuation decisions and intentions than does a combination of perceived tsunami risk and perceived efficacy of evacuation modeled on protection motivation theory. These findings suggest that the appropriate balance between false alarms and misses may be highly context-specific. Investigating this in each context would make an important contribution to the effectiveness of early-warning systems.

  19. Understanding the Societal Impact of Humanities Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2016-01-01

    in society. An important assumption in this paper is that impact should be studied both from conceptual, qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Any approach that focuses merely on scientific outputs (such as publications or citations) or that relies on purely bibliometric indicators will result...

  20. Evaluating landscape health: Integrating societal goals and biophysical process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, D.J.; Gaudet, C.; Karr, J.R.; Baron, J. S.; Bohlen, C.; Jackson, W.; Jones, B.; Naiman, R.J.; Norton, B.; Pollock, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Evaluating landscape change requires the integration of the social and natural sciences. The social sciences contribute to articulating societal values that govern landscape change, while the natural sciences contribute to understanding the biophysical processes that are influenced by human activity and result in ecological change. Building upon Aldo Leopold's criteria for landscape health, the roles of societal values and biophysical processes in shaping the landscape are explored. A framework is developed for indicators of landscape health and integrity. Indicators of integrity are useful in measuring biological condition relative to the condition in landscapes largely unaffected by human activity, while indicators of health are useful in evaluating changes in highly modified landscapes. Integrating societal goals and biophysical processes requires identification of ecological services to be sustained within a given landscape. It also requires the proper choice of temporal and spatial scales. Societal values are based upon inter-generational concerns at regional scales (e.g. soil and ground water quality). Assessing the health and integrity of the environment at the landscape scale over a period of decades best integrates societal values with underlying biophysical processes. These principles are illustrated in two contrasting case studies: (1) the South Platte River study demonstrates the role of complex biophysical processes acting at a distance; and (2) the Kissimmee River study illustrates the critical importance of social, cultural and economic concerns in the design of remedial action plans. In both studies, however, interactions between the social and the biophysical governed the landscape outcomes. The legacy of evolution and the legacy of culture requires integration for the purpose of effectively coping with environmental change.

  1. Archives and societal provenance Australian essays

    CERN Document Server

    Piggott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Records and archival arrangements in Australia are globally relevant because Australia's indigenous people represent the oldest living culture in the world, and because modern Australia is an ex-colonial society now heavily multicultural in outlook. Archives and Societal Provenance explores this distinctiveness using the theoretical concept of societal provenance as propounded by Canadian archival scholars led by Dr Tom Nesmith. The book's seventeen essays blend new writing and re-workings of earlier work, comprising the fi rst text to apply a societal provenance perspective to a national sett

  2. The Appreciation of The Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何丽然

    2016-01-01

    The Fish by Marianne Moore was published in 1921 and this poem leaves large space for the readers to conduct comprehensive interpretation. A couple of significant aspects of the poem are well worth discussing and appreciating. In this paper, the poem will be summarized in a way of story-telling and some indispensable elements of the poem will be analyzed in detail. First, the structure of the poem will be analyzed from two perspectives: the disordered arrangement of the lines and the missing of the subject. Besides, the metre of the poem will be analyzed: strict rhyme scheme and alliteration.What’s more, the figure of speech applied in the poem needs to be paid more attention: simile, metaphor and personification. In particular, the contrast of colors in this poem will be studied: darkness and colorfulness. Last but not least, the theme of the poem is opening and three themes will be discussed: life and death, natural disaster and man-made damage, the symbiosis.

  3. Linking soil systems to societal value systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Katharina; Daedlow, Katrin; Techen, Anja; Kaiser, David Brian

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable management of soils is needed to avoid soil degradation and to maintain soil functions. This requires the assessment of how human activities drive soil management, how soil management affect soil functions and soil degradation, which trade-offs occur and how they compromise sustainable development targets. In the frame of the German research programme "Soils as a sustainable resource for the bio-economy - BonaRes", we developed an enhanced approach of the DPSIR (driver-pressure-state-impact-response) cycle which helps to assess these interrelations. Because not all soil functions can be maximized simultaneously in space and time and trade-offs are inevitable, it depends on the societal value system to decide which management practices and respective soil functional performances are valued sustainably. We analysed the applicability of three valuation concepts being prominent in research about social-ecological systems, namely resource efficiency, ecosystem services, and ethics and equity. The concept of resource efficiency is based in the life-cycle thinking and is often applied at the level of the farming systems and in the context of bio-economy strategies. It covers the use of natural (water, energy, nutrients, land) and economic resources. At the landscape level, the concept of ecosystem services is prominent. Here, the contribution of soils to the provisioning, regulating and cultural services of the natural ecosystems is considered. Ethical considerations include the intrinsic values of nature as well as issues of local and global equity between different societal groups, generations, and localities. The three concepts cover different problem dimensions and complexity levels of soil management and decision making. Alone, none of them are capable to discover complex questions of sustainable soil management and development. Rather, the exact spatial and temporal framing of the sustainability problem at stake determines which combination of the value

  4. Societal health and urban sustainability indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrich, C.H.; Tonn, B.E.

    1996-08-27

    Without the social will, no city can successfully Undertake the planning and programs necessary for meaningful progress toward sustainability. Social will derives from wellsprings of vital societal health. This paper presents an approach to helping cities in APEC member economies initiate a program for developing indicators of sustainability. Representative indicators of social capital and other aspects of civic engagement, as proxies for societal health, are presented.

  5. What precisely works in Appreciative Inquiry?

    OpenAIRE

    Aksu, Kübra

    2014-01-01

    In deze masterproef wordt, aan de hand van kwalitatief onderzoek, gepeild naar de werkende elementen van Appreciative Inquiry. De recente wetenschappelijke literatuur omtrent Appreciative Inquiry bekritiseert een te grote focus op het positieve. Een focus op het positieve is nuttig maar het is geen doel op zich. Het doel van Appreciative Inquiry is het genereren van een nieuwe en betere toekomst. Daarnaast is er, in de context van change management, een sterke groei waar te nemen in het aanta...

  6. Where Does It Come From? Developmental Aspects of Art Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabmann, Alfred; Gerger, Gernot; Schmidt, Barbara M.; Wögerer, Eva; Osipov, Igor; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Art is a unique feature of human experience. It involves the complex interplay among stimuli, persons and contexts. Little is known of how the various features deemed important in art appreciation depend on development, thus are already present at a young age. Similarly to our previous approach with adults of differing levels of expertise, the…

  7. Playing to Your Strengths: Appreciative Inquiry in the Visioning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifolt, Matthew; Stowe, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    "Appreciative Inquiry" (AI) is a structured approach to visioning focused on reflection, introspection, and collaboration. Rooted in organizational behavior theory, AI was introduced in the early 1980s as a life-centric approach to human systems (Watkins and Mohr 2001). Since then, AI has been used widely within the business community;…

  8. Pattern, participation, praxis, and power in unitary appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W Richard

    2004-01-01

    This article is an explication and clarification of unitary appreciative inquiry based on several recent projects. Four central dimensions of the inquiry process are presented: pattern, participation, praxis, and power. Examples of inquiry projects demonstrate and illuminate the possibilities of unitary appreciative inquiry. The relationship of these central dimensions to experiential, presentational, propositional, and practical knowledge outcomes is articulated. A matrix framework integrating pattern, participation, praxis, and power demonstrates the potential for generating knowledge relevant to the lives of participants and creating an inquiry process worthy of human aspiration.

  9. On the societal nature of praxis and organic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2016-03-01

    In its focus on social practices, the feature article presents an interesting theoretical framework for rethinking not only where and how knowing and learning in science education exhibit themselves but also we might change our own research practice. The framework is not new to me, as I have advocated it explicitly for more than 15 years. But over time it became apparent to me that some particularities of participation in practice may be grounded more strongly in an orientation towards the societal nature of any human praxis. In this forum contribution, I present a theoretical approach built on societal-historical activity theory that also takes activism as a major category for theorizing participation. This approach not only covers the extent of the social practice framework but also allows us to make thematic the production of inequity and restrictions to access science and engineering that are characteristic of many societies.

  10. The societal cost of Taenia solium cysticercosis in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Schmidt, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Taenia solium is a zoonotic parasite prevalent in many low income countries throughout Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, including Tanzania. The parasite is recognized as a public health threat; however the burden it poses on populations of Tanzania is unknown. The aim of this study...... was to estimate the societal cost of T. solium cysticercosis in Tanzania, by assessing both the health and economic burden. The societal cost of T. solium cysticercosis was assessed in humans and pigs based on data obtained by a systematic review. Experts' opinion was sought in cases where data were...... and economic threat for Tanzania. We urge that a One Health approach, which involves the joint collaboration and effort of veterinarians, medical doctors, agricultural extension officers, researchers and relevant governmental agencies, is taken to find sustainable solutions for prevention, control...

  11. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  12. An Art Appreciation Curriculum for Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Kim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week art appreciation curriculum on 17 preschool children's levels of self-esteem, art involvement, and art appreciation. Pre- and postintervention tests demonstrated that, as a result of the curriculum, the children's self-esteem increased and that they displayed greater interest and knowledge of art. (MDM)

  13. Art Appreciation Courses in Illinois Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Lenetta K.; Keim, Marybelle C.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews literature on the characteristics of community college art appreciation courses and instructors. Presents findings from a survey of Illinois community colleges regarding the characteristics of art appreciation instructors and the institutions offering such programs and course content and methodology. Reports results and discusses…

  14. Skills and the appreciation of computer art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Margaret A.

    2016-04-01

    The appreciation of art normally includes recognition of the artist's skills in making it. Most people cannot appreciate computer art in that way, because they know little or nothing about coding. Various suggestions are made about how computer artists and/or curators might design and present computer art in such a way as to make the relevant making-skills more intelligible.

  15. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  16. An Art Appreciation Curriculum for Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Kim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week art appreciation curriculum on 17 preschool children's levels of self-esteem, art involvement, and art appreciation. Pre- and postintervention tests demonstrated that, as a result of the curriculum, the children's self-esteem increased and that they displayed greater interest and knowledge of art. (MDM)

  17. The Appreciation of Coffee Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧玲

    2010-01-01

    As a unique culture in human history,the coffee culture originated with a magic story.This paper first tells the origin of coffee culture.Then it illustrates some typical coffee cultures in the world.Moreover,the paper specially describes the Chinese coffee culture before making a conclusion.

  18. Neuroethics: the ethical, legal, and societal impact of neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Martha J

    2012-01-01

    Advances in cognitive, affective, and social neuroscience raise a host of new questions concerning the ways in which neuroscience can and should be used. These advances also challenge our intuitions about the nature of humans as moral and spiritual beings. Neuroethics is the new field that grapples with these issues. The present article surveys a number of applications of neuroscience to such diverse arenas as marketing, criminal justice, the military, and worker productivity. The ethical, legal, and societal effects of these applications are discussed. Less practical, but perhaps ultimately more consequential, is the impact of neuroscience on our worldview and our understanding of the human person.

  19. The Implementation of Appreciative Management in the Recruting Process and the Integration of the New Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Simona PONEA

    2010-01-01

    Appreciative management support organizations, especially in the process of development of the human resources. Appreciative management,considered as a management centred on excellence, is based on the filosophy of appreciative inquiry.Any organization can apply this model starting with the process of recruitment. The process of employment requires each time a new beginning for the organization. New employees should be introduced carefully in the organizational culture and also must be provid...

  20. Societal response to nanotechnology: converging technologies–converging societal response research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronteltap, A.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Tobi, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology particularly vulnerable to societal unrest, which may hinder its further development. With the increasing convergence of several technological domains in the field of nanotechnology, so too could convergence of social science methods help to anticipate societ

  1. [Dying and death in societal transformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Andreas; Wegleitner, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Dying and death in modern societies are subject to profound social, professional and cultural-religious changes. Secularization and a stronger differentiation of societies have led to a change in the way humans handle the dying process. Normatively ritualized collective behaviour has been replaced by an individual, subjectivized approach. In late modern societies there are many different views of what "successful" or "good" dying means.In the article this change is described by the following seven theses: 1. We live longer and we die longer. 2. We no longer die suddenly and unexpectedly but slowly and foreseeably. 3. Even though our biological life on earth has become longer, our life has been shortened by the loss of eternity. 4. We no longer die on the stage of ritualized relationships with our family and neighbours but behind the curtains of organizations. 5. We live and die in a society of organizations and have to get organized for the final phase of our life. 6. Living and dying are no large, state-owned enterprises but small, private enterprises. 7. The hospice movement as well as palliative medicine have created public awareness, made dying a matter of discussion and offered a new set of options.In late modernism end-of-life care requires new approaches based on individual and shared responsibility as well as cooperation between professional institutions and community-based voluntary care.A change towards community care is visible. Thus "dying" is a topic in the discussion about the future of public health and societal solidarity.

  2. PROSPECTIVE LEADERS' VIEW ON ROMANIAN SOCIETAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATANA GHEORGHE ALEXANDRU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with Romanian prospective leaders’ perceptions and expectations concerning the societal culture. It is a part of a European research project, GLOBE Students, dealing with the interrelations between societal culture and leadership. The basic theoretical constructs and methodological framework of investigation are those developed by GLOBE international research project. In adapting our research to student population peculiarities, GLOBE Beta questionnaire was altered through adding new items (scales. The sample consists in 429 students in business/economics and engineering, belonging to three Romanian universities. The findings show that in student’s opinion there are significant differences between societal culture practices and values (expectations on all nine cultural dimensions in GLOBE model.

  3. Children’s proximal societal conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    ) the children’s proximal societal conditions for development and learning, means for instance that considerations about an inclusive agenda in a (Danish) welfare state with well-developed school- and daycare system, are no longer simply thoughts about the school having space for as many pupils as possible...... the conceptualization of children’s “proximal societal conditions”. Throughout different research projects in which children’s everyday life in different daycare settings and in schools has been studied, it becomes clear that ‘the societal’ is not something that is above or outside the institutional setting...... or the children’s everyday life, but something that is represented through societal structures and actual persons participating (in political ways) within the institutional settings, in ways that has meaning to children’s possibilities to participate, learn and develop. Understanding school or daycare as (part of...

  4. In Appreciation of Abner Shimony

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Abner Shimony was an exceptional human being and a remarkably lucid and penetrating thinker whose work centered on some of the most significant physical and philosophical questions of his era at their nexus. He approached these questions with an open, agile and critical mind, something quickly evident to anyone who had the privilege of conversing with him. His choice of problems to pursue, which for the most part involved epistemology and the relationships between mind, matter and space-time, was visionary. Undoubtedly, most of the discussions of Abner Shimony's work in future will center on his enormous contribution to the investigation of the significance to physics, both theoretical and experimental, of quantum entanglement, the characteristic of physical entities on which his work came to concentrate, well represented in the Clauser--Horne--Shimony--Holt inequality. Also significant for physics is his pioneering development of the quantification of entanglement in the early-to-mid 1990s. Shimony focused l...

  5. Gains and Pains From RMB Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The appreciation of China’s RMB means one dollar can be exchanged for fewer yuan.Therefore, as for domestic exporters, the one dollar export will take in less yuan. As a result, the profitability of exporters will

  6. RMB Appreciation, Output Growth, and Inflation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YONGWEI; CHEN; DONG; LI

    2013-01-01

    Following Dibooglu and Kutan(2005),we construct a structural VAR model to investigate the impact of RMB(the Chinese currency)appreciation on growth and inflation in China.The empirical results show that RMB appreciation has negative effects on output growth and inflation while neither effect is statistically significant.However,exchange rate shocks are important in the fluctuations of output growth and inflation.We also simulate the scenario of a sharp currency appreciation compared to the gradual approach adopted by the Chinese government.In the counterfactual analysis we find that a sharp appreciation would lead to more violent shocks in economic growth and inflation compared to the gradual approach.

  7. The Implementation of Appreciative Management in the Recruting Process and the Integration of the New Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona PONEA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Appreciative management support organizations, especially in the process of development of the human resources. Appreciative management,considered as a management centred on excellence, is based on the filosophy of appreciative inquiry.Any organization can apply this model starting with the process of recruitment. The process of employment requires each time a new beginning for the organization. New employees should be introduced carefully in the organizational culture and also must be provided with a confortable environment. Appreciative management provides an innovative way of development of any organization. Is very important as well that the manager know how to apply amoung with this, the process of peer education and also peer supervision. Also, a special place in this paper will be on appreciative management applied during the employment and the integration proces of new employees. We believe that the application of Appreciative Management, during the recruitment processes and the integration of new emloyees, can prevent any organizational crisis.

  8. Interaction of societal development and communication technoloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casimir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Societal development has always been influenced by technology, and by information and communication technology (ICT) in particular. Communication technology has an impact on daily life: Consumption patterns and daily activities change, the concept of a household is affected, and the organisation of

  9. Atomoxetine's Effect on Societal Costs in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myren, Karl-Johan; Thernlund, Gunilla; Nylen, Asa; Schacht, Alexander; Svanborg, Par

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare societal costs between patients treated with atomoxetine and placebo in Sweden. Method: Ninety-nine pediatric ADHD patients were randomized to a 10-week double-blind treatment with atomoxetine (n = 49) or placebo (n = 50). All parents received four sessions of psycho-education. Parents filled out a resource utilization…

  10. Transition Experiments: Exploring societal changes towards sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.M. van den Bosch (Suzanne)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis presents the outcome of exploratory research on how transition experiments can be used as instruments to further sustainable development. A transition experiment is a specific type of innovation project that is aimed at exploring radically new ways to meet societal needs,

  11. Modulating societal acceptance in sustainable energy projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, R.P.J.M.; Mourik, R.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre, Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-09-15

    The intermediary results of the Create Acceptance project are presented and discussed. In a metaanalysis of 25 case studies on new energy projects we identify five crucial challenges for project managers of new energy projects. On the basis of this analysis we present a six-step methodology for creating societal acceptance in new and ongoing energy projects.

  12. Shaping societal impact: between Control and Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messemaker, M.; Wolbers, J.; Treurniet, W.; Boersma, K.

    2013-01-01

    In our modern society, the impact of large-scale safety and security incidents can be large and diverse. Yet, this societal impact is makeable and controllable to a limited extent. At best, the effect of concrete response actions is that the direct damage is somewhat reduced and that the recovery is

  13. Appreciative counselling. Methodological framework [Consilierea apreciativa. Cadre metodologice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio SANDU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Application of counseling as a strategy in social practice, is reffering to both indicative assessment function of potentialities and resources of the client, and the interventionist-systemic function for behavioral change through cognitive-behavioral changes. In this article, we focus on counseling techniques that remain an area of excellence in social practice, a fundamental methodological dimension. Whatever the chosen approach to counseling, the operational foundation of the counseling process is the traditional problem-solving process. We can see this as a congruency between human ego problems solving and facilitate the social networking functionality and social systems in which the individual belongs. At the social systems functionality level itself we can identify the area of appreciative counseling.We can bount the counseling process into five phases:It can delineate the counseling process into five phases:1. Building a partnership relation between the counselor and the client2. Deep exploration of the client’s success strategies.3. Exploring alternatives in partnership between client and counselor through the process of appreciative visioning.4. Identifying innovative ways to create the desired future for the client himself/ herself5. Implementation of self-achievement strategy of the client.We present the main understandings and practical ways of operating in the intentional-nondirectiv appreciative interview. These forms are in full agreement with both the principles of Roger’s counseling and principles of appreciative inquiry and social constructionism adding an additional effectiveness to applied counseling techniques.

  14. How to appreciate the Gardens South of the Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李竹君

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of classical Chinese garden is to provide buildings, green spaces or relaxing spaces, but it is later endowed with more functions as a carrier for showing human beings’dependence on and respect for the nature, as well as var-ious emotions of them. This article briefly discussed how to appreciate the gardens south of the Yangtze River from aspects of construction elements, artistic conception and techniques.

  15. Engaging Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers in Modeling a Socioscientific Issue as a Way to Help Them Appreciate the Social Aspects of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evagorou, Maria; Mauriz, Blanca Puig

    2017-01-01

    Socioscientific issues are ill-structured problems that involve moral, ethical, and financial aspects, and lack clear-cut solutions. Teaching socioscientific issues necessarily puts a demand on teachers to draw on knowledge stemming from other domains, and to also appreciate, and present to the students the societal aspects of science. For new…

  16. Societal landslide and flood risk in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Salvati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We assessed societal landslide and flood risk to the population of Italy. The assessment was conducted at the national (synoptic and at the regional scales. For the assessment, we used an improved version of the catalogue of historical landslide and flood events that have resulted in loss of life, missing persons, injuries and homelessness in Italy, from 1850 to 2008. This is the recent portion of a larger catalogue spanning the 1941-year period from 68 to 2008. We started by discussing uncertainty and completeness in the historical catalogue, and we performed an analysis of the temporal and geographical pattern of harmful landslide and flood events, in Italy. We found that sites affected by harmful landslides or floods are not distributed evenly in Italy, and we attributed the differences to different physiographical settings. To determine societal risk, we investigated the distribution of the number of landslide and flood casualties (deaths, missing persons, and injured people in Italy, and in the 20 Italian Regions. Using order statistics, we found that the intensity of a landslide or flood event – measured by the total number of casualties in the event – follows a general negative power law trend. Next, we modelled the empirical distributions of the frequency of landslide and flood events with casualties in Italy and in each Region using a Zipf distribution. We used the scaling exponent s of the probability mass function (PMF of the intensity of the events, which controls the proportion of small, medium, and large events, to compare societal risk levels in different geographical areas and for different periods. Lastly, to consider the frequency of the events with casualties, we scaled the PMF obtained for the individual Regions to the total number of events in each Region, in the period 1950–2008, and we used the results to rank societal landslide and flood risk in Italy. We found that in the considered period societal landslide

  17. Societal landslide and flood risk in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, P.; Bianchi, C.; Rossi, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2010-03-01

    We assessed societal landslide and flood risk to the population of Italy. The assessment was conducted at the national (synoptic) and at the regional scales. For the assessment, we used an improved version of the catalogue of historical landslide and flood events that have resulted in loss of life, missing persons, injuries and homelessness in Italy, from 1850 to 2008. This is the recent portion of a larger catalogue spanning the 1941-year period from 68 to 2008. We started by discussing uncertainty and completeness in the historical catalogue, and we performed an analysis of the temporal and geographical pattern of harmful landslide and flood events, in Italy. We found that sites affected by harmful landslides or floods are not distributed evenly in Italy, and we attributed the differences to different physiographical settings. To determine societal risk, we investigated the distribution of the number of landslide and flood casualties (deaths, missing persons, and injured people) in Italy, and in the 20 Italian Regions. Using order statistics, we found that the intensity of a landslide or flood event - measured by the total number of casualties in the event - follows a general negative power law trend. Next, we modelled the empirical distributions of the frequency of landslide and flood events with casualties in Italy and in each Region using a Zipf distribution. We used the scaling exponent s of the probability mass function (PMF) of the intensity of the events, which controls the proportion of small, medium, and large events, to compare societal risk levels in different geographical areas and for different periods. Lastly, to consider the frequency of the events with casualties, we scaled the PMF obtained for the individual Regions to the total number of events in each Region, in the period 1950-2008, and we used the results to rank societal landslide and flood risk in Italy. We found that in the considered period societal landslide risk is largest in Trentino

  18. Societal costs of diabetes mellitus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortsø, C; Green, A; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide comprehensive real-world evidence on societal diabetes-attributable costs in Denmark. METHODS: National register data are linked on an individual level through unique central personal registration numbers in Denmark. All patients in the Danish National Diabetes Register in 2011 (N...... = 318 729) were included in this study. Complication status was defined according to data from the Danish National Hospital Register. Diabetes-attributable costs were calculated as the difference between costs of patients with diabetes and the expected costs given the annual resource consumption...... of the diabetes-free population. RESULTS: Societal costs attributable to diabetes were estimated to be at least 4.27 billion EUR in 2011, corresponding to 14,349 EUR per patient-year. A twofold higher healthcare resource usage was found for patients with diabetes as compared with the diabetes-free population...

  19. Societal Dynamics Understanding Social Knowledge and Wisdom

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    At both a micro-information level and a macro-societal level, the concepts of “knowledge” and “wisdom” are complementary – in both decisions and in social structures and institutions.  At the decision level, knowledge is concerned with how to make a proper choice of means, where “best” is measured as the efficiency toward achieving an end.  Wisdom is concerned with how to make a proper choice of ends  that attain “best” values. At a societal level, knowledge is managed through science/technology and innovation.  And while science/technology is society's way to create new means with high efficiencies, they reveal nothing about values.  Technology can be used for good or for evil, to make the world into a garden or to destroy all life.  It is societal wisdom which should influence the choice of proper ends -- ends to make the world a garden. How can society make progress in wisdom as well as knowledge?  Historically, the disciplines of the physical sciences and biology have provided sci...

  20. Appreciative Socialization Group: Rules of Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona USURELU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Appreciative socialization group is the result of a strong collaboration between a NGO from Iasi, Romania, active volunteers and service users involved (disabled persons. In this paper we aim to offer the rules of implementation of this model. It is important to respect some rules in order to obtain the desired result – social integration of disabled persons in our case. Apprecitive socialization group is based on a number of elements taken from the literature that treats this subject, and a number of elements of appreciative inquiry, the process of socialization, the process of empowerment and also the partnership process.

  1. Seeing Rroma Community through Appreciative Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona USURELU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Roma community is often caught between two perspectives – is seen either from a positive point of view, or a negative one. Around the world exist organizations that continually emphasize the rights of the Roma population and the positive aspects that are found in their culture. In this article we will consider exploring a range of appreciative models from Roma community; called by us “success stories” that are shaped around this community. Among the elements analyzed, we will stop on the process of appreciative inquiry, in terms of which we will refer to the “success stories” collected from the media and specialized literature.

  2. Bilingualism and Biculturalism as Individual and as Societal Phenonomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Joshua A.

    1980-01-01

    As diglossia is the societal counterpart of individual bilingualism, diethnia is the stable, societal counterpart to individual biculturalism. Diethnia requires societal compartmentalization as well as institutionally protected functional specificity. Maintenance of this division is difficult, given modern, interactive, mobile, and individualistic…

  3. Growth, financial development, societal norms and legal institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garretsen, Harry; Lensink, Robert; Sterken, Elmer

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses whether societal norms help to explain cross-country differences in financial development. We analyze whether societal norms in addition to legal institutions have an impact on financial development. We address the implications of the inclusion of societal norms for the analysis

  4. Growth, financial development, societal norms and legal institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garretsen, Harry; Lensink, Robert; Sterken, Elmer

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses whether societal norms help to explain cross-country differences in financial development. We analyze whether societal norms in addition to legal institutions have an impact on financial development. We address the implications of the inclusion of societal norms for the analysis

  5. An Appreciation of Berni Julian Alder

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    2015-01-01

    Berni Julian Alder profoundly influenced my research career at the Livermore Laboratory and the Davis Campus' Teller Tech, beginning in 1962 and lasting for over fifty years. I very much appreciate the opportunity provided by his Ninetieth Birthday Celebration to review some of the many high spots along the way.

  6. Olive Banks (1923-2006): An Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, June

    2008-01-01

    This Appreciation of Olive Banks (1923-2006) draws upon her memoir published in Women's History Review, Vol. 8, No. 3, 1999, pp. 401-410, and upon the author's recollections of and correspondence with her. Born into a solidly working-class family, Olive Banks overcame the disadvantages of her social class background and gender to become an…

  7. Appreciative Inquiry - anerkendende udforskning skaber mulighedsrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvig, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Anerkendende udforskning, den danske danske betegnelse for aktionsforskningstilgangen Appreciative Inquiry, fokuserer på at udforske og forandre forhold i det organisatoriske liv, gennem understregningen af, at det er muligt at skabe og vedligeholde en organisation, på grundlag af dens styrker- d...

  8. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Art Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sophia S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Under the challenge of many post-modern theories and critics on art and art history, the boundaries and definition of art has becoming more diverse. Conventional art appreciation no longer covers all the debates and issues arising from the complex meaning of art in the modern world. Art education today must widen students' vision of…

  9. Distinguishing intention and function in art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Glenn; Carlson, Allen

    2013-04-01

    We applaud Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) attempt to encompass the function of artworks within their psycho-historical model of art appreciation. However, we suggest that in order to fully realize this aim, they require a clearer distinction between an artist's intentions toward an artwork and its proper functions. We also show how such a distinction improves the internal coherence of their model.

  10. A Jazz Primer. Jazz Appreciation Month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents background information on Jazz Appreciation Month. Includes a lesson for middle level students that can be adapted for upper elementary and high school students on jazz history. Offers an extension activity that incorporates oral history and provides a list of Internet and print resources on jazz. (CMK)

  11. The Appreciation of Career Literature in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billups, Arland; Peterson, Gary W.

    1994-01-01

    High school students (n=80) read two passages from each of three domains of career literature: short stories, formal literature, and popular literature. Both reading skill and cognitive development were related to extent to which adolescents appreciated three passages which presented career information. Reported need for information to make career…

  12. Evaluating Appreciative Inquiry: a relational constructionist perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, D. van der; Hosking, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Appreciative Inquiry (AI) has become increasingly popular as a social constructionist approach to organizational change and development. Many claims are made about its status and value but there are few published evaluation studies. We discuss these matters by setting out our own version of social c

  13. Using Appreciative Inquiry To Promote Diversity In Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Alston-Mills

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The topic of diversity and inclusion often evokes negative responses either spoken or unspoken. The importance of common language and promoting trust are necessary to begin dialogue. Appreciative Inquiry as a philosophy and approach began in the 1980’s and was formalized as an application in organizational change. The major principles of Appreciative Inquiry have informed the philosophy of Appreciative Leadership, the relational capacity to convert creative potential and to transform it into positive power. In addition to organizational change, the core values have been applied to social issues, team building, individual relationships, and global and international affairs. Appreciative Inquiry is a strength-based process through which people act in partnership to determine and co-create how to move an organization forward. As the importance of diversity and inclusion has become better recognized, social systems have become less homogeneous in fact and in our understanding of them. The principles and core values of Appreciative Inquiry can be applied to workshops on diversity. Rather than shame and blame, a workshop such as, Opening Doors: A Personal and Professional Journey, is based on recognition and appreciation of the many dimensions of diversity. The focus of these educational workshops is to provide tools for engagement and the deconstruction of the paradigms that have given rise to the various oppressions. The model is a collaborative relationship with allies and those who are empowered to be advocates for positive personal change and for the good of the whole. Thus the concept of fostering inclusion in diversity includes and not limited to position, religion, gender, ethnicity, age and other invisible identities. The goals are to create a welcoming, safe, and inclusive environment for all and to give voice to those who have been silenced. The program has been delivered to universities, human service agencies, government and community

  14. Da psicologia social à psicologia societal

    OpenAIRE

    Willem Doise

    2002-01-01

    O principal fator que diferencia os psicólogos sociais, para além dos diferentes paradigmas científicos, é sua posição em relação à legitimidade e à necessidade de uma psicologia societal. O objetivo desta psicologia sempre foi o de articular explicações no nível do indivíduo e explicações de ordem social, mostrando como o indivíduo dispõe de processos que lhe permitem funcionar em sociedade e, de uma maneira complementar, como as dinâmicas sociais, particularmente interacionistas, posicionai...

  15. La società bulimica (Luisa Stagi)

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Di Massa

    2003-01-01

    Nell'era della globalizzazione, infatti, il rapporto con il cibo è sempre meno influenzato dalla natura e sempre più condizionato dalla cultura. Almeno nelle società opulente. Il rapporto è però contraddittorio: l'edonismo dilagante impone di trarre dal cibo il massimo godimento, ma al tempo stesso di evitarne l'impatto negativo sul corpo. Un corpo che si fa sempre più terreno della progettualità individuale e componente emblematica dell'identità personale e sociale. Il controllo sul proprio ...

  16. Awareness of Societal Issues Among High School Biology Teachers Teaching Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Bloch, Ilit

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how aware high school biology teachers are of societal issues (values, moral, ethic, and legal issues) while teaching genetics, genetics engineering, molecular genetics, human heredity, and evolution. The study includes a short historical review of World War II atrocities during the Holocaust when scientists from all the above-mentioned disciplines had been involved in trying to support and develop the eugenics theories. It investigates pre- and postwar theories of the eugenics movement in the United States which were implemented successfully in Germany and a literature survey of the studies of societal issues related to these subjects. The sample consisted of 30 male and female biology teachers. Enclosed are teachers' answers in favor or against including debates about societal issues in their classrooms while teaching the disciplines mentioned above. Teachers' answers were analyzed in relation to three variables: years of teaching experience, gender, and religion faith. Data were collected from questionnaires and personal interviews and analyzed according to qualitative and quantitative methods. The results show that amongst the teachers there is a medium to low level of awareness of societal issues, while mainly emphasizing scientific subjects in preparation of matriculation examinations. The majority of the teachers do not include societal issues in their teaching, but if students raise these issues, teachers claimed to address them. No differences in teachers' opinions to societal issues were found in relation to gender or religious faith. Teachers with more years of teaching experience tend to teach with a more Science, Technology, and Society (STS) approach than novice teachers. The results are discussed in relation to teachers' professional development and teaching strategies are suggested to be used in their classrooms based on a STS approach, which includes the societal issues as a main goal.

  17. Using appreciative inquiry to transform health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2013-08-01

    Amid tremendous changes in contemporary health care stimulated by shifts in social, economic and political environments, health care managers are challenged to provide new structures and processes to continually improve health service delivery. The general public and the media are becoming less tolerant of poor levels of health care, and health care professionals need to be involved and supported to bring about positive change in health care. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and method for promoting transformational change, shifting from a traditional problem-based orientation to a more strength-based approach to change, that focuses on affirmation, appreciation and positive dialog. This paper discusses how an innovative participatory approach such as AI may be used to promote workforce engagement and organizational learning, and facilitate positive organizational change in a health care context.

  18. World Could Pay For Yuan Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Debating whether China’s yuan is undervalued is a hot topic of conversation between China and its major trading partners, particularly the United States, which has a large trade deficit with China. Soon after the Second Meeting of the China-U.S. Strategic Economic Dialogue focused on this topic in May, some U.S. senators proposed a bill that is widely recog- nized as aiming to force the acceleration of appreciation of the yuan. But Professor Liu Zhibiao, Dean of the School of Economics of Nanjing University, points out one salient fact: With the increase of foreign invest- ment and rising level of trade openness, China is contributing more and more to the world’s economic growth, with the benefits of this growth being shared by the whole world. Therefore, the cost of sharp appreciation in the value of the Chinese currency will exert impact on the whole world, he says.

  19. RMB:Depreciating Internationally while Appreciating Externally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贝多广; 朱晓莉

    2008-01-01

    RMB has been depreciating internally while appreciating externally since 2002. This new monetary phenomenon, has been strengthened in the context that US dollar depreciates internationally and that domestic economy is overwhelmed with excessive liquidities. Certainly the monetary phenomenon is the reflection of the actual economy: continued trade surplus, triggered robustly by the export-driven economy, is bringing a huge amount of exchange reserve which accelerates sequentially the expansion of domestic money supply. Furthermore, a refrained appreciation of RMB tends to deteriorate the domestic inflation, which is not simply a traditional concept of CPI but a broad inflation parameter including a variety of asset prices. It’s sure that the new phenomenon is becoming a new challenge to the macroeconomic equilibrium as well as the decision maker of monetary policy.

  20. Multinational investigation of cross-societal cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrough, Angela Rachael; Glöckner, Andreas

    2016-09-27

    In a globalized world, establishing successful cooperation between people from different nations is becoming increasingly important. We present results from a comprehensive investigation of cross-societal cooperation in one-shot prisoner's dilemmas involving population-representative samples from six countries and identify crucial facilitators of and obstacles to cooperation. In interactions involving mutual knowledge about only the other players' nationalities, we demonstrate that people hold strong and transnationally shared expectations (i.e., stereotypes) concerning the cooperation level of interaction partners from other countries. These expectations are the strongest determinants of participant cooperation. Paradoxically, however, they turn out to be incorrect stereotypes that even correlate negatively with reality. In addition to erroneous expectations, participants' cooperation behavior is driven by (shared) social preferences that vary according to the interaction partner's nationality. In the cross-societal context, these social preferences are influenced by differences in wealth and ingroup favoritism, as well as effects of specific country combinations but not by spatial distance between nations.

  1. Multinational investigation of cross-societal cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrough, Angela Rachael

    2016-01-01

    In a globalized world, establishing successful cooperation between people from different nations is becoming increasingly important. We present results from a comprehensive investigation of cross-societal cooperation in one-shot prisoner’s dilemmas involving population-representative samples from six countries and identify crucial facilitators of and obstacles to cooperation. In interactions involving mutual knowledge about only the other players’ nationalities, we demonstrate that people hold strong and transnationally shared expectations (i.e., stereotypes) concerning the cooperation level of interaction partners from other countries. These expectations are the strongest determinants of participant cooperation. Paradoxically, however, they turn out to be incorrect stereotypes that even correlate negatively with reality. In addition to erroneous expectations, participants’ cooperation behavior is driven by (shared) social preferences that vary according to the interaction partner’s nationality. In the cross-societal context, these social preferences are influenced by differences in wealth and ingroup favoritism, as well as effects of specific country combinations but not by spatial distance between nations. PMID:27621437

  2. Societal reintegration following cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan; Hurton, Scott; Ayloo, Subhashini; Cwinn, Mathew; De Coutere-Bosse, Sarah; Molinari, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Studies on patients' societal reintegration following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are scarce. Between September 2006 and January 2008, all adults who were alive after 3 years post OLT were included in this prospective cohort study. Validated questionnaires were administered to all candidates with the primary aim of investigating the rate of their social re-integration following OLT and potential barriers they might have encountered. Among 157 eligible patients 110 (70%) participated. Mean participants' age was 57 years (SD 11.4) and 43% were females. Prior to OLT, 75% of patients were married and 6% were divorced. Following OLT there was no significant difference in marital status. Employment rate fell from 72% to 30% post-OLT. Patients who had been employed in either low-skill or advanced-skill jobs were less likely to return to work. After OLT, personal income fell an average of 4,363 Canadian dollars (CAN$) (SD 20,733) (P=0.03) but the majority of recipients (80%) reported high levels of satisfaction for their role in society. Although patients' satisfaction post-OLT is high, employment status is likely to be negatively affected for individuals who are not self-employed. Strategies to assist recipients in returning to their pre-OLT jobs should be developed to improve patients' economical status and societal ability to recoup resources committed for OLT.

  3. The Influence of Reading and Appreciation of Classic Poems on Medical Students’All-round Humanity Cultivation%古典诗文的阅读与鉴赏活动对培养医学生综合人文素养的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥秋菊

    2013-01-01

    Reading and appreciation of classic poems play a great role in influencing medical students’all-round humanity cultivation by four aspects, namely, character cultivation, life value, moral standards and aesthetic perception.%  古典诗文的阅读与鉴赏活动从医学生的人格培养、人生价值、伦理道德、审美感知等方面影响着医学生综合人文素养的提高。

  4. Gut appreciation: possibilities for aesthetic disgust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Korsmeyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the arousal of disgust is now widely acknowledged to be an appropriate response to certain works of art, controversy remains regarding whether to consider this emotion an actual zone of appreciative enjoyment. This paper presents several solutions to the so-called paradox of aversion and argues for a brand of aesthetic disgust that produces an experience that can be savored despite its difficult and unpleasant qualities.

  5. Patient Appreciation Day in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Dianne

    2014-08-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy struggle with many physical and emotional stressors. Many ways to help patients cope with stressors and improve the treatment experience are found in the literature, including humor, art, entertainment, and hospitality. At H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, the radiation therapy nurses and staff members use entertainment in an annual patient appreciation day event as one way to give back to the patients.

  6. Appreciative Socialization Group: Rules of Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Simona USURELU; Antonio SANDU

    2012-01-01

    Appreciative socialization group is the result of a strong collaboration between a NGO from Iasi, Romania, active volunteers and service users involved (disabled persons). In this paper we aim to offer the rules of implementation of this model. It is important to respect some rules in order to obtain the desired result – social integration of disabled persons in our case. Apprecitive socialization group is based on a number of elements taken from the literature that treats this subject, and a...

  7. Can persons with schizophrenia appreciate visual art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Norton, D; McBain, R

    2008-10-01

    The way schizophrenia patients perceive the world is largely mysterious. Understanding and appreciating the visual world begins with the perception of basic visual features, which is altered in this mental disorder. Yet, the roles basic visual features play in functional activities such as appreciation of art are unclear. This study examined the effects of visual feature manipulation on beauty perception of art in schizophrenia patients (n=29) and in normal controls (n=30). Three pieces of art--The Starry Night (Van Gogh), Mona Lisa (Da Vinci) and a natural landscape photograph (anonymous)--were manipulated in terms of their coloration (removal of color), spatial frequency content (low or high-frequency pass) and visual noise level (with added noise). Subjects judged the beauty of the original and visual-feature-manipulated artworks by rating each piece individually (1 to 7) and by ranking all pieces from most to least beautiful. For the three original art pieces, averaged ratings and rankings were similar in patients and controls. However, when the visual features of the original pieces were manipulated, changes in the beauty ratings were significantly smaller in patients. The reduced sensitivity to visual feature manipulations suggests that the modulation of basic visual signals, often used for vivid and dynamic expressions in art, may be under-appreciated in schizophrenia.

  8. THE PRACTICAL ASPECT OF DEVELOPING ART APPRECIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Duh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article the significance and the role of art appreciation are dealt with. The ways and procedures of developing art appreciation of pupils in primary school are presented. With the support of the procedure of gradual uncovering of an artwork, in which two different methods were employed, namely increasing the sharpness and fragmentary image, the response and experience of 14 – 15 years old pupils were investigated in this study. In this, focus was on the examination of appropriateness of the procedures according to the type of the selected artworks. The procedures were examined on two sets, namely on a set of artworks with realistically depicted motifs and on a set of abstract paintings. We have found the selected procedures were to a certain extent more appropriate for dealing with realistic motifs, and to a lesser extent for abstract motifs. For pupils it is more difficult to accept an unknown, alien image, they much more easily identify themselves with recognisable forms and motifs. The latter motivate and inspire them more; they activate communication and in consequence raise the level of the development of art appreciation.

  9. Anti-Profit Beliefs: How People Neglect the Societal Benefits of Profit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Bhattacharjee (Amit); Dana, J.D. (Jason); Baron, J.M. (Jonathan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProfit-seeking firms are stereotypically depicted as immoral and harmful to society. At the same time, profit-driven enterprise has contributed immensely to human prosperity. Though scholars agree that profit can incentivize societally beneficial behaviors, people may neglect this

  10. Awareness of Societal Issues among High School Biology Teachers Teaching Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Bloch, Ilit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how aware high school biology teachers are of societal issues (values, moral, ethic, and legal issues) while teaching genetics, genetics engineering, molecular genetics, human heredity, and evolution. The study includes a short historical review of World War II atrocities during the Holocaust when…

  11. Silver Nanoparticles: Technological Advances, Societal Impacts, and Metrological Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Jiménez, Bryan; Johnson, Monique E.; Montoro Bustos, Antonio R.; Murphy, Karen E.; Winchester, Michael R.; Vega Baudrit, José R.

    2017-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) show different physical and chemical properties compared to their macroscale analogs. This is primarily due to their small size and, consequently, the exceptional surface area of these materials. Presently, advances in the synthesis, stabilization, and production of AgNPs have fostered a new generation of commercial products and intensified scientific investigation within the nanotechnology field. The use of AgNPs in commercial products is increasing and impacts on the environment and human health are largely unknown. This article discusses advances in AgNP production and presents an overview of the commercial, societal, and environmental impacts of this emerging nanoparticle (NP), and nanomaterials in general. Finally, we examine the challenges associated with AgNP characterization, discuss the importance of the development of NP reference materials (RMs) and explore their role as a metrological mechanism to improve the quality and comparability of NP measurements.

  12. [Societal cost of pre-lingual deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubbico, L; Bartolucci, M A; Broglio, D; Boner, A

    2007-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss still remain an important medical and social problem for the delayed language development. Object of this study is to provide an updated and close estimate of the economic burden involved in pre-lingual hearing loss. Data were provided by the Ministry of Health data bank, the Ministry of Education national data bank, the National Institute of Social Insurance national data bank and the Italian Central Statistics Institute. The information was collected by means of a specially provided Societal Cost Questionnaire (SCQ). Direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and indirect welfare costs involved in deafness were included in the cost estimate. Was enrolled in the study a sample of subjects with pre-lingual deafness, with a mean bilateral neuro-sensorial hearing impairment equal to 60 dB or more for 500, 1,000 and 2,000 Hz frequency tones in the better ear detected in neonatal age, had prevented speech from developing. The statistical assessment was performed according to an actuarial approach, considering the estimated life expectancy at birth, based on updated population data from census 2001. Based on life expectancy, the lifetime mean cost assessed for a subject affected by profound pre-lingual deafness turned out to be equal to Euro 737,994.76 for a male and Euro 755,404.02 for a female. Unlike other disabling affections, deafness weighs significantly more on the social system than on the health system. As a matter of fact, the direct medical costs, such as audiological diagnosis, hearing aids, etc., only account for 3.8% of the societal cost, whereas education, rehabilitation and welfare costs reach 96.2% of the total. Finally, our results suggest that societal costs can only be reduced by zeroing in on promotion and broadening of effective prevention strategies. The appropriate public health measures (such as the universal newborn hearing screening) set up and implemented in several European and non-European countries proved

  13. The Influence Factors and Mechanism of Societal Risk Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rui; Shi, Kan; Li, Shu

    Risk perception is one of important subjects in management psychology and cognitive psychology. It is of great value in the theory and practice to investigate the societal hazards that the public cares a lot especially in Socio-economic transition period. A survey including 30 hazards and 6 risk attributes was designed and distributed to about 2, 485 residents of 8 districts, Beijing. The major findings are listed as following: Firstly, a scale of societal risk perception was designed and 2 factors were identified (Dread Risk & Unknown Risk). Secondly, structural equation model was used to analyze the influence factors and mechanism of societal risk perception. Risk preference, government support and social justice could influence societal risk perception directly. Government support fully moderated the relationship between government trust and societal risk perception. Societal risk perception influenced life satisfaction, public policy preferences and social development belief.

  14. PLF and Sustainability, Ethics and Societal Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thorkild

    2011-01-01

    production using the principles and technology of process engineering.Today the livestock sector and the decision of the future technology (e.g. PLF) are confronted with the task to take into account an enormous amount of issues, normative, economic, technological and social. On the normative side are many....... However, new farming technologies may have a much wider impact on society than the immediate consequences for farmers and their livestock; this impact can be evaluated objectively using different methods for ethical assessment. Precision livestock farming can be defined as the management of livestock...... societal pressures to consider animal welfare, environmental issues (agro biodiversity, clean water), landscape and health. Economically, farmers have lots of problems to earn some profit; from the technological side, farmers are pressured to participate in the dynamics of technology and innovation...

  15. Da psicologia social à psicologia societal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doise Willem

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O principal fator que diferencia os psicólogos sociais, para além dos diferentes paradigmas científicos, é sua posição em relação à legitimidade e à necessidade de uma psicologia societal. O objetivo desta psicologia sempre foi o de articular explicações no nível do indivíduo e explicações de ordem social, mostrando como o indivíduo dispõe de processos que lhe permitem funcionar em sociedade e, de uma maneira complementar, como as dinâmicas sociais, particularmente interacionistas, posicionais ou de valores e de crenças gerais, orientam o funcionamento desses processos.

  16. Da psicologia social à psicologia societal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Doise

    Full Text Available O principal fator que diferencia os psicólogos sociais, para além dos diferentes paradigmas científicos, é sua posição em relação à legitimidade e à necessidade de uma psicologia societal. O objetivo desta psicologia sempre foi o de articular explicações no nível do indivíduo e explicações de ordem social, mostrando como o indivíduo dispõe de processos que lhe permitem funcionar em sociedade e, de uma maneira complementar, como as dinâmicas sociais, particularmente interacionistas, posicionais ou de valores e de crenças gerais, orientam o funcionamento desses processos.

  17. Applications and societal benefits of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrady, Anthony L; Neal, Mike A

    2009-07-27

    This article explains the history, from 1600 BC to 2008, of materials that are today termed 'plastics'. It includes production volumes and current consumption patterns of five main commodity plastics: polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and polyethylene terephthalate. The use of additives to modify the properties of these plastics and any associated safety, in use, issues for the resulting polymeric materials are described. A comparison is made with the thermal and barrier properties of other materials to demonstrate the versatility of plastics. Societal benefits for health, safety, energy saving and material conservation are described, and the particular advantages of plastics in society are outlined. Concerns relating to littering and trends in recycling of plastics are also described. Finally, we give predictions for some of the potential applications of plastic over the next 20 years.

  18. Abordagem societal das representações sociais The societal approach of social representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria de Oliveira Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste artigo é apresentar as principais contribuições de Willem Doise para o desenvolvimento da teoria das representações sociais. Nesta direção, foram examinados: a Teoria das Representações Sociais como a grande teoria; a criação do Laboratório de Psicologia Social Experimental na Universidade de Genebra; os estudos experimentais sobre o desenvolvimento social da inteligência; os estudos experimentais das representações sociais; os quatro níveis de análise em Psicologia Social; as relações grupais; o paradigma das três fases; a pesquisa sobre os direitos humanos. Ainda que se considere que a adesão à Teoria das Representações Sociais pressupõe o estudo de indicadores que organizam o campo representacional, a análise dos posicionamentos individuais neste campo e a ancoragem destes posicionamentos nas dinâmicas societais, é preciso reconhecer que esta forma de fazê-lo ainda é pouco difundida nos meios científicos da América Latina.The aim of this paper is to present the main contributions of Willem Doise to the development of the Social Representations Theory. The following topics were examined: the Social Representations Theory as the grand theory; the foundation of Experimental Social Psychology Laboratory in University of Geneva; the experimental studies in social development of intelligence; the experimental studies in Social Representations; the four levels of analysis in Social Psychology; group relationships; the paradigm of three level and the human rights research. The adherence to the Social Representation Theory assumes the study of indicators that organize the representational field, the analysis of the individual positioning in this field and the anchoring of these positioning in the societal dynamics. Nevertheless, it is necessary to admit that this way of analysing is still little diffused in the scientific area of Latin America.

  19. Prof. DR. F. C. Eloff - An appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G de Graaff

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available I have been requested to write an appreciation of the man to whom these proceedings of a symposium on the Kalahari Ecosystem are dedicated @ Prof. Dr. F. C. Eloff, or Fritz as he is popularly referred to. I undertook the task with some trepidation and the only claim to the honour to write this article may be the fact that I have known Professor Eloff since 1949 when I was a green-shanked first year veterinary student at the University of Pretoria where he lectured in zoology to the new students.

  20. Appreciation of peer reviewers for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Lee, Cin-Ty; Paytan, Adina; Faul, Ulrich; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    The editorial and scientific publishing process relies on the sustained work of volunteer reviewers, and evaluating the interdisciplinary and broad interest papers published in G-Cubed can be a particular challenge. As Editors and Associated Editors, we are therefore hugely appreciative of the efforts of our reviewers and would like to thank and acknowledge them in this editorial. G-Cubed published 252 manuscripts out of 472 submissions in 2015, and for this, we were able to rely on the efforts of 712 dedicated reviewers. Their names are listed below; in italics are those 41 who provided three or more reviews(!). A big thank you from the G-Cubed team!

  1. The societal cost of Taenia solium cysticercosis in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Schmidt, Veronika; Winkler, Andrea Sylvia; Harrison, Wendy; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2017-01-01

    Taenia solium is a zoonotic parasite prevalent in many low income countries throughout Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, including Tanzania. The parasite is recognized as a public health threat; however the burden it poses on populations of Tanzania is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the societal cost of T. solium cysticercosis in Tanzania, by assessing both the health and economic burden. The societal cost of T. solium cysticercosis was assessed in humans and pigs based on data obtained by a systematic review. Experts' opinion was sought in cases where data were not retrievable. The health burden was assessed in terms of annual number of neurocysticercosis (NCC) associated epilepsy incident cases, deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), while the economic burden was assessed in terms of direct and indirect costs imposed by NCC-associated epilepsy and potential losses due to porcine cysticercosis. Based on data retrieved from the systematic review and burden assessments, T. solium cysticercosis contributed to a significant societal cost for the population. The annual number of NCC-associated epilepsy incident cases and deaths were 17,853 (95% Uncertainty Interval (UI), 5666-36,227) and 212 (95% UI, 37-612), respectively. More than 11% (95% UI, 6.3-17) of the pig population was infected with the parasite when using tongue examination as diagnostic method. For the year 2012 the number of DALYs per thousand person-years for NCC-associated epilepsy was 0.7 (95% UI, 0.2-1.6). Around 5 million USD (95% UI, 797,535-16,933,477) were spent due to NCC-associated epilepsy and nearly 3 million USD (95% UI, 1,095,960-5,366,038) were potentially lost due to porcine cysticercosis. Our results show that T. solium imposes a serious public health, agricultural and economic threat for Tanzania. We urge that a One Health approach, which involves the joint collaboration and effort of veterinarians, medical doctors, agricultural extension officers

  2. Appreciative Perspectives on Supervision in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena UNGURU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Supervision is considered to be an extremly important stage in the professional development of the specialists in the fields with asistential nature, such as: psychotherapy, coaching, personal development, counselling, etc. In Romania, the supervision of social services has become compulsory through the Order 288/2006. A great part of the content of standards for the case management, including those referred to supervision, namely to the theoretical and methodological development of some teachers, such as: Professor PhD Ştefan Cojocaru, Professor PhD Ana Muntean, Professor PhD Elena Zamfir. In this review, we will synthesize a part of Professor Ştefan Cojocaru’s contribution to the development of the field of appreciative supervision, as it is presented in the volume Appreciative methods in social work. Survey, supervision and case management, published with Polirom Publishing House in 2005. We will aim to also synthesize a series of echos of his work in the Romanian scientific literature.

  3. Model-Based Exploration of Societal Aging in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.; Logtens, T.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Mismanagement of societal aging is an important threat to health care, social security, and the economy of many nations. A System Dynamics simulation model related to societal aging in the Netherlands and its implications for the Dutch welfare system is used here to generate exploratory scenarios an

  4. Thinking about Art: Encouraging Art Appreciation in Early Childhood Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Ann S.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the place of art appreciation in early childhood education programs. Discusses historical changes in philosophies of art education and young children's capability for appreciating art. Presents suggestions for including art appreciation in the preschool curriculum, and describes ways to tie art activities to children's interests,…

  5. Helping Students Develop an Appreciation for School Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Phillips, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    The topic of content appreciation (i.e., developing a broad valuing of curricular content) has not received the attention it deserves. In this article, the authors present Brophy's (2008a; 2008b) model of content appreciation in the context of a hypothetical case study of a teacher trying to foster content appreciation. In doing so, they…

  6. Appreciative Advising from the Academic Advisor's Viewpoint: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Nancy Garrett

    2010-01-01

    Appreciative Advising represents a revolutionary new approach to the field of academic advising. Based on Appreciative Inquiry, which was developed by David Cooperrider at Case Western Reserve University in the 1980's, Appreciative Advising is also influenced by positive psychology, reality therapy, and strengths based advising. The Appreciative…

  7. Future societal issues in industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurbiers, Daan; Osseweijer, Patricia; Kinderlerer, Julian

    2007-09-01

    Three international stakeholder meetings were organized by The Netherlands-based "Kluyver Center for Genomics of Industrial Fermentation" with the objective to identify the future societal issues in the field of industrial biotechnology and to develop a coordinated strategy for public dialogue. The meetings resulted in five unanimous recommendations: (i) that science, industry and the European Commission in conjunction with other stakeholders create a comprehensive roadmap towards a bio-based economy; (ii) that the European Commission initiate a series of round-table meetings to further articulate the views, interests and responsibilities of the relevant stakeholders and to define policy; (iii) that the development of new innovative communication activities is stimulated to increase public engagement and to discuss the ways that we do or do not want technologies to shape our common future; (iv) that further social studies are undertaken on public attitudes and behaviors to the bio-based economy and that novel methods are developed to assess public views of future technological developments; and (v) that the concept of sustainability is further operationalized and taken as a core value driving research and development and policy making.

  8. Economics and societal impacts of tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, Howard B.

    2011-08-01

    During the spring of 2011, there were a record number of unusually strong and devastating tornadoes in the United States, which killed more than 500 people, the most in the country since 1953. Tornadoes are responsible for more than $1 billion annually (adjusted to 2007 U.S. dollars) in property damage and for disrupting thousands of lives and businesses. The most notable tornado this past spring devastated Joplin, Mo.; tornadoes also struck such diverse locations as Springfield, Mass.; Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Raleigh, N. C.; communities near Oklahoma City, Okla.; Minneapolis, Minn.; central and east Texas; Philadelphia, Pa.; and St. Louis, Mo. It is therefore timely to assess the economic and societal impacts of tornadoes. In this book the authors use various statistical techniques to evaluate the cost of tornadoes to society. They begin by reviewing the methodologies of formulating a tornado climatology across diverse regions according to tornado intensity, deaths, injuries, and property damage, and they then provide a history of the U.S. National Weather Service's (NWS) public warning efforts, describe tornado shelters and how the public responds to warnings, and suggest ways to reduce tornado risk.

  9. Satellite Power System (SPS) societal assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Construction and operation of a 60-unit (300 GW) domestic SPS over the period 2000 to 2030 would stress many segments of US society. A significant commitment of resources (land, energy, materials) would be required, and a substantial proportion of them would have to be committed prior to the production of any SPS electricity. Estimated resource demands, however, seem to be within US capabilities. Modifications will be required of institutions called upon to deal with SPS. These include financial, managerial and regulatory entities and, most particularly, the utility industry. Again, the required changes, while certainly profound, seem to be well within the realm of possibility. Enhanced cooperation in international affairs will be necessary to accommodate development and operation of the SPS. To remove its potential as a military threat and to reduce its vulnerability, either the SPS itself must become an international enterprise, or it must be subject to unrestricted international inspection. How either of these objectives could, in fact, be achieved, or which is preferable, remains unclear. Forty-four concerns about the SPS were identified via a public outreach experiment involving 9000 individuals from three special interest organizations. The concerns focused on environmental impacts (particularly the effects of microwave radiation) and the centralizing tendency of the SPS on society. The interim results of the public outreach experiment influenced the scope and direction of the CDEP; the final results will be instrumental in defining further societal assessment efforts.

  10. The Sustainability Revolution: A Societal Paradigm Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom R. Burns

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses a question relevant to those interested in the achievement of greater sustainability: What are some of the ways that major societal transformations come about? Firstly, four key mechanisms are identified in the article. Then, I go on to focus on one of these, which has a prominent place in the sustainability revolution that it is argued is now taking place. The question of what are characteristic features of the sustainability revolution is addressed. The ongoing transformations are largely piecemeal, incremental, diffuse—in earlier writings referred to as “organic”. Organic is a more encompassing notion than “grassroots”, since the innovation and transformation processes may be launched and developed at multiple levels by collective agents that in some cases are very large and would not be understood as “grassroots” actors. The article argues that the sustainability revolution shares some features, in particular its organic character, with the early industrial revolution. It concludes by addressing the question of what are the similarities and differences between the sustainability and industrial revolutions.

  11. Childhood obesity: a societal problem to solve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M B; Puhl, R

    2003-02-01

    In contrast to other threats to American children's health, the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity are considered the responsibility of individual children and their parents. This pressure exists in the context of the societal stigmatization of overweight children and the powerful environmental inducements aimed directly at children to eat nutritionally poor foods. Parents of overweight children are left in the difficult position of fearing the social and health consequences of their child's obesity, and fighting a losing battle against the omnipotent presence of the media and constant exposure to unhealthy foods. This paper brings together several literatures to provide a comprehensive examination of the major challenges facing obese children and their families. In particular, this paper documents the extent of stigmatization towards overweight children and reviews evidence of the conflicting advice given to parents about how to help children develop healthful eating in the face of biological and learned food preferences. We conclude with a call for a shift in thinking about the role of our society in the aetiology, treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

  12. US Dollar's Appreciation Despite the Financial Crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Wenjing

    2009-01-01

    @@ During the Asian financial crisis, the exchange rate of Thai baht against U.S. dollar grew by 17%. The rate of Korean won against U.S. dollar skyrocketed to a record high of 1008:1 and that of Indonesian rupi-ah against dollar even crossed the 10000:1 mark. However, after the international financial crisis broke out in 2008, the dol-lar index turned out to rise dramatically. On November 21, 2008, the dollar index reached 88 points, rising by 23.3% over the 71 points on April 22, 2008. Conven-tional wisdom is that a currency should depreciate when the economic fundamen-tals are in a downturn. Then how do we explain the substantial appreciation of the U.S. dollar?

  13. Aesthetic Appreciation, Ethics, and 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Aretoulakis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous critical articles on what really happened on the otherwise beautiful morning of 11 September 2001. Beyond doubt, the bulk of the critical responses to the terrorist attacks focused on the ethical and humanitarian, or rather the unethical and inhumane implications of the atrocious act, leaving no room for any philosophical reflection on the potential assessment or reception of the event from the perspective of art and aesthetics. The few years that have gone by since 2001 have provided us with some a sense of emotional detachment from the horror of that day, a detachment that may have awakened our aesthetic and artistic instincts with regard to the attacks themselves as well as their visual representation. Chronological distance renders an unprejudiced and independent stance more possible now than ever. It also allows us to reconsider our initial politically correct and ethically justified repulsion of the efforts made by a few artists to aestheticize 9/11. Such repulsion, however, was associated with the delusion that by denouncing aesthetics we were really securing the prevalence of politics, morality and ethical responsibility in a terror-afflicted society. My point in this paper is that there is a need for aesthetic appreciation when contemplating a violent event such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks. What is more, appreciation of the beautiful, even in case of a 9/11, seems necessary because it is a key to establishing an ethical stance towards terror, life, and art. It should be stressed that independent aesthetic experience is not important in itself but is a means of cultivating an authentic moral and ethical judgment.

  14. Salieri's dilemma: a counterpoint between envy and appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegoyen, R Horacio; Nemas, Clara R

    2003-02-01

    Taking as its starting point Klein's concepts of 1957, this paper stresses certain characteristics of envy that have not yet been taken into account in psychoanalysis. Klein described the conflict between envy and gratitude as inherent in the human being; she suggested an interesting link between envy and admiration, but never developed this idea in her theory. The hypothesis that we put forward in this paper is the existence of a particular intolerance-related to envy-of one's own capacity to recognise the valuable aspects of the object. This situation leads to the paradox that the same faculty that allows the patient to appreciate the good qualities of the object is at the same time the source of unbearable pain. The capacity to recognise the good aspects of the object-whether they are perceived or attributed by projective identification-cannot be accepted as a valuable aspect of the self and is taken as a proof of the self 's unworthiness. We think that the description of this intolerance towards admirative appreciation introduces a change in the understanding of idealization simply as a defence against envy and enriches the conflict expressed in the immediacy of the transference - countertransference.

  15. Graceful Failure and Societal Resilience Analysis Via Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, P. S.; Cioffi-Revilla, C.; Rogers, J. D.; Bassett, J.; Hailegiorgis, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Agent-based social modeling is opening up new methodologies for the study of societal response to weather and climate hazards, and providing measures of resiliency that can be studied in many contexts, particularly in coupled human and natural-technological systems (CHANTS). Since CHANTS are complex adaptive systems, societal resiliency may or may not occur, depending on dynamics that lack closed form solutions. Agent-based modeling has been shown to provide a viable theoretical and methodological approach for analyzing and understanding disasters and societal resiliency in CHANTS. Our approach advances the science of societal resilience through computational modeling and simulation methods that complement earlier statistical and mathematical approaches. We present three case studies of social dynamics modeling that demonstrate the use of these agent based models. In Central Asia, we exmaine mutltiple ensemble simulations with varying climate statistics to see how droughts and zuds affect populations, transmission of wealth across generations, and the overall structure of the social system. In Eastern Africa, we explore how successive episodes of drought events affect the adaptive capacity of rural households. Human displacement, mainly, rural to urban migration, and livelihood transition particularly from pastoral to farming are observed as rural households interacting dynamically with the biophysical environment and continually adjust their behavior to accommodate changes in climate. In the far north case we demonstrate one of the first successful attempts to model the complete climate-permafrost-infrastructure-societal interaction network as a complex adaptive system/CHANTS implemented as a ``federated'' agent-based model using evolutionary computation. Analysis of population changes resulting from extreme weather across these and other cases provides evidence for the emergence of new steady states and shifting patterns of resilience.

  16. Smell and Anosmia in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tafalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant defined the garden as a visual art and considered that smell plays no role in its aesthetic appreciation. If the Kantian thesis were right, then a person who has no sense of smell (who suffers from anosmia would not be impaired in his or her aesthetic appreciation of gardens. At the same time, a visually impaired person could not appreciate the beauty of gardens, although he or she could perceive them through hearing, smell, taste, and touch. In this paper I discuss the role of smell and anosmia in the aesthetic appreciation of gardens. I accept the Kantian idea that the appreciation of a garden is the appreciation of its form, but I also defend that, at least in some cases, smell can belong to the form of gardens and, consequently, the ability or inability to smell influences their aesthetic appreciation.

  17. Utilizing Earth Observations for Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades a tremendous progress has been made in the Earth science space-based remote sensing observations, technologies and algorithms. Such advancements have improved the predictability by providing lead-time and accuracy of forecast in weather, climate, natural hazards, and natural resources. It has further reduced or bounded the overall uncertainties by partially improving our understanding of planet Earth as an integrated system that is governed by non-linear and chaotic behavior. Many countries such as the US, European Community, Japan, China, Russia, India has and others have invested billions of dollars in developing and launching space-based assets in the low earth (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) orbits. However, the wealth of this scientific knowledge that has potential of extracting monumental socio-economic benefits from such large investments have been slow in reaching the public and decision makers. For instance, there are a number of areas such as water resources and availability, energy forecasting, aviation safety, agricultural competitiveness, disaster management, air quality and public health, which can directly take advantage. Nevertheless, we all live in a global economy that depends on access to the best available Earth Science information for all inhabitants of this planet. This presentation discusses a process to transition Earth science data and products for societal needs including NASA's experience in achieving such objectives. It is important to mention that there are many challenges and issues that pertain to a number of areas such as: (1) difficulties in making a speedy transition of data and information from observations and models to relevant Decision Support Systems (DSS) or tools, (2) data and models inter-operability issues, (3) limitations of spatial, spectral and temporal resolution, (4) communication limitations as dictated by the availability of image processing and data compression techniques. Additionally, the

  18. Utilizing Earth Observations for Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades a tremendous progress has been made in the Earth science space-based remote sensing observations, technologies and algorithms. Such advancements have improved the predictability by providing lead-time and accuracy of forecast in weather, climate, natural hazards, and natural resources. It has further reduced or bounded the overall uncertainties by partially improving our understanding of planet Earth as an integrated system that is governed by non-linear and chaotic behavior. Many countries such as the US, European Community, Japan, China, Russia, India has and others have invested billions of dollars in developing and launching space-based assets in the low earth (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) orbits. However, the wealth of this scientific knowledge that has potential of extracting monumental socio-economic benefits from such large investments have been slow in reaching the public and decision makers. For instance, there are a number of areas such as water resources and availability, energy forecasting, aviation safety, agricultural competitiveness, disaster management, air quality and public health, which can directly take advantage. Nevertheless, we all live in a global economy that depends on access to the best available Earth Science information for all inhabitants of this planet. This presentation discusses a process to transition Earth science data and products for societal needs including NASA's experience in achieving such objectives. It is important to mention that there are many challenges and issues that pertain to a number of areas such as: (1) difficulties in making a speedy transition of data and information from observations and models to relevant Decision Support Systems (DSS) or tools, (2) data and models inter-operability issues, (3) limitations of spatial, spectral and temporal resolution, (4) communication limitations as dictated by the availability of image processing and data compression techniques. Additionally, the

  19. 1 < 2 and 2 < 3: Nonlinguistic appreciations of numerical order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula eAnderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordinal understanding is involved in understanding social hierarchies, series of actions, and everyday events. Moreover, an appreciation of numerical order is critical to understanding to number at a highly abstract, conceptual level. In this paper, we review the findings concerning the development and expression of ordinal numerical knowledge in preverbal human infants in light of literature about the same cognitive abilities in nonhuman animals. We attempt to reconcile seemingly contradictory evidence, provide new directions for prospective research, and evaluate the shared basis of ordinal knowledge among nonverbal organisms. Our review of the research leads us to conclude that both infants and nonhuman animals are adapted to respond to monotonic progressions in numerical order, consonant with mathematical definitions of numerical order. Further, we suggest that patterns in the way that infants and nonhuman animals process numerical order can be accounted for by changes across development, the conditions under which representations are generated, or both.

  20. The Societal Costs of Schizophrenia in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher, Mark; Mattli, Renato; von Wyl, Agnes; Reich, Oliver; Wieser, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that typically develops in early adulthood and becomes chronic in most cases. The disease is associated with elevated health care utilization, impaired functionality and the loss of life years and quality of life. The prevalence and costs of schizophrenia are not yet known for Switzerland. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of schizophrenia in Switzerland and to assess its burden on patients, caregivers and society as a whole. A hospital registry was combined with an outpatient physician survey and health insurance claims data to capture all patients living in the northern part of the canton of Zurich. Structured interviews with outpatient physicians were held to obtain information on outpatient care in private practices. Total costs included direct medical and nonmedical costs and lost production. All costs were calculated for the year 2012 from a societal perspective using a prevalence-based bottom-up approach. Intangible costs were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Uncertainty and its sources were addressed in univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The point prevalence of schizophrenia in Switzerland was estimated at 0.39% of the population. The average costs of schizophrenia in 2012 were EUR 39,408 per patient. Lost production accounted for 64% (EUR 25,108) of the total cost of illness, direct medical costs for 24% (EUR 9,507) and care by relatives or in residential homes for the mentally ill for 12% (EUR 4,793). Inpatient hospital care amounted to EUR 6,242 per year or 66% of direct medical costs. The results show the high burden of schizophrenia on patients, caregivers and society. The prevalence estimate can be considered a lower bound because undiagnosed cases were not identified by our empirical strategy. The estimated costs are conservative because the costs of comorbidities were not considered. The strengths of this study are the full coverage of the sample region by a

  1. Factors influencing societal response of nanotechnology : an expert stakeholder analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology can be described as an emerging technology and, as has been the case with other emerging technologies such as genetic modification, different socio-psychological factors will potentially influence societal responses to its development and application. These factors will play an important role in how nanotechnology is developed and commercialised. This article aims to identify expert opinion on factors influencing societal response to applications of nanotechnology. Structured i...

  2. Using appreciative inquiry during care transitions: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Elizabeth; Costa, Linda L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a transitional care coaching intervention offered to chronically ill medical patients during the transition from hospital to home. This 2-arm randomized pilot study uses a coaching framework based on appreciative inquiry theory. This article reviews the appreciative inquiry literature and identifies the characteristics of patients who participated in appreciative inquiry coaching. Lessons learned are summarized, and suggestions for future research are offered.

  3. Appreciation of Hardy's Poem "Neutral Tones" from the Point of View of Functional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-qin

    2008-01-01

    According to the theory of Systemic-Functional Linguistics (SFL), language cannot be disassociated from meaning. Function and semantics, as SFL suggests, are considered as the basis of human language and communicative activity. In order to reveal the inseparability of language and semantic, this paper aims to analyze and appreciate Hardy's poem…

  4. Can Renminbi Appreciation Reduce the US Trade Deficit?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Hung-Gay Fung; Donald Kummer

    2006-01-01

    Using a computational general equilibrium model, we analyze the impacts of Chinese real exchange rate appreciation on the trade balance of China and the USA and on various industries of both countries. We use several scenarios with 2.1, 6 and 12 percent real exchange rate appreciations for our simulation analysis. The results indicate that China's exchange rate appreciation might not solve the enlarging US current account deficits.Chinese outputs in both primary and manufacture sectors will increase, whereas the outputs of energy and services sectors will be adversely affected. The price of value-added products declines in light of the renminbi appreciation.

  5. The revised Appreciation of the Liberal Arts Scale (ALAS-R: Development, reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Malcolm Reid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Three studies were conducted to develop and evaluate an Appreciation of the Liberal Arts Scale. The final 24-item revision (ALAS-R was reliable (α = .86. Students who had a greater appreciation of the liberal arts were less materialistic, had greater life satisfaction, had greater ability to defer gratification, and reported greater openness to experiences, leadership, wisdom, and judgment. In addition, ALAS-R scores were predictably related to students’ choice of academic major, with Arts and Humanities majors scoring higher. This scale has the potential to contribute to prediction of student retention and major, as well as the assessment of a dimension of college student development.

  6. Participatory dreaming: a conceptual exploration from a unitary appreciative inquiry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repede, Elizabeth J

    2009-10-01

    Dreaming is a universal phenomenon in human experience and one that carries multiple meanings in the narrative discourse across disciplines. Dreams can be collective, communal, and emancipatory, as well as individual. While individual dreaming has been extensively studied in the literature, the participatory nature of dreaming as a unitary phenomenon is limited. The concept of participatory dreaming within a unitary appreciative framework for healing is explored from perspectives in anthropology, psychology, and nursing. A participatory model of dreaming is proposed from a synthesis of the literature for use in future research using unitary appreciative inquiry.

  7. Global challenges for e-waste management: the societal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalini, Federico

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decades the electronics industry and ICT Industry in particular has revolutionized the world: electrical and electronic products have become ubiquitous in today's life around the planet. After use, those products are discarded, sometimes after re-use cycles in countries different from those where they were initially sold; becoming what is commonly called e-waste. Compared to other traditional waste streams, e-waste handling poses unique and complex challenges. e-Waste is usually regarded as a waste problem, which can cause environmental damage and severe human health consequences if not safely managed. e-Waste contains significant amounts of toxic and environmentally sensitive materials and is, thus, extremely hazardous to humans and the environment if not properly disposed of or recycled. On the other hand, e-waste is often seen as a potential source of income for individuals and entrepreneurs who aim to recover the valuable materials (metals in particular) contained in discarded equipment. Recently, for a growing number of people, in developing countries in particular, recycling and separation of e-waste has become their main source of income. In most cases, this is done informally, with no or hardly any health and safety standards, exposing workers and the surrounding neighborhoods to extensive health dangers as well as leading to substantial environmental pollution. Treatment processes of e-waste aim to remove the hazardous components and recover as much reusable material (e.g. metals, glass and plastics) as possible; achieving both objectives is most desired. The paper discuss societal implications of proper e-waste management and key elements to be considered in the policy design at country level.

  8. Clinical, economic and societal impact of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    The concern over antibiotic resistance has been voiced since the discovery of modern antibiotics > 75 years ago. The concerns have only increased with time, with efforts to control resistance caused by widespread overuse of antibiotics in human medicine and far more than appreciated use in the feeding of animals for human consumption to promote growth. The problem is worldwide, but certain regions and selected health care institutions report far more resistance, including strains of Gram-negative bacteria that are susceptible only to the once discarded drugs polymyxin B or colistin, and pan-resistant strains are on the rise. One of the central efforts to control resistance, apart from antimicrobial stewardship, is the development of new antimicrobial agents. This has lagged significantly over the past 10 - 15 years, for a variety of reasons; but promising new agents are being developed, unfortunately none thus far addressing all potentially resistant strains. There is the unlikely, but not unreal, possibility that we could return to a pre-antibiotic era, where morbidity and mortality rates have risen dramatically and routine surgical procedures are not performed for fear of post-operative infections. The onus of control of resistance is a moral imperative that falls on the shoulders of all.

  9. Self-compassion moderates body comparison and appearance self-worth's inverse relationships with body appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kristin J; Tylka, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    Although research on positive body image has increased, little research has explored which variables protect body appreciation during body-related threats. Self-compassion may be one such variable. Individuals high in self-compassion are mindful, kind, and nurturing toward themselves during situations that threaten their adequacy, while recognizing that being imperfect is part of "being human." In this study, we investigated whether two body-related threats (i.e., body comparison and appearance contingent self-worth) were more weakly related to body appreciation when self-compassion was high among an online sample of 263 women (Mage=35.26, SD=12.42). Results indicated that self-compassion moderated the inverse relationships between body related threats and body appreciation. Specifically, when self-compassion was very high, body comparison and appearance contingent self-worth were unrelated to body appreciation. However, when self-compassion was low, these relationships were strong. Self-compassion, then, may help preserve women's body appreciation during body-related threats.

  10. Transmodernity: Integrating perspectives on societal evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateljevic, I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper! engage with a broad range of literature that provides signals and evidence of an emerging and significant paradigm shift in human evolution. To describe this shift, different authors use a variety of terms, such as the transmodemity paradigm (Ghisi); the transmodern philosophy of

  11. Music Appreciation and Hemisphere Orientation: Visual versus Verbal Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalanowski, Annette H.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes effect of brain hemisphere orientation on music appreciation. Reports results from 36 left-hemisphere and 36 right-hemisphere undergraduates who responded to a musical selection verbally or visually. Finds right-hemisphere students show greater appreciation, measured by attention, understanding, and enjoyment scores. Discusses…

  12. A New Framework for Leadership Preparation: Appreciative Organizing in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, William R.; Burrello, Leonard C.; Mann, John L.

    2017-01-01

    The authors describe how teams of faculty and district leadership development directors used an appreciative organizing in education (AOE) framework using appreciative inquiry (AI) scholarship to promote a more sustainable architecture for the preparation and development of leaders. The AOE framework is introduced and a description is provided of…

  13. Transformation of Online Teaching Practices through Implementation of Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the application and outcome of appreciative inquiry as an online instructional strategy for the development of three specific factors: adult learner motivation, engagement, and performance. Appreciative andragogy was an original phrase developed for this study and is an adaptation of appreciative…

  14. Appreciative Inquiry and Implementation Science in Leadership Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R; Hessler, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Appreciative inquiry was developed to initiate and animate change. As implementation science gains a foothold in practice settings to bridge theory, evidence, and practice, appreciative inquiry takes on new meaning as a leadership intervention and training tool. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(5):207-209.

  15. Using Appreciative Intelligence for Ice-Breaking: A New Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neena; Pathak, Anil Anand

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of applying appreciative intelligence and appreciative inquiry concepts to design a possibly new model of ice-breaking, which is strengths-based and very often used in any training in general and team building training in particular. Design/methodology/approach: The design has…

  16. 7 CFR 762.147 - Servicing shared appreciation agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the value of the security at the time of writedown, as shown on the shared appreciation agreement. (ii... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Servicing shared appreciation agreements. 762.147..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.147 Servicing shared...

  17. 7 CFR 766.202 - Determining the shared appreciation due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the SAA to make deductions for that value. (3) For calculation of shared appreciation recapture, the... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining the shared appreciation due. 766.202..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS DIRECT LOAN SERVICING-SPECIAL Servicing Shared...

  18. Situational Affordance - Appreciating human Interpretations in New Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, John Bang; Koch, Christian

    New Product Development (NPD) takes place within a web of connected actors who do not master fully the objects of the process, but rather they interpret the affordance - the en-abling and constraining framing by objects such as sketches, drawings, specifications, mock-ups and prototypes. The arti......New Product Development (NPD) takes place within a web of connected actors who do not master fully the objects of the process, but rather they interpret the affordance - the en-abling and constraining framing by objects such as sketches, drawings, specifications, mock-ups and prototypes...... two are more in the sociological direction. Alpha employs the artefact as a drawing and/or a mock-up in order to understand the customer’s situation, Golf applies a draft version of the customer’s CAD-drawing to translate the requirement to the toolmaker, Juliett utilises drawings and specifications...... to negotiate technical and non-technical aspects alike, while Sierra uses a CAD-system to support joint-development crossing organisational boundaries. The cases share features such as triadic relations; customer’s problem, product designers and artefact. For example, a wheelchair is presented to Sierra...

  19. Situational Affordance - Appreciating human Interpretations in New Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, John Bang; Koch, Christian

    2009-01-01

    con-sists of a functional and a relational dimension. We haul the functional dimension at both ends by employing an engineering and a sociological view. This is done by first viewing an artefact as consisting of different sub-systems and components and second by understand-ing design as a combination...

  20. Situational Affordance - Appreciating human Interpretations in New Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, John Bang; Koch, Christian

    ’s approach con-sists of a functional and a relational dimension. We haul the functional dimension at both ends by employing an engineering and a sociological view. This is done by first viewing an artefact as consisting of different sub-systems and components and second by understand-ing design...

  1. Murray Gell-Mann, A Short Appreciation

    CERN Document Server

    Hartle, James B

    2015-01-01

    On September 25, 2014 Murray Gell-Mann was presented with the Helmholz Medal of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities in a ceremony at the Santa Fe Institute. The author, among others, was asked to speak for fifteen minutes on Murray and his accomplishments. The following is an edited transcription of the author's speaking text.

  2. Insights into the Societal Risk of Nuclear Power Plant Accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Richard; Mubayi, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    The elements of societal risk from a nuclear power plant accident are clearly illustrated by the Fukushima accident: land contamination, long-term relocation of large numbers of people, loss of productive farm area, loss of industrial production, and significant loss of electric capacity. NUREG-1150 and other studies have provided compelling evidence that the individual health risk of nuclear power plant accidents is effectively negligible relative to other comparable risks, even for people living in close proximity to a plant. The objective of this study is to compare the societal risk of nuclear power plant accidents to that of other events to which the public is exposed. We have characterized the monetized societal risk in the United States from major societally disruptive events, such as hurricanes, in the form of a complementary cumulative distribution function. These risks are compared with nuclear power plant risks, based on NUREG-1150 analyses and new MACCS code calculations to account for differences in source terms determined in the more recent SOARCA study. A candidate quantitative societal objective is discussed for potential adoption by the NRC. The results are also interpreted with regard to the acceptability of nuclear power as a major source of future energy supply.

  3. Appreciation and Life Satisfaction: Does Appreciation Uniquely Predict Life Satisfaction above Gender, Coping Skills, Self-Esteem, and Positive Affectivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Joshua Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to examine whether appreciation explains variance in life satisfaction after controlling for gender, positive affectivity, self-esteem, and coping skills. Two hundred ninety-eight undergraduates went to the informed consent page of the online survey composed of the Appreciation Scale, the Satisfaction With…

  4. International Conference on Informatics and Communication Technologies for Societal Developmen

    CERN Document Server

    Bhojan, Anand; Peter, J

    2015-01-01

    This volume comprises research papers presented at the International Conference on Informatics and Communication Technologies for Societal Development (ICICTS 2014) held at Karunya University, India. The content focuses on the recent advancements in image or signal processing, computer vision, communication technologies, soft computing, advanced computing, data mining, and knowledge discovery. The primary objective of this volume is to facilitate advancement and application of the knowledge and to promote ideas that solve problems faced by society through cutting-edge technologies. The chapters contain selected articles from academicians, researchers, and industry experts in the form of frameworks, models, and architectures. Practical approaches, observations, and results of research that promotes societal development are also incorporated. This volume will serve as a useful compendium for interested readers and researchers working towards societal development from the technological perspective.

  5. Difference in brain activations during appreciating paintings and photographic analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Yoshinori; Terao, Takeshi; Hatano, Koji; Hoaki, Nobuhiko; Kohno, Kentaro; Araki, Yasuo; Kodama, Kensuke; Makino, Mayu; Izumi, Toshihiko; Shimomura, Tsuyoshi; Fujiki, Minoru; Kochiyama, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have investigated neural correlates of aesthetic appreciation for paintings but to date the findings have been heterogeneous. This heterogeneity may be attributed to previous studies' measurement of aesthetic appreciation of not only the beauty of paintings but also the beauty of motifs of the paintings. In order to better elucidate the beauty of paintings, it seems necessary to compare aesthetic appreciation of paintings and photographic analogs which included corresponding real images. We prepared for famous painters' pictures and their photographic analogs which were set up to resemble each painting in order to investigate the hypothesis that there exist specific neural correlates associated with the aesthetic appreciation for paintings. Forty-four subjects participated in functional magnetic resonance study which required comparisons of aesthetic appreciation of paintings of still life and landscape versus photographic analogs including corresponding real images of still life and landscape. Bilateral cuneus and the left lingual gyrus were activated in the comparison of aesthetic appreciation of paintings versus photographic analogs. In conclusion, the present findings suggest a possibility of the existence of specific neural correlates associated with the aesthetic appreciation for paintings and that bilateral cuneus and the left lingual gyrus may be involved.

  6. A psycho-societal approach to life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    particularly interested in the relations between the culturally mediated and the sensory/bodily aspects of experience processes because this is the boundary zones of knowledge and seat of the dynamics of learning. My psycho-societal approach was developing from interpreting autobiographical and later certain...... other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho-societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main...

  7. SOCIETAL PERSPECTIVE ON COST DRIVERS FOR HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT IN SINDH, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Asif Raza; Mitton, Craig; Qureshi, Rahat; Bryan, Stirling; Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-01-01

    Understanding cost-drivers and estimating societal costs are important challenges for economic evaluation of health technologies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study assessed community experiences of health resource usage and perceived cost-drivers from a societal perspective to inform the design of an economic model for the Community Level Interventions for Pre-eclampsia (CLIP) trials. Qualitative research was undertaken alongside the CLIP trial in two districts of Sindh province, Pakistan. Nine focus groups were conducted with a wide range of stakeholders, including pregnant women, mothers-in-law, husbands, fathers-in-law, healthcare providers at community and health facility-levels, and health decision/policy makers at district-level. The societal perspective included out-of-pocket (OOP), health system, and program implementation costs related to CLIP. Thematic analysis was performed using NVivo software. Most pregnant women and male decision makers reported a large burden of OOP costs for in- and out-patient care, informal care from traditional healers, self-medication, childbirth, newborn care, transport to health facility, and missed wages by caretakers. Many healthcare providers identified health system costs associated with human resources for hypertension risk assessment, transport, and communication about patient referrals. Health decision/policy makers recognized program implementation costs (such as the mobile health infrastructure, staff training, and monitoring/supervision) as major investments for the health system. Our investigation of care-seeking practices revealed financial implications for families of pregnant women, and program implementation costs for the health system. The societal perspective provided comprehensive knowledge of cost drivers to guide an economic appraisal of the CLIP trial in Sindh, Pakistan.

  8. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    . Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating the economic costs and benefits

  9. 78 FR 28461 - Military Spouse Appreciation Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... military spouses are at the core of our Armed Forces, and on Military Spouse Appreciation Day, we celebrate... certification process, we can help ensure the financial stability of our military families, strengthen our...

  10. Appreciative inquiry: a radically different approach to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Appreciative Inquiry, or Al, seeks to identify what went right and duplicate the experience. Adjustment in thinking may be difficult for defensive-minded health care professionals. Likelihood of success appears greater when smaller groups are involved.

  11. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing.

  12. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of sci...

  13. Humor recognition and appreciation deficits in early psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    吳愷晴; Ng, Hoi-ching, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Humor recognition and appreciation are important aspects to enhance psychological well-being and enrich social relationships and interactions. The present study hypothesized that first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients with adult onset in the Chinese society have deficits in humor recognition and appreciation compared with healthy controls. It also predicted FEP patients with a diminished ability in recalling humorous stimuli. Moreover, this study sought to explore the potential associations o...

  14. Factors influencing societal response of nanotechnology: an expert stakeholder analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhi.gupta@wur.nl; Fischer, Arnout R. H., E-mail: arnout.fischer@wur.nl; Lans, Ivo A. van der, E-mail: Ivo.vanderLans@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group (Netherlands); Frewer, Lynn J., E-mail: lynn.frewer@newcastle.ac.uk [Newcastle University, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Nanotechnology can be described as an emerging technology and, as has been the case with other emerging technologies such as genetic modification, different socio-psychological factors will potentially influence societal responses to its development and application. These factors will play an important role in how nanotechnology is developed and commercialised. This article aims to identify expert opinion on factors influencing societal response to applications of nanotechnology. Structured interviews with experts on nanotechnology from North West Europe were conducted using repertory grid methodology in conjunction with generalized Procrustes analysis to examine the psychological constructs underlying societal uptake of 15 key applications of nanotechnology drawn from different areas (e.g. medicine, agriculture and environment, chemical, food, military, sports, and cosmetics). Based on expert judgement, the main factors influencing societal response to different applications of nanotechnology will be the extent to which applications are perceived to be beneficial, useful, and necessary, and how 'real' and physically close to the end-user these applications are perceived to be by the public.

  15. Learning in Life History - psycho-societal interpretation of biographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2008-01-01

    Taking its point of departure from some critical remarks about some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based on life history research. The key concepts...

  16. Theorizing Learning in Life History - a psycho-societal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2007-01-01

      Taking it's point of departure in some critical remarks to some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based in life history research. Key concepts...

  17. Societal Renewal : where social entrepreneurship and municipal government meet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glad, Tatiana; Bos, Rense; During, R.

    2015-01-01

    On November 2014 at Impact Hub Amsterdam, 30 civil servants, politicians and social entrepreneurs were brought together for a two-part innovation lab – named the Societal Renewal Lab – where a dedicated group with diverse perspectives was invited to take a deeper dive into understanding the system c

  18. Individual Empowerment. Global Societal Trends to 2030: Thematic Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Marlon; Ghez, Jeremy; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Yaqub, Ohid

    2015-01-01

    This Research Report forms part of our series on global societal trends and their impact on the EU in 2030. This analysis is embedded within the framework of the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS) set up to develop a lasting framework to assess global trends and to develop policy responses across EU institutions over the next…

  19. Character and Citizenship Education: Conversations between Personal and Societal Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jasmine B.-Y.; Low, Ee Ling

    2012-01-01

    The theme of this special issue is "Character and Citizenship Education: Conversations between Personal and Societal Values." Character education and citizenship education, taken separately or as a single entity are currently riding high on the political and educational policy agendas of several governments (Arthur, 2003; Berkowitz & Bier, 2007;…

  20. Character and Citizenship Education: Conversations between Personal and Societal Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jasmine B.-Y.; Low, Ee Ling

    2012-01-01

    The theme of this special issue is "Character and Citizenship Education: Conversations between Personal and Societal Values." Character education and citizenship education, taken separately or as a single entity are currently riding high on the political and educational policy agendas of several governments (Arthur, 2003; Berkowitz & Bier, 2007;…

  1. Examining the Societal Impacts of Nanotechnology through Simulation: NANO SCENARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, Leslie; Keating, Elizabeth; Toprac, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a university-sponsored experiential-based simulation, the NANO SCENARIO, to increase the public's awareness and affect attitudes on the societal implications of nanoscience and nanotechnology by bringing together diverse stakeholders' perspectives in a participatory learning environment. Nanotechnology has the potential for…

  2. Factors influencing societal response of nanotechnology : an expert stakeholder analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, N.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Lans, van der I.A.; Frewer, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology can be described as an emerging technology and, as has been the case with other emerging technologies such as genetic modification, different socio-psychological factors will potentially influence societal responses to its development and application. These factors will play an import

  3. Factors influencing societal response of nanotechnology: an expert stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Fischer, Arnout R H; van der Lans, Ivo A; Frewer, Lynn J

    2012-05-01

    Nanotechnology can be described as an emerging technology and, as has been the case with other emerging technologies such as genetic modification, different socio-psychological factors will potentially influence societal responses to its development and application. These factors will play an important role in how nanotechnology is developed and commercialised. This article aims to identify expert opinion on factors influencing societal response to applications of nanotechnology. Structured interviews with experts on nanotechnology from North West Europe were conducted using repertory grid methodology in conjunction with generalized Procrustes analysis to examine the psychological constructs underlying societal uptake of 15 key applications of nanotechnology drawn from different areas (e.g. medicine, agriculture and environment, chemical, food, military, sports, and cosmetics). Based on expert judgement, the main factors influencing societal response to different applications of nanotechnology will be the extent to which applications are perceived to be beneficial, useful, and necessary, and how 'real' and physically close to the end-user these applications are perceived to be by the public. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11051-012-0857-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  4. Theorizing Learning in Life History - a psycho-societal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2007-01-01

      Taking it's point of departure in some critical remarks to some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based in life history research. Key concepts...

  5. Societal costs and burden of otitis media in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speets AM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Anouk Speets1, Judith Wolleswinkel1, Cristina Cardoso21Pallas health research and consultancy, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2GlaxoSmithKline, Algés, PortugalAbstract: This study aimed to estimate the resource consumption and societal impact of otitis media (OM in children younger than five years of age in Portugal. An Internet survey on generic childhood symptoms and diseases was administered to a sample of parents. This self-report survey had been previously implemented in other European countries. Medically confirmed OM was defined as symptoms of earache or “running ear” and/or a diagnosis of OM provided by a medical doctor. Direct medical, nonmedical, and indirect nonmedical costs were calculated for individual cases. Mean total costs per OM episode were estimated at €334. This corresponds to an estimated societal impact of 72 million €/year, of which 39% were indirect nonmedical costs. An epidemiological study should help to confirm the results of this study, and evaluate whether an intervention to reduce the occurrence and/or duration of OM may have an impact on societal costs and quality of life for affected families.Keywords: otitis media, costs, societal burden, Portugal

  6. White University Students' Responses to Societal Racism: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanierman, Lisa A.; Oh, Euna; Poteat, V. Paul; Hund, Anita R.; McClair, Vetisha L.; Beer, Amanda M.; Clarke, Alexis M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to extend earlier conceptual and empirical literature on the ways in which White individuals respond to societal racism. To this end, the authors conducted in-depth interviews to examine 11 midwestern, non-Hispanic, White university students' reactions and experiences related to individual and institutional…

  7. Economic and societal dimensions of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulve, te H.; Rip, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There is an increasing interest in nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery systems which are expected to have significant impacts for health care. The economic and societal aspects are uncertain, even ambiguous, at this stage of development, and often not addressed, or only as part of the

  8. Factors influencing societal response of nanotechnology: an expert stakeholder analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Fischer, Arnout R. H.; van der Lans, Ivo A.; Frewer, Lynn J.

    2012-05-01

    Nanotechnology can be described as an emerging technology and, as has been the case with other emerging technologies such as genetic modification, different socio-psychological factors will potentially influence societal responses to its development and application. These factors will play an important role in how nanotechnology is developed and commercialised. This article aims to identify expert opinion on factors influencing societal response to applications of nanotechnology. Structured interviews with experts on nanotechnology from North West Europe were conducted using repertory grid methodology in conjunction with generalized Procrustes analysis to examine the psychological constructs underlying societal uptake of 15 key applications of nanotechnology drawn from different areas (e.g. medicine, agriculture and environment, chemical, food, military, sports, and cosmetics). Based on expert judgement, the main factors influencing societal response to different applications of nanotechnology will be the extent to which applications are perceived to be beneficial, useful, and necessary, and how 'real' and physically close to the end-user these applications are perceived to be by the public.

  9. Power and contexts – some societal conditions for participatory projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch-Poulsen, Jørgen; Kristiansen, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    between two societal Discourses: an economic-management Discourse versus a pedagogic-social Discourse. Unfortunately, we were not aware of the strength and the extent of the economic-management Discourse before it was too late. Thirdly, the article speaks in favor of continuous context inquiring dialogues...

  10. Lorenzo Cini, Società civile e democrazia radicale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available La nostra collana Methexis ha pubblicato ad accesso aperto il volume di Lorenzo Cini, Società civile e democrazia radicale, Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2012. La versione digitale del testo, in formato PDF, è a disposizione di tutti presso l’archivio elettronico dell'editore.

  11. Societal and individual landslide risk to the population of Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Paola; Bianchi, Cinzia; Mondini, Alessandro; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2010-05-01

    Landslides cause damage to people every year in Italy. The number of fatalities (deaths and missing persons) and the number of casualties (deaths, missing persons, and injured people) are a direct, quantitative measure of the intensity of a disaster, and can be used to evaluate individual and societal risk quantitatively. Individual-risk criteria are expressed using mortality (or death) rates, which are given by the number of deaths per 100,000 people, in a given period. Societal-risk criteria are commonly established constructing frequency-consequences plots. In these plots, the number of losses (deaths, fatalities, or casualties) in each event is plotted versus the frequency of the event. Societal risk is then determined investigating the relationships linking the frequency of the events to their intensity, measured by the number of the losses. We have updated existing estimates of societal and individual landslide risk in Italy. For our assessment, we have used an improved version of the catalogue of historical landslide events that have resulted in loss of life, missing persons, injured people, and homelessness in Italy, from 1850 to 2008. This is the recent portion of a larger catalogue spanning the 1941-year period from 68 AD to 2008. This information was used to update the existing national estimates and to obtain first regional estimates of societal and individual landslide risk in Italy. To model the distribution of the frequency of landslide events with casualties in Italy, and in each of the 20 Regions in Italy, we adopted a Zipf distribution. We used the scaling exponent of the probability mass function (PMF) of the intensity of the events, which controls the proportion of small, medium and large events, to compare societal landslide risk levels in different geographical areas and for different periods. To consider the frequency of the events with casualties, we have scaled the PMF obtained for the individual Regions to the total number of events in

  12. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    . Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating the economic costs and benefits

  13. CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CREATING SOCIETAL INTELLIGENCE IN STUDENTS OF A GRADUATE SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Vladimirovich GULYAKIN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered both the outer circumstances globally shaped and the learning environment set at a graduate school of technologies being both conditions entailing creation of societal intelligence in students of the college. The outer circumstances globally shaped mean the general features of the modern society that enters into the era of information society, reflecting the course of information processing and supply, of global-ized standards and communication round the world.Learning preconditions represent the settled circum-stances manifesting the social humanism targets for the learning environment at a graduate school of technolo-gies.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Measurements from Space: Scientific Advance and Societal Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, S. W.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    The dawn of the 21st Century finds spaceborne sensors poised to revolutionize the atmospheric CO2 record by providing high-quality measurements with unprecedented spatio-temporal coverage and density. Space-based CO2 observations will augment local and regional measurements from ground and airborne sensors, providing global context for existing measurements and covering regions not readily accessible or instrumented by other means. Hyperspectral data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), launched in 2002, have been used to produce global maps of CO2 concentrations in the mid-troposphere. These data provide important new constraints on the global distribution and transport of CO2. Future satellite missions dedicated to CO2 observations will collect precise global measurements, enabling more detailed process studies and contributing to further improvements in coupled carbon-climate model development, initialization, and validation. Japan's GOSAT mission, scheduled for launch in January 2009 will measure CO2 and CH4 spectral radiances via thermal and near infrared spectrometry to study the transport mechanisms of greenhouse gases with an emphasis on identification of CO2 sources and sinks on sub-continental scales in support of the Kyoto protocol. NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), scheduled to launch in February 2009, will deliver measurements of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the precision, temporal and spatial resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the variability of CO2 sources and sinks on regional spatial scales and seasonal to interannual time scales. Satellite CO2 observations, combined with continued ground and airborne measurements, will improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the atmospheric abundance and distribution of this important greenhouse gas, generating both scientific advance and societal benefit. Deriving actionable information from these observation

  15. The Societal and Economic Value of Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard C.; Koenig, Lane; Acevedo, Daniel; Dall, Timothy M.; Gallo, Paul; Romeo, Anthony; Tongue, John; Williams, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although rotator cuff disease is a common musculoskeletal problem in the United States, the impact of this condition on earnings, missed workdays, and disability payments is largely unknown. This study examines the value of surgical treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tears from a societal perspective. Methods: A Markov decision model was constructed to estimate lifetime direct and indirect costs associated with surgical and continued nonoperative treatment for symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears. All patients were assumed to have been unresponsive to one six-week trial of nonoperative treatment prior to entering the model. Model assumptions were obtained from the literature and data analysis. We obtained estimates of indirect costs using national survey data and patient-reported outcomes. Four indirect costs were modeled: probability of employment, household income, missed workdays, and disability payments. Direct cost estimates were based on average Medicare reimbursements with adjustments to an all-payer population. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results: The age-weighted mean total societal savings from rotator cuff repair compared with nonoperative treatment was $13,771 over a patient’s lifetime. Savings ranged from $77,662 for patients who are thirty to thirty-nine years old to a net cost to society of $11,997 for those who are seventy to seventy-nine years old. In addition, surgical treatment results in an average improvement of 0.62 QALY. Societal savings were highly sensitive to age, with savings being positive at the age of sixty-one years and younger. The estimated lifetime societal savings of the approximately 250,000 rotator cuff repairs performed in the U.S. each year was $3.44 billion. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears produces net societal cost savings for patients under the age of sixty-one years and greater QALYs for all patients. Rotator cuff repair is cost

  16. USGEO National Earth Observation Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Relative Contributions of Earth Observing Systems to Societal Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The second National Civil Earth Observation Assessment identifies the inputs and relative contributions of the portfolio of observing systems currently relied upon by Federal agencies to meet key Earth observing objectives. The Assessment employs a hierarchical value-tree framework that traces the pathways through which Earth observing systems contribute value across 13 societal benefit areas, utilizing multiple levels to provide logical traceability. This presentation describes the methods used to construct societal benefit area value-trees that include key objectives and the information products, services, and research derived from Earth observations that help satisfy them. It describes the methods for weighting nodes at multiple levels of each value-tree and the expert elicitation process for assessing the relative contributions of Earth observing systems to the development of information products, services, and research. The methodology employed in the Assessment is especially useful at assessing the interdependence and relative contributions of multiple Earth observing systems on the development of blended information products and tracing information pathways from direct observations through intermediate products, such as models, to end-products used to improve decision-making. This presentation will highlight case study examples from the 13 societal benefit areas (agriculture and forestry, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy and mineral resources, human health, ocean and costal resources, space weather, transportation, water resources weather, and reference measurements) to demonstrate tractability from Earth observing systems, through information products and research that satisfy key objectives, to societal benefit.

  17. Advances in complex societal, environmental and engineered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Essaaidi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses recent technological progress that has led to an increased complexity in many natural and artificial systems. The resulting complexity research due to the emergence of new properties and spatio-temporal interactions among a large number of system elements - and between the system and its environment - is the primary focus of this text. This volume is divided into three parts: Part one focuses on societal and ecological systems, Part two deals with approaches for understanding, modeling, predicting and mastering socio-technical systems, and Part three includes real-life examples. Each chapter has its own special features; it is a self-contained contribution of distinguished experts working on different fields of science and technology relevant to the study of complex systems. Advances in Complex Systems of Contemporary Reality: Societal, Environmental and Engineered Systems will provide postgraduate students, researchers and managers with qualitative and quantitative methods for handling th...

  18. Life History Approach: Biographies and psycho-societal Interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    -societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main theoretical understandings of language, body and mind. My article will present the reflections on the use of life history based methodology in learning...... in intended as well as unintended learning, in formal education as well as in everyday life. Life histories represent lived lives past, present and anticipated future. As such they are interpretations of individuals’ experiences of the way in which societal dynamics take place in the individual body and mind......, either by the individual him/herself or by another biographer. The Life History approach was developing from interpreting autobiographical and later certain other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho...

  19. Evolutionary Explanations for Societal Differences in Single Parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barber Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The new research strategy presented in this paper, Evolutionary Social Science, is designed to bridge the gap between evolutionary psychology that operates from the evolutionary past and social science that is bounded by recent history. Its core assumptions are (1 that modern societies owe their character to an interaction of hunter-gatherer adaptations with the modern environment; (2 that changes in societies may reflect change in individuals; (3 that historical changes and cross-societal differences are due to the same adaptational mechanisms, and (4 that different social contexts (e.g., social status modify psychological development through adaptive mechanisms. Preliminary research is reviewed concerning historical, societal, and cross-national variation in single parenthood as an illustration of the potential usefulness of this new approach. Its success at synthesizing the evidence demonstrates that the time frames of evolutionary explanation and recent history can be bridged.

  20. Grand societal challenges in information systems research and education

    CERN Document Server

    vom Brocke, Jan; Hofmann, Sara; Tumbas, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    This book examines how information systems research and education can play a major role in contributing to solutions to the Societal Grand Challenges formulated in "The Millennium Project" (millenium-project.org). Individual chapters focus on specific challenges, review existing approaches and contributions towards solutions in information systems research and outline a research agenda for these challenges. The topics considered in this volume range from climate change, population growth, global ICT availability, breakthroughs in science and technology and energy demand to ethical decision-making, policymaking, gender status and transnational crime prevention. It is the first book to present ideas on how the Information Systems discipline can contribute to the solution on this wide spectrum of grand societal challenges.

  1. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction. PMID:23754437

  2. Breakthrough the Plight of Music Appreciation Course in High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu; Wei

    2015-01-01

    Teaching of music appreciation course in high school has been facing in many deficiencies for a long time.On regard of this,many music teachers has done some researches.The development of the times has brought great improvement in the education system.What’s more,unceasingly practice and innovation of music teachers also contribute to the fact that music appreciation course is becoming increasingly popular in high school music education.This paper analyzed the current trend of music appreciation course in high school,briefly stated the deficiencies in the teaching,with providing several solutions,hoping to contribute some methods for further development of music education in high school.

  3. Breakthrough the Plight of Music Appreciation Course in High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wei

    2015-01-01

    Teaching of music appreciation course in high school has been facing in many deficiencies for a long time.On regard of this,many music teachers has done some researches. The development of the times has brought great improvement in the education system.What's more,unceasingly practice and innovation of music teachers also contribute to the fact that music appreciation course is becoming increasingly popular in high school music education.This paper analyzed the current trend of music appreciation course in high school,briefly stated the deficiencies in the teaching,with providing several solutions,hoping to contribute some methods for further development of music education in high school.

  4. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J; Mirasso, Claudio R; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-06-18

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction.

  5. PENERAPAN KONSEP GAMIFIKASI APPRECIATIVE PADA E-MARKETPLACE UMKM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acun Kardianawati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Untuk meningkatkan daya saing E-Marketplace UMKM, inovasi pada sistem transaksi online salah satu cara yang dapat diterapkan. Sistem transaksi online dapat dikembangkan dengan menggunakan elemen dari perancangan game. Penggunaan elemen game tersebut dinamakan gamifikasi, yang dapat digunakan  untuk meningkatkan pengalaman, loyalty, brand awareness, dan motivasi pembeli dalam melakukan transaksi. Salah satu permasalahan yang sering terjadi dalam gamifikasi adalah pada konsep dan desain yang tidak sistematis dapat dipecahkan dengan penggunaan Appreciative Inquiry. Analisa dengan Appreciative Inquiry menghasilkan penerapan gamifikasi yang dilakukan pada kelebihan E-Marketplace UMKM, yaitu pada eksplorasi dan pemilihan produk. Penerapan gamifikasi tersebut ditujukan untuk pembeli dan penjual, dimana dari sisi pembeli dapat memotivasi dalam melihat-lihat produk dan dari sisi penjual termotivasi dalam hal penyajian produknya. Gamifikasi ini memberikan keunikan dan pembeda dari pesaing sehingga dapat meningkatkan kemungkinan pembelian produk dan dengan demikian dapat meningkatkan daya saing dari E-Marketplace UMKM. Kata Kunci: Appreciative Inquiry, E-Marketplace, gamifikasi, UMKM.

  6. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity: An Interdisciplinary Methodological Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Salling Olesen, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The thematic issue presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis. Its particular focus is on subjectivity—as an aspect of the research object and as an aspect of the research process. By the term "approach" is indicated the intrinsic connection between the t...

  7. Access to Information About Stuttering and Societal Knowledge of Stuttering

    OpenAIRE

    Gabel, Rodney; Brackenbury, Tim; Irani, Farzan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine societal knowledge of stuttering, access to information sources, and the influence of information sources on knowledge of stuttering. 185 participants from Northwest Ohio were surveyed. Results of the study indicated that the general public varies in their knowledge of stuttering and that majority of participants had not accessed information about stuttering, and the few who had, did so a long time ago. Finally, access to information sources had little...

  8. Access to Information About Stuttering and Societal Knowledge of Stuttering

    OpenAIRE

    Gabel, Rodney; Brackenbury, Tim; Irani, Farzan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine societal knowledge of stuttering, access to information sources, and the influence of information sources on knowledge of stuttering. 185 participants from Northwest Ohio were surveyed. Results of the study indicated that the general public varies in their knowledge of stuttering and that majority of participants had not accessed information about stuttering, and the few who had, did so a long time ago. Finally, access to information sources had little...

  9. Promoting happiness: the malleability of individual and societal subjective wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Louis; Kuykendall, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Is it possible to enhance the subjective wellbeing of individuals and societies? If so, what are the mental health interventions and economic mechanisms by which subjective wellbeing could be enhanced? We address these questions in our review of the literature on subjective wellbeing. Research now shows that although subjective wellbeing is heritable and stable, it can change substantially over time. Long-term changes can be affected by positive or negative life events; subjective wellbeing interventions have also proved to be effective for boosting wellbeing for as long as six months. At the societal level, economic factors matter for the subjective wellbeing of citizens. Economic wealth is shown to be a predictor of societal wellbeing across countries and over time. Also, high unemployment severely lowers the wellbeing of individuals and has spillover effects on other societal members, such as the employed. Given the weight of evidence, we are optimistic that subjective wellbeing can be enhanced. For practitioners, policy makers, and economists interested in the wellbeing of individuals, we propose that these findings have implications for mental health practice and economic policies. Future research and methodological issues are discussed.

  10. When Inequality Fails: Power, Group Dominance, and Societal Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Pratto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Social dominance theory was developed to account for why societies producing surplus take and maintain the form of group-based dominance hierarchies, in which at least one socially-constructed group has more power than another, and in which men are more powerful than women and adults more powerful than children. Although the theory has always allowed for societies to differ in their severity of group-based dominance and how it is implemented, it has predicted that alternative forms of societal organization will occur rarely and not last. This paper revisits aspects of the theory that allow for the possibility of societal alternatives and change. We also consider boundary conditions for the theory, and whether its current theoretical apparatus can account for societal change. By expanding the typical three-level dynamic system to describe societies (micro-meso-macro into four levels (including meta to consider how societies relate to one another, we identify political tensions that are unstable power structures rather than stable hierarchies. In research on institutions, we identify smaller-scale alternative forms of social organization. We identify logical, empirical, and theoretical shortcomings in social dominance theory’s account of stability and change, consider alternative forms of social organization, and suggest fruitful avenues for theoretical extension.

  11. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of science. I stress the international aspects of science communication, the national politico-scientific context as well as more local contexts as equally important conditions for understanding current Danish science communication.

  12. Scientific and Societal Considerations in Selecting Assessment Endpoints for Environmental Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Strange

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It is sometimes argued that, from an ecological point of view, population-, community-, and ecosystem-level endpoints are more relevant than individual-level endpoints for assessing the risks posed by human activities to the sustainability of natural resources. Yet society values amenities provided by natural resources that are not necessarily evaluated or protected by assessment tools that focus on higher levels of biological organization. For example, human-caused stressors can adversely affect recreational opportunities that are valued by society even in the absence of detectable population-level reductions in biota. If protective measures are not initiated until effects at higher levels of biological organization are apparent, natural resources that are ecologically important or highly valued by the public may not be adequately protected. Thus, environmental decision makers should consider both scientific and societal factors in selecting endpoints for ecological risk assessments. At the same time, it is important to clearly distinguish the role of scientists, which is to evaluate ecological effects, from the role of policy makers, which is to determine how to address the uncertainty in scientific assessment in making environmental decisions and to judge what effects are adverse based on societal values and policy goals.

  13. Scientific and societal considerations in selecting assessment endpoints for environmental decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Elizabeth M; Lipton, Joshua; Beltman, Douglas; Snyder, Blaine D

    2002-03-08

    It is sometimes argued that, from an ecological point of view, population-, community-, and ecosystem-level endpoints are more relevant than individual-level endpoints for assessing the risks posed by human activities to the sustainability of natural resources. Yet society values amenities provided by natural resources that are not necessarily evaluated or protected by assessment tools that focus on higher levels of biological organization. For example, human-caused stressors can adversely affect recreational opportunities that are valued by society even in the absence of detectable population-level reductions in biota. If protective measures are not initiated until effects at higher levels of biological organization are apparent, natural resources that are ecologically important or highly valued by the public may not be adequately protected. Thus, environmental decision makers should consider both scientific and societal factors in selecting endpoints for ecological risk assessments. At the same time, it is important to clearly distinguish the role of scientists, which is to evaluate ecological effects, from the role of policy makers, which is to determine how to address the uncertainty in scientific assessment in making environmental decisions and to judge what effects are adverse based on societal values and policy goals.

  14. Following the masters: portrait viewing and appreciation is guided by selective detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Steve; Riebe, Caitlin; Enns, James T

    2013-01-01

    A painted portrait differs from a photo in that selected regions are often rendered in much sharper detail than other regions. Artists believe these choices guide viewer gaze and influence their appreciation of the portrait, but these claims are difficult to test because increased portrait detail is typically associated with greater meaning, stronger lighting, and a more central location in the composition. In three experiments we monitored viewer gaze and recorded viewer preferences for portraits rendered with a parameterised non-photorealistic technique to mimic the style of Rembrandt (DiPaola, 2009 International Journal of Art and Technology 2 82-93). Results showed that viewer gaze was attracted to and held longer by regions of relatively finer detail (experiment 1), and also by textural highlighting (experiment 2), and that artistic appreciation increased when portraits strongly biased gaze (experiment 3). These findings have implications for understanding both human vision science and visual art.

  15. Beauty and the brain: culture, history and individual differences in aesthetic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Human aesthetic processing entails the sensation-based evaluation of an entity with respect to concepts like beauty, harmony or well-formedness. Aesthetic appreciation has many determinants ranging from evolutionary, anatomical or physiological constraints to influences of culture, history and individual differences. There are a vast number of dynamically configured neural networks underlying these multifaceted processes of aesthetic appreciation. In the current challenge of successfully bridging art and science, aesthetics and neuroanatomy, the neuro-cognitive psychology of aesthetics can approach this complex topic using a framework that postulates several perspectives, which are not mutually exclusive. In this empirical approach, objective physiological data from event-related brain potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging are combined with subjective, individual self-reports.

  16. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Literary Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabanchi, Zargham; Doost, Haniyeh Alami

    2012-01-01

    This study attempts to see if there was a relationship between EI (emotional intelligence) and literary appreciation. To explore this ninety university students who were all studying English literature were chosen from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Out of the ninety participants, fifty participants were female and forty were male. They were aged…

  17. Appreciating Diversity through Children's Stories and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Appreciation of diversity begins in our classrooms with the children we know and interact with on a daily basis. Each child has a unique history--a story that gives us insights when we interact, plan our classroom community, and design our instruction. Children who have a primary language other than English have stories that they can communicate…

  18. Dogmatism, Intelligence, and the Understanding/Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In a study of satire as persuasion, two experiments were conducted--one to determine whether dogmatism affected the understanding and appreciation of editorial satire, the second to determine the same about intelligence as measured by the Scholastic Aptitude Test. In the first experiment, 116 college students read three satirical editorials. After…

  19. Riddle Appreciation and Reading Comprehension in Cantonese-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ivy N. Y.; To, Carol K. S.; Weekes, Brendan S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Inference-making skills are necessary for reading comprehension. Training in riddle appreciation is an effective way to improve reading comprehension among English-speaking children. However, it is not clear whether these methods generalize to other writing systems. The goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between…

  20. Dogmatism, Intelligence, and the Understanding/Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In a study of satire as persuasion, two experiments were conducted--one to determine whether dogmatism affected the understanding and appreciation of editorial satire, the second to determine the same about intelligence as measured by the Scholastic Aptitude Test. In the first experiment, 116 college students read three satirical editorials. After…

  1. Art appreciation and aesthetic feeling as objects of explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2013-04-01

    The target article presents a thought-provoking approach to the relation of neuroscience and art. However, at least two issues pose potential difficulties. The first concerns whether "art appreciation" is a coherent topic for scientific study. The second concerns the degree to which processing fluency can explain aesthetic feeling or may simply be one component of a more complex account.

  2. Riddle Appreciation and Reading Comprehension in Cantonese-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ivy N. Y.; To, Carol K. S.; Weekes, Brendan S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Inference-making skills are necessary for reading comprehension. Training in riddle appreciation is an effective way to improve reading comprehension among English-speaking children. However, it is not clear whether these methods generalize to other writing systems. The goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between…

  3. Small Waterfalls in Art Therapy Supervision: A Poetic Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreibman, Rachel; Chilton, Gioia

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint presents aesthetic writing and reflection on the art therapy supervisor and supervisee dyad from a practice of appreciative inquiry. Through writing and exchanging poems, the authors sought to uncover the dynamics of the supervisory relationship that contributed to a positive learning experience. Poetry as inquiry provoked new…

  4. The Development of Preschoolers' Appreciation of Communicative Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Elizabeth S.; Graham, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, preschoolers' appreciation of a listener's knowledge of the location of a hidden sticker after the listener was provided with an ambiguous or unambiguous description was assessed. Preschoolers (N = 34) were tested at 3 time points, each 6 months apart (4, 4 1/2, and 5 years). Eye gaze measures demonstrated that…

  5. Developing Students' Appreciation for What is Taught in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere

    2008-01-01

    This article elaborates a presentation made upon reception of the E. L. Thorndike Career Achievement Award in Educational Psychology from Division 15 of the American Psychological Association. It considers how value aspects of motivation apply to efforts to develop students' appreciation for school learning. Currently, we have only limited…

  6. U.S. to Suffer From Sharp RMB Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Most Americans naturally attribute the price increase of Chinese imports tothe price hikes in China. However , this is not the case. Many people fail to notice that the price increase of Chinese commodities is actually the result of the appreciation of t

  7. Small Waterfalls in Art Therapy Supervision: A Poetic Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreibman, Rachel; Chilton, Gioia

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint presents aesthetic writing and reflection on the art therapy supervisor and supervisee dyad from a practice of appreciative inquiry. Through writing and exchanging poems, the authors sought to uncover the dynamics of the supervisory relationship that contributed to a positive learning experience. Poetry as inquiry provoked new…

  8. Brief discussion about the artistic aesthetica appreciation of watercolor expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎亚萍

    2012-01-01

    watercolor as a artistic form, like other genres of fine art, undertakes the role of expressing the ideological connotation of the art worker. At the same time of following the primary idea of aesthetical appreciation, we exert the unique water nature of watercolor to fully express ourselves.

  9. 76 FR 32851 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ...-American Music Appreciation Month, we honor the rich musical traditions of African-American musicians and their gifts to our country and our world. From the cadenced hums of spirituals to the melodies of rhythm... and equality for all. Today, African-American musicians continue to create new musical genres...

  10. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eYamada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders’ satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality. A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors’ impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits.

  11. Art Appreciation for Developing Communication Skills among Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    In the contemporary process of teaching fine arts, children's own creative expression and art appreciation are used to encourage learners towards both perception and reception; consequently, the evaluation and internalization of works of art play an equally important role. In a qualitative empirical research study that takes the form of a case…

  12. An Appreciative Inquiry into an Urban Drug Court: Cultural Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond; Cohen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an appreciative inquiry (AI) theoretical research perspective and change methodology to transform the working relationships and cultural expectations of members through the discovery of their positive core leading to an optimistic and confidence-based future for an urban drug court. This study describes how…

  13. An Appreciative Inquiry Exploring Game Sense Teaching in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research framed as a strengths-based appreciative inquiry (AI) into the use of a game sense (GS) approach for sport and games teaching in physical education (PE). The aim of this research was to find the elements which sustain teachers in the use of a GS approach. This is particularly pertinent given strong advocacy for GS as…

  14. Creating Classrooms of Preference: An Exercise in Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as a process used in organizational creation and change and then outlines steps for an in-class exercise titled "The Preferred Classroom," to be used to design and organize a college classroom for the term. The exercise also prepares business students for future exposure to AI. A brief literature…

  15. Using Appreciative Inquiry and Dialogical Learning to Explore Dominant Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Mary Grace

    2008-01-01

    Experiential learning theory, conversational learning, and seminar practices combine to shape an educational experience that is grounded in principles of appreciative inquiry. The seminar, taught to undergraduate business majors, seeks to encourage students to explore their underlying assumptions about business in society. Because postindustrial…

  16. Engaging Students and Staff with Educational Development through Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima; Dagman, Ozlem; Peters, John; Snell, Ellen; Tutton, Caroline; Wright, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) offers a constructive, strengths-based framework for engaging students and staff in the enhancement of academic programmes of study. This paper explores the basis of AI, its potential for educational development and the many agendas it might help address. Students and academic staff involved in an AI project, focused on…

  17. Appreciative Inquiry: A Pilot Study of School Counselor Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rolla E.; Emil, Serap

    2010-01-01

    Counselor education programs are influenced by humanistic philosophy, including the strengths-based perspective. This article describes how appreciative inquiry, a strengths-based approach to systems change, informed the development of a pilot survey used to assess graduate perceptions of a school counselor education program. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. The "Depreciation" and "Appreciation" of Some Address Terms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhucheng, Ju

    1991-01-01

    Examines how the cultural revolution in China has changed, to some extent, the rules governing the use of address terms, discussing the close interrelation between the use of address terms and cultural values and how the change in mental outlook has led to the depreciation or appreciation of certain terms. (Author/CB)

  19. The appreciation of nature and landscape by tourism service providers and visitors in the Ore Mountains (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents empirical studies on the appreciation of nature and landscape in the Eastern Ore Mountains (Saxony, Germany by tourism service providers (TSP and visitors. Attractive landscape and experience of nature are the most important reasons to visit this region and to spend leisure time there. Particularly mountain meadows, raised bogs and mixed forests are highly appreciated. Deforestation, industrial development and the decline of biodiversity would reduce attractiveness for visitors. We also assessed whether the tourism sector is prepared to contribute to the funding of nature conservation and landscape management. Use of general tax revenues is favoured, but other modes would also be accepted, e.g. a nature tax. Willingness to pay (WTP is ranging between €0.75 and €1.36 per guest per night by TSP, or between €1.06 and €2.73 per day by visitors. With respect to landscape preference and WTP we found in some cases significant differences among visitors, depending on region of residence, age and education level. A major part of the annual costs for nature conservation and landscape could be covered by public funds (taxes, if the results of the WTP approach were understood as a sign of societal demand and a call to action.

  20. Using appreciative inquiry to transform student nurses’ image of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motshedisi E. Chauke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Literature provides adequate evidence of a poor perception of nursing within the profession, resulting in high rates of attrition of student nurses and newly qualified nurses. The nursing profession, in particular nurse educators, has an ethical and professional responsibility to find innovative strategies to promote the positive image of nursing amongst student nurses.Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore the potential of appreciative inquiry (AI as an intervention teaching strategy to transform student nurses’ image of nursing.Design: A quantitative, quasi-experimental, explorative-descriptive design comprising the pretest, appreciative inquiry as intervention, and the post-test was used.Methods: Convenience sampling was used to select third and fourthyear college and university student nurses in the Gauteng province of South Africa for the pre- and the post-test respectively. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed by SPSS version 20.0.Findings: The pretest results revealed a mix of positive and negative perceptions of the image of nursing amongst student nurses. The negative perceptions of the image of nursing that needed intervention included the working conditions of nurses, and the perception of nursing as a profession that was not respected and appreciated. The post-test results showed a significant and positive change in the student nurses’ perception of the image of nursing as a respected and appreciated profession. Although AI resulted in a negative to positive change in some aspects of student nurses’ image of nursing, the negative perceptions of the working conditions of nurses remained and became more negative. The positive image of gender in nursing was enhanced following the implementation of AI.Conclusion: Appreciative inquiry demonstrated potential as a teaching strategy to produce a positive nursing image change and positive orientation towards nursing amongst student nurses.

  1. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Change Perceptions Concerning the Satisfaction of Organization Members' Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan COJOCARU

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the innovative use of appreciative inquiry (AI in the organizational environment for changing the perception concerning the satisfaction of its members’ needs. The experiment started from the assumption that organizations are social constructions generated by the interpretations social actors have about this entity and about themselves, being the result of human interactions. The experiment used the appreciative inquiry as form of intervention, run in the four stages of the 4-D cycle. The results of the intervention show that, although appreciative inquiry was directed chiefly towards changing the perceptions concerning the satisfaction of the need for security, the interpretations given by organization members changed with regard to the satisfaction of all needs (security, basic needs, belonging, esteem and self-actualization. The study shows that motivation can be changed through an appreciative approach of events, through their reinterpretation within a process of dialogue and consensus; the reinterpretation of the organization as a text and the application of appreciative inquiry principles results in an organizational reconstruction as a process that can be run in a relatively short period of time. The positive changes of the organizational environment were also a result of the way the organization was researched. The appreciative interviews resulted in individual reinterpretations of organizational contexts, which were negotiated and assumed in the environment of the collectivity. The changes were supported by the organization members’ involvement in building a shared vision, in making a plan in which every person is a voice in the organization, and in developing attachment and ownership in relation to the developed plans.

  2. Appreciative Accreditation: A Mixed Methods Explanatory Study of Appreciative Inquiry-Based Institutional Effectiveness Results in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, John

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of using Appreciative Inquiry in accreditation and related institutional effectiveness activities within higher education. Using an explanatory participant-selection mixed methods approach, qualitative data from a series of interviews were used to explain the experiences of individuals identified from quantitative…

  3. Geospatial decision support systems for societal decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    While science provides reliable information to describe and understand the earth and its natural processes, it can contribute more. There are many important societal issues in which scientific information can play a critical role. Science can add greatly to policy and management decisions to minimize loss of life and property from natural and man-made disasters, to manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources, and in general, to enhance and protect our quality of life. However, the link between science and decision-making is often complicated and imperfect. Technical language and methods surround scientific research and the dissemination of its results. Scientific investigations often are conducted under different conditions, with different spatial boundaries, and in different timeframes than those needed to support specific policy and societal decisions. Uncertainty is not uniformly reported in scientific investigations. If society does not know that data exist, what the data mean, where to use the data, or how to include uncertainty when a decision has to be made, then science gets left out -or misused- in a decision making process. This paper is about using Geospatial Decision Support Systems (GDSS) for quantitative policy analysis. Integrated natural -social science methods and tools in a Geographic Information System that respond to decision-making needs can be used to close the gap between science and society. The GDSS has been developed so that nonscientists can pose "what if" scenarios to evaluate hypothetical outcomes of policy and management choices. In this approach decision makers can evaluate the financial and geographic distribution of potential policy options and their societal implications. Actions, based on scientific information, can be taken to mitigate hazards, protect our air and water quality, preserve the planet's biodiversity, promote balanced land use planning, and judiciously exploit natural resources. Applications using the

  4. PELATIHAN APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY UNTUK MENINGKATKAN EFIKASI DIRI WIRANIAGA DALAM MELAKUKAN TUGAS PENJUALAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neni Lala Sitepu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Salesman performance and his effort is influenced by self efficacy. Appreciative inquiry is transformation in order to dig positive experiences that lead human future. The aim of this research is measuring the effect of appreciative inquiry training to improve self efficacy of salesman. Manipulation is conducted by experiental learning method. 36 participants was divided into two groups, experimental group (N=18 and control group (N=18. Characteristic of subject is salesman whose low self efficacy which selected by self efficacy scale. This research used untreated control group design with pretest-posttest. The result showed that mean of posttest (M=148.06 from experimental group is higher than pretest (93.94 and also in control group, posttest (M=88.11 and pretest (87.3. This means that both groups have a higher degree of self efficacy, with difference in experimental group is higher (M=54.12 than control group (0.81. Keywords: appreciative inquiry, self efficacy, salesman, untreated control group design with pretest-posttest

  5. Return to the Basics: Societal, Value and Public Ethics Reform

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    Iulian Chifu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes occurring now at the international level and the large chronic instability are going to define the decades to come. The global crisis as well as the European sovereign debts crisis are affecting Romania which has adopted austerity measures but without any complementary programs of development. Since we have our own problems of development and adaptation to the current world, important efforts to creating societal cohesion, to reviewing the system of values and moral references and to „through away the sellers from the Temple” are totally needed.

  6. Societal and ethical aspects of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    The Fukushima Nuclear Power Station accident in Japan in 2011 was a poignant reminder that radioactive contamination of the environment has consequences that encompass far more than health risks from exposure to radiation. Both the accident and remediation measures have resulted in serious societal impacts and raise questions about the ethical aspects of risk management. This article presents a brief review of some of these issues and compares similarities and differences with the lessons learned from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in Ukraine. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:651-653. © 2016 SETAC.

  7. River basins as social-ecological systems: linking levels of societal and ecosystem water metabolism in a semiarid watershed

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    Violeta Cabello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available River basin modeling under complexity requires analytical frameworks capable of dealing with the multiple scales and dimensions of environmental problems as well as uncertainty in the evolution of social systems. Conceptual and methodological developments can now be framed using the wide socio-eco-hydrological approach. We add hierarchy theory into the mix to discuss the conceptualization of river basins as complex, holarchic social-ecological systems. We operationalize the social-ecological systems water metabolism framework in a semiarid watershed in Spain, and add the governance dimension that shapes human-environment reciprocity. To this purpose, we integrate an eco-hydrological model with the societal metabolism accounting scheme for land use, human activity, and water use. We explore four types of interactions: between societal organization and water uses/demands, between ecosystem organization and their water requirements/supplies, between societal metabolism and aquatic ecosystem health, and between water demand and availability. Our results reveal a metabolic pattern of a high mountain rural system striving to face exodus and agricultural land abandonment with a multifunctional economy. Centuries of social-ecological evolution shaping waterscapes through traditional water management practices have influenced the eco-hydrological functioning of the basin, enabling adaptation to aridity. We found a marked spatial gradient on water supply, use pattern, and impact on water bodies from the head to the mouth of the basin. Management challenges posed by the European water regulatory framework as a new driver of social-ecological change are highlighted.

  8. Art Appreciation for Developing Communication Skills among Preschool Children

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    Matjaž Duh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary process of teaching fine arts, children’s own creative expression and art appreciation are used to encourage learners towards both perception and reception; consequently, the evaluation and internalization of works of art play an equally important role. In a qualitative empirical research study that takes the form of a case study, we studied the response of children to works of art and their demonstrated communication skills in this. The results have shown that children respond to works of art on multiple levels. With non-standardized narrative group interviews, we observed children’s associations. Children perceived and internalized the given artworks and also put their emotions into words. The study has shown that systematic development of art appreciation among pre-school children can have a positive impact on their communication skills.

  9. Art Appreciation and the Method of Aesthetic Transfer

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    Zupančič Tomaž

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The method of aesthetic transfer is a modern teaching method in art education. It emphasizes the pedagogic value of the aesthetic experience. It is a comprehensive method, as it encompasses different parameters of art didactics. It affects lesson time allocation and determines content, methods, and teaching modes. It also affects motivation and final evaluation. The essence of the method of aesthetic transfer lies in transferring aesthetic messages from the artwork to students. The foundation and condition for a successful implementation of the method of aesthetic transfer is a high-quality art appreciation. There are several ways and methods for successfully developing art appreciation, the common objective of all being to allow students to see, perceive, and enjoy a work of art. Thus they enrich their artistic and aesthetic development, and establish a positive attitude towards art, while this method at the same time encourages their own artistic exploration.

  10. Engagement with beauty: appreciating natural, artistic, and moral beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Solom, Rebecca C; Frost, Nellie K; Parsons, Lucas; Davidson, John

    2008-05-01

    The Engagement With Beauty Scale (EBS), designed from the aesthetics of I. Kant (1790/1987), G. W. F. Hegel (ca. 1835/1993), and T. Aquinas (ca. 1260/1947) and the psychological work of J. Haidt (J. Haidt & D. Keltner, 2004), measures engagement with natural, artistic, and moral beauty. In Studies 1 and 2, the authors describe scale construction, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency, and temporal stability. In Studies 1 and 2, the authors also establish concurrent validity with the Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence subscale of the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (C. Peterson & M. E. P. Seligman, 2004), the Gratitude, Resentment, and Appreciation Test (P. C. Watkins, K. Woodward, T. Stone, & R. L. Kolts, 2003), and the Spiritual Transcendence Scale (R. L. Piedmont, 2004). In Study 3, the authors used the EBS Artistic Beauty subscale to differentiate students engaged in the arts from those who were not.

  11. Appreciative Socialization Group. A Model of Personal Development

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    Simona PONEA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we want to present o new of form of group, which we consider as being important for the process of personal development. Groups are a form of gathering more people united by a common purpose. We believe that through their group, members can develop new skills and also can obtain the change in the direction they want. Socialization is the processthat we “share” along with others, by communicating and also by having close views towards different things in life. Appreciative socialization involves placing emphasis on those elements that have value to us, which are positive. We consider appreciative group socialization as a model of good practice that aims the development among group members and increasesempowerment process.

  12. APPRECIATIVE INTELLIGENCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ROMANIAN MANAGERS’ BEHAVIOUR

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    MIRELA BUCUREAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Appreciative intelligence is a process that allows successful managers to realize their innovative and creative ideas, achieving realistic goals by using the ability to identify the positive potential of actions and take advantage of them. The main characteristic of a manager, in order to obtain organizational welfare is to have the ability to discover the hidden aspects of any situation and to share them with his employees, investors, partners and colleagues. In this paper we will present the result of a questionnaire that we applied on a number of ten Romanian managers, five from Bihor County and five from Cluj County, in order to find out if they heard about appreciative intelligence and if they consider it important for the organizational development.

  13. Cultural estrangement: the role of personal and societal value discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Mark M; Gebauer, Jochen E; Maio, Gregory R

    2006-01-01

    Study 1 examined whether cultural estrangement arises from discrepancies between personal and societal values (e.g., freedom) rather than from discrepancies in attitudes toward political (e.g., censorship) or mundane (e.g., pizza) objects. The relations between different types of value discrepancies, estrangement, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness also were examined. Results indicated that personal-societal discrepancies in values and political attitudes predicted estrangement, whereas mundane attitude discrepancies were not related to estrangement. As expected, value discrepancies were the most powerful predictor of estrangement. Value discrepancies were not related to subjective well-being but fulfilled a need for uniqueness. Study 2 replicated the relations between value discrepancies, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness while showing that a self-report measure of participants' values and a peer-report measure of the participants' values yielded the same pattern of value discrepancies. Together, the studies reveal theoretical and empirical benefits of conceptualizing cultural estrangement in terms of value discrepancies.

  14. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity: An Interdisciplinary Methodological Challenge

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    Henning Salling Olesen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The thematic issue presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis. Its particular focus is on subjectivity—as an aspect of the research object and as an aspect of the research process. By the term "approach" is indicated the intrinsic connection between the theorizing of an empirical object and the reflection of the research process and the epistemic subject. In terms of methodology it revives the themes originally launched in FQS exactly ten years ago: "Subjectivity and Reflectivity in Qualitative Research" (BREUER, MRUCK & ROTH, 2002; MRUCK & BREUER, 2003. This editorial introduction presents the intellectual background of the psycho-societal methodology, reflects on its relevance and critical perspectives in a contemporary landscape of social science, and comments the way in which an international and interdisciplinary research group has developed this approach to profane empirical research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs120345

  15. Postmodernism in Belgrade architecture: Between cultural modernity and societal modernization

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    Blagojević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the introduction and articulation of ideas and aesthetic practice of postmodernism in architecture of late socialism in Yugoslavia, with the focus on Belgrade architecture scene. Theoretical and methodological point of departure of this analysis is Jürgen Habermas's thesis of modernity as an incomplete, i.e., unfinished project, from his influential essay “Die Moderne: Ein unvollendetes Projekt” (1980. The thematic framework of the paper is shifted towards issues raised by Habermas which concern relations of cultural modernity and societal modernization, or rather towards consideration of architectural postmodernity in relation to the split between culture and society. The paper investigates architectural discourse which was profiled in Belgrade in 1980s, in a historical context of cultural modernity simultaneous with Habermas's text, but in different conditions of societal modernization of Yugoslav late socialism. In that, the principle methodological question concerns the interpretation of postmodern architecture as part of the new cultural production within the social restructuration of late and/or end of socialism as a system, that being analogous to Fredric Jameson's thesis of “Postmodernism, Or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism” (1984.

  16. The Societal Benefits and Costs of School Dropout Recovery

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    James S. Catterall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an analysis of the societal benefits and costs of recovering school dropouts. Successful recovery is defined by subsequent graduation from high school. The analysis is based on established estimates of the societal costs of dropping out including reduced government tax collections and higher social costs of welfare, healthcare, and crime. These potential costs are cast as benefits when a dropout is recovered. A large dropout recovery program provides the setting for the analysis. Rigorous attention is given to accurate estimation of the number of students who would not have graduated without the program in the year assessed and to the induced public costs of their continued education. Estimated benefits are weighed against the total annual public costs of the program, which operates in 65 school centers and commands an annual budget of about $70 million. The estimated benefit-cost ratio for this program is 3 to 1, a figure comparable to benefit-cost ratio estimates reported in studies of dropout prevention. The sensitivity of this conclusion to specific assumptions within the analysis is discussed.

  17. Under diagnosis of adult ADHD: cultural influences and societal burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asherson, Philip; Akehurst, Ron; Kooij, J J Sandra; Huss, Michael; Beusterien, Kathleen; Sasané, Rahul; Gholizadeh, Shadi; Hodgkins, Paul

    2012-07-01

    To explore the literature focusing on cultural influences in the diagnosis of adult ADHD and respective societal burden. A review of the literature over the past 10 years was performed using OVID. Although numerous articles focused on diagnosis and burden of adult ADHD, few focused on cultural factors influencing diagnosis. Like other mental health disorders, cultural and social perspectives contribute to our understanding of adult ADHD and may play a significant role in the diagnosis and varying acceptance of the condition. Moreover, adults with ADHD may underestimate the impact of ADHD symptoms, and in many cases have learned to compensate for ADHD related impairments by choosing lifestyles that help compensate for symptoms. Some adults with ADHD may appear to function well, however they may expend excessive amounts of energy to overcome impairments; and they may be distressed by ongoing symptoms such as restlessness, mood instability and low self-esteem. Research shows that ADHD can be detrimental to many areas of life including work, daily activities, social and family relationships and psychological and physical well-being. Patient-reported impairments in productivity due to poor time management, procrastination, and distractibility can translate into significant indirect costs and decreased quality of life. ADHD in adults is also associated with increased accidents, medical resource utilization, antisocial behaviour and drug alcohol abuse. The substantial societal burden of adult ADHD highlights the importance of providing a better understanding of the factors that contribute to accurate diagnosis and of improving the low recognition of the disorder in many world regions.

  18. Appreciating Site-Specific Qualities in Urban Harbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    When “site-specificity” becomes a central value in city and harbor transformation, it soon proves necessary to address the ways in which scholars and professionals actually determine site-specific qualities in urban fabrics and social life. This paper delves into the above questions by means...... of site-specificity, even in the traditional harbor settings. Considered with conceptual care, such situations may teach us what it means to “appreciate site-specific qualities”....

  19. Can Yuan Appreciation Solve U.S.Problems?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wen; Liu Yunyun

    2010-01-01

    @@ At The Heritage Foundation seminar in Washington,D.C.,a group of American experts on China brainstormed how appreciating the Chinese currency(yuan)can change the high unemployment situation now facing the United States.Beijing Review conducted exclusive interviews with three of the U.S.experts on the yuan issue after the seminar.The experts collectively agreed a trade war would be a zero-sum game for both countries.Edited excerpts follow:

  20. Postdocs Attend Special Events during Postdoc Appreciation Week | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI at Frederick postdocs were treated to special events by the Fellows and Young Investigators Committee during National Postdoc Appreciation Week, September 15–19. At the first Frederick fellows seminar of the fall on September 17, postdocs were invited to hear their colleagues present highlights of their research and stay for pizza and ice cream, compliments of the committee. Postdocs are also invited to a special networking event at Barley and Hops on September 24.

  1. Influence of aesthetic appreciation of wildlife species on attitudes towards their conservation in Kenyan agropastoralist communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pinho, Joana Roque; Grilo, Clara; Boone, Randall B; Galvin, Kathleen A; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of human aesthetic appreciation of animal species on public attitudes towards their conservation and related decision-making has been studied in industrialized countries but remains underexplored in developing countries. Working in three agropastoralist communities around Amboseli National Park, southern Kenya, we investigated the relative strength of human aesthetic appreciation on local attitudes towards the conservation of wildlife species. Using semi-structured interviewing and free listing (n = 191) as part of a mixed methods approach, we first characterized local aesthetic judgments of wildlife species. With a Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) approach, we then determined the influence of perceiving four species as beautiful on local support for their protection ("rescuing them"), and of perceiving four other species as ugly on support for their removal from the area, while controlling for informant personal and household socioeconomic attributes. Perceiving giraffe, gazelles and eland as beautiful is the strongest variable explaining support for rescuing them. Ugliness is the strongest variable influencing support for the removal of buffalo, hyena, and elephant (but not lion). Both our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that perceptions of ugly species could become more positive through direct exposure to those species. We propose that protected areas in developing countries facilitate visitation by local residents to increase their familiarity with species they rarely see or most frequently see in conflict with human interests. Since valuing a species for its beauty requires seeing it, protected areas in developing countries should connect the people who live around them with the animals they protect. Our results also show that aesthetic appreciation of biodiversity is not restricted to the industrialized world.

  2. A Different Approach to Strategic Planning Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Openo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interview describes the integration of Appreciative Inquiry (AI into the strategic planning cycle at Medicine Hat College. Appreciative Inquiry can play a powerful role in initiating and managing change through the process of asking generative questions. AI increases the possibility of introducing successful and transformative change at all levels within an organization. The interview was conducted in December 2015 by Innovations in Practice Editor Jennifer Easter. Dans l’entretien, il s’agit de l’intégration de l’enquête appréciative (Appreciative Inquiry en cycle de planification stratégique au Medicine Hat College. L’enquête appréciative peut jouer un rôle vigoureux dans l’initiation et la gestion de changement par le processus de poser des questions génératrices. L’enquête appréciative augmente la possibilité d’introduire le changement réussi et significatif à tous les niveaux d’une organisation. L’entretien a été mené en décembre de 2015 par Jennifer Easter, la rédactrice d’Innovations in Practice.

  3. What impact does community service learning have on medical students' appreciation of population health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa-Hadad, J; Murdoch-Eaton, D; Rudolf, M C J

    2015-11-01

    The Bar Ilan Faculty of Medicine places public health as a priority in its medical curriculum, emphasizing its importance by strategically placing the required course as first on entry into medical school. Students are introduced to the importance of population health and community engagement through participatory community learning experiences. This study aims to examine how participatory community teaching methods impact students' understanding and attitudes towards community health. Mixed quantitative and qualitative design. 75 first year students completed the required public health course utilizing participatory community methods, including community visits, Team Based Learning, an ethnic forum, and lifestyle medicine. Evaluation comprised skills assessment through project work, analysis of reflective notes and comparison of assessment scores with students in the previous year who experienced a formal lecture-only based curriculum. Students acquired public health skills, including conducting a needs assessment, searching for research evidence and designing an evaluation framework. Reflective notes revealed in-depth understanding not only of course aims, but an appreciation of the social determinants of health and the local community. Test marks indicated public health knowledge reached a comparable standard (83 ± 7.3) to the previous year (85 ± 9.3; P = 0.431). Participatory community learning equips students with public health skills, knowledge, and enhanced understanding of communities. It offers a way to effectively teach public health, while emphasizing the extended role and societal responsibilities of doctors. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Appreciative Group Socialization. Model PresentationAppreciative Group Socilaization. Model Presentation [Grupul de socializare apreciativ. Prezentarea modelului

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona PONEA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Appreciative group socialization appeared of the active collaboration of specialists from the Bureau of Support and Advice for Disabled People, the Diecesan Centre of Caritas (www.caritas-iasi.ro, active volunteers and service users involved.It added that an important role in the process of analyzing the needs of beneficiaries to participate in group. The analysis was conducted in a pragmatic manner as their experiences of beneficiaries involved as volunteers, other volunteers involved in practical and analyzing records of beneficiaries, especially the social surveys. An important role was played by the views of beneficiaries and the desire to involve volunteers.Apprecitive group socialization comprised of a number of elements taken from the literature that treats this subject, and a number of elements of appreciative inquiry, the process of socialization, the process of empowerment and also the partnership process.

  5. Statistical Estimation of Dose-response Functions of Respiratory Diseases and Societal Costs of Haze-related Air Pollution in Brunei Darussalam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaman, K. A.; Ibrahim, N.

    - The effects on human health resulting from the January to April 1998 haze-related air pollution episode in Brunei Darussalam were analysed for five groups of diseases of the respiratory system. The analysis concentrated on the statistical estimation of dose-response functions which related the number of cases of respiratory diseases to the level of quality of ambient environment as measured by the pollutants standards index (PSI) and other environmental variables. The total number of cases of the five groups of diseases was shown to be significantly related to PSI and temperature. Societal costs were also estimated. The results showed that societal costs were significantly related to PSI, temperature and relative humidity. Societal costs increased with higher PSI and relative humidity but decreased with increasing temperature.

  6. Appreciative Group Socialization. Model PresentationAppreciative Group Socilaization. Model Presentation [Grupul de socializare apreciativ. Prezentarea modelului

    OpenAIRE

    Simona PONEA; Antonio SANDU

    2010-01-01

    Appreciative group socialization appeared of the active collaboration of specialists from the Bureau of Support and Advice for Disabled People, the Diecesan Centre of Caritas (www.caritas-iasi.ro), active volunteers and service users involved.It added that an important role in the process of analyzing the needs of beneficiaries to participate in group. The analysis was conducted in a pragmatic manner as their experiences of beneficiaries involved as volunteers, other volunteers involved in pr...

  7. Appreciative Embodiment - En undersøgende kritik samt videreudvikling af Appreciative Inquiry i et kropsligt perspektiv

    OpenAIRE

    Duvander, Mille Persson

    2009-01-01

    Executive summary This study is based on the organizational theory Appreciative Inquiry (AI) that develops organizations by focusing on the strengths and resources available within the organization. The investigation concerns the position bodies have in this type of organizational communication, and the study is placed in the field of interpersonal communication. The empirical basis contains three parts: 1. Observations, video recordings, interviews and field notes from a social constr...

  8. Reducing Societal Obesity: Establishing a Separate Exercise Model through Studies of Group Behavior

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    J. S. Puterbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 50 years has brought attention to high and increasing levels of human obesity in most of the industrialized world. The medical profession has noticed, has evaluated, and has developed models for studying, preventing, and reversing obesity. The current model prescribes activity in specific quantities such as days, minutes, heart rates, and footfalls. Although decreased levels of activity have come from changes revolving around built environments and social networks, the existing medical model to lower body weights by increasing activity remains individually prescriptive. It is not working. The study of societal obesity precludes the individual and must involve group behavioral studies. Such studies necessitate acquiring separate tools and, therefore, require a significant change in the evaluation and treatment of obesity. Finding groups with common activities and lower levels of obesity would allow the development of new models of land use and encourage active lifestyles through shared interests.

  9. Energy Sustainability: A Key Toto Addressing Environmental, Economic and Societal Challenges

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    Marc A. Rosen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is a critically important goal for human activity and development, particularly in the area of energy. Energy resources are critical for economic development and living standards, but their use causes significant environmental impacts. Given the pervasiveness of energy use, energy sustainability is a key to addressing environmental, economic and societal challenges. To achieve energy sustainability, many factors that need to be including harnessing sustainable energy sources, utilizing sustainable energy carriers, increasing efficiency, reducing environmental impact and improving socioeconomic acceptability (e.g., community involvement, affordability, equity and land use. To demonstrate the factors and their importance to energy sustainability, the Red-Mediterranean-Dead Seas Canal Project is considered as a case study. Conclusions are provided related both to steps for energy sustainability.

  10. Ambivalences of creating life societal and philosophical dimensions of synthetic biology

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhard, Margret; Toepfer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    "Synthetic biology" is the label of a new technoscientific field with many different facets and agendas. One common aim is to "create life", primarily by using engineering principles to design and modify biological systems for human use. In a wider context, the topic has become one of the big cases in the legitimization processes associated with the political agenda to solve global problems with the aid of (bio-)technological innovation. Conceptual-level and meta-level analyses are needed: we should sort out conceptual ambiguities to agree on what we talk about, and we need to spell out agendas to see the disagreements clearly. The book is based on the interdisciplinary summer school "Analyzing the societal dimensions of synthetic biology", which took place in Berlin in September 2014. The contributions address controversial discussions around the philosophical examination, public perception, moral evaluation and governance of synthetic biology.

  11. Space-based societal applications—Relevance in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaranarayana, A.; Varadarajan, C.; Hegde, V. S.

    2009-11-01

    Space technology has the vast potential for addressing a variety of societal problems of the developing countries, particularly in the areas of communication, education and health sectors, land and water resources management, disaster management and weather forecasting. Both remote sensing and communication technologies can be used to achieve this goal. With its primary emphasis on application of space technology, on an end-to-end basis, towards national development, the Indian Space Programme has distinguished itself as one of the most cost-effective and development-oriented space programmes in the world. Developing nations are faced with the enormous task of carrying development-oriented education to the masses at the lower strata of their societies. One important feature of these populations is their large number and the spread over vast and remote areas of these nations, making the reaching out to them a difficult task. Satellite communication (Satcom) technology offers the unique capability of simultaneously reaching out to very large numbers, spread over vast areas, including the remote corners of the country. It is a strong tool to support development education. India has been amongst the first few nations to explore and put to use the Satcom technology for education and development-oriented services to the rural masses. Most of the developing countries have inadequate infrastructure to provide proper medical care to the rural population. Availability of specialist doctors in rural areas is a major bottleneck. Use of Satcom and information technology to connect rural clinics to urban hospitals through telemedicine systems is one of the solutions; and India has embarked upon an effective satellite-based telemedicine programme. Space technology is also useful in disaster warning and management related applications. Use of satellite systems and beacons for locating the distressed units on land, sea or air is well known to us. Indian Space Research Organisation

  12. Salute mentale nella società dello spettacolo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Debernardi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Io partirei (il condizionale la dice lunga da un’affermazione di Franco Basaglia “io sono uno psichiatra, non un antipsichiatra”. Questa affermazione la dice ancor più lunga, anzi lunghissima … perché rimette al centro ciò che riconosce: il potere. Riconoscere il potere che ‘ci’ viene attribuito, usarlo per dichiarare o denunciare il nostro non sapere (non so cosa sia la follia, diceva Basaglia e per dire invece che riconosco il ‘malato’ ed i suoi bisogni, i suoi diritti, vuol dire assumere tutte le contraddizioni esistenti. Se non si parte da una centralità (sociale, praticamente sociale, la società concreta o meglio da un baricentro (sempre sociale concreto la quaestio “cosa è o sia la salute mentale o il suo opposto” diventa un esercizio di emissione di fiati, suoni, grafie.

  13. Il XLIV Congresso della Società Italiana di Reumatologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Oliviero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Il 17-20 Ottobre 2007 al Lido di Venezia presso il Palazzo del Casinò e il Palazzo del Cinema si è svolto il XLIV Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Reumatologia (SIR. Numerosi esperti nazionali e internazionali hanno esposto le più importanti acquisizioni nel campo della ricerca clinica e di base reumatologiche. I tre giorni del congresso sono stati caratterizzati da letture, sessioni scientifiche, corsi educazionali, incontri con gli esperti, sezioni poster, corsi di aggiornamento su temi speciali, e diversi simposi. Tra i temi affrontati, particolare rilievo è stato dedicato ai singoli fattori implicati nella patogenesi delle malattie reumatiche, quali le citochine, i fagociti, le cellule endoteliali, i linfociti, i fibroblasti e gli autoanticorpi. In questo ambito un contributo di rilievo è stato offerto dai numerosi relatori stranieri ospiti del convegno. Dal punto di vista clinico, sono...

  14. Satellite Climate Data Records: Development, Applications, and Societal Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenze Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review paper discusses how to develop, produce, sustain, and serve satellite climate data records (CDRs in the context of transitioning research to operation (R2O. Requirements and critical procedures of producing various CDRs, including Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs, Thematic CDRs (TCDRs, Interim CDRs (ICDRs, and climate information records (CIRs are discussed in detail, including radiance/reflectance and the essential climate variables (ECVs of land, ocean, and atmosphere. Major international CDR initiatives, programs, and projects are summarized. Societal benefits of CDRs in various user sectors, including Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries, Energy, Heath, Water, Transportation, and Tourism are also briefly discussed. The challenges and opportunities for CDR development, production and service are also addressed. It is essential to maintain credible CDR products by allowing free access to products and keeping the production process transparent by making source code and documentation available with the dataset.

  15. Societal Impact of Improved Environment and Geospatial Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, J.; Andrzejewska, M.; Stonor, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geospatial projects are often dogged by the inability to establish a strong quantitative value proposition and are unable to sustain the attention of senior decision makers. In a tough economic climate, it is particularly important that any project that requires a significant investment can show a clear Return on Investment (ROI). In the case of commerce, benefit can be quantified through increase in sales/profit or reduction of risk. In the case of societal impact, quantification is more challenging. At the Geospatial World Forum (GWF) 2013 in Rotterdam, a number of case studies were presented on social impacts which used differing approaches to impact assessment. Some of the cases discussed projects with community issues and explained alternative means of conflict resolution. However, a comparison of the different case studies was not made at the GWF meeting. This presentation will take the next step and address the commonalities and differences in the approaches.

  16. Creating value from societal challenges; Waarde creeren uit maatschappelijke uitdagingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-10-15

    The Dutch government requested the Advisory Council for Science and Technology Policy (AWT) to report on how to contribute to addressing societal challenges through (1) the top sector policy, (2) the profiling policy, and (3) the European framework program Horizon 2020, or a combination of these policies. The AWT bases his opinion on the nature of the societal challenges, the commitment of the business community and the commitment of the knowledge institutes (Chapter 2). Next, follow the reasons why the market insufficiently picks up the challenges, the tools that the government can deploy to do something about it, and the constraints that the government runs into (Chapter 3). Subsequently four cases are discussed (energy, healthcare, mobility and security), followed by experiences in other countries (Chapter 4). Finally, conclusions and recommendations are given (chapter 5 and 6) [Dutch] Het kabinet vraagt de AWT om advies uit te brengen over de vraag hoe in Nederland optimaal kan worden bijgedragen aan de aanpak van maatschappelijke uitdagingen via (1) het topsectorenbeleid, (2) het profileringsbeleid, en (3) het Europese kaderprogramma Horizon 2020, dan wel een combinatie van deze beleidsprogramma's. De AWT baseert zijn advies op de aard van de maatschappelijke uitdagingen, de inzet van het bedrijfsleven en de inzet van de kennisinstellingen (hoofdstuk 2). Dan volgen de redenen waarom de markt deze uitdagingen onvoldoende oppakt, de instrumenten die de overheid kan inzetten om hier iets aan te doen en de beperkingen waar de overheid tegenaan loopt (hoofdstuk 3). Daarna komen vier casussen aan bod (energie, zorg, mobiliteit en veiligheid), gevolgd door ervaring in enkele andere landen (hoofdstuk 4). Het advies besluit met conclusies en aanbevelingen (hoofdstuk 5 en 6)

  17. Exploring Societal Preferences for Energy Sufficiency Measures in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne eMoser

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing a challenging transition towards more sustainable energy systems, which produce more renewables and consume less energy. The latter goal can only be achieved through a combination of efficiency measures and changes in people’s lifestyles and routine behaviours (i.e. sufficiency. While research has shown that acceptance of technical efficiency is relatively high, there is a lack of research on societal preferences for sufficiency measures. However, this is an important prerequisite for designing successful interventions to change behaviour.This paper analyses societal preferences for different energy-related behaviours in Switzerland. We use an online choice-based conjoint analysis (N=150 to examine preferences for behaviours with high technical potentials for energy demand reduction in the following domains: mobility, heating and food. Each domain comprises different attributes across three levels of sufficiency. Respondents were confronted with trade-off situations evoked through different fictional lifestyles that comprised different combinations of attribute levels. Through a series of trade-off decisions, participants were asked to choose their preferred lifestyle. The results revealed that a vegetarian diet was considered the most critical issue that respondents were unwilling to trade off, followed by distance to workplace and means of transportation. The highest willingness to trade off was found for adjustments in room temperature, holiday travel behaviours, and living space. Participants’ preferences for the most energy-sufficient lifestyles were rather low. However, the study showed that there were lifestyles with substantive energy-saving potentials that were well accepted among respondents. Our study results suggest that the success of energy-sufficiency interventions might depend strongly on the targeted behaviour. We speculate that they may face strong resistance (e.g., vegetarian diet. Thus, it seems

  18. Societal Discounting of Health Effects in Cost-Effectiveness Analyses: The Influence of Life Expectancy

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Polinder; Willem Jan Meerding; Job van Exel; Werner Brouwer

    2005-01-01

    Background: Increasing life expectancy and decreasing marginal valuation of additional QALYs over time may serve as a basis for discounting future health effects from a societal perspective. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that societal time preference for health is related to perceived future life expectancy. Methods: A sample of 223 people from the general population prioritised healthcare programmes with differential timing of health benefits and costs from a societal perspective. Furt...

  19. Societal transformation and adaptation necessary to manage dynamics in flood hazard and risk mitigation (TRANS-ADAPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Sven; Thaler, Thomas; Bonnefond, Mathieu; Clarke, Darren; Driessen, Peter; Hegger, Dries; Gatien-Tournat, Amandine; Gralepois, Mathilde; Fournier, Marie; Mees, Heleen; Murphy, Conor; Servain-Courant, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Facing the challenges of climate change, this project aims to analyse and to evaluate the multiple use of flood alleviation schemes with respect to social transformation in communities exposed to flood hazards in Europe. The overall goals are: (1) the identification of indicators and parameters necessary for strategies to increase societal resilience, (2) an analysis of the institutional settings needed for societal transformation, and (3) perspectives of changing divisions of responsibilities between public and private actors necessary to arrive at more resilient societies. This proposal assesses societal transformations from the perspective of changing divisions of responsibilities between public and private actors necessary to arrive at more resilient societies. Yet each risk mitigation measure is built on a narrative of exchanges and relations between people and therefore may condition the outputs. As such, governance is done by people interacting and defining risk mitigation measures as well as climate change adaptation are therefore simultaneously both outcomes of, and productive to, public and private responsibilities. Building off current knowledge this project will focus on different dimensions of adaptation and mitigation strategies based on social, economic and institutional incentives and settings, centring on the linkages between these different dimensions and complementing existing flood risk governance arrangements. The policy dimension of adaptation, predominantly decisions on the societal admissible level of vulnerability and risk, will be evaluated by a human-environment interaction approach using multiple methods and the assessment of social capacities of stakeholders across scales. As such, the challenges of adaptation to flood risk will be tackled by converting scientific frameworks into practical assessment and policy advice. In addressing the relationship between these dimensions of adaptation on different temporal and spatial scales, this

  20. Appreciating the political ethnography of master narratives and counterstories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philip

    2011-12-01

    Here I write an appreciation of Settlage's account of experiences with preservice teachers in the United States. Focusing on his use of notions of narrative and counterstories I explore the politics of experience in education looking at how he uses narrative and story, the politics entailed in the polyvocal evidence he presents and the significance of the ethnographic context for his account. After a discussion of these three significant conceptual insights I conclude with a return to his account and his somewhat diffident reflections about the project he reports on.

  1. An Appreciation for I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素勤

    2010-01-01

    William Wordsworth, the representative poet of the early romanticism, is regarded as a "worshipper of nature", who can penetrate to the heart of things and give the reader the very life of nature. He wrote a lot of natural poems. "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" is one of his famous short lyrics to show his deep love for nature. This paper focuses on talking about the background and appreciating of the beauty of the poem for its charming poetic language and the significance of it.

  2. RMB Appreciation: The End of Low-Cost Textile Export

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With the opening of Guangzhou Fair,the development tendency of China's exports of textiles and garments became the focus of the industry again.It is known that since the production cost has increased because of the appreciation of RMB and the inerease in raw material and labor price,almost every enterprise pariticipating in the fair have raised their prices by 3% to 5%,some even more than 10%,However,it is not optimistic that the clients abroad would completely accept the rise in price.

  3. A global assessment of the societal impacts of glacier outburst floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Tweed, Fiona S.

    2016-09-01

    societal impact are to be better understood. We note that future modelling of the global impact of glacier floods cannot assume that the same trends will continue and will need to consider combining land-use change with probability distributions of geomorphological responses to climate change and to human activity.

  4. Going home from hospital -- an appreciative inquiry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jan; Pearson, Pauline; Douglas, Barbara; Swinburne, Stella; Wilding, Helen

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on a project that involved a number of agencies and groups, including older people, working together to examine and develop practice in an area of shared concern -- going home from hospital. The project was stimulated by a 'whole-system event', and was based on appreciative inquiry (AI) methodology, which has roots in both action research and organisational development. In AI, the research is directed towards appreciating what it is about the social world that is positive, and exploring this. The study was planned around three workshops to streamline data collection and analysis. Group members were also required to carry out some activities between workshops. Invitations were sent out to groups and individuals previously identified as involved or interested in the discharge process across one health district (n = 71). Workshop one discussed the planned research schedule, and introduced the basic concepts of AI. This workshop also took participants through the interview process. Each participant was asked to undertake two interviews. Thirty-five individual interviews and one focus group were completed. At workshop two, interview data were analysed by the group using the nominal group technique. Subsequent group discussion produced 'provocative propositions'. At the third workshop, provocative propositions were developed into action plans. This paper gives an overview of the study, and explores some of the issues involved when working with service users and providers as co-researchers.

  5. Anti-Profit Beliefs: How People Neglect the Societal Benefits of Profit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit; Dana, Jason; Baron, Jonathan

    2017-07-20

    Profit-seeking firms are stereotypically depicted as immoral and harmful to society. At the same time, profit-driven enterprise has contributed immensely to human prosperity. Though scholars agree that profit can incentivize societally beneficial behaviors, people may neglect this possibility. In 7 studies, we show that people see business profit as necessarily in conflict with social good, a view we call anti-profit beliefs. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that U.S. participants hold anti-profit views of real U.S. firms and industries. Study 3 shows that hypothetical organizations are seen as doing more harm when they are labeled "for-profit" rather than "non-profit," while Study 4 shows that increasing harm to society is viewed as a strategy for increasing a hypothetical firm's long-run profitability. Studies 5-7 demonstrate that carefully prompting subjects to consider the long run incentives of profit can attenuate anti-profit beliefs, while prompting short run thinking does nothing relative to a control. Together, these results suggest that the default view of profits is zero-sum. While people readily grasp how profit can incentivize firms to engage in practices that harm others, they neglect how it can incentivize firms to engage in practices that benefit others. Accordingly, people's stereotypes of profit-seeking firms are excessively negative. Even in one of the most market-oriented societies in history, people doubt the contributions of profit-seeking industry to societal progress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Ecosystem and Societal Consequences of Ocean versus Atmosphere Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J. P.; Adams, E. E.; Bleck, R.; Caldeira, K.; Carman, K.; Erickson, D.; Kennett, J. P.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Tsouris, C.

    2005-12-01

    Climate stabilization during the next 100 to 200 y will require significant reductions in atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions to avoid large increases in global temperature. While there is only mild disagreement concerning carbon management options such as energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, and even geologic C storage, ocean storage remains controversial, due to its potential impacts for deep-sea ecosystems. A cautionary approach to carbon management might avoid any ocean C storage. However, this approach does not consider the balance between ocean and terrestrial ecosystems, or societal concerns. Using a broader perspective, we might ask whether atmospheric CO2 storage (i.e. the status quo), or deep ocean sequestration is better for Earth's ecosystems and societies? We explored the potential storage capacity of the deep ocean for carbon dioxide, under scenarios producing a 0.2 pH unit reduction, a level similar to observed scale of pH variability in deep ocean basins, which may also represent coarse thresholds for deep-sea ecosystem impacts. Roughly 500 PgC could be stored in the deep ocean to lower pH by 0.2 units, yielding a long term (~250 y) ocean sequestration program of 2 PgCy-1. The mitigation value of such ocean C sequestration for upper ocean and terrestrial systems depends strongly on future emission scenarios. Under a low emission scenario (e.g. SRES scenario A1T, B1; atm CO2 ~575 ppm, global temperature change of ~+2 oC), a 2 PgCy-1 ocean CO2 injection program could mitigate global temperature by ~-0.4 oC (20%) by 2100. This could reduce significantly the number of people at risk of water shortage and tropical diseases, with lesser improvement expected for hunger or coastal flooding. Mitigation for terrestrial and shallow ocean ecosystems is difficult to predict. A 0.4 oC reduction in warming this century is expected to delay the progression of coral reef devastation by roughly 20 y. The mitigation potential of ocean storage under very

  7. Humor: Aggression, Defence, and Conservatism: Group Characteristics and Differential Humor Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, George H.

    1976-01-01

    A broad sample of adult male and female subjects was administered an humor appreciation inventory (54 jokes, 9 categories). The major finding was that humor appreciation scores are remarkably similar regardless of background characteristics. (Author/SBP)

  8. Empowering Graduate Students to Lead on Interdisciplinary Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, E.

    2015-12-01

    Challenging societal problems that cannot be solved by one method or one discipline alone, like epidemic preparedness, mental health, and climate change, demand leadership and the ability to work across disciplines from those with specialized expertise. Teaching leadership at the graduate school level is a challenge that many schools are striving to meet, through mechanisms like project-based courses, leadership skill development workshops, and others. We argue that some of the most valuable but most difficult leadership skills to learn are those that require cultural norms that are fundamentally different from those traditionally encountered in graduate school. These include the ability to make informed decisions based on limited knowledge and resources, the need to make choices in the face of uncertainty, and the recognition that one ultimately bears responsibility for the outcomes. These skills are also among the most important for students planning on nonacademic careers. Acquiring such skills requires a focus on learning-by-doing and a culture of graduate student empowerment. This submission focuses on the experience of students in a student-centered, interdisciplinary, cross-campus leadership program called Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS), hosted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ELISS establishes the expectation that students act as leaders, which in itself reframes leadership as an achievable goal. A major finding from two years of experience with ELISS is the critical importance of establishing cultures of trust and empowerment at the graduate level in order to foster development of transferable skills. ELISS graduate students specifically focus on interdisciplinary collaboration (the 13 2015 fellows come from 13 academic disciplines); stakeholder engagement, primarily focused on outreach to both traditional and nontraditional experts in our communities outside of academia; and solution-generating rather

  9. Physical, Ecological, and Societal Indicators for the National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Melissa A.; Chen, Robert; Baptista, Sandra R.; Quattrochi, Dale; O'Brien, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Assessment (NCA) is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), pursuant to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, Section 106, which requires a report to Congress every 4 years. The current NCA (http://globalchange.gov/what-we-do/assessment/) differs in multiple ways from previous U.S. climate assessment efforts, being: (1) more focused on supporting the Nation s activities in adaptation and mitigation and on evaluating the current state of scientific knowledge relative to climate impacts and trends; (2) a long-term, consistent process for evaluation of climate risks and opportunities and providing information to support decision-making processes within regions and sectors; and (3) establishing a permanent assessment capacity both inside and outside of the federal government. As a part of ongoing, long-term assessment activities, the NCA intends to develop an integrated strategic framework and deploy climate-relevant physical, ecological, and societal indicators. The NCA indicators framework is underdevelopment by the NCA Development and Advisory Committee Indicators Working Group and are envisioned as a relatively small number of policy-relevant integrated indicators designed to provide a consistent, objective, and transparent overview of major variations in climate impacts, vulnerabilities, adaptation, and mitigation activities across sectors, regions, and timeframes. The potential questions that could be addressed by these indicators include: How do we know that there is a changing climate and how is it expected to change in the future? Are important climate impacts and opportunities occurring or predicted to occur in the future? Are we adapting successfully? What are the vulnerabilities and resiliencies given a changing climate? Are we preparing adequately for extreme events? It is not expected that the NCA societal indicators would be linked directly to a single decision or portfolio of

  10. Bridging two worlds that care about art: psychological and historical approaches to art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William Forde; Antliff, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Art appreciation often involves contemplation beyond immediate perceptual experience. However, there are challenges to incorporating such processes into a comprehensive theory of art appreciation. Can appreciation be captured in the responses to individual artworks? Can all forms of contemplation be defined? What properties of artworks trigger contemplation? We argue that such questions are fundamental to a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation, and we suggest research that may assist in refining this framework.

  11. Teachers' Guide to Music Appreciation III A and III B in the Senior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Mark; Dawkins, Barbara R.

    This guide to music appreciation courses was developed for use in senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Music Appreciation III A examines the development of music, from the Gothic period through the Classical period. Music Appreciation III B examines the development of music from the Romantic period through the 1970s.…

  12. Transformation of Online Teaching Practices Utilizing Appreciative Inquiry to Enhance the Process of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the application and outcome of appreciative andragogy as an online instructional strategy for the development of adult learner motivation, engagement, and performance. Appreciative andragogy was an original phrase developed for this study and is an adaptation of appreciative inquiry. The concept of…

  13. The dynamics of functioning investigating societal transitions with partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this article a mathematical framework is introduced and explored for the study of processes in societal transitions. A transition is conceptualised as a fundamental shift in the functioning of a societal system. The framework views functioning as a real-valued field defined upon a rea

  14. Prospects of modelling societal transitions: Position paper of an emerging community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtz, G.; Alkemade, F.; De Haan, F.; Köhler, J.; Trutnevyte, E.; Luthe, T.; Halbe, J.; Papachristos, G.; Chappin, E.; Kwakkel, J.H.; Ruutu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Societal transitions involve multiple actors, changes in institutions, values and technologies, and interactions across multiple sectors and scales. Given this complexity, this paper takes on the view that the societal transitions research field would benefit from the further maturation and broader

  15. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  16. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  17. The Societal Dimension in German Science Education--From Tradition towards Selected Cases and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ralf; Stuckey, Marc; Belova, Nadja; Eilks, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reflects the theory and practice of societal-oriented science education in the past and present of German science teaching. Starting from a quite unique German justification for more thorough societal-oriented science education and some historical reflections a model for socio-scientific issues-based science teaching will be presented.…

  18. Societal discounting of health effects in cost-effectiveness analyses: The influence of life expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Polinder (Suzanne); W.J. Meerding (Willem Jan); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Increasing life expectancy and decreasing marginal valuation of additional QALYs over time may serve as a basis for discounting future health effects from a societal perspective. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that societal time preference for health is related to percei

  19. Surgical appreciation of Robert Boyle in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D L

    2000-12-01

    Robert Boyle was known as the Father of Chemistry. He lived at a time when science and religion were closely linked. It was a pious and puritanical time, but also a time of great enlightenment. His original and paramount thesis, that air has weight, has given us Boyle's gas law. Another of his writings in the Cowlishaw Collection is on religion. It is stated that, at one stage, he was deliberating whether to be a scientist or a priest. Surgical appreciation of Boyle's law has poignant application in scientific methods and research in the 21st century. The development of advanced laparoscopic surgery represents a challenging new era in surgery that was not envisaged by our surgical predecessors. Basic surgical research into the effects of gas pressure on renal function and bowel response will be presented.

  20. How can we help students appreciate physics education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Ling; Zaki, Eman; Schmidt, Jason; Woolston, Don

    2004-03-01

    Helping students appreciate physics education is a formidable task, considering that many students struggle to pass introductory physics courses. Numerous efforts have been made for this undertaking because it is an important step leading to successful learning. In an out-of-classroom academic program, the Supplemental Instruction (SI) Program, we have used the approach, INSPIRE (inquiry, network, skillfulness, perseverance, intuition, reasoning, and effort), to help more students value their experiences in these courses. The method basically includes key elements outlined by experts in physics education [1]. Student responses have been encouraging. Having undergraduates as facilitators in the program is advantageous in promoting principles of physics education. Their training emphasizes tenacity, resourcefulness, understanding, support, and teamwork, i.e. TRUST. We present the organization and focus of the SI Program, and discuss how these improve learning atmosphere and facilitate learning. [1] Edward F. Redish et al, Am J. Phys. 66(3), March 1998.

  1. The Body Appreciation Scale-2: item refinement and psychometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Tracy L; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L

    2015-01-01

    Considered a positive body image measure, the 13-item Body Appreciation Scale (BAS; Avalos, Tylka, & Wood-Barcalow, 2005) assesses individuals' acceptance of, favorable opinions toward, and respect for their bodies. While the BAS has accrued psychometric support, we improved it by rewording certain BAS items (to eliminate sex-specific versions and body dissatisfaction-based language) and developing additional items based on positive body image research. In three studies, we examined the reworded, newly developed, and retained items to determine their psychometric properties among college and online community (Amazon Mechanical Turk) samples of 820 women and 767 men. After exploratory factor analysis, we retained 10 items (five original BAS items). Confirmatory factor analysis upheld the BAS-2's unidimensionality and invariance across sex and sample type. Its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct (convergent, incremental, and discriminant) validity were supported. The BAS-2 is a psychometrically sound positive body image measure applicable for research and clinical settings.

  2. Appreciative inquiry: a research tool for mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Julia L; Hughes, Frances

    2014-06-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) provides an alternative approach to the inquisitional style of uncovering "what went wrong and who is at fault" to instead "what can be done to make things better," thus creating an environment that enables one to discover (investigate), dream (what could have been done instead), design (what needs to be done to bring about change), and deliver/ destiny (working with a whole of health and community approach to obtain the positive outcomes for mental health consumers). AI is transformational in nature and provides a way of viewing organizations from an enabling perspective. This article discusses the concept of AI, highlights opportunities and challenges that may be encountered, and explores the possibility of applying the AI concept to mental health research/inquiry.

  3. Appreciative inquiry and older people--finding the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jan

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a literature search which sought papers specifically on appreciative inquiry (AI) and older people. The results of this search suggested that there were not many papers which met these criteria, and those that did were more often discussion papers rather than research papers. This lack of publication belies the observation that research with older people could benefit from the positive approach entailed in an AI approach. The reasons for this are discussed in the paper, but the possibility is explored that some authors may be using AI, but not classifying their studies as this. The studies that do explicitly use AI have reported that participants became productively engaged in the process, but there is little evidence that this promising start has been followed up.

  4. Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

  5. Convenient meat and meat products. Societal and technological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Frédéric; Degreef, Filip

    2015-11-01

    In past and contemporary foodscapes, meat and meat products have not only been following convenience trends, they have been at the heart of them. Historically, the first substantial demands for meat convenience must have been for the outsourcing of hunting or domestication, as well as slaughtering activities. In its turn, this prompted concerns for shelf-life stabilisation and the development of preservation strategies, such as meat fermentation. Demands for ease of preparation and consumption can be traced back to Antiquity but have gained in importance over the centuries, especially with the emergence of novel socio-cultural expectations and (perceived) time scarcity. Amongst other trends, this has led to the creation of ready meals and meat snacks and the expansion of urban fast food cultures. Additionally, contemporary requirements focus on the reduction of mental investments, via the "convenient" concealment of slaughtering, the optimisation of nutritional qualities, and the instant incorporation of more intangible matters, such as variety, hedonistic qualities, reassurance, and identity. An overview is given of the technological issues related to the creation of meat convenience, in its broadest sense, along with their societal implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Developing compassion through a relationship centred appreciative leadership programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Belinda; Cook, Fiona

    2014-09-01

    Recent attention in health care focuses on how to develop effective leaders for the future. Effective leadership is embodied in relationships and should be developed in and with staff and patients. This paper describes development, implementation and evaluation of an appreciative and relationship centred leadership programme carried out with 86 nursing staff covering 24 in-patient areas within one acute NHS Board in Scotland. The aim of the programme was to support staff to work together to develop a culture of inquiry that would enhance delivery of compassionate care. The 12 month Leadership Programme used the principles of appreciative relationship centred leadership. Within this framework participants were supported to explore relationships with self, patients and families, and with teams and the wider organisation using caring conversations. Participants worked within communities of practice and action learning sets. They were supported to use a range of structured tools to learn about the experience of others and to identify caring practices that worked well and then explore ways in which these could happen more of the time. A range of methods were used to evaluate impact of the programme including a culture questionnaire and semi structured interviews. Immersion crystallisation technique and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Key themes included; enhanced self-awareness, better relationships, greater ability to reflect on practice, different conversations in the workplace that were more compassionate and respectful, and an ethos of continuing learning and improvement. The programme supported participants to think in different ways and to be reflective and engaged participants rather than passive actors in shaping the cultural climate in which compassionate relationship centred care can flourish. Multidisciplinary programmes where the process and outcomes are explicitly linked to organisational objectives need to be considered in future

  7. Humor Appreciation Involves Parametric and Synchronized Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2016-10-18

    Humor perception is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human societies. In theories of humor perception, three factors, non-seriousness, social context, and incongruity, have been implicated in humor. In another theory, however, elaboration and reinterpretation of contexts are considered to play a role in eliciting humor. Although the neural correlates of humor appreciation have been investigated using neuroimaging methods, only a few studies have conducted such experiments under natural conditions. In the present study, two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments, using a comedy movie as a stimulus, were conducted to investigate the neural correlates of humor under natural conditions. The subjects' brain activity was measured while watching and enjoying a movie. In experiment 1, a parametric analysis showed that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and hippocampus/amygdala had a positive relationship with the subjective rating of funniness. In experiment 2, intersubject correlation was analyzed to investigate synchronized activity across all participants. Signal synchronization that paralleled increased funniness ratings was observed in the MPFC and hippocampus. Thus, it appears that both parametric and synchronized activity in the MPFC and hippocampus are important during humor appreciation. The present study has revealed the brain regions that are predominantly involved in humor sensation under natural condition. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Appreciative Teaching of Social Sciences in Competence Based Approaches to Higher Education

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    Antonio SANDU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In teaching the disciplines in the social-human field, we appealed to the constructionist model of education. In this model, the unity of competence represents a construct resulting from the communicative action as a deliberate act instituted by the stakeholders participating in the social construction of the professional identity. Therefore, such unity is not a given defining abstract itself for a professional activity. Each such unit of competence resulted in a process of negotiation of interpretations on the meaning of the term ‘good practice’ in a given professional activity. Experimental implementation of certain curricular innovations may constitute an element of added value only to the extent to which this pseudo-experiment takes the form of a process of co-learning and curricular co-construction both in the educational framework, and also for students to acknowledge the partnership in the educational act, and not the magisterial attitude specific to the educational model centred on the teacher. In this article we present a series of curricular innovations that targeted the expansion of the appreciative-constructionist model of learning as a basis for curricular projection and development. The method consists of using the appreciative inquiry in reformulating the experience of the subjects related to the social reality analysed, and the customisation of different contexts of the social experience.

  9. Eye Movements during Art Appreciation by Students Taking a Photo Creation Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Chiaki; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko; Okada, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on the differences in the art appreciation process between individuals, and indicated that novice viewers of artworks, in comparison to experts, rarely consider the creation process of the artwork or how this may relate to style. However, behavioral changes in individuals after educational interventions have not been examined. Art education researchers claim that technical knowledge and creation experiences help novice viewers to pay attention to technical features of artwork. Therefore, an artistic photo creation course was designed and conducted to help students acquire techniques and procedural knowledge of photo creation. The present study verified whether students' viewing strategies during appreciation of photographs changed after the course. Twenty-one students participated in two sessions, viewing the same 12 photographs before and after the course. Based on the analysis of recorded eye movements, the results indicated that the students' perceptual exploration became more active with photographs containing recognizable subjects (i.e., humans and objects), and their global saccades increased when they viewed classic photography, one of the categories of photography covered in the course. Interview data after the course indicated that students became aware of the technical effects in photographs. These results suggest that students' viewing strategies may change following a course, as assessed by behavioral measures of eye movements. Further examination is needed to validate this approach to educational effect measurement.

  10. Eye movements during art appreciation by students taking a photo creation course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Ishiguro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have focused on the differences in the art appreciation process between individuals, and indicated that novice viewers of artworks, in comparison to experts, rarely consider the creation process of the artwork or how this may relate to style. However, behavioral changes in individuals after educational interventions have not been examined. Art education researchers claim that technical knowledge and creation experiences help novice viewers to pay attention to technical features of artwork. Therefore, an artistic photo creation course was designed and conducted to help students acquire techniques and procedural knowledge of photo creation. The present study verified whether students’ viewing strategies during appreciation of photographs changed after the course. Twenty-one students participated in two sessions, viewing the same 12 photographs before and after the course. Based on the analysis of recorded eye movements, the results indicated that the students’ perceptual exploration became more active with photographs containing recognizable subjects (i.e., humans and objects, and their global saccades increased when they viewed classic photography, one of the categories of photography covered in the course. Interview data after the course indicated that students became aware of the technical effects in photographs. These results suggest that students’ viewing strategies may change following a course, as assessed by behavioral measures of eye movements. Further examination is needed to validate this approach to educational effect measurement.

  11. La Società Umanitaria e la diffusione del Metodo Montessori (1908-1923

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    Irene Pozzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Società Umanitaria ofMilan, between 1918 and 1923, played an essential role in spreading and developing the Montessori Method. Studying in the Historical Archive of Società Umanitaria the numerous documents there collected, the author reconstructed the crucial moments of the extremely significant collaboration between Maria Montessori and Augusto Osimo, General Secretary of the Società Umanitaria.This complex and in-depth investigation was guided by the analysis, in specific, of the training courses for Montessori teachers organised by Società Umanitaria, essentially unexamined before this study, that allowed the researcher to have a deep insight into the action of Società Umanitaria aimed to promote and implement the Montessori Method in Italy and all around the world.

  12. The Evaluation Scale: Exploring Decisions About Societal Impact in Peer Review Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Gemma E; Samuel, Gabrielle N

    Realising the societal gains from publicly funded health and medical research requires a model for a reflexive evaluation precedent for the societal impact of research. This research explores UK Research Excellence Framework evaluators' values and opinions and assessing societal impact, prior to the assessment taking place. Specifically, we discuss the characteristics of two different impact assessment extremes - the "quality-focused" evaluation and "societal impact-focused" evaluation. We show the wide range of evaluator views about impact, and that these views could be conceptually reflected in a range of different positions along a conceptual evaluation scale. We describe the characteristics of these extremes in detail, and discuss the different beliefs evaluators had which could influence where they positioned themselves along the scale. These decisions, we argue, when considered together, form a dominant definition of societal impact that influences the direction of its evaluation by the panel.

  13. Ecologising Societal Metabolism and Recycling of Phosphorus At Household and Neighbourhood Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, B.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    The pressures of humanity on a fragile water resource base, and the corresponding need for environmental and freshwater protection requires that human excreta and other societal wastes (solid and liquid) be recycled and used as a resource. The Bel- lagio principles underpin the basis for this new approach to environmental sanitation. There are two main concepts emanating from the Bellagio principles, which make the basis of this paper. Firstly, the Household Centred Environmental Sanitation (HCES) puts the household at the focal point of environmental sanitation planning and; sec- ondly, the Circular System of Resource Management (CSRM) that emphasises conser- vation, local recycling and reuse of resources. Recycling of Phosphorus (P) in urban or peri-urban ecological agriculture (without synthetic fertilisers) is used in this paper to assess the feasibility of these concepts. An inventory of annual P-fluxes based on characterisation of input goods, processes, transformation, output fluxes and storage was conducted for a high-density suburb in Harare, Zimbabwe where agriculture is already a major activity. Using systems thinking approach and material flow account- ing two compartments or subsystems are defined to enable accounting and analysis of P-bearing materials. The "household" (consumption/use and excretion/waste) and "agriculture" (soil-plant interaction). With a population of about 100 000 inhabitants, P inflows amount to about 26 600 kg/a and 1 900 kg/a as food/beverages and deter- gents respectively within the "household" subsystem. Storage is taken as negligible, whilst 85

  14. Of Fish and Fishermen: Shifting Societal Baselines to Reduce Environmental Harm in Fisheries

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    Mimi E. Lam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available If reasonable fishery harvests and environmental harms are specified in new regulations, policies, and laws governing the exploitation of fish for food and livelihoods, then societal baselines can shift to achieve sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. Fisheries regulations can limit the environmental and social costs or harms caused by fishing by requiring the fishing industry to pay for the privilege to fish, via access fees for the opportunity to catch fish and extraction fees for fish caught; both fees can be combined with a progressive environmental tax to discourage overcapitalization and overfishing. Fisheries policies can be sustainable if predicated on an instrumental and ethical harm principle to reduce fishing harm. To protect the public trust in fisheries, environmental laws can identify the unsustainable depletion of fishery resources as ecological damage and a public nuisance to bind private fishing enterprises to a harm principle. Collaborative governance can foster sustainable fisheries if decision-making rights and responsibilities of marine stewardship are shared among government, the fishing industry, and civil society. As global food security and human welfare are threatened by accelerating human population growth and environmental impacts, decisions of how to use and protect the environment will involve collective choices in which all citizens have a stake - and a right.

  15. August 2014 Hiroshima landslide disaster and its societal impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Sassa, Kyoji; Wang, Chunxiang

    2015-04-01

    In the early morning of August 20, 2014, Hiroshima city was hit by a number of debris flows along a linear rain band which caused extreme downpour. This disaster claimed 74 death, although this city experienced very similar disaster in 1999, claiming more than 30 residents lives. In the most severely affected debris flow torrent, more than 50 residents were killed. Most of the casualties arose in the wooden, vulnerable houses constructed in front of the exit of torrents. Points and lessons learnt from the disaster are as follows: 1. Extreme rainfall events : geology and geomorphology does not much affect the distribution of landslides initiation sites. 2. Area of causative extreme rainfall is localized in 2 km x 10 km along the rain band. 3. Authors collected two types of sands from the source scar of the initial debris slides which induced debris flows. Tested by the ring shear apparatus under pore-pressure control condition, clear "Sliding surface liquefaction" was confirmed for both samples even under small normal stress, representing the small thickness of the slides. These results shows even instant excess pore pressure could initiate the slides and trigger slide-induced debris flow by undrained loading onto the torrent deposits. 4. Apparently long-term land-use change affected the vulnerability of the community. Residential area had expanded into hill-slope (mountainous / semi-mountainous area) especially along the torrents. Those communities were developed on the past debris flow fan. 5. As the devastated area is very close to downtown of Hiroshima city, it gave gigantic societal impact to the Japanese citizens. After 1999 Hiroshima debris flow disaster, the Landslide disaster reduction law which intends to promote designation of landslide potential risk zones, was adopted in 2000. Immediately after 2014 disaster, national diet approved revision of the bill.

  16. Translational Geoscience: Converting Geoscience Innovation into Societal Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffries, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Translational geoscience — which involves the conversion of geoscience discovery into societal, economic, and environmental impacts — has significant potential to generate large benefits but has received little systematic attention or resources. In contrast, translational medicine — which focuses on the conversion of scientific discovery into health improvement — has grown enormously in the past decade and provides useful models for other fields. Elias Zerhouni [1] developed a "new vision" for translational science to "ensure that extraordinary scientific advances of the past decade will be rapidly captured, translated, and disseminated for the benefit of all Americans." According to Francis Collins, "Opportunities to advance the discipline of translational science have never been better. We must move forward now. Science and society cannot afford to do otherwise." On 9 July 2015, the White House issued a memorandum directing U.S. federal agencies to focus on translating research into broader impacts, including commercial products and decision-making frameworks [3]. Natural hazards mitigation is one of many geoscience topics that would benefit from advances in translational science. This paper demonstrates that natural hazards mitigation can benefit from advances in translational science that address such topics as improving emergency preparedness, communicating life-saving information to government officials and citizens, explaining false positives and false negatives, working with multiple stakeholders and organizations across all sectors of the economy and all levels of government, and collaborating across a broad range of disciplines. [1] Zerhouni, EA (2005) New England Journal of Medicine 353(15):1621-1623. [2] Collins, FS (2011) Science Translational Medicine 3(90):1-6. [3] Donovan, S and Holdren, JP (2015) Multi-agency science and technology priorities for the FY 2017 budget. Executive Office of the President of the United States, 5 pp.

  17. AMISR in the Africa: Scientific and Societal Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtie, B.; Moldwin, M.; Yizengaw, E.; Coster, A. J.; Hysell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Much of our understanding of equatorial electrodynamics is primarily based on observations from the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar (ISR) observatory (JRO), the only ISR in the equatorial region. The JRO is located in the American sector that is characterized by the large off-set in the magnetic to geodectic equators and the shift of the magnetic equator from the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere. In the African sector, the geomagnetic and geodetic equators are approximately parallel, separated by at most 10 degrees. Data from satellites (e.g. ROCSAT, C/NOFS, DMSP) have indicated that the equatorial ionosphere in the African sector responds differently than other sectors. For example, ionospheric bubbles have been observed to be much deeper and to occur more frequently in the African sector. It has also been reported that ionospheric depletions more frequently rise to higher altitudes (up to 1000+ km) in the African sector than those in other longitude sectors. However, these observations have not been confirmed, validated or studied in detail by observations from the ground due to lack of suitable ground-based instrumentation in Africa. Thus, the causes or driving mechanisms of the unique density irregularities, bubbles, and depletions in the African sector remain unresolved. To address these issues, the U.S. National Science Foundation recently sponsored a workshop that held at Boston College to consider the possibility of relocating an Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR) to Ethiopia. Adding the ISR to the recently growing number of ground-based space science instruments on the continent, such as GPS, magnetometers, VHF, and Ionosonde, would be of significant scientific benefit and have a huge societal impact on the African space science community in particular and the science and engineering fields in general. The primary purpose of this workshop was to define the science goals motivating such a move and to examine the technical and

  18. The challenges of human population ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Miriam; Oxlund, Bjarke; Jespersen, Astrid; Krasnik, Allan; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Westendorp, Rudi Gerardus Johannes; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    The 20th century saw an unprecedented increase in average human lifespan as well as a rapid decline in human fertility in many countries of the world. The accompanying worldwide change in demographics of human populations is linked to unanticipated and unprecedented economic, cultural, medical, social, public health and public policy challenges, whose full implications on a societal level are only just beginning to be fully appreciated. Some of these implications are discussed in this commentary, an outcome of Cultures of Health and Ageing, a conference co-sponsored by the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) and the Center for Healthy Ageing at UCPH, which took place on 20–21 June 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questions discussed here include the following: what is driving age-structural change in human populations? how can we create ‘age-friendly’ societies and promote ‘ageing-in-community’? what tools will effectively promote social engagement and prevent social detachment among older individuals? is there a risk that further extension of human lifespan would be a greater burden to the individual and to society than is warranted by the potential benefit of longer life? PMID:25452294

  19. The Usefulness of Appreciative Inquiry As a Method to Identify Mass Sports Program Success

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    Bernadine VAN GRAMBERG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the relationship between good health and physical activity is well known. Despite the growth of public mass sports programs in many countries, few evaluate them to ensure they meet their targets. Measuring organizational effectiveness and program success in public sports organizations is difficult and cannot be done directly as it involves a number of complex dimensions involving both internal (organizational and external (customer factors. Recognizing this, the paper advances the Appreciative Inquiry approach as a culturally sensitive method to focus on the positives of human experience rather than finding faults or gaps and as a means of identifying the success factors of service delivery. The paper outlines the research strategy to investigate success in Malaysian mass sport programs.

  20. Helen Hudson Lecture. Positive practice change using appreciative inquiry in oncology primary care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colleen P

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory oncology nurses struggle to meet the increasing demands placed on them. Increased volume of patients, more complex treatments and symptom management, an older population with multiple co-morbidities combined with fiscal and human resource restraints has created job dissatisfaction and the feeling of powerlessness in the current environment. The Appreciative Inquiry process enables nurses to become engaged in planning and creating positive change based on their knowledge, experiences and clinical expertise, as oncology professionals. Through surveys and group work, nurses in this project were able to turn theory into positive practice change, inspiring a new paradigm of primary oncology nursing. Through the promotion of innovation, we have inspired hope while advocating for our profession.

  1. Societal Drivers of European Water Governance: A Comparison of Urban River Restoration Practices in France and Germany

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    Aude Zingraff-Hamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The European water governance took a decisive turn with the formulation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD, which demands the restoration of all water bodies that did not achieve sufficient ecological status. Urban rivers are particularly impaired by human activities and their restorations are motivated by multiple ecological and societal drivers, such as requirements of laws and legislation, and citizen needs for a better quality of life. In this study we investigated the relative influence of socio-political and socio-cultural drivers on urban river restorations by comparing projects of different policy contexts and cultural norms to cross-fertilize knowledge. A database of 75 projects in French and German major cities was compiled to apply (a a comparative statistical analysis of main project features, i.e., motivation, goals, measures, morphological status, and project date; and (b a qualitative textual analysis on project descriptions and titles. The results showed that despite a powerful European directive, urban river restoration projects still keep national specificities. The WFD drives with more intensity German, rather than French, urban river restoration. This study showed the limits of macro-level governance and the influence of microlevel governance driven by societal aspects such as nature perception and relationships between humans and rivers.

  2. Creating intentionally inviting schools through professional development: an appreciative inquiry

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    G.M. Steyn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The professional development (PD of teachers plays an important role in schools; it is indispensable for continuous school development. When schools are exposed to new approaches to learning and teaching, teachers are granted the opportunities to change their thinking and behaviour. In 2009, two South African schools with specific inviting characteristics were nominated for the inviting school award given by the International Alliance for Invitational Education (IAIE. However, the inviting characteristics of these schools were not explicitly intentional according to the IE philosophy, therefore they had to follow a professional development programme aimed at raising teachers’ awareness of invitational education (IE. Workshops were held to equip staff members with IE knowledge and skills, and to increase their understanding of their current practices with a view of making them more intentionally inviting. The study focused on the following two questions: What are the positive experiences of teaching staff concerning the current approach to teaching and learning in schools?; and What strategies may be introduced to assist teachers and their schools in becoming intentionally inviting? These two questions are based on appreciative inquiry (AI and IE. A qualitative research design was most appropriate for the purpose of this study. An analysis of the data revealed two categories (the discovery phase: discovering the best of what exists in the school and the dreaming phase: creating a new future on which AI is based.

  3. Enhancing Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships Through Appreciative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Ciara; Peters, Ruth; Parkhurst, Malia; Beck, Leah Leilani; Hui, Brian; May, Vanessa Tui; Tanjasiri, Sora Park

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships often pertain to trust and power, dilemmas posed by funding sources, and equitable community participation. Although challenges in CBPR can be welcomed because they present opportunities for growth and development of partnerships, tools are needed to facilitate issue identification and resolution. Moreover, such tools need to align with CBPR principles involving equal feedback among partners to improve the partnership and its outcomes. To describe how appreciative inquiry (AI) was used as an evaluation tool to contribute to the strengthening of empowerment of ongoing and future community-university relationships in CBPR collaborations. AI was applied at the end of a community-university partnership to promote breast and cervical cancer screening among Tongan women in Southern California. Through individual interviews and group discussion, tensions were identified and discussed in light of partnership and community strengths. Through AI, program staff emphasized community and university strengths of shared key values related to the program and aspects of program management that enabled them to contribute to successful program outcomes. They also discussed the following challenges: 1) approach of partners, 2) role definition, and 3) and time span of program development and implementation. Based on these discussions, recommendations were made to overcome current challenges and improve ongoing and future CBPR collaborations. The AI process helped the partners recommit to collaborate with each other, renewed their excitement about working together, and assisted with reclarification of their roles to inform future collaborations.

  4. Newly appreciated roles for basophils in allergy and protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasuyama, H; Obata, K; Wada, T; Tsujimura, Y; Mukai, K

    2011-09-01

    Basophils are evolutionarily conserved in many animal species, in spite of the fact that they account for basophils have an indispensable and nonredundant role in vivo, even though they show some phenotypic similarity with tissue-resident mast cells. However, their functional significance remained uncertain long after Paul Ehrlich discovered them as blood-circulating cells with basophilic granules more than 130 years ago. The study of basophils has been far behind that of mast cells, owing to the rarity of basophils and the paucity of tools for their detection and functional analysis. Recent development of novel analytical tools, including basophil-depleting antibodies and genetically engineered mice deficient only in basophils, has greatly advanced basophil research and illuminated previously unrecognized roles of basophils. We now appreciate that basophils and mast cells play distinct roles in immune responses. Basophils have crucial roles in the development of acute and chronic allergic responses, the protective immunity against ecto- and endoparasites, and the regulation of acquired immunity, including the augmentation of humoral memory responses and the initiation of Th2 responses. Thus, basophils are no longer the neglected minority and are key players in the immune system.

  5. Audience gaze while appreciating a multipart musical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Satoshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    Visual information has been observed to be crucial for audience members during musical performances. The present study used an eye tracker to investigate audience members' gazes while appreciating an audiovisual musical ensemble performance, based on evidence of the dominance of musical part in auditory attention when listening to multipart music that contains different melody lines and the joint-attention theory of gaze. We presented singing performances, by a female duo. The main findings were as follows: (1) the melody part (soprano) attracted more visual attention than the accompaniment part (alto) throughout the piece, (2) joint attention emerged when the singers shifted their gazes toward their co-performer, suggesting that inter-performer gazing interactions that play a spotlight role mediated performer-audience visual interaction, and (3) musical part (melody or accompaniment) strongly influenced the total duration of gazes among audiences, while the spotlight effect of gaze was limited to just after the singers' gaze shifts. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Neural Pathway of Renovative and Innovative Products Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Furong; Chiu, Chiyue; Luo, Jing

    2016-12-01

    According to the level of change an invention makes on existing things and how it overrides people’s mental schemas on established categories, new inventions can be classified into two groups: incremental inventions (i.e., renovations), which make minor improvements on existing designs, and radical inventions (i.e., innovations), which make major developments that enable people to do things they have never been able to do before. Although innovation and renovation are two fundamentally different types of creation that feature new changes ranging from those in product development to those in large scale social changes, and people tend to report higher subjective preferences for incremental inventions compared to radical inventions, the cognitive brain mechanisms underlying the mental representation of these two types of inventions remains unknown. Through the use of innovative and renovative designs as materials, we found that relative to non-creative designs, creative (renovative &innovative) designs enhanced memory or association-related activation in the right parahippocampus. In particular, innovations evoked more activation in the conceptual pathway for representing objects than did renovations, whereas renovations evoked more activation in the motor pathway than innovations. These results suggest that operating experiences may provide advantages for understanding and appreciating creative designs.

  7. Societal output and use of research performed by health research groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ark Gerrit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The last decade has seen the evaluation of health research pay more and more attention to societal use and benefits of research in addition to scientific quality, both in qualitative and quantitative ways. This paper elaborates primarily on a quantitative approach to assess societal output and use of research performed by health research groups (societal quality of research. For this reason, one of the Dutch university medical centres (i.e. the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC was chosen as the subject of a pilot study, because of its mission to integrate top patient care with medical, biomedical and healthcare research and education. All research departments were used as units of evaluation within this university medical centre. The method consisted of a four-step process to reach a societal quality score per department, based on its (research outreach to relevant societal stakeholders (the general public, healthcare professionals and the private sector. For each of these three types of stakeholders, indicators within four modes of communication were defined (knowledge production, knowledge exchange, knowledge use and earning capacity. These indicators were measured by a bottom-up approach in a qualitative way (i.e. all departments of the LUMC were asked to list all activities they would consider to be of societal relevance, after which they were converted into quantitative scores. These quantitative scores could then be compared to standardised scientific quality scores that are based on scientific publications and citations of peer-reviewed articles. Based on the LUMC pilot study, only a weak correlation was found between societal and scientific quality. This suggests that societal quality needs additional activities to be performed by health research groups and is not simply the consequence of high scientific quality. Therefore we conclude that scientific and societal evaluation should be considered to be synergistic in terms

  8. Leadership, governance and management in dental education - new societal challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, G; Thomas, R; Skinner, V; Bissell, V; Cohen, L; Cowpe, J; Giuliani, M; Gomez-Roman, G; Hovland, E; Imtiaz, A; Kalkwarf, K; Kim, K-K; Lamster, I; Marley, J; Mattsson, L; Paganelli, C; Quintao, C; Swift, J; Thirawat, J; Williams, J; Soekanto, S; Jones, M

    2008-02-01

    Dental schools around the world face new challenges that raise issues with regard to how they are governed, led and managed. With rapid societal changes, including globalization and consumerism, the roles of universities and their funding have become intensely debated topics. When financial burdens on universities increase, so does the pressure on dental schools. This is exacerbated by the relative expense of running dental schools and also by the limited understanding of both university managers and the public of the nature and scope of dentistry as a profession. In these circumstances, it is essential for dental schools to have good systems of leadership and management in place so that they can not only survive in difficult times, but flourish in the longer term. This paper discusses the concept of governance and how it relates to leadership, management and administration in dental schools and hospitals. Various approaches to governance and management in dental schools on different continents and regions are summarized and contrasted. A number of general governance and leadership issues are addressed. For example, a basic principle supported by the Working Group is that an effective governance structure must link authority and responsibility to performance and review, i.e. accountability, and that the mechanism for achieving this should be transparent. The paper also addresses issues specific to governing, leading and managing dental schools. Being a dean of a modern dental school is a very demanding role and some issues relating to this role are raised, including: dilemmas facing deans, preparing to be dean and succession planning. The importance of establishing a shared vision and mission, and creating the right culture and climate within a dental school, are emphasized. The Working Group advocates establishing a culture of scholarship in dental schools for both teaching and research. The paper addresses the need for effective staff management, motivation and

  9. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, D.; Barron, E. J.; Fine, R. A.; Bellingham, J. G.; Boss, E.; Boyle, E. A.; Edwards, M.; Johnson, K. S.; Kelley, D. S.; Kite-Powell, H.; Ramberg, S. E.; Rudnick, D. L.; Schofield, O.; Tamburri, M.; Wiebe, P. H.; Wright, D. J.; Committee on an Ocean Infrastructure StrategyU. S. Ocean Research in 2030

    2011-12-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, an expert committee was convened by the National Research Council to identify major research questions anticipated to be at the forefront of ocean science in 2030, define categories of infrastructure that should be included in planning, provide advice on criteria and processes that could be used to set priorities, and recommend ways to maximize the value of investments in ocean infrastructure. The committee identified 32 future ocean research questions in four themes: enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant now and are likely to take decades to solve. U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations and autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. A coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments will be needed and should be based upon known priorities and reviewed every 5-10 years. After assessing trends in ocean infrastructure and technology development, the committee recommended implementing a comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan in order to retain access to the sea; continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. They also recommended that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit. Particular consideration should be given to

  10. 4. The transectional structure of society: the basic societal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    For the purposes of research and/or evaluation, a society is organised into 13 basic societal functions (BSFs) within an overall Coordination and Control system. This organisation facilitates transectional descriptions of society or a component of a society for assessment at any given time across the longitudinal phases of a disaster. An assessment results in a picture or description of function(s) limited to the point in time of the assessment. Together with simultaneous assessments of the functional status of all, some, or one of the other BSFs, such assessments deliver a transectional picture of the situation of a society. Since no function operates in isolation from the other functions, information of the concomitant status of several BSFs is crucial to gain a better understanding of functional losses and of the effects and side effects of an intervention. The 13 BSFs include: (1) Public Health (dominantly preventive); (2) Medical Care (dominantly curative); (3) Water and Sanitation; (4) Shelter and Clothing; (5) Food and Nutrition; (6) Energy Supplies; (7) Public Works and Engineering; (8) Social Structure; (9) Logistics And Transportation; (10) Security; (11) Communications; (12); Economy; and (13) Education. These BSFs relate with each other through the Coordination and Control function. Many functions of the BSFs and their respective subfunctions and elements overlap (they share some common subfunctions and elements). However, for the purposes of research/evaluation, it is necessary to assign subfunctions and elements to only one of the BSFs. Just as in the practice of clinical medicine, the sum of assessments provides the transectional description of the status of each of these BSFs at a given time. From this information, compared to the pre-event description of the society, interventions are selected that are likely to meet the defined objectives and their overarching goal(s), and respective plans are developed and implemented. The effects of each

  11. Development of an Updated Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

    2014-07-01

    This report briefly summarizes work done in FY 2013 on the subject LDRD. The working hypothesis is that societal disruption should be addressed in a safety goal. This is motivated by the point that the Fukushima disaster resulted in very little public dose, but enormous societal disruption; a goal that addressed societal disruption would fill a perceived gap in the US NRC safety goal structure. This year's work entailed analyzing the consequences of postulated accidents at various reactor sites in the US, specifically with a view to quantifying the number of people relocated and the duration of their relocation, to see whether this makes sense as a measure of societal disruption.

  12. Libertà religiosa e società multiculturali: il caso del velo islamico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicola Fiorita

    2011-01-01

    ... religiosa nelle società multiculturali” svoltosi presso la Facoltà di Scienze Politiche dell’Università della Calabria (7 Aprile 2008). SOMMARIO: 1. Il velo islamico: un simbolo religioso...

  13. Societal Conditions and the Gender Difference in Well-Being: Testing a Three-Stage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Miron; Li, Chen; Diener, Edward F

    2017-03-01

    Findings from a meta-analysis on gender differences in self-esteem (Zuckerman et al., 2016) suggest that the relation between the degree to which societal conditions are favorable to women and gender difference in self-esteem might be quadratic; when conditions improve, women's self-esteem (relative to that of men) trends downward but when conditions continue to improve, women's self-esteem begins to trend upward. Testing whether these relations generalize to subjective well-being, the present study found a quadratic relation between improving societal conditions and the gender difference in life satisfaction and positive affect (women are lower than men when societal conditions are moderately favorable compared to when they are at their worst and at their best); the relation was linear for negative emotion (women report more negative emotions than men when societal conditions are better). Directions for future research that will address potential explanations for these results are proposed.

  14. Societal Statistical Data for a Food Chain Modeling of the UAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsi, Maitha Al Fandi; Kim, Sung-yeop; Lim, Ho-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear energy was seen as a potential alternative for the current non-renewable energy sources such as oil, gas and coal. Nuclear power was then chosen due to its sustainable qualities as well as sufficiency in the supply of energy for the upcoming years. In addition, it is believed that it will greatly contribute to UAE's economy and energy security. Despite its promising qualities, the risk underlying nuclear fallout can be catastrophic. Therefore, for safety analysis, a prospective assessment on the potential risks associated with the occurrence of such event should be performed. Constructing a food chain model and an exposure pathway that is specific to the UAE is essential, as it could aid in the determination of the potential dose an individual could receive following a routine or accidental release of radionuclides into the environment. This paper includes societal statistical data such as data on the production of food as well as dietary data such as the consumption of food in the UAE. Such data was compiled along with other parameter values from the literature. These findings could potentially be used as input values upon the development of a food chain model. The Barakah nuclear power plant will soon start operating in the UAE, and it is therefore critical that safety assessments in case of nuclear fallout be made. Following fallout, radionuclides can travel along successive trophic levels of a food chain, ultimately affecting humans. Yet, the exposure pathway by which it is transported varies between countries depending on the plant and animal species considered as well as other climatic factors. Hence, developing a food chain model specific to the UAE environment is essential, as it will aid in the determination of the potential dose an exposed individual might receive. Available societal data specific to the UAE from the year 2007 to 2016 were compiled. The data is comprised of UAE food production, domestic and per capita consumption. In addition

  15. D1.3.1C Report Covering the Wider Societal Implications of the HANDS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Morten; Vuust, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Replies to the following questions will assist the Commission to obtain statistics and indicators on societal and socio-economic issues addressed by projects. The questions are arranged in a number of key themes. As well as producing certain statistics, the replies will also help identify those p...... projects that have shown a real engagement with wider societal issues, and thereby identify interesting approaches to these issues and best practices. The replies for individual projects will not be made public....

  16. The Band Effect – physically strenuous music making increases aesthetic appreciation of music

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hans Fritz; Lydia Schneider; Arno Villringer

    2016-01-01

    The esthetic appreciation of music is strongly influenced by cultural background and personal taste. One would expect that this would complicate the utilizability of musical feedback in paradigms, such that music would only be perceived as a reward if it complies to personal esthetic appreciation. Here we report data where we assessed esthetic appreciation of music after 1. a physically strenuous music improvisation and 2. after passive music listening (where participants esthetically assesse...

  17. Improving nursing practice and patient care: building capacity with appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Donna Sullivan; Wood, Susan O; Leeman, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Appreciative inquiry is a philosophy and methodology for promoting positive organizational change. Nursing leaders at 6 community hospitals are partnering with the authors on a project that uses appreciative inquiry to improve communication and collaboration, to increase nurse involvement in decision making, and to enhance cultural awareness and sensitivity. In this article, the authors describe appreciative inquiry, how hospitals are using it, and the initial lessons learned.

  18. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center--providing comprehensive earth science for complex societal issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David G.; Wallace, Alan R.; Schneider, Jill L.

    2010-01-01

    supports approximately 40 USGS research specialists who utilize cooperative agreements with universities, industry, and other governmental agencies to support their collaborative research and information exchange. Scientists of the WMERSC study how and where non-fuel mineral resources form and are concentrated in the earth's crust, where mineral resources might be found in the future, and how mineral materials interact with the environment to affect human and ecosystem health. Natural systems (ecosystems) are complex - our understanding of how ecosystems operate requires collecting and synthesizing large amounts of geologic, geochemical, biologic, hydrologic, and meteorological information. Scientists in the Center strive to understand the interplay of various processes and how they affect the structure, composition, and health of ecosystems. Such understanding, which is then summarized in publicly available reports, is used to address and solve a wide variety of issues that are important to society and the economy. WMERSC scientists have extensive national and international experience in these scientific specialties and capabilities - they have collaborated with many Federal, State, and local agencies; with various private sector organizations; as well as with foreign countries and organizations. Nearly every scientific and societal challenge requires a different combination of scientific skills and capabilities. With their breadth of scientific specialties and capabilities, the scientists of the WMERSC can provide scientifically sound approaches to a wide range of societal challenges and issues. The following sections describe examples of important issues that have been addressed by scientists in the Center, the methods employed, and the relevant conclusions. New directions are inevitable as societal needs change over time. Scientists of the WMERSC have a diverse set of skills and capabilities and are proficient in the collection and integration of

  19. 3 CFR 8389 - Proclamation 8389 of June 2, 2009. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... music tradition also reflects creativity and individualism. Blues, jazz, soul, and rock and roll... Music Appreciation Month, 2009 8389 Proclamation 8389 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8389 of June 2, 2009 Proc. 8389 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2009By the President of...

  20. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Australian Football Coaches' Experience with Game Sense Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a project framed as a strengths-based case study in the field of sport coaching. The aim of this research was twofold. First, the project trialled. Appreciate Inquiry (AI) for sport pedagogy research and explain how AI can be used in sport coaching research. Second, using an appreciative perspective, the aim of the research…

  1. Education for Appreciating Environment--An Example of Curriculum Design of Natural Aesthetic Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Environmental protection is now the common consensus in the world. If we can teach students how to appreciate the natural environment and love its beauty, they may protect the environment naturally. But how can we learn to appreciate nature? The research on the contemporary aesthetics of nature provides rich discussions and directions. This paper…

  2. Aesthetic appreciation of tactile unity-in-variety in product designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.A.G.; Blijlevens, J.; Hekkert, P.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of unity-in-variety has recently been shown to affect visual aesthetic appreciation of product designs. We investigated whether this principle can also account for tactile aesthetic appreciation of products. Design students rated nine car keys on unity, variety and aesthetic appreciati

  3. Appreciative Inquiry as a Method for Participatory Change in Secondary Schools in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuayb, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry is a strategy which takes a positive approach to organizational development. It aims to identify good practice, design effective development plans, and ensure implementation. This article examines the potentials and limitations of using the appreciative inquiry in a mixed methods research design for developing school…

  4. Appreciative Inquiry and Video Self Modeling Leadership Program: Achieving Skill or Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Bethany Jewell

    2013-01-01

    A leadership program was created for students to gain skills and/or change their behavior using Appreciative Inquiry and Video Self Modeling, VSM. In 2011a youth that experiences a disability had been unable to achieve a skill utilizing traditional methods of skill acquisition. He employed the Appreciative Inquiry and VSM leadership program and…

  5. Appreciative Inquiry as a Method for Participatory Change in Secondary Schools in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuayb, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry is a strategy which takes a positive approach to organizational development. It aims to identify good practice, design effective development plans, and ensure implementation. This article examines the potentials and limitations of using the appreciative inquiry in a mixed methods research design for developing school…

  6. Inclusiveness of ICT in Secondary Education: Students' Appreciation of ICT Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Irma; Volman, Monique; Admiraal, Wilfried; ten Dam, Geert

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on students' appreciation of information and communication technology (ICT) applications in schools for general secondary education. We investigate to what extent students from different gender and ethnic backgrounds appreciate various characteristics of ICT tools. The research question is, "How are…

  7. Climate Change and Societal Response: Livelihoods, Communities, and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change may be considered a natural disaster evolving in slow motion on a global scale. Increasing storm intensities, shifting rainfall patterns, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and other manifold alterations are being experienced around the world. Climate has never been constant in any location, but human-induced changes associated…

  8. Societal threat as a moderator of cultural group selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Roos, Patrick; Nau, Dana; Harrington, Jesse; Mu, Yan; Jackson, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    As scholars have rushed to either prove or refute cultural group selection (CGS), the debate lacks sufficient consideration of CGS's potential moderators. We argue that pressures for CGS are particularly strong when groups face ecological and human-made threat. Field, experimental, computational, and genetic evidence are presented to substantiate this claim.

  9. Body appreciation in adult women: relationships with age and body satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; McCourt, Alice

    2013-09-01

    The major aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of age on positive body image (operationalized as body appreciation) across the female lifespan. A secondary aim was to examine the effect of age on the relationship between positive body image and body satisfaction. Participants were 158 women aged between 18 and 75 years who completed questionnaire measures of body appreciation and body dissatisfaction-satisfaction. A significant positive linear relationship was found between age and body appreciation; that is, older women had higher levels of body appreciation than their younger counterparts. Although body appreciation was positively correlated with body dissatisfaction-satisfaction across all age groups, the association was weaker for older women. The results contribute to a richer picture of women's body image across the lifespan, as well as confirming positive body image as something beyond the mere absence of body dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Affinity for Poetry and Aesthetic Appreciation of Joyful and Sad Poems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Maria; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Artworks with sad and affectively negative content have repeatedly been reported to elicit positive aesthetic appreciation. This topic has received much attention both in the history of poetics and aesthetics as well as in recent studies on sad films and sad music. However, poetry and aesthetic evaluations of joyful and sad poetry have received only little attention in empirical studies to date. We collected beauty and liking ratings for 24 sad and 24 joyful poems from 128 participants. Following previous studies, we computed an integrated measure for overall aesthetic appreciation based on the beauty and liking ratings to test for differences in appreciation between joyful and sad poems. Further, we tested whether readers' judgments are related to their affinity for poetry. Results show that sad poems are rated significantly higher for aesthetic appreciation than joyful poems, and that aesthetic appreciation is influenced by the participants' affinity for poetry. PMID:28119649

  11. The artful mind: sexual selection and an evolutionary neurobiological approach to aesthetic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Based on functional imaging of beauty appreciation in art and of beautiful faces, a heuristic model is presented that proposes that beauty appreciation in art is based on a sexual selection mechanism that led to the preference of beautiful faces. Beauty is linked to sexual selection as a sign of fitness. Beautiful traits, like the peacock's tail, are costly and thereby signal superior genetic quality. Mechanistically, beauty is a construct of the brain that links positive feedback of the reward system with hedonic experience, namely pleasure, which itself might be encoded in the orbito-frontal cortex. The context determines whether a stimulus should lead to further approach or withdrawal in order to maintain a hedonic homeostasis. The fact that aesthetic appreciation of art uses the same circuitry as the aesthetic appreciation of faces suggests that there is no special art circuitry in the brain, but that available networks are used for aesthetic appreciation of art.

  12. Body appreciation, sexual relationship status, and protective sexual behaviors in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Virginia Ramseyer; Satinsky, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between body appreciation and sexual risk reduction behavior in women is under-explored. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between body appreciation, male condom use, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing among a community-based sample of women (n=285). Logistic regression results revealed that after controlling for age, BMI, and sexual orientation, having more than one sexual partner moderated body appreciation and current male condom use (OR=4.21, pwomen with higher body appreciation may be more likely to engage in some protective sexual health behaviors. Interventions that seek to improve body appreciation instead of body size change such as weight loss or gain may encourage certain protective sexual behaviors in women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-compassion as a mediator between attachment anxiety and body appreciation: An exploratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Piontkowski, Sarah; Hui, Kayi; Ziemer, Kathryn Schaefer; Garriott, Patton O

    2016-12-01

    Body appreciation has been found to be linked to interpersonal and intrapersonal factors, with attachment styles and self-compassion separately identified as important correlates. The present study examined these variables together in a model, and we hypothesized that maternal attachment anxiety was related to peer and romantic attachment anxiety, which, in turn, was associated with self-compassion and body appreciation. Using structural equation modeling, this cross-sectional study with a sample of 1306 incoming first year college women found that the proposed model explained 40% of the variance in body appreciation. Results further revealed that peer and romantic attachment anxiety mediated the relationships between maternal attachment anxiety and self-compassion, and that self-compassion mediated the associations between peer and romantic attachment anxiety and body appreciation. Self-compassion appears to hold a central role in explaining the relation between attachment anxiety and body appreciation.

  14. 77 FR 33595 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... piece of American culture, music offers a vibrant soundtrack to the story of our people and our Union... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8832 of June 1, 2012 African-American Music... universal truths of our shared humanity. African-American musicians have left an indelible mark on...

  15. A Stylistic Appreciation of William Wordsworth's The Solitary Reaper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡园媛

    2009-01-01

    This paper, based on the literary stylistic approach, is about the analysis of William Wordsworth's lyrics The Solitary Reaper. The features in its metrics, lexis and imagery explicitly reveal the poet's love for human, passion for nature and principle of simplicity.

  16. 让心理资本获得最大升值:管理心理学在能源资源企业人力资源管理中的应用%Let psychological capital appreciate to the greatest extent:Management psychology’s application in human resources management of energy and resources companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王闻

    2014-01-01

    管理心理学的研究对象主要是“人”以及其内外部环境,在人力资源管理中具有重要作用。当前,能源资源企业经过改革之后,仍要面对如何深入改善组织结构和领导效能,提高组织绩效的问题,具体来说就是如何运用管理心理学来进行人力资源管理的问题。本文从6个方面对管理心理学在能源资源企业中的应用进行了论述,包括制定人力资源发展规划;用管理心理学的方法进行员工招聘与选拔;对员工进行心理学培训;从管理心理学角度进行薪酬管理;从管理心理学角度进行绩效管理改革;建立和谐的劳动关系等。这些现代管理知识和手段能够为提升能源资源企业人力资源管理的服务质量提供理论依据和借鉴。%The management psychology is mainly to study human beings and its internal environment , which plays an important role in human resources management .At present ,after the reform ,the energy and resources companies still have to face with the problems such as how to deeply improve the organization structure ,the efficiency and ability of leaders ,and enhance the performance of the organization ,specifically speaking ,to face with how to apply management psychology to carry out human resources management .The thesis aims to discuss the application of management psychology in energy and resources companies from 6 aspects ,including to draw up human resources development plan ;to recruit and select staff by management psychology method ;to carry out employee psychological training ;to manage salary from management psychology aspect ;to launch performance reform from management psychology aspect ;to establish harmonious labor relationship .These modern management knowledge and methods can provide theoretical basis and references for improving the services and quality of human resources management in energy and resources companies .

  17. The how and why of societal publications for citizen science projects and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Arnold J. H.; Bron, Wichertje A.; Mulder, Sara

    2014-05-01

    In the scientific community, the importance of communication to society is often underestimated. Scientists and scientific organisations often lack the skills to organise such communication effectively. The Dutch citizen science phenology network Nature's Calendar has been successful in communicating to the general public via numerous newspaper articles, television appearances, presentations, websites and social media. We refer to these publications as societal publications. Due to active communication to mass media, we frequently reach millions of people. This communication helped us to involve thousands of volunteers in recording the timing of phenological events like the start of flowering, leaf unfolding and bird migration, but also several health-related events like hay fever symptoms and tick bites. In this paper, we analyse and present our experiences with the Nature's Calendar project regarding societal publications. Based on this analysis, we explain the importance of societal publications for citizen science projects and scientists in general, and we show how scientists can increase the newsworthiness of scientific information and what factors and activities can increase the chances of media paying attention to this news. We show that societal publications help phenological networks by facilitating the recruitment, retention and instruction of observers. Furthermore, they stimulate the generation of new ideas and partners that lead to an increase in knowledge, awareness and behavioural change of the general public or specific stakeholders. They make projects, and scientists involved, better known to the public and increase their credibility and authority. Societal publications can catalyse the production of new publications, thereby enforcing the previous mentioned points.

  18. Ecosystem services in coupled social-ecological systems: Closing the cycle of service provision and societal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassl, Michael; Löffler, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Both the 'cascade model' of ecosystem service provision and the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response framework individually contribute to the understanding of human-nature interactions in social-ecological systems (SES). Yet, as several points of criticism show, they are limited analytical tools when it comes to reproducing complex cause-effect relationships in such systems. However, in this paper, we point out that by merging the two models, they can mutually enhance their comprehensiveness and overcome their individual conceptual deficits. Therefore we closed a cycle of ecosystem service provision and societal feedback by rethinking and reassembling the core elements of both models. That way, we established a causal sequence apt to describe the causes of change to SES, their effects and their consequences. Finally, to illustrate its functioning we exemplified and discussed our approach based on a case study conducted in the Alpujarra de la Sierra in southern Spain.

  19. Merging Field Measurements and High Resolution Modeling to Predict Possible Societal Impacts of Permafrost Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Nicolsky, D.; Marchenko, S. S.; Cable, W.; Panda, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    A general warming trend in permafrost temperatures has triggered permafrost degradation in Alaska, especially at locations influenced by human activities. Various phenomena related to permafrost degradation are already commonly observed, including increased rates of coastal and riverbank erosion, increased occurrences of retrogressive thaw slumps and active layer detachment slides, and the disappearance of tundra lakes. The combination of thawing permafrost and erosion is damaging local community infrastructure such as buildings, roads, airports, pipelines, water and sanitation facilities, and communication systems. The potential scale of direct ecological and economical damage due to degrading permafrost has just begun to be recognized. While the projected changes in permafrost are generally available on global and regional scales, these projections cannot be effectively employed to estimate the societal impacts because of their coarse resolution. Intrinsic problems with the classical "spatial grid" approach in spatially distributed modeling applications preclude the use of this modeling approach to solve the above stated problem. Two types of models can be used to study permafrost dynamics in this case. One approach is a site-specific application of the GIPL2.0 permafrost model and another is a very high (tens to hundred meter) resolution spatially distributed version of the same model. The results of properly organized field measurements are also needed to calibrate and validate these models for specific locations and areas of interest. We are currently developing a "landscape unit" approach that allows practically unlimited spatial resolution of the modeling products. Classification of the study area into particular "landscape units" should be performed in accordance with the main factors controlling the expression of climate on permafrost in the study area, typically things such as vegetation, hydrology, soil properties, topography, etc. In areas with little

  20. Systemic vasculitis: how little we know about their societal and economic burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieste, Leopoldo; Palla, Ilaria; Baldini, Chiara; Talarico, Rosaria; D'Angiolella, Lucia; Mosca, Marta; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to perform an evaluation of the state of the art of the economic and societal burden of systemic vasculitis (VAs). Due to the rarity of these diseases and their variable clinical picture, few data are available in the literature on their health economic issues, and only some papers have been published that marginally examine the problem. Since VAs are severe conditions with a high medical and societal impact and determine high healthcare resource consumption, studies able to define societal, quality of life and economic burden of these pathologies are needed. Policy makers, private and public organisations involved in the care of VAs need data to programme future investment or make cost-effectiveness analysis for introducing new drugs or protocols.

  1. A Process Towards Societal Value within a Community-Based Regional Development Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Åslund

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Processes, activities and tasks of a community-based area development project are described. The main process has been used three times and a model is presented. An earlier developed process map has been verified. The description of the project can help other communities to plan development projects. The illustration can be valuable for entrepreneurs who are planning a societal value initiative and for decision-makers and stakeholders who can contribute to, are concerned with, or may be affected by societal entrepreneurship. Observation, participating studies, dokumentations and an interview with the project leader has been carried out. Data have been analyzed and compared with the previously developed process map to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes within societal entrepreneurship. The purpose was to study and describe the processes of a community-based area development project and to compare it with a previously developed process map and to verify the process map.

  2. Using Correlation Adaptometry Method in Assessing Societal Stress: a Ukrainian Case

    CERN Document Server

    Rybnikov, Svyatoslav

    2012-01-01

    Societal stress may cause far reaching political, economic and even geological effects. Nevertheless, it is still scarcely investigated, contrary to social stress, which an individual faces in their interactions within a society. It is natural to suppose that in its adaptation, society demonstrates the same objective laws that biological population does, since they are, in fact, the closest systems. In the survey, the hypothesis is tested that the collective stress effect holds true in society, which must appear (as it happens according to correlation adaptometry method in biological systems) in escalation of both correlations between societal characteristics and their dispersion. Both tends are observed in Ukrainian society during 2009-2012, as a result of political elections that affect societal anxiety.

  3. Le identità deboli e la perdita del Padre nella società occidentale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Baratta

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Scopo di questo contributo è analizzare le problematiche della formazione di identità nella società contemporanea, problematiche trasversali, che riguardano la costruzione del sé, le reti di relazioni che si determinano in una società complessa e i contesti anche virtuali che in essa si costruiscono. Identità caratterizzate da alta volatilità e perciò deboli, identità che non danno senso alla vita, perché dipendono da stili di vita temporanei, difficilmente sequenziabili. L'articolo propone una rilettura di Pareto e di Gehlen, testi di Risè e Prandstraller hanno permesso di definire meglio la dimensione qualitativa delle identità deboli. L'affievolirsi della figura paterna, nella società contemporanea, sia essa postindustriale, postmoderna, neomoderna è una ragione evidente della formazione di identità deboli.

  4. Minimal intervention prosthodontics: current knowledge and societal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowley, John

    2002-01-01

    Minimal intervention prosthodontics can be considered a treatment option for a country's overall dental health care plan. Prosthodontics can cover a range of increasingly aggressive treatment interventions depending on the severity and progression of the disease. The 'shortened dental arch' concept is a minimal treatment intervention approach that has been advocated for a wide range of partially edentulous patients. This concept favors limited prosthodontic intervention to achieve patient-perceived acceptable function levels in the presence of multiple missing teeth. The implementation of minimal interventions should be balanced by considering risk-to-benefit ratios, as well as the consequences of nonintervention of low-level prosthodontic interventions. The 'nonintervention' approach and low-level prosthodontic interventions have inherent consequences and well-documented risks; professional ethics dictate that a practitioner present these risks as well as the known benefits of all treatment options. Developing countries are under significant pressure to effectively utilize limited resources, increase skilled human resources, provide advanced levels of care to very large numbers of patients and plan for the future dental health care of their society. Many developing countries are prime candidates for inadvertent abuse and misappropriation of prosthodontic materials, treatment modalities and human resources in trying to provide cost-effective prosthodontic care. A developing country can learn from the mistakes that developed countries have made in the past and use the evidence from these experiences to plan for a better future state of dental health for their society.

  5. Remotely Sensed Nightlights to Map Societal Exposure to Hydrometeorological Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Jane Soto Gómez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study used remotely sensed maps of nightlights to investigate the etiology of increasing disaster losses from hydrometeorological hazards in a data-scarce area. We explored trends in the probability of occurrence of hazardous events (extreme rainfall and exposure of the local population as components of risk. The temporal variation of the spatial distribution of exposure to hydrometeorological hazards was studied using nightlight satellite imagery as a proxy. Temporal (yearly and spatial (1 km resolution make them more useful than official census data. Additionally, satellite nightlights can track informal (unofficial human settlements. The study focused on the Samala River catchment in Guatemala. The analyses of disasters, using DesInventar Disaster Information Management System data, showed that fatalities caused by hydrometeorological events have increased. Such an increase in disaster losses can be explained by trends in both: (i catchment conditions that tend to lead to more frequent hydrometeorological extremes (more frequent occurrence of days with wet conditions; and (ii increasing human exposure to hazardous events (as observed by amount and intensity of nightlights in areas close to rivers. Our study shows the value of remote sensing data and provides a framework to explore the dynamics of disaster risk when ground data are spatially and temporally limited.

  6. The protective role of body appreciation against media-induced body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the protective role of positive body image against negative effects produced by viewing thin-idealised media. University women (N=68) completed trait measures of body appreciation and media protective strategies. At a subsequent session, participants viewed 11 thin-ideal advertisements. Body dissatisfaction was assessed before and after advertisement exposure, and state measures of self-objectification, appearance comparison, and media protective strategies were completed. Results indicated that body appreciation predicted less change in body dissatisfaction following exposure, such that participants with low body appreciation experienced increased body dissatisfaction, while those with high body appreciation did not. Although state appearance comparison predicted increased body dissatisfaction, neither state self-objectification nor appearance comparison accounted for body appreciation's protective effect. Trait and state media protective strategies positively correlated with body appreciation, but also did not account for body appreciation's protective effect. The results point to intervention targets and highlight future research directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dalla società disciplinare alla società di mercato: Appunti semiotici sull’immagine del lavoro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Coratelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I propose a semiotic investigation of images of jobs. The aim is not to analyze the social representation of the job, but to explore if there remains a present-day image of the job, and what are its historical and social conditions of existence. The problem is to study the relation between social structure and the image of the job. First, following Foucault’s studies on disciplinary society, the relation between disciplinary society and the image of labour in the factory will be described. This is followed by an account of the problematic passage from disciplinary society to what Deleuze called a “society of control”. Giving particular consideration to Foucault’s theory of power/knowledge relations and Deleuze’s semiotic reading of this theory,the new social organization of jobs, activities and times will be investigated. Social structure is changing from disciplinary and striated space, such as the space of the factory, to the smooth space of dispersion, like the space of the market. The image of the job changes from the image of the workforce to the image of human capital. Finally, rethinking Foucault’s lectures on biopolitics, the relation between the market and hu- man capital will be analyzed. My hypothesis is that it is not possible to have an image of the job as human capital in the present: the concept of human capital coincides with the human being and its capability, but there is no longer any specific space for the market, given that the market permeates every space of life.

  8. Societal Norms Rather Than Sexual Orientation Influence Kin Altruism and Avuncularity in Tribal Urak-Lawoi, Italian, and Spanish Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Liotta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Homosexual males could balance their low fitness by increasing benefits to relatives either through kin-directed altruism or by avuncularity (altruistic behavior toward the children of siblings). Evidence in support of kin selection and avuncularity includes the fact that homosexuals seem to be more empathic and altruistic than heterosexuals. Other studies have not confirmed behaviors that increase kin altruism in homosexuals. We explored altruistic behavior and avuncularity in a sample of 278 subjects, either homosexual or heterosexual, from three populations: Italian, Spanish, and Urak-Lawoi, a Southeast Asian tribal population. Among the Urak-Lawoi, the kathoeys, androphilic men who dress and behave as women, were compared with heterosexuals. All populations were rated for societal norms on the expression of affiliative behavior. No greater kin altruism or avuncularity among the kathoeys or in homosexuals in either Mediterranean population was found. Greater avuncularity and kin-directed altruism, independent of sexual orientation, were found among the Urak-Lawoi, and these traits were the least prevalent among the Italians, corresponding to different societal norms. The increase in kin altruism and avuncularity was associated in all males with societal differences and norms on general altruism toward nonkin children, suggesting it is not an adaptive design to maintain homosexuality in humans.

  9. Traditions and Transitions in Quantitative Societal Culture Research in Organization Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Mark, F.; Søndergaard, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative societal culture research (QSCR) in organization studies crystallizes a configuration of social science perspectives and methods that became prominent in the 1970s. We consider the qualities of and boundaries around cultural groups that this tradition emphasizes, and other...... characteristics of cultural groups that it does not emphasize. Current debates surrounding this tradition reflect both recent social science innovations and rediscoveries of early social science perspectives. Our analysis of quantitative cross-cultural societal research in organization studies considers...... this process of crystallization, innovation and rediscovery. We suggest ways to address current controversies and promote conversations with other research approaches....

  10. Libertà religiosa e società multiculturali: il caso del velo islamico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Fiorita

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Contributo destinato alla pubblicazione negli Atti del Convegno “La libertà di manifestazione del pensiero e la libertà religiosa nelle società multiculturali” svoltosi presso la Facoltà di Scienze Politiche dell’Università della Calabria (7 Aprile 2008. SOMMARIO: 1. Il velo islamico: un simbolo religioso? – 2. Il velo islamico e gli ordinamenti giuridici europei – 3. Il velo islamico e l’ordinamento giuridico italiano – 4. Oltre il velo: appunti e suggerimenti per società plurali in cerca di percorsi praticabili.

  11. Frabboni F. (2005, Società della conoscenza e scuola, Trento, Erickson.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella D'Ugo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Guardandoci intorno appare ormai lampante anche ad un occhio poco attento che siamo immersi in una società complessa e in transizione. Una società in cui le superpotenze economiche dominano grazie ad un monopolio colonialistico che si fa strada noncurante di quella metà della terra relegata a vivere con pochi euro al giorno: siamo all’orrore economico, all’orrore di paesi sempre più ricchi a scapito di paesi sempre più poveri. In questo quadro i compiti della pedagogia risultano di notevole importanza.

  12. A psycho-societal perspective on neoliberal welfare services in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a psycho-societal approach to the micro-processes of Danish neoliberal welfare services, elaborating a learning and identity perspective. My many years of encounters with professionals in welfare services have illuminated how they display a strong identification with...... of neoliberal policies and practices has dominated the Danish welfare sector. By applying a psycho-societal conceptual approach - illustrated by an empirical example - I sketch out how identification, ambivalence and defence are significant features of welfare service professionals’ learning and practices...

  13. Emergent Societal Effects of Crimino-Social Forces in an Animat Agent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogings, Chris J.; Hawick, Ken A.

    Societal behaviour can be studied at a causal level by perturbing a stable multi-agent model with new microscopic behaviours and observing the statistical response over an ensemble of simulated model systems. We report on the effects of introducing criminal and law-enforcing behaviours into a large scale animat agent model and describe the complex spatial agent patterns and population changes that result. Our well-established predator-prey substrate model provides a background framework against which these new microscopic behaviours can be trialled and investigated. We describe some quantitative results and some surprising conclusions concerning the overall societal health when individually anti-social behaviour is introduced.

  14. Modulating societal acceptance in new energy projects: Towards a toolkit methodology for project managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, R.P.J.M.; Mourik, R.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, Policy Studies Unit, P.O. Box 56890, 1040 AW, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre, P.O. Box 5, 00532 Helsinki (Finland)

    2009-05-15

    In this paper we discuss the results of the Create Acceptance project. In a comparative analysis of 27 case studies on new energy projects we identify five crucial challenges for project managers of new energy projects related to societal acceptance. We discuss a six-step methodology for facilitating societal acceptance in new and ongoing energy projects. The methodology is tested and refined in five demonstration projects in Europe to test its usability. The experiences with the methodology are positive, but several issues are identified for further improvement. (author)

  15. Modulating societal acceptance in new energy projects. Towards a toolkit methodology for project managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, R.P.J.M.; Mourik, R.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-10-15

    In this paper we discuss the results of the Create Acceptance project. In a comparative analysis of 27 case studies on new energy projects we identify five crucial challenges for project managers of new energy projects related to societal acceptance. We discuss a six-step methodology for facilitating societal acceptance in new and ongoing energy projects. The methodology is tested and refined in five demonstration projects in Europe to test its usability. The experiences with the methodology are positive, but several issues are identified for further improvement.

  16. Geological mapping goes 3-D in response to societal needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorleifson, H.; Berg, R.C.; Russell, H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to 3-D mapping has been made possible by technological advances in digital cartography, GIS, data storage, analysis, and visualization. Despite various challenges, technological advancements facilitated a gradual transition from 2-D maps to 2.5-D draped maps to 3-D geological mapping, supported by digital spatial and relational databases that can be interrogated horizontally or vertically and viewed interactively. Challenges associated with data collection, human resources, and information management are daunting due to their resource and training requirements. The exchange of strategies at the workshops has highlighted the use of basin analysis to develop a process-based predictive knowledge framework that facilitates data integration. Three-dimensional geological information meets a public demand that fills in the blanks left by conventional 2-D mapping. Two-dimensional mapping will, however, remain the standard method for extensive areas of complex geology, particularly where deformed igneous and metamorphic rocks defy attempts at 3-D depiction.

  17. Appreciation, Use, and Management of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in California's Working Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Ferranto, Shasta; Huntsinger, Lynn; Kelly, Maggi; Getz, Christy

    2012-09-01

    "Working landscapes" is the concept of fostering effective ecosystem stewardship and conservation through active human presence and management and integrating livestock, crop, and timber production with the provision of a broad range of ecosystem services at the landscape scale. Based on a statewide survey of private landowners of "working" forests and rangelands in California, we investigated whether owners who are engaged in commercial livestock or timber production appreciate and manage biodiversity and ecosystem services on their land in different ways than purely residential owners. Both specific uses and management practices, as well as underlying attitudes and motivations toward biodiversity and ecosystem services, were assessed. Correlation analysis showed one bundle of ecosystem goods and services (e.g., livestock, timber, crops, and housing) that is supported by some landowners at the community level. Another closely correlated bundle of biodiversity and ecosystem services includes recreation, hunting/fishing, wildlife habitat, and fire prevention. Producers were more likely to ally with the first bundle and residential owners with the second. The survey further confirmed that cultural ecosystem services and quality-of-life aspects are among the primary amenities that motivate forest and rangeland ownership regardless of ownership type. To live near natural beauty was the most important motive for both landowner groups. Producers were much more active in management for habitat improvement and other environmental goals than residential owners. As the number of production-oriented owners decreases, developing strategies for encouraging environment-positive management by all types of landowners is crucial.

  18. Assessing multi-disciplinary Earth observation impacts on societal benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, J.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary interactions are becoming more important as demands for science-driven information needed for decision-making are increasing. Further development of systems to improve the scientific understanding of Earth's system and its response to natural or human-induced changes are required to meet this need. These would facilitate modeling and analyses in many critical areas such as climate prediction, food security, water availability and ecosystem sustainability among others. It is intuitive that better information will have a positive impact on decision outcomes. Yet this is difficult to quantitate. The impacts of multi-disciplinary work are particularly difficult to assess, yet it is hard to predict climate change without considering oceans, land use and many other Earth system characteristics. There are several steps that are important to quantitate the benefits. Some of these have been discussed at IIASA, RFI and other centers of excellence in this area. The key is to establish a program with metrics, a community of practice to propagate the metrics and clear case studies that will demonstrate effectiveness. A workshop was held to set the foundations for this approach and recommendations from a team of global experts are evolving into a program. This presentation discusses the indicators and metrics, examines their efficacy and looks at a case study to assess and validate the development.

  19. Area of media-political text as method of the appreciating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В А Марьянчик

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article was considered area as the global category, realisating appreciating potential in media-political text. There is analyzing simulative function of the media-text and it's influence on the addressee's world picture.

  20. On the benefits of nominal appreciations: Contrasting evidence across developed and developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Kandil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies determinants of flexibility of the nominal effective exchange rate and the effects of exchange rate shocks on macroeconomic variables and key components of the external balances using data for a sample of advanced and developing countries. The composite evidence points to the positive effects of appreciation through cheaper imports in support of higher growth and lower price inflation in advanced and developing countries. However, the negative effects of appreciation are more pervasive on the external balances in developing countries. The implication is developing countries remain highly dependent on exports of commodities. In contrast, advanced countries are more diversified and ahead in capitalizing on currency appreciation to mobilize investment growth, a channel that boosts competitiveness and mitigates the adverse effect of appreciation on external stability. The evidence attests to the need to create an environment that is more conducive to investment growth in developing countries.

  1. Appreciative inquiry for leading in complex systems: supporting the transformation of academic nursing culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Roseanne C; Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Pesut, Daniel J

    2007-07-01

    Increasingly complex environments in which nurse educators must function create distinct challenges for leaders in nursing education. Complexity is found in the presence of knowledge-driven economies, advancements in technology, and the blurring of campus boundaries created by online learning versus traditional classroom education. A dual bureaucracy of faculty and administration coexists in nursing education. The transformation of bureaucratic culture is a strategic challenge for academic leaders who strive to move dichotomous groups toward a collective vision of a preferred future. This article advocates for the affirmative administrative process of appreciative inquiry for academic nursing leadership, in nudging the dual bureaucracy toward transformational change. The intent and characteristics of appreciative inquiry are discussed, appreciative leadership strategies and actions are explained, methods for leading cultural paradigm shift are outlined, and an exemplar of the actualization of appreciative inquiry is presented.

  2. The Appreciation of Marvell's Romantic Feelings in his To His Coy Mistress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦雅

    2002-01-01

    A good appreciation and explanation are given about a classical poem of love:The moving honey phrases and images are used sophisticate dly and the unexpected imaginations add the colourful touches of presentation.

  3. Older people maintaining well-being: an International Appreciative Inquiry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jan; Richardson, Elsie; Marais, Sandra; Moyle, Wendy

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on the progress of an international study investigating older people's strategies for maintaining well-being in the UK, Germany, South Africa and Australia. It uses an Appreciative Inquiry framework for investigation.

  4. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shen, Tongye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynch, Rebecca M [NON LANL; Derdeyn, Cynthia A [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  5. Gender differences in the neural underpinning of perceiving and appreciating the beauty of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Valentina; Mele, Sonia; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2014-05-01

    Although previous studies have suggested a certain degree of right hemisphere dominance for the response of extrastriate body area (EBA) during body perception, recent evidence suggests that this functional lateralization may differ between men and women. It is unknown, however, whether and how gender differences in body perception affect appreciating the beauty of the body of conspecifics. Here, we applied five 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) pulses over left and right EBA and over the vertex to investigate the contribution of visual body representations in the two hemispheres on esthetic body perception. Female and male healthy volunteers were requested to judge how much they liked opposite- and same-gender virtual model bodies or to judge their weight, thus allowing us to compare the effects of right- and left-EBA rTMS on esthetic (liking) and perceptual (weight) judgments of human bodies. The analysis of the esthetic judgments provided by women revealed that right-EBA rTMS increased the liking judgments of opposite- but not same-gender models, as compared to both vertex and left EBA stimulation. Conversely, in men the liking judgments of opposite-gender models decreased after virtual disruption of both right and left EBA as compared to vertex stimulation. Crucially, no significant effect was found for the perceptual task, showing that left- and right-EBA rTMS did not affect weight perception. Our results provide evidence of gender difference in the hemispheric asymmetry of EBA in the esthetic processing of human bodies, with women showing stronger right hemisphere dominance in comparison with men.

  6. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark (Danish original version)

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of sci...

  7. Inverse J-curve of RMB Appreciation:China Versus America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕晶菁

    2013-01-01

    This is a research report of the study on the inverse J-curve effect of RMB appreciation based on the empirical analysis of trading data between China and America during 1994-2012.This report uses the Marshall-Lerner conditions on J-curve effect explanation,and theoretically analyzes the inverse J-curve effect.Through empirical analysis, that reveals the empirical results exist the ‘inverse J-curve effect’ in the process of Chinese Yuan appreciation.

  8. Values and strategies of literary aesthetic appreciation in college English teaching in Chinese campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen; Guo, Yingjie

    2012-01-01

    Literary aesthetic appreciation is an indispensable part of college English teaching. As an important content of aesthetic education as well as one of the basic qualities of the compound-type foreign language learners, literary aesthetic appreciation is also an essential part of the college teaching innovation, curriculum construction and training objectives. In the course of students' acquiring aesthetic knowledge, college English teachers need to combine moral education and highlight the va...

  9. Enhancing patient safety: improving the patient handoff process through appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell-Falik, Nancy; Feinson, Michael; Mohr, Bernard J

    2007-02-01

    Patient transfers from one care giver to another are an area of high safety consequence, as is evident by many studies and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's Patient Safety Goals. The authors describe how one hospital made measurable improvements in a patient handoff process by using an unconventional approach to change called appreciative inquiry. Rather than identifying the root causes of ineffective handoffs, appreciative inquiry was used to engage staff in identifying and building on their most effective handoff experiences.

  10. Leveraging Appreciative Intelligence for Positive Enactment in Times of Uncertainty: A Case Study of a Small Investment Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan S. Case

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: How do we develop a complex understanding of markets and environments? Are markets and environments concrete entities that exist “out there” or are they socially constructed by human imagination and intentional language use? Approach: Using a case study approach, the interactions in a small investment firm were analyzed to bring to surface the complex relationship among markets, enactment and learning, often from ambiguous events in unstable environments. Weick’s framework of enactment and components of appreciative intelligence theory are used to explicate how the CEO of a small investment firm engages in intentional conversations and dialogue to reduce cognitive dissonance brought about by fast changing and often conflicting financial data and creates new opportunities. Results: Using Weick’s notion of enactment, we showed that managers often create their environments through cycles of perceptions and action whereby perceptions of the environment leads to particular actions and choices by organizations. Such a process made use of two of the three components of appreciative intelligence: reframing to recognize opportunities and engaging in actions to bring the new possibility to fruition. Conclusion: The case study showed that enactment and several components of strategic management use the same processes and that an opportunity existed to develop an integrated model between the two perspectives. Results indicated that strategic actions were meaning-laden stimuli that feed selective information to decision makers about market uncertainty. The case study of the investment firm also revealed how the two components of appreciative intelligence, reframing to recognize opportunities and bringing the future to the present, help managers under high stress who operate in fast paced environments make innovative use of ambiguous data and produce positive outcomes.

  11. Learning about the Earth through Societally-relevant Interdisciplinary Research Projects: the Honours Integrated Science Program at McMaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, C.; Symons, S. L.; Harvey, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Students in the Honours Integrated Science (iSci) program at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) learn about the Earth through interdisciplinary research projects that focus on important societal issues. The iSci program is a new and innovative undergraduate program that emphasizes the links between scientific disciplines and focuses on learning through research and the development of scientific communication skills. The program accepts up to 60 students each year and is taught by a team of 18 instructors comprising senior and junior faculty, post-doctoral fellows, a lab coordinator, instructional assistant, a librarian and library staff, and an administrator. The program is designed around a pedagogical model that emphasizes hands-on learning through interdisciplinary research (Research-based Integrated Education: RIE) and is mostly project-based and experiential. In their freshman year students learn fundamental Earth science concepts (in conjunction with chemistry, physics, mathematics and biology) through research projects focused on environmental contamination, interplanetary exploration, the effect of drugs on the human body and environment, sustainable energy, and cancer. In subsequent years they conduct research on topics such as the History of the Earth, Thermodynamics, Plant-Animal Interactions, Wine Science, Forensics, and Climate Change. The iSci program attracts students with a broad interest in science and has been particularly effective in directing high quality students into the Earth sciences as they are introduced to the discipline in their first year of study through research projects that are interesting and stimulating. The structure of the iSci program encourages consideration of geoscientific applications in a broad range of societally relevant research projects; these projects are reviewed and modified each year to ensure their currency and ability to meet program learning objectives.

  12. APPLICATION OF BEST AVAILABLE SCIENCE TO SOCIETAL DECISIONS: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION BASED ON BEST AVAILABLE SCIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MOGHISSI, A ALAN; LOVE, BETTY R; STRAJA, SORIN R

    2007-06-30

    This grant covered several areas of significant societal interest. It included an evaluation of the validity of scientific claims; developed an approach for stakeholder participation; and demonstrated the validity of the developed methods through the performance of a number of independent peer reviews.

  13. Education, Technology and Connectedness. Global Societal Trends to 2030: Thematic Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Veronika; Ghez, Jeremy; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Yaqub, Ohid

    2015-01-01

    This Research Report forms part of our series on global societal trends and their impact on the EU in 2030. This analysis is embedded within the framework of the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS) set up to develop a lasting framework to assess global trends and to develop policy responses across EU institutions over the next…

  14. Sickness absence due to mental health disorders-a societal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C. A. M.; van Rhenen, W.; Koopmans, P. C.; Bultmann, U.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Klink, J. J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickness absence (SA) is affected by societal factors. Increasing socioeconomic stress may cause or worsen mental health disorders, which are among the most frequent causes of SA. Employees may also be more cautious about being absent, for example in times of poor economy. Aims To monitor

  15. Report on Current Praxis of Policies and Activities Supporting Societal Engagement in Research and Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, Rainer; Mbungu, Grace; Anderson, Edward; Chonkova, Blagovesta; Damianova, Zoya; Davis, Houda; Dencker, Siri; Jørgensen, Marie-Louise; Kozarev, Ventseslav; Larsen, Gy; Mulder, Henk; Pfersdorf, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the “Engage2020 Project” 1 is to promote the use of engagement methods and policies that support societal engagement in research and innovation by mapping what is practiced and spreading awareness of the opportunities amongst researchers, policy makers, and other interested parties. The

  16. Societal transformations in the face of climate. Research priorities for the next decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, P.J.; Behagel, J.H.; Hegger, D.; Mees, H.; Rijswick, M.; Termeer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change Creates new challenges for the global society. Responding to climate change is a complex process of societal transformations that should be studied as such. The contribution of the social sciences is crucial to the understanding of these processes of change. The growing body of knowle

  17. 76 FR 70971 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Societal Response to Tornado Warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Response to Tornado Warnings AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice... examine the societal impacts of tornado warnings, specifically the methods of receipt, response, and the... Following a particularly deadly year of tornadoes in the United States despite the existence of adequate...

  18. Personal Values and Attitudes towards Societal and Environmental Accountability: A Study of MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Asit

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to promote corporate societal and environmental accountability (SEA) should be informed by an understanding of stakeholders' attitudes toward enhanced accountability standards. However, little is known regarding current attitudes on this subject or the determinants of these attitudes. To address this issue, this study examines the…

  19. Personal Values and Attitudes towards Societal and Environmental Accountability: A Study of MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Asit

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to promote corporate societal and environmental accountability (SEA) should be informed by an understanding of stakeholders' attitudes toward enhanced accountability standards. However, little is known regarding current attitudes on this subject or the determinants of these attitudes. To address this issue, this study examines the…

  20. Report on Current Praxis of Policies and Activities Supporting Societal Engagement in Research and Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, Rainer; Mbungu, Grace; Anderson, Edward; Chonkova, Blagovesta; Damianova, Zoya; Davis, Houda; Dencker, Siri; Jørgensen, Marie-Louise; Kozarev, Ventseslav; Larsen, Gy; Mulder, Henk; Pfersdorf, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the “Engage2020 Project” 1 is to promote the use of engagement methods and policies that support societal engagement in research and innovation by mapping what is practiced and spreading awareness of the opportunities amongst researchers, policy makers, and other interested parties. The p

  1. Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.F.; Van de Poel, I.; Osseweijer, P.

    2010-01-01

    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach

  2. Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.F.; Van de Poel, I.; Osseweijer, P.

    2010-01-01

    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach t

  3. Adaptation to extreme weather: identifying different societal perspectives in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasileiadou, E.; Hisschemoller, M.; Petersen, A.C.; Hazeleger, W.; Betgen, C.; Hoog, de I.; Min, E.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity and occurrence of extreme weather events are expected to change with climate change. This change necessitates adaptive responses to extreme events, which need to take into account different societal perspectives, in order to be robust. In this paper, we explore the perspectives of diff

  4. Piecing Together the Puzzle: Development of the Societal Attitudes towards Autism (SATA) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Luci N.; Bulgrin, Amanda; Morgan, Betsy L.

    2013-01-01

    The rise in the prevalence of autism creates a need for a reliable and valid measure of attitudes towards autism. The current study describes the development of a brief 16-item measure of Societal Attitudes towards Autism (SATA) that exhibits sound psychometric properties and has a demonstrated ability to discriminate between expert and general…

  5. From Burdens to Benefits: The Societal Impact of PDL-Enriched, Efficacy-Enhanced Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Steven H.; Glassett, Kelly F.; Rosenlund, David; Copas, Aimee; Huddleston, T. Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Societies continue to absorb increased burdens in cost for helping citizens unable to achieve at optimal levels. Building on past research, we project educational benefits to offset current societal burdens through enhanced educator capabilities. Studies reviewed show participation in a high-impact professional development and learning solution…

  6. Social Cohesion and the Labour Market: Societal Regimes of Civic Attitudes and Labour Market Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeglio, Isabelle; Janmaat, Jan Germen; Mehaut, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the connections between the indicators used in the literature on social cohesion, which usually reflect "general" values or behaviours, and indicators specific to a particular space, namely the labour market. A key question is the stability of the social cohesion's indicators when moving from a societal level to…

  7. Adolescents' Conceptions of National Wealth Distribution: Connections with Perceived Societal Fairness and Academic Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, William F.; Willems, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This study examined mostly lower-middle-income Latino (37%) and African American (33%) adolescents' (N = 90, M[subscript age] = 15.90) conceptions of how U.S. wealth is and ought to be distributed, and whether these judgments are related to adolescents' views about societal and legal fairness and their immediate academic plans. Individually…

  8. Globalisation and Societal Culture: Redefining Schooling and School Leadership in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Walker, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the concept of globalization and explores the relationship between globalization and societal culture. States the transfer between systems must be more culturally sensitive. Offers a list of cultural dimensions to gauge the influence of cultures. Argues that greater cultural sensitivity is necessary when raising issues on school reform…

  9. Media Use and Children's Perceptions of Societal Threat and Personal Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Babyar, Heather M.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined children's media use (i.e., amount of television and Internet usage) and relationships to children's perceptions of societal threat and personal vulnerability. The sample consisted of 90 community youth aged 7 to 13 years (M = 10.8; 52.2% male) from diverse economic backgrounds. Analyses found children's television use to be…

  10. Societal transformations in the face of climate. Research priorities for the next decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, P.J.; Behagel, J.H.; Hegger, D.; Mees, H.; Rijswick, M.; Termeer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change Creates new challenges for the global society. Responding to climate change is a complex process of societal transformations that should be studied as such. The contribution of the social sciences is crucial to the understanding of these processes of change. The growing body of

  11. Local spatial and temporal factors influencing population and societal vulnerability to natural disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Li, Ning; Wu, Wenxiang; Wu, Jidong; Shi, Peijun

    2014-04-01

    The identification of societal vulnerable counties and regions and the factors contributing to social vulnerability are crucial for effective disaster risk management. Significant advances have been made in the study of social vulnerability over the past two decades, but we still know little regarding China's societal vulnerability profiles, especially at the county level. This study investigates the county-level spatial and temporal patterns in social vulnerability in China from 1980 to 2010. Based on China's four most recent population censuses of 2,361 counties and their corresponding socioeconomic data, a social vulnerability index for each county was created using factor analysis. Exploratory spatial data analysis, including global and local autocorrelations, was applied to reveal the spatial patterns of county-level social vulnerability. The results demonstrate that the dynamic characteristics of China's county-level social vulnerability are notably distinct, and the dominant contributors to societal vulnerability for all of the years studied were rural character, development (urbanization), and economic status. The spatial clustering patterns of social vulnerability to natural disasters in China exhibited a gathering-scattering-gathering pattern over time. Further investigations indicate that many counties in the eastern coastal area of China are experiencing a detectable increase in social vulnerability, whereas the societal vulnerability of many counties in the western and northern areas of China has significantly decreased over the past three decades. These findings will provide policymakers with a sound scientific basis for disaster prevention and mitigation decisions.

  12. How firms talk about sustainability and the societal role of business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Kloppenborg

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the language of sustainability in a business context. Based on information excerpted from two Scandinavian firm web sites a closer examination of reasoning and arguing concerning sustainability and the societal role of business is performed. The interpretation...

  13. Dialogue as a tool for societal valorization of environmental and industrial biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, T.A.P.; Schuitmaker, Tjerk Jan; Bitsch, Lise; Betten, W.; de Cock Buning, T.; Broerse, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this project we explored and experimented with how a meaningful dialogue can be operationalized most effectively in the terms of enhancing societal valorisation of environmental and industrial biotechnology. We did so in the context of the Dutch research consortium BE-Basic. The project is co-fun

  14. Measuring societal effects of transdisciplinary research projects: design and application of an evaluation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Alexander I; Helgenberger, Sebastian; Wiek, Arnim; Scholz, Roland W

    2007-11-01

    Most Transdisciplinary Research (TdR) projects combine scientific research with the building of decision making capacity for the involved stakeholders. These projects usually deal with complex, societally relevant, real-world problems. This paper focuses on TdR projects, which integrate the knowledge of researchers and stakeholders in a collaborative transdisciplinary process through structured methods of mutual learning. Previous research on the evaluation of TdR has insufficiently explored the intended effects of transdisciplinary processes on the real world (societal effects). We developed an evaluation framework for assessing the societal effects of transdisciplinary processes. Outputs (measured as procedural and product-related involvement of the stakeholders), impacts (intermediate effects connecting outputs and outcomes) and outcomes (enhanced decision making capacity) are distinguished as three types of societal effects. Our model links outputs and outcomes of transdisciplinary processes via the impacts using a mediating variables approach. We applied this model in an ex post evaluation of a transdisciplinary process. 84 out of 188 agents participated in a survey. The results show significant mediation effects of the two impacts "network building" and "transformation knowledge". These results indicate an influence of a transdisciplinary process on the decision making capacity of stakeholders, especially through social network building and the generation of knowledge relevant for action.

  15. Towards the societal system of innovation: The case of metropolitan areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkeli, S.; Wintjes, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Innovation serves many purposes. In this paper we study new varieties of innovation and innovation policy which address societal challenges in the largest cities in Europe. These metropolitan areas consistently show resounding characteristics in terms of multiplicities of innovation, governance and

  16. Epidemiological characteristics and societal burden of varicella zoster virus in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien G. J.; Gumbs, Pearl D.; Fortanier, Sander A. C.; Van Steenwijk, Pauline C. E.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Varicella and herpes zoster are both caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection or reactivation and may lead to complications associated with a (severe) societal burden. Because the epidemiology of VZV-related diseases in the Netherlands remains largely unknown or incomplete, the m

  17. Sickness absence due to mental health disorders-a societal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C. A. M.; van Rhenen, W.; Koopmans, P. C.; Bultmann, U.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Klink, J. J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickness absence (SA) is affected by societal factors. Increasing socioeconomic stress may cause or worsen mental health disorders, which are among the most frequent causes of SA. Employees may also be more cautious about being absent, for example in times of poor economy. Aims To monitor

  18. Climato-economic livability predicts societal collectivism and political autocracy better than parasitic stress does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vliert, Evert; Postmes, Tom

    2012-04-01

    A 121-nation study of societal collectivism and a 174-nation study of political autocracy show that parasitic stress does not account for any variation in these components of culture once the interactive impacts of climatic demands and income resources have been accounted for. Climato-economic livability is a viable rival explanation for the reported effects of parasitic stress on culture.

  19. Climato-economic livability predicts societal collectivism and political autocracy better than parasitic stress does

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, E.; Postmes, T.

    2012-01-01

    A 121-nation study of societal collectivism and a 174-nation study of political autocracy show that parasitic stress does not account for any variation in these components of culture once the interactive impacts of climatic demands and income resources have been accounted for. Climato-economic livab

  20. Dialogue as a tool for societal valorization of environmental and industrial biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, T.A.P.; Schuitmaker, Tjerk Jan; Bitsch, Lise; Betten, W.; de Cock Buning, T.; Broerse, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this project we explored and experimented with how a meaningful dialogue can be operationalized most effectively in the terms of enhancing societal valorisation of environmental and industrial biotechnology. We did so in the context of the Dutch research consortium BE-Basic. The project is

  1. Teaching Societal and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology to Engineering Students through Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Rosalyn W.; Schummer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Societal and ethical implications of nanotechnology have become a hot topic of public debates in many countries because both revolutionary changes and strong public concerns are expected from its development. Because nanotechnology is, at this point, mostly articulated in visionary and futuristic terms, it is difficult to apply standard methods of…

  2. Factors influencing the societal acceptance of new energy technologies. Meta-analysis of recent European projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poti, B.; Difiore, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy); Brohmann, B.; Daniels, A.; Fritsche, U.; Huenecke, K. [Oeko-Institut, Darmstadt (Germany); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre, Helsinki (Finland); Raven, R.P.J.M.; Mourik, R.; Feenstra, C.F.J.; Willemse, R. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, University of Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [Ecoinstitut Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Farkas, B.; Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Centre MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Jolivet, E. [IAE Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Maack, M.H.; Matschoss, K. [Icelandic New Energy INE, Reykjavik (Iceland); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland); Prasad, G. [Energy Research Centre ERC, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2008-03-15

    Within this report an analysis is made of 27 case studies of historical and recent new energy technologies in different European regions and South Africa. The analysis focuses on the societal acceptance in these projects in order to identify determinants of success and failure. A wide diversity of technologies is discussed including hydrogen, CO2 capture and storage, biomass, solar and wind energy technologies.

  3. Transition management: reflexive governance of societal complexity through searching, learning and experimenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Rotmans (Jan); D.A. Loorbach (Derk)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOur society faces a number of persistent problems whose symptoms are becoming more and more apparent. Persistent problems are complex because they are: deeply embedded in our societal structures; uncertain because of the hardly reducible structural uncertainty they include; difficult to

  4. 76 FR 11437 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Societe Generale Energy Corp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Societe Generale Energy Corp. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery.... (SGEC) has applied for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant... application from the SGEC for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada as...

  5. Societal impacts and vulnerability to floods in Bangladesh and Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir H. Dewan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh and Nepal lie between the Himalayas and low-lying coasts of the Bay of Bengal and are traversed by hundreds of rivers and tributaries. Historical data shows that, since 1970, the scale, intensity and duration of floods have increased in Bangladesh and Nepal, causing grave human suffering; disruptions in normal life and activity, damages of infrastructure, crops and agricultural land with severe impacts on the economy. Bangladesh is affected by torrential rain, glacier melt, upstream water flow and tidal surges. In 1988, Bangladesh experienced one of the most severe floods of the twentieth century which aroused significant concern internationally and triggered the Bangladesh Action Plan for Flood Control. The Government of Bangladesh (GOB has so far constructed a number of flood shelters and carried out 482 water and flood control projects involving flood protection embankments, drainage channels, sluice gates and regulators on different rivers and canals. These also provided safety measures against inundation by tidal waves, storm-surges and flooding. The Terai region of Nepal is highly prone to hydrological risks including torrential rain, floods, glaciers resulting in erosion and landslides. The Government of Nepal (GON has implemented different mitigation measures mainly early warning awareness, rescue measure, relief, and post-flood rehabilitation programs etc. Disaster Management Bureaus of both the countries have already conducted many trainings, workshops and seminars to disseminate scientific knowledge and coping up practices to disaster managers and to create public awareness. Besides the contemporary approaches to mitigating flood effects, people of these countries have coped with floods through generations relying on traditional/indigenous knowledge and other local adaptation practices. It is crucial that along with scientific process, indigenous, traditional and conventional practices are to be integrated for a national

  6. Analysis of Water Conflicts across Natural and Societal Boundaries: Integration of Quantitative Modeling and Qualitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Balaram, P.; Islam, S.

    2009-12-01

    Water issues and problems have bewildered humankind for a long time yet a systematic approach for understanding such issues remain elusive. This is partly because many water-related problems are framed from a contested terrain in which many actors (individuals, communities, businesses, NGOs, states, and countries) compete to protect their own and often conflicting interests. We argue that origin of many water problems may be understood as a dynamic consequence of competition, interconnections, and feedback among variables in the Natural and Societal Systems (NSSs). Within the natural system, we recognize that triple constraints on water- water quantity (Q), water quality (P), and ecosystem (E)- and their interdependencies and feedback may lead to conflicts. Such inherent and multifaceted constraints of the natural water system are exacerbated often at the societal boundaries. Within the societal system, interdependencies and feedback among values and norms (V), economy (C), and governance (G) interact in various ways to create intractable contextual differences. The observation that natural and societal systems are linked is not novel. Our argument here, however, is that rigid disciplinary boundaries between these two domains will not produce solutions to the water problems we are facing today. The knowledge needed to address water problems need to go beyond scientific assessment in which societal variables (C, G, and V) are treated as exogenous or largely ignored, and policy research that does not consider the impact of natural variables (E, P, and Q) and that coupling among them. Consequently, traditional quantitative methods alone are not appropriate to address the dynamics of water conflicts, because we cannot quantify the societal variables and the exact mathematical relationships among the variables are not fully known. On the other hand, conventional qualitative study in societal domain has mainly been in the form of individual case studies and therefore

  7. Are Comic Books an Effective Way to Engage Nonmajors in Learning and Appreciating Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Jay; Boomer, K. B.

    2011-01-01

    Comic books employ a complex interplay of text and images that gives them the potential to effectively convey concepts and motivate student engagement. This makes comics an appealing option for educators trying to improve science literacy about pressing societal issues involving science and technology. Here, we report results from the first…

  8. Are Comic Books an Effective Way to Engage Nonmajors in Learning and Appreciating Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Jay; Boomer, K. B.

    2011-01-01

    Comic books employ a complex interplay of text and images that gives them the potential to effectively convey concepts and motivate student engagement. This makes comics an appealing option for educators trying to improve science literacy about pressing societal issues involving science and technology. Here, we report results from the first…

  9. Model Based Reasoning by Introductory Students When Analyzing Earth Systems and Societal Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, L. N.; Herbert, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how students use their conceptual models to reason about societal challenges involving societal issues such as natural hazard risk assessment, environmental policy and management, and energy resources can improve instructional activity design that directly impacts student motivation and literacy. To address this question, we created four laboratory exercises for an introductory physical geology course at Texas A&M University that engages students in authentic scientific practices by using real world problems and issues that affect societies based on the theory of situated cognition. Our case-study design allows us to investigate the various ways that students utilize model based reasoning to identify and propose solutions to societally relevant issues. In each of the four interventions, approximately 60 students in three sections of introductory physical geology were expected to represent and evaluate scientific data, make evidence-based claims about the data trends, use those claims to express conceptual models, and use their models to analyze societal challenges. Throughout each step of the laboratory exercise students were asked to justify their claims, models, and data representations using evidence and through the use of argumentation with peers. Cognitive apprenticeship was the foundation for instruction used to scaffold students so that in the first exercise they are given a partially completed model and in the last exercise students are asked to generate a conceptual model on their own. Student artifacts, including representation of earth systems, representation of scientific data, verbal and written explanations of models and scientific arguments, and written solutions to specific societal issues or environmental problems surrounding earth systems, were analyzed through the use of a rubric that modeled authentic expertise and students were sorted into three categories. Written artifacts were examined to identify student argumentation and

  10. A societal cost-of-illness study of hemodialysis in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Rana; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Karavetian, Mirey; Salameh, Pascale; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2016-12-01

    Renal failure is a growing public health problem, and is mainly treated by hemodialysis. This study aims to estimate the societal costs of hemodialysis in Lebanon. This was a quantitative, cross-sectional cost-of-illness study conducted alongside the Nutrition Education for Management of Osteodystrophy trial. Costs were assessed with a prevalence-based, bottom-up approach, for the period of June-December 2011. The data of 114 patients recruited from six hospital-based units were collected through a questionnaire measuring healthcare costs, costs to patients and family, and costs in other sectors. Recall data were used for the base-case analysis. Sensitivity analyses employing various sources of resources use and costs were performed. Costs were uprated to 2015US$. Multiple linear regression was conducted to explore the predictors of societal costs. The mean 6-month societal costs were estimated at $9,258.39. The larger part was attributable to healthcare costs (91.7%), while costs to patient and family and costs in other sectors poorly contributed to the total costs (4.2% and 4.1%, respectively). In general, results were robust to sensitivity analyses. Using the maximum value for hospitalization resulted in the biggest difference (+15.5% of the base-case result). Female gender, being widowed/divorced, having hypertension comorbidity, and higher weekly time on dialysis were significantly associated with greater societal costs. Information regarding resource consumption and cost were not readily available. Rather, they were obtained from a variety of sources, with each having its own strengths and limitations. Hemodialysis represents a high societal burden in Lebanon. Using extrapolation, its total annual cost for the Lebanese society is estimated at $61,105,374 and the mean total annual cost ($18,516.7) is 43.70% higher than the gross domestic product per capita forecast for 2015. Measures to reduce the economic burden of hemodialysis should be taken, by promoting

  11. Responses to Environmental & Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth (RESCUE) foresight initiative - towards a European response to grand challenges in sustainability research and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, B.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    The "Responses to Environmental and Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth" (RESCUE; www.esf.org/rescue) foresight initiative - a joint COST-ESF "Frontiers of Science" initiative - aimed to help Europe address the societal and scientific challenges related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues. In RESCUE, the focus of attention was on people and the goal was to stimulate an integrated, innovative response from natural, social and human sciences. The RESCUE foresight initiative began in September 2009 and has recently been completed. RESCUE had the following key objectives: 1. To propose a strategic process for natural, social and human sciences to improve their ability and capacity to work together to address global environmental change through interdisciplinary synergy and to respond effectively to societal and policy-relevant needs; 2. To articulate new scientific issues related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues, especially those of transdisciplinary nature and of major relevance to society; 3. To explore new approaches towards truly integrated, interdisciplinary science, and to facilitate the 'revolution' in education and capacity building it requires. The work of RESCUE focused on the following themes: · Contributions from social sciences and humanities in developing responses to challenges of the Anthropocene; · Collaboration between the natural, social and human sciences in global environmental change and resilience studies; · Requirements for research methodologies and data; · Education and capacity building - towards a 'revolution'; · The interface between science and policy, communication and outreach. The RESCUE recommendations include the following issues to be addressed by science-funders, science policy-makers, researchers, practitioners, educators and a range of other societal actors: · develop an institutional framework for an open knowledge society, · re-organise research so

  12. Ontogeny and pharmacogenetics: determinants of age-associated differences in drug clearance during human development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. Kearns (Greg)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment per se represents a continuum of biologic events that enable adaptation, somatic growth and eventually, reproduction. From a societal, psychosocial, behavioral and medical perspective, it is generally appreciated that infants and children are far different from adults and eld

  13. Electroencephalographic Correlates of Sensorimotor Integration and Embodiment during the Appreciation of Virtual Architectural Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Tieri, Gaetano; Jelic, Andrea; De Matteis, Federico; Maglione, Anton G; Babiloni, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there is the hope that neuroscientific findings will contribute to the improvement of building design in order to create environments which satisfy man's demands. This can be achieved through the understanding of neurophysiological correlates of architectural perception. To this aim, the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals of 12 healthy subjects were recorded during the perception of three immersive virtual reality environments (VEs). Afterwards, participants were asked to describe their experience in terms of Familiarity, Novelty, Comfort, Pleasantness, Arousal, and Presence using a rating scale from 1 to 9. These perceptual dimensions are hypothesized to influence the pattern of cerebral spectral activity, while Presence is used to assess the realism of the virtual stimulation. Hence, the collected scores were used to analyze the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the EEG for each behavioral dimension in the theta, alpha and mu bands by means of time-frequency analysis and topographic statistical maps. Analysis of Presence resulted in the activation of the frontal-midline theta, indicating the involvement of sensorimotor integration mechanisms when subjects expressed to feel more present in the VEs. Similar patterns also characterized the experience of familiar and comfortable VEs. In addition, pleasant VEs increased the theta power across visuomotor circuits and activated the alpha band in areas devoted to visuospatial exploration and processing of categorical spatial relations. Finally, the de-synchronization of the mu rhythm described the perception of pleasant and comfortable VEs, showing the involvement of left motor areas and embodied mechanisms for environment appreciation. Overall, these results show the possibility to measure EEG correlates of architectural perception involving the cerebral circuits of sensorimotor integration, spatial navigation, and embodiment. These observations can help testing architectural hypotheses in order to design

  14. Prostitution in times of economic crisis: effects, human agency and societal responses

    OpenAIRE

    Persak, Nina

    2012-01-01

    In times of economic hardship both formal and informal economy are affected. The paper begins by inspecting the characteristics of the informal economy, some of which may act as disadvantages as well as advantages, addressing prostitution as one type of informal economic activity. Looking at the available data, we then observe in which way and to what extent the current global financial crisis has affected the informal economy, in general, and prostitution, in particular. Next, we examine the...

  15. Between certainty and comprehensiveness in evaluating the societal impact of humanities research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Research evaluation is a tool that can be used for many different purposes, with every different kind trading off comparing and understanding activities and seeking to treat evaluation subjects fairly. Evaluation problems can emerge when an approach that seeks to give one kind of fairness is used

  16. Predicting body appreciation in young women: An integrated model of positive body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-09-01

    This study examined a range of predictors, based on previous theoretical models, of positive body image in young adult women. Participants were 266 women who completed an online questionnaire measuring body appreciation, activity participation, media consumption, perceived body acceptance by others, self-compassion, and autonomy. Potential mechanisms in predicting body appreciation assessed were self-objectification, social appearance comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation. Results indicated that greater perceived body acceptance by others and self-compassion, and lower appearance media consumption, self-objectification, social comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation were related to greater body appreciation. An integrated model showed that appearance media (negatively) and non-appearance media and self-compassion (positively) were associated with lower self-objectification, social comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation, which in turn related to greater body appreciation. Additionally, perceived body acceptance by others was directly associated with body appreciation. The results contribute to an understanding of potential pathways of positive body image development, thereby highlighting possible intervention targets.

  17. An Empirical Study of the Impact of China’s Export Tax Rebates on RMB Appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degong Ma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available While the issue of RMB (Renminbi, Chinese Yuan revaluation became the focus of world attention in 2003, the reform of the RMB exchange rate regime in 2005 didn't fundamentally solve the RMB appreciation problem, and even in 2008 the global financial crisis made RMB appreciation face new challenges and risks. It appears that the rise in RMB value is caused by supply exceeding demand in China's foreign exchange market; however, intrinsically it is due to the asymmetry iWhile the issue of RMB (Renminbi, Chinese Yuan revaluation became the focus of world attention in 2003, the reform of the RMB exchange rate regime in 2005 didn't fundamentally solve the RMB appreciation problem, and even in 2008 the global financial crisis made RMB appreciation face new challenges and risks. It appears that the rise in RMB value is caused by supply exceeding demand in China's foreign exchange market; however, intrinsically it is due to the asymmetry in RMB exchange rate formation mechanism. The export tax rebates policy implemented by Chinese government is one of the leading causes of the asymmetry. This study constructs a transmission model between export tax rebates and foreign exchange rates, and applies the Granger Test to validate the causality between kernel variables based on correlative data from 1994-2011, and uses the error correction method to analyze the quantified relations of kernel variables, and finally gets the contribution rate of export tax rebates to RMB appreciation.

  18. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    In a rural fish pond. lotuses are in full bloom. lotus roots are spreading, ducks are playing, fish are swimming about, and a couple in a boat are happily feeding the fish. This is a scene from the countryside where the painter lives. The composition fills the canvas and is abstract in form. The red background adds jubilation and warmth to the scene.

  19. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Cheng Lei has lived in an artistic environment since childhood. In 1991 she graduated from the Central Institute of Fine Arts in Beijing. She loves, raises and paints cats. Cheng is adept at revealing the beauty and intelligence of felines using light and neutral tones in her watercolors "In my paintings I’m more concerned with expressing my own feelings, my understanding of

  20. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Zhuo Dehui graduated from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts in 1973 with a specialty in lacquer painting, and shortly thereafter began teaching at the school. Zhuo has conducted research and actively created decorative art for many decades, and has often led groups of students deep into the areas inhabited by minority nationalities, The two paintings shown here represent his impressions and depictions of

  1. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Luo Zhongli. now a professor with the Oil Painting Department in the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts became famous in the Chinese painters’ circle in 1980 with his enormous painting, Father. This painting also led the rise

  2. ART APPRECIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annie; Wong; Leung; Kit-Wah

    1998-01-01

    The mythological goddess known as N(?)wa was a representative figure of Chinese primitive matriarchy. With her brush, Annie Leung expresses admiration for N(?)wa’s heroic feat of mending the hole in the sky with a colorful stone even as the flood waters rose around her.

  3. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    During his teens, Li Shaozhou painted what he saw simply because he took pleasure in it Afler gradualing from high school, Li went to work in a rural area. After staying there for two years, he joined the army, where he decided to learn painting in order to depict his experiences Ho gat the chance to study at the Aris Academy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army majoring in Chinese

  4. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Painter Liu Mi said: "My important task as a woman is to contribute more love to the world." Perhaps her paintings themselves, through the truth. goodness and beauty they portray. can be seen as her contribution towards creating a better world. Here are two oil paintings by Liu Mi.

  5. ART APPRECIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The changing climate and plateau surrounding Tibet hove nursed strong and healthy Tibetans with straightforward and unsophisticated character. Tibetans are simple and kind, with their life deeply influenced by the religion and traditional culture of the minority nationality. Ren Jimin realistically paints the love and profound feelings of Tibetan women. Ren combines the skills of traditional Chinese and Western painting, and produces works with a mixture of colors combined with water and ink. The works

  6. Appreciating Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  7. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Modern embossed forged copper has an elegant character. This art form works well as decoration for the walls of buildings. Chen Chuan, the designer, pursues a look of simplicity and powerfulness in his works Auspiciousness and Harmony, which is based on the themes of man and nature. Chen carefully plans the arrangement of convex and concave parts, adding texture by hammering or scraping in many small points and fine lines. With a steel pick, the artist creates a surface sometimes rough and matte, sometimes smooth and shiny. Chen Chuan graduated from the Hubei Institute of Arts in 1965, and was deputy director of the Shandong Provincial Art Gallery from 1984 to 1991. A member of the China Artists Association and the China Graphic Art Association, Chen Chuan is ranked as a first-class artisan, and currently serves as director of the forge copper art office of the Shandong Academy. He has won awards at exhibitions held both at home and abroad.

  8. Appreciating Happiness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China Central Television released the results of its recent happiness survey on January 12. The results show that almost 45 percent of more than 80,000 respondents—all Chinese—feel happy or very happy;about 11 percent are not happy. Recently,Beijing Review interviewed Hu Dayuan,Deputy Director of the China Center for Economic Research(CCER) at Peking University. Hu was a consultant on the survey and has done research on happiness for several years.

  9. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    These paintings display the high degree of skill required by Chinese painters. The paintings shown here demonstrate the painter’s skill in using line and color. On the basis of tradition, he has created something new. The painter, Jin Hongiun, traveled to the tropical forests of southern China a number of times in recent years to

  10. ART APPRECIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In Naive Girls, Zhang Nan portrays three country girls with brightly decorative colors commonly seen in Chinese folk art. Their individuality is portrayed with the contrasting colors of their clothing, yet the whole picture is harmonious. The naivete of country girls is distilled into art. Delight portrays a fishing girl drying fish in the open air. On her bamboo hat hang strings of fish. The background is painted with skills used in traditional Chinese water and ink painting.

  11. How Multilevel Societal Learning Processes Facilitate Transformative Change: A Comparative Case Study Analysis on Flood Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pahl-Wostl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable resources management requires a major transformation of existing resource governance and management systems. These have evolved over a long time under an unsustainable management paradigm, e.g., the transformation from the traditionally prevailing technocratic flood protection toward the holistic integrated flood management approach. We analyzed such transformative changes using three case studies in Europe with a long history of severe flooding: the Hungarian Tisza and the German and Dutch Rhine. A framework based on societal learning and on an evolutionary understanding of societal change was applied to identify drivers and barriers for change. Results confirmed the importance of informal learning and actor networks and their connection to formal policy processes. Enhancing a society's capacity to adapt is a long-term process that evolves over decades, and in this case, was punctuated by disastrous flood events that promoted windows of opportunity for change.

  12. Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO(2)) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Johannes F; van de Poel, Ibo; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2010-08-01

    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO(2) nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral conditions for societal experimentation (absence of alternatives, controllability, limited informed consent, and continuing evaluation). To remedy the current way nano-sized TiO(2) containing sunscreens are utilised, we suggest five complementing actions (closing the gap, setup monitoring tools, continuing review, designing for safety, and regulative improvements) so that its marketing can become more acceptable.

  13. Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poel, Ibo; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO2 nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral conditions for societal experimentation (absence of alternatives, controllability, limited informed consent, and continuing evaluation). To remedy the current way nano-sized TiO2 containing sunscreens are utilised, we suggest five complementing actions (closing the gap, setup monitoring tools, continuing review, designing for safety, and regulative improvements) so that its marketing can become more acceptable. PMID:20835397

  14. Contributions of societal modernity to cognitive development: a comparison of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how societal changes associated with modernization are related to cognitive development. Data were from 4 cultural communities that represented a broad range of traditional and modern elements: the Garifuna (Belize), Logoli (Kenya), Newars (Nepal), and Samoans (American Samoa). Naturalistic observations and the performances of 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-year-old children (N = 192) on 7 cognitive measures were examined. Results replicated age-related improvement on all measures. Contributions of modernity were evident in children's play behaviors and cognitive performances, especially in skills related to schooling. Modernization and schooling independently predicted differences on most of the measures. Results are discussed in relation to the Flynn effect, the worldwide increase in cognitive scores across generations, and the ways in which societal modernization may contribute to cognitive development.

  15. From workers education to societal competencies:Approaches to a critical, emancipatory education fordemocracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Zeuner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents two conceptions concerning critical political education forworkers, developed in Germany in the 1960s and the 1990s respectively. First, theconception of “Sociological Imagination and Exemplary Learning” ublished in 1968by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt (1975. Further the elaborationof this conception, which since the 1980s is known as “Societal Competencies“ (Negt,1986. These competencies concern fundamental knowledge, which enables people tomake political judgments, and act politically in democratic societies in an enlightenedand reflected way. This conception deliberately distinguishes itself from the economic,instrumentalist notions of key qualifications and key competencies, which at least sincethe 1970s have been discussed with the aim of maintaining individual employability andcompetitiveness. ‘Societal competencies’ aim for individual and collectiveemancipation, the development of the capability to make judgments, and autonomy inthe sense of the enlightened political agency and participation in democratizationprocesses.

  16. Societal issues as Mars mission impediments: planetary protection and contamination concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, M S

    1995-03-01

    Societal and non-scientific factors represent potentially significant impediments for future Mars missions, especially in areas involving planetary protection. This paper analyzes public concerns about forward contamination to Mars and back contamination to Earth, evaluates major areas where lack of information may lead to uncontrollable impacts on future missions, and concludes that NASA should adopt a strategy that actively plans both the generation and subsequent management of planetary protection information to ensure that key audiences obtain needed information in a timely manner. Delay or avoidance in dealing with societal issues early in mission planning will increase the likelihood of public opposition, cost increases and missed launch windows. While this analysis of social and non-scientific considerations focuses on future Mars missions, the findings are also relevant for RTG launches, nuclear propulsion and other NASA activities perceived to have health, safety or environmental implications.

  17. Weight discrepancy and body appreciation of Zimbabwean women in Zimbabwe and Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Mada, Rujeko; Tovée, Martin J

    2012-09-01

    Few studies have investigated a cultural group's corporeal experiences in both its country of origin and a host, Western country using the same methodology. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study examined body image among 140 women in Harare, Zimbabwe, and an age-matched sample of 138 Zimbabwean migrants in Britain. Participants completed measures of actual-ideal weight discrepancy, body appreciation, and lifetime exposure to Western and Zimbabwean media. Preliminary analyses showed that there were no significant differences in body mass index between the two groups. Further analyses showed that Zimbabwean women in Britain had significantly greater weight discrepancy and lower body appreciation than their counterparts in Zimbabwe. In addition, weight discrepancy and body appreciation among both samples were significantly associated with exposure to Western media, but not Zimbabwean media. These findings support the contention that transcultural migration may place individuals at risk for symptoms of negative body image. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How firms talk about sustainability and the societal role of business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Kloppenborg

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the language of sustainability in a business context. Based on information excerpted from two Scandinavian firm web sites a closer examination of reasoning and arguing concerning sustainability and the societal role of business is performed. The interpretation...... of the information given on these web sites is inspired by an approach referred to as rhetorical. The focal point is language in action and the impact and constitutive meaning of language in this ongoing discourse about sustainability....

  19. The interplay between societal concerns and the regulatory frame on GM crops in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Yann; Reheul, Dirk; De Waele, Danny; Van Speybroeck, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Recapitulating how genetic modification technology and its agro-food products aroused strong societal opposition in the European Union, this paper demonstrates how this opposition contributed to shape the European regulatory frame on GM crops. More specifically, it describes how this opposition contributed to a de facto moratorium on the commercialization of new GM crop events in the end of the nineties. From this period onwards, the regulatory frame has been continuously revised in order to slow down further erosion of public and market confidence. Various scientific and technical reforms were made to meet societal concerns relating to the safety of GM crops. In this context, the precautionary principle, environmental post-market monitoring and traceability were adopted as ways to cope with scientific uncertainties. Labeling, traceability, co-existence and public information were installed in an attempt to meet the general public request for more information about GM agro-food products, and the specific demand to respect the consumers' and farmers' freedom of choice. Despite these efforts, today, the explicit role of public participation and/or ethical consultation during authorization procedures is at best minimal. Moreover, no legal room was created to progress to an integral sustainability evaluation during market procedures. It remains to be seen whether the recent policy shift towards greater transparency about value judgments, plural viewpoints and scientific uncertainties will be one step forward in integrating ethical concerns more explicitly in risk analysis. As such, the regulatory frame stands open for further interpretation, reflecting in various degrees a continued interplay with societal concerns relating to GM agro-food products. In this regard, both societal concerns and diversely interpreted regulatory criteria can be inferred as signaling a request - and even a quest - to render more explicit the broader-than-scientific dimension of the actual

  20. Societal marketing concept and spirituality in the workplace theory: finding the common ground

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo Ferreira Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests that there exist many theoretical linkages between the societal marketing concept (SMC) and spirituality in the workplace (SWP) theory. Thus, it is reviewed the literature of both SMC and the emerging field of SWP theory in order to find unexplored commonalities between them. As a result, it acknowledges that SMC broached a new perspective in marketing discipline regarding that it added sizeable social and ethical responsibility to the marketer's role. Most importantly, it...