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Sample records for humane experimental technique

  1. The development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Bong Shick; Oh, In Suk; Cha, Kyung Ho; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Geun Ok; Cheon, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon

    1997-07-01

    New human factors issues, such as evaluation of information navigation, the consideration of operator characteristics, and operator performance assessment, related to the HMI design based on VDUs are being risen. Thus, in order to solve these human factors issues, this project aims to establish the experimental technologies including the techniques for experimental design, experimental measurement, data collection and analysis, and to develop ITF (Integrated Test Facility) suitable for the experiment of HMI design evaluation. For the establish of the experimental data analysis and evaluation methodologies, we developed as the following: (1) a paradigm for human factors experimentation including experimental designs, procedures, and data analysis. (2) the methods for the assessment of operator`s mental workload (3) DAEXESS (data analysis and experiment evaluation supporting system). Also, we have established a experiment execution technologies through the preliminary experiments, such as the suitability evaluation of information display on a LSDP, the evaluation of information display on a LSDP, the evaluation of computerized operation procedure and an experiment of advanced alarm system (ADIOS). Finally, we developed the ITF including human machine simulator, telemetry system, an eye tracking system, an audio/video data measurement system, and three dimensional micro behaviour analysis system. (author). 81 refs., 68 tabs., 73 figs.

  2. Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engelfried, J

    1999-01-01

    In this course we will give examples for experimental techniques used in particle physics experiments. After a short introduction, we will discuss applications in silicon microstrip detectors, wire chambers, and single photon detection in Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters. A short discussion of the relevant physics processes, mainly different forms of energy loss in matter, is enclosed.

  3. Experimental techniques; Techniques experimentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P. [GANIL CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/DSM, 14 - Caen (France)

    2007-07-01

    This lecture presents the experimental techniques, developed in the last 10 or 15 years, in order to perform a new class of experiments with exotic nuclei, where the reactions induced by these nuclei allow to get information on their structure. A brief review of the secondary beams production methods will be given, with some examples of facilities in operation or under project. The important developments performed recently on cryogenic targets will be presented. The different detection systems will be reviewed, both the beam detectors before the targets, and the many kind of detectors necessary to detect all outgoing particles after the reaction: magnetic spectrometer for the heavy fragment, detection systems for the target recoil nucleus, {gamma} detectors. Finally, several typical examples of experiments will be detailed, in order to illustrate the use of each detector either alone, or in coincidence with others. (author)

  4. Experimental Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyer, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion spectroscopy requires specialised apparatus, both when it comes to measuring photon absorption and light emission (fluorescence). The reason is much lower ion densities compared to solution-phase spectroscopy. In this chapter different setups are described, all based on mass spectro...... in data interpretation, and the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques are clarified. New instrumental developments involving cryo-cooled storage rings, which show great promise for the future, are briefly touched upon.......Gas-phase ion spectroscopy requires specialised apparatus, both when it comes to measuring photon absorption and light emission (fluorescence). The reason is much lower ion densities compared to solution-phase spectroscopy. In this chapter different setups are described, all based on mass...... to circumvent this is discussed based on a chemical approach, namely tagging of ammonium groups by crown ether. Prompt dissociation can sometimes be identified from the total beam depletion differing from that due to statistical dissociation. Special emphasis in this chapter is on the limitations and pitfalls...

  5. The development of human factors technologies -The development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Bong Sik; Oh, In Suk; Cha, Kyung Hoh; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    In this year, we studied the followings: (1) Development of operator mental workload evaluation techniques, (2) Development of a prototype for preliminary human factors experiment, (3) Suitability test of information display on a large scale display panel, (4) Development of guidelines for VDU-based control room design, (5) Development of integrated test facility (ITF). (6) Establishment of an eye tracking system, and we got the following results: (1) Mental workload evaluation techniques for MMI evaluation, (2) PROTOPEX (PROTOtype for preliminary human factors experiment) for preliminary human factors experiments, (3) Usage methods of APTEA (Analysis-Prototyping-Training-Experiment-Analysis) experiment design, (4) Design guidelines for human factors verification, (5) Detail design requirements and development plan of ITF, (6) Eye movement measurement system. 38 figs, 20 tabs, 54 refs. (Author).

  6. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures.

  7. Semiconductor Research Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Balkan, Naci

    2012-01-01

    The book describes the fundamentals, latest developments and use of key experimental techniques for semiconductor research. It explains the application potential of various analytical methods and discusses the opportunities to apply particular analytical techniques to study novel semiconductor compounds, such as dilute nitride alloys. The emphasis is on the technique rather than on the particular system studied.

  8. Development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques - Human factors design and evaluation of the main control room of atomic power plants using visual display terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Ho; Chung, Min Kyun; Choi, Kyung Lim; Song, Young Woong; Eoh, Hong Joon; Lee, In Suk; Kim, Bom Soo; Yeo, Yun Shin; Lee, Haeo Sun [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This study was conducted to build a prototype of the operator interface on a visual display terminal, and to provide a framework for using and applying prototyping techniques. A typical subsystem of an MCR was prototyped and validated by operator testing. Lessons learned during the development as well as prototyping techniques were described in this report for an efficient development. In addition, human factors experimental plans were surveyed and summarized for evaluating new design alternatives as well as the current design of the operator interface. The major results of this study are listed as follow: A method for designing an operator interface prototype on a VDT, A prototype of the operator interface of a typical subsystem, Guidelines for applying prototyping techniques, Characteristics and major considerations of experimental plans, Guidelines for applying prototyping techniques, Characteristics and major considerations of experimental plans, Guidelines for analyzing experimental data, A paradigm for human factors experimentation including experimental designs, procedures, and data analyses. 27 refs., 60 tabs., 47 figs. (author)

  9. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  10. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  11. Experimental techniques in hadron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianotti P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD is the theory of the strong interaction, but the properties of the hadrons cannot be directly calculated from the QCD Lagrangian and alternative approaches are then used. In order to test the different models, precise measurements of hadron properties are of extreme importance. This is the main motivation for the hadron spectroscopy experimental program carried out since many years with different probes and different detectors. A survey of some recent results in the field is here presented and commented, together with the opportunities offered by the forthcoming experimental programs.

  12. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  13. Phase equilibria basic principles, applications, experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Reisman, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Phase Equilibria: Basic Principles, Applications, Experimental Techniques presents an analytical treatment in the study of the theories and principles of phase equilibria. The book is organized to afford a deep and thorough understanding of such subjects as the method of species model systems; condensed phase-vapor phase equilibria and vapor transport reactions; zone refining techniques; and nonstoichiometry. Physicists, physical chemists, engineers, and materials scientists will find the book a good reference material.

  14. Experimentation on humans and nonhumans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhar, Evelyn B

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I argue that it is wrong to conduct any experiment on a nonhuman which we would regard as immoral were it to be conducted on a human, because such experimentation violates the basic moral rights of sentient beings. After distinguishing the rights approach from the utilitarian approach, I delineate basic concepts. I then raise the classic "argument from marginal cases" against those who support experimentation on nonhumans but not on humans. After next replying to six important objections against that argument, I contend that moral agents are logically required to accord basic moral rights to every sentient being. I conclude by providing criteria for distinguishing ethical from unethical experimentation.

  15. Ansiedade experimental humana Human experimental anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme Graeff

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A ansiedade experimental no ser humano constitui-se em ponte entre os modelos animais e os ensaios clínicos. OBJETIVO: Este artigo focaliza métodos químicos e psicológicos utilizados para provocar ansiedade experimental em seres humanos. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se revisão seletiva da literatura. RESULTADOS: Os desafios farmacológicos têm sido usados principalmente para induzir ataques de pânico em pacientes com transtorno de pânico, os quais são mais sensíveis a eles que indivíduos normais ou pacientes portadores de outros transtornos psiquiátricos. Uma das mais importantes contribuições deste método é a de ter mostrado que os agentes panicogênicos mais seletivos, como o lactato ou a inalação de CO2, não ativam o eixo hormonal do estresse. Entre os métodos psicológicos, destacam-se o condicionamento de respostas elétricas da condutância da pele, cujo perfil farmacológico se aproxima daquele do transtorno de ansiedade generalizada, e o teste da simulação do falar em público, cuja farmacologia é semelhante à do transtorno de pânico. CONCLUSÕES: Tais resultados salientam a diferença entre a neurobiologia da ansiedade e a do pânico.BACKGROUND: Human experimental anxiety methods bridge the gap between animal models and clinical assays. OBJECTIVE: This article is focused on chemical and psychological procedures used to generate experimental anxiety in human beings. METHODS: A selective review of the literature has been carried out. RESULTS: Pharmacological challenges have been mainly used to induce panic attacks in panic disorder patients, who are more susceptible than normal individuals or patients with other psychiatric disorders. One of the most important contributions of this method is to have shown that the most selective panicogenic agents, such as lactate or CO2 inhalation, do not activate the hormonal stress axis. Among the psychological methods stand the conditioning of the electrical skin conductance

  16. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and...

  17. Experimental techniques in code switching research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondene van Dulm

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses various experimental techniques which may be used to elicit data on code switching. A brief overview of the literature is followed by a description of the techniques used in a small-scale study of the structural aspects of intrasentential code switching between South African English (SAE and Afrikaans. The aim of the small-scale study was to gather preliminary data which could be used to evaluate the empirical merit of a number of predictions for the structure of SAE-Afrikaans intrasentential code switching. In addition to the techniques used in the small-scale study, a number of adaptations and additions to be applied in the larger-scale study to follow are discussed. These improvements to the techniques are proposed on the basis of the results of the small-scale study, and take the relevant literature into account. The various techniques are discussed in terms of their ability to provide valid and reliable data which can be subjected to statistical analysis and which can fruitfully inform questions regarding the structure of intrasentential code switching. The benefits of research of this nature to language practitioners and to the field of linguistics are highlighted.  

  18. Human parallels to experimental myopia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C; Goldschmidt, Ernst; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    Raviola and Wiesel's monkey eyelid suture studies of the 1970s laid the cornerstone for the experimental myopia science undertaken since then. The aim has been to clarify the basic humoral and neuronal mechanisms behind induced myopization, its eye tissue transmitters in particular. Besides...... of the present PubMed literature-based review is to evaluate apparent similarities between experience from disturbed imaging in experimental laboratory science and varieties within the spectrum of childhood human myopia. So far, the main impression is that macroscopical optical deprivation appears absent...... in the prevalent types of human myopia, nor is myopia a regular sequel where early eye pathology has led to poor imaging and optical deprivation. Optical aberrations of a higher order are a relatively new issue in myopia research, and microstructural deprivation is only marginally dealt within the survey. Links...

  19. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, F G; Parente, A; Del-Ben, C M; Guimarães, F S

    2003-04-01

    This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  20. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Graeff

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  1. A novel modelling and experimental technique to predict and measure tissue temperature during CO2 laser stimuli for human pain studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saadi, Mohammed Hamed; Nadeau, V; Dickinson, M R

    2006-07-01

    Laser nerve stimulation is now accepted as one of the preferred methods for applying painful stimuli to human skin during pain studies. One of the main concerns, however, is thermal damage to the skin. We present recent work based on using a CO2 laser with a remote infrared (IR) temperature sensor as a feedback system. A model for predicting the subcutaneous skin temperature derived from the signal from the IR detector allows us to accurately predict the laser parameters, thus maintaining an optimum pain stimulus whilst avoiding dangerous temperature levels, which could result in thermal damage. Another aim is to relate the modelling of the CO2 fibre laser interaction to the pain response and compare these results with practical measurements of the pain threshold for various stimulus parameters. The system will also allow us to maintain a constant skin temperature during the stimulus. Another aim of the experiments underway is to review the psychophysics for pain in human subjects, permitting an investigation of the relationship between temperature and perceived pain.

  2. Experimental and numerical techniques to assess catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.; Petkow, D.; Steinbeck, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic heating can be a significant portion of the thermal load experienced by a body during re-entry. Under the auspices of the NATO Research and Technology Organisation Applied Vehicle Technologies Panel Task Group AVT-136 an assessment of the current state-of-the-art in the experimental characterization and numerical simulation of catalysis on high-temperature material surfaces has been conducted. This paper gives an extraction of the final report for this effort, showing the facilities and capabilities worldwide to assess catalysis data. A corresponding summary for the modeling activities is referenced in this article.

  3. Methods and experimental techniques in computer engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Schiaffonati, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Computing and science reveal a synergic relationship. On the one hand, it is widely evident that computing plays an important role in the scientific endeavor. On the other hand, the role of scientific method in computing is getting increasingly important, especially in providing ways to experimentally evaluate the properties of complex computing systems. This book critically presents these issues from a unitary conceptual and methodological perspective by addressing specific case studies at the intersection between computing and science. The book originates from, and collects the experience of, a course for PhD students in Information Engineering held at the Politecnico di Milano. Following the structure of the course, the book features contributions from some researchers who are working at the intersection between computing and science.

  4. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  5. An experimental analysis of human straight walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental analysis of human straight walking has been presented. Experiments on human walking were carried out by using Cassino tracking system which is a passive cable-based measuring system. This system is adopted because it is capable of both pose and wrench measurements with fairly simple monitoring of operation. By using experimental results, trajectories of a human limb extremity and its posture have been analyzed; forces that are exerted against cables by the limb of a person under test have been measured by force sensors as well. Furthermore, by using experimental tests, modeling and characterization of the human straight walking gait have been proposed.

  6. Computational Techniques of Electromagnetic Dosimetry for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reviews the rationale of international safety guidelines for human protection against electromagnetic fields. Then, this paper also presents computational techniques to conduct dosimetry in anatomically-based human body models. Computational examples and remaining problems are also described briefly.

  7. Differential sensor in front photopyroelectric technique: II. Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo-Andrade, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); MarIn, E [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, CP 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Orea, A [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, CP 07360, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pichardo-Molina, J L, E-mail: rumen@fisica.uaz.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Loma del Campestre, CP 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2009-06-21

    We describe the differential cell design and the experimental (optical and electronic) setup for the differential front photopyroelectric technique, whose theory has been developed in the first part of this paper (Ivanov et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 085106). We will show first how the direct (non-differential) front photopyroelectric theory described in our previous paper reproduces well the experimental results. The usefulness of the differential technique is demonstrated by means of experimental measurements of the thermal effusivity in binary ethanol-water and glycerol-water mixtures, based on a theoretical methodology that simplifies the measurement procedure and diminishes the experimental uncertainty.

  8. Complement activation in experimental human malaria infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Mollnes, T.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Klasen, I.S.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate complement activation in uncomplicated, early phases of human malaria. Fifteen healthy volunteers were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Parasitemia and complement activation products were assessed. During blood stage parasitem

  9. Phase behavior of multicomponent membranes: Experimental and computational techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Kumar, P.B. Sunil

    2009-01-01

    membranes. Current increase in interest in the domain formation in multicomponent membranes also stems from the experiments demonstrating liquid ordered-liquid disordered coexistence in mixtures of lipids and cholesterol and the success of several computational models in predicting their behavior....... This review includes basic foundations on membrane model systems and experimental approaches applied in the membrane research area, stressing on recent advances in the experimental and computational techniques....

  10. A New Experimental Technique for Applying Impulse Tension Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Z. S.; Yu, H. P.; Su, H; Zhang, X.; Li, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a new experimental technique for applying impulse tension loads. Briefly, the technique is based on the use of pulsed-magnetic-driven tension loading. Electromagnetic forming (EMF) can be quite effective in increasing the forming limits of metal sheets, such as aluminium and magnesium alloys. Yet, why the forming limit is increased is still an open question. One reason for this is the difficulty to let forming proceed on a certain influence monotonically: ...

  11. Experimental Data Mining Techniques(Using Multiple Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zaidi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the possible solutions of non-linear multivariable by experimental Data mining techniques using on orthogonal array. Taguchi method is a very useful technique to reduce the time and cost of the experiment but the ignoring all kind of interaction effects. The results are not much encouraging and motivate to study Laser cutting process of non-linear multivariable is modeled by one and two way analysis of variance also linear and non linear regression analysis. These techniques are used to explore better analysis techniques and improve the laser cutting quality by reducing process variations caused by controllable process parameters. The size of data set causes difficulties in modeling and simulation of the problem such as decision tree is useful technique but it is not able to predict better results. The results of analysis of variance are encouraging. Taguchi and regression normally optimizes input process parameters for single characteristics.

  12. Experimental Technique of Titanium Fire in Aero-engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Guangbao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium fire is the typical catastrophic fault in the aero-engine. Aiming at the urgent demand for experimental technique of titanium fire from advanced high thrust-weight ratio aero-engine, the combustion technology and theory of titanium alloy based on friction oxygen concentration method (FOC were systematically studied. The evaluation method of fireproof property and the friction ignition model were built, and the fireproof mechanism was illustrated. By generalizing recent progress in experimental technique of titanium fire from three levels, including evolutionary rule, mechanism and prevention and control technology, the ideas and directions of experimental technique associated with the application research of titanium fire in the future were proposed, namely overall evaluation of fireproof property close to air flow environment of the aero-engine, prediction model of fireproof property and experimental verification of fireproof technique under the air flow environment of aero-engine. It is necessary to establish the prevention system of titanium fire in aero-engine, which contributes to the realization of "full titanium" in compressor and to the increase of high thrust-weight ratio.

  13. Clara Maass, yellow fever and human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Carballo, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Clara Louise Maass, a 25-year-old American nurse, died of yellow fever on August 24, 1901, following experimental inoculation by infected mosquitoes in Havana, Cuba. The human yellow fever experiments were initially conducted by MAJ Walter Reed, who first used written informed consent and proved the validity of Finlay's mosquito-vector hypothesis. Despite informed consent form and an incentive of $100 in U.S. gold, human subjects were exposed to a deadly virus. The deaths of Clara Maass and two Spanish immigrants resulted in a public outcry and the immediate cessation of yellow fever human experiments in Cuba.

  14. Experimental Techniques for Studies in Atomic & Molecular Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Heijkenskjöld, Filip

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is based on a selection of six different experimental techniques used for studies in atomic and molecular physics. The techniques analysed in the thesis are compared to find similarities in strategies and ways to avoid sources of error. Paper 1 deals with collision based spectroscopy with 60 keV Xe6+ ions on sodium and argon gas targets. Information on energy of Rydberg states in Xe5+ is unveiled by optical spectroscopy in the wavelength range from vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to visi...

  15. The development of human behavior analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Geun Ok; Cheon, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon; Oh, In Suk; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Jae Chang

    1997-07-01

    In this project, which is to study on man-machine interaction in Korean nuclear power plants, we developed SACOM (Simulation Analyzer with a Cognitive Operator Model), a tool for the assessment of task performance in the control rooms using software simulation, and also develop human error analysis and application techniques. SACOM was developed to assess operator`s physical workload, workload in information navigation at VDU workstations, and cognitive workload in procedural tasks. We developed trip analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis and a classification system. We analyzed a total of 277 trips occurred from 1978 to 1994 to produce trip summary information, and for 79 cases induced by human errors time-lined man-machine interactions. The INSTEC, a database system of our analysis results, was developed. The MARSTEC, a multimedia authoring and representation system for trip information, was also developed, and techniques for human error detection in human factors experiments were established. (author). 121 refs., 38 tabs., 52 figs.

  16. Advanced experimental and numerical techniques for cavitation erosion prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Chahine, Georges; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Karimi, Ayat

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the cavitation erosion phenomenon and state-of-the-art research in the field. It is divided into two parts. Part 1 consists of seven chapters, offering a wide range of computational and experimental approaches to cavitation erosion. It includes a general introduction to cavitation and cavitation erosion, a detailed description of facilities and measurement techniques commonly used in cavitation erosion studies, an extensive presentation of various stages of cavitation damage (including incubation and mass loss), and insights into the contribution of computational methods to the analysis of both fluid and material behavior. The proposed approach is based on a detailed description of impact loads generated by collapsing cavitation bubbles and a physical analysis of the material response to these loads. Part 2 is devoted to a selection of nine papers presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Experimental and Numerical Techniques for Cavitation Erosion (Gr...

  17. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  18. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, E.

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air) and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a) a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b) an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  19. Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazimullin, M V; Lebedev, Yu A

    2010-04-01

    An application of Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental studies is considered. This method has obvious advantages compared with traditional lock-in amplifiers technique--simple experimental setup, a quickly available information on all the required harmonics, high speed of data processing using fast Fourier transform algorithm. A computationally simple, fast and accurate Fourier coefficients interpolation (FCI) method has been implemented to obtain a useful information from harmonics of a multimode signal. Our analysis shows that in this case FCI method has a systematical error (bias) of a signal parameters estimation, which became essential for the short data sets. Hence, a new differential Fourier coefficients interpolation (DFCI) method has been suggested, which is less sensitive to a presence of several modes in a signal. The analysis has been confirmed by simulations and measurements of a quartz wedge birefringence by means of the photoelastic modulator. The obtained bias, noise level, and measuring speed are comparable and even better than in lock-in amplifier technique. Moreover, presented DFCI method is expected to be promised candidate for using in actively developing imaging systems based on the modulation technique requiring fast digital signal processing of large data sets.

  20. Nonlocal Regularized Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques for MRI: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to revitalize researchers' interest in algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART by expanding their capabilities and demonstrating their potential in speeding up the process of MRI acquisition. Using a continuous-to-discrete model, we experimentally study the application of ART into MRI reconstruction which unifies previous nonuniform-fast-Fourier-transform- (NUFFT- based and gridding-based approaches. Under the framework of ART, we advocate the use of nonlocal regularization techniques which are leveraged from our previous research on modeling photographic images. It is experimentally shown that nonlocal regularization ART (NR-ART can often outperform their local counterparts in terms of both subjective and objective qualities of reconstructed images. On one real-world k-space data set, we find that nonlocal regularization can achieve satisfactory reconstruction from as few as one-third of samples. We also address an issue related to image reconstruction from real-world k-space data but overlooked in the open literature: the consistency of reconstructed images across different resolutions. A resolution-consistent extension of NR-ART is developed and shown to effectively suppress the artifacts arising from frequency extrapolation. Both source codes and experimental results of this work are made fully reproducible.

  1. Efficacy of conventional and experimental techniques for denture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, R N; Powers, J M; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of one experimental and three conventional techniques for denture repair. Forty maxillary dentures were constructed in dental stone casts duplicated from an edentulous copper-aluminium maxillary master cast. Two groups of 20 dentures each were prepared with Lucitone 199 (water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C) or Acron MC (microwave, 3 min/500 W) denture base materials processed in gypsum moulds. The 40 dentures were all separated sagittally in the middle. After that, five dentures of each denture base material were repaired with one of the four following techniques: L (Lucitone 199, water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C, gypsum mould), A (Acron MC, microwave, 3 min/500 W, gypsum mould), AR (Acron MC/R, autopolymerized, 60 psi/45 degrees C/15 min) and the experimental technique AS (Acron MC, 1 min/500 W + 1 min/0 W + 1 min/500 W, hard silicone mould). The parameters denture accuracy (DA), horizontal (HC) and vertical changes (VC) of the occlusal plane measured the efficacy of the repair techniques. The DA was determined by weighing a film of silicone impression material set in contact to the tissue surface of the denture seated on the metallic master die. For HC, cross-arch measurements were made among reference marks drilled on the teeth 11, 21, 16 and 26. The VC was obtained by calculating the relative differences in height between similar teeth of each semi-arch (pairs 13-23, 14-24, 15-25 e 16-26). For DA, HC and VC, the percentage differences between the percentage means obtained before and after repair were calculated and grouped for comparisons. Analysis of variance (SuperANOVA) and means compared by Tukey-Kramer intervals (0.05) revealed that AR repair had the best percentage difference value for DA [0.5% (P 0.05)]. For HC, there was a statistical difference (P 0.05). Denture accuracy was not affected by the interaction of base material-repair technique; repair with AR technique gave the best adaptation; the interaction of base material

  2. Experimental Comparison of Efficacy for Three Handfeeding Techniques in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa K; McConnell, Eleanor S; Amella, Elaine J; Anderson, Ruth A; Bales, Connie W; Silva, Susan; Barnes, Angel; Beck, Cornelia; Colon-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2017-04-01

    Nursing home (NH) residents who require assistance during mealtimes are at risk for malnutrition. Supportive handfeeding is recommended, yet there is limited evidence supporting use of a specific handfeeding technique to increase meal intake. To compare efficacy of three handfeeding techniques for assisting NH residents with dementia with meals: Direct Hand (DH), Over Hand (OH), and Under Hand (UH). A prospective pilot study using a within-subjects experimental Latin square design with randomization to one of three handfeeding technique sequences. 30 residents living with advanced dementia in 11 U.S. NHs. Time required for assistance; meal intake (% eaten); and feeding behaviors, measured by the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia (EdFED) scale. Research Assistants provided feeding assistance for 18 video-recorded meals per resident (N = 540 meals). Residents were assisted with one designated technique for 6 consecutive meals, changing technique every 2 days. Mean time spent providing meal assistance did not differ significantly between techniques. Mean meal intake was greater for DH (67 ± 15.2%) and UH (65 ± 15.0%) with both significantly greater than OH (60 ± 15.1%). Feeding behaviors were more frequent with OH (8.3 ± 1.8%), relative to DH (8.0 ± 1.8) and UH (7.7 ± 1.8). All three techniques are time neutral. UH and DH are viable options to increase meal intake among NH residents with advanced dementia and reduce feeding behaviors relative to OH feeding. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Comparison of different experimental techniques used for wax deposition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, Stephen; Johnston, Angela [Nalco Energy Services, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines and pipelines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on five separate crude oils by using a varying protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments were carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  4. Characterization of wax deposition by different experimental techniques - a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeman, Olga; Allenson, Steve

    2006-03-15

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on multiple crude oils using various testing protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments was carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. A new test design designated ''cold tube'' is proposed. (Author) (tk)

  5. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  6. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  7. Biofilms and mechanics: a review of experimental techniques and findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Vernita D.; Davis-Fields, Megan; Kovach, Kristin; Rodesney, Christopher A.

    2017-06-01

    Biofilms are developmentally-dynamic communities of sessile microbes that adhere to each other and, often, to other structures in their environment. The cohesive mechanical forces binding microbes to each other confer mechanical and structural stability on the biofilm and give rise to biofilm viscoelasticity. The adhesive mechanical forces binding microbes to other structures in their environment can promote biofilm initiation and mechanosensing that leads to changes in biological activity. Thus, physical mechanics is intrinsic to characteristics that distinguish biofilms from free-swimming or free-floating microbes in liquid culture. However, very little is known about the specifics of what mechanical traits characterize different types of biofilms at different stages of development. Even less is known about how mechanical inputs impact microbial biology and how microbes can adjust their mechanical coupling to, and interaction with, their environment. These knowledge gaps arise, in part, from the challenges associated with experimental measurements of microbial and biofilm biomechanics. Here, we review extant experimental techniques and their most-salient findings to date. At the end of this review we indicate areas where significant advances in the state-of-the art are heading.

  8. Total laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty: experimental technique in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico R. Romero

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe a unique simplified experimental technique for total laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty in a porcine model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty on 10 animals. The gastroepiploic arch was identified and carefully mobilized from its origin at the pylorus to the beginning of the previously demarcated gastric wedge. The gastric segment was resected with sharp dissection. Both gastric suturing and gastrovesical anastomosis were performed with absorbable running sutures. The complete procedure and stages of gastric dissection, gastric closure, and gastrovesical anastomosis were separately timed for each laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty. The end-result of the gastric suturing and the bladder augmentation were evaluated by fluoroscopy or endoscopy. RESULTS: Mean total operative time was 5.2 (range 3.5 - 8 hours: 84.5 (range 62 - 110 minutes for the gastric dissection, 56 (range 28 - 80 minutes for the gastric suturing, and 170.6 (range 70 to 200 minutes for the gastrovesical anastomosis. A cystogram showed a small leakage from the vesical anastomosis in the first two cases. No extravasation from gastric closure was observed in the postoperative gastrogram. CONCLUSIONS: Total laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty is a feasible but complex procedure that currently has limited clinical application. With the increasing use of laparoscopy in reconstructive surgery of the lower urinary tract, gastrocystoplasty may become an attractive option because of its potential advantages over techniques using small and large bowel segments.

  9. Equipment and Experimental Technique For Temperature Measurements In Deep Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristoforov, A.

    The technique of temperature measurements is highly informative since any dynami- cal processes in the boreholes and in the vicinities are accompanied by thermal effects. Electronics and equipment for remote measurements in the boreholes are briefly dis- cussed in the report. It includes a deep instrument, cable winch and surface recording unit placed onboard a car. The temperature dependent frequency modulated signal is used in deep instrument. A cable of original construction was developed for chute-lift operations. It has a signal and power channel at the same time and play the depth me- ter. The surface recording unit includes power supply for deep instruments, receiver, frequency meter and indicator. A personal computer is used for the measurement nu- merical control. Energy for the electronics is supplied by a car battery. Self sufficiency and high accuracy are specialities of the equipment. Using the technique and equip- ment we made the experimental study of temperature in the boreholes of the East European platform, Middle Asia, West Siberia, Kamchatka and other regions. Most of our temperatures and temperature gradients have been used for mapping.

  10. Fault Management Techniques in Human Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Brian; Crocker, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses human spaceflight fault management operations. Fault detection and response capabilities available in current US human spaceflight programs Space Shuttle and International Space Station are described while emphasizing system design impacts on operational techniques and constraints. Preflight and inflight processes along with products used to anticipate, mitigate and respond to failures are introduced. Examples of operational products used to support failure responses are presented. Possible improvements in the state of the art, as well as prioritization and success criteria for their implementation are proposed. This paper describes how the architecture of a command and control system impacts operations in areas such as the required fault response times, automated vs. manual fault responses, use of workarounds, etc. The architecture includes the use of redundancy at the system and software function level, software capabilities, use of intelligent or autonomous systems, number and severity of software defects, etc. This in turn drives which Caution and Warning (C&W) events should be annunciated, C&W event classification, operator display designs, crew training, flight control team training, and procedure development. Other factors impacting operations are the complexity of a system, skills needed to understand and operate a system, and the use of commonality vs. optimized solutions for software and responses. Fault detection, annunciation, safing responses, and recovery capabilities are explored using real examples to uncover underlying philosophies and constraints. These factors directly impact operations in that the crew and flight control team need to understand what happened, why it happened, what the system is doing, and what, if any, corrective actions they need to perform. If a fault results in multiple C&W events, or if several faults occur simultaneously, the root cause(s) of the fault(s), as well as their vehicle-wide impacts, must be

  11. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  12. Experimental annotation of the human genome using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, D D; Schadt, E E; Armour, C D; He, Y D; Garrett-Engele, P; McDonagh, P D; Loerch, P M; Leonardson, A; Lum, P Y; Cavet, G; Wu, L F; Altschuler, S J; Edwards, S; King, J; Tsang, J S; Schimmack, G; Schelter, J M; Koch, J; Ziman, M; Marton, M J; Li, B; Cundiff, P; Ward, T; Castle, J; Krolewski, M; Meyer, M R; Mao, M; Burchard, J; Kidd, M J; Dai, H; Phillips, J W; Linsley, P S; Stoughton, R; Scherer, S; Boguski, M S

    2001-02-15

    The most important product of the sequencing of a genome is a complete, accurate catalogue of genes and their products, primarily messenger RNA transcripts and their cognate proteins. Such a catalogue cannot be constructed by computational annotation alone; it requires experimental validation on a genome scale. Using 'exon' and 'tiling' arrays fabricated by ink-jet oligonucleotide synthesis, we devised an experimental approach to validate and refine computational gene predictions and define full-length transcripts on the basis of co-regulated expression of their exons. These methods can provide more accurate gene numbers and allow the detection of mRNA splice variants and identification of the tissue- and disease-specific conditions under which genes are expressed. We apply our technique to chromosome 22q under 69 experimental condition pairs, and to the entire human genome under two experimental conditions. We discuss implications for more comprehensive, consistent and reliable genome annotation, more efficient, full-length complementary DNA cloning strategies and application to complex diseases.

  13. The flaws and human harms of animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2015-10-01

    Nonhuman animal ("animal") experimentation is typically defended by arguments that it is reliable, that animals provide sufficiently good models of human biology and diseases to yield relevant information, and that, consequently, its use provides major human health benefits. I demonstrate that a growing body of scientific literature critically assessing the validity of animal experimentation generally (and animal modeling specifically) raises important concerns about its reliability and predictive value for human outcomes and for understanding human physiology. The unreliability of animal experimentation across a wide range of areas undermines scientific arguments in favor of the practice. Additionally, I show how animal experimentation often significantly harms humans through misleading safety studies, potential abandonment of effective therapeutics, and direction of resources away from more effective testing methods. The resulting evidence suggests that the collective harms and costs to humans from animal experimentation outweigh potential benefits and that resources would be better invested in developing human-based testing methods.

  14. An experimental characterization of human torso motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafolla, Daniele; Chen, I.-Ming; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The torso plays an important role in the human-like operation of humanoids. In this paper, a method is proposed to analyze the behavior of the human torso by using inertial and magnetic sensing tools. Experiments are conducted to characterize the motion performance of the human torso during daily routine operations. Furthermore, the forces acting on the human body during these operations are evaluated to design and validate the performance of a humanoid robot.

  15. Application of experimental and numerical simulation techniques to microscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Vishwanath

    Two of the areas that have become relevant recently are the areas of mixing in micro-scale devices, and manufacturing of functional nanoparticles. MicroPIV experiments were performed on two different mixers, one a wide microchannel with the surface grooves, in the laminar regime, and the other, a confined impinging jets reactor, in the laminar and turbulent regimes. In the wide microchannel with surface grooves, microPIV data were collected at the interface and the midplane at the Reynolds numbers of 0.08, 0.8, and 8. The experiments were performed on three internal angles of the chevrons, namely 135°, 90°, and 45°. The normalized transverse velocity generated in the midplane due to the presence of the grooves, is the strongest for the internal angle of 135°, and in that, the normalized transverse velocity is maximum at the Reynolds numbers of 0.08 and 0.8. MicroPIV experiments were performed in a confined impinging jets reactors at Reynolds numbers of 200, 1000, and 1500. The data was collected in the midplane, and turbulent statistics were further computed. The high velocity jets impinge along the centerline of the reactor. Upon impinging, part of the fluid turns towards the top wall and the majority of it turn towards the outlet. This high velocity impingement causes and unstable zone called the impingement zone, which moves about the centerline line, causing the jets to flap back and forth. Spatial correlations were computed to get an estimate of the size of the coherent structures. Large eddy simulation was performed on the CIJR for the Reynolds numbers of 1000 and 1500, using OpenFOAM. The Reynolds number is based on the inlet jet hydraulic diameter. Excellent agreement was found with the experimental and simulation data. Turbulent reactive mixing in a rectangular microscale confined impinging-jets reactor (CIJR) was investigated using the pH indicator phenolphthalein in this study for three different jet Reynolds numbers of 25, 1000 and 1500. Laminar

  16. A technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.E.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; Wreathall, J.; Parry, G.W. [and others

    1996-05-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has become an important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical element of PRA; however, limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. A multidisciplinary HRA framework has been developed with the objective of providing a structured approach for analyzing operating experience and understanding nuclear plant safety, human error, and the underlying factors that affect them. The concepts of the framework have matured into a rudimentary working HRA method. A trial application of the method has demonstrated that it is possible to identify potentially significant human failure events from actual operating experience which are not generally included in current PRAs, as well as to identify associated performance shaping factors and plant conditions that have an observable impact on the frequency of core damage. A general process was developed, albeit in preliminary form, that addresses the iterative steps of defining human failure events and estimating their probabilities using search schemes. Additionally, a knowledge- base was developed which describes the links between performance shaping factors and resulting unsafe actions.

  17. IMMEDIATE HUMAN PULP RESPONSE TO ETHANOL-WET BONDING TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Pashley, David Henry; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique associated with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 17 sound premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontics. The teeth were assigned into three groups: Ethanol-wet bonding (G1), water-wet bonding (G2) and calcium hydroxide (G3, control). Two teeth were used as intact control. After acid-etching, the cavities from G1 were filled with 100% ethanol for 60s and blot-dried before the application of Single Bond 2. In G2, the cavities were filled with distilled water for 60s previously to adhesive application and in G3, the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. The teeth were extracted 48h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth 6 μm-thick serial sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated and scored for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentin thickness was 463±65μm (G1); 425±184μm (G2); and 348±194μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding technique applied on deep cavities prepared in vital teeth does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding has been considered an experimental technique that may increase resin-dentin bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100% ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive

  18. Cross-impact analysis experimentation using two techniques to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coherency. This paper describes cross-impact analysis experimentation in which a Monte ..... [4] is used to accomplish this computational task. Using this method ..... 202–222 in Baldwin MM (Ed), Portraits of complexity: Applications of systems.

  19. Review of Surgical Techniques of Experimental Renal Transplantation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri; Haylor, John

    2017-08-01

    Microvascular surgical techniques of renal transplant in rats have evolved over the past 5 decades to achieve successful rat renal transplant; these modifications have included surgical techniques to address the anatomic variations in the renal blood vessels and those to reduce ischemic and operation durations. Here, we review the surgical techniques of renal transplant in rats and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of individual techniques of vascular and ureteric anastomoses. For this review, we performed a systematic literature search using relevant medical subject heading terms and included appropriate publications in the review. Since the first description of a rat model of renal transplant by Bernard Fisher and his colleagues in 1965, which used end-to-side anastomosis between the renal vein and renal artery to the recipient inferior vena cava and aorta, several vascular and ureteric anastomosis techniques have been modified. Vascular anastomosis techniques now include end-to-end anastomosis, use of donor aortic and inferior vena cava conduits, sleeve and cuff anastomoses, and application of fibrin glue. Likewise, restoration of the urinary tract can now be achieved by direct anastomosis of the donor ureter to the recipient bladder, end-to-end anastomosis between the donor and recipient ureters, and donor bladder cuff to the recipient bladder. There are advantages and disadvantages attributable to individual techniques. The range of vascular and ureteric anastomosis techniques that has emerged reflects the need for mastering more than one technique to suit the vascular anatomy of individual animals and to reduce operating time for achieving successful outcomes after renal transplant.

  20. Human body preservation - old and new techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Erich

    2014-03-01

    This review deals with the art of (anatomical) embalming. The first part contains a brief historical review of the history of embalming, starting with ancient cultures such as the Egyptians and the lesser known Chinchorro culture, then going down the centuries and describing the anatomical techniques developed over the last two centuries. The second part deals in detail with the chemicals used for embalming purposes. The third part deals with several approaches to evaluating embalming methods, their suitability for biomechanical testing, antimicrobial properties, histological appearance, and usability. The fourth and final part analyze the European Biocidal Products Directive (98/8/EC) in the light of embalming.

  1. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants ...

  2. Human Experimentation: Impact on Health Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacalis, T. Demetri; Griffis, Kathleen

    1980-01-01

    The problems of the use of humans as subjects of medical research and the protection of their rights are discussed. Issues include the use of informed consent, the evaluation of risks and benefits, and the review of research plans by a committee. (JD)

  3. Seismic techniques of enhanced oil recovery: experimental and field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, O.L.; Simkin, E.M.; Chilingar, G.V.; Gorfunkel, M.V.; Robertson, J.O. Jr.

    2002-09-15

    Application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery techniques during late field development stages usually yields poor results. The reasons are principally due to the low efficiency of these technologies, probably because the gravity and capillary forces are not properly considered. Improved efficiency for hydrocarbon recovery produced by seismic vibration is discussed. (author)

  4. Techniques of Differentiation and Integration, Mathematics (Experimental): 5297.27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Gary B.

    This guidebook on minimum course content was designed for students who have mastered the skills and concepts of analytic geometry. It is a short course in the basic techniques of calculus recommended for the student who has need of these skills in other courses such as beginning physics, economics or statistics. The course does not intend to teach…

  5. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ∼0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  6. Spectroscopy techniques for human disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Moreno, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Modern medicine would benefit from the pursuit of new, more specific and easier to implement diagnosis tools. In recent years, Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy have proven to be successful diagnostic techniques for a wide range of diseases including atherosclerosis, kidney stones, bone diseases, diabetes, and a wide collection of neoplasms. Optical spectroscopy has several advantages over more traditional diagnostic methods (i.e., histopathology, quantitative PCR, etc.) such as faster data analysis, nonspecific sample preparation, nonspecific labels/reagents/antibodies usage requirements, and immediate on-site implementation. In the present work, label-free in vitro fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been used to differentiate between blood cells of patients affected with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and those of healthy subjects. The SERS technique has also been applied to hemoglobin variants as well as to serum obtained from patients affected with chronic heart failure who positively or negatively responded to the seasonal influenza vaccine. We found that spectral ratios of the background fluorescence intensity that accompanies the SERS spectra of granulocytes serve as excellent markers for the presence of MPNs. In addition, we also found expression dysregulation of two hypoxia induced factor regulated genes, which correlates with our results obtained by SERS spectroscopy assay in MPN patients and supports the presence of the Warburg effect in MPNs. We hypothesize that SERS measures metabolic change in granulocytes through two possible mechanisms: (i) Changes in dielectric properties of the environment surrounding the silver-cell interface; and (ii) changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide concentrations, which in turn changes the relative contribution of the autofluorescence to the emission spectrum. These hypotheses are supported by SERS measurement of 2-deoxy

  7. An investigation into stent expansion using numerical and experimental techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Toner, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive finite element analyses have been carried out by researchers to investigate the difference in the mechanical loading induced in vessels stented with various different stent designs and the influence of this loading on restenosis outcome. This study investigates the experimental validation of these numerical stent expansions using compliant mock arteries. The development of this in-vitro validation test has the prospect of providing a fully validated preclinical testing tool which ca...

  8. The focus group technique in electoral research - an experimental project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTOS NEVES, Manuela Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the application of focus group method in electoral research and its contribution to the strategic planning of campaigns. The methodological approach and analysis were based on the nature of information that this kind of research may provide. The starting point was an experimental research conducted by the campaign of a re-election candidate to the House of Representatives of the state of Espírito Santo.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HORIZONTAL COMBUSTION TECHNIQUE FOR BITUMINOUS COAL BRIQUET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路春美; 程世庆; 邵延玲; 张晔

    1997-01-01

    Through a lot of experiments, a new kind of stove using horizontal combustion technique for bituminous coal briquet has been developed. Making use of this stove, studies have been made on burning process of bituminous coal briquet, distribution of temperature field in the stove, the regularities of evolution and combustion of volatile matter, the burning rate and efficiency of bituminous coal briquet, characteristics of fire-sealing and sulfur-retention. The results show that, with the technique, some achievements can be obtained in combustion of bituminous coal briquet, such as lower pollution that the flue gas black degree is below 0.5R and dust concentration is below 90mg/m3 . The stove's combustion efficiency reaches 90%, sulfur fixing efficiency is 60%, and CO concentration is decreased by 40% compared with other traditional stoves. With so many advantages, the stove can be used extensively in civil stoves and smaller industrial boilers.

  10. Experimental study of digital image processing techniques for LANDSAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifman, S. S. (Principal Investigator); Allendoerfer, W. B.; Caron, R. H.; Pemberton, L. J.; Mckinnon, D. M.; Polanski, G.; Simon, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results are reported for: (1) subscene registration, (2) full scene rectification and registration, (3) resampling techniques, (4) and ground control point (GCP) extraction. Subscenes (354 pixels x 234 lines) were registered to approximately 1/4 pixel accuracy and evaluated by change detection imagery for three cases: (1) bulk data registration, (2) precision correction of a reference subscene using GCP data, and (3) independently precision processed subscenes. Full scene rectification and registration results were evaluated by using a correlation technique to measure registration errors of 0.3 pixel rms thoughout the full scene. Resampling evaluations of nearest neighbor and TRW cubic convolution processed data included change detection imagery and feature classification. Resampled data were also evaluated for an MSS scene containing specular solar reflections.

  11. Formal modelling techniques in human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de G.; Veer, van der G.C.; Vliet, van J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is a theoretical contribution, elaborating the concept of models as used in Cognitive Ergonomics. A number of formal modelling techniques in human-computer interaction will be reviewed and discussed. The analysis focusses on different related concepts of formal modelling techniques in hum

  12. The Flaws and Human Harms of Animal Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Nonhuman animal (“animal”) experimentation is typically defended by arguments that it is reliable, that animals provide sufficiently good models of human biology and diseases to yield relevant information, and that, consequently, its use provides major human health benefits. I demonstrate that a growing body of scientific literature critically assessing the validity of animal experimentation generally (and animal modeling specifically) raises important concerns about its reliability...

  13. Energy enters guilty plea. [Department of Energy human experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhijani, A. (Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, Takoma Park, MD (United States))

    This article discusses the history leading up to the admission from Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary that the Energy Department had conducted secret, dangerous, and immoral experiments on the American people. The article describes some of the experimentation on human subjects, attempts to identify the rationale behind exposing human subjects to radiation, and discusses the lack of ethics displayed by the Energy Department in both its experimentation and in its analysis of results. 16 refs.

  14. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  15. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  16. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  17. Experimental evaluation of envelope tracking techniques for voltage disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marei, Mostafa I. [Electrical Power and Machines Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, 1 El-Sarayat St., Abbasia, 11517 Cairo (Egypt); El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M.A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept., University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper a digital signal processor (DSP) based real time voltage envelope tracking system is developed and examined. The ADAptive LINEar neuron (ADALINE) and the Recursive Least Square (RLS) algorithms are adopted for envelope tracking. The proposed ADALINE and RLS algorithms give accurate results even under rapid dynamic changes. The paper investigates the effects of different parameters on the performance of the ADALINE algorithm and that of the RLS algorithm. The experimental system is cantered around a Texas Instrument 16 bit fixed-point arithmetic (TMS320LF2407A) evaluation board. Both the ADALINE and the RLS tracking algorithms are developed using the DSP-assembly language. A simple voltage flicker generator is implemented to produce various voltage disturbances. Extensive tests of the proposed envelope tracking algorithms are conducted to evaluate their dynamic performance. (author)

  18. An experimental study of human birth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Alexa; Gossmann, Roseanna; Fauci, Lisa J.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-11-01

    The laboring uterus is a complex and dynamic fluid system. Relatively little is known about the fluid properties in this system. However, the two primary fluids of interest, amniotic fluid and vernix caseosa, likely play integral roles in the force transferred to the fetus during the final stages of parturition. This investigation probes the role of fluid in the force transfer during delivery by considering physical models that determine the role of various components of the full system. The first experimental model represents the fetus passing through the birth canal as concentric cylinders with a fluid filled gap. The rigid, inner cylinder moves through the highly flexible outer cylinder at a prescribed velocity. The geometry of the inner cylinder is varied by aspect ratio and length. A total of five different inner geometries are used to fully investigate the parameter space. As the inner cylinder moves through the outer cylinder, strain measurements are taken. These measurements are converted to force measurements as a function of time and position in the outer cylinder. The results of these experiments are compared with numerical results to form a more complete picture of force transfer. This model can be used as the foundation for predicting the force needed to deliver a fetus in the final stages of parturition. Additionally, more complex models, that incorporate uterine contraction forces, are being developed.

  19. Classification of alarm processing techniques and human performance issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.S.; O' Hara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Human factors reviews indicate that conventional alarm systems based on the one sensor, one alarm approach, have many human engineering deficiencies, a paramount example being too many alarms during major disturbances. As an effort to resolve these deficiencies, various alarm processing systems have been developed using different techniques. To ensure their contribution to operational safety, the impacts of those systems on operating crew performance should be carefully evaluated. This paper briefly reviews some of the human factors research issues associated with alarm processing techniques and then discusses a framework with which to classify the techniques. The dimensions of this framework can be used to explore the effects of alarm processing systems on human performance.

  20. Classification of alarm processing techniques and human performance issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.S.; O`Hara, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    Human factors reviews indicate that conventional alarm systems based on the one sensor, one alarm approach, have many human engineering deficiencies, a paramount example being too many alarms during major disturbances. As an effort to resolve these deficiencies, various alarm processing systems have been developed using different techniques. To ensure their contribution to operational safety, the impacts of those systems on operating crew performance should be carefully evaluated. This paper briefly reviews some of the human factors research issues associated with alarm processing techniques and then discusses a framework with which to classify the techniques. The dimensions of this framework can be used to explore the effects of alarm processing systems on human performance.

  1. Experimental and Computational Techniques in Soft Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsen, Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    1. Microscopy of soft materials Eric R. Weeks; 2. Computational methods to study jammed Systems Carl F. Schrek and Corey S. O'Hern; 3. Soft random solids: particulate gels, compressed emulsions and hybrid materials Anthony D. Dinsmore; 4. Langmuir monolayers Michael Dennin; 5. Computer modeling of granular rheology Leonardo E. Silbert; 6. Rheological and microrheological measurements of soft condensed matter John R. de Bruyn and Felix K. Oppong; 7. Particle-based measurement techniques for soft matter Nicholas T. Ouellette; 8. Cellular automata models of granular flow G. William Baxter; 9. Photoelastic materials Brian Utter; 10. Image acquisition and analysis in soft condensed matter Jeffrey S. Olafsen; 11. Structure and patterns in bacterial colonies Nicholas C. Darnton.

  2. Experimental analysis of mechanical response of stabilized occipitocervical junction by 3D mark tracking technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brémand F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is about a biomechanical comparison of some stabilization solutions for the occipitocervical junction. Four kinds of occipito-cervical fixations are analysed in this work: lateral plates fixed by two kinds of screws, lateral plates fixed by hooks and median plate. To study mechanical rigidity of each one, tests have been performed on human skulls by applying loadings and by studying mechanical response of fixations and bone. For this experimental analysis, a specific setup has been developed to impose a load corresponding to the flexion-extension physiological movements. 3D mark tracking technique is employed to measure 3D displacement fields on the bone and on the fixations. Observations of displacement evolution on the bone according to the fixation show different rigidities given by each solution.

  3. Experimental analysis of mechanical response of stabilized occipitocervical junction by 3D mark tracking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaneau, A.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J. C.; Brèque, C.; Brémand, F.; D'Houtaud, S.; Rigoard, P.

    2010-06-01

    This study is about a biomechanical comparison of some stabilization solutions for the occipitocervical junction. Four kinds of occipito-cervical fixations are analysed in this work: lateral plates fixed by two kinds of screws, lateral plates fixed by hooks and median plate. To study mechanical rigidity of each one, tests have been performed on human skulls by applying loadings and by studying mechanical response of fixations and bone. For this experimental analysis, a specific setup has been developed to impose a load corresponding to the flexion-extension physiological movements. 3D mark tracking technique is employed to measure 3D displacement fields on the bone and on the fixations. Observations of displacement evolution on the bone according to the fixation show different rigidities given by each solution.

  4. Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques for Nacelle Liner Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.; Nark, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has been developed to investigate sound propagation through a duct of size comparable to the aft bypass duct of typical aircraft engines. The axial dimension of the bypass duct is often curved and this geometric characteristic is captured in the CDTR. The semiannular bypass duct is simulated by a rectangular test section in which the height corresponds to the circumferential dimension and the width corresponds to the radial dimension. The liner samples are perforate over honeycomb core and are installed on the side walls of the test section. The top and bottom surfaces of the test section are acoustically rigid to simulate a hard wall bifurcation or pylon. A unique feature of the CDTR is the control system that generates sound incident on the liner test section in specific modes. Uniform air flow, at ambient temperature and flow speed Mach 0.275, is introduced through the duct. Experiments to investigate configuration effects such as curvature along the flow path on the acoustic performance of a sample liner are performed in the CDTR and reported in this paper. Combinations of treated and acoustically rigid side walls are investigated. The scattering of modes of the incident wave, both by the curvature and by the asymmetry of wall treatment, is demonstrated in the experimental results. The effect that mode scattering has on total acoustic effectiveness of the liner treatment is also shown. Comparisons of measured liner attenuation with numerical results predicted by an analytic model based on the parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation are reported. The spectra of attenuation produced by the analytic model are similar to experimental results for both walls treated, straight and curved flow path, with plane wave and higher order modes incident. The numerical model is used to define the optimized resistance and reactance of a liner that significantly improves liner attenuation in the frequency range 1900-2400 Hz. A

  5. New experimental technique to determine coal self-ignition duration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhai ZHANG; Guang XI

    2008-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model was adopted to simulate the relationship between self-ignition duration and sulfur content, ash content, oxygen con-sumption rate, carbon monoxide as well as carbon dioxide generation rate of coal at different temperatures of self heating process. The data from spontaneous combustion experiments were used for ANN training to obtain the connection strength between nerve cells. An oil-bath pro-grammed temperature experiment device was designed and the experimental condition and the size of the test tube were determined for testing the oxygen consumption and the gases generation rate of coal during self-heating process. The sulfur content, the ash content and the data from the oil-bath experiment were taken as ANN inputs to calculate the experiment self-ignition duration of coal. Compared with spontaneous combustion experiment, less than 1% of coal sample and 10% of time are required with an error of less than 3 days to test self-ignition duration of coal.

  6. Stem cell clonality -- theoretical concepts, experimental techniques, and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauche, Ingmar; Bystrykh, Leonid; Eaves, Connie; Roeder, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Here we report highlights of discussions and results presented at an International Workshop on Concepts and Models of Stem Cell Organization held on July 16th and 17th, 2012 in Dresden, Germany. The goal of the workshop was to undertake a systematic survey of state-of-the-art methods and results of clonality studies of tissue regeneration and maintenance with a particular emphasis on the hematopoietic system. The meeting was the 6th in a series of similar conceptual workshops, termed StemCellMathLab,(2) all of which have had the general objective of using an interdisciplinary approach to discuss specific aspects of stem cell biology. The StemCellMathLab 2012, which was jointly organized by the Institute for Medical Informatics and Biometry, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology and the Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, brought together 32 scientists from 8 countries, with scientific backgrounds in medicine, cell biology, virology, physics, computer sciences, bioinformatics and mathematics. The workshop focused on the following questions: (1) How heterogeneous are stem cells and their progeny? and (2) What are the characteristic differences in the clonal dynamics between physiological and pathophysiological situations? In discussing these questions, particular emphasis was placed on (a) the methods for quantifying clones and their dynamics in experimental and clinical settings and (b) general concepts and models for their description. In this workshop summary we start with an introduction to the current state of clonality research and a proposal for clearly defined terminology. Major topics of discussion include clonal heterogeneity in unperturbed tissues, clonal dynamics due to physiological and pathophysiological pressures and conceptual and technical issues of clone quantification. We conclude that an interactive cross-disciplinary approach to research in this

  7. Forecasting display technique of human in network virtual environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The simulation of human in the distributed virtual environment is different from the simulation of ve hicle. Due to the human's many joints, to implement the real-time performance of the interaction between the virtual human and the environment, the quantity of information broadcasted in the network will be increased. So with the growing of the quantity of virtual human added to the network, the network burthen would augment rap idly. Therefore, for the simulation of virtual human this paper divides organically the motion parts of the body, which makes those body parts that often interact with the environment are described according to the joints while other parts are described according to the action information. Simultaneity, this paper adopts Dead Reckoning to reduce the quantity of information needed by maintaining the reality motion of virtual human. The experiment indicates that the forecasting display technique can efficiently reduce the network burthen and enhance the inter action of virtual human.

  8. Translocations of amphibians: Proven management method or experimental technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigel, Richard A.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    In an otherwise excellent review of metapopulation dynamics in amphibians, Marsh and Trenham (2001) make the following provocative statements (emphasis added): If isolation effects occur primarily in highly disturbed habitats, species translocations may be necessary to promote local and regional population persistence. Because most amphibians lack parental care, they areprime candidates for egg and larval translocations. Indeed, translocations have already proven successful for several species of amphibians. Where populations are severely isolated, translocations into extinct subpopulations may be the best strategy to promote regional population persistence. We take issue with these statements for a number of reasons. First, the authors fail to cite much of the relevant literature on species translocations in general and for amphibians in particular. Second, to those unfamiliar with current research in amphibian conservation biology, these comments might suggest that translocations are a proven management method. This is not the case, at least in most instances where translocations have been evaluated for an appropriate period of time. Finally, the authors fail to point out some of the negative aspects of species translocation as a management method. We realize that Marsh and Trenham's paper was not concerned primarily with translocations. However, because Marsh and Trenham (2001) made specific recommendations for conservation planners and managers (many of whom are not herpetologists or may not be familiar with the pertinent literature on amphibians), we believe that it is essential to point out that not all amphibian biologists are as comfortable with translocations as these authors appear to be. We especially urge caution about advocating potentially unproven techniques without a thorough review of available options.

  9. Spectral Biomimetic Technique for Wood Classification Inspired by Human Echolocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Martínez Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Palatal clicks are most interesting for human echolocation. Moreover, these sounds are suitable for other acoustic applications due to their regular mathematical properties and reproducibility. Simple and nondestructive techniques, bioinspired by synthetized pulses whose form reproduces the best features of palatal clicks, can be developed. The use of synthetic palatal pulses also allows detailed studies of the real possibilities of acoustic human echolocation without the problems associated with subjective individual differences. These techniques are being applied to the study of wood. As an example, a comparison of the performance of both natural and synthetic human echolocation to identify three different species of wood is presented. The results show that human echolocation has a vast potential.

  10. A Course in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Principles, Practice, and Modern Experimental Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eduardo E.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a multidisciplinary course which comprises fundamental, practical, and experimental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis. The course structure is a combination of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the use of spectroscopic techniques for surface analysis. (SK)

  11. EFFORTS Sub-task report on task 4.1: Experimental Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling.......Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling....

  12. Contact angle hysteresis on polymer substrates established with various experimental techniques, its interpretation, and quantitative characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Musin, Albina; Jager, Rachel; Barkay, Zahava

    2008-04-15

    The effect of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) was studied on various polymer substrates with traditional and new experimental techniques. The new experimental technique presented in the article is based on the slow deformation of the droplet, thus CAH is studied under the constant volume of the drop in contrast to existing techniques when the volume of the drop is changed under the measurement. The energy of hysteresis was calculated in the framework of the improved Extrand approach. The advancing contact angle established with a new technique is in a good agreement with that measured with the needle-syringe method. The receding angles measured with three experimental techniques demonstrated a very significant discrepancy. The force pinning the triple line responsible for hysteresis was calculated.

  13. Application of Data Collection Techniques by Human Performance Technology Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Minjing

    2011-01-01

    By content-analyzing 22 published cases from a variety of professional and academic books and journals, this study examines the status quo of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners' application of five major data collection techniques in their everyday work: questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation, and document collection. The…

  14. Development of an evaluation technique for human-machine interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Dae Hwan; Koo, Sang Hui; Ahn, Won Yeong; Ryu, Yeong Shin [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    The purpose of this study is two-fold : firstly to establish an evaluation technique for HMI(Human Machine Interface) in NPPs(Nuclear Power Plants) and secondly to develop an architecture of a support system which can be used for the evaluation of HMI. In order to establish an evaluation technique, this study conducted literature review on basic theories of cognitive science studies and summarized the cognitive characteristics of humans. This study also surveyed evaluation techniques of HMI in general, and reviewed studies on the evaluation of HMI in NPPs. On the basis of this survey, the study established a procedure for the evaluation of HMI in NPPs in Korea and laid a foundation for empirical verification.

  15. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadipour, Mahboubeh; Nazari, Mohammad; Sanei, Behnam; Ghayour, Zahra; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Yazdani, Hajar; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF), protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection. PMID:28331516

  16. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Hadipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF, protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection.

  17. Validation of Two Nonlinear System Identification Techniques Using an Experimental Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lenaerts

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a nonlinear system is performed using experimental data and two different techniques, i.e. a method based on the Wavelet transform and the Restoring Force Surface method. Both techniques exploit the system free response and result in the estimation of linear and nonlinear physical parameters.

  18. Effect of recording/playback technique and experimental method on assessments of noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Emine; Persson-Waye, Kerstin; Møller, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated possible effects of recording/playback technique and experimental method on assessments of annoyance, loudness and unpleasantness. A possible effect of exposure duration was also studied. Sounds were recorded with two different techniques: monophonic and binaural (dummy......-head technique). In addition, they were reproduced with three different techniques: monophonic recordings presented through a loudspeaker system, binaural recordings presented through closed (circum-aural) and completely open (free-of-the-ear headphones. The study adopted three psychometric methods...... of experiments and interpretation of results. The results also show that long-term annoyance and unpleasantness are poorly predicted by short-duration methods....

  19. Linking human factors to corporate strategy with cognitive mapping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, Judy; Greig, Michael; Salustri, Filippo A; Neumann, W Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For human factors (HF) to avoid being considered of "side-car" status, it needs to be positioned within the organization in such a way that it affects business strategies and their implementation. Tools are needed to support this effort. This paper explores the feasibility of applying a technique from operational research called cognitive mapping to link HF to corporate strategy. Using a single case study, a cognitive map is drawn to reveal the complex relationships between human factors and achieving an organization's strategic goals. Analysis of the map for central concepts and reinforcing loops enhances understanding that can lead to discrete initiatives to facilitate integration of HF. It is recommended that this technique be used with senior managers to understand the organizations` strategic goals and enhance understanding of the potential for HF to contribute to the strategic goals.

  20. Modelling human actions on lightweight structures: experimental and numerical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents recent, numerical and experimental, developments in modelling dynamic loading generated by humans. As modern structures with exposure to human-induced loading, such as footbridges, building floors and grandstands, are becoming ever lighter and more slender, they are increasingly susceptible to vibration under human-induced dynamic excitation, such as walking, jumping, running and bobbing, and their vibration serviceability assessment is often a deciding factor in the design process. While simplified modelling of the human using a harmonic force was sufficient for assessment of vibration performance of more robust structures a few decades ago, the higher fidelity models are required in the contemporary design. These models are expected not only to describe both temporal and spectral features of the force signal more accurately, but also to capture the influence, psychological and physiological, of human-structure and human-human interaction mechanisms on the human kinematics, and consequently on the force generated and the resulting vibration response. Significant advances have been made in both the research studies and design guidance. This paper reports the key developments and identifies the scope for further research.

  1. Human toxocariosis: Seroprevalence in Lima inhabitans by ELISA technique

    OpenAIRE

    ESPINOZA, YRMA; Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Daniel A. Carrión”, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Departamento Académico de Microbiología Médica Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Huapaya, Pedro; Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Daniel A. Carrión”, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Sevilla, Carlos; Departamento Académico de Microbiología Médica; Huiza, Alina; Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Daniel A. Carrión”, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Bióloga.; Jiménez, Susana; Departamento Académico de Microbiología Médica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Náquira, César; Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Daniel A. Carrión”, UNSMM; Instituto Nacional de Salud

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To estimate seroprevalence of human toxocariosis in Lima inhabitants. Design: Cross-sectional study, non aleatory selection. Material and methods: To people living in Lima city urban marginal communities, an interview and clinical examination were done and serum samples obtained to detect antibodies against Toxocara by ELISA technique. Stool samples were also obtained to check parasites causing cross reactions with serology. Results: From 553 persons examined 23,3% were reactive. T...

  2. Laser Ultrasonic Technique for Evaluating Human Dental Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D H-C; Fleming, S; Law, S [Insititue of Photonics and Optical Science, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lee, Y-C [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan (China); Swain, M; Xue, J, E-mail: hsiao-chuan.wang@sydney.edu.au [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    A non-destructive laser ultrasonic surface acoustic wave technique has been demonstrated to quantitatively evaluate the elastic response of human dental enamel. We demonstrate the system performance by measuring surface acoustic wave velocity in sound and demineralised enamel. In addition, progressive measurements were made to monitor the change in the enamel elasticity during a two week remineralisation process. The results are presented and they confirm the efficacy, as well as illuminating the progress, of the treatment.

  3. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  4. Informed consent in human experimentation before the Nuremberg code.

    OpenAIRE

    Vollmann, J; Winau, R.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of ethics with respect to medical experimentation in Germany during the 1930s and 1940s was crucial at the Nuremberg trials and related trials of doctors and public health officials. Those involved in horrible crimes attempted to excuse themselves by arguing that there were no explicit rules governing medical research on human beings in Germany during the period and that research practices in Germany were not different from those in allied countries. In this context the Nuremberg co...

  5. Social Learning in a Human Society: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdi, Maziyar; Solman, Grayden; Kingstone, Alan; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study to investigate the learning and decision making behavior of individuals in a human society. Social learning is used as the mathematical basis for modelling interaction of individuals that aim to perform a perceptual task interactively. A psychology experiment was conducted on a group of undergraduate students at the University of British Columbia to examine whether the decision (action) of one individual affects the decision of the subsequent individu...

  6. Informed consent in human experimentation before the Nuremberg code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, J; Winau, R

    1996-12-07

    The issue of ethics with respect to medical experimentation in Germany during the 1930s and 1940s was crucial at the Nuremberg trials and related trials of doctors and public health officials. Those involved in horrible crimes attempted to excuse themselves by arguing that there were no explicit rules governing medical research on human beings in Germany during the period and that research practices in Germany were not different from those in allied countries. In this context the Nuremberg code of 1947 is generally regarded as the first document to set out ethical regulations in human experimentation based on informed consent. New research, however, indicates that ethical issues of informed consent in guidelines for human experimentation were recognised as early as the nineteenth century. These guidelines shed light on the still contentious issue of when the concepts of autonomy, informed consent, and therapeutic and non-therapeutic research first emerged. This issue assumes renewed importance in the context of current attempts to assess liability and responsibility for the abuse of people in various experiments conducted since the second world war in the United States, Canada, Russia, and other nations.

  7. Image reconstruction techniques for high resolution human brain PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comtat, C.; Bataille, F.; Sureau, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    High resolution PET imaging is now a well established technique not only for small animal, but also for human brain studies. The ECAT HRRT brain PET scanner(Siemens Molecular Imaging) is characterized by an effective isotropic spatial resolution of 2.5 mm, about a factor of 2 better than for state-of-the-art whole-body clinical PET scanners. Although the absolute sensitivity of the HRRT (6.5 %) for point source in the center of the field-of-view is increased relative to whole-body scanner (typically 4.5 %) thanks to a larger co-polar aperture, the sensitivity in terms of volumetric resolution (75 (m{sup 3} at best for whole-body scanners and 16 (m{sup 3} for t he HRRT) is much lower. This constraint has an impact on the performance of image reconstruction techniques, in particular for dynamic studies. Standard reconstruction methods used with clinical whole-body PET scanners are not optimal for this application. Specific methods had to be developed, based on fully 3D iterative techniques. Different refinements can be added in the reconstruction process to improve image quality: more accurate modeling of the acquisition system, more accurate modeling of the statistical properties of the acquired data, anatomical side information to guide the reconstruction . We will present the performances these added developments for neuronal imaging in humans. (author)

  8. Experimental comparison of different oscillation-based test techniques in an analog block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Kay; Picos, Rodrigo; Bota, Sebastia; Roca, Miquel; Garcia-Moreno, Eugeni

    2005-06-01

    This paper experimentally analyses the capabilities of an Oscillation-Based Test technique for diagnosis purposes. To evaluate the feasibility of this test strategy, the technique is applied to an Operational Transconductance Amplifier with fault injection capabilities. The application of this methodology has low impact on circuit performances. Voltage and current magnitude have been considered as test observables. The effects of catastrophic and parametric defects (bridges, opens and shorts) are analyzed in this work. Results show that by a right choice of the test observable, this technique provides high fault coverage levels even in the case of process variations.

  9. Application of experimental design techniques to structural simulation meta-model building using neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费庆国; 张令弥

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are being used to construct meta-models in numerical simulation of structures. In addition to network structures and training algorithms, training samples also greatly affect the accuracy of neural network models. In this paper, some existing main sampling techniques are evaluated, including techniques based on experimental design theory,random selection, and rotating sampling. First, advantages and disadvantages of each technique are reviewed. Then, seven techniques are used to generate samples for training radial neural networks models for two benchmarks: an antenna model and an aircraft model. Results show that the uniform design, in which the number of samples and mean square error network models are considered, is the best sampling technique for neural network based meta-model building.

  10. Experimental evaluation of optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alirezaei, M.; Kanarachos, S.A.; Scheepers, B.T.M.; Maurice, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Development and experimentally evaluation of an optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) strategy based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) control technique is presented. The proposed nonlinear controller is based on a nonlinear vehicle model with nonlinear tire characteristics. A novel ext

  11. Experimental Verification of Interference Mitigation Techniques for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    Inter-cell interference is the main performance limiting factor in the dense deployment of small cells targeted by the upcoming 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology. In this paper, we present an experimental evaluation of inter-cell interference mitigation techniques in a real indoor office...

  12. Experimental evaluation of optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alirezaei, M.; Kanarachos, S.A.; Scheepers, B.T.M.; Maurice, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Development and experimentally evaluation of an optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) strategy based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) control technique is presented. The proposed nonlinear controller is based on a nonlinear vehicle model with nonlinear tire characteristics. A novel

  13. The Use of Techniques of Sensory Evaluation as a Framework for Teaching Experimental Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R.; Hamilton, M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes sensory assessment techniques and conditions for their satisfactory performance, including how they can provide open-ended exercises and advantages as relatively inexpensive and simple methods of teaching experimentation. Experiments described focus on diffusion of salt into potatoes after being cooked in boiled salted water. (Author/JN)

  14. Experimental Nondestructive Test for Estimation of Buckling Load on Unstiffened Cylindrical Shells Using Vibration Correlation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspars Kalnins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive methods, to calculate the buckling load of imperfection sensitive thin-walled structures, such as large-scale aerospace structures, are one of the most important techniques for the evaluation of new structures and validation of numerical models. The vibration correlation technique (VCT allows determining the buckling load for several types of structures without reaching the instability point, but this technique is still under development for thin-walled plates and shells. This paper presents and discusses an experimental verification of a novel approach using vibration correlation technique for the prediction of realistic buckling loads of unstiffened cylindrical shells loaded under axial compression. Four different test structures were manufactured and loaded up to buckling: two composite laminated cylindrical shells and two stainless steel cylinders. In order to characterize a relationship with the applied load, the first natural frequency of vibration and mode shape is measured during testing using a 3D laser scanner. The proposed vibration correlation technique allows one to predict the experimental buckling load with a very good approximation without actually reaching the instability point. Additional experimental tests and numerical models are currently under development to further validate the proposed approach for composite and metallic conical structures.

  15. An experimental comparison of modelling techniques for speaker recognition under limited data condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayanna; S R Mahadeva Prasanna

    2009-10-01

    Most of the existing modelling techniques for the speaker recognition task make an implicit assumption of sufficient data for speaker modelling and hence may lead to poor modelling under limited data condition. The present work gives an experimental evaluation of the modelling techniques like Crisp Vector Quantization (CVQ), Fuzzy Vector Quantization (FVQ), Self-Organizing Map (SOM), Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ), and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) classifiers. An experimental evaluation of the most widely used Gaussian Mixture Model–Universal Background Model (GMM–UBM) is also made. The experimental knowledge is then used to select a subset of classifiers for obtaining the combined classifiers. It is proposed that the combined LVQ and GMM–UBM classifier provides relatively better performance compared to all the individual as well as combined classifiers.

  16. Electromagnetic and Thermal Dosimetric Techniques in Humans and its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to radio frequency fields. Radio frequency fields are also used for medical application. This paper reviews electromagnetic and thermal computational dosimetric techniques, which has been developed by the authors. The feature of the thermal dosimetric method is that body core temperature can be computed reasonably unlike conventional method. This scheme is particularly useful for intense localized or whole-body electromagnetic wave exposure. Computational examples are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposal.

  17. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Quality within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error.This presentation will provide a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  18. Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2010-09-01

    Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

  19. What experimental experience affects dogs' comprehension of human communicative actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Marc D; Comins, Jordan A; Pytka, Lisa M; Cahill, Donal P; Velez-Calderon, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Studies of dogs report that individuals reliably respond to the goal-directed communicative actions (e.g., pointing) of human experimenters. All of these studies use some version of a multi-trial approach, thereby allowing for the possibility of rapid learning within an experimental session. The experiments reported here ask whether dogs can respond correctly to a communicative action based on only a single presentation, thereby eliminating the possibility of learning within the experimental context. We tested 173 dogs. For each dog reaching our test criteria, we used a single presentation of six different goal-directed actions within a session, asking whether they correctly follow to a target goal (container with concealed food) a (1) distal hand point, (2) step toward one container, (3) hand point to one container followed by step toward the other, (4) step toward one container and point to the other, (5) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands free, and (6) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands occupied. Given only a single presentation, dogs selected the correct container when the experimenter hand pointed, foot pointed with hands occupied, or stepped closer to the target container, but failed on the other actions, despite using the same method. The fact that dogs correctly followed foot pointing with hands occupied, but not hands free, suggests that they are sensitive to environmental constraints, and use this information to infer rational, goal-directed action. We discuss these results in light of the role of experience in recognizing communicative gestures, as well as the significance of coding criteria for studies of canine competence.

  20. [Enhanced molecular techniques for the diagnosis of human papillomavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Ramona Gabriela; Onofriescu, M; Nemescu, D; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda

    2009-01-01

    optimisation of Real Time PCR technique for quantifying oncogenic types 16 and 18 of Human Papilloma Viruses, genotyped through classic PCR, followed by hybridisation. DNA/ HPV was purified with High Pure PCR Template Preparation kit (ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS), genotyping was performed with Linear Array HPV Genotyping (ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS) and PCR reaction was realized with ABI 9700 Gold Plate System. Absolute quantification of HPV 16 and 18 was performed with Path-HPV16/18 Real-time PCR detection kit for Human Papillomavirus, 2 x Precision Mastermix kits (PrimerDesign), and the instrument used was MX3000P STRATAGENE. I. HPV genotyping was optimised through testing of 12 cervical samples, collected from patients who have signed the informed consent approved by the local Bioethical Committee. Among the tested samples, 5 were negative for any HPV type, 3 patients had unique infections with oncogenic HPV type, and 2 patients had multiple infections, with oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV types. Negative and positive controls were validated, identical as the internal control - beta globin gene. II. Absolute quantification for HPV 16 and 18 were performed on two samples tested by the previous method. The number of viral copies was determined using the standard curves procedure, whose parameters values were between the accepted limits. We fulfilled the quality criteria for both techniques: genotyping assay and viral load quantification by Real Time PCR. This allows us to start the study for monitoring persistent infections with HPV 16 and HPV 18.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Tunnel Discharge Ability by Using Drag Reduction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-kui WANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiments in an open flume model and in the spillway tunnel models were carried out by using drag reduction technique. The drag reduction experiments in open channel model adopted two techniques: polymer addition and coating. The drag reduction effect of polyacrylamide (PAM solution and the dimethyl silicone oil coating were studied by the flume model experiments, and the results were satisfied. Then the experiments were carried out in the model of a Hydropower station, which is the second largest dam in China. In order to reduce the resistance, the spillway tunnel models were coated inside with the dimethyl silicone oil. It is the first time that applying the drag reduction technique in the large hydraulic model. The experimental results show that the coating technique can effectively increase the ability of flood discharge. The outlet velocity and the jet trajectory distance were also increased, which is beneficial to the energy dissipation of the spillway tunnel.

  2. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  3. Excimer laser "corneal shaping": a new technique for customized trephination in penetrating keratoplasty. First experimental results in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Klaus; Schreiber, Wolfram; Behrens-Baumann, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the presented experimental work was to develop a technique for congruent trephination of donor and recipient corneas in free form using a 193-nm excimer laser and to study the clinical follow-up after the application of the technique in a rabbit model. In 12 New Zealand White rabbits homologous penetrating keratoplasty was performed. Trephination of donor buttons and recipient beds was achieved in six animals by conventional mechanical trephination and in six by excimer laser trephination with a guided laser beam in a non-circular geometry. The surgical procedure and its applicability to human subjects were evaluated and the postoperative clinical course was followed for 6 months. The surgical procedure of full-thickness excimer laser trephination could be performed reproducibly in the animal model both for dissection of the donor buttons and for preparation of the recipient beds. Keratoplasty was performed with kidney-shaped transplants after trephination in free form with the guided laser beam. Postoperative clinical follow-up did not show any differences between the two trephination groups that could be related to the applied trephination technique. After 6 months we observed well-adapted and clear corneal grafts, kidney-shaped in the excimer trephination group and circular in the mechanical trephination group. No side effects on the crystalline lens and the central retina could be clinically observed following excimer laser trephination. We present the first experimental study of keratoplasty with freely selected transplant geometry and perfect congruence of donor button and recipient bed. The application of this technique in certain corneal disorders in humans will offer improved treatment options in the future.

  4. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  5. Application of Modern Experimental Technique to Solve Morphological Complexity in Plants Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURANTO

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern taxonomy has two approaches, i.e. classical and experimental taxonomy. Classical taxonomy uses morphological characters, while experimental taxonomy uses broader methods including chemistry, physics and mathematics, in the form of laboratory data that are revealed together with the progress of optical technique (microscope, chemistry methods (chromatography, electrophoresis, etc. Modern taxonomy tends to use series of interrelated data. More data used would result in more validity and give better clarification of taxonomic status. A lot of modern taxonomic data such as palynology, cytotaxonomy (cytology, chemical constituent (chemotaxonomy, isozyme and DNA sequencing were used recently.

  6. Study of Influence of Experimental Technique on Measured Particle Velocity Distributions in Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Balaji; Shaffer, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Fluid flows that are loaded with high concentration of solid particles are common in oil and chemical processing industries. However, the opaque nature of the flow fields and the complex nature of the flow have hampered the experimental and computational study of these processes. This has led to the development of a number of customized experimental techniques for high concentration particle flows for evaluation and improvement of CFD models. This includes techniques that track few individual particles, measures average particle velocity over a small sample volume and those over a large sample volume. In this work novel high speed PIV (HsPIV), with individual particle tracking, was utilized to measure velocities of individual particles in gas-particle flow fields at the walls circulating and bubbling fluidized bed. The HsPIV measurement technique has the ability to simultaneously recognize and track thousands of individual particles in flows of high particle concentration. To determine the effect of the size of the sample volume on particle velocity measurements, the PDF of Lagrangian particle velocity was compared with the PDF of Eulerian for different domain sizes over a range of flow conditions. The results will show that measured particle velocity distribution can vary from technique to technique and this bias has to be accounted in comparison with CFD simulations.

  7. Experimental Study on Indoor Air Cleaning Technique of Nano-Titania Catalysis Under Plasma Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Deli; YANG Xuechang; ZHOU Fei; WU Yuhuang

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a new technique of air cleaning by plasma combined with catalyst was proposed, which consisted of electrostatic precipitation, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) decomposition and sterilization. A novel indoor air purifier based on this technique was adopted. The experimental results showed that formaldehyde decomposition by the plasma-catalyst hybrid system was more efficient than that by plasma only. Positive discharge was better than negative discharge in formaldehyde removal. Meanwhile, the outlet concentration of ozone byproduct was effectively reduced by the nano-titania catalyst.

  8. Analytical and experimental evaluation of techniques for the fabrication of thermoplastic hologram storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on recording information on thermoplastic are given. A description was given of a typical fabrication configuration, the recording sequence, and the samples which were examined. There are basically three configurations which can be used for the recording of information on thermoplastic. The most popular technique uses corona which furnishes free charge. The necessary energy for deformation is derived from a charge layer atop the thermoplastic. The other two techniques simply use a dc potential in place of the corona for deformation energy.

  9. Erythropoietin regulations in humans under different environmental and experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunga, H-C; Kirsch, K A; Roecker, L; Kohlberg, E; Tiedemann, J; Steinach, M; Schobersberger, W

    2007-09-30

    In the adult human, the kidney is the main organ for the production and release of erythropoietin (EPO). EPO is stimulating erythropoiesis by increasing the proliferation, differentiation and maturation of the erythroid precursors. In the last decades, enormous efforts were made in the purification, molecular encoding and description of the EPO gene. This led to an incredible increase in the understanding of the EPO-feedback-regulation loop at a molecular level, especially the oxygen-dependent EPO gene expression, a key function in the regulation loop. However, studies in humans at a systemic level are still very scanty. Therefore, it is the purpose of the present review to report on the main recent investigations on EPO production and release in humans under different environmental and experimental conditions, including: (i) studies on EPO circadian, monthly and even annual variations, (ii) studies in connection with short-, medium- and long-term exercise at sea-level which will be followed (iii) by studies performed at moderate and high altitude.

  10. Improving human object recognition performance using video enhancement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Lucy S.; Lewis, Colin; Oakley, John P.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric scattering causes significant degradation in the quality of video images, particularly when imaging over long distances. The principle problem is the reduction in contrast due to scattered light. It is known that when the scattering particles are not too large compared with the imaging wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering) then high spatial resolution information may be contained within a low-contrast image. Unfortunately this information is not easily perceived by a human observer, particularly when using a standard video monitor. A secondary problem is the difficulty of achieving a sharp focus since automatic focus techniques tend to fail in such conditions. Recently several commercial colour video processing systems have become available. These systems use various techniques to improve image quality in low contrast conditions whilst retaining colour content. These systems produce improvements in subjective image quality in some situations, particularly in conditions of haze and light fog. There is also some evidence that video enhancement leads to improved ATR performance when used as a pre-processing stage. Psychological literature indicates that low contrast levels generally lead to a reduction in the performance of human observers in carrying out simple visual tasks. The aim of this paper is to present the results of an empirical study on object recognition in adverse viewing conditions. The chosen visual task was vehicle number plate recognition at long ranges (500 m and beyond). Two different commercial video enhancement systems are evaluated using the same protocol. The results show an increase in effective range with some differences between the different enhancement systems.

  11. In Vitro Experimental Testing of the Human Knee: A Concise Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletsky, Lorin; Shalhoub, Sami; Fitzwater, Fallon; Eboch, William; Dickinson, Matthew; Akhbari, Bardiya; Louie, Ednah

    2016-02-01

    In vitro testing of the human knee provides valuable insight that contributes to further understanding knee biomechanics. Cadaveric testing correlates well with clinical trials because the tissue has similar properties to that of live subjects. In addition, in vitro testing allows studies to be performed that would otherwise be unethical to evaluate in vivo. Due to their many advantages, cadaveric testing has been utilized to evaluate many of medical devices and surgical techniques that have been developed in recent decades. This article aims to review the current technologies and methodologies utilized in experimental in vitro testing of the human knee. The article provides a summary of the different rigs and machines that are currently used to examine the biomechanics of the knee. It also highlights the variable experimental techniques and measurement systems that are used to collect the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint. As technologies advance so do the measurement systems and equipment in the experimental biomechanics field. The influence of improvements to these testing equipment and measurement devices on in vitro testing of the knee will also be discussed in this review. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Experimental sensitivity analysis of a linearly stable thermoacoustic system via a pulsed forcing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Nicholas P.; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an experimental sensitivity analysis on a vertical electrically heated Rijke tube. We examine the shift in linear decay rates and frequencies of thermoacoustic oscillations, with and without control devices. To measure the decay rate, we wait for the system to reach a steady state and then excite it with an acoustic pulse from a loudspeaker. We identify the range of amplitudes over which the amplitude decays exponentially with time. In this range, the rate of change of the amplitude is linearly proportional to the amplitude, and we calculate the constant of proportionality, the linear decay rate, which can be compared with model predictions. The aim of this work is (i) to improve the experimental techniques implemented by Rigas et al. (J Fluid Mech 787, 2016), Jamieson et al. (Int J Spray Combust Dyn, 2016), using a technique inspired by Mejia et al. (Combust Flame 169:287-296, 2016), and (ii) to provide experimental data for future comparison with adjoint-based sensitivity analysis. Our experimental setup is automated and we can obtain thousands of decay rates in 1/12 the time of our previous method.

  13. A human visual based binarization technique for histological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Rajendran, Rahul; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    In the field of vision-based systems for object detection and classification, thresholding is a key pre-processing step. Thresholding is a well-known technique for image segmentation. Segmentation of medical images, such as Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), X-Ray, Phase Contrast Microscopy, and Histological images, present problems like high variability in terms of the human anatomy and variation in modalities. Recent advances made in computer-aided diagnosis of histological images help facilitate detection and classification of diseases. Since most pathology diagnosis depends on the expertise and ability of the pathologist, there is clearly a need for an automated assessment system. Histological images are stained to a specific color to differentiate each component in the tissue. Segmentation and analysis of such images is problematic, as they present high variability in terms of color and cell clusters. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding technique that aims at segmenting cell structures from Haematoxylin and Eosin stained images. The thresholded result can further be used by pathologists to perform effective diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed method is analyzed by visually comparing the results to the state of art thresholding methods such as Otsu, Niblack, Sauvola, Bernsen, and Wolf. Computer simulations demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in segmenting critical information.

  14. Optical techniques to understand biofunctional adaptation in human dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; Asundi, Anand K.

    2004-08-01

    Human tooth structure in the oral environment is subjected to mechanical forces and thermal fluctuations. Dentine, the major component of the tooth structure, is a bio-composite, mainly composed of a highly mineralized phase and a collagenous phase. When subjected to changes in load and/or temperature, dentine will experience stresses and strains distribution within their structure. Though such effects are found to cause deleterious effects on artificial dental restorations, biological structures such as dentine seem to posses an inherent ability to adapt to functional thermo-mechanical loads. Optical techniques enable visualization and quantification of deformation, strain and stress on dental structures and provide a better understanding on their thermo-mechanical response. In this study 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional digital photoelasticity, digital moiré interferometry and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) are all shown to be quite promising in this application. This paper will highlight these techniques and the corresponding applications. These experiments will aid in designing and development of better dental restorations and implants in clinical practice.

  15. Experimental comparison between speckle and grating-based imaging technique using synchrotron radiation X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-08-08

    X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging techniques provide important and complementary information that is inaccessible to the conventional absorption contrast imaging. Both grating-based imaging (GBI) and speckle-based imaging (SBI) are able to retrieve multi-modal images using synchrotron as well as lab-based sources. However, no systematic comparison has been made between the two techniques so far. We present an experimental comparison between GBI and SBI techniques with synchrotron radiation X-ray source. Apart from the simple experimental setup, we find SBI does not suffer from the issue of phase unwrapping, which can often be problematic for GBI. In addition, SBI is also superior to GBI since two orthogonal differential phase gradients can be simultaneously extracted by one dimensional scan. The GBI has less stringent requirements for detector pixel size and transverse coherence length when a second or third grating can be used. This study provides the reference for choosing the most suitable technique for diverse imaging applications at synchrotron facility.

  16. Mixing time in stirred vessels:A review of experimental techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel Ascanio

    2015-01-01

    Mixing time is defined as the time required for achieving a certain degree of homogeneity of injected tracer in a unit operation vessel. It has been used as a key parameter for assessing the performance of a mixing system. From an experimental standpoint, several techniques have been developed for measuring the mixing time. Based on the disturbances to flow, they can be classified into two groups:non-intrusive and intrusive. However, depending on the type of data generated, they can be also classified into direct measurements and indirect measurements (Eulerian and Lagrangian). Since the techniques available for measuring mixing times in an agitated tank do not provide the same information, its choice depends on several factors, namely:accuracy, reproducibility, suitability, cost, sampling speed, type of data, and processing time. A review of the experimental techniques reported in the literature in the last 50 years for the measurement of mixing time in stirred vessels under single and gas–liquid flow conditions with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in the laminar and turbulent regime is made, and a comparison between these techniques is also presented.

  17. Rugoscopy: Human identification by computer-assisted photographic superimposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezwana Begum Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human identification has been studied since fourteenth century and it has gradually advanced for forensic purposes. Traditional methods such as dental, fingerprint, and DNA comparisons are probably the most common techniques used in this context, allowing fast and secure identification processes. But, in circumstances where identification of an individual by fingerprint or dental record comparison is difficult, palatal rugae may be considered as an alternative source of material. Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the individualistic nature and use of palatal rugae patterns for personal identification and also to test the efficiency of computerized software for forensic identification by photographic superimposition of palatal photographs obtained from casts. Materials and Methods: Two sets of Alginate impressions were made from the upper arches of 100 individuals (50 males and 50 females with one month interval in between and the casts were poured. All the teeth except the incisors were removed to ensure that only the palate could be used in identification process. In one set of the casts, the palatal rugae were highlighted with a graphite pencil. All the 200 casts were randomly numbered, and then, they were photographed with a 10.1 Mega Pixel Kodak digital camera using standardized method. Using computerized software, the digital photographs of the models without highlighting the palatal rugae were overlapped over the images (transparent of the palatal rugae with highlighted palatal rugae, in order to identify the pairs by superimposition technique. Incisors were remained and used as landmarks to determine the magnification required to bring the two set of photographs to the same size, in order to make perfect superimposition of images. Results: The result of the overlapping of the digital photographs of highlighted palatal rugae over normal set of models without highlighted palatal rugae resulted in 100% positive

  18. The development of human factors technologies -The development of human behaviour analysis techniques-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Heui; Park, Keun Ok; Chun, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon; Park, Jae Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    In order to contribute to human error reduction through the studies on human-machine interaction in nuclear power plants, this project has objectives to develop SACOM(Simulation Analyzer with a Cognitive Operator Model) and techniques for human error analysis and application. In this year, we studied the followings: (1) Site investigation of operator tasks, (2) Development of operator task micro structure and revision of micro structure, (3) Development of knowledge representation software and SACOM prototype, (4) Development of performance assessment methodologies in task simulation and analysis of the effects of performance shaping factors. human error analysis and application techniques> (1) Classification of error shaping factors(ESFs) and development of software for ESF evaluation, (2) Analysis of human error occurrences and revision of analysis procedure, (3) Experiment for human error data collection using a compact nuclear simulator, (4) Development of a prototype data base system of the analyzed information on trip cases. 55 figs, 23 tabs, 33 refs. (Author).

  19. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which

  20. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; 10.1007/s00221-008-1639-7

    2009-01-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize t...

  1. Immunomodulation in human and experimental uveitis: Recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vijay

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that targets the neural retina and serves as a model of human uveitis. EAU can be induced against several retinal proteins in rats, mice, and subhuman primates. These include the S-antigen, a major protein in retinal photoreceptor cells; interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP; and rhodopsin and other antigens of retinal origin. There are many similarities between clinical uveitis and EAU, but the latter differs in being self-limited, and needs adjuvant for disease induction. The experimental disease can be induced only in susceptible animal strains. Use of the EAU model has helped investigators understand the pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate disease-modifying strategies, which could be applied in the clinic. There has been significant progress in this field during last decade, but much more understanding is needed before the knowledge can be transferred to clinical practice. A deeper understanding of the immune mechanisms involved in the EAU model may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches targeted at various components of the immune response by immunomodulation to control uveitis. This review summarises the evidence from the EAU model, which could be of relevance to the clinical management of patients with uveitis.

  2. Use of reward-penalty structures in human experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. C.; Allen, R. W.; Schwartz, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The use of motivational techniques in human performance research is reviewed and an example study employing a reward-penalty structure to simulate the motivations inherent in a real-world situation is presented. Driver behavior in a decision-making driving scenario was studied. The task involved control of an instrumented car on a cooperative test course. Subjects were penalized monetarily for tickets and accidents and rewarded for saving driving time. Two groups were assigned different ticket penalties. The group with the highest penalties tended to drive more conservatively. However, the average total payoff to each group was the same, as the conservative drivers traded off slower driving times with lower ticket penalties.

  3. A Review of Experimental Techniques for Measuring Micro- to Nano-Particle-Laden Gas Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxu Tu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dispersed micro- to nano-particle-laden gas flows are common in many engineering and environmental applications. Characterizing both their dispersed and carrier phase using experimental methods is very important for determining their properties and behavior. This paper reviews techniques for measuring the carrier phase, as well as the dispersed particles ranging from the micro- to the nano-scale. We focus not only on the developments of specific techniques over the last 20 years, but also on relationships and comparisons among these techniques. In addition to a systematic description and classification of these methods, we discuss the parameters they measure, such as particle velocity, size, composition and concentration. A more detailed review is provided for several important measurement techniques, including particle image velocimetry, the phase-Doppler particle analyzer and light-scattering intensity measurements for microparticles, as well as the scanning mobility particle sizer, the fast mobility particle sizer and the electrical low pressure impactor for nano-particles. The founding principles, development histories, various applications of these techniques and where they are going are summarized. This article provides a resource for investigators that plan to study micro- or nano-particle-laden gas flows in various contexts.

  4. NEW TECHNIQUE FOR OBESITY SURGERY: INTERNAL GASTRIC PLICATION TECHNIQUE USING INTRAGASTRIC SINGLE-PORT (IGS-IGP) IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Verena; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Gül, Safak; Noesser, Maximilian; Fuehrer, Kirs Ten; Sauer, Igor; Pratschke, Johann; Zorron, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method to ameliorate co-morbidities as consequence of morbidly obese patients with BMI over 35 kg/m2. Endoscopic techniques have been developed to treat patients with mild obesity and ameliorate comorbidities, but endoscopic skills are needed, beside the costs of the devices. To report a new technique for internal gastric plication using an intragastric single port device in an experimental swine model. Twenty experiments using fresh pig cadaver stomachs in a laparoscopic trainer were performed. The procedure was performed as follow in ten pigs: 1) volume measure; 2) insufflation of the stomach with CO2; 3) extroversion of the stomach through the simulator and installation of the single port device (Gelpoint Applied Mini) through a gastrotomy close to the pylorus; 4) performance of four intragastric handsewn 4-point sutures with Prolene 2-0, from the gastric fundus to the antrum; 5) after the performance, the residual volume was measured. Sleeve gastrectomy was also performed in further ten pigs and pre- and post-procedure gastric volume were measured. The internal gastric plication technique was performed successfully in the ten swine experiments. The mean procedure time was 27±4 min. It produced a reduction of gastric volume of a mean of 51%, and sleeve gastrectomy, a mean of 90% in this swine model. The internal gastric plication technique using an intragastric single port device required few skills to perform, had low operative time and achieved good reduction (51%) of gastric volume in an in vitro experimental model. A cirurgia bariátrica é atualmente o método mais efetivo para melhorar as co-morbidades decorrentes da obesidade mórbida com IMC acima de 35 kg/m2. Técnicas endoscópicas foram desenvolvidas para tratar pacientes com obesidade leve e melhorar as comorbidades, mas habilidades endoscópicas são necessárias, além dos custos. Relatar uma nova técnica para a plicatura gástrica interna

  5. Experimental approach and techniques for the evaluation of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber fluid mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strock, T.W. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.; Gohara, W.F. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fluid mechanics within wet flue desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions. The fluid flow directly affects scrubber pressure drop, mist eliminator water removal, and the SO{sub 2} mass transfer/chemical reaction process. Current industrial efforts to develop cost-effective high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on optimizing the fluid mechanics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics is discussed in this paper. Specifically, scaling procedures for downsizing a wet scrubber for the laboratory environment with field data comparisons are summarized. Furthermore, experimental techniques for the measurement of wet scrubber flow distribution, pressure drop, spray nozzle droplet size characteristics and wet scrubber liquid-to-gas ratio are discussed. Finally, the characteristics and capabilities of a new hydraulic test facility for wet FGD scrubbers are presented. (author)

  6. Experimental Technique and Assessment for Measuring the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient from Natural Ice Accretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Dukhan, Nihad

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Nine flat plates, 18 inches square, were obtained from which aluminum castings were made that gave good ice shape characterizations. Test strips taken from these plates were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, can be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for both parallel and accelerating flow will be studied. The smooth plate model verification baseline data as well as one ice roughened test case are presented.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR MODULES WITH DIFFERENT TECHNIQUE OF COOLING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Izam Abd Jalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the world has experiencing global warming due to excessive energy release into atmospheres. Today, a lot of research being conducted on ways to recover or reused the energy losses. An experimental investigation has been carried out to identify the most suitable cooling system techniques to achieve a stable and sustainable power output. Four types of Thermoelectric Module (TEM was fitted and tested on different cooling system techniques. Testing was conducted using a candle flame as a heat source to produce a suitable temperature with the maximum temperature of 200°C. An electronic circuit is used to provide a constant and sufficient power. The use of suitable cooling system and TEM was found by investigating the module parameters such as the temperature different of hot to cold side, number of thermo elements and internal resistance. This research contributes an important role in saving energy and reducing the dependency to primary energy sources (AC power or battery.

  8. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Methane Drainage in Coal Seams with Compound Technique of Perforating and Fracturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yong; Shen Zhaowu

    2007-01-01

    Compound technique of perforating and fracturing can effectively control the perforating direction and the fracturing expansion. The feasibility of this technique used in fracturing coal seams is analyzed. In this paper, the experiments of perforating and fracturing are carried out on samples of coal and the experimental effects are satisfactory. Compound technique of perforating and fracturing is promising in coal seams.

  9. Comparison of QuadrapolarTM radiofrequency lesions produced by standard versus modified technique: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safakish R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramin Safakish Allevio Pain Management Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Lower back pain (LBP is a global public health issue and is associated with substantial financial costs and loss of quality of life. Over the years, different literature has provided different statistics regarding the causes of the back pain. The following statistic is the closest estimation regarding our patient population. The sacroiliac (SI joint pain is responsible for LBP in 18%–30% of individuals with LBP. Quadrapolar™ radiofrequency ablation, which involves ablation of the nerves of the SI joint using heat, is a commonly used treatment for SI joint pain. However, the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency procedure is not always effective at ablating all the sensory nerves that cause the pain in the SI joint. One of the major limitations of the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency procedure is that it produces small lesions of ~4 mm in diameter. Smaller lesions increase the likelihood of failure to ablate all nociceptive input. In this study, we compare the standard Quadrapolar radiofrequency ablation technique to a modified Quadrapolar ablation technique that has produced improved patient outcomes in our clinic. The methodology of the two techniques are compared. In addition, we compare results from an experimental model comparing the lesion sizes produced by the two techniques. Taken together, the findings from this study suggest that the modified Quadrapolar technique provides longer lasting relief for the back pain that is caused by SI joint dysfunction. A randomized controlled clinical trial is the next step required to quantify the difference in symptom relief and quality of life produced by the two techniques. Keywords: lower back pain, radiofrequency ablation, sacroiliac joint, Quadrapolar radiofrequency ablation

  10. An experimental investigation of the combustion performance of human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabanjo, Tosin; Kolios, Athanasios J; Patchigolla, Kumar; Wagland, Stuart T; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Jurado, Nelia; Hanak, Dawid P; Manovic, Vasilije; Parker, Alison; McAdam, Ewan; Williams, Leon; Tyrrel, Sean; Cartmell, Elise

    2016-11-15

    Poor sanitation is one of the major hindrances to the global sustainable development goals. The Reinvent the Toilet Challenge of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is set to develop affordable, next-generation sanitary systems that can ensure safe treatment and wide accessibility without compromise on sustainable use of natural resources and the environment. Energy recovery from human excreta is likely to be a cornerstone of future sustainable sanitary systems. Faeces combustion was investigated using a bench-scale downdraft combustor test rig, alongside with wood biomass and simulant faeces. Parameters such as air flow rate, fuel pellet size, bed height, and fuel ignition mode were varied to establish the combustion operating range of the test rig and the optimum conditions for converting the faecal biomass to energy. The experimental results show that the dry human faeces had a higher energy content (∼25 MJ/kg) than wood biomass. At equivalence ratio between 0.86 and 1.12, the combustion temperature and fuel burn rate ranged from 431 to 558 °C and 1.53 to 2.30 g/min respectively. Preliminary results for the simulant faeces show that a minimum combustion bed temperature of 600 ± 10 °C can handle faeces up to 60 wt.% moisture at optimum air-to-fuel ratio. Further investigation is required to establish the appropriate trade-off limits for drying and energy recovery, considering different stool types, moisture content and drying characteristics. This is important for the design and further development of a self-sustained energy conversion and recovery systems for the NMT and similar sanitary solutions.

  11. Transcriptome kinetics of circulating neutrophils during human experimental endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan de Kleijn

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear cells (neutrophils play an important role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the development of sepsis. These cells are essential for the defense against microorganisms, but may also cause tissue damage. Therefore, neutrophil numbers and activity are considered to be tightly regulated. Previous studies have investigated gene transcription during experimental endotoxemia in whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the gene transcription response of the circulating pool of neutrophils to systemic inflammatory stimulation in vivo is currently unclear. We examined neutrophil gene transcription kinetics in healthy human subjects (n = 4 administered a single dose of endotoxin (LPS, 2 ng/kg iv. In addition, freshly isolated neutrophils were stimulated ex vivo with LPS, TNFα, G-CSF and GM-CSF to identify stimulus-specific gene transcription responses. Whole transcriptome microarray analysis of circulating neutrophils at 2, 4 and 6 hours after LPS infusion revealed activation of inflammatory networks which are involved in signaling of TNFα and IL-1α and IL-1β. The transcriptome profile of inflammatory activated neutrophils in vivo reflects extended survival and regulation of inflammatory responses. These changes in neutrophil transcriptome suggest a combination of early activation of circulating neutrophils by TNFα and G-CSF and a mobilization of young neutrophils from the bone marrow.

  12. Experimental techniques to determine salt formation and deposition in supercritical water oxidation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.P.C.; LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for destroying aqueous organic waste. Feed material, containing organic waste at concentrations typically less than 10 wt % in water, is pressurized and heated to conditions above water`s critical point where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. An oxidizer, is then added to the feed. Given adequate residence time and reaction temperature, the SCWO process rapidly produces innocuous combustion products. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the feed emerge as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; metals, heteroatoms, and halides appear in the effluent as inorganic salts and acids. The oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms acid anions. In the presence of metal ions, salts are formed and precipitate out of the supercritical fluid. In a tubular configured reactor, these salts agglomerate, adhere to the reactor wall, and eventually interfere by causing a flow restriction in the reactor leading to an increase in pressure. This rapid precipitation is due to an extreme drop in salt solubility that occurs as the feed stream becomes supercritical. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. A phenomenological model is developed in this paper to predict the time that reactor pressure begins to rise as a function of the fluid axial temperature profile and effective solubility curve. The experimental techniques used to generate effective solubility curves for one salt of interest, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, are described, and data is generated for comparison. Good correlation between the model and experiment is shown. An operational technique is also discussed that allows the deposited salt to be redissolved in a single phase and removed from the affected portion of the reactor. This technique is demonstrated experimentally.

  13. New experimental technique for the measurement of the velocity field in thin films falling over obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, Julien R.; Daglis, Ana; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the surface velocity of a thin falling film. Thin falling films are important in various processes such as cooling in heat exchangers or cleaning processes. For instance, in a household dishwasher cleaning depends on the ability of a thin draining film to remove material from a substrate. We are interested in the impact of obstacles attached to a substrate on the velocity field of a thin film flowing over them. Measuring the velocity field of thin falling films is a challenging experimental problem due to the small depth of the flow and the large velocity gradient across its depth. We propose a new technique based on PIV to measure the plane components of the velocity at the surface of the film over an arbitrarily large area and an arbitrarily large resolution, depending mostly on the image acquisition technique. We perform experiments with thin films of water flowing on a flat inclined surface, made of glass or stainless steel. The typical Reynolds number of the film is of the order of 100 to 1000, computed using the surface velocity, the film thickness and the kinematic viscosity of the film. We measure the modification to the flow field, from a viscous-gravity regime, caused by small solid obstacles, such as three-dimensional hemispherical obstacles and two-dimensional steps. We compare our results with past theoretical and numerical studies. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  14. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  15. Experimental Comparison of the Hemodynamic Effects of Bifurcating Coronary Stent Implantation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindise, Melissa; Vlachos, Pavlos; AETheR Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Stent implantation in coronary bifurcations imposes unique effects to the blood flow patterns and currently there is no universally accepted stent deployment approach. Despite the fact that stent-induced changes can greatly alter clinical outcomes, no concrete understanding exists regarding the hemodynamic effects of each implantation method. This work presents an experimental evaluation of the hemodynamic differences between implantation techniques. We used four common stent implantation methods including the currently preferred one-stent provisional side branch (PSB) technique and the crush (CRU), Culotte (CUL), and T-stenting (T-PR) two-stent techniques, all deployed by a cardiologist in coronary models. Particle image velocimetry was used to obtain velocity and pressure fields. Wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, residence times, and drag and compliance metrics were evaluated and compared against an un-stented case. The results of this study demonstrate that while PSB is preferred, both it and T-PR yielded detrimental hemodynamic effects such as low WSS values. CRU provided polarizing and unbalanced results. CUL demonstrated a symmetric flow field, balanced WSS distribution, and ultimately the most favorable hemodynamic environment.

  16. Cytological techniques to study human female meiotic prophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Ignasi; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Most of the human aneuploidies have a maternal origin. This feature makes the study of human female meiosis a fundamental topic to understand the reasons leading to this important social problem. Unfortunately, due to sample collection difficulties, not many studies have been performed on human female meiotic prophase. In this chapter we present a comprehensive collection of protocols that allows the study of human female meiotic prophase through different technical approaches using both spread and structurally preserved oocytes.

  17. Adipose tissue metabolism in humans determined by vein catheterization and microdialysis techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1994-01-01

    A technique for catheterization of a vein draining abdominal subcutaneous tissue and a microdialysis technique that allows measurements of intercellular water concentrations in adipose tissue in humans have recently been described. In the present study, we compare the two techniques during an ora...... assumptions on which calculations of venous concentrations from microdialysis data are based. Advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are discussed....

  18. Proteomic Studies on Human and Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    KAUST Repository

    Moussa, Ehab

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection that results from interrelated pathologies. Despite extensive research efforts, the mechanism of the disease is not completely understood. Clinical studies, postmortem analysis, and animal models have been the main research arenas in CM. In this thesis, shotgun proteomics approach was used to further understand the pathology of human and experimental CM. The mechanism by which CM turns fatal is yet to be identified. A clinical proteomics study was conducted on pooled plasma samples from children with reversible or fatal CM from the Gambia. The results show that depletion of coagulation factors and increased levels of circulating proteasomes are associated with fatal pediatric CM. This data suggests that the ongoing coagulation during CM might be a disseminated intravascular coagulation state that eventually causes depletion of the coagulation factors leading to petechial hemorrhages. In addition, the mechanism(s) by which blood transfusion benefits CM in children was investigated. To that end, the concentration and multimerization pattern of von-willebrand factor, and the concentration of haptoglobin in the plasma of children with CM who received blood transfusions were measured. In addition to clinical studies, experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in mice has been long used as a model for the disease. A shotgun proteomics workflow was optimized to identify the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with ECM.Because of the utmost importance of membrane proteins in the pathology of the disease, sample fractionation and filter aided sample preparation were used to recover them. The proteomic signature of the brains of mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome, mice infected with P. berghei NK56 that developed severe malaria but without neurological signs, and non-infected mice, were compared to identify CM specific proteins. Among the differentially

  19. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  20. Experimental and theoretical contributions to X-ray phase-contrast techniques for medical imaging; Contributions experimentales et theoriques aux techniques de contraste de phase pour l'imagerie medicale par rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diemoz, P.C.

    2011-02-28

    Several X-ray phase-contrast techniques have recently been developed. Unlike conventional X-ray methods, which measure the absorption properties of the tissues, these techniques derive contrast also from the modulation of the phase produced by the sample. Since the phase shift can be significant even for small details characterized by weak or absent absorption, the achievable image contrast can be greatly increased, notably for the soft biological tissues. These methods are therefore very promising for applications in the medical domain. The aim of this work is to contribute to a deeper understanding of these techniques, in particular propagation-based imaging (PBI), analyzer-based imaging (ABI) and grating interferometry (GIFM), and to study their potential and the best practical implementation for medical imaging applications. An important part of this work is dedicated to the use of mathematical algorithms for the extraction, from the acquired images, of quantitative sample information (the absorption, refraction and scattering sample properties). In particular, five among the most known algorithms based on the geometrical optics approximation have been theoretically analysed and experimentally compared, in planar and tomographic modalities, by using geometrical phantoms and human bone-cartilage and breast samples. A semi-quantitative method for the acquisition and reconstruction of tomographic images in the ABI and GIFM techniques has also been proposed. The validity conditions are analyzed in detail and the method, enabling a considerable simplification of the imaging procedure, has been experimentally checked on phantoms and human samples. Finally, a theoretical and experimental comparison of the PBI, ABI and GIFM techniques is presented. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques are discussed. The results obtained from this analysis can be very useful for determining the most adapted technique for a given application. (author)

  1. Experimental Study on Detection of Deterioration in Concrete Using Infrared Thermography Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwon Huh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is certainly prone to internal deteriorations or defects during the construction and operating periods. Compared with other nondestructive techniques, infrared thermography can easily detect the subsurface delamination in a very short period of time, but accurately identifying its size and depth in concrete is a very challenging task. In this study, experimental testing was carried out on a concrete specimen having internal delaminations of various sizes and at varying depths. Delaminations at 1 and 2 cm deep showed a good temperature contrast after only 5-minute heating, but delaminations at 3 cm practically identified the value of the temperature contrast from heating of 15 minutes. In addition, the size of the delamination at 3 cm deep could be estimated with a difference of 10% to 28% for 20 minutes of heating. The depth of the delamination was linearly correlated with the increase in its size.

  2. Experimental observation of silver and gold penetration into dental ceramic by means of a radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya, F.; Payan, J.; Bernardini, J.; Moya, E.G.

    1987-12-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to study silver and gold diffusion into dental porcelain under experimental conditions close to the real conditions in prosthetic laboratories for porcelain bakes. It was clearly shown that these non-oxidizable elements were able to diffuse into the ceramic as well as oxidizable ones. The penetration depth varied widely according to the element. The ratio DAg/DAu was about 10(3) around 850 degrees C. In contrast to gold, the silver diffusion rate was high enough to allow silver, from the metallic alloy, to be present at the external ceramic surface after diffusion into the ceramic. Hence, the greening of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys could be explained mainly by a solid-state diffusion mechanism.

  3. Experimental and mumerical validation of the technique for concrete cure monitoring using piezoelectric admittance measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Cheol; Park, Gyu Hae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This paper presents a new technique for monitoring the concrete curing process using embedded piezoelectric transducers via admittance measurements. When a piezoelectric transducer is embedded in a structure, the electrical impedance (admittance) of the transducer is coupled with the mechanical impedance of the host structure, which allows monitoring of the structural condition. In this study, the admittance signatures are used for monitoring the concrete curing process. This new method is based on an admittance-based sensor diagnostic process, in which the capacitance values of the piezoelectric transducers are dependent on the strength of the host structure. We numerically and experimentally investigated the variations in capacitive value during the curing process. The results demonstrate that there is a clear relationship between the concrete curing status and the slope, this indicates that the proposed method could be efficiently used for monitoring the curing status of a concrete structure.

  4. Experimental Techniques for the Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Materials Used in Microelectromechanical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir V. Kamat

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of mechanical properties of materials used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS devices is critical not only in designing structures such as cantilevers and beams but also for ensuring their reliability during operation of these devices. It has been established that the mechanical properties are scaleand-process-dependent, and hence it is essential to measure the mechanical properties of these materials at the same length scale and using the same process as that used in their usage in MEMS devices. The various experimental techniques in vogue to measure the mechanical properties of these materials are briefly reviewed. The facilities established at the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad, and their capabilities are also highlighted.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.605-615, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1565

  5. Development of Experimental Setup of Metal Rapid Prototyping Machine using Selective Laser Sintering Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. N.; Mulay, A. V.; Ahuja, B. B.

    2016-08-01

    Unlike in the traditional manufacturing processes, additive manufacturing as rapid prototyping, allows designers to produce parts that were previously considered too complex to make economically. The shift is taking place from plastic prototype to fully functional metallic parts by direct deposition of metallic powders as produced parts can be directly used for desired purpose. This work is directed towards the development of experimental setup of metal rapid prototyping machine using selective laser sintering and studies the various parameters, which plays important role in the metal rapid prototyping using SLS technique. The machine structure in mainly divided into three main categories namely, (1) Z-movement of bed and table, (2) X-Y movement arrangement for LASER movements and (3) feeder mechanism. Z-movement of bed is controlled by using lead screw, bevel gear pair and stepper motor, which will maintain the accuracy of layer thickness. X-Y movements are controlled using timing belt and stepper motors for precise movements of LASER source. Feeder mechanism is then developed to control uniformity of layer thickness metal powder. Simultaneously, the study is carried out for selection of material. Various types of metal powders can be used for metal RP as Single metal powder, mixture of two metals powder, and combination of metal and polymer powder. Conclusion leads to use of mixture of two metals powder to minimize the problems such as, balling effect and porosity. Developed System can be validated by conducting various experiments on manufactured part to check mechanical and metallurgical properties. After studying the results of these experiments, various process parameters as LASER properties (as power, speed etc.), and material properties (as grain size and structure etc.) will be optimized. This work is mainly focused on the design and development of cost effective experimental setup of metal rapid prototyping using SLS technique which will gives the feel of

  6. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of

  7. Advanced Techniques for Seismic Protection of Historical Buildings: Experimental and Numerical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolani, Federico M.

    2008-07-01

    The seismic protection of historical and monumental buildings, namely dating back from the ancient age up to the 20th Century, is being looked at with greater and greater interest, above all in the Euro-Mediterranean area, its cultural heritage being strongly susceptible to undergo severe damage or even collapse due to earthquake. The cultural importance of historical and monumental constructions limits, in many cases, the possibility to upgrade them from the seismic point of view, due to the fear of using intervention techniques which could have detrimental effects on their cultural value. Consequently, a great interest is growing in the development of sustainable methodologies for the use of Reversible Mixed Technologies (RMTs) in the seismic protection of the existing constructions. RMTs, in fact, are conceived for exploiting the peculiarities of innovative materials and special devices, and they allow ease of removal when necessary. This paper deals with the experimental and numerical studies, framed within the EC PROHITECH research project, on the application of RMTs to the historical and monumental constructions mainly belonging to the cultural heritage of the Euro-Mediterranean area. The experimental tests and the numerical analyses are carried out at five different levels, namely full scale models, large scale models, sub-systems, devices, materials and elements.

  8. A generalized rough set-based information filling technique for failure analysis of thruster experimental data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Shan; Zhu Qiang; Li Jianxun; Chen Lin

    2013-01-01

    Interval-valued data and incomplete data are two key problems for failure analysis of thruster experimental data and have been basically solved by the proposed methods in this paper. Firstly, information data acquired from the simulation and evaluation system formed as interval-valued information system (IIS) is classified by the interval similarity relation. Then, as an improve-ment of the classical rough set, a new kind of generalized information entropy called‘‘H0-informa-tion entropy’’ is suggested for the measurement of uncertainty and the classification ability of IIS. There is an innovative information filling technique using the properties of H0-information entropy to replace missing data by some smaller estimation intervals. Finally, an improved method of failure analysis synthesized by the above achievements is presented to classify the thruster experimental data, complete the information, and extract the failure rules. The feasibility and advantage of this method is testified by an actual application of failure analysis, whose performance is evaluated by the quantification of E-condition entropy.

  9. APPLYING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of UIMS (User Interface Management System), a system using a variety of artificial intelligence techniques to build knowledge-based user interfaces combining functionality and information from a variety of computer systems that maintain, test, and configure customer telephone...... and data networks. Three artificial intelligence (AI) techniques used in UIMS are discussed, namely, frame representation, object-oriented programming languages, and rule-based systems. The UIMS architecture is presented, and the structure of the UIMS is explained in terms of the AI techniques....

  10. APPLYING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of UIMS (User Interface Management System), a system using a variety of artificial intelligence techniques to build knowledge-based user interfaces combining functionality and information from a variety of computer systems that maintain, test, and configure customer telephone...... and data networks. Three artificial intelligence (AI) techniques used in UIMS are discussed, namely, frame representation, object-oriented programming languages, and rule-based systems. The UIMS architecture is presented, and the structure of the UIMS is explained in terms of the AI techniques....

  11. Synchrotron radiation measurement of multiphase fluid saturations in porous media: Experimental technique and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, David M.; Bierck, Barnes R.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1998-06-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is an important research topic. In situ, nondestructive experimental methods for studying multiphase flow are important for improving our understanding and the theory. Rapid changes in fluid saturation, characteristic of immiscible displacement, are difficult to measure accurately using gamma rays due to practical restrictions on source strength. Our objective is to describe a synchrotron radiation technique for rapid, nondestructive saturation measurements of multiple fluids in porous media, and to present a precision and accuracy analysis of the technique. Synchrotron radiation provides a high intensity, inherently collimated photon beam of tunable energy which can yield accurate measurements of fluid saturation in just one second. Measurements were obtained with precision of ±0.01 or better for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a 2.5 cm thick glass-bead porous medium using a counting time of 1 s. The normal distribution was shown to provide acceptable confidence limits for PCE saturation changes. Sources of error include heat load on the monochromator, periodic movement of the source beam, and errors in stepping-motor positioning system. Hypodermic needles pushed into the medium to inject PCE changed porosity in a region approximately ±1 mm of the injection point. Improved mass balance between the known and measured PCE injection volumes was obtained when appropriate corrections were applied to calibration values near the injection point.

  12. Experimental techniques for gyroscope performance enhancement for the Gravity Probe B relativity mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Saps; Everitt, Francis; Parkinson, Brad; Turneaure, John; MacKeiser; Taber, Mike; Bardas, Doron; Lockhart, Jim; Muhlfelder, Barry; Mester, John; Xiao, Yueming; Gutt, Gregory; Gill, Dale; Brumley, Robert; Di Donna, Brian

    1996-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B relativity mission experiment is designed to measure the frame dragging and geodetic relativistic precessions in a 650 km polar orbit. We describe some of the advanced experimental techniques used to achieve the required gyroscope accuracy of between 0.05 and 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img1. The subjects discussed are: (i) the development of high-precision gyroscopes with drift rates of less than 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img2, (ii) a low-temperature bake-out procedure resulting in a helium pressure of less than 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img3 at 2.5 K, (iii) a read-out system using DC SQUID magnetometers with a noise figure of 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img4 at 5 mHz and (iv) AC and DC magnetic shielding techniques which produce an AC attenuation factor in excess of 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img5 and a residual DC field of less than 0264-9381/13/11A/026/img6.

  13. Experimental characterization of sulfate damage of concrete based on the harmonic wave modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tingyuan; Meng, Wanlin; Talebzadeh, Neda; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize cracking progression of concrete samples subjected to sulfate attack cycles by employment of a nonlinear wave modulation technique. The sidebands in frequency domain (f1±f2) are produced due to the modulation of two ultrasonic waves (high frequency f1 and low frequency f2) and the relative amplitude of sidebands is defined as the nonlinear parameter considered as a caliber for structural damage. Different from previous work where the low frequency signal was generated by the instrumented hammer, the low frequency signal in this research is a harmonic wave produced by an electromagnetic exciter to avoid the uncertainty of man-made influence. Experimental results show that the nonlinear parameter presents an excellent correlation with the progress of material deterioration, indicating that the wave modulation method is capable of discriminating different states of damage. The work validates the feasibility and sensitivity of nonlinear wave modulation technique based on harmonic signals for the damage detection of concrete materials suffered from typical durability problems.

  14. Slow cryopreservation is not superior to vitrification in human spermatozoa; an experimental controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shehata Ali Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spermatozoa cryopreservation is used for the management of infertility and some other medical conditions. The routinely applied cryopreservation technique depends on permeating cryoprotectants, whose toxic effects have raised the attention towards permeating cryoprotectants-free vitrification technique. Objective: To compare between the application of slow cryopreservation and vitrification on human spermatozoa. Materials and Methods: This was an experimental controlled study involving 33 human semen samples, where each sample was divided into three equal parts; fresh control, conventional slow freezing, and permeating cryoprotectants-free vitrification. Viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP of control and post-thawing spermatozoa were assessed with the sperm viability kit and the JC-1 kit, respectively, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Results: Significant reduction of the progressive motility, viability and MMP was observed by the procedure of freezing and thawing, while there was not any significant difference between both cryopreservation techniques. Cryopreservation resulted in 48% reduction of the percentage of viable spermatozoa and 54.5% rise in the percentage of dead spermatozoa. In addition, high MMP was reduced by 24% and low MMP was increased by 34.75% in response to freezing and thawing. Progressive motility of spermatozoa was correlated significantly positive with high MMP and significantly negative with low MMP in control as well as post-thawing specimens (r=0.8881/ -0.8412, 0.7461/ -0.7510 and 0.7603/ -0.7839 for control, slow and vitrification respectively, p=0.0001. Conclusion: Although both cryopreservation techniques have similar results, vitrification is faster, easier and associated with less toxicity and costs. Thus, vitrification is recommended for the clinical application.

  15. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and molecular

  16. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  17. Segmentation techniques for extracting humans from thermal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A pedestrian detection system for underground mine vehicles is being developed that requires the segmentation of people from thermal images in underground mine tunnels. A number of thresholding techniques are outlined and their performance on a...

  18. Mechanisms regulating invasiveness and growth of endometriosis lesions in rat experimental model and in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikova, Natalia Yu; Antsiferova, Yulia S; Posiseeva, Lyubov V; Shishkov, Dmitrii N; Posiseev, Denis V; Filippova, Ekaterina S

    2010-05-15

    To compare the expression of MMP-2, TIMP-2, and TGFbeta2 mRNA in experimental and human endometriotic lesions and to assess the possibility of its cytokine regulation. Experimental laboratory study. Medical center. ANIMALS AND PATIENT(S): Thirty female Wistar rats, 17 women with endometriosis, 11 healthy women. Uterine transplants were attached to rat peritoneum via the surgical autotransplantation technique. The collection of endometriotic implants at 7, 14, and 21 days postsurgery and laparoscopic collection of peritoneal fluid, ectopic, and matched eutopic endometrium from women with endometriosis were performed. MMP-2, TIMP-2, TGFbeta2 mRNA expression in endometrium was assessed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In rats, the increase of MMP-2 and decrease of TIMP-2 mRNA expression was noted at the 7th day, and an increase of TGFbeta2 mRNA expression was seen at the 14th day postsurgery. In humans, elevation of TIMP-2 mRNA expression in eutopic endometrium and of MMP-2, TGFbeta2 mRNA expression in ectopic endometrium was observed. Autologous peritoneal fluid stimulated MMP-2 mRNA expression in eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Cytokines derived from ectopic lesions mononuclear cells increased TGFbeta2 mRNA expression in endometrium of healthy women. Supposedly MMP-TIMP balance is important in promoting endometriotic tissue invasion and TGFbeta2 in regulating ectopic endometrium growth. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Assessment of the Dynamical Behaviour of a Footbridge Under Human-Induced Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos da Silva José Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to perform an experimental and numerical assessment of an existing pedestrian footbridge located in the campus of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, Brazil. The structural system is based on an internal reinforced concrete footbridge spanning 24.5m, constituted by concrete beams and slabs and being currently used for pedestrian crossing. The modal testing of the structure was performed by dynamic monitoring through accelerometers installed on the structure as well as by a vibrometer device based on Laser Doppler Vibrometry using the SIMO and SISO acquisition techniques, respectively. Then, these experimental results were calibrated with a numerical model by the use of finite element method (FEM through the ANSYS program. Afterwards, a forced vibration analysis was performed on the structure based on human-induced loads considering two control groups: the first one is intended to excite the investigated footbridge to cause resonance motion with a controlled step frequency and the second one is related to freely random people crossing the footbridge as it occurs normally during its real life. Thus, the structural system dynamic response in terms of peak accelerations values were evaluated and compared to the current human comfort criteria.

  20. Human monitoring, smart health and assisted living techniques and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Sauro; Freddi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the three main scientific and technological areas critical for improving people's quality of life - namely human monitoring, smart health and assisted living - from both the research and development points of view.

  1. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  2. Behaviour based Mobile Robot Navigation Technique using AI System: Experimental Investigation on Active Media Pioneer Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parasuraman, V.Ganapathy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A key issue in the research of an autonomous robot is the design and development of the navigation technique that enables the robot to navigate in a real world environment. In this research, the issues investigated and methodologies established include (a Designing of the individual behavior and behavior rule selection using Alpha level fuzzy logic system  (b Designing of the controller, which maps the sensors input to the motor output through model based Fuzzy Logic Inference System and (c Formulation of the decision-making process by using Alpha-level fuzzy logic system. The proposed method is applied to Active Media Pioneer Robot and the results are discussed and compared with most accepted methods. This approach provides a formal methodology for representing and implementing the human expert heuristic knowledge and perception-based action in mobile robot navigation. In this approach, the operational strategies of the human expert driver are transferred via fuzzy logic to the robot navigation in the form of a set of simple conditional statements composed of linguistic variables.Keywards: Mobile robot, behavior based control, fuzzy logic, alpha level fuzzy logic, obstacle avoidance behavior and goal seek behavior

  3. Multinational corporations and infectious disease: Embracing human rights management techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Singer, Burton H; Weiss, Mitchell G; Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Wielga, Mark; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Global health institutions have called for governments, international organisations and health practitioners to employ a human rights-based approach to infectious diseases. The motivation for a human rights approach is clear: poverty and inequality create conditions for infectious diseases to thrive, and the diseases, in turn, interact with social-ecological systems to promulgate poverty, inequity and indignity. Governments and intergovernmental organisations should be concerned with the control and elimination of these diseases, as widespread infections delay economic growth and contribute to higher healthcare costs and slower processes for realising universal human rights. These social determinants and economic outcomes associated with infectious diseases should interest multinational companies, partly because they have bearing on corporate productivity and, increasingly, because new global norms impose on companies a responsibility to respect human rights, including the right to health. We reviewed historical and recent developments at the interface of infectious diseases, human rights and multinational corporations. Our investigation was supplemented with field-level insights at corporate capital projects that were developed in areas of high endemicity of infectious diseases, which embraced rights-based disease control strategies. Experience and literature provide a longstanding business case and an emerging social responsibility case for corporations to apply a human rights approach to health programmes at global operations. Indeed, in an increasingly globalised and interconnected world, multinational corporations have an interest, and an important role to play, in advancing rights-based control strategies for infectious diseases. There are new opportunities for governments and international health agencies to enlist corporate business actors in disease control and elimination strategies. Guidance offered by the United Nations in 2011 that is widely embraced

  4. Improved experimental model for measuring skin degerming activity on the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, R N; McGrath, M B; Goss, W A

    1972-07-01

    A gloved-hand method is presented for evaluating the interaction of antimicrobial agents with the normal resident bacterial flora of human skin. One of the key features of the experimental model is a simplified technique for sampling the skin, which involves the addition of eluting fluid to the gloved hand. As with other skin sampling techniques, the number of bacteria recovered from the hands showed considerable variation from subject to subject. However, no significant differences were observed between the numbers of bacteria recovered from the right and left hands of individual subjects. The mean number of bacteria recovered from the hand before and after washing with nonmedicated soap was consistent and reproducible over a period of at least 5 consecutive days. The number of recoverable bacteria from the hand was greatly reduced by a single treatment with a surgical scrub preparation containing hexachlorophene. The extent of skin degerming achieved was little affected by the use of a surgical brush, and was maximal at approximately 30 min after contact with the hexachlorophene-containing formulation. It was determined that the level of transient bacteria on the hands could be controlled by a simple wash with nonmedicated soap, resulting in a stabilized base-line level from which treatment interactions with the resident microflora could be measured more precisely. The basic elements of the method presented fulfill the requirements of a satisfactory experimental model for the in vivo evaluation of skin-degerming agents on the hand. The selection of appropriate experimental designs allows treatment comparisons to be made with a high degree of statistical confidence.

  5. Techniques and applications for binaural sound manipulation in human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of binaural sound to speech and auditory sound cues (auditory icons) is addressed from both an applications and technical standpoint. Techniques overviewed include processing by means of filtering with head-related transfer functions. Application to advanced cockpit human interface systems is discussed, although the techniques are extendable to any human-machine interface. Research issues pertaining to three-dimensional sound displays under investigation at the Aerospace Human Factors Division at NASA Ames Research Center are described.

  6. The Human Factors of Graphic Interaction: Tasks and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    representation an interaction technique diagram. Our diagrams are not as detailed as the Labanotation [HUTC70], but unlike that notation they represent more...Conference Proceedings on Data Handling Devices (1970), 8. HUTC70 Hutchinson, A., " Labanotation ", Theatre Arts Books, New York (1970). IRVI76 Irving

  7. Development and Experimental Verification of Key Techniques to Validate Remote Sensing Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Wang, S. G.; Ge, Y.; Jin, R.; Liu, S. M.; Ma, M. G.; Shi, W. Z.; Li, R. X.; Liu, Q. H.

    2013-05-01

    Validation of remote sensing land products is a fundamental issue for Earth observation. Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (MOST) has launched a high-tech R&D Program named `Development and experimental verification of key techniques to validate remote sensing products' in 2011. This paper introduces the background, scientific objectives, research contents of this project and research result already achieved. The objectives of this project include (1) to build a technical specification for the validation of remote sensing products; (2) to investigate the performance, we will carry out a comprehensive remote sensing experiment on satellite - aircraft - ground truth and then modify Step 1 until reach the predefined requirement; (3) to establish a validation network of China for remote sensing products. In summer 2012, with support of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER), field observations have been successfully conducted in the central stream of the Heihe River Basin, a typical inland river basin in northwest China. A flux observation matrix composed of eddy covariance (EC) and large aperture scintillometer (LAS), in addition to a densely distributed eco-hydrological wireless sensor network have been established to capture multi-scale heterogeneities of evapotranspiration (ET), leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture and temperature. Airborne missions have been flown with the payloads of imaging spectrometer, light detection and ranging (LiDAR), infrared thermal imager and microwave radiometer that provide various scales of aerial remote sensing observations. Satellite images with high resolution have been collected and pre-processed, e.g. PROBA-CHRIS and TerraSAR-X. Simultaneously, ground measurements have been conducted over specific sampling plots and transects to obtain validation data sets. With this setup complex problems are addressed, e.g. heterogeneity, scaling, uncertainty, and eventually to

  8. Analysis of human immune responses in quasi-experimental settings: tutorial in biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rajiv; Ajjampur, Sitara S; Ward, Honorine D; Kang, Gagandeep; Naumova, Elena N

    2012-01-03

    Human immunology is a growing field of research in which experimental, clinical, and analytical methods of many life science disciplines are utilized. Classic epidemiological study designs, including observational longitudinal birth cohort studies, offer strong potential for gaining new knowledge and insights into immune response to pathogens in humans. However, rigorous discussion of methodological issues related to designs and statistical analysis that are appropriate for longitudinal studies is lacking. In this communication we address key questions of quality and validity of traditional and recently developed statistical tools applied to measures of immune responses. For this purpose we use data on humoral immune response (IR) associated with the first cryptosporidial diarrhea in a birth cohort of children residing in an urban slum in south India. The main objective is to detect the difference and derive inferences for a change in IR measured at two time points, before (pre) and after (post) an event of interest. We illustrate the use and interpretation of analytical and data visualization techniques including generalized linear and additive models, data-driven smoothing, and combinations of box-, scatter-, and needle-plots. We provide step-by-step instructions for conducting a thorough and relatively simple analytical investigation, describe the challenges and pitfalls, and offer practical solutions for comprehensive examination of data. We illustrate how the assumption of time irrelevance can be handled in a study with a pre-post design. We demonstrate how one can study the dynamics of IR in humans by considering the timing of response following an event of interest and seasonal fluctuation of exposure by proper alignment of time of measurements. This alignment of calendar time of measurements and a child's age at the event of interest allows us to explore interactions between IR, seasonal exposures and age at first infection. The use of traditional

  9. Analysis of human immune responses in quasi-experimental settings: tutorial in biostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunology is a growing field of research in which experimental, clinical, and analytical methods of many life science disciplines are utilized. Classic epidemiological study designs, including observational longitudinal birth cohort studies, offer strong potential for gaining new knowledge and insights into immune response to pathogens in humans. However, rigorous discussion of methodological issues related to designs and statistical analysis that are appropriate for longitudinal studies is lacking. Methods In this communication we address key questions of quality and validity of traditional and recently developed statistical tools applied to measures of immune responses. For this purpose we use data on humoral immune response (IR associated with the first cryptosporidial diarrhea in a birth cohort of children residing in an urban slum in south India. The main objective is to detect the difference and derive inferences for a change in IR measured at two time points, before (pre and after (post an event of interest. We illustrate the use and interpretation of analytical and data visualization techniques including generalized linear and additive models, data-driven smoothing, and combinations of box-, scatter-, and needle-plots. Results We provide step-by-step instructions for conducting a thorough and relatively simple analytical investigation, describe the challenges and pitfalls, and offer practical solutions for comprehensive examination of data. We illustrate how the assumption of time irrelevance can be handled in a study with a pre-post design. We demonstrate how one can study the dynamics of IR in humans by considering the timing of response following an event of interest and seasonal fluctuation of exposure by proper alignment of time of measurements. This alignment of calendar time of measurements and a child's age at the event of interest allows us to explore interactions between IR, seasonal exposures and age

  10. Development and Comparison of Techniques for Generating Permeability Maps using Independent Experimental Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, Ferdinand; Romanenko, Konstantin; Pini, Ronny; Balcom, Bruce; Benson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    We have developed and evaluated methods for creating voxel-based 3D permeability maps of a heterogeneous sandstone sample using independent experimental data from single phase flow (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI) and two-phase flow (X-ray Computed Tomography, CT) measurements. Fluid velocities computed from the generated permeability maps using computational fluid dynamics simulations fit measured velocities very well and significantly outperform empirical porosity-permeability relations, such as the Kozeny-Carman equation. Acquiring images on the meso-scale from porous rocks using MRI has till recently been a great challenge, due to short spin relaxation times and large field gradients within the sample. The combination of the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme with three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE) - a technique recently developed at the UNB MRI Center - can overcome these challenges and enables obtaining quantitative 3 dimensional maps of porosities and fluid velocities. Using porosity and (single-phase) velocity maps from MRI and (multi-phase) saturation maps from CT measurements, we employed three different techniques to obtain permeability maps. In the first approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to porosities measured using MRI. In the second approach, we computed permeabilities using a J-Leverett scaling method, which is based on saturation maps obtained from N2-H2O multi-phase experiments. The third set of permeabilities was generated using a new inverse iterative-updating technique, which is based on porosities and measured velocities obtained in single-phase flow experiments. The resulting three permeability maps provided then input for computational fluid dynamics simulations - employing the Stanford CFD code AD-GPRS - to generate velocity maps, which were compared to velocity maps measured by MRI. The J-Leveret scaling method and the iterative-updating method

  11. Recognition of Expressions on Human Face using AI Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Nagpal

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions convey non-verbal cues, which play animportant role in interpersonal relations. Facial expressionsrecognition technology helps in designing an intelligent humancomputer interfaces. This paper discusses a three phase techniquefor the facial expression recognition of the Indian faces. In thefirst phase the faces are tracked using Haar classifier in the livevideos of Indian student’s community. In the second phase 38facial feature points are detected using Active Appearance Model(AAM technique. In the last step the support vector machine(SVM is used to classify four primary facial expression.Integrating these broader techniques and obtaining a reasonablygood performance is a very big challenge. The performance ofthe proposed facial expressions recognizer is 82.7%.

  12. The orthotopic left lung transplantation in rats: a valuable experimental model without using cuff technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-chun; Wang, Dian-jun; Yin, Ni; Yin, Bang-liang; Fang, Rui-xin; Xiao, Xue-jun; Wu, Yue-Heng

    2008-11-01

    Advances in the field of clinical lung transplantation must rely on observations made in animal models. In this study, we introduced a new procedure in the rat, orthotopic left lung transplantation without using the cuff technique, in which the donor pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and membranous parts of the bronchus were anastomosed continuously in the lumen using a mattress suture under a surgical microscope; meanwhile, a second, low-pressure perfusion through the pulmonary artery and turnover of the vascular stump were made, which also made the vessel anastomosis easy. Transplantations were completed in 68 rats (89.5%), the mean time used for suturing the left lung hilar structure was 23.5 +/- 4.6 min. All lung grafts had good life-sustaining function because of there being no cuff-induced granulation tissue in bronchial anastomotic stoma, and three out of 12 allografts were observed with active bronchiolitis obliterans lesions at 8 weeks after transplantation. This model is a simple, valuable experimental model for studying lung transplantation and new therapies for preventing acute or chronic rejection.

  13. Numerical and Experimental Study of Wake Redirection Techniques in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Foley, S.; Nanos, E. M.; Yu, T.; Campagnolo, F.; Bottasso, C. L.; Zanotti, A.; Croce, A.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is to validate a wind farm LES framework in the context of two distinct wake redirection techniques: yaw misalignment and individual cyclic pitch control. A test campaign was conducted using scaled wind turbine models in a boundary layer wind tunnel, where both particle image velocimetry and hot-wire thermo anemometers were used to obtain high quality measurements of the downstream flow. A LiDAR system was also employed to determine the non-uniformity of the inflow velocity field. A high-fidelity large-eddy simulation lifting-line model was used to simulate the aerodynamic behavior of the system, including the geometry of the wind turbine nacelle and tower. A tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic approach was adopted to improve the sub-grid scale modeling. Comparisons with experimental measurements are used to systematically validate the simulations. The LES results are in good agreement with the PIV and hot-wire data in terms of time-averaged wake profiles, turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stresses. Discrepancies are also highlighted, to guide future improvements.

  14. Optimization and enhancement of soil bioremediation by composting using the experimental design technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayara, Tahseen; Sarrà, Montserrat; Sánchez, Antoni

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was the application of the experimental design technique to optimize the conditions for the bioremediation of contaminated soil by means of composting. A low-cost material such as compost from the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste as amendment and pyrene as model pollutant were used. The effect of three factors was considered: pollutant concentration (0.1-2 g/kg), soil:compost mixing ratio (1:0.5-1:2 w/w) and compost stability measured as respiration index (0.78, 2.69 and 4.52 mg O2 g(-1) Organic Matter h(-1)). Stable compost permitted to achieve an almost complete degradation of pyrene in a short time (10 days). Results indicated that compost stability is a key parameter to optimize PAHs biodegradation. A factor analysis indicated that the optimal conditions for bioremediation after 10, 20 and 30 days of process were (1.4, 0.78, 1:1.4), (1.4, 2.18. 1:1.3) and (1.3, 2.18, 1:1.3) for concentration (g/kg), compost stability (mg O2 g(-1) Organic Matter h(-1)) and soil:compost mixing ratio, respectively.

  15. Experimental investigation on liquid-phase fabrication techniques for multilayer infrared hollow fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bang-Shan; Zeng, Xuan; Iwai, Katsumasa; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Chi, Nan; Shi, Yi-Wei

    2011-07-01

    Infrared hollow fiber with metal and dielectric inner-coatings has found applications in medical and industrial fields. It is a commonly used method to lower the loss by inner-coating multi dielectric layers. In this paper, SiO 2 and AgI were selected to fabricate the multilayer mid-infrared hollow fiber. Liquid-phase coating techniques were experimentally discussed in order to control the film thickness. It is shown that concentration and flow speed of the coating solution are key parameters to modify SiO 2 film thickness. AgI film was obtained by firstly coating a silver layer and then iodinating the silver layer into AgI. SiO 2 and AgI films were deposited orderly on the inner wall of a 0.7-mm bore glass capillary. Both thicknesses for SiO 2 and AgI films were well controlled and optimized according to the theoretical calculation. The measured infrared loss spectrum of SiO 2/AgI/SiO 2/Ag multilayer hollow fiber has a good agreement with the calculated result and shows band gap effect around the wavelength of 5.3 μm.

  16. Physically-Based Interactive Flow Visualization Based on Schlieren and Interferometry Experimental Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brownlee, C.

    2011-11-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph, interferometry, and schlieren imaging for centuries, which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. Interferometry tracks changes in phase-shift resulting in bands appearing. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraph, schlieren and interferometry images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Applications of our method to multifield data and custom application-dependent color filter creation are explored. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are finally presented. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Experimental techniques for the characterization of carbon nanoparticles – a brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Kempiński

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The review of four experimental methods: X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance and four-point electrical conductivity measurements is presented to characterize carbon nanoparticles. Two types of carbon nanoparticle systems are discussed: one comprising the powder of individual carbon nanoparticles and the second as a structurally interconnected nanoparticle matrix in the form of a fiber. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy reveal the atomic structure of the carbon nanoparticles and allow for observation of the changes in the quasi-graphitic ordering induced by ultrasonic irradiation and with the so-called quasi-high pressure effect under adsorption conditions. Structural changes have strong influence on the electronic properties, especially the localization of charge carriers within the nanoparticles, which can be observed with the EPR technique. This in turn can be well-correlated with the four-point electrical conductivity measurements which directly show the character of the charge carrier transport within the examined structures.

  18. Simple, inexpensive technique for high-quality smartphone fundus photography in human and animal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Luis J; Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily available in an ophthalmic practice. Methods. Fundus images were captured with a smartphone and a 20D lens with or without a Koeppe lens. By using the coaxial light source of the phone, this system works as an indirect ophthalmoscope that creates a digital image of the fundus. The application whose software allows for independent control of focus, exposure, and light intensity during video filming was used. With this app, we recorded high-definition videos of the fundus and subsequently extracted high-quality, still images from the video clip. Results. The described technique of smartphone fundus photography was able to capture excellent high-quality fundus images in both children under anesthesia and in awake adults. Excellent images were acquired with the 20D lens alone in the clinic, and the addition of the Koeppe lens in the operating room resulted in the best quality images. Successful photodocumentation of rabbit fundus was achieved in control and experimental eyes. Conclusion. The currently described system was able to take consistently high-quality fundus photographs in patients and in animals using readily available instruments that are portable with simple power sources. It is relatively simple to master, is relatively inexpensive, and can take advantage of the expanding mobile-telephone networks for telemedicine.

  19. Localization of human immunodeficiency virus antigens in infected cells by scanning/transmission-immunogold techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M.I.; Santa Maria, I.; de Andres, R.; Najera, R.

    1988-01-01

    An application of high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and gold-labelling techniques for the rapid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in infected cells has been developed. Experimental in vitro studies for detecting two HIV structural proteins, gp41 and p17, were performed following an indirect labeling procedure that uses monoclonal anti-p17 and anti-gp41 antibodies as primary antibodies and 40 nm gold-linked goat antimouse IgG as secondary antibodies. The cells were then studied by STEM in the scanning mode. Unambiguous localization of the viral antigens was possible by combining the three-dimensional image provided by the secondary electron image and the atomic number-dependent backscattered electron image for the identification of the gold marker. This technique combines both the morphological information and the rapid procedures of scanning electron microscopy with the precise and sensitive antigen detection provided by the use of STEM and immunological methods. The preliminary results of its application to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four anti-HIV-seropositive patients showing the presence of specific labeling in all of them suggest that it might prove useful for early detection of HIV infection before seroconversion, as well as for quantitative studies.

  20. Simple, Inexpensive Technique for High-Quality Smartphone Fundus Photography in Human and Animal Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Haddock

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily available in an ophthalmic practice. Methods. Fundus images were captured with a smartphone and a 20D lens with or without a Koeppe lens. By using the coaxial light source of the phone, this system works as an indirect ophthalmoscope that creates a digital image of the fundus. The application whose software allows for independent control of focus, exposure, and light intensity during video filming was used. With this app, we recorded high-definition videos of the fundus and subsequently extracted high-quality, still images from the video clip. Results. The described technique of smartphone fundus photography was able to capture excellent high-quality fundus images in both children under anesthesia and in awake adults. Excellent images were acquired with the 20D lens alone in the clinic, and the addition of the Koeppe lens in the operating room resulted in the best quality images. Successful photodocumentation of rabbit fundus was achieved in control and experimental eyes. Conclusion. The currently described system was able to take consistently high-quality fundus photographs in patients and in animals using readily available instruments that are portable with simple power sources. It is relatively simple to master, is relatively inexpensive, and can take advantage of the expanding mobile-telephone networks for telemedicine.

  1. Objective techniques for psychological assessment, phase 2. [techniques for measuring human performance during space flight stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortz, E. C.; Saur, A. J.; Nowlis, D. P.; Kendall, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an initial experiment in a research program designed to develop objective techniques for psychological assessment of individuals and groups participating in long-duration space flights. Specifically examined is the rationale for utilizing measures of attention as an objective assessment technique. Subjects participating in the experiment performed various tasks (eg, playing matrix games which appeared on a display screen along with auditory stimuli). The psychophysiological reactions of the subjects were measured and are given. Previous research of various performance and psychophysiological methods of measuring attention is also discussed. The experiment design (independent and dependent variables) and apparatus (computers and display devices) are described and shown. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  2. "Humanized" stem cell culture techniques: the animal serum controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkatte, Chandana; Gunasingh, Gency Ponrose; Cherian, K M; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha

    2011-01-01

    Cellular therapy is reaching a pinnacle with an understanding of the potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to regenerate damaged tissue in the body. The limited numbers of these hMSCs in currently identified sources, like bone marrow, adipose tissue, and so forth, bring forth the need for their in vitro culture/expansion. However, the extensive usage of supplements containing xenogeneic components in the expansion-media might pose a risk to the post-transplantation safety of patients. This warrants the necessity to identify and develop chemically defined or "humanized" supplements which would make in vitro cultured/processed cells relatively safer for transplantation in regenerative medicine. In this paper, we outline the various caveats associated with conventionally used supplements of xenogenic origin and also portray the possible alternatives/additives which could one day herald the dawn of a new era in the translation of in vitro cultured cells to therapeutic interventions.

  3. Accelerator human interface. 4. Object analysis by OMT technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Isamu; Nakahara, Kazuo [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mutoh, Masakatsu; Shibasaki, Yoshinobu

    1995-07-01

    The analysis of the objects of various classes in accelerator domain was carried out by OMT technique, and its summary is reported. By changing the technique from the conventional procedural type to object-oriented type, and reconsidering accelerator control, it becomes possible to give large impact to the development of software and accelerator control. Also the importance of establishing fundamental object system and its outline are described. As to the original objects of accelerators, the change due to age is small as compared with computer environment. Accordingly, by extracting the standard objects as far as possible, and making the objects so as to be able to deal with control system and multi-platform progressing with age, the situation that control systems become out of date can be clearly solved. The establishment of optimal objects shows the possibility of presenting optimal control system, and object analysis brings about many merits. OMT was adopted here. Accelerator control domain is divided into device class and generic task class, and the latter is divided into operation, diagnosis, operation support, simulation, data base, indication system and maintenance classes. The abstracting of data and procedure, the succession between devices and the behavior of objects are described. (K.I.)

  4. On the Interface Between Automated Predictive Demand Planning Techniques and Humans in Collaborative Planning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schorsch, Timm; Wallenburg, Carl Marcus; Wieland, Andreas

    of these techniques. The underlying case of this paper refers to collaborative supply chain processes that are predestinated for integrating new big data and predictive analytics techniques. By building a theoretical framework for deriving sound hypothesis and introducing and testing the experimental design...

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of Palygorskite from Torrejon el Rubio (Spain) Based on Experimental Techniques and Theoretical DFT Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.M.; Timon, V.; Cubero, J. J.; Sanchez-Ledesma, D. M.; Gutierrez-Nebot, L.; Martinez, J. J.; Romero, C.; Labajo, M.; Melon, A.; Barrios, I.

    2013-10-01

    New data about the physico-chemical, microstructural and crystal-chemical properties of the mineral paligorskite from Torrejon el Rubio (Caceres, Spain) were obtained by a combination of experimental techniques (XRD, FRX, FTIR, TG-DSC, SEM and chemical analyses), as well as geometry optimization by means of the Density Functional Theory (DFT). This study demonstrates the applicability of the mixed theoretical-experimental work to characterize and understand the properties of clay minerals used in technological applications and environmental remediation. (Author)

  6. Current radiological techniques used to evaluate unilateral partial ureteral obstruction: an experimental rabbit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Mehmet; Celebi, Suleyman; Kuzdan, Özgür; Koçan, Hüseyin; Ayyıldız, Halil Suat; Bayrak, İlkay Koray; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Yapıcı, Oktay; Kefeli, Mehmet; Arıtürk, Ender

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate functional and prognostic benefits of Doppler ultrasonography (DU), diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), and magnetic resonance urography (MRU) during diagnosis and follow-up of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and to examine apoptosis rates caused by UPJO in an experimental rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbits were divided randomly into two groups. The left kidneys of 15 rabbits from the first group underwent Ulm-Miller surgery to create UPJO, whereas the left kidneys of nine rabbits from the second group underwent sham surgery. A pressure flow study (Whitaker's test) was done during postoperative week 6. Based on the Whitaker test, the DU, DRS, and MRU findings were compared. The number of apoptotic renal cells was counted after death. The Whitaker test run during postoperative week 6 revealed obstructions in 15 rabbits from group 1; the nine rabbits of the sham group had no obstructions. Sensitivity and specificity of DRS were 93.3 and 88.8 %, respectively, and those of MRU were 93.3 and 88.8 %, respectively. The postoperative mean RI values were significantly higher than the preoperative values, associated with sensitivity of 86.6 % and specificity of 77.5 % for detecting UPJO. DRS, MRU, and RI could not predict UPJO in one (8 %), one (8 %), and two (16 %) kidneys, respectively. Likelihood ratio (LR) was 8.4 for MRU and scintigraphy, while for RI, LR was 3.9. Pathology specimens revealed that all kidneys with UPJO underwent apoptosis, and the number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher on the UPJO-created side than on the contralateral and in the sham group (p < 0.05). No test predicted all apoptosis related to UPJO. The RI, DRS, and DMRU results correlated with the pressure flow results for detecting UPJO. No single radiological technique predicted all initial UPJO-created kidneys that concluded with apoptosis. Further studies are required to seek with better methods for diagnosing an obstruction or to define a

  7. An Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were…

  8. Human-Robot Emergency Response - Experimental Platform and Preliminary Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Leuven, Belgium, May 16–21 1998, pp. 3715–3720. [13] itseez, “ Opencv ,” http...function and camshift function in OpenCV [13]. In each image obtained form cameras, we first calculate back projection of a histogram model of a human. In

  9. Diagnosis of human fascioliasis by stool and blood techniques: update for the present global scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Coma, S; Bargues, M D; Valero, M A

    2014-12-01

    Before the 1990s, human fascioliasis diagnosis focused on individual patients in hospitals or health centres. Case reports were mainly from developed countries and usually concerned isolated human infection in animal endemic areas. From the mid-1990s onwards, due to the progressive description of human endemic areas and human infection reports in developing countries, but also new knowledge on clinical manifestations and pathology, new situations, hitherto neglected, entered in the global scenario. Human fascioliasis has proved to be pronouncedly more heterogeneous than previously thought, including different transmission patterns and epidemiological situations. Stool and blood techniques, the main tools for diagnosis in humans, have been improved for both patient and survey diagnosis. Present availabilities for human diagnosis are reviewed focusing on advantages and weaknesses, sample management, egg differentiation, qualitative and quantitative diagnosis, antibody and antigen detection, post-treatment monitoring and post-control surveillance. Main conclusions refer to the pronounced difficulties of diagnosing fascioliasis in humans given the different infection phases and parasite migration capacities, clinical heterogeneity, immunological complexity, different epidemiological situations and transmission patterns, the lack of a diagnostic technique covering all needs and situations, and the advisability for a combined use of different techniques, at least including a stool technique and a blood technique.

  10. [From Nuremberg to the ethics committees in human experimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarez, Jean-Paul

    2008-02-01

    During the Nuremberg trials, the accusation prompted the creation of an ad hoc committee to advise on human experiments carried out on prisoners during wartime in the USA. Precisely a charge that had been brought against Karl Brandt and his colleagues. This committee was the forerunner of the Independent Committees, to which the Declaration of Helsinki assigned a role in analysing the ethics of research projects in humans. From 1980 onwards, in industrialised countries, the legislation regarding clinical trials began to incorporate similar structures, IRBs in the United States of America, Ethics Committees elsewhere, and the ''Committee for the Protection of Persons" in France. However, at that time, in spite of the misleading words, we went from ethics to law, from rules of conduct intended for researchers to legal regulations organising relations between sponsors, investigators and persons participating in biomedical research, which is not the same thing.

  11. [Identification of mosquitoes' human food source by using the co-agglutination technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M; Fachado, A; Fonte, L

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of a coagglutination technique for the identification of a human source for feeding mosquitoes is described. The dilution of ingested blood samples in filter paper was performed in 2 mL of a sodium chloride solution at 0.85%. It was used a suspension of sensibilized Staphylococcus aureus with rabbit's serum, human plasmatic anti-proteins, and human anti-IgG rabbit's serum discriminated well between human and non human blood. No agglutination was observed with the negative control. This technique proved to be sensitive to identify 100% of the human blood samples taken to the paper 24 hours after the mosquitoes completed their feeding at a temperature of 26 to 28 degrees C. Among mosquitoes fed and collected in the fields the test had a satisfactory result. Therefore, it may be used in routine work in the fields. The results showed the sensitivity and specificity of this method for identifying human blood ingested by mosquitoes.

  12. Simple, inexpensive technique for high-quality smartphone fundus photography in human and animal eyes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haddock, Luis J; Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily...

  13. Simple, Inexpensive Technique for High-Quality Smartphone Fundus Photography in Human and Animal Eyes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haddock, Luis J; Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily...

  14. VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop Experimentation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    including a Work Organization Analysis, a Cognitive Transformations Analysis (CogTA) and a Strategies Analysis ( Chalmers , 2010, 2011). These analyses...spatial layout of the display ( Chalmers , 2011). The intent of EID is to support the demands of the human instead of just presenting data. Following... Chalmers , 2011). It was hypothesized that the IID would improve the warfighting capabilities of the CO and the WL in such a way that it would

  15. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-06-15

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans.

  16. Experimental and theoretical models of human cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Marius; Mesoudi, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The modern field of cultural evolution is now over 30 years old, and an extensive body of theory and data has been amassed. This article reviews models of cultural evolution, both experimental and theoretical, and surveys what they can tell us about cultural evolutionary processes. The models are grouped according to which of four broad questions they address: (1) How are cultural traits changed during transmission? (2) How and why do cultural traits accumulate over time? (3) What social learning biases do people use? and (4) What are the population-level consequences of different social learning biases? We conclude by highlighting gaps in the literature and promising future research directions, including the further integration of theoretical models and experimental data, the identification of the factors underlying cumulative cultural evolution, and the explanation of individual and cultural variation in social learning biases. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bachmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device.

  19. A Comparison of Human Neutrophils Acquired from Four Experimental Models of Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Madhur P.; Day, Richard M.; Gilroy, Derek W.; O’Brien, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in neutrophil function have been implicated in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. Several models are employed to study activated human neutrophils akin to those found at a site of inflammation. These include whole blood (WB) ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo techniques: cantharidin blister, skin windows and intra-dermal injection of UV-killed E.coli (UVKEc). Neutrophils obtained from these have never been compared. We compared the activation status of neutrophils from each technique in order to inform the optimal model for use in human studies. Healthy male volunteers were randomised to undergo one of the four techniques (n = 5/group). LPS: WB stimulated with 1ng/ml of LPS for 4 hours. Cantharidin: 12.5μl of 0.1% cantharidin elicited a single blister, aspirated at 24 hours. Skin windows: four 6mm mechanical-suction blisters created, de-roofed and an exudate-collection chamber placed over the windows for 4 hours before aspiration. UVKEc: 1.5 x 107 UVKEc injected intra-dermally. A single 10mm mechanical-suction blister formed and aspirated at 4 hours. Unstimulated WB used as the control. Flow cytometry was used to determine activation status using CD16, CD11b, CD54, CD62L and CD88. Functional status was assessed with a phagocytosis assay. The pattern of neutrophil activation was similar in all models. Neutrophil CD11b was elevated in all models, most markedly in UVKEc (p<0.0001), and CD54 was also elevated but only significant in the LPS model (p = 0.001). CD62L was significantly reduced in all 4 models (p<0.0001) and CD88 was also suppressed in all. There were no changes in CD16 in any model, neither was there any significant difference in the phagocytic capacity of the neutrophils. In summary, there are no significant differences in activation marker expression or phagocytic capacity in the neutrophils obtained from each technique. Therefore we believe whole blood stimulation is the best model in experimentally challenging

  20. Effect of an experimental zirconia-silica coating technique on micro tensile bond strength of zirconia in different priming conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the adhesive properties of a MDP-containing resin cement to a colored zirconia ceramic, using an experimental zirconia-silica coating technique with different priming conditions. Methods 18 zirconia ceramic discs (Cercon base colored) were divided into two gro

  1. Experimental control of superstitious responding in humans1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, A. Charles; Cutts, David

    1963-01-01

    Superstitions were demonstrated with human subjects when presses on one button were reinforced on a VI 30-sec schedule while presses on a second were never reinforced. Superstitious responding, on the second button, was often maintained because presses on that button were frequently followed by reinforcement for a subsequent press on the first button. The introduction of a changeover delay (COD), which separated in time presses on the second button and subsequent reinforced presses on the first button, reduced or eliminated the superstitious responding of these subjects. Some complex superstitions were also demonstrated with other subjects for which the COD was in effect from the beginning of the session. PMID:14019310

  2. Towards a human eye behavior model by applying Data Mining Techniques on Gaze Information from IEC

    CERN Document Server

    Pallez, Denis; Baccino, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly present what is Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC) and rapidly how we have combined this artificial intelligence technique with an eye-tracker for visual optimization. Next, in order to correctly parameterize our application, we present results from applying data mining techniques on gaze information coming from experiments conducted on about 80 human individuals.

  3. Experimental rhinovirus infection in human volunteers exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, F.W.; Dubovi, E.J.; Harder, S.; Seal, E. Jr.; Graham, D.

    1988-05-01

    We studied 24 young adult male volunteers experimentally inoculated with type 39 rhinovirus to determine whether the course of viral infection was modified by exposure to moderate levels of ozone (0.3 ppm for 6 h per day) over the 5 days after virus inoculation. No differences in rhinovirus titers in nasal secretions, recruitment of neutrophils into nasal secretions, levels of interferon in nasal lavage fluid, in vitro lymphocyte proliferative responses to rhinovirus antigen, or levels of convalescent serum neutralizing antibody to type 39 rhinovirus were demonstrated in relation to ozone exposure. The level and pattern of ozone exposure used in this experiment had no demonstrable adverse effects on the immune responses necessary to limit and terminate rhinovirus infection of the upper respiratory tract.

  4. An experimental psychophysiological approach to human bradycardiac reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1985-01-01

    Bradycardic reflexes in man are both of scientific and clinical interest. Using the methods of experimental psychophysiology, control over relevant independent variables permits the study of fine-grained temporal physiologic response topographies, and of psychological factors that may modify the reflex. In addition, information can also be sought through interdisciplinary collaborations with experimental physiologists in order to shed light on the mechanism of the reflexes. These general features of the approach are illustrated by presenting data on two bradycardic reflex preparations: the laboratory dive analog, and the 90-degree negative tilt. The dive-analog studies have shown that a) the dive-reflex proper is a late-occurring bradycardia accompanied by a late-occurring vasoconstriction; and b) for the elicitation of this reflex, both breath-holding and face immersion are necessary. In addition, the physiologic manipulation of temperature affects the reflex in an inverse way over the range of 10 degrees to 40 degrees C, while the sense of control (a psychological variable) attenuates the reflex. The negative-tilt preparation produces a bradycardic response that is ideal as a Pavlovian unconditional response. Some Pavlovian conditioning arrangements, especially an "imaginational" form, do produce significant conditional bradycardic responding, and this has both potential clinical (e.g., biofeedback-related) and theoretical (e.g., S-R vs. S-S accounts of Pavlovian conditioning) applications. The paper ends with a comment on the cognitive paradigm shift in psychology. Although this shift is of importance, it is suggested that it is also important to "remember the response."

  5. Adhesive measurements of polymer bonded explosive constituents using the JKR experimental technique with a viscoelastic contact description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. R.; Williamson, D. M.; Lewis, D.; Glauser, A.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown experimentally that under many circumstances the strength limiting factor of Polymer Bonded Explosives (PBXs) is the adhesion which exists between the filler crystals and the polymer matrix. Experimental measurements of the Work of Adhesion between different binders and glass have been conducted using the JKR experimental technique, a reversible axisymmetric fracture experiment, during which the area of contact and the applied force are both measured during loading and unloading of the interface. The data taken with this technique show a rate dependence not present in the analytical JKR theory which is normally used to describe the adhesive contact of two elastic bodies, and which arises from the viscoelastic properties of the bulk polymer. The data is intended to inform the development, and validate the predictions of, microstructural models of PBX deformation and failure.

  6. An experimental investigation of heat transfer enhancement in minichannel: Combination of nanofluid and micro fin structure techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ji; Diao, Yanhua; Zhao, Yaohua;

    2017-01-01

    This work experimentally studied the single-phase heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics by using two heat transfer enhancement techniques (micro fin structure and nanofluids) in multiport minichannel flat tube (MMFT). MMFT consisted of numerous parallel rectangular minichannels and is w......This work experimentally studied the single-phase heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics by using two heat transfer enhancement techniques (micro fin structure and nanofluids) in multiport minichannel flat tube (MMFT). MMFT consisted of numerous parallel rectangular minichannels...... with different micro fin numbers (N = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4) and nanofluids with three volume concentrations (φ = 0.005%, 0.01% and 0.1%) were used as test sections and working fluids respectively. Secondly, the experiments using two combined enhancement technique were performed. By using conjunctively two...

  7. Tuskegee redux: evolution of legal mandates for human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Robert S; Williams, Jamila C; Kilbourne, Barbara A; Juarez, Paul D

    2012-11-01

    Human health experiments systematically expose people to conditions beyond the boundaries of medical evidence. Such experiments have included legal-medical collaboration, exemplified in the U.S. by the Public Health Service (PHS) Syphilis Study (Tuskegee). That medical experiment was legal, conforming to segregationist protocols and specific legislative authorization which excluded a selected group of African Americans from any medical protection from syphilis. Subsequent corrective action outlawed unethical medical experiments but did not address other forms of collaboration, including PHS submission to laws which may have placed African American women at increased risk from AIDS and breast cancer. Today, anti-lobbying law makes it a felony for PHS workers to openly challenge legally anointed suspension of medical evidence. African Americans and other vulnerable populations may thereby face excess risks-not only from cancer, but also from motor vehicle crashes, firearm assault, end stage renal disease, and other problems-with PHS workers as silent partners.

  8. Fetal developmental programing: insights from human studies and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gisele Aparecida Dionísio; Ribeiro, Vinícius Luís Bertotti; Barbisan, Luís Fernando; Marchesan Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida

    2017-03-01

    Environmental factors, particularly nutrition during pregnancy and early life can influence the risk of chronic diseases in later life. The underlying mechanism, termed "programing", postulates that an environmental stimulus during a critical window of time, early in life, has a permanent effect on subsequent structure and function of the organism. In this study we review the concept of fetal programing on chronic diseases and the proposed hypotheses for the association between early development and later disease, including epigenetic variation. We concentrate on specific aspects of maternal nutrition, particularly under-nutrition and over-nutrition, in humans and animal models. An adequate maternal nutrition during pregnancy is crucial for the health outcome of the offspring at adulthood.

  9. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Overview Gastric cancer has been traditionally defined by the Correa paradigm as a progression of sequential pathological events that begins with chronic inflammation [1]. Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the typical explanation for why the stomach becomes chronically inflamed. Acute gastric inflammation then leads to chronic gastritis, atrophy particularly of acid-secreting parietal cells, metaplasia due to mucous neck cell expansion from trans-differentiation of zymogenic cells to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma [2]. The chapter contains an overview of gastric anatomy and physiology to set the stage for signaling pathways that play a role in gastric tumorigenesis. Finally, the major known mouse models of gastric transformation are critiqued in terms of the rationale behind their generation and contribution to our understanding of human cancer subtypes. PMID:27573785

  10. The importance of being systematically surprisable : Comparative social simulation as experimental technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterkamp, M; Imhof, P

    1999-01-01

    We argue that computer simulation can serve as a functional equivalent for the experimental method in sociology, with respect to theory development. To this end Eve present accounts of experimentation and simulation by experimenting/simulating scientists and sociologists of science. From these analy

  11. Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: I. Experimental Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2015-01-01

    The nonperturbing experimental methods have been described, by means of which the solitary vortex structures in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma were detected and investigated. The comparison with the experimental methods used in devices with pure electron plasma was made. The problems of shielding the electrostatic perturbations in nonneutral plasmas were considered.

  12. Human masticatory muscle activity and jaw position under experimental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C-M; Chou, S-L; Gale, E N; McCall, W D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether stress induced a consistent pattern of increased electromyographic (EMG) activity in different masticatory muscles, and whether stress produced changes in jaw position. Thirty-five dental students at Taipei Medical College volunteered for this study. Mental arithmetic was used to create a stress condition and relaxation instruction was used to help relax the subjects. Subjects were asked to evaluate the stress they felt under each experimental condition with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Surface electrodes were used to monitor the EMG activities of the right masseter, right posterior temporalis and suprahyoid muscles. A kinesiograph was used to observe the jaw position. Data collected before mental arithmetic or relaxation monitored the baseline level. The VAS means were significantly increased during the stress condition and significantly decreased following relaxation, compared with the baseline. There was also a significant increase in EMG activity of all three muscles during mental arithmetic compared with baseline; different patterns of increased EMG activity were noticed in the three muscles under a continuous stress condition. Under stress, the incidence of tooth contact at intercuspal position was also increased.

  13. HEW Proposed Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects: Experimentation and the Institutionalized Mentally Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington University Law Quarterly, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Underlying bases for federal interest in experimentation on human subjects, including abuses of investigative processes and efforts at regulation, are explored. Focus is on recent HEW rules on the protection of human subjects, which will have a significant impact on many research institutions. (LBH)

  14. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  15. An Experimental Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Selected Techniques and Resources on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Alan A.

    The study was designed to test new instructional techniques in vocational agriculture, determine their effectiveness on student achievement, and compare individual and group instructional techniques. Forty-eight randomly selected Iowa high school vocational agriculture programs with enrollments of 35 students or more, were selected for testing the…

  16. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an

  17. Pathways to human experimentation, 1933-1945: Germany, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baader, Gerhard; Lederer, Susan E; Low, Morris; Schmaltz, Florian; Schwerin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The history of human experimentation in the twelve years between Hitler's rise to power and the end of the Second World War is notorious in the annals of the twentieth century. The horrific experiments conducted at Dachau, Auschwitz, Ravensbrueck, Birkenau, and other National Socialist concentration camps reflected an extreme indifference to human life and human suffering. Unfortunately, they do not reflect the extent and complexity of the human experiments undertaken in the years between 1933 and 1945. Following the prosecution of twenty-three high-ranking National Socialist physicians and medical administrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Nuremberg Medical Trial (United States v. Karl Brandt et al.), scholars have rightly focused attention on the nightmarish researches conducted by a small group of investigators on concentration camp inmates. Less well known are alternative pathways that brought investigators to undertake human experimentation in other laboratories, settings, and nations.

  18. Studies on the interaction of salvianolic acid B with human hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingting; Zhu, Shajun; Cao, Hui; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Guoqing; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Tianhong

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between salvianolic acid B (Sal B) and human hemoglobin (HHb) under physiological conditions was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The experimental results indicate that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of HHb by Sal B is a static quenching procedure, the binding reaction is spontaneous, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of Sal B to HHb. Based on Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the binding distance between Sal B and the inner tryptophan residues of HHb was determined to be 2.64 nm. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that Sal B can not lead to the microenvironmental changes around the Tyr and Trp residues of HHb, and the binding site of Sal B on HHb is located at α 1β 2 interface of HHb. Furthermore, the CD spectroscopy indicated the secondary structure of HHb is not changed in the presence of Sal B.

  19. Neural response to emotional stimuli during experimental human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Jennifer S; Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Rosenberger, Christina; Banner, Christina; Wolf, Oliver T; Engler, Harald; Oberbeck, Reiner; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Bingel, Ulrike; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2013-09-01

    Increases in peripheral cytokines during acute inflammation may affect various neuropsychological functions. The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate the effects of acute endotoxemia on mood and the neural response to emotionally aversive visual stimuli in healthy human subjects. In a double-blind, randomized crossover study, 18 healthy males received a bolus injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.4 ng/kg) or saline. Plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol as well as mood ratings were analyzed together with the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response during the presentation of aversive versus neutral pictures. Endotoxin administration induced pronounced transient increases in plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-10, and cortisol. Positive mood was decreased and state anxiety increased. In addition, activation of right inferior orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in response to emotional visual stimuli was significantly increased in the LPS condition. Increased prefrontal activation during the presentation of emotional material may reflect enhanced cognitive regulation of emotions as an adaptive response during an acute inflammation. These findings may have implications for the putative role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of depression.

  20. Hsp60 response in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Colangeli, Roberto; Orban, Gergely; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Lo Bello, Margherita; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Bucchieri, Fabio; Pomara, Cristoforo; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Macario, Alberto J L

    2015-03-24

    The mitochondrial chaperonin Hsp60 is a ubiquitous molecule with multiple roles, constitutively expressed and inducible by oxidative stress. In the brain, Hsp60 is widely distributed and has been implicated in neurological disorders, including epilepsy. A role for mitochondria and oxidative stress has been proposed in epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated the involvement of Hsp60 in TLE using animal and human samples. Hsp60 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus, measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, was increased in a rat model of TLE. Hsp60 was also increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons somata and neuropil and hippocampus proper (CA3, CA1) of the epileptic rats. We also determined the circulating levels of Hsp60 in epileptic animals and TLE patients using ELISA. The epileptic rats showed circulating levels of Hsp60 higher than controls. Likewise, plasma post-seizure Hsp60 levels in patients were higher than before the seizure and those of controls. These results demonstrate that Hsp60 is increased in both animals and patients with TLE in affected tissues, and in plasma in response to epileptic seizures, and point to it as biomarker of hippocampal stress potentially useful for diagnosis and patient management.

  1. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  2. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  3. Identification of rupture locations in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms using experimental and computational techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Barry J.; Cloonan, Aidan J.; Walsh, Michael T.; Vorp, David A.; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed In the event of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, the outcome is often death. This paper aims to experimentally identify the rupture locations of in vitro AAA models and validate these rupture sites using finite element analysis (FEA). Silicone rubber AAA models were manufactured using two different materials (Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170, Dow Corning) and imaged using computed tomography (CT). Experimental models were inflated until rupture with high speed photograp...

  4. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfekey, Hatem; Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Okamoto, Shogo

    2016-12-02

    Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body-because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies-resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard.

  5. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Elfekey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body—because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies—resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard.

  6. Experimental methods and modeling techniques for description of cell population heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, R. Lencastre; Nierychlo, M.; Lundin, L.; Pedersen, A. E.; Puentes Téllez, Pilar; Dutta, A.; Carlquist, M.; Bolic, A.; Schapper, D.; Brunetti, A. C.; Helmark, S.; Heins, A. -L; Jensen, A. D.; Nopens, I.; Rottwitt, K.; Szita, N.; van Elsas, J. D.; Nielsen, P. H.; Martinussen, J.; Sorensen, S. J.; Lantz, A. E.; Gernaey, K. V.

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous development, in the last decades, of analytical techniques providing complex information at single cell level, the study of cell heterogeneity has been the focus of several research projects within analytical biotechnology. Nonetheless, the complex interplay between environmental

  7. Simulations as a guidance to support and optimize experimental techniques for ultrasonic non-destructive testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Delrue, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In today's rapidly growing industrial world where the requirement of reliability is increasing day by day and where newer and advanced materials are being introduced on a large scale, non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques have a very important role to play. The goal of NDT methodologies and techniques is to detect the presence of damage and inclusions, and to image components or structures to find defect locations, without destroying the material. Among the variety of non-destructive tes...

  8. Techniques of Assisted Human Reproduction and the Problematic of Parental Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the issues related to the civil responsibility of parents, when using the assisted human reproductions techniques. Drew up a discussion about the reflections of the principles of responsible parenting and of human dignity in the use of those techniques, delineating one by one of them that can cause damages to the embryo, unborn or child already born. Discussing about the assisted human reproduction techniques, it outlined those allowed by the Federal Medical Council through the Resolution nº 2013/2013 and stood out the legal system omission related to the regulation of the use of those techniques, since the only legal instrument that deals with it, that is the Law nº 11.105/2005, did not specify about it. Was presented therefore, all human assisted reproduction techniques that give rise to a possible potentiation of vulnerability of the embryo as well as to possibly answers regarding to the legal status of the embryo that the doctrine is trying to trace. Finally, we discussed about the civil responsibility forms, relating it to the responsible parenthood and the damages caused from not using those techniques.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Technique in the Analysis of Phases of Hydroxylapatite and Calcium Phosphate in a Human Jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđan D. Poštić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human jawbones consist mainly of hydroxylapatite. The aim of this study was to assess the structure of solid calcium phosphate compounds of the jawbone in cases of normal and osteoporotic JBs. Design: The X-ray diffraction technique was used to analyze the structure of samples of cadavers’ jawbones. The experimental JB samples were taken from an osteoporotic and atrophic jawbone, and control samples were from normal and nonosteoporotic bone samples. Results: Hydroxylapatite was the only phase in control bone samples. In experimental bone samples, the above-mentioned phase was registered, as well as monetite and brushite. Conclusion: The obtained data indicated that the changes of crystalographic forms of calcium phosphate in the physiologic system were balanced according to the possibility of change in the inorganic chemical system.

  10. The experimental isomeric cross-section ratio in the nuclear activation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vänskä, R.; Rieppo, R.

    1981-02-01

    First, the experimental isomeric cross-section ratio is discussed considering a single metastable state induced. The experimental ratio is given in a straightforward and exact formula, which is generally applicable to any incident particle activation and to any isomeric pair of an exclusive, fractional or non-existing isomeric transition decay. Second, the derived experimental isomeric yield ration is adapted for the present work where neutron induced reactions are considered and gamma-ray spectrometry is utilized in the determination of the 14-15 MeV neutron activation cross-sections and isomeric cross-section ratios for the germanium reactions, 74Ge(n, α) 71m,gZn and 76Ge(n, 2n) 75m,gGe, leading to single metastable and ground states in the product.

  11. [Ethical issues of human experimentation with special reference to informed consent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, L; Silvestrini, B

    2000-10-01

    Human experimentation in order to develop new medical therapies creates very complex ethical problems: when is it possible to test a new therapy on a human subject? Is it always necessary his/her consent? Which information should be given to the subject before requesting his/her consent? How to behave in the case of minors, psychiatric patients and other subjects not perfectly free or able to understand the information provided? Is it right to subject a person to an experimentation from which he/she will not get any direct advantage? Which results can be published? In other words, which are the ethical limits of human experimentation? These are difficult questions, to which the authors tried to answer referring to some ethically significant human experimentations, such as those performed by Lind and Jenner in the XVIII century, and those carried out by the nazi doctors, from whose trial derived the Nuremberg Code, which introduced for the first time, at an international level, the principle of the informed consent. Some of the limits of this document, including the impossibility of doing research on subjects not able to give their informed consent, such as minors and psychiatric patients, were overcome by the Declaration of Helsinki, whose current version resulted from several subsequent revisions. According to this document, a major role is played by the Institutional Review Boards or Institutional Ethical Committees that have the heavy responsibility of evaluating the ethical connotations of human experimentations.

  12. Scientific misconduct and unethical human experimentation: historic parallels and moral implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefor, Alan T

    2005-01-01

    Although a great deal of human experimentation has been performed to elucidate information otherwise not obtainable, there are many recorded instances of unethical human experimentation. There is also a history of crimes that were committed and disguised as human experiments, best exemplified by the activities of some physicians in Nazi Germany from 1933 until 1945. As a direct result of these activities, a war-crimes trial after World War II resulted in the creation of the Nuremberg Code, to guide future human experimentation. Despite this, unethical experiments were conducted at major academic institutions in the United States in the years after World War II by otherwise normal physicians who did not feel that the Nuremberg Code applied to them personally. There are several possible explanations for such activities, but the desire for personal advancement is prominent among these. Episodes of scientific misconduct such as falsification of experimental data or of personal qualifications seem to be more commonly reported recently and have also been described in the popular press. This activity may also be motivated by desire for personal advancement, giving it a parallel to the conduct of unethical human experimentation. Education may be the best way to prevent these activities that may have similar motivating factors.

  13. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dansheng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the electromechanical impedance (EMI method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes.

  14. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dansheng; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-10-22

    In the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes.

  15. Analysis of the experimental level scheme of {sup 61}Cu using computational technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Anuradha, E-mail: annu1gupta1@gmail.com; Verma, Preeti, E-mail: preetiverma130587@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti-2003@yahoo.co.in [Professor, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The high-spin structure in {sup 61}Cu nucleus is studied in terms of effective two body interaction. In order to take into account the deformed BCS basis, the basis states are expanded in terms of the core eigenfunctions. Yrast band with some other bands havew been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental data for {sup 61}Cu nucleus. On comparing the available experimental as well as other theoretical data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  16. Experimental approach to investigate the dynamics of mixing coolant flow in complex geometry using PIV and PLIF techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hutli Ezddin; Gottlasz Valer; Tar Dániel; Ezsol Gyorgy; Baranyai Gabor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the increase of mixing phenomenon in a coolant flow in order to improve the heat transfer, the economical operation and the structural integrity of Light Water Reactors-Pressurized Water Reactors (LWRs-PWRs). Thus the parameters related to the heat transfer process in the system will be investigated. Data from a set of experiments, obtained by using high precision measurement techniques, Particle Image V...

  17. Numerical and experimental determination of the minimum and maximum measuring times for the hot wire parallel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos W. N. dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot wire technique is considered to be an effective and accurate means of determining the thermal conductivity of ceramic materials. However, specifically for materials of high thermal diffusivity, the appropriate time interval to be considered in calculations is a decisive factor for getting accurate and consistent results. In this work, a numerical simulation model is proposed with the aim of determining the minimum and maximum measuring time for the hot wire parallel technique. The temperature profile generated by this model is in excellent agreement with that one experimentally obtained by this technique, where thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat are simultaneously determined from the same experimental temperature transient. Eighteen different specimens of refractory materials and polymers, with thermal diffusivities ranging from 1x10-7 to 70x10-7 m²/s, in shape of rectangular parallelepipeds, and with different dimensions were employed in the experimental programme. An empirical equation relating minimum and maximum measuring times and the thermal diffusivity of the sample is also obtained.

  18. Return to Our Roots: Raising Radishes to Teach Experimental Design. Methods and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews research in teaching applied statistics. Concludes that students should analyze data from studies they have designed and conducted. Describes an activity in which students study germination and growth of radish seeds. Includes a table providing student instructions for both the experimental procedure and data analysis. (CFR)

  19. Tracer experimental techniques for CFD model verification and validation in sugar crystallizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffith, J.; Borroto, J.; Dominguez, J.; Derivet, M.; Cuesta, J.; Flores, P.; Fernandez Rivas, D.; Amor, A.; Franklin, B.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the CRP improvement of the experimental design for RTD tests at a pilot crystallizer was performed. A new approach for RTD studies in non-Newtonian fluids for flow patterns characterization at the pilot crystallizer was carried out. Batch mixing process was tested and the homogen

  20. Experimental demonstration of a scalable transmitter frontend technique in IMDD-OFDMA-PON upstream scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Cheng; Liu, Na; Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Xue

    2016-11-01

    Scalable transmitter frontend scheme is proposed to reduce the sampling rate of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and the complexity of digital signal processing (DSP) in intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDMA-PON upstream scenarios. The hardware cost of each ONU is substantially decreased. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is experimentally demonstrated.

  1. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil L. Bangare; Madhura Patil

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed wor...

  2. Human factors multi-technique approach to teenage engagement in digital technologies health research

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Alexandra R; Craven, Michael P; Atkinson, Sarah; Simons, Lucy; Cobb, Sue; Mazzola, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the use of multi-techniques for teenage HCI health research. Through four case studies we present information about adolescents as users of healthcare services and technologies, adolescent personal development and the human factors approaches through which teenagers have been involved in healthcare research projects. In each case study; comprising of the design or evaluation of a new digital technology for supporting health or well-being, the techniques used by researche...

  3. A Comparison of Collection Techniques for Gene Expression Analysis of Human Oral Taste Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Nicholas Steven; Liu, Dongli; Shaw, Jan; Hannan, Garry; Duesing, Konsta; Keast, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Variability in human taste perception is associated with both genetic and environmental factors. The influence of taste receptor expression on this variability is unknown, in part, due to the difficulty in obtaining human oral tissue that enables quantitative expression measures of taste genes. In a comparison of six current techniques (Oragene RNeasy Kit, Isohelix swab, Livibrush cytobrush, tongue saliva, cheek saliva collection, and fungiform papillae biopsy), we identify the fungiform papillae biopsy is the optimal sampling technique to analyse human taste gene expression. The fungiform papillae biopsy resulted in the highest RNA integrity, enabling amplification of all the assessed taste receptor genes (TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS1R3, SCNN1A and CD36) and taste tissue marker genes (NCAM1, GNAT3 and PLCβ2). Furthermore, quantitative expression was observed in a subset of taste genes assessed from the saliva collection techniques (cheek saliva, tongue saliva and Oragene RNA kit). These saliva collection techniques may be useful as a non-invasive alternative sampling technique to the fungiform papillae biopsy. Identification of the fungiform papillae biopsy as the optimal collection method will facilitate further research into understanding the effect of gene expression on variability in human taste perception.

  4. A Comparison of Collection Techniques for Gene Expression Analysis of Human Oral Taste Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Steven Archer

    Full Text Available Variability in human taste perception is associated with both genetic and environmental factors. The influence of taste receptor expression on this variability is unknown, in part, due to the difficulty in obtaining human oral tissue that enables quantitative expression measures of taste genes. In a comparison of six current techniques (Oragene RNeasy Kit, Isohelix swab, Livibrush cytobrush, tongue saliva, cheek saliva collection, and fungiform papillae biopsy, we identify the fungiform papillae biopsy is the optimal sampling technique to analyse human taste gene expression. The fungiform papillae biopsy resulted in the highest RNA integrity, enabling amplification of all the assessed taste receptor genes (TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS1R3, SCNN1A and CD36 and taste tissue marker genes (NCAM1, GNAT3 and PLCβ2. Furthermore, quantitative expression was observed in a subset of taste genes assessed from the saliva collection techniques (cheek saliva, tongue saliva and Oragene RNA kit. These saliva collection techniques may be useful as a non-invasive alternative sampling technique to the fungiform papillae biopsy. Identification of the fungiform papillae biopsy as the optimal collection method will facilitate further research into understanding the effect of gene expression on variability in human taste perception.

  5. Investigation on experimental techniques to detect, locate and quantify gear noise in helicopter transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Atherton, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A robotic system to automate the detection, location, and quantification of gear noise using acoustic intensity measurement techniques has been successfully developed. Major system components fabricated under this grant include an instrumentation robot arm, a robot digital control unit and system software. A commercial, desktop computer, spectrum analyzer and two microphone probe complete the equipment required for the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System (RAIMS). Large-scale acoustic studies of gear noise in helicopter transmissions cannot be performed accurately and reliably using presently available instrumentation and techniques. Operator safety is a major concern in certain gear noise studies due to the operating environment. The man-hours needed to document a noise field in situ is another shortcoming of present techniques. RAIMS was designed to reduce the labor and hazard in collecting data and to improve the accuracy and repeatability of characterizing the acoustic field by automating the measurement process. Using RAIMS a system operator can remotely control the instrumentation robot to scan surface areas and volumes generating acoustic intensity information using the two microphone technique. Acoustic intensity studies requiring hours of scan time can be performed automatically without operator assistance. During a scan sequence, the acoustic intensity probe is positioned by the robot and acoustic intensity data is collected, processed, and stored.

  6. The GT resonance revealed in beta sup + -decay using new experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Algora, A; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Agramunt, J; Blomqvist, J M; Batist, L; Borcea, R; Collatz, R; Gadea, A; Gerl, J; Gierlik, M; aGórska, M; Guilbaud, O; Grawe, H; Hellström, M; Hu, Z; Janas, Z; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; Kleinheinz, P; Liu, W; Martínez, T; Moroz, F; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Rykaczewski, K; Shibata, M; Szerypo, J; Wittmann, V

    1999-01-01

    The GT beta decay of sup 1 sup 5 sup 0 Ho has been studied with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS), with an array of 6 Euroball CLUSTER Ge detectors (the CLUSTER CUBE), and with an alpha detector. The three techniques complement each other. The results provide the first observation of an extremely sharp resonance in GT beta decay.

  7. Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C.; Gehrchen, P.M.; Kiaer, T.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A finite element analysis-based bone remodeling study in human was conducted in the lumbar spine operated on with pedicle screws. Bone remodeling results were compared to prospective experimental bone mineral content data of patients operated on with pedicle screws. OBJECTIVE......: The validity of 2 bone remodeling algorithms was evaluated by comparing against prospective bone mineral content measurements. Also, the potential stress shielding effect was examined using the 2 bone remodeling algorithms and the experimental bone mineral data. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In previous studies......, in the human spine, the bone remodeling algorithms have neither been evaluated experimentally nor been examined by comparing to unsystematic experimental data. METHODS: The site-specific and nonsite-specific iterative bone remodeling algorithms were applied to a finite element model of the lumbar spine...

  8. Historical analysis of the neural control of movement from the bedrock of animal experimentation to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter B C

    2004-04-01

    The history of the investigation of the sensorimotor control of movement is outlined from its inception at the beginning of the 19th century. Particular emphasis is placed on the opening up of new possibilities by the development of new techniques, from chronophotography to magnetic brain stimulation, all of which have exploited developments in technology. Extrapolating from history, future advance in physiological understanding can be guaranteed to require seizing the new tools provided by the physical sciences and refining these to our particular need. The ever-present danger is that these are then deployed with triumphal optimism rather than critical doubt and earlier methods either jettisoned prematurely or used incautiously. The new techniques have enabled experimentation to become ever less intrusive, permitting a progressive shift from animal to human work, thereby offering the prospect of an increasing clinical reward.

  9. An experimental approach to estimation of human information processing capacity for diagnosis tasks in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Tae

    2006-02-15

    The objectives of this research are 1) to determine the human's information processing capacity and 2) to describe the relationship between the information processing capacity and human factors. This research centers on the relationship, as experimentally determined, between an operator's mental workload and information flow during accident diagnosis tasks at nuclear power plants (NPPs). The relationship between the information flow rate and operator's mental workload is investigated experimentally. According to this relationship, the operator's information processing capacity can be established. Once the information processing capacity of a main control room (MCR) operator in a NPP is known, it is possible to apply it 1) to predict the operator's performance, 2) to design diagnosis tasks, and 3) to design human-machine interface. In advanced MCR, an operator's mental activity is more important than his or her physical activity. The mental workload is the portion of the operator's limited capacity that is actually required to perform a particular task. A high mental workload may cause an operator to make a mistake and consequently affect that the safe operation of NPPs. Thus, to predict an operator's performance is very important for the nuclear safety. The information processing capacity is the operator's ability to manage the amount of bits per second when an operator is diagnosing tasks or accidents. We can estimate the information processing capacity using the relationship between the information flow rate and human performance. That is, if the operator's performance decreases rapidly as the information flow rate (bit/sec) is increased, it is possible to determine the operator's information processing capacity. A diagnosis task is one of the most complex and mentally demanding tasks as well as a crucial part in maintaining the safe operation of NPPs. Diagnosis tasks refer to the overall tasks of finding the

  10. Ethical consideration of experimentation using living human embryos: the Catholic Church's position on human embryonic stem cell research and human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, N

    2003-01-01

    Although the potential applications of human embryonic stem cells and therapeutic cloning hold promise for the alleged medical benefits, these technologies have posed profound ethical issues because they necessitate the destruction of human embryos. A fundamental point in the issues is the concept of the moral status of human embryos. The Catholic Church has held that human life begins at the moment of conception and therefore, has defended the dignity, inviolable right to life and integrity of human embryos. The Catholic Church has opposed human embryonic stem cell research and any kind of human cloning because they are contrary to the dignity of procreation, of conjugal union and of human embryos. Moreover, these techniques have the risk of creating a sub-category of human beings that are destined basically for the convenience of others. In conclusion, science and technology can never be independent of the criterion of morality, since technology exists for man and must respect his finality.

  11. Epineurial sheath tube (EST) technique: an experimental peripheral nerve repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Ahmet; Dunda, Sebastian E; Mon O'Dey, Dan; Brook, Gary A; Suschek, Christoph V; Pallua, Norbert

    2011-12-01

    Here we present the epineurial sheath tube (EST) technique as a modified microsurgical rat sciatic nerve model. The EST technique provides a cavity or pouch consisting of an outer epineurial sleeve that has been freed from nerve fascicles. This cavity may be appropriate to test the effectiveness and biocompatibility of implanted growth factors, cell suspensions (embedded in solutions or gels), or bioartificial nerve guide constructs. A total number of 10 rats underwent the surgical procedure for the EST technique. Cylinders made of fibrin gel served as implants and place-holders. Three animals were euthanized directly after operation, while the others survived for 6 weeks. After immersion fixation (3·9% glutaraldehyde), both conventional histology [semi-thin sections (1 μm), toluidine blue] and scanning electron microscopy were performed. Conventional histology and scanning electron microscopy of samples that had been fixed directly after the surgical procedure displayed the integrity of the closed epineurial tube with the fibrin cylinder in its center. Even after 6 weeks, the outer epineurium was not lacerated, the stitches did not loosen, and the lumen did not collapse, but remained open. The practicability of the EST technique could be verified regarding feasibility, reproducibility, mechanical stability, and openness of the lumen. The EST technique can be adapted to other nerve models (e.g. median or facial nerve). It provides a cavity or pouch, which can be used for different neuroscientific approaches including concepts to improve the therapeutic benefit of autologous nerve grafting or therapies to be used as an alternative to autologous nerve grafting.

  12. AN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE TO MEASURE PROJECTILE DECELERATION HISTORY DURING NORMAL PENETRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    INTO PLAIN; Liu Xiaohu; Liu Ji; Wang Cheng

    2000-01-01

    The present paper presents a new experimental method to measure the deceleration time his tory of projectiles penetrating into concrete in full-size test. The experiment can be carried out by using an onboard accelerometer to measure the projectile deceleration history and the data are transmitted to a ground recording system. With this experimental method, a series of tests on hemisphere-nose steel projectiles pene trating normally into plain concrete at the velocity region 150 - 400 m/s have been executed and the deceler ation histories obtained. The high frequency portion in the deceleration data has been investigated and proved to be the structure response of projectile. The characteristics of deceleration history have also been analyzed and discussed.

  13. Modular Sampling and Analysis Techniques for the Real-Time Analysis of Human Breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M; Farquar, G; Adams, K; Bogan, M; Martin, A; Benner, H; Spadaccini, C; Steele, P; Davis, C; Loyola, B; Morgan, J; Sankaran, S

    2007-07-09

    At LLNL and UC Davis, we are developing several techniques for the real-time sampling and analysis of trace gases, aerosols and exhaled breath that could be useful for a modular, integrated system for breath analysis. Those techniques include single-particle bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) for the analysis of exhaled aerosol particles or droplets as well as breath samplers integrated with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or MEMS-based differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). We describe these techniques and present recent data obtained from human breath or breath condensate, in particular, addressing the question of how environmental exposure influences the composition of breath.

  14. Experimental endotoxemia as a model to study neuroimmune mechanisms in human visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sven; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2012-07-01

    The administration of bacterial endotoxin (i.e., lipopolysaccharide, LPS) constitutes a well-established experimental approach to study the effects of an acute and transient immune activation on physiological, behavioral, and emotional aspects of sickness behavior in animals and healthy humans. However, little is known about possible effects of experimental endotoxemia on pain in humans. This knowledge gap is particularly striking in the context of visceral pain in functional as well as chronic-inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders. Although inflammatory processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain, it remains incompletely understood how inflammatory mediators interact with bottom-up (i.e., increased afferent input) and top-down (i.e., altered central pain processing) mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. Considering the recent findings of visceral hyperalgesia after LPS application in humans, in this review, we propose that experimental endotoxemia with its complex peripheral and central effects constitutes an experimental model to study neuroimmune communication in human pain research. We summarize and attempt to integrate relevant animal and human studies concerning neuroimmune communication in visceral and somatic pain, discuss putative mechanisms, and conclude with future research directions. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  16. The near field acoustic holography technique for cyclostationary sound field and its experimental research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Quan; JIANG Weikang

    2005-01-01

    One near field acoustic holography (NAH) technique is proposed for analyzing cyclostationary sound field. The signal of this kind of sound field has very serious modulation phenomenon generally, in spectrum of which obvious sidebands exist. It is difficult for the traditional NAH to possess demodulation function, so virtual power of sidebands exists in its hologram. Replacing the Fourier's transform with the second-order cyclic statistics, the proposed NAH technique uses the cyclic spectrum density (CSD) function as reconstructed physical quantity, instead of the spectrum or power spectrum density of sound pressure signal.The CSD function can demodulate cyclostationary signals, which makes no virtual power of sidebands in its hologram. The results of simulation and experiment show that the proposed NAH can extract more information about cyclostationary sound field than traditional NAH, by which sound field can be known more clearly.

  17. Comparison of multivariate calibration techniques applied to experimental NIR data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Centner, V; Verdu-Andres, J; Walczak, B; Jouan-Rimbaud, D; Despagne, F; Pasti, L; Poppi, R; Massart, DL; de Noord, OE

    2000-01-01

    The present study compares the performance of different multivariate calibration techniques applied to four near-infrared data sets when test samples are well within the calibration domain. Three types of problems are discussed: the nonlinear calibration, the calibration using heterogeneous data sets, and the calibration in the presence of irrelevant information in the set of predictors. Recommendations are derived from the comparison, which should help to guide a nonchemometrician through th...

  18. Estimation of Fracture Length as a Mechanical Property in Hydrofraturing Technique using an Experimental Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guruprasad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares temperature distribution and weld bead profiles of constant current and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded AISI 304L grade stainless steel joints. The effects of pulsed current welding on tensile properties, hardness profiles, micro structural features and residual stress distribution of stainless steel joints are reported. The use of pulsed current technique improves the tensile properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone.

  19. Ethical regulation or regulating ethics? The need for both internal and external governance of human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomossy, George F

    2002-10-01

    Research regulation is a timely topic for discussions in bioethics and public health policy. This response to articles in the previous special issue of the Monash Bioethics Review emphasises the importance of having both internal and external controls on human experimentation. Unless both elements are incorporated into research ethics governance frameworks, they will ultimately fail to achieve what should be their primary goal: human subject protection.

  20. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  1. Identification of rupture locations in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms using experimental and computational techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Cloonan, Aidan J; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2010-05-01

    In the event of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, the outcome is often death. This paper aims to experimentally identify the rupture locations of in vitro AAA models and validate these rupture sites using finite element analysis (FEA). Silicone rubber AAA models were manufactured using two different materials (Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170, Dow Corning) and imaged using computed tomography (CT). Experimental models were inflated until rupture with high speed photography used to capture the site of rupture. 3D reconstructions from CT scans and subsequent FEA of these models enabled the wall stress and wall thickness to be determined for each of the geometries. Experimental models ruptured at regions of inflection, not at regions of maximum diameter. Rupture pressures (mean+/-SD) for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 models were 650.6+/-195.1mmHg and 410.7+/-159.9mmHg, respectively. Computational models accurately predicted the locations of rupture. Peak wall stress for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 models was 2.15+/-0.26MPa at an internal pressure of 650mmHg and 1.69+/-0.38MPa at an internal pressure of 410mmHg, respectively. Mean wall thickness of all models was 2.19+/-0.40mm, with a mean wall thickness at the location of rupture of 1.85+/-0.33 and 1.71+/-0.29mm for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 materials, respectively. Rupture occurred at the location of peak stress in 80% (16/20) of cases and at high stress regions but not peak stress in 10% (2/20) of cases. 10% (2/20) of models had defects in the AAA wall which moved the rupture location away from regions of elevated stress. The results presented may further contribute to the understanding of AAA biomechanics and ultimately AAA rupture prediction.

  2. Coal Recycling from Tailings using Flotation with 2-Level Experimental Design Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Jannesar Malakooti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the possibility of producing coal with less than 11% ash from tailings of flotation process was investigated. The effect of six flotation parameters: collector type, collector consumption, frother type, frother consumption, pulp density and mixing rate were studied on a sample from a tailing dam. A software based experimental design approach (DX7 was applied to determine and model effective parameters as well as flotation optimization through fractional factorial. It was shown that collector type and flotation machine mixing rate were the most effective parameters on ash content of concentrate. The results indicated that the production of a desired ash content concentrate, i.e.

  3. Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

    1994-09-01

    Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

  4. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given...... with a focus on an ex vivo application of OCT. Image and video examples of freshly obtained murine lungs are included. The main advantage of OCT for ex vivo analysis is the non-contact, non-invasive, and non-destructive fast acquisition of a three-dimensional data set with micrometer-resolution....

  5. Experimental Study on Practical Quantum Key Distribution Scheme with Time-Multiplexed Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Xian; HU Hua-Peng; LIANG Rui-Sheng; LU Yi-Qun; WANG Jin-Dong; LU Wei

    2008-01-01

    We present a scheme that is capable of detecting photon numbers during the quantum key distribution (QKD) based on an improved differential phase shift (DPS) system without Trojan horse attack. A time-multiplexed detector (TMD) is set in for the photon-number resolution. Two fibre loops are used for detecting photon numbers as well as distributing keys. The long-term stabilization is guaranteed by two Faraday mirrors (FM) at Bob's site to automatically compensate for polarization defect. Our experimental study (90km QKD is completed) indicates that such a system is stable and secure which nearly reaches the performance of a single photon scheme.

  6. Analyses of human colonic mucus obtained by an in vivo sampling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Loof, A.; Houtvin, S.A.L.W. van; Troost, F.J.; Venema, K.; Kodde, A.; Koek, G.H.; Schipper, R.G.; Heerde, W.L. van; Brummer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The mucus layer is an important dynamic component of the epithelial barrier. It contains mucin glycoproteins and other compounds secreted by the intestinal epithelium, such as secretory IgA. However, a standardized in vivo sampling technique of mucus in humans is not yet available. Aim:

  7. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Lnc2Cancer: a manually curated database of experimentally supported lncRNAs associated with various human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Jianjian; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Yue, Ming; Wang, Lihua; Li, Xia

    2016-01-04

    Lnc2Cancer (http://www.bio-bigdata.net/lnc2cancer) is a manually curated database of cancer-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) with experimental support that aims to provide a high-quality and integrated resource for exploring lncRNA deregulation in various human cancers. LncRNAs represent a large category of functional RNA molecules that play a significant role in human cancers. A curated collection and summary of deregulated lncRNAs in cancer is essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms and functions of lncRNAs. Here, we developed the Lnc2Cancer database, which contains 1057 manually curated associations between 531 lncRNAs and 86 human cancers. Each association includes lncRNA and cancer name, the lncRNA expression pattern, experimental techniques, a brief functional description, the original reference and additional annotation information. Lnc2Cancer provides a user-friendly interface to conveniently browse, retrieve and download data. Lnc2Cancer also offers a submission page for researchers to submit newly validated lncRNA-cancer associations. With the rapidly increasing interest in lncRNAs, Lnc2Cancer will significantly improve our understanding of lncRNA deregulation in cancer and has the potential to be a timely and valuable resource.

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  10. An experimental technique for studying the dynamic stability of slurry fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavan, S.K.; Chu, M.L.; Reddy, N.P.; Yazdani, S.

    1987-01-01

    In coal slurry transportation, repeated vertical accelerations larger than the gravitational acceleration are encountered. The sedimentation behavior of the slurry fuels under these conditions is an area of concern in fuel transportation. A laboratory-scale technique has been developed that can be used to study the sedimentation behavior of coal slurry fuels under conditions of repeated vertical accelerations. A coal slurry sample contained in a settling column is subjected to repeated vertical movement using a mechanical shaker. The coal concentration profile along the height of the settling column can be used to quantify the sedimentation behavior of the slurry.

  11. An Experimental Insight into the ZnO Thin Films Properties Prepared by Dip Coating Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Benhaliliba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of the pure and metal doped ZnO films are investigated using a low cost dip coating technique. The films have grown slowly onto a glass substrate at room temperature. Based on X-ray pattern parameters are extracted such as grain size, lattice parameters. Optical measurements within the UV-Vis band give us the transmittance of films ( 80 % and optical band gap. Using the Hall Effect measurement (HMS in room temperature, we determine the bulk density of charge carriers, mobility and their electrical resistivity.

  12. The experimental localization of Aubry-Mather sets using regularization techniques inspired by viscosity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Massimiliano; Bernardi, Olga; Cardin, Franco

    2007-09-01

    We provide a new method for the localization of Aubry-Mather sets in quasi-integrable two-dimensional twist maps. Inspired by viscosity theories, we introduce regularization techniques based on the new concept of "relative viscosity and friction," which allows one to obtain regularized parametrizations of invariant sets with irrational rotation number. Such regularized parametrizations allow one to compute a curve in the phase-space that passes near the Aubry-Mather set, and an invariant measure whose density allows one to locate the gaps on the curve. We show applications to the "golden" cantorus of the standard map as well as to a more general case.

  13. Testing equipment and experimental techniques for the investigation of the photoviscoelastic behaviour of soft polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, H.

    Creep tests with uniaxial stress and pure shear have been carried out in order to determine the behaviour of soft plastics, which is governed by a non-linear material law, and to apply it to the photoelastic analysis of biaxial stress in plastic components under quasistatic and isothermal loads. The test facility is described as well as the technique applied to correct stress/creep curves for sigma=const. Results are presented for plane and tubular samples of soft PVC and an unsaturated polyester.

  14. Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Study of Subgrade Moisture Variation and Underground Antidrainage Technique under Groundwater Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a main natural factor impacting the subgrade structure, and it plays a significant role in the stability of the subgrade. In this paper, the analytical solution of the subgrade moisture variations considering groundwater fluctuations is derived based on Richards’ equation. Laboratory subgrade model is built, and three working cases are performed in the model to study the capillary action of groundwater at different water tables. Two types of antidrainage materials are employed in the subgrade model, and their anti-drainage effects are discussed. Moreover, numerical calculation is conducted on the basis of subgrade model, and the calculate results are compared with the experimental measurements. The study results are shown. The agreement between the numerical and the experimental results is good. Capillary action is obvious when the groundwater table is rising. As the groundwater table is falling, the moisture decreases in the position of the subgrade near the water table and has no variations in the subgrade where far above the table. The anti-drainage effect of the sand cushion is associated with its thickness and material properties. New waterproofing and drainage material can prevent groundwater entering the subgrade effectively, and its anti-drainage effect is good.

  15. Development of a fast, lean and agile direct pelletization process using experimental design techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Stavros N; Rekkas, Dimitrios M

    2017-04-01

    A novel hot melt direct pelletization method was developed, characterized and optimized, using statistical thinking and experimental design tools. Mixtures of carnauba wax (CW) and HPMC K100M were spheronized using melted gelucire 50-13 as a binding material (BM). Experimentation was performed sequentially; a fractional factorial design was set up initially to screen the factors affecting the process, namely spray rate, quantity of BM, rotor speed, type of rotor disk, lubricant-glidant presence, additional spheronization time, powder feeding rate and quantity. From the eight factors assessed, three were further studied during process optimization (spray rate, quantity of BM and powder feeding rate), at different ratios of the solid mixture of CW and HPMC K100M. The study demonstrated that the novel hot melt process is fast, efficient, reproducible and predictable. Therefore, it can be adopted in a lean and agile manufacturing setting for the production of flexible pellet dosage forms with various release rates easily customized between immediate and modified delivery.

  16. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

  17. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  18. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  19. A scanning electron microscopic study of different caries removal techniques on human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Ozgünaltay, Gül; Dayangaç, Berrin

    2002-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluated the effect of different caries removal techniques on human dentin topography. Thirty-six extracted human carious mandibular molars were randomly assigned to six groups according to caries removal technique. Carious tissue was removed by hand excavation, bur excavation, air-abrasion, laser ablation, chemomechanical methods and sono-abrasion. The remaining dentin surfaces were replicated and gold-coated. The surfaces were examined using SEM and distinct differences in appearance were observed among specimens treated with different caries removal techniques. While hand-excavated, bur-excavated and air-abraded carious dentin surfaces were covered with a residual smear layer, sono-abrasion with patent dentinal tubules completely removed the smear layer. A few patent orifices of dentinal tubules were observed in dentin subjected to laser ablation and chemo-mechanical caries removal.

  20. Detection of cow's milk proteins and minor components in human milk using proteomics techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Varalda, A; Peila, C; Fabris, C; Conti, A; Bertino, E

    2012-10-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are the best characterized food allergens. The aim of this study was to investigate cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, and other minor protein components by proteomics techniques, more sensitive than other techniques used in the past. Sixty-two term and 11 preterm colostrum samples were collected, subjected to a treatment able to increase the concentration of the most diluted proteins and simultaneously to reduce the concentration of the proteins present at high concentration (Proteominer Treatment), and subsequently subjected to the steps of proteomic techniques. The most relevant finding in this study was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in human colostrum, then bovine alpha-1-casein could be considered the cow's milk allergen that is readily secreted in human milk and could be a cause of sensitization to cow's milk in exclusively breastfed predisposed infants. Another interesting result was the detection, at very low concentrations, of proteins previously not described in human milk (galectin-7, the different isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein and the serum amyloid P-component), probably involved in the regulation of the normal cell growth, in the pro-apoptotic function and in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. Further investigations are needed to understand if these families of proteins have specific biological activity in human milk.

  1. Experimental improvements in sample preparation for the track registration technique from dry and solution media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Navarro, M.J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), E.T.S.I de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: he04@caminos.upm.es; Pujol, Ll. [Centro de Estudios y Experimentacion de Obras Publicas (CEDEX), Alfonso XII, 3, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Gonzalez, J.A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), E.T.S.I de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-04-15

    This paper describes the sample preparation studies carried out to determine gross alpha activities in waste materials by means of alpha-particle track counting using CR-39 detector. Sample preparation for the track registration technique using evaporation or electroplating methods (also known as conventional 'dry methods') has a number of drawbacks. The distribution of tracks in different areas of the detector surface is non-uniform, so accurate quantitative determinations depend on tedious and time-consuming counting of tracks under an optical microscope. In this paper, we propose the use of tensioactives in sample preparation to achieve uniform track distribution over the entire detector surface, which enables track density to be evaluated by scanning a small representative area. Under our counting conditions, uniform distribution was achieved with 0.2 ml of Teg from a planchetted source. Furthermore, track registration techniques using solution media (also known as the 'wet methods') and conventional 'dry methods' were analysed and compared with the proposed method. The reproducibility of the procedure described in the study was tested by analysing gross alpha activity in two low-level nuclear waste samples at two different laboratories.

  2. Experimental methods and modeling techniques for description of cell population heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Nierychlo, M.; Lundin, L.

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous development, in the last decades, of analytical techniques providing complex information at single cell level, the study of cell heterogeneity has been the focus of several research projects within analytical biotechnology. Nonetheless, the complex interplay between environmen......With the continuous development, in the last decades, of analytical techniques providing complex information at single cell level, the study of cell heterogeneity has been the focus of several research projects within analytical biotechnology. Nonetheless, the complex interplay between...... environmental changes and cellular responses is yet not fully understood, and the integration of this new knowledge into the strategies for design, operation and control of bioprocesses is far from being an established reality. Indeed, the impact of cell heterogeneity on productivity of large scale cultivations...... is acknowledged but seldom accounted for. In order to include population heterogeneity mechanisms in the development of novel bioprocess control strategies, a reliable mathematical description of such phenomena has to be developed. With this review, we search to summarize the potential of currently available...

  3. Pressure Measurement Techniques for Abdominal Hypertension: Conclusions from an Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Santosh Chopra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP measurement is an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of abdominal hypertension. Different techniques have been described in the literature and applied in the clinical setting. Methods. A porcine model was created to simulate an abdominal compartment syndrome ranging from baseline IAP to 30 mmHg. Three different measurement techniques were applied, comprising telemetric piezoresistive probes at two different sites (epigastric and pelvic for direct pressure measurement and intragastric and intravesical probes for indirect measurement. Results. The mean difference between the invasive IAP measurements using telemetric pressure probes and the IVP measurements was −0.58 mmHg. The bias between the invasive IAP measurements and the IGP measurements was 3.8 mmHg. Compared to the realistic results of the intraperitoneal and intravesical measurements, the intragastric data showed a strong tendency towards decreased values. The hydrostatic character of the IAP was eliminated at high-pressure levels. Conclusion. We conclude that intragastric pressure measurement is potentially hazardous and might lead to inaccurately low intra-abdominal pressure values. This may result in missed diagnosis of elevated abdominal pressure or even ACS. The intravesical measurements showed the most accurate values during baseline pressure and both high-pressure plateaus.

  4. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  5. The effects of different maceration techniques on nuclear DNA amplification using human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J; Luedtke, Jennifer G; Allison, Jamie L; Arber, Carolyn E; Merriwether, D Andrew; Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe

    2010-07-01

    Forensic anthropologists routinely macerate human bone for the purposes of identity and trauma analysis, but the heat and chemical treatments used can destroy genetic evidence. As a follow-up to a previous study on nuclear DNA recovery that used pig ribs, this study utilizes human skeletal remains treated with various bone maceration techniques for nuclear DNA amplification using the standard Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) markers. DNA was extracted from 18 samples of human lower leg bones subjected to nine chemical and heat maceration techniques. Genotyping was carried out using the AmpFlSTR COfiler and AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus ID kits. Results showed that heat treatments via microwave or Biz/Na(2)CO(3) in sub-boiling water efficiently macerate bone and produce amplifiable nuclear DNA for genetic analysis. Long-term use of chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide is discouraged as it results in poor bone quality and has deleterious effects on DNA amplification.

  6. A Review of Emerging Analytical Techniques for Objective Physical Activity Measurement in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cain C T; Barnes, Claire M; Stratton, Gareth; McNarry, Melitta A; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Summers, Huw D

    2017-03-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most prevalent risk factors for non-communicable diseases in the world. A fundamental barrier to enhancing physical activity levels and decreasing sedentary behavior is limited by our understanding of associated measurement and analytical techniques. The number of analytical techniques for physical activity measurement has grown significantly, and although emerging techniques may advance analyses, little consensus is presently available and further synthesis is therefore required. The objective of this review was to identify the accuracy of emerging analytical techniques used for physical activity measurement in humans. We conducted a search of electronic databases using Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar. This review included studies written in English and published between January 2010 and December 2014 that assessed physical activity using emerging analytical techniques and reported technique accuracy. A total of 2064 papers were initially retrieved from three databases. After duplicates were removed and remaining articles screened, 50 full-text articles were reviewed, resulting in the inclusion of 11 articles that met the eligibility criteria. Despite the diverse nature and the range in accuracy associated with some of the analytic techniques, the rapid development of analytics has demonstrated that more sensitive information about physical activity may be attained. However, further refinement of these techniques is needed.

  7. Experimental, computational, and analytical techniques for diagnosing breast cancer using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.

    This dissertation presents the results of an investigation into experimental, computational, and analytical methodologies for diagnosing breast cancer using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. First, the optimal experimental methodology for tissue biopsy studies was determined using an animal study. It was found that the use of freshly excised tissue samples preserved the original spectral line shape and magnitude of the fluorescence and diffuse reflectance. Having established the optimal experimental methodology, a clinical study investigating the use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the diagnosis of breast cancer was undertaken. In addition, Monte Carlo-based models of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence were developed and validated to interpret these data. These models enable the extraction of physically meaningful information from the measured spectra, including absorber concentrations, and scattering and intrinsic fluorescence properties. The model was applied to the measured spectra, and using a support vector machine classification algorithm based on physical features extracted from the diffuse reflectance spectra, it was found that breast cancer could be diagnosed with a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 92%, respectively, which are substantially better than that obtained using a conventional, empirical algorithm. It was found that malignant tissues had lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation, were more scattering, and had lower beta-carotene concentration, relative to the non-malignant tissues. It was also found that the fluorescence model could successfully extract the intrinsic fluorescence line shape from tissue samples. One limitation of the previous study is that a priori knowledge of the tissue's absorbers and scatterers is required. To address this limitation, and to improve upon the method with which fiber optic probes are designed, an alternate approach was developed. This method used a

  8. Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Iedani, Oun; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Ribbons, Karen; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2017-02-28

    Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.

  9. Ethics of animal research in human disease remediation, its institutional teaching; and alternatives to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Scowen, Paul; Eri, Rajaraman

    2017-08-01

    Animals have been used in research and teaching for a long time. However, clear ethical guidelines and pertinent legislation were instated only in the past few decades, even in developed countries with Judeo-Christian ethical roots. We compactly cover the basics of animal research ethics, ethical reviewing and compliance guidelines for animal experimentation across the developed world, "our" fundamentals of institutional animal research ethics teaching, and emerging alternatives to animal research. This treatise was meticulously constructed for scientists interested/involved in animal research. Herein, we discuss key animal ethics principles - Replacement/Reduction/Refinement. Despite similar undergirding principles across developed countries, ethical reviewing and compliance guidelines for animal experimentation vary. The chronology and evolution of mandatory institutional ethical reviewing of animal experimentation (in its pioneering nations) are summarised. This is followed by a concise rendition of the fundamentals of teaching animal research ethics in institutions. With the advent of newer methodologies in human cell-culturing, novel/emerging methods aim to minimise, if not avoid the usage of animals in experimentation. Relevant to this, we discuss key extant/emerging alternatives to animal use in research; including organs on chips, human-derived three-dimensional tissue models, human blood derivates, microdosing, and computer modelling of various hues. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Early loss of oligodendrocytes in human and experimental neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzos, Claudia; Winkler, Anne; Metz, Imke; Kayser, Dieter M; Thal, Dietmar R; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang; Nessler, Stefan; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Stadelmann, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a chronic, mostly relapsing inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by serum anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies in the majority of patients. Anti-AQP4 antibodies derived from NMO patients target and deplete astrocytes in experimental models when co-injected with complement. However, the time course and mechanisms of oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination and the fate of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) have not been examined in detail. Also, no studies regarding astrocyte repopulation of experimental NMO lesions have been reported. We utilized two rat models using either systemic transfer or focal intracerebral injection of recombinant human anti-AQP4 antibodies to generate NMO-like lesions. Time-course experiments were performed to examine oligodendroglial and astroglial damage and repair. In addition, oligodendrocyte pathology was studied in early human NMO lesions. Apart from early complement-mediated astrocyte destruction, we observed a prominent, very early loss of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as a delayed loss of myelin. Astrocyte repopulation of focal NMO lesions was already substantial after 1 week. Olig2-positive OPCs reappeared before NogoA-positive, mature oligodendrocytes. Thus, using two experimental models that closely mimic the human disease, our study demonstrates that oligodendrocyte and OPC loss is an extremely early feature in the formation of human and experimental NMO lesions and leads to subsequent, delayed demyelination, highlighting an important difference in the pathogenesis of MS and NMO.

  11. [Pathomorphology of lung changes caused by gramoxone poisoning. Human pathologic and animal experimental studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnay, I; Haraszti, A

    1988-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of changes caused by Gramoxone, a week killer, to the human lung as well as to experimental material. The process of damage was found to depend on the amount of toxic substance involved and on the route of uptake. Fibrosis, eventually, is the greatest danger. Intraperitoneal application leads to squamous epithelium metaplasia in the lung.

  12. Setting occupational exposure limits in humans: contributions from the field of experimental psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M.A.M.; Kroeze, J.H.A.; Dalton, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Psychophysical methods from the field of experimental psychology are evaluated for their utility in the derivation of occupational exposure limits (OELs) for volatile chemicals based on acute sensory irritation in humans. The lateralization threshold method, which involves the localization of trigem

  13. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila;

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicul...

  14. Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian; Gehrchen, P Martin; Kiaer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A finite element analysis-based bone remodeling study in human was conducted in the lumbar spine operated on with pedicle screws. Bone remodeling results were compared to prospective experimental bone mineral content data of patients operated on with pedicle screws....

  15. Angiography of the temporomandibular joint. Description of an experimental technique with initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, R; Shimoda, T; Westesson, P L; Takahashi, A; Morris, T W; Sano, T; Moses, J J

    1994-10-01

    The vascular supply to the temporomandibular joint is not completely understood. To form a base for advancement in this area we developed a method for experimental angiography of the temporomandibular joint that was applied to fresh temporomandibular joint autopsy specimens. Via the external carotid artery the vessels were infused with a mixture of barium and an acrylic resin. The specimens were sectioned and contact radiographs were obtained. These showed the vascularity of the joint and the surrounding structures with great detail. Most of the vascular supply appears to come from the lateral and medial aspects of the condyle head and from the anterior and posterior disk attachments. The method was applied to both normal and abnormal joints and the results suggest that this method could be used to gather further understanding of the vascularity of the temporomandibular joint relative to disease.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Signatures in an Automotive Torque Converter Using a Microwave Telemetry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Anderson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique experimental investigation of cavitation signatures in an automotive torque converter under stall conditions is reported. A quantitative criterion is proposed for predicting early and advanced cavitation in terms of suitable nondimensional pump speeds. The dimensionless pump speed that marks early cavitation is obtained by relating this parameter to the appearance of charge-pressure–dependent pressure fluctuations in the differential pressure transducer readings. The differential pressure transducers were mounted at well-defined locations in the pump passage of a torque converter. The data were transmitted by a wireless telemetry system mounted on the pump housing. Data were received and processed by a ground-based data acquisition system. Automatic transmission fluid exhibited cavitation for charge pressures of 70–130 psi and pump speeds of 1000– 2250 rpm. Advanced cavitation was marked by operating conditions that exhibited a 2% or more torque degradation from the converter's noncavitating performance.

  17. Scaling Analysis Techniques to Establish Experimental Infrastructure for Component, Subsystem, and Integrated System Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael G. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid energy system research has the potential to expand the application for nuclear reactor technology beyond electricity. The purpose of this research is to reduce both technical and economic risks associated with energy systems of the future. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) mitigate the variability of renewable energy sources, provide opportunities to produce revenue from different product streams, and avoid capital inefficiencies by matching electrical output to demand by using excess generation capacity for other purposes when it is available. An essential step in the commercialization and deployment of this advanced technology is scaled testing to demonstrate integrated dynamic performance of advanced systems and components when risks cannot be mitigated adequately by analysis or simulation. Further testing in a prototypical environment is needed for validation and higher confidence. This research supports the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and NHES, and their adaptation to commercial industrial applications that will potentially advance U.S. energy security, economy, and reliability and further reduce carbon emissions. Experimental infrastructure development for testing and feasibility studies of coupled systems can similarly support other projects having similar developmental needs and can generate data required for validation of models in thermal energy storage and transport, energy, and conversion process development. Experiments performed in the Systems Integration Laboratory will acquire performance data, identify scalability issues, and quantify technology gaps and needs for various hybrid or other energy systems. This report discusses detailed scaling (component and integrated system) and heat transfer figures of merit that will establish the experimental infrastructure for component, subsystem, and integrated system testing to advance the technology readiness of components and systems to the level required for commercial

  18. An Experimentally Validated Numerical Modeling Technique for Perforated Plate Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M J; Nellis, G F; Kelin, S A; Zhu, W; Gianchandani, Y

    2010-11-01

    Cryogenic and high-temperature systems often require compact heat exchangers with a high resistance to axial conduction in order to control the heat transfer induced by axial temperature differences. One attractive design for such applications is a perforated plate heat exchanger that utilizes high conductivity perforated plates to provide the stream-to-stream heat transfer and low conductivity spacers to prevent axial conduction between the perforated plates. This paper presents a numerical model of a perforated plate heat exchanger that accounts for axial conduction, external parasitic heat loads, variable fluid and material properties, and conduction to and from the ends of the heat exchanger. The numerical model is validated by experimentally testing several perforated plate heat exchangers that are fabricated using microelectromechanical systems based manufacturing methods. This type of heat exchanger was investigated for potential use in a cryosurgical probe. One of these heat exchangers included perforated plates with integrated platinum resistance thermometers. These plates provided in situ measurements of the internal temperature distribution in addition to the temperature, pressure, and flow rate measured at the inlet and exit ports of the device. The platinum wires were deposited between the fluid passages on the perforated plate and are used to measure the temperature at the interface between the wall material and the flowing fluid. The experimental testing demonstrates the ability of the numerical model to accurately predict both the overall performance and the internal temperature distribution of perforated plate heat exchangers over a range of geometry and operating conditions. The parameters that were varied include the axial length, temperature range, mass flow rate, and working fluid.

  19. Development of Observation Techniques in Reactor Vessel of Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Imaizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Akinori; Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Yukimoto

    In-Vessel Observations (IVO) techniques for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. And several IVO equipments for an SFR are developed. However, in order to secure the reliability of IVO techniques, it was necessary to demonstrate the performance under the actual reactor environment with high temperature, high radiation dose and remained sodium. During the investigation of an incident that occurred with Joyo, IVO using a standard Video Camera (VC) and a Radiation-Resistant Fiberscope (RRF) took place at (1) the top of the Sub-Assemblies (S/As) and the In-Vessel Storage rack (IVS), (2) the bottom face of the Upper Core Structure (UCS). A simple 6 m overhead view of each S/A, through the fuel handling or inspection holes etc, was photographed using a VC for making observations of the top of S/As and IVS. About 650 photographs were required to create a composite photograph of the top of the entire S/As and IVS, and a resolution was estimated to be approximately 1mm. In order to observe the bottom face of the UCS, a Remote Handling Device (RHD) equipped with RRFs (approximately 13 m long) was specifically developed for Joyo with a tip that could be inserted into the 70 mm gap between the top of the S/As and the bottom of the UCS. A total of about 35,000 photographs were needed for the full investigation. Regarding the resolution, the sodium flow regulating grid of 0.8mm in thickness could be discriminated. The performance of IVO equipments under the actual reactor environment was successfully confirmed. And the results provided useful information on incident investigations. In addition, fundamental findings and the experience gained during this study, which included the design of equipment, operating procedures, resolution, lighting adjustments, photograph composition and the durability of the RRF under radiation exposure, provided valuable insights into further improvements and verifications for IVO techniques to

  20. On the Equivalence of Experimental B(E2) Values Determined by Various Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Birch, M; Singh, B

    2016-01-01

    We establish the equivalence of the various techniques for measuring B(E2) values using a statistical analysis. Data used in this work come from the re- cent compilation by B. Pritychenko et al., At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 107 (2016). We consider only those nuclei for which the B(E2) values were measured by at least two different methods, with each method being independently performed at least twice. Our results indicate that most prevalent methods of measuring B(E2) values are equivalent, with some weak evidence that Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) measurements may differ from Coulomb excitation (CE) and nuclear resonance fuorescence (NRF) measurements. However, such an evidence appears to arise from discrepant DSAM measurements of the lifetimes for 60Ni and some Sn nuclei rather than a systematic deviation in the method itself.

  1. Experimental analysis of pulsing techniques in a proton exchange fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Aquiles; Abtahi, Amir [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Zilouchian, Ali [Department of Electrical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of pulsing reactant flows on the performance of a PEMFC at low current density. This study considers a full range of pulsing flows and their effect in voltage over time. The factors evaluated were voltage, pressure, and flow rates of each reactant flow over time. A specific current density was set for the experiments. The experiments were performed at lower flow rates and temperatures of reactants than in standard operating conditions. The experiments used constant temperature of reactants as well as constant relative humidity. Comparison made between continuous flow and several sets of pulsing flows for hydrogen and air were developed. Pulsing of reactants opens an opportunity as a practical water management procedure. In addition, this technique helps extending performance range on PEMFC when a limited amount of reactants is supplied. The data collected was presented in graphical form. (author)

  2. Experimental comparison of various techniques for spot size measurement of high-energy X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Qin; Chen, Nan; Cheng, Jin-Ming; Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Hong; Long, Quan-Hong; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In flash-radiography experiments, the quality of the acquired image strongly depends on the focal size of the X-ray source spot. A variety of techniques based on imaging of the pinhole, the slit and the rollbar are adopted to measure the focal spot size of the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator. The image of the pinhole provides a two-dimensional distribution of the X-ray spot, while those of the slit and the rollbar give a line-spread distribution and an edge-spread distribution, respectively. The spot size characterized by the full-width at half-maximum and that characterized by the LANL definition are calculated for comparison.

  3. Cooperative Experimental System Development - cooperative techniques beyound initial design and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Kyng, Morten; Mogensen, Preben Holst

    1995-01-01

    /design to targeted object oriented design, specification, and realisation; and design for tailorability. The emerging CESD approach is based on several years of experience in applying cooperative analysis and design techniques in projects developing general, tailorable software products. The CESD approach is...... be based solely on observation and detached reflection; prototyping methods often have a narrow focus on the technical construction of various kinds of prototypes; Participatory Design techniques—including the Scandinavian Cooperative Design (CD) approaches—seldom go beyond the early analysis....../design activities of development projects. In contrast, the CESD approach is characterized by its focus on: active user involvement throughout the entire development process; prototyping experiments closely coupled to work-situations and use-scenarios; transforming results from early cooperative analysis...

  4. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  5. Experimental research on application of mutual-aid teaching method in technique teaching of university’s football elective course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jiarong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the social development and reform of education system, the quality-oriented education and lifelong education gradually become education reform goals of colleges and universities, the physical education of the higher education and university are also developed. This research adopts the literature data method, ques-tionnaire method, experimental method, mathematical statistics or other methods to do experiments for the stu-dents who take the football elective course (a total of 36 class hours per semester in Zhuhai College of Jilin University with the mutual-aid teaching method. The experimental results show that: First, there is a significant difference between achievements of the specific football technique of the students in the experimental group and the students in the control group (P <0.05; second, in the teaching evaluation, the failure rate of the students in the experimental group significantly reduces, and the pass rate and good rate significantly increases after experi-ment; third, the majority of students accept the mutual-aid teaching method; fourth, the mutual-aid teaching method can be used to significantly improve the learning motivation level of the students.

  6. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  7. Experimental Study on the Sensitive Emission Lines Intensities of Metal Samples Using Laser Ablation Technique and Its Comparison to Arc Discharge Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Susilowati

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study has been carried out to measure the sensitive emission lines intensities of several metal samples (copper, zinc, silver, gold, gallium, nickel, silicone and iron using laser ablation technique conducted in low pressure surrounding gas by means of Laser Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS and in atmospheric pressure region using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS. In both cases the Nd-YAG laser was operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm with pulse duration of 8 ns and its intensity tightly focused on the metal samples in helium or air as an ambient gas. The laser energy was fixed at approximately 100 mJ using a set of neutral density filters placed tilted in front of the laser output window. The result of the intensity measurements showed a good agreement which those obtained using arc discharge technique as shown in Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wavelength Table. Further evaluation of these results on the basis of standard deviation leads to the conclusion that LISPS is more favorable for quantitative analysis compared to LIBS. It was further shown that replacing air by helium gas at low pressure improve to some extent the LISPS reproducibility and sensitivity.

  8. Eating frequency, food intake, and weight: a systematic review of human and animal experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollie eRaynor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eating frequently during the day, or grazing, has been proposed to assist with managing food intake and weight. This systematic review assessed the effect of greater eating frequency (EF on intake and anthropometrics in human and animal experimental studies. Studies were identified through the PubMed electronic database. To be included, studies needed to be conducted in controlled settings or use methods that carefully monitored food intake, and measure food intake or anthropometrics. Studies using human or animal models of disease states (i.e., conditions influencing glucose or lipid metabolism, aside from being overweight or obese, were not included. The 25 reviewed studies (15 human and 10 animal studies contained varying study designs, EF manipulations (1 to 24 eating occasions per day, lengths of experimentation (230 min to 28 weeks, and sample sizes (3 to 56 participants/animals per condition. Studies were organized into four categories for reporting results: 1 human studies conducted in laboratory/metabolic ward settings; 2 human studies conducted in field settings; 3 animal studies with experimental periods 1 month. Out of the 13 studies reporting on consumption, 8 (61.5% found no significant effect of EF. Seventeen studies reported on anthropometrics, with 11 studies (64.7% finding no significant effect of EF. Future, adequately powered, studies should examine if other factors (i.e., disease states, physical activity, energy balance and weight status, long-term increased EF influence the relationship between increased EF and intake and/or anthropometrics.

  9. Effect of experimental treatment on GAPDH mRNA expression as a housekeeping gene in human diploid fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainuddin Azalina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several genes have been used as housekeeping genes and choosing an appropriate reference gene is important for accurate quantitative RNA expression in real time RT-PCR technique. The expression levels of reference genes should remain constant between the cells of different tissues and under different experimental conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different experimental treatments on the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH mRNA so that the reliability of GAPDH as reference gene for quantitative real time RT-PCR in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs can be validated. HDFs in 4 different treatment groups viz; young (passage 4, senescent (passage 30, H2O2-induced oxidative stress and γ-tocotrienol (GTT-treated groups were harvested for total RNA extraction. Total RNA concentration and purity were determined prior to GAPDH mRNA quantification. Standard curve of GAPDH expression in serial diluted total RNA, melting curve analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to determine the reliability of GAPDH as reference gene. Results HDFs with different experimental treatments exhibited diverse cell morphology with different expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal activity. However the expression level of GAPDH was consistent in all treatment groups. Conclusion The study demonstrated that GAPDH is reliable as reference gene for quantitative gene expression analysis in HDFs. Therefore it can be used as housekeeping gene for quantitative real time RT-PCR technique in human diploid fibroblasts particularly in studying cellular senescence.

  10. X-Ray Spectroscopy: An Experimental Technique to Measure Charge State Distribution Right at the Ion-Solid Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Charge state distributions of $^{56}$Fe and $^{58}$Ni projectile ions passing through thin carbon foils have been studied in the energy range of 1.44 - 2.69 MeV/u using a novel method from the x-ray spectroscopy technique. Interestingly the charge state distribution in the bulk show Lorentzian behavior instead of usual Gaussian distribution. Further, different parameters of charge state distribution like mean charge state, distribution width and asymmetric parameter are determined and compared with the empirical calculations and ETACHA predictions. It is found that the x-ray measurement technique is appropriate to determine the mean charge state right at the interaction zone or in the bulk. Interestingly, empirical formalism predicts much lower projectile mean charge states compare to x-ray measurements which clearly indicate multi-electron capture from the target surface. The ETACHA predictions and experimental results are found to be comparable for energies $\\geq$ 2 MeV/u.

  11. Experimental measurement of a time-varying optical path difference by the small-aperture beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Jumper, Eric J.

    1996-08-01

    We discuss the use of time series of the jitter angle of multiple, small-aperture probe beams (the small-aperture beam technique, or SABT) as they emerge from a turbulent, optically active flow-field to quantify the time-varying optical path difference (OPD). The flow field studied is that for the transitionally turbulent region of a two-dimensional heated jet. Techniques to construct a complete time series of instantaneous realizations of the OPD are first applied to a numerically generated flow field and then to an experimental flow field. The SABT sensor's measurement accuracy is assessed, and its application to flow fields that differ from the numerical heated jet is discussed.

  12. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Stephen [University of Chicago

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  13. Evaluation of conventional castaneda and lysis centrifugation blood culture techniques for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantur, Basappa G; Mangalgi, Smita S

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the role of the lysis centrifugation blood culture technique over the conventional Castaneda technique for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. The lysis centrifugation technique has been found to be more sensitive in both acute (20% higher sensitivity; P < 0.00001) and chronic (40% higher sensitivity; P = 0.087) forms of brucellosis. The major advantage of lysis centrifugation was in the mean detection time, which was only 2.4 days in acute and 2.7 days in chronic cases, with 103 out of 110 (93.6%) and 17 out of 20 (85%) cultures from acute and chronic brucellosis, respectively, detected before the conventional culture was positive. Our results confirmed the potential usefulness of the lysis technique in diagnosis and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  14. Experimental investigation on 3D-SEM reconstructions of a wire gauge using stereo-pair technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carli, Lorenzo; Genta, G.; Cantatore, Angela

    2011-01-01

    stage. A wire gauge with a 250 μm reference diameter was adopted as calibrated artefact to perform an uncertainty evaluation of the diameter estimate, in terms of input parameters required by commercial software performing stereophotogrammetry. Systematic exploration of sample space was performed......In this work an experimental investigation is addressed concerning 3D-SEM reconstructions obtained from the so-called stereo-pair technique. Three-dimensional topography of an object can be derived from two SEM images acquired from two different angles, through item rotation by means of the SEM...

  15. Experimental measurement of a time-varying optical path difference using the small-aperture beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Jumper, Eric J.

    1993-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of time series of the jitter angle of multiple, small-aperture probe beams as they emerge from a turbulent, optically-active flow field to quantify the time-varying optical path difference (OPD). Techniques to reconstruct a complete time series of instantaneous realizations of the OPD are first applied to a numerically-generated flow field and then to an experimental flow field. The flow field studied was that for the transitionally- turbulent region of a heated, two-dimensional jet. From these OPD histories spatial and temporal frequencies characterizing the OPD's are extracted. The relevance of these results to adaptive-optic devices is discussed.

  16. Galileo and Zubiri… The beginning of modern technique The experimental method as a «physical proof of reality»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Espinoza Lolas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to analyse the origins of modern Technique in the life and work of Pisan scientist Galileo Galilei (1564-1642 in light of two essential ideas. On the one hand, the events of Galileo’s era(16th and 17th centuries and, on the other, the essential category of «experimentation» as a «physical proof of reality», which appears in Intelligence and Reason (1983 by Xavier Zubiri (1898-1983. From this category of analysis we will be able to see the richness of Galileo’s original technical scientific research and how it has been crucial for the later development of human research throughout History.

  17. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jessica S Veysey; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2015-01-01

    Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer) and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools). Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding populations of pool

  18. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Veysey Powell

    Full Text Available Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools. Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding

  19. Experimental investigation for an isolation technique on conducting the electromechanical impedance method in high-temperature pipeline facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wongi S.; Lee, Hyeonseok

    2016-11-01

    In general, the pipelines within a nuclear power plant facility may experience high temperatures up to several hundred degrees. Thus it is absolutely vital to monitor these pipes to prevent leakage of radioactive substances which may lead to a catastrophic outcome of the surrounding environment. Over the years, one of the structural health monitoring technique known as the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique has been of great interests in various fields including civil infrastructures, mechanical and aerospace structures. Although it has one of the best advantages to be able for a single piezoelectric transducer to act as a sensor and an actuator, simultaneously, its low curie temperature makes it difficult for the EMI technique to be conducted at high temperature environment. To overcome this problem, this study shows a method to avoid attaching the piezoelectric transducer directly onto the target structure using a metal wire for damage detection at high temperature. By shifting the frequency to compensate the signature changes subjected to the variations in temperature, the experimental results indicate that damage identification is more successful above 200 oC, making the metal wire method suitable for the EMI technique at high temperature environment.

  20. Soil decontamination at the Montevecchio-Levante mine site with experimental washing and leaching techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessi, R. [Progemisa SpA, Cagliari (Italy); Fadda, S.; Peretti, R.; Zucca, A. [CSGM, Centro Studi Germinerari e Mineralurgici del CNR, Cagliari (Italy); Serci, A. [Digita, Dipt. di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali, Cagliari (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The soils in the neighbourhood of the Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, a stream that flows in the valley below the tailings pond of the Montevecchio-Levante mineral processing plant (SW Sardinia, Italy) are severely contaminated by heavy metals, to the extent that traditional land uses are compromised. Consequently urgent measures are needed both to abate the pollution at source and rehabilitate the contaminated land. This paper is concerned with the problem of soil decontamination using washing and leaching techniques. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in mechanically agitated reactors, using citric acid and acetic acid solutions and brine of hydrochloric acid and calcium chloride. The influence of both reagent concentration and solid-to-liquid ratio has been assessed, and in the most significant cases, the attack kinetics has been determined. The tests showed the brine to be the most effective for removing metals from the soils. Based on the findings of the investigations, the possibility of decontamination by heap leaching has been simulated in the laboratory using the column technique. [Italian] I suoi circostanti il Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, che scorre a valle del bacino di decantazione degli sterili dell'impianto di trattamento dei minerali di Montevecchio-Levante (Sardegna Centro-Occidentale), sono caratterizzati da un elevato contenuto di metalli pesanti, che ne pregiudicano gli usi tradizionali. Si rende percio' improrogabile sia la necessita' di intervenire sulle cause all'origine della contaminazione, sia di bonificare i suoli in questione al fine di recuperarli a nuovi usi. La memoria intende portare un contributo alle relative problematiche affrontando la possibilita' di decontaminazione mediante tecniche di lavaggio e lisciviazione. La sperimentazione di laboratorio e' stata condotta in reattori ad agitazione meccanica, utilizzando soluzioni con acido citrico, acido acetico ed una salamoia costituita da acido

  1. Gypsum plasterboards enhanced with phase change materials: A fire safety assessment using experimental and computational techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolaitis Dionysios I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCM can be used for thermal energy storage, aiming to enhance building energy efficiency. Recently, gypsum plasterboards with incorporated paraffin-based PCM blends have become commercially available. In the high temperature environment developed during a fire, the paraffins, which exhibit relatively low boiling points, may evaporate and, escaping through the gypsum plasterboard's porous structure, emerge to the fire region, where they may ignite, thus adversely affecting the fire resistance characteristics of the building. Aiming to assess the fire safety behaviour of such building materials, an extensive experimental and computational analysis is performed. The fire behaviour and the main thermo-physical physical properties of PCM-enhanced gypsum plasterboards are investigated, using a variety of standard tests and devices (Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, Cone Calorimeter. The obtained results are used to develop a dedicated numerical model, which is implemented in a CFD code. CFD simulations are validated using measurements obtained in a cone calorimeter. In addition, the CFD code is used to simulate an ISO 9705 room exposed to fire conditions, demonstrating that PCM addition may indeed adversely affect the fire safety of a gypsum plasterboard clad building.

  2. An experimental assessment on the performance of different lubrication techniques in grinding of Inconel 751

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.S. Balan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of emulsion for combined heat extraction and lubrication requires continuous monitoring of the quality of emulsion to sustain a desired grinding environment; this is applicable to other grinding fluids as well. Thus to sustain a controlled grinding environment, it is necessary to adopt an effectively lubricated wheel-work interface. The current study was undertaken to assess experimentally the ​ effects of different grinding environments such as dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL and Cryo-MQL on performance, such as grinding force, temperature, surface roughness and chip morphology on Inconel 751, a higher heat resistance material posing thermal problems and wheel loading. The results show that grinding with the combination of both liquid nitrogen (LN2 and MQL lowers temperature, cutting forces, and surface roughness as compared with MQL and dry grinding. Specific cutting energy is widely used as an inverse measure of process efficiency in machining. It is found from the results that specific cutting energy of Cryo-MQL assisted grinding is 50–65% lower than conventional dry grinding. The grindability of Inconel 751 superalloy can be enhanced with Cryo-MQL condition.

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Bone Using Digital Image Correlation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the fracture mechanisms of bone subjected to external force well, an experimental study has been performed on the bovine bone by carrying out the three-point bending test with 3D digital image correlation (DIC method, which provides a noncontact and full field of displacement measurement. The local strain and damage evolution of the bone has been recorded real time. The results show that the deflection measured by DIC agrees well with that obtained by the displacement sensor of the mechanical testing machine. The relationship between the deflection and the force is nearly linear prior to reaching the peak strength which is about 16 kN for the tested bovine tibia. The full-field strain contours of the bone show that the strain distribution depends on not only the force direction, but also the natural bone shape. The natural arched-shape bovine tibia bone could bear a large force, due to the tissue structure with high strength, and the fracture propagation process of the sample initiates at the inner side of the bone first and propagates along the force direction.

  4. STUDY OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BANANA-COIR HYBRID COMPOSITE USING EXPERIMENTAL AND FEM TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hariprasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural fibers as reinforcement in polymers has gained importance in recent years due to their eco-friendly nature. Thus, an investigation has been undertaken on banana-coir, which is a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight, but also relatively very cheap. Composite plates were prepared with resin 392 g, coir 54 g, and banana 69 g. The purpose of this work is to establish the tensile, flexural, and impact properties of banana-coir reinforced composite materials with a thermo set for treated and untreated fibers. The resin used was epoxy (EP306. The tensile and impact tests showed that treated banana-coir epoxy hybrid composites have higher tensile strength and impact strength than untreated composites. However, untreated fiber composites have greater flexural strength than the treated fiber composites. The finite element analysis (FEA software ANSYS has been employed successfully to evaluate the properties. The stresses at the interface of the banana-coir and matrix, induced by the different loading conditions, were applied to predict the tensile, impact, and flexural properties by using the FEA models. The model output was compared with the experimental results and found to be close. This analysis is useful for realizing the advantages of hybrid fiber reinforced composites in structural applications and for identifying where the stresses are critical and damage the interface under varying loading conditions.

  5. Comparison of TOA and RSS based techniques for RF localization inside human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Umair I; Pahlavan, Kaveh; Makarov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Localization inside the human body using radio frequency (RF) transmission is gaining importance in a number of applications such as Capsule Endoscopy. The accuracy of RF localization depends on the technology adopted for this purpose. The two most common RF localization technologies use received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-arrival (TOA). This paper presents a comparison of the accuracy of TOA and RSS based localization inside human tissue. Analysis of the propagation of radio waves inside the human body is extremely challenging and computationally intensive. We use our proprietary finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique algorithm reported in [1] to simulate waveform transmissions inside the human body, which is almost 60 times faster than commercially available solvers used for similar purposes. The RSS and TOA of the waveforms are extracted for localization and the accuracies of the two methods are compared. The accuracy of each technique is compared with traditional CRLB commonly used for calculation of bounds for the performance of localization techniques.

  6. Applications of structural and spectroscopic techniques to the experimental and theoretical study of new luminescent materials

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Ahumada, G A

    2001-01-01

    momentum:DELTA J = 6 is observed for this system. A declining cascade that can reasonably explain the unsuspected related spectral intensity, in the order of 10-9, is presented and suggested although a value was predicted for the electric dipolar force of lesser than 4 orders of magnitude what was observed. This problem is discussed and a mechanism is proposed for spectral intensities associated with two emissions characterized by DELTA J = 4 (electric hexadecapole) and DELTA J = 2 (electric cuadrupole). The laboratory tests made, include synthesis by solid state reactions of Dy sup 3 sup + and Ho sup 3 sup + , type elpasolites, structural characterization using the x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and diffuse neutron scattering techniques, and Raman and electronic spectroscopic characterization. Results are presented for cubic systems with Cr sup 3 sup + (3d sup 3 ) and Mo sup 3 sup + (4d sup 3 ) ions, since these are privileged from a spectroscopic point of view and except for the hexacyano ion of Cr(...

  7. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshoy Ranjan Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel and counterrotating (V-shape are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG.

  8. An experimental evaluation of error seeding as a program validation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J. C.; Ammann, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A previously reported experiment in error seeding as a program validation technique is summarized. The experiment was designed to test the validity of three assumptions on which the alleged effectiveness of error seeding is based. Errors were seeded into 17 functionally identical but independently programmed Pascal programs in such a way as to produce 408 programs, each with one seeded error. Using mean time to failure as a metric, results indicated that it is possible to generate seeded errors that are arbitrarily but not equally difficult to locate. Examination of indigenous errors demonstrated that these are also arbitrarily difficult to locate. These two results support the assumption that seeded and indigenous errors are approximately equally difficult to locate. However, the assumption that, for each type of error, all errors are equally difficult to locate was not borne out. Finally, since a seeded error occasionally corrected an indigenous error, the assumption that errors do not interfere with each other was proven wrong. Error seeding can be made useful by taking these results into account in modifying the underlying model.

  9. An Experimental Technique for the Evaluation of Strain Dependent Material Properties of Hard Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shad A. Reed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel vibration experiment consisting of a free-free boundary condition, an electromagnetic excitation source, a vacuum chamber, and a laser vibrometer based surface measurement system has been developed that permits high levels of excitation on highly damped specimens with a minimal amount of unwanted systematic error. While some of the aspects of this experiment are not unique, when combined with a processing technique that accounts for the nonlinearities present in the system, this experiment permits, accurate measurement of strain dependent stiffness and damping properties of hard coatings at high strain levels. This procedure has been demonstrated using a titanium beam that has been coated with a free-layer damping treatment of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel. The results indicate that Magnesium Aluminate Spinel has both nonlinear stiffness and damping properties. The stiffness asymptotes to a minimum value around 650 microstrain while the damping is a maximum around 100 microstrain. Additionally, the data contained herein cover a larger strain range for this material than previously reported.

  10. Experimental studies of active and passive flow control techniques applied in a twin air-intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Akshoy Ranjan; Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG.

  11. Different surgical techniques and L-carnitine supplementation in an experimental varicocele model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, S; Gurocak, S; Konac, E; Ure, I; Onen, H I; Gonul, I I; Sozen, S; Menevse, A

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of various varicocelectomy techniques and/or L-carnitine as an adjunct treatment, following the emergence of oxidative stress, on the expression levels of SCF/c-kit signalling pathways in spermatogenesis. Forty-two rats were divided into seven groups: group 1 (G1) control; group 2 (G2) sham; group 3 (G3) varicocele; group 4 (G4) varicocele + varicocelectomy with testicular nonartery sparing; group 5 (G5) same as G4 but with artery sparing; group 6 (G6) same as G4 but with L-carnitine and group 7 (G7) same as G5 with L-carnitine. mRNA expression levels of SCF and c-kit were measured quantitatively using real-time polymerase chain reaction. CASP-3 activity at protein level was determined, and histological evaluation was performed. mRNA expression level of SCF increased in G6 as compared to control group (3.52-folds change; P = 0.035), whereas mRNA expression level of c-kit gene remained the same. We found that in the left testis of G6 group, mRNA expression level of SCF increased 2.2-folds in comparison with the right testis (P carnitine may be considered as supportive treatment regimes in addition to conventional surgical treatments.

  12. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  13. Experimental analysis of crack evolution in concrete by the acoustic emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saliba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fracture process zone (FPZ was investigated on unnotched and notched beams with different notch depths. Three point bending tests were realized on plain concrete under crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD control. Crack growth was monitored by applying the acoustic emission (AE technique. In order to improve our understanding of the FPZ, the width and length of the FPZ were followed based on the AE source locations maps and several AE parameters were studied during the entire loading process. The bvalue analysis, defined as the log-linear slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of acoustic emissions, was also carried out to describe quantitatively the influence of the relative notch depth on the fracture process. The results show that the number of AE hits increased with the decrease of the relative notch depth and an important AE energy dissipation was observed at the crack initiation in unnotched beams. In addition, the relative notch depth influenced the AE characteristics, the process of crack propagation, and the brittleness of concrete.

  14. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  15. Experimental evaluation of fatty acid profiles as a technique to determine dietary composition in benthic elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Crystal L; Mitchell, James G; Seuront, Laurent; Stone, David A J; Huveneers, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) analysis is a tool for dietary investigation that complements traditional stomach content analyses. Controlled feeding experiments were used to determine the extent to which the FA composition of diet is reflected in the liver and muscle tissue of the Port Jackson shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni. Over 10 wk, two groups of sharks were fed prawns or squid, which have distinct FA profiles. The percentage of total FA was significantly different for shark liver and muscle tissue when comparing controls with prawn- and squid-fed sharks. Compared with experimentally fed sharks, control shark muscle and liver had higher levels of 18:1n-9 and 20:2n-9. When comparing prawn- and squid-fed sharks, only liver tissue showed a significant difference in FA profiles. The livers of prawn-fed sharks were comparatively higher in 18:1n-7, 22:5n-3, 20:0, and 18:1n-9, while the squid-fed sharks had higher levels of 16:0 and 22:6n-3. These FAs in shark liver tissue were all reflective of higher amounts in their respective dietary items, demonstrating the conservative transfer of FA from diet to liver tissue. This study shows that liver and muscle FA profiles can be used as indicators of dietary change through the comparison of controls and fed sharks. The timescale of this study may not have been sufficient for capturing the integration of FA into muscle tissue because only liver FA profiles were useful to distinguish between sharks fed different diets. These findings have important implications for sampling design where FA profiles are used to infer dietary preferences.

  16. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  17. [Application of operant conditioning techniques to forensic toxicology: experimental studies on alcohol and abusable drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishida, S

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes some experiments that apply the operant conditioning techniques to forensic toxicological research. These techniques may be useful in investigating the mechanisms of action, toxic symptoms, legal competence and drug metabolism associated with substance abuse such as abuse of alcohol, psychotropic drugs, narcotics, stimulants, and organic solvents. 1) Genetic research on alcohol preference in rats. We applied operant conditioning to investigate alcohol preference in rats and constructed an apparatus for the measurement of discriminated operate responses for water or alcohol reinforcement in rat. This apparatus is a modified Skinner box with a one-lever two-liquid system. Fixed ratio-10 (FR-10) schedules of reinforcement are used to increase the work of the rat before it obtains the reinforcement. The voluntary choice of water or 10% ethanol by the rat can be assessed quantitatively by measuring the lever-pushing responses. It is an extremely useful method for measuring the real alcohol preference of rats. A rat was kept in a Skinner box overnight. The numbers of responses and reinforcement for water and ethanol and the volumes of the two liquids consumed were recorded. The ratio of ethanol reinforcement was defined as the number of ethanol reinforcement to the total number of ethanol and water reinforcement. The ratio of ethanol intake was defined as the volume of ethanol consumed to the volume of water and ethanol consumed. Ethanol consumption per g body weight was calculated from the volume of ethanol consumed by the rat. We used this apparatus to investigate alcohol preference of more than 300 Wistar Albino Rats, and divided them into a high alcohol preference (HAP) group and a low alcohol preference (LAP) group. Inbreeding between littermates was conducted in each of the HAP and LAP groups. The liver tissue of each offspring was obtained and the cytosol fraction was collected and subjected to isoelectric focusing using polyacrylamide gel

  18. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  19. Enhancing Self-Efficacy and Performance: An Experimental Comparison of Psychological Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradley James; O'Halloran, Paul Daniel; Stukas, Arthur Anthony

    2016-01-01

    We assessed how 6 psychological performance enhancement techniques (PETs) differentially improved self-efficacy (SE) and skill performance. We also assessed whether vicarious experiences and verbal persuasion as posited sources of SE (Bandura, 1982 ) were supported and, further, if the effects of the 6 PETs remained after controlling for achievement motivation traits and self-esteem. A within-subject design assessed each individual across 2 trials for 3 disparate PETs. A between-groups design assessed differences between PETs paired against each other for 3 similar novel tasks. Participants (N = 96) performed 2 trials of 10 attempts at each of the tasks (kick, throw, golf putt) in a counterbalanced sequence using their nondominant limb. Participants completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and General Self-Efficacy Scale and were randomly allocated to either the modeling or imagery, goal-setting or instructional self-statement, or knowledge-of-results or motivational feedback conditions aligned with each task. An instructional self-statement improved performance better than imagery, modeling, goal setting, and motivational and knowledge-of-results augmented feedback. Motivational auditory feedback most improved SE. Increased SE change scores were related to increased performance difference scores on all tasks after controlling for age, sex, achievement motivation, and self-esteem. Some sources of SE may be more influential than others on both SE and performance improvements. We provide partial support for the sources of SE proposed by Bandura's social-cognitive theory with verbal persuasion but not vicarious experiences improving SE.

  20. Development and evaluation of a technique for in vivo monitoring of 60Co in human lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, J. Q.; Lucena, E. A.; Dantas, A. L. A.; Dantas, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    60Co is a fission product of 235U and represents a risk of internal exposure of workers in nuclear power plants, especially those involved in the maintenance of potentially contaminated parts and equipment. The control of 60Co intake by inhalation can be performed through in vivo monitoring. This work describes the evaluation of a technique through the minimum detectable activity and the corresponding minimum detectable effective doses, based on biokinetic and dosimetric models of 60Co in the human body. The results allow to state that the technique is suitable either for monitoring of occupational exposures or evaluation of accidental intake.

  1. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  2. Microbial community profiling for human microbiome projects: Tools, techniques, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamady, Micah; Knight, Rob

    2009-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing studies and new software tools are revolutionizing microbial community analyses, yet the variety of experimental and computational methods can be daunting. In this review, we discuss some of the different approaches to community profiling, highlighting strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches, sequencing methodologies, and analytical methods. We also address one key question emerging from various Human Microbiome Projects: Is there a substantial core of abundant organisms or lineages that we all share? It appears that in some human body habitats, such as the hand and the gut, the diversity among individuals is so great that we can rule out the possibility that any species is at high abundance in all individuals: It is possible that the focus should instead be on higher-level taxa or on functional genes instead.

  3. Experimental models of brain ischemia: a review of techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and investigational cell-based therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eCanazza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke continues to be a significant cause of death and disability worldwide. Although major advances have been made in the past decades in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation, enormous challenges remain in the way of translating new therapeutic approaches from bench to bedside. Thrombolysis, while routinely used for ischemic stroke, is only a viable option within a narrow time window. Recently, progress in stem cell biology has opened up avenues to therapeutic strategies aimed at supporting and replacing neural cells in infarcted areas. Realistic experimental animal models are crucial to understand the mechanisms of neuronal survival following ischemic brain injury and to develop therapeutic interventions. Current studies on experimental stroke therapies evaluate the efficiency of neuroprotective agents and cell-based approaches using primarily rodent models of permanent or transient focal cerebral ischemia. In parallel, advancements in imaging techniques permit better mapping of the spatial-temporal evolution of the lesioned cortex and its functional responses. This review provides a condensed conceptual review of the state of the art of this field, from models and magnetic resonance imaging techniques through to stem cell therapies.

  4. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondronikola, M; Annamalai, P; Chao, T; Porter, C; Saraf, M K; Cesani, F; Sidossis, L S

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a few studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT.

  5. A new technique for accelerated liver regeneration: An experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kasper Jarlhelt; Knudsen, Anders Riegels; Jepsen, Betina Norman; Meier, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Anders Patrik Alexander; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2017-08-01

    initial step in humans can be performed percutaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques and 4D computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, F.; Mäder, U.; Jenni, A.; Schwendener, N.

    the bentonite core that was adjusting to the experimental conditions. Subsequently, the OPC fluid is fully buffered, and a gradually decreasing ionic strength is observed as a result of progressive consumption of hydroxide at the mineral reaction front.

  7. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sunil kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding.

  8. Determination of cadmium and lead in human biological samples by spectrometric techniques: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; de Carvalho, Anaildes Lago

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of human biological samples, such as blood, urine, nails, and hair, is generally used for the verification of human exposure to toxic metals. In this review, various spectrometric methods for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples are discussed and compared. Several spectrometric techniques are presented and discussed with respect to various characteristics such as sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Special attention is drawn to the procedures for digestion prior to the determination of cadmium and lead in hair, nails, blood, and urine.

  9. Analysis of the rivets from the RMS Titanic using experimental and theoretical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jennifer Jo

    Earlier studies of Titanic wrought iron rivets revealed an anisotropic, inhomogeneous composite material composed of glassy iron silicate (slag) particles embedded in a ferrite matrix. Micrographs indicated a directional character to the slag "stringers" that follows the method of processing---aligned parallel to the shaft in the center of the rivet, but oriented perpendicular to the shaft within the inner section of each head. It was proposed that the re-orientation of large slag particles in the rivet head weakened this region, predisposing the rivets to fail as a result of collision with the iceberg. Using quantitative metallography, mechanical testing, and a combination of modeling techniques, this hypothesis was tested using 35 Titanic rivets and additional contemporary wrought iron. Results revealed that the wrought iron microstructure showed a high slag content that was very coarse and unevenly distributed. Results from micro structural, chemical and mechanical analysis, as well as supporting historical evidence, suggested that two types of rivets, both wrought iron and steel, were used on the Titanic. Tensile testing results indicated that the longitudinal orientation in wrought iron possesses an average of 20% higher tensile strength and nearly four times the ductility of the transverse orientation. Results for Titanic rivet steel suggest a 100MPa enhancement in yield strength and tensile strength over wrought iron. Sequential imaging during mechanical testing, supported by micromechanical modeling predictions, indicated that the mechanical behavior of wrought iron is strongly affected by the orientation, distribution and content of slag within the matrix. Finite element analysis of a wrought iron rivet with anisotropic properties demonstrated that, because of poor ductility produced by the re-orientation of slag within the head, a Titanic rivet could not withstand a 5mm displacement of the hull's steel plates. Due to its low ultimate tensile strength, the

  10. Developmental origins of health and disease: experimental and human evidence of fetal programming for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gusmão Correia, M L; Volpato, A M; Águila, M B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, C A

    2012-07-01

    The concept of developmental origins of health and disease has been defined as the process through which the environment encountered before birth, or in infancy, shapes the long-term control of tissue physiology and homeostasis. The evidence for programming derives from a large number of experimental and epidemiological observations. Several nutritional interventions during diverse phases of pregnancy and lactation in rodents are associated with fetal and neonatal programming for metabolic syndrome. In this paper, recent experimental models and human epidemiological studies providing evidence for the fetal programming associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and related diseases are revisited.

  11. An Experimental Study of Muscle Coordination and Function during Human Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How humans solve the ill-posed problem of motor control is still a mystery. In this paper, we attempt to decompose human walking and running as the main movements of a leg into units of motor function. We introduce the key concept of “A-A ratio,” defined as the ratio of an extensor muscle’s electromyography (EMG signal to the sum of agonist and antagonist muscles’ EMG signals. Human walking and running are then decomposed into two units of motor function by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA to the A-A ratio dataset. The kinematic meanings of these units are also experimentally shown by using a human-like musculoskeletal leg robot.

  12. The Beach and the Labyrinth: Experimental Urban Landscapes of the Human (Dark City, 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vidal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998, people live in a city that is constantly in the dark. The city is in fact a laboratory constructed by a race of Strangers who live below the urban surface to do experiments aimed at discovering what makes human beings human. The Strangers will survive only by becoming like them. To find out what humanity is, but assuming it is essentially related to memory, every day they paralyze all human activity, extract memories from individuals, mix them, and inject them back. When people wake up, they are totally different persons – but do not know it. This article examines how, starting with such a situation, Dark City explores the role of memory in personhood, the problem of authenticity, and the status of “false” memories in making the self, and how the connect to the experimental psychology and the neuroscience of memory.

  13. Simple, Inexpensive Technique for High-Quality Smartphone Fundus Photography in Human and Animal Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Haddock, Luis J.; Kim, David Y.; Shizuo Mukai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily available in an ophthalmic practice. Methods:. Fundus images were captured with a smartphone and a 20D lens with or without a Koeppe lens. By using the coaxial light source of the phone, this system works as an indirect ophthalmoscope that creates a digital image of the fundus. The application wh...

  14. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramanarao Parasa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation on the interaction between cyclovirobuxine D and human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ren; Liu, Jianming; Dong, Qiao; Fan, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Cyclovirobuxine D is an active compound extracted from the plant Buxux microphylla, and widely available as medications; however, its abuse may casts potential detrimental effects on human health. By using multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling, the interaction of cyclovirobuxine D with human serum albumin was investigated. The fluorescence results manifested that static type was the operative mechanism for the interaction with human serum albumin. The structural investigation of the complexed HSA through CD, three-dimensional, FT-IR and synchronous fluorescence shown the polypeptide chain of HSA partially destabilizing. Docking studies revealed the molecule to be bound in the subdomain IIA. Finally, we investigated the distance between the bound ligand and Trp-214 of human serum albumin.

  16. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    et al. (2000) revealed that crack growth is controlled by local strain rate conditions. Finally, a simplified strain partition model provides a link between critical strain rates measured across the weld and predicted at grain boundaries within the mushy zone. Although based on simplified assumptions, predicted and measured critical strain rate values are of the same order of magnitude. However, because of a longer mushy zone experienced at higher 4043 filler dilution related to a reduction in cooling rate, these models predict a lower weldability with increasing filler dilution, in contradiction with experimental observations. Combining the crack initiation and growth models suggests that hydrogen and strain rate, respectively, determine crack formation. An hypothetical hydrogen - strain rate map defines conceptually the conditions for cracking, suggesting better weldability at low weld metal hydrogen content. With the aid of the modified varestraint test (MVT) and a controlled hydrogen contamination system, results, presented in the form of ram speed - hydrogen map, revealed that hydrogen has little effect on crack growth, providing support to the proposed cracking models. However, a drop in weldability corresponding to the peak in weld metal hydrogen supersaturation suggests a different solidification cracking mechanism, where cavitation supports crack growth. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of the Flotac-400 dual technique and the formalin-ether concentration technique for diagnosis of human intestinal protozoon infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sören L; Lohourignon, Laurent K; Speich, Benjamin; Rinaldi, Laura; Knopp, Stefanie; N'goran, Eliézer K; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for accurate diagnosis of intestinal parasite infections in humans, but currently available copromicroscopic techniques have shortcomings, such as low sensitivity. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of a further modified version of the recently developed Flotac technique with that of the widely used formalin-ether concentration technique (FECT) for the detection of intestinal protozoa in human stool samples. Formaldehyde-preserved stool samples from 108 individuals in Côte d'Ivoire were subjected to the Flotac-400 dual technique, using two different flotation solutions (FS), and to the FECT. Stool samples were examined according to computer-generated random lists by an experienced laboratory technician blinded for the results of each method. Both methods detected the same eight intestinal protozoon species. While the Flotac-400 dual technique (results from both FS combined) found higher prevalences of Entamoeba coli (77.8% versus 71.3%, P technique can be utilized for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoon infections in humans. Since Flotac is a sensitive technique for the detection of soil-transmitted helminths and Schistosoma mansoni, it might become a viable copromicroscopic technique for the concurrent diagnosis of helminths and intestinal protozoon infections.

  18. Evaluation of a fiber-optic technique for recording intramuscular pressure in the human leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Zhang, Qiuxia; Styf, Jorma

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate a forward-sensing fiber-optic pressure technique for recording of intramuscular pressure (IMP) in the human leg and investigate factors that may influence IMP measurements used in diagnosing compartment syndromes. IMP in the tibialis anterior muscle was recorded simultaneously by a fiber-optic technique and needle-injection technique in 12 legs of 7 healthy subjects. Both measurement catheters were placed in parallel with the muscle fibers to the same depth, as verified by sonography. IMP recordings were performed at rest before, during and after applying a model of abnormally elevated IMP (simulated compartment syndrome). IMP was elevated by venous obstruction induced by a thigh tourniquet of a casted leg. IMP was also measured during injections of 0.1 ml of saline into the muscle through the catheters. IMP at baseline was 5.1 (SD = 2.6) mmHg measured with the fiber-optic technique and 7.1 (SD = 2.5) mmHg with the needle-injection technique (p syndrome. IMP increased significantly following injection of 0.1 ml of saline, measured by both techniques. It remained increased 1 min after injection. The fiber-optic technique was able to record pulse-synchronous IMP oscillations. The fiber-optic technique may be used for IMP measurements in a muscle with both normal and abnormally elevated IMP. It has good dynamic properties allowing for measurement of IMP oscillations. Saline injection used with needle-injection systems to ensure catheter patency compromises IMP readings at least one minute after injection.

  19. Experimentation with human subjects: a critique of the views of Hans Jonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Schafer, A.

    1983-01-01

    The ethics of experimentation on human subjects has become the subject of much debate among medical scientists and philosophers. Ethical problems and conflicts of interest become especially serious when research subjects are recruited from the class of patients. Are patients who are ill and suffering in a position to give voluntary and informed consent? Are there inevitable conflicts of interest and moral obligation when a personal physician recruits his own patients for an experiment designe...

  20. Experimental mouse tumour models: what can be learnt about human cancer immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-12-02

    The recent demonstration that cancer immunotherapy extends patient survival has reinvigorated interest in elucidating the role of immunity in tumour pathogenesis. Experimental mouse tumour models have provided key mechanistic insights into host antitumour immune responses, and these have guided the development of novel treatment strategies. To accelerate the translation of these findings into clinical benefits, investigators need to gain a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of mouse model systems as tools for deciphering human antitumour immune responses.

  1. [Baccio Baldini (1517-1589), protomedicus on the medical court between humanism and experimentalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, Silvia; Giuffra, Valentina; Kieffer, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    The article aims to shed light on some particular aspects of the activity and the scientific thought of Baccio Baldini, Director of the Laurentian Library and Court physician of the Medici family in Florence. The analysis of his work as a humanist and the recovery of some unpublished documents enable to define the figure of Baldini as a paradigmatic example of the court physicians of modern age in Italy, highlighting the complementarity between humanism and experimentalism in the Renaissance medicine.

  2. Integration of datasets from different analytical techniques to assess the impact of nutrition on human metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eVernocchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria colonizing the human intestinal tract exhibit a high phylogenetic diversity that reflects their immense metabolic potentials. The catalytic activity of gut microbes has an important impact on gastrointestinal (GI functions and host health. The microbial conversion of carbohydrates and other food components leads to the formation of a large number of compounds that affect the host metabolome and have beneficial or adverse effects on human health. Meabolomics is a metabolic-biology system approach focused on the metabolic responses understanding of living systems to physio-pathological stimuli by using multivariate statistical data on human body fluids obtained by different instrumental techniques. A metabolomic approach based on an analytical platform could be able to separate, detect, characterize and quantify a wide range of metabolites and its metabolic pathways. This approach has been recently applied to study the metabolic changes triggered in the gut microbiota by specific diet components and diet variations, specific diseases, probiotic and synbiotic food intake.This review describes the metabolomic data obtained by analyzing human fluids by using different techniques and particularly Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Solid-phase Micro Extraction (GC-MS/SPME, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR Spectroscopy. This instrumental approach have a good potential in the identification and detection of specific food intake and diseases biomarkers.

  3. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  4. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  5. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  6. Automatic Mirror Alignment for VIRGO: First experimental demonstration of the Anderson technique on a large-scale interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Freise, A; Amico, P; Aoudia, S; Arnaud, N; Avino, S; Babusci, D; Ballardin, G; Barille, R; Barone, F; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Beauville, F; Bizouard, M A; Boccara, C; Bondu, F; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Braccini, S; Brillet, A; Brisson, V; Brocco, L; Buskulic, Damir; Calamai, G; Calloni, E; Campagna, E; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cleva, F; Coulon, J P; Cuoco, E; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; De Rosa, R; Di Fiore, L; Di Virgilio, A; Dujardin, B; Eleuteri, A; Enard, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Gammaitoni, L; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Giordano, G; Giordano, L; Gouaty, R; Grosjean, D; Guidi, G; Hebri, S; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heusse, P; Holloway, L; Kreckelbergh, S; La Penna, P; Loriette, V; Loupias, M; Losurdo, G; Mackowski, J M; Majorana, E; Man, C N; Marchesoni, F; Marchetti, E; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Mazzoni, M; Milano, L; Moins, C; Moreau, J; Morgado, N; Mours, B; Pacheco, J; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Pardi, S; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Peirani, S; Perniola, B; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qipiani, K; Rapagnani, P; Reita, V; Remillieux, A; Ricci, F; Ricciardi, I; Ruggi, P; Russo, G; Solimeno, S; Spallicci, A D; Stanga, R; Taddei, R; Tombolato, D; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J Y; Vocca, H; Yvert, M; Zhang, Z

    2004-01-01

    The French-Italian interferometric gravitational wave detector VIRGO is currently being commissioned. Its principal instrument is a Michelson laser interferometer with 3 km long optical cavities in the arms and a power-recycling mirror. The interferometer resides in an ultra-high vacuum system and the mirrors are suspended from multistage pendulums for seismic isolation. This type of laser interferometer reaches its maximum sensitivity only when the optical setup is held actively very accurately at a defined operating point: control systems using the precise interferometer signals stabilise the longitudinal and angular positions of the optical component. This paper gives an overview of the control system for the angular degrees of freedom; we present the current status of the system and report the first experimental demonstration of the Anderson technique on a large-scale interferometer.

  7. Experimental validation of a new bianisotropic parameter retrieval technique using plasmonic metasurfaces made of V-shape antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Shaltout, Amr M.; Ni, Xingjie; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    We report on a numerical study of a new bianisotropic parameter retrieval technique for both regular and complementary V-shape antenna metasurfaces. Each antenna element with a discrete phase shift is modeled by a homogenous bianisotropic film to represent the optical response. For the complementary design, the retrieval implies a complementary behavior of effective material properties and predicts the analogous functionalities. Further, FDFD solver is developed to integrate the bianisotropic descriptions of each antenna and describes a fully functional metasurface. The computational burden is significantly reduced, because effective material properties replace the detailed meshing of the antennas. Experimentally, large dimension arrays of nano-voids are fabricated using electron beam lithography. It is demonstrated that cross-polarized light is diffracted towards the same direction. Furthermore, the complementary design greatly increases the extinction ratio of functional fields to background fields.

  8. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  9. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  10. An experimental approach to validating a theory of human error in complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N. M.; Rouse, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of 'human error' is pervasive in engineering systems in which the human is involved. In contrast to the common engineering approach of dealing with error probabilistically, the present research seeks to alleviate problems associated with error by gaining a greater understanding of causes and contributing factors from a human information processing perspective. The general approach involves identifying conditions which are hypothesized to contribute to errors, and experimentally creating the conditions in order to verify the hypotheses. The conceptual framework which serves as the basis for this research is discussed briefly, followed by a description of upcoming research. Finally, the potential relevance of this research to design, training, and aiding issues is discussed.

  11. Experimental Technique and Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    4.1 A Tritium Gas Target for Neutron Production at HI-13 Tandem Accelerator Qi Bujia Zhou Zuying Zhou Chenwei Tang Hongqing Du Yanfeng Chen Qingwang Li Jimin A tritium gas target has been built and employed in neutron physics experiments at HI-13 tandem accelerator with both DC and pulsed beams. As neutron sources using the T(p,n)3He and T(d,n)4He reactions provide a higher yield for a given energy loss, target backgrounds can be measured and the cell withstands substantial beam currents. Such a target is needed to effectively carry out studies of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering and neutron induced charged particle emission reactions in the energy range up to 40 MeV. The gas target consists of a helium gas cell and a tritium gas cell. There is a flange at one end of the helium gas cell to which the entrance window is attached. Between the tritium gas cell and helium gas cell there is the other window which is similar to the entrance one. The other end of the tritium gas cell is closed. The tritium gas cell is lined by 0.3 mm thick gold plate and 1 mm thick gold disk serves as the beam stop. Gold has been shown to yield low neutron backgrounds when bombarded by charged particle. The tritium cell is 4 cm long and 1.1 cm in diameter. The cell body is fabricated from stainless steel. The cell wall is 0.3 mm thick.The cells in which O-rings and indium O-ring are employed to accomplish entrance-foil attachment. An 80 cm long copper tube with 2.0 mm OD and 1.0 mm ID is silver-soldered into the cell flange to provide the connection with the gas handling system. Cross sectional view of the tritium gas target is shown in the Fig. 1. The gas cell was cooled by water drops. The whole tritium loop was in vacuum and tested by helium

  12. Experimental study for determining the corrosion in situ of SS-304 in heat transformers applying electrochemical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas-Arteaga, C.; Siqueiros, J.; Romero, R.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas - UAEM, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this work the corrosion performance of SS-304 experimentally tested in a single stage absorption heat transformer (SSAHT) operating with lithium-bromide aqueous solution and water as the absorbent and work fluids coupled to a desalinizer is reported. The main aim of this work was to determine the corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism of SS-304 through some electrochemical cells designed for this specific purpose and connected in one of the pipe constituting the heat transformer. Some electrochemical techniques named electrochemical noise (EN), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were applied under the next experimental conditions: temperature 83-85 C, concentration of LiBr-H{sub 2}O corrosive solution 56 (wt.%), and flow rate 0.0278 m{sup 3}/s. According to the physical characterization, SS-304 suffered a mixed corrosion process, which is in concordance with the signal noise pattern obtained. Through the Nyquist plots from EIS the corrosion process was obtained as controlled by charge transfer at the first 3:25 h, and then a diffusion effect was observed. (authors)

  13. Investigation of interlaminar shear strength in carbon epoxy and carbon epoxy carbon nanotubes using experimental and finite element technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rama Lakshmi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns experimental and finite element analysis of carbon epoxy and carbon epoxy carbon nanotube composites to estimate interlaminar shear strength. Mechanical properties such as elastic ratios, thickness are varied for double notched specimen and the corresponding deflections and interlaminar shear strengths are estimated by ANSYS. From simple rule of mixtures, equivalent orthotropic material properties are estimated. These properties are provided as input in ANSYS to generate finite element model. Solid layered element is used to model double notch specimen. To estimate the properties of carbon epoxy carbon nanotube composite, initially finite element model of matrix and carbon nanotube is generated by properties individual material properties of both the materials. From the obtained stretch and stress, the equivalent material property of combined matrix and carbon nanotube is achieved. This property is provided as input in simple rule of mixtures to find out the equivalent orthotropic materials are determined. It is inferred that experiment results are in good agreement with results generated by ANSYS. The superiority of the presence of carbon nanotube in the composite is proved from experimental and finite element technique from the estimated fracture parameters.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of some common animal data scaling techniques in estimating human radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Aydogan, B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, animal studies are typically performed to get a first approximation of the expected radiation dose in humans. This study evaluates the performance of some commonly used data extrapolation techniques to predict residence times in humans using data collected from animals. Residence times were calculated using animal and human data, and distributions of ratios of the animal results to human results were constructed for each extrapolation method. Four methods using animal data to predict human residence times were examined: (1) using no extrapolation, (2) using relative organ mass extrapolation, (3) using physiological time extrapolation, and (4) using a combination of the mass and time methods. The residence time ratios were found to be log normally distributed for the nonextrapolated and extrapolated data sets. The use of relative organ mass extrapolation yielded no statistically significant change in the geometric mean or variance of the residence time ratios as compared to using no extrapolation. Physiologic time extrapolation yielded a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01, paired t test) in the geometric mean of the residence time ratio from 0.5 to 0.8. Combining mass and time methods did not significantly improve the results of using time extrapolation alone. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Experimental and numerical analysis of the air inflow technique for dust removal from the vacuum vessel of a tokamak machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paci, S. [Pisa University, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56100 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: sandro.paci@ing.unipi.it; Porfiri, M.T. [ENEA Nuclear Fusion Technologies, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    In fusion facilities, the dust production inside the plasma chamber is a concern from the viewpoint of both machine performance and safety. To the purpose of a correct handling of the experimental devices the problem of its removal must be properly solved. This work deals with the experiments carried out in the STARDUST facility by using as dust removal technique an air inflow into the volume representing the vacuum vessel. The goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of such an approach, less invasive as compared to all the others so far. These experiments, performed by using characterized carbon, tungsten and stainless steel dusts, show that the mobilization capability of the air inflow is between few percent and 100%, mainly depending on dust type of and deposit shape. The capture efficiency in a filter reached a maximum of about 7.5% in the STARDUST geometrical configuration. In conclusion, this simple and clean (from the radioactive point of view) removing technique needs particular care to be more effective and is not the perfect solution due to its low efficiency in the collection of removed powder in proper surfaces (i.e., filters). Nevertheless improvements are possible and worthwhile.

  16. A joint numerical and experimental study of the jet of an aircraft engine installation with advanced techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, V.; Molton, P.; Bézard, H.; Deck, S.; Jacquin, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained during the European Union JEDI (JEt Development Investigations) project carried out in cooperation between ONERA and Airbus. The aim of these studies was first to acquire a complete database of a modern-type engine jet installation set under a wall-to-wall swept wing in various transonic flow conditions. Interactions between the engine jet, the pylon, and the wing were studied thanks to ¤advanced¥ measurement techniques. In parallel, accurate Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations were carried out from simple ones with the Spalart Allmaras model to more complex ones like the DRSM-SSG (Differential Reynolds Stress Modef of Speziale Sarkar Gatski) turbulence model. In the end, Zonal-Detached Eddy Simulations (Z-DES) were also performed to compare different simulation techniques. All numerical results are accurately validated thanks to the experimental database acquired in parallel. This complete and complex study of modern civil aircraft engine installation allowed many upgrades in understanding and simulation methods to be obtained. Furthermore, a setup for engine jet installation studies has been validated for possible future works in the S3Ch transonic research wind-tunnel. The main conclusions are summed up in this paper.

  17. 中医手法与人类健康%Traditional Chinese Medicine Technique and Human Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王之虹

    2012-01-01

    中医手法包括针法、灸法、推拿、整骨、刮痧、拔罐、功法、针刀等中医特色诊疗手法.作用机制为通过皮部—络脉—经脉—脏腑这一由表及里的疾病防治网络,达到疏通经络、行气活血的目的,进而发挥平衡阴阳、调整脏腑的功能.中医手法是调理人体“亚健康”状态最适宜的手段,在人类健康产业的发展中发挥巨大的作用.%Traditional Chinese medicine technique is characteristic of TCM diagnosis and treatment practices, include acupuncture, moxibustion, TuiNa, osteopathy, GuaSha, cupping, exercises, needle knife, etc. It's mechanism of action isthrough the disease prevention network from the outside to the inside, which is skin areas - collaterals - meridians - organs, to clear the meridians and transport qi and blood,and thus play a balance of yin and yang, adjust the function of organs. Traditional Chinese medicine technique is the most appropriate means to condition the human body "sub - healthy" state. Traditional Chinese medicine technique will play a major role in the developmet of the human health industry.

  18. Experimental approach to investigate the dynamics of mixing coolant flow in complex geometry using PIV and PLIF techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutli Ezddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the increase of mixing phenomenon in a coolant flow in order to improve the heat transfer, the economical operation and the structural integrity of Light Water Reactors-Pressurized Water Reactors (LWRs-PWRs. Thus the parameters related to the heat transfer process in the system will be investigated. Data from a set of experiments, obtained by using high precision measurement techniques, Particle Image Velocimetry and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PIV and PLIF, respectively are to improve the basic understanding of turbulent mixing phenomenon and to provide data for CFD code validation. The coolant mixing phenomenon in the head part of a fuel assembly which includes spacer grids has been investigated (the fuel simulator has half-length of a VVER 440 reactor fuel. The two-dimensional velocity vector and temperature fields in the area of interest are obtained by PIV and PLIF technique, respectively. The measurements of the turbulent flow in the regular tube channel around the thermocouple proved that there is rotation and asymmetry in the coolant flow caused by the mixing grid and the geometrical asymmetry of the fuel bundle. Both PIV and PLIF results showed that at the level of the core exit thermocouple the coolant is homogeneous. The discrepancies that could exist between the outlet average temperature of the coolant and the temperature at in-core thermocouple were clarified. Results of the applied techniques showed that both of them can be used as good provider for data base and to validate CFD results.

  19. Computation of electrostatic fields in anisotropic human tissues using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motresc, V. C.; van Rienen, U.

    2004-05-01

    The exposure of human body to electromagnetic fields has in the recent years become a matter of great interest for scientists working in the area of biology and biomedicine. Due to the difficulty of performing measurements, accurate models of the human body, in the form of a computer data set, are used for computations of the fields inside the body by employing numerical methods such as the method used for our calculations, namely the Finite Integration Technique (FIT). A fact that has to be taken into account when computing electromagnetic fields in the human body is that some tissue classes, i.e. cardiac and skeletal muscles, have higher electrical conductivity and permittivity along fibers rather than across them. This property leads to diagonal conductivity and permittivity tensors only when expressing them in a local coordinate system while in a global coordinate system they become full tensors. The Finite Integration Technique (FIT) in its classical form can handle diagonally anisotropic materials quite effectively but it needed an extension for handling fully anisotropic materials. New electric voltages were placed on the grid and a new averaging method of conductivity and permittivity on the grid was found. In this paper, we present results from electrostatic computations performed with the extended version of FIT for fully anisotropic materials.

  20. Computation of electrostatic fields in anisotropic human tissues using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. C. Motresc

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of human body to electromagnetic fields has in the recent years become a matter of great interest for scientists working in the area of biology and biomedicine. Due to the difficulty of performing measurements, accurate models of the human body, in the form of a computer data set, are used for computations of the fields inside the body by employing numerical methods such as the method used for our calculations, namely the Finite Integration Technique (FIT. A fact that has to be taken into account when computing electromagnetic fields in the human body is that some tissue classes, i.e. cardiac and skeletal muscles, have higher electrical conductivity and permittivity along fibers rather than across them. This property leads to diagonal conductivity and permittivity tensors only when expressing them in a local coordinate system while in a global coordinate system they become full tensors. The Finite Integration Technique (FIT in its classical form can handle diagonally anisotropic materials quite effectively but it needed an extension for handling fully anisotropic materials. New electric voltages were placed on the grid and a new averaging method of conductivity and permittivity on the grid was found. In this paper, we present results from electrostatic computations performed with the extended version of FIT for fully anisotropic materials.

  1. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of the human trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, O; del Palomar, A Pérez; López-Villalobos, J L; Ginel, A; Doblaré, M

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage and smooth muscle constitute the main structural components of the human central airways, their mechanical properties affect the flow in the trachea and contribute to the biological function of the respiratory system. The aim of this work is to find out the mechanical passive response of the principal constituents of the human trachea under static tensile conditions and to propose constitutive models to describe their behavior. Histological analyses to characterize the tissues and mechanical tests have been made on three human trachea specimens obtained from autopsies. Uniaxial tensile tests on cartilaginous rings and smooth muscle were performed. Tracheal cartilage was considered an elastic material and its Young's modulus and Poisson's coefficient were determined fitting the experimental curves using a Neo-Hookean model. The smooth muscle was proved to behave as a reinforced hyperelastic material with two families of collagen fibers, and its non-linearity was investigated using the Holzapfel strain-energy density function for two families of fibers to fit the experimental data obtained from longitudinal and transversal cuts. For cartilage, fitting the experimental curves to an elastic model, a Young's modulus of 3.33 MPa and nu=0.49 were obtained. For smooth muscle, several parameters of the Holzapfel function were found out (C(10)=0.877 kPa, k(1)=0.154 kPa, k(2)=34.157, k(3)=0.347 kPa and k(4)=13.889) and demonstrated that the tracheal muscle was stiffer in the longitudinal direction. The better understanding of how these tissues mechanically behave is essential for a correct modeling of the human trachea, a better simulation of its response under different loading conditions, and the development of strategies for the design of new endotracheal prostheses. (c) 2009 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantification of rainfall prediction uncertainties using a cross-validation based technique. Methodology description and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Ignacio; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jerónimo; Salsón, Santiago; Petazzi, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology to compute rainfall fields including the quantification of predictions uncertainties using raingauge network data. The proposed methodology comprises two steps. Firstly, the ordinary krigging technique is used to determine the estimated rainfall depth in every point of the study area. Then multiple equi-probable errors fields, which comprise both interpolation and measuring uncertainties, are added to the krigged field resulting in multiple rainfall predictions. To compute these error fields first the standard deviation of the krigging estimation is determined following the cross-validation based procedure described in Delrieu et al. (2014). Then, the standard deviation field is sampled using non-conditioned Gaussian random fields. The proposed methodology was applied to study 7 rain events in a 60x60 km area of the west coast of Galicia, in the Northwest of Spain. Due to its location at the junction between tropical and polar regions, the study area suffers from frequent intense rainfalls characterized by a great variability in terms of both space and time. Rainfall data from the tipping bucket raingauge network operated by MeteoGalicia were used to estimate the rainfall fields using the proposed methodology. The obtained predictions were then validated using rainfall data from 3 additional rain gauges installed within the CAPRI project (Probabilistic flood prediction with high resolution hydrologic models from radar rainfall estimates, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Reference CGL2013-46245-R.). Results show that both the mean hyetographs and the peak intensities are correctly predicted. The computed hyetographs present a good fit to the experimental data and most of the measured values fall within the 95% confidence intervals. Also, most of the experimental values outside the confidence bounds correspond to time periods of low rainfall depths, where the inaccuracy of the measuring devices

  3. Comparison between a Computational Seated Human Model and Experimental Verification Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Olesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sitting-acquired deep tissue injuries (SADTI are the most serious type of pressure ulcers. In order to investigate the aetiology of SADTI a new approach is under development: a musculo-skeletal model which can predict forces between the chair and the human body at different seated postures. This study focuses on comparing results from a model developed in the AnyBody Modeling System, with data collected from an experimental setup. A chair with force-measuring equipment was developed, an experiment was conducted with three subjects, and the experimental results were compared with the predictions of the computational model. The results show that the model predicted the reaction forces for different chair postures well. The correlation coefficients of how well the experiment and model correlate for the seat angle, backrest angle and footrest height was 0.93, 0.96, and 0.95. The study show a good agreement between experimental data and model prediction of forces between a human body and a chair. The model can in the future be used in designing wheelchairs or automotive seats.

  4. Evolving techniques of diagnosis. Toward establishment of new paradigm for human machine cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Masaharu; Takahashi, Makoto [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kanamoto, Shigeru; Saeki, Akira; Washio, Takashi; Ohga, Yukiharu; Furuta, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Shinji

    1998-09-01

    By monitoring equipments of a plant and state of a process, the diagnostic technique to detect a sign of abnormality properly to identify its reason has often been advanced on a lot of researches in various industrial fields containing atomic force. Some fundamental studies expected for such diagnostic technique to play an important role to keep and improve operational safety of a nuclear plant have been conducted since early period of the nuclear reaction development, but their contents are evolved and changed rapidly, in recent. The technique on the diagnosis was related closely to a statistical analysis method on signal fluctuation component, so-called reactor noise analysis method in early 1980s, but technical innovation step of their recent advancement were remarkable by introduction of new techniques such as chaos theory, wavelet analysis, model base application of expert system, artificial intelligence, and so on at middle of 1980s. And, when diagnosing in the field of atomic force, owing to be required for much high ability, studies on a multi method integration system considered complementary application of a plurality of technical methods and a cooperative method between human and mechanical intelligences, are also forwarded actively faster than those in other industrial areas. In this paper, in each important item, its technical nature and present state of its application to diagnosis are described with their future technical view. (G.K.)

  5. A new technique for analyzing trace element uptake by human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Yoshiki; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Okuyama, Katsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Komatsu, Hisanori; Sano, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine (F) and strontium (Sr) are key elements in the de- and remineralization of teeth. To quantitatively analyze the distribution of F and Sr, micro-particle-induced gamma/X-ray emission (PIGE/PIXE) technique was used. The cavities were prepared and filled with the fluoride- and Sr-containing restorative materials (FSCMs) in extracted human molars. The single-section enamel specimens were prepared by slicing from the buccal to lingual surface including the FSCMs. After 5 weeks of automatic pH cycling, the demineralization was calculated by integrated mineral loss (ΔIML) from transverse-microradiography. The distributions of F and Sr were analyzed by the PIGE/PIXE technique. The micro-PIGE/PIXE technique indicated a fluorine uptake difference between the enamel surface and enamel cavity wall. ΔIML of FSCMs were significantly lower than intact enamel. The micro-PIGE/PIXE technique enables measurement of F and Sr uptake from FSCMs into enamel, which would be beneficial for research on caries development and prevention.

  6. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil L. Bangare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed work is divided in to following Modules: Module 1: Image Pre-Processing Module 2: Feature Extraction, Segmentation using K-Means Algorithm and Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Module 3: Tumor Area calculation & Stage detection Module 4: Classification and position calculation of tumor using Neural Network

  7. Autonomous facial recognition system inspired by human visual system based logarithmical image visualization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qianwen; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous facial recognition system is widely used in real-life applications, such as homeland border security, law enforcement identification and authentication, and video-based surveillance analysis. Issues like low image quality, non-uniform illumination as well as variations in poses and facial expressions can impair the performance of recognition systems. To address the non-uniform illumination challenge, we present a novel robust autonomous facial recognition system inspired by the human visual system based, so called, logarithmical image visualization technique. In this paper, the proposed method, for the first time, utilizes the logarithmical image visualization technique coupled with the local binary pattern to perform discriminative feature extraction for facial recognition system. The Yale database, the Yale-B database and the ATT database are used for computer simulation accuracy and efficiency testing. The extensive computer simulation demonstrates the method's efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of illumination invariance for facial recognition.

  8. Advanced design technique of human-machine interfaces for PLC control of complex systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád-István Sütő

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Touchscreen operator panels proved to be a convenient succesor for clasical operator panels for implementing human-machine interfaces (HMIs in programmable logic controllers (PLC systems. The paper introduces a new technique for HMIs design in such systems, based on the idea of touchscreens replication. This redundancy allow actions which are not possible within the menus and sub-menus of a single touchscreen. Its strenght is revealed especially in complex systems, where operators can easily be overwhelmed by the huge amount of process information. The technique was applied on a mill tube rolling installation. The results also proved an increase of system security and zero downtime for HMI maintenance activities.

  9. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  10. Evaluation of a Rat Model of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Human MBP as Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Guo; Yuehua Li; Hongyi Lin; Xiaohui Ji; Jing Li; Lingli Que; Yingdong Zhang; Yushan Rong; Jianwen Wang

    2004-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a good model for human multiple sclerosis (MS)research. However, there are some defects in the traditional models. Here, we improved the model by using the human myelin basic protein (MBP) as antigen. EAE was induced by immunization of female Wistar rats with human MBP. Compared with the traditional models, the new model was evaluated by clinical signs to pathological changes. The immune state of the model was assessed by the lymphocyte infiltrative response and levels of TNF-α,IFN-γ, IL-10. It was found that most of rats exhibited tail tone loss and hind-limb paralysis,also there were demyelination, infiltrative lymphocyte foci, "Neuronophagia" in the cortex of cerebra and the white matter of spinal cords. PBMC and spleen lymphocytes were strongly response to the stimulation of MBP and PHA. The levels of TNF-α,IFN-γ were altered with the severity of EAE. In the remitting phase, IL-10 was increased significantly. This study demonstrate that the animal model of EAE induced by human MBP bears resemblance to the features of human multiple sclerosis and promises to be a better model than ever before for the study of MS. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):387-391.

  11. Evaluation of a Rat Model of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Human MBP as Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinGuo; YuehuaLi; HongyiLin; XiaohuiJi; JingLi; LingliQue; YingdongZhang; YushanRong; JianwenWang

    2004-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a good model for human multiple sclerosis (MS)research. However, there are some defects in the traditional models. Here, we improved the model by using the human myelin basic protein (MBP) as antigen. EAE was induced by immunization of female Wistar rats with human MBP. Compared with the traditional models, the new model was evaluated by clinical signs topathological changes. The immune state of the model was assessed by the lymphocyte infiltrative response and levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10. It was found that most of rats exhibited tail tone loss and hind-limb paralysis,also there were demyelination, infiltrative lymphocyte foci, “Neuronophagia” in the cortex of cerebra and the white matter of spinal cords. PBMC and spleen lymphocytes were strongly response to the stimulation of MBP and PHA. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ were altered with the severity of EAE. In the remitting phase, IL-10 wasincreased significantly. This study demonstrate that the animal model of EAE induced by human MBP bears resemblance to the features of human multiple sclerosis and promises to be a better model than ever before for the study of MS. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):387-391.

  12. Experimental study of air-cooled water condensation in slightly inclined circular tube using infrared temperature measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungdae [Nuclear Engineering Department, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae-Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok, E-mail: dekim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Air-cooled condensation experiments in an inclined Pyrex glass tube were performed. • High-resolution wall temperature data and flow regime formations could be obtained. • The local heat flux was strongly dependent on the air-side heat transfer. • A CFD analysis was conducted for calculating the local heat flux distribution. - Abstract: This study presents the results of an investigation of the air-cooled water condensation heat transfer characteristics inside a slightly inclined circular tube made of transparent Pyrex glass. The high-resolution wall temperature data and stratified film formations could be obtained with the assistance of an infrared (IR) thermometry technique and side-view visualization using a CCD camera. In all experimental cases, the condensation flow patterns were in the fully-stratified flow region. In addition, the experimentally measured void fraction corresponded well with the logarithmic mean void fraction model. The local temperature differences in the cooling air flow across the condenser tube and high-resolution temperature profiles on the tube’s outer wall were obtained in the experimental measurements. Under the experimental conditions of this study, the local heat flux distributions in the longitudinal direction of the test tube were strongly dependent on the cooling air velocity. And, with the help of IR thermometry, the tube outer wall temperature data at 45 local points could be measured. From the data, the asymmetry distribution of the local wall temperatures and the accurate location of the transition from two-phase mixture to single phase liquid inside the tube could be obtained. Also, the analysis of the thermal resistances by condensation, wall conduction and air convection showed that the air convective heat transfer behavior can play a dominant role to the local heat transfer characteristics. Finally, in order to obtain the local heat flux distribution along the tube’s outer wall, a two

  13. Technique of cultivating limbal derived corneal epithelium on human amniotic membrane for clinical transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The technique of transplantation of cultivated limbal epithelium rather than direct limbal tissue isa novel method of "cell therapy" involved in reconstructing the ocular surface in severe limbal stem celldeficiency [LSCD], caused by chemical burns. Aim : To describe a simple feeder-cell free technique of cultivating limbal epithelium on human amniotic membrane[HAM]. Materials and Methods : The limbal tissues (2 mm were harvested from patients with LSCD. These tissueswere proliferated in vitro on HAM supplemented by human corneal epithelial cell medium and autologousserum. Cultures covering more ?50% area of 2.5x5 cm HAM were considered adequate for clinical use. Thecultured epithelium was characterized by histopathology and immunophenotyping.Results: A total of 542 cultures out of 250 limbal tissues were cultivated in the laboratory from January 2001through July 2005. The culture explants showed that clusters of cells emerging from the edge of the explantsin one-three days formed a complete monolayer within 10-14 days. In 86% of cultures (464 of 542, thegrowth was observed within one-two days. Successful explant cultures were observed in 98.5% (534 of 542cultures with 91% explant cultures showing an area of ?6.25 cm2 (6.25 - 12.5 cm2 range. The cultivatedepithelium was terminated between 10-14 days for clinical transplantation. The problems encountered wereinadequate growth (2 of 542 and contamination (2 of 542. Conclusions : We demonstrate a simple technique of generating a sheet of corneal epithelium from a limbalbiopsy. This new technique could pave the way for a novel form of cell therapy.

  14. The Biological Effects of Quadripolar Radiofrequency Sequential Application: A Human Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Faga, Angela; Scevola, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: An experimental study was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of an innovative quadripolar variable electrode configuration radiofrequency device with objective measurements in an ex vivo and in vivo human experimental model. Background data: Nonablative radiofrequency applications are well-established anti-ageing procedures for cosmetic skin tightening. Methods: The study was performed in two steps: ex vivo and in vivo assessments. In the ex vivo assessments the radiofrequency applications were performed on human full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue specimens harvested during surgery for body contouring. In the in vivo assessments the applications were performed on two volunteer patients scheduled for body contouring surgery at the end of the study. The assessment methods were: clinical examination and medical photography, temperature measurement with thermal imaging scan, and light microscopy histological examination. Results: The ex vivo assessments allowed for identification of the effective safety range for human application. The in vivo assessments allowed for demonstration of the biological effects of sequential radiofrequency applications. After a course of radiofrequency applications, the collagen fibers underwent an immediate heat-induced rearrangement and were partially denaturated and progressively metabolized by the macrophages. An overall thickening and spatial rearrangement was appreciated both in the collagen and elastic fibers, the latter displaying a juvenile reticular pattern. A late onset in the macrophage activation after sequential radiofrequency applications was appreciated. Conclusions: Our data confirm the effectiveness of sequential radiofrequency applications in obtaining attenuation of the skin wrinkles by an overall skin tightening. PMID:25244081

  15. A simple filtration technique for obtaining purified human chromosomes in suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Parmar, Neha; Bhella, Gurdeep K; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-05-01

    Here we present a simple method for cleaning polyamine human mitotic chromosomes in solution. This was achieved by filtering intact (unburst) nuclei along with both large and small cytoplasmic debris through a series of different pore sized filters. Pure human chromosomes were recovered using a simple reverse filtration step. Fluorescence microscopy was used to validate the chromosome suspension after each filtration step. This reverse filtration technique is an improvement in both procedure time and chromosome recovery compared to currently used post-purification methods. Chromosomes purified by our method could be used for many applications, such as structural studies using microfluidics and high resolution imaging or generation of chromosome paints and sequencing after flow cytometry.

  16. A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FORESTER,JOHN A.; BLEY,DENNIS C.; COOPER,SUSANE; KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M.; THOMPSON,CATHERINE; RAMEY-SMITH,ANN; WREATHALL,JOHN

    2000-07-18

    This paper describes the most recent version of a human reliability analysis (HRA) method called ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis'' (ATHEANA). The new version is documented in NUREG-1624, Rev. 1 [1] and reflects improvements to the method based on comments received from a peer review that was held in 1998 (see [2] for a detailed discussion of the peer review comments) and on the results of an initial trial application of the method conducted at a nuclear power plant in 1997 (see Appendix A in [3]). A summary of the more important recommendations resulting from the peer review and trial application is provided and critical and unique aspects of the revised method are discussed.

  17. Measurement of histamine release from human lung tissue ex vivo by microdialysis technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Dan; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Nolte, H;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Currently no method is available for measurement of mediator release from intact human lung. In this study, a microdialysis technique was used to measure histamine release from mast cells in human lung tissue ex vivo. MATERIAL: Microdialysis fibers of 216 microm were inserted...... into lung tissue and perfused with Krebs Ringer buffer at a rate of 3 microl/min. After a 15 min period of steady-state perfusion, anti-IgE and vehicle were injected into the lung tissue above individual fibers. Samples from each fibre were collected for 20 min at 2 min intervals. Histamine was assayed...... fluorometrically. RESULTS: Anti-IgE concentrations of 40-40,000 U/ml dose-dependently released histamine, significant histamine release being demonstrated with anti-IgE concentrations of 400 U/ml and greater. The kinetics of histamine release showed peak values 2-8 min after the injection. Great individual...

  18. Experimental identification and analytical modelling of human walking forces: Literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racic, V.; Pavic, A.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.

    2009-09-01

    Dynamic forces induced by humans walking change simultaneously in time and space, being random in nature and varying considerably not only between different people but also for a single individual who cannot repeat two identical steps. Since these important aspects of walking forces have not been adequately researched in the past, the corresponding lack of knowledge has reflected badly on the quality of their mathematical models used in vibration assessments of pedestrian structures such as footbridges, staircases and floors. To develop better force models which can be used with more confidence in the structural design, an adequate experimental and analytical approach must be taken to account for their complexity. This paper is the most comprehensive review published to date, of 270 references dealing with different experimental and analytical characterizations of human walking loading. The source of dynamic human-induced forces is in fact in the body motion. To date, human motion has attracted a lot of interest in many scientific branches, particularly in medical and sports science, bioengineering, robotics, and space flight programs. Other fields include biologists of various kinds, physiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists (graphics and animation), human factors and ergonomists, etc. It resulted in technologically advanced tools that can help understanding the human movement in more detail. Therefore, in addition to traditional direct force measurements utilizing a force plate and an instrumented treadmill, this review also introduces methods for indirect measurement of time-varying records of walking forces via combination of visual motion tracking (imaging) data and known body mass distribution. The review is therefore an interdisciplinary article that bridges the gaps between biomechanics of human gait and civil engineering dynamics. Finally, the key reason for undertaking this review is the fact that human-structure dynamic interaction and

  19. Ranking factors affecting the productivity of human resources using MADM techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Shekari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For improving and efficient uses of various resources such as labor, capital, materials, energy and information, productivity is the purpose of all economic and industrial organizations and service enterprises. The human factor is the main strategic resource and the realization axis of productivity for each type of organization. Therefore the factors affecting the productivity, depends on suitable conditions for labor. This study is performed to identification and prioritization the factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company. The objective of this research is an applied and the data collection methods and conclusions are descriptive - survey. Statistical sample size by using Cochran's formula is considered equal to 120. To perform this study with the Delphi method, we identify the factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company and by using MADM techniques, prioritization of these factors has been done. Also Team Expert Choice2000 software have used for analysis. Research results show that factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company in order of importance are: Health aspects, leadership style, motivational factors, organizational commitment, work experience, general and applied education, demographic characteristics, physical environment within the organization, external environment and competitive spirit.

  20. AI techniques for optimizing multi-objective reservoir operation upon human and riverine ecosystem demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Ping; Chang, Fi-John; Chang, Li-Chiu; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2015-11-01

    Flow regime is the key driver of the riverine ecology. This study proposes a novel hybrid methodology based on artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for quantifying riverine ecosystems requirements and delivering suitable flow regimes that sustain river and floodplain ecology through optimizing reservoir operation. This approach addresses issues to better fit riverine ecosystem requirements with existing human demands. We first explored and characterized the relationship between flow regimes and fish communities through a hybrid artificial neural network (ANN). Then the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) was established for river flow management over the Shihmen Reservoir in northern Taiwan. The ecosystem requirement took the form of maximizing fish diversity, which could be estimated by the hybrid ANN. The human requirement was to provide a higher satisfaction degree of water supply. The results demonstrated that the proposed methodology could offer a number of diversified alternative strategies for reservoir operation and improve reservoir operational strategies producing downstream flows that could meet both human and ecosystem needs. Applications that make this methodology attractive to water resources managers benefit from the wide spread of Pareto-front (optimal) solutions allowing decision makers to easily determine the best compromise through the trade-off between reservoir operational strategies for human and ecosystem needs.

  1. On the Use of Machine Vision Techniques to Detect Human Settlements in Satellite Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C; Sengupta, S K; Poland, D; Futterman, J A H

    2003-01-10

    The automated production of maps of human settlement from recent satellite images is essential to studies of urbanization, population movement, and the like. The spectral and spatial resolution of such imagery is often high enough to successfully apply computer vision techniques. However, vast amounts of data have to be processed quickly. In this paper, we propose an approach that processes the data in several different stages. At each stage, using features appropriate to that stage, we identify the portion of the data likely to contain information relevant to the identification of human settlements. This data is used as input to the next stage of processing. Since the size of the data has reduced, we can now use more complex features in this next stage. These features can be more representative of human settlements, and also more time consuming to extract from the image data. Such a hierarchical approach enables us to process large amounts of data in a reasonable time, while maintaining the accuracy of human settlement identification. We illustrate our multi-stage approach using IKONOS 4-band and panchromatic images, and compare it with the straight-forward processing of the entire image.

  2. Experimental primates and non-human primate (NHP) models of human diseases in China: current status and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Pang, Wei; Hu, Xin-Tian; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2014-11-18

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are phylogenetically close to humans, with many similarities in terms of physiology, anatomy, immunology, as well as neurology, all of which make them excellent experimental models for biomedical research. Compared with developed countries in America and Europe, China has relatively rich primate resources and has continually aimed to develop NHPs resources. Currently, China is a leading producer and a major supplier of NHPs on the international market. However, there are some deficiencies in feeding and management that have hampered China's growth in NHP research and materials. Nonetheless, China has recently established a number of primate animal models for human diseases and achieved marked scientific progress on infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases, endocrine diseases, reproductive diseases, neurological diseases, and ophthalmic diseases, etc. Advances in these fields via NHP models will undoubtedly further promote the development of China's life sciences and pharmaceutical industry, and enhance China's position as a leader in NHP research. This review covers the current status of NHPs in China and other areas, highlighting the latest developments in disease models using NHPs, as well as outlining basic problems and proposing effective countermeasures to better utilize NHP resources and further foster NHP research in China.

  3. The Genetic Influences on Oxycodone Response Characteristics in Human Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia Møller

    2015-01-01

    PTT (n = 41) were included. Genetic associations with pain outcomes were explored. Nineteen opioid receptor genetic polymorphisms were included in this study. Variability in oxycodone response to skin heat was associated with OPRM1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs589046 (P ...Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic response...... to oxycodone in healthy volunteers. Experimental multimodal, multitissue pain data from previously published studies carried out in Caucasian volunteers were used. Data on thermal skin pain tolerance threshold (PTT) (n = 37), muscle pressure PTT (n = 31), mechanical visceral PTT (n = 43) and thermal visceral...

  4. [Thrombolytic efficacy of a Lys-plasminogen-urokinase combination: studies in experimental animals and humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, J; Foncuberta, J; Rosendo, A; Elez, J

    1990-01-01

    During animal experimental phase, lis-pg combined with UK produced a thrombolysis of about a 62.5%. This effect is accompanied by an important fibrinolytic system activation, a decrease in fibrinogen levels (0.37 +/- 0.2 gr/l) and an increase PDF/Fg (120.5 +/- 30 ng/ml). Such thrombolytic stage produced diverse hemorrhagic complications in experimental animals. During human clinical trial stage, then patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) at proximal lower limbs level were submitted to diverse treatment protocols with Lis-Plasminogen (Lis-plg) and Urokinase (UK). After preliminary outcomes we can conclude that administration of Lis-plg followed by UK increases the fibrinolytic activity but also increases the risk of hemorrhagic complications. This second effect is not probably caused by an specific absorption on the thrombo surface, but by an increase of circulating plasminogen levels Lis-plg exogenous-induced.

  5. [Christian responsibility and experimental medicine. Experiments with and on humans, experiments on animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Heinrich W

    2002-01-01

    The Jewish-Christian convictions that man was created as the image of God founded the "ethics of unavailability" which contrast with the utilitarian "ethics of interests." As man s nature is imperfect according to biblical understanding, those responsible in the field of experimental medicine should counteract all tendencies in society which promote an utopian definition of health and an eugenic mentality (idea of the "perfection of mankind"). Consequently, scientists must reflect their own image of man and the effects of their actions on this image. The goals of experimental medicine must also be examined under the aspect of fairness: do they only benefit a minority in the rich industrial nations? As in research on humans, the ethical evaluation of animal experiments must consider the question of the underlying image of humanity and the responsibility of mankind connected to it. Because of changes in society's values, the validity of traditional anthropocentrism is increasingly questioned. However, this does not affect the view of the special position of man as the bearer of responsibility. Even though there are different biblical statements on the relationship between man and animal, the Christian maxim to minimise violence towards animals can be derived from them. In the case of animal experiments this means: experiments which cause the animals severe suffering must be avoided by waiving the potential gain of knowledge from them. In general: in an ethical discussion on medical experiments using humans or animals, the public must be informed completely and involved effectively. A moratorium must be possible before plans become facts. Thinking about ethical problems in the area of experimental medicine should not be separated from the far-reaching questions about changes in our lifestyle and consumer behaviour.

  6. No release of interstitial glutamate in experimental human model of muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Jørgensen, M.; Stallknecht, Bente;

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate may be released from muscle nociceptors and thereby contribute to mechanisms underlying acute and chronic muscle pain. In vivo concentration of glutamate during muscle pain has not previously been studied in either animals or humans. In the present study, we aimed to study the in vivo...... flow increased significantly over time in response to infusion of chemical mixture and placebo (p = 0.001). However, we found no difference in changes in muscle blood flow between chemical mixture and placebo (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates no signs of increased release...... of glutamate from myofascial nociceptors during and after acute experimentally induced muscle pain and tenderness....

  7. Relevance of the glutathione system in temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence in human and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  8. Amphetamine-related drugs neurotoxicity in humans and in experimental animals: Main mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratalla, Rosario; Khairnar, Amit; Simola, Nicola; Granado, Noelia; García-Montes, Jose Ruben; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Tizabi, Yousef; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela

    2017-08-01

    Amphetamine-related drugs, such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH), are popular recreational psychostimulants. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated that, besides having the potential for abuse, amphetamine-related drugs may also elicit neurotoxic and neuroinflammatory effects. The neurotoxic potentials of MDMA and METH to dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons have been clearly demonstrated in both rodents and non-human primates. This review summarizes the species-specific cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in MDMA and METH-mediated neurotoxic and neuroinflammatory effects, along with the most important behavioral changes elicited by these substances in experimental animals and humans. Emphasis is placed on the neuropsychological and neurological consequences associated with the neuronal damage. Moreover, we point out the gap in our knowledge and the need for developing appropriate therapeutic strategies to manage the neurological problems associated with amphetamine-related drug abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [On evaluating the robot-based experimental system for biomechanical experiment of human knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guoyong; Tian, Lianfang; Bai, Bo; Sun, Hui

    2010-02-01

    This is a report on how we use the hybrid force-displacement control method to load the human knee and analyze the effect and value of our robot experimental system through the biomechanical experiments of total meniscal resection of human knee. The whole robot control system can load continuously on the specimens, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the traditional loading methods which can only load discretely. In the meantime, by using the robot-based testing system, the force (torque) of the specimens and the spatial position under the force can be measured in real-time, which overcomes the shortcomings caused by the separation of force (torque) measurement from displacement measurement and so greatly improves the measurement accuracy.

  10. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-03-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a "Confined Pitot Tube," is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics(®) software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method.

  11. A critical study on the experimental determination of stiffness and viscosity of the human triceps surae by free vibration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    París-García, Federico; Barroso, Alberto; Cañas, José; Ribas, Juan; París, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Muscles and tendons play an important role in human performance. Their mechanical behaviour can be described by analytical/numerical models including springs and dampers. Free vibration techniques are a widely used approach to the in vivo determination of stiffness and viscosity of muscle-tendon complexes involved in sport movements. By considering the data reported in the literature, it appears that the visco-elastic properties of the triceps surae muscle-tendon complexes are independent of the modality in which free vibration is induced as well as they do not depend on the composition of the population of subjects submitted to the experiments. This research will critically discuss this important aspect focussing in particular on two studies documented in the literature. For this purpose, two equipments will be developed to reproduce literature experiments under the assumption that the oscillating part of the body behaves as a single-degree-of-freedom system: The governing degree of freedom is associated with the vertical displacement of the lower leg or with the rotation of the foot around the ankle articulation. Unlike literature, measurements are now conducted on the same population of subjects in order to draw more general conclusions on the real equivalence of results and validity of the mechanical properties determined experimentally. Free vibration tests are accurately simulated by analytical models describing the response of each vibrating system. It is found that if the two measurement protocols are applied to the same population of individuals as it is done in this study, values of visco-elastic properties of muscle-tendon complexes extracted from experimental data are significantly different, the differences presenting a convincing consistency. This result is in contrast with the literature and confirms the need to evaluate results of free vibration techniques by taking homogeneous bases of comparison.

  12. Welfare aspects of vertebrate pest control and culling: ranking control techniques for humaneness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littin, K; Fisher, P; Beausoleil, N J; Sharp, T

    2014-04-01

    The management of vertebrate pests depends on the use of traps, pesticides, repellents and other methods, each of which can cause varying levels of pain and other negative experiences to animals. Vertebrate pest control is essential for managing the impacts of unwanted or over-abundant animals on human and animal health, ecological balance and economic interests. As the need for this management is unlikely to diminish over time, a framework has been developed for assessing the humaneness of each technique by considering their negative impacts on animal welfare so that these can be included in decision-making about the selection of techniques for a specific control operation. This information can also support evidence-based regulations directed at managing such animal welfare impacts. In this paper, the authors discuss this assessment framework, briefly review two assessments conducted using the framework and discuss ways in which Competent Authorities and others can use it and other means to improve animal welfare in vertebrate pest management.

  13. Techniques of Human Embryonic Stem Cell and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jarosław; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Developing procedures for the derivation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) gave rise to novel pathways into regenerative medicine research. For many years, stem cells have attracted attention as a potentially unlimited cell source for cellular therapy in neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and spinal cord injuries, for example. In these studies, adult stem cells were insufficient; therefore, many attempts were made to obtain PSCs by other means. This review discusses key issues concerning the techniques of pluripotent cell acquisition. Technical and ethical issues hindered the medical use of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cells. Therefore, induced PSCs (iPSCs) emerged as a powerful technique with great potential for clinical applications, patient-specific disease modelling and pharmaceutical studies. The replacement of viral vectors or the administration of analogous proteins or chemical compounds during cell reprogramming are modifications designed to reduce tumorigenesis risk and to augment the procedure efficiency. Intensified analysis of new PSC lines revealed other barriers to overcome, such as epigenetic memory, disparity between human and mouse pluripotency, and variable response to differentiation of some iPSC lines. Thus, multidimensional verification must be conducted to fulfil strict clinical-grade requirements. Nevertheless, the first clinical trials in patients with spinal cord injury and macular dystrophy were recently carried out with differentiated iPSCs, encouraging alternative strategies for potential autologous cellular therapies.

  14. Initial investigation of the effects of an experimentally learned schema on spatial associative memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn C W; Wagner, Isabella C; Genzel, Lisa; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-12-10

    Networks of interconnected neocortical representations of prior knowledge, "schemas," facilitate memory for congruent information. This facilitation is thought to be mediated by augmented encoding and accelerated consolidation. However, it is less clear how schema affects retrieval. Rodent and human studies to date suggest that schema-related memories are differently retrieved. However, these studies differ substantially as most human studies implement pre-experimental world-knowledge as schemas and tested item or nonspatial associative memory, whereas animal studies have used intraexperimental schemas based on item-location associations within a complex spatial layout that, in humans, could engage more strategic retrieval processes. Here, we developed a paradigm conceptually linked to rodent studies to examine the effects of an experimentally learned spatial associative schema on learning and retrieval of new object-location associations and to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying schema-related retrieval. Extending previous findings, we show that retrieval of schema-defining associations is related to activity along anterior and posterior midline structures and angular gyrus. The existence of such spatial associative schema resulted in more accurate learning and retrieval of new, related associations, and increased time allocated to retrieve these associations. This retrieval was associated with right dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral parietal activity, as well as interactions between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial and lateral parietal regions, and between the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions, supporting the hypothesis that retrieval of new, schema-related object-location associations in humans also involves augmented monitoring and systematic search processes.

  15. CD133(+) human umbilical cord blood stem cells enhance angiogenesis in experimental chronic hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhafif, Nagwa; El Baz, Hanan; Hammam, Olfat; Hassan, Salwa; Salah, Faten; Mansour, Wafaa; Mansy, Soheir; Yehia, Hoda; Zaki, Ahmed; Magdy, Ranya

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo angiogenic potential of transplanted human umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD133(+) stem cells in experimental chronic hepatic fibrosis induced by murine schistosomiasis was studied. Enriched cord blood-derived CD133(+) cells were cultured in primary medium for 3 weeks. Twenty-two weeks post-Schistosomiasis infection in mice, after reaching the chronic hepatic fibrotic stage, transplantation of stem cells was performed and mice were sacrificed 3 weeks later. Histopathology and electron microscopy showed an increase in newly formed blood vessels and a decrease in the fibrosis known for this stage of the disease. By immunohistochemical analysis the newly formed blood vessels showed positive expression of the human-specific angiogenic markers CD31, CD34 and von Willebrand factor. Few hepatocyte-like polygonal cells showed positive expression of human vascular endothelial growth factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The transplanted CD133(+) human stem cells primarily enhanced hepatic angiogenesis and neovascularization and contributed to repair in a paracrine manner by creating a permissive environment that enabled proliferation and survival of damaged cells rather than by direct differentiation to hepatocytes. A dual advantage of CD133(+) cell therapy in hepatic disease is suggested based on its capability of hematopoietic and endothelial differentiation.

  16. Dystrophin Distribution and Expression in Human and Experimental Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ruben G. F.; Schipper, Sandra; Hoogland, Govert; Schijns, Olaf E. M. G.; Dings, Jim T. A.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dystrophin is part of a protein complex that connects the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In addition to its role in muscle tissue, it functions as an anchoring protein within the central nervous system such as in hippocampus and cerebellum. Its presence in the latter regions is illustrated by the cognitive problems seen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Since epilepsy is also supposed to constitute a comorbidity of DMD, it is hypothesized that dystrophin plays a role in neuronal excitability. Here, we aimed to study brain dystrophin distribution and expression in both, human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Method: Regional and cellular dystrophin distribution was evaluated in both human and rat hippocampi and in rat cerebellar tissue by immunofluorescent colocalization with neuronal (NeuN and calbindin) and glial (GFAP) markers. In addition, hippocampal dystrophin levels were estimated by Western blot analysis in biopsies from TLE patients, post-mortem controls, amygdala kindled (AK)-, and control rats. Results: Dystrophin was expressed in all hippocampal pyramidal subfields and in the molecular-, Purkinje-, and granular cell layer of the cerebellum. In these regions it colocalized with GFAP, suggesting expression in astrocytes such as Bergmann glia (BG) and velate protoplasmic astrocytes. In rat hippocampus and cerebellum there were neither differences in dystrophin positive cell types, nor in the regional dystrophin distribution between AK and control animals. Quantitatively, hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels were about 60% higher in human TLE patients than in post-mortem controls (p < 0.05), whereas the level of the shorter Dp71 isoform did not differ. In contrast, AK animals showed similar dystrophin levels as controls. Conclusion: Dystrophin is ubiquitously expressed by astrocytes in the human and rat hippocampus and in the rat cerebellum. Hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels are upregulated

  17. [Analysis, identification and correction of some errors of model refseqs appeared in NCBI Human Gene Database by in silico cloning and experimental verification of novel human genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Li; Ji, Liang; Li, Yan-Da

    2004-05-01

    We found that human genome coding regions annotated by computers have different kinds of many errors in public domain through homologous BLAST of our cloned genes in non-redundant (nr) database, including insertions, deletions or mutations of one base pair or a segment in sequences at the cDNA level, or different permutation and combination of these errors. Basically, we use the three means for validating and identifying some errors of the model genes appeared in NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQS: (I) Evaluating the support degree of human EST clustering and draft human genome BLAST. (2) Preparation of chromosomal mapping of our verified genes and analysis of genomic organization of the genes. All of the exon/intron boundaries should be consistent with the GT/AG rule, and consensuses surrounding the splice boundaries should be found as well. (3) Experimental verification by RT-PCR of the in silico cloning genes and further by cDNA sequencing. And then we use the three means as reference: (1) Web searching or in silico cloning of the genes of different species, especially mouse and rat homologous genes, and thus judging the gene existence by ontology. (2) By using the released genes in public domain as standard, which should be highly homologous to our verified genes, especially the released human genes appeared in NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQS, we try to clone each a highly homologous complete gene similar to the released genes in public domain according to the strategy we developed in this paper. If we can not get it, our verified gene may be correct and the released gene in public domain may be wrong. (3) To find more evidence, we verified our cloned genes by RT-PCR or hybrid technique. Here we list some errors we found from NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQs: (1) Insert a base in the ORF by mistake which causes the frame shift of the coding amino acid. In detail, abase in the ORF of a gene is a redundant insertion, which causes a reading frame

  18. Isolation of cellular lipid droplets: two purification techniques starting from yeast cells and human placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannik, Jaana; Meyers, Alex; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that can be found in most eukaryotic and certain prokaryotic cells. Structurally, the droplets consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer. One of the most useful techniques in determining the cellular roles of droplets has been proteomic identification of bound proteins, which can be isolated along with the droplets. Here, two methods are described to isolate lipid droplets and their bound proteins from two wide-ranging eukaryotes: fission yeast and human placental villous cells. Although both techniques have differences, the main method-- density gradient centrifugation--is shared by both preparations. This shows the wide applicability of the presented droplet isolation techniques. In the first protocol, yeast cells are converted into spheroplasts by enzymatic digestion of their cell walls. The resulting spheroplasts are then gently lysed in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Ficoll is added to the lysate to provide a density gradient, and the mixture is centrifuged three times. After the first spin, the lipid droplets are localized to the white-colored floating layer of the centrifuge tubes along with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the plasma membrane, and vacuoles. Two subsequent spins are used to remove these other three organelles. The result is a layer that has only droplets and bound proteins. In the second protocol, placental villous cells are isolated from human term placentas by enzymatic digestion with trypsin and DNase I. The cells are homogenized in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Low-speed and medium-speed centrifugation steps are used to remove unbroken cells, cellular debris, nuclei, and mitochondria. Sucrose is added to the homogenate to provide a density gradient and the mixture is centrifuged to separate the lipid droplets from the other cellular fractions. The purity of the lipid droplets in both protocols is confirmed by Western Blot analysis. The droplet fractions from both preps

  19. Feasibility of refreezing human spermatozoa through the technique of liquid nitrogen vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Verza Jr

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of refreezing human semen using the technique of liquid nitrogen vapor with static phases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty samples from 16 subjects who required disposal of their cryopreserved semen were thawed, corresponding to 6 cancer patients and 10 participants in the assisted reproduction (AR program. Samples were refrozen using the technique of liquid nitrogen vapor with static phases, identical to the one used for the initial freezing, and thawed again after 72 hours. We assessed the concentration of motile spermatozoa, total and progressive percent motility and spermatic vitality, according to criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO, as well as spermatic morphology according to the strict Kruger criterion, after the first and after the second thawing. RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in all the parameters evaluated between the first and the second thawing. Median values for the concentration of motile spermatozoa decreased from 2.0x10(6/mL to 0.1x10(6/mL (p < 0.01; total percent motility from 42% to 22.5% (p < 0.01; progressive percent motility from 34% to 9.5% (p < 0.01; vitality from 45% to 20% (p < 0.01; and morphology from 5% to 5% (p = 0.03. There was no significant difference in the spermatic parameters between the cancer and assisted reproduction groups, both after the first and after the second thawing. We observed that in 100% of cases there was retrieval of motile spermatozoa after the second thawing. CONCLUSIONS: Refreezing of human semen by the technique of liquid nitrogen vapor allows the retrieval of viable spermatozoa after thawing.

  20. FUNCTIONAL-ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF POLYHALOGENATED AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS IN EXPERIMENTAL-ANIMALS AND HUMAN INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, A; AHLBORG, UG; VANDENBERG, M; BIRNBAUM, LS; BOERSMA, ER; BOSVELD, B; DENISON, MS; GRAY, LE; HAGMAR, L; HOLENE, E; HUISMAN, M; JACOBSON, SW; JACOBSON, JL; KOOPMANESSEBOOM, C; KOPPE, JG; KULIG, BM; MORSE, DC; MUCKLE, G; PETERSON, RE; SAUER, PJJ; SEEGAL, RF; SMITSVANPROOIJE, AE; TOUWEN, BCL; WEISGLASKUPERUS, N; WINNEKE, G

    1995-01-01

    A scientific evaluation was made of functional aspects of developmental toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in experimental animals and in human infants. Persistent neurobehavioral, reproductive and endocri

  1. Review on different experimental techniques developed for recording force-deformation behaviour of soft tissues; with a view to surgery simulation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Elnaz; Rostami, Mostafa; Farahmand, Farzam

    2017-05-01

    Different experimental techniques which have been developed to obtain data related to force-deformation behaviour of soft tissues play an important role in realistically simulating surgery processes as well as medical diagnoses and minimally invasive procedures. Indeed, an adequate quantitative description of soft-tissue-mechanical-behaviour requires high-quality experimental data to be obtained and analysed. In this review article we will first scan the motivations and basic technical issues on surgery simulation. Then, we will concentrate on different experimental techniques developed for recording force-deformation (stress-strain) behaviour of soft tissues with focussing on the in-vivo experimental setups. We will thoroughly review the available techniques by classifying them to four groups; elastography, indentation, aspiration and grasping techniques. The evolutions, advantages and limitations of each technique will be presented by a historical review. At the end, a discussion is given with the aim of summarising the proposed points and predicting the future of techniques utilised in extracting data related to force-deformation behaviour.

  2. Comprehensive theoretical analysis and experimental exploration of ultrafast microchip-based high-field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingfeng; Wang, Yonghuan; Chen, Chilai; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui

    2015-06-01

    High-field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has become an efficient technique for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions at ambient pressure, which utilizes the mobility differences of ions at high and low fields. Micro FAIMS devices made by micro-electromechanical system technology have small gaps of the channels, high electric field and good installation precision, as thus they have received great attentions. However, the disadvantage of relatively low resolution limits their applications in some areas. In this study, theoretical analysis and experimental exploration were carried out to overcome the disadvantage. Multiple scans, characteristic decline curves of ion transmission and pattern recognitions were proposed to improve the performance of the microchip-based FAIMS. The results showed that although micro FAIMS instruments as a standalone chemical analyzer suffer from low resolution, by using one or more of the methods proposed, they can identify chemicals precisely and provide quantitative analysis with low detection limit in some applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A radioisotopic technique for analysis of free fatty acid reesterification in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibel, R L; Hirsch, J

    1985-01-01

    Reesterification rates of free fatty acids (FFA) formed by intracellular triglyceride hydrolysis in small fragments of human adipose tissue were measured. Subcutaneous gluteal adipose tissue, obtained by needle biopsy, was incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [3H]palmitate and [14C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In triglycerides (TG) and diglycerides (DG) synthesized by the tissue, [14C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety, and 3H appears solely in the esterified fatty acids. Since rates of TG and DG synthesis can be determined from 14C accumulation rates in these molecules, the total amounts of FFA esterified can also be calculated. The difference between this estimate of total FFA esterification and the moles of [3H]palmitate esterified to these molecules represents the amount of unlabeled FFA from ongoing TG hydrolysis that was reesterified during the incubation. FFA recycling by the reesterification pathway is an important mechanism for the control of the quantity and proportions of FFA and glycerol leaving the human adipocyte. Fasting and beta-adrenergic stimulation reduce the fraction of endogenously released FFA that are reesterified from resting values of 30-40% to 8-21%, thereby increasing the molar ratio of FFA to glycerol leaving the adipocyte. The technique described can be employed to monitor sequential changes in this important metabolic cycle in humans under a wide range of nutritional and clinical circumstances.

  4. Measurement of stress-strain behaviour of human hair fibres using optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Kwon, H J

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have presented stress-strain relationship of human hair, but most of them have been based on an engineering stress-strain curve, which is not a true representation of stress-strain behaviour. In this study, a more accurate 'true' stress-strain curve of human hair was determined by applying optical techniques to the images of the hair deformed under tension. This was achieved by applying digital image cross-correlation (DIC) to 10× magnified images of hair fibres taken under increasing tension to estimate the strain increments. True strain was calculated by summation of the strain increments according to the theoretical definition of 'true' strain. The variation in diameter with the increase in longitudinal elongation was also measured from the 40× magnified images to estimate the Poisson's ratio and true stress. By combining the true strain and the true stress, a true stress-strain curve could be determined, which demonstrated much higher stress values than the conventional engineering stress-strain curve at the same degree of deformation. Four regions were identified in the true stress-strain relationship and empirical constitutive equations were proposed for each region. Theoretical analysis on the necking condition using the constitutive equations provided the insight into the failure mechanism of human hair. This analysis indicated that local thinning caused by necking does not occur in the hair fibres, but, rather, relatively uniform deformation takes place until final failure (fracture) eventually occurs.

  5. Nanotribological and nanomechanical characterization of human hair using a nanoscratch technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Guohua [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS, Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Road, Suite 255, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Bhushan, Bharat [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS, Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Road, Suite 255, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States)]. E-mail: bhushan.2@osu.edu

    2006-06-15

    Human hair ({approx}50-100 {mu}m in diameter) is a nanocomposite biological fiber with well-characterized microstructures, and is of great interest for both cosmetic science and materials science. Characterization of nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of human hair including the coefficient of friction and scratch resistance is essential to develop better shampoo and conditioner products and advance biological and cosmetic science. In this paper, the coefficient of friction and scratch resistance of Caucasian and Asian hair at virgin, chemo-mechanically damaged, and conditioner-treated conditions are measured using a nanoscratch technique with a Nano Indenter II system. The scratch tests were performed on both the single cuticle cell and multiple cuticle cells of each hair sample, and the scratch wear tracks were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after the scratch tests. The effect of soaking on the coefficient of friction, scratch resistance, hardness and Young's modulus of hair surface were also studied by performing experiments on hair samples which had been soaked in de-ionized water for 5 min. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of human hair as a function of hair structure (hair of different ethnicity), damage, treatment and soaking are discussed.

  6. Suction-modified needle biopsy technique for the human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Joshua A; Yu, Alvin; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Haddad, Fadia H; Baker, Michael J; Fox, John C; Adams, Gregory R

    2013-10-01

    The needle biopsy technique for the soleus muscle is of particular interest because of the muscle's unique fiber type distribution, contractile properties, and sensitivity to unloading. Unlike other commonly biopsied muscles, the soleus is not fully superficial and is in close proximity to neurovascular structures, resulting in a more challenging biopsy. Because of this, a standardized protocol for performing needle biopsies on the human soleus muscle that is safe, reliable, and repeatable is presented. Ultrasonography was used on an initial set of 12 subjects to determine the optimal biopsy zone, thereby guiding the location of the incision site. There were 45 subjects recruited who attended 2 separate biopsy sessions. Each biopsy session incorporated 3 passes of the biopsy needle proximal, posterior, and distal using suction from a portable vacuum source producing 3 separate muscle specimens. There were 84 soleus muscle biopsy procedures which were successfully conducted yielding 252 total samples without complication. Ultrasonography was used to confirm biopsy needle infiltration of the soleus muscle. Average sample weight obtained per pass was 61.5 +/- 15.7 mg. Histochemistry and molecular analyses demonstrated a considerably higher amount of slow type I MHC in comparison to the vastus lateralis, providing verification for the successful sampling of the soleus muscle. The procedure presented consists of a detailed protocol to accurately and consistently obtain muscle biopsy samples from the human soleus muscle. We have demonstrated that the human soleus biopsy is a safe, reliable, and repeatable procedure providing ample tissue for multiple types of analyses.

  7. Study on the Gas Detonation Experimental System of Human Body Electrostatic Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The modeling system of the gas detonation by the human body electrostatic discharge(ESD)in coal mine is developed successfully,and the body’s dynamic ESD model is established.To obtain a gas concentration causes by the explosions most easily in coal mine environment.The results provide an academic and experimental evidence for the safe electrostatic production and management in coal mine.The system adopts 77E58 as control core and the circuit optimized design,to take dual protection to the gas path and circuit of the system,systematic operation is safe and reliable.The experimental results show that the system can be carried out series of experiments of the human body ESD model detonating mixed gas,the measuring accuracy of gas concentration is 0.1%.And draws a conclusion that the gas concentration which causes the explosions most easily is 8.7%,but not the higher gas concentration is,the more explosive is.

  8. Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Gaze

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal cytokine response of healthy humans to parasitic helminths has never been reported. We investigated the systemic and mucosal cytokine responses to hookworm infection in experimentally infected, previously hookworm naive individuals from non-endemic areas. We collected both peripheral blood and duodenal biopsies to assess the systemic immune response, as well as the response at the site of adult worm establishment. Our results show that experimental hookworm infection leads to a strong systemic and mucosal Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β response, with some evidence of a Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2 response. Despite upregulation after patency of both IL-15 and ALDH1A2, a known Th17-inducing combination in inflammatory diseases, we saw no evidence of a Th17 (IL-17 response. Moreover, we observed strong suppression of mucosal IL-23 and upregulation of IL-22 during established hookworm infection, suggesting a potential mechanism by which Th17 responses are suppressed, and highlighting the potential that hookworms and their secreted proteins offer as therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.

  9. Tomato Lycopene and Lung Cancer Prevention: From Experimental to Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Catalano

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that tomato lycopene may be preventive against the formation and the development of lung cancer. Experimental studies demonstrated that lycopene may inhibit the growth of several cultured lung cancer cells and prevent lung tumorigenesis in animal models through various mechanisms, including a modulation of redox status, cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induction, a regulation of growth factor signaling, changes in cell growth-related enzymes, an enhancement of gap junction communication and a prevention of smoke-induced inflammation. In addition, lycopene also inhibited cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Several lycopene metabolites have been identified, raising the question as to whether the preventive effects of lycopene on cancer risk is, at least in part, due to its metabolites. Despite these promising reports, it is difficult at the moment to directly relate available experimental data to human pathophysiology. More well controlled clinical intervention trials are needed to further clarify the exact role of lycopene in the prevention of lung cancer cell growth. Such studies should take into consideration subject selection, specific markers of analysis, the levels of carotenoids being tested, metabolism and isomerization of lycopene, interaction with other bioactive food components. This article reviews data on the cancer preventive activities of lycopene, possible mechanisms involved, and the relationship between lycopene consumption and human cancer risk.

  10. Tomato Lycopene and Lung Cancer Prevention: From Experimental to Human Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palozza, Paola, E-mail: p.palozza@rm.unicatt.it; Simone, Rossella E.; Catalano, Assunta [Institute of General Pathology, School of Medicine, Catholic University, L. Go F. Vito, Rome 1 00168 (Italy); Mele, Maria Cristina [Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Catholic University, L. Go F. Vito, Rome 1 00168 (Italy)

    2011-05-11

    Increasing evidence suggests that tomato lycopene may be preventive against the formation and the development of lung cancer. Experimental studies demonstrated that lycopene may inhibit the growth of several cultured lung cancer cells and prevent lung tumorigenesis in animal models through various mechanisms, including a modulation of redox status, cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induction, a regulation of growth factor signaling, changes in cell growth-related enzymes, an enhancement of gap junction communication and a prevention of smoke-induced inflammation. In addition, lycopene also inhibited cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Several lycopene metabolites have been identified, raising the question as to whether the preventive effects of lycopene on cancer risk is, at least in part, due to its metabolites. Despite these promising reports, it is difficult at the moment to directly relate available experimental data to human pathophysiology. More well controlled clinical intervention trials are needed to further clarify the exact role of lycopene in the prevention of lung cancer cell growth. Such studies should take into consideration subject selection, specific markers of analysis, the levels of carotenoids being tested, metabolism and isomerization of lycopene, interaction with other bioactive food components. This article reviews data on the cancer preventive activities of lycopene, possible mechanisms involved, and the relationship between lycopene consumption and human cancer risk.

  11. Body mass index is not associated with cytokine induction during experimental human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Lucas T; van der Pluijm, Rob W; Ramakers, Bart Pc; Dorresteijn, Mirrin J; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Kox, Matthijs; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A higher body mass index (BMI) appears to be associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients, possibly explained by an altered innate immune response. However, the precise relationship between BMI and the innate immune response in humans in vivo is unknown. We investigated the relationship between BMI and the systemic cytokine response during experimental human endotoxemia. Endotoxemia was induced in 112 healthy male volunteers by intravenous administration of 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli endotoxin. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1RA were serially determined. The relationship between BMI and the cytokine response, as well as body temperature, was investigated. The BMIs of the participants ranged from 18.3 to 33.6 kg/m(2), (median: 22.7 kg/m(2)). All participants showed a marked increase in plasma cytokine levels [median (interquartile range)] peak levels: TNF-α 509 (353-673) pg/ml; IL-6 757 (522-1098) pg/ml; IL-10 271 (159-401) pg/ml; IL-1RA 4882 (3927-6025) pg/ml; and an increase in body temperature [1.8(1.4-2.2)] during endotoxemia. No significant correlations were found between BMI and levels of any of the cytokines or body temperature. No relationship between BMI and the cytokine response was found in healthy volunteers subjected to experimental endotoxemia. These data question the relationship between BMI and cytokine responses in critical illness.

  12. Comparison of Spares Logistics Analysis Techniques for Long Duration Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Andrew; de Weck, Olivier; Mattfeld, Bryan; Stromgren, Chel; Cirillo, William

    2015-01-01

    As the durations and distances involved in human exploration missions increase, the logistics associated with the repair and maintenance becomes more challenging. Whereas the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) depends upon regular resupply from the Earth, this paradigm may not be feasible for future missions. Longer mission durations result in higher probabilities of component failures as well as higher uncertainty regarding which components may fail, and longer distances from Earth increase the cost of resupply as well as the speed at which the crew can abort to Earth in the event of an emergency. As such, mission development efforts must take into account the logistics requirements associated with maintenance and spares. Accurate prediction of the spare parts demand for a given mission plan and how that demand changes as a result of changes to the system architecture enables full consideration of the lifecycle cost associated with different options. In this paper, we utilize a range of analysis techniques - Monte Carlo, semi-Markov, binomial, and heuristic - to examine the relationship between the mass of spares and probability of loss of function related to the Carbon Dioxide Removal System (CRS) for a notional, simplified mission profile. The Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool (EMAT), developed at NASA Langley Research Center, is utilized for the Monte Carlo analysis. We discuss the implications of these results and the features and drawbacks of each method. In particular, we identify the limitations of heuristic methods for logistics analysis, and the additional insights provided by more in-depth techniques. We discuss the potential impact of system complexity on each technique, as well as their respective abilities to examine dynamic events. This work is the first step in an effort that will quantitatively examine how well these techniques handle increasingly more complex systems by gradually expanding the system boundary.

  13. Insights from advances in research of chemically induced experimental models of human inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the most important being Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Although the pathogenesis of IBD remains unclear, it is widely accepted that genetic, environmental, and immunological factors are involved. Recent studies suggest that intestinal epithelial defenses are important to prevent inflammation by protecting against microbial pathogens and oxidative stresses. To investigate the etiology of IBD, animal models of experimental colitis have been developed and are frequently used to evaluate new anti-inflammatory treatments for IBD. Several models of experimental colitis that demonstrate various pathophysiological aspects of the human disease have been described. In this manuscript, we review the characteristic features of IBD through a discussion of the various chemically induced experimental models of colitis (e.g. dextran sodium sulfate-, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-, oxazolone-, acetic acid-, and indomethacin-induced models). We also summarize some regulatory and pathogenic factors demonstrated by these models that can, hopefully, be exploited to develop future therapeutic strategies against IBD.

  14. Immunodiagnosis of systemic aspergillosis. I. Antigenemia detected by radioimmunoassay in experimental infection. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, M.H.; Coats-Stephen, M.

    1979-01-01

    Because systemic aspergillosis is difficult to diagnose ante mortem, a study to improve immunodiagnosis was undertaken in a rabbit model of disseminated infection. We found that the predominant humoral response of infected animals was directed against four Aspergillus antigens identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. One of these antigens, a cell-wall carbohydrate, was purified by gel-filtration chromatography and was used to develop a radiommunoassay. The sensitivity of this assay was increased by testing for serum-bound antigen as well as for free antigen. When the sensitivity of the RIA was evaluated in the animal model, antigenemia was detected in 78% of 51 rabbits with disseminated infection and ante mortem in 86% of 42 rabbits with lethal infection. By contrast, with immunoprecipitin analysis only eight of 51 rabbits were positive for antigen, and six of 51 rabbits were positive for Aspergillus antibody. The specificity of the RIA was also tested. Negative controls for antigen included sera from 76 normal rabbits and sera from 25 rabbits with systemic candidiasis. The Candida control group is pertinent because 48% of these rabbits had specific Candida antigenemia detected by a mannan RIA. This study demonstrates that Aspergillus antigenemia occurs during the course of experimental disseminated aspergillosis and illustrates the potential of an Aspergillus antigen RIA for sensitive, specific immunodiagnosis of human infections.

  15. Parallel transmission techniques in magnetic resonance imaging: experimental realization, applications and perspectives; Parallele Sendetechniken in der Magnetresonanztomographie: experimentelle Realisierung, Anwendungen und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, P.

    2007-06-15

    The primary objective of this work was the first experimental realization of parallel RF transmission for accelerating spatially selective excitation in magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, basic aspects regarding the performance of this technique were investigated, potential risks regarding the specific absorption rate (SAR) were considered and feasibility studies under application-oriented conditions as first steps towards a practical utilisation of this technique were undertaken. At first, based on the RF electronics platform of the Bruker Avance MRI systems, the technical foundations were laid to perform simultaneous transmission of individual RF waveforms on different RF channels. Another essential requirement for the realization of Parallel Excitation (PEX) was the design and construction of suitable RF transmit arrays with elements driven by separate transmit channels. In order to image the PEX results two imaging methods were implemented based on a spin-echo and a gradient-echo sequence, in which a parallel spatially selective pulse was included as an excitation pulse. In the course of this work PEX experiments were successfully performed on three different MRI systems, a 4.7 T and a 9.4 T animal system and a 3 T human scanner, using 5 different RF coil setups in total. In the last part of this work investigations regarding possible applications of Parallel Excitation were performed. A first study comprised experiments of slice-selective B1 inhomogeneity correction by using 3D-selective Parallel Excitation. The investigations were performed in a phantom as well as in a rat fixed in paraformaldehyde solution. In conjunction with these experiments a novel method of calculating RF pulses for spatially selective excitation based on a so-called Direct Calibration approach was developed, which is particularly suitable for this type of experiments. In the context of these experiments it was demonstrated how to combine the advantages of parallel transmission

  16. Human factors requirements for telerobotic command and control: The European Space Agency experimental programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Space Telerobotics research, performed under contract to the European Space Agency (ESA), concerning the execution of human factors experiments, and ultimately leading to the development of a telerobotics test bed, has been carried out since 1985 by a British Consortium consisting of British Aerospace, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and, more recently, the UK National Advanced Robotics Research Centre. The principal aim of the first study of the series was to derive preliminary requirements for a teleoperation servicing system, with reference to two mission model scenarios. The first scenario introduced the problem of communications time delays, and their likely effect on the ground-based operator in control of a manipulator system on board an unmanned servicing vehicle in Low Earth Orbit. In the second scenario, the operator was located on the NASA Orbiter aft flight deck, supervising the control of a prototype manipulator in the 'servicing' of an experimental payload in the cargo bay area. Human factors analyses centered on defining the requirements for the teleoperator workstation, such as identifying basic ergonomic requirements for workstation and panel layouts, defining teleoperation strategies, developing alphanumeric and graphic screen formats for the supervision or direct control of the manipulator, and the potential applications of expert system technology. The second study for ESA involved an experimental appraisal of some of the important issues highlighted in the first study, for which relevant human factors data did not exist. Of central importance during the second study was the issue of communications time delays and their effect on the manual control of a teleoperated manipulator from a ground-based command and control station.

  17. Results of a nuclear power plant application of A New Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Forester, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc. (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the success of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator on shift until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5-month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  18. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary.

  19. Experimental study of movements respiratory conditions acceptable in radiotherapy techniques advanced; Estudio experimental de las condiciones de movimiento respiratorio aceptables en tecnicas de radioterapia avanzada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco de Fez, P.; Ruiz Martinez, A.; Ruiz Martinez, A.; Jornet Sala, N.; Latorre Musoll, A.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Ribas Morales, M.

    2015-07-01

    The aim is Determine experimentally in what conditions the movement of the PTV produces uncertainties unacceptable in the various stages of the treatment radiotherapy, from the acquisition of imagens 4D to the irradiation. (Author)

  20. Experimental Research on the TrkA Gene Inhibition of Angiogenesis in Human Neuroblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JihongZhang; JinhuaZhang; GefeiLiu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of gene therapy for human neuroblastoma (NB) with the TrkA gene inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. METHODS Three groups of cells including SY5Y, SY5Y-TrkA and SY5Y-Vec NB cells, were cultured by routine methods. Comparison of oncogenicity was performed among the three groups of cells. Tumor volume and angiogenesis in nude mice were also compared with VEGFmRNA expression (by RT-PCR analysis), immunohistochemistry and microvessel counting. RESULTS The TrkA-transfected SY5Y NB cells showed significantly reduced oncogenicity and tumor angiogenesis. Tumor volumes were statistically different among the control, Empty-Vec and the experimental group, namely 1.736±0.485cm3, 1.803±0.751cm3 and 0.395±0.015cm3, respectively (P<0.01). The difference of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression between the experimental group and the control group was significant (P<0.01). Microvessel density (MVD) of the control, Empty-Vec and the experimental group were 27.21±14.58, 27.76±14.15 and 4.08±4.72 respectively, with statistical differences from the experimental group (P<0.001 ). CONCLUSION The tumor angiogenesis and growth of NB were significantly inhibited by the TrkA gene. These studies provide a theoretical basis for application of NB antiangiogenesis gene therapy.

  1. Microsurgical techniques for experimental kidney transplantation and general guidelines to establish studies about transplantation immunology Técnicas microcirúrgicas para transplante renal experimental e condutas para estabelecer experimentos sobre imunologia do transplante

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Ney Aguiar Martins; Alexander Filatenkov

    2003-01-01

    Experimental models of organ transplantation played a crucial role to establish the principles of transplantation immunology. The renal transplantation in rodents became the most used model to study the mechanisms of allograft rejection. To perform it, it is necessary to master the microsurgery techniques and the research group should cooperate with other specialists in the field. In this article we review the surgical techniques employed in rats, and we draw guidelines to establish studies a...

  2. Modern Facilities for Experimental Measurement of Dynamic Loads Induced by Humans: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitomir Racic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a critical overview of available technology and facilities for determining human-induced dynamic forces of civil engineering structures, such as due to walking, running, jumping and bouncing. In addition to traditional equipment for direct force measurements comprising force plate(s, foot pressure insoles and instrumented treadmills, the review also investigates possibility of using optical motion tracking systems (marker-based and marker-free optoelectronic technology and non-optical motion tracking systems (inertial sensors to reproduce contact forces between humans and structures based on body kinematics data and known body mass distribution. Although significant technological advancements have been made in the last decade, the literature survey showed that the state-of-the-art force measurements are often limited to individuals in artificial laboratory environments. Experimental identification of seriously needed group- and crowd-induced force data recorded on as-built structures, such as footbridges, grandstands and floors, still remains a challenge due to the complexity of human actions and the lack of adequate equipment.

  3. REVIEW: A review of in vivo experimental methods to determine the composition of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    This review of experimental methods employed in the measurement of the composition of the human body covers the developments that have occurred over the past 30 years. Early methods such as hydrodensitometry and skinfold anthropometry have been superseded by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The measurement of the whole-body abundance of certain elements by isotopic dilution, neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence can give important information of clinical significance, but neutron activation facilities remain available in only a few centres worldwide. The relatively simple, rapid and risk-free electrical methods such as multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, which can be employed at the bedside, have been found to be more complicated in their interpretation. Electromagnetic methods may only measure the composition of the human body at its surface. X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have not yet been employed much in body composition measurements. Some models for the composition of the human body are reviewed.

  4. Building an experimental model of the human body with non-physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuz, Joseph M; Moraes, Christopher; Mertz, David R; Leung, Brendan M; Takayama, Shuichi

    2017-03-01

    New advances in engineering and biomedical technology have enabled recent efforts to capture essential aspects of human physiology in microscale, in-vitro systems. The application of these advances to experimentally model complex processes in an integrated platform - commonly called a 'human-on-a-chip (HOC)' - requires that relevant compartments and parameters be sized correctly relative to each other and to the system as a whole. Empirical observation, theoretical treatments of resource distribution systems and natural experiments can all be used to inform rational design of such a system, but technical and fundamental challenges (e.g. small system blood volumes and context-dependent cell metabolism, respectively) pose substantial, unaddressed obstacles. Here, we put forth two fundamental principles for HOC design: inducing in-vivo-like cellular metabolic rates is necessary and may be accomplished in-vitro by limiting O2 availability and that the effects of increased blood volumes on drug concentration can be mitigated through pharmacokinetics-based treatments of solute distribution. Combining these principles with natural observation and engineering workarounds, we derive a complete set of design criteria for a practically realizable, physiologically faithful, five-organ millionth-scale (× 10(-6)) microfluidic model of the human body.

  5. Review of Ginkgo biloba-induced toxicity, from experimental studies to human case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ren, Zhen; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Guo, Lei

    2017-01-02

    Ginkgo biloba seeds and leaves have been used as a traditional herbal remedy for thousands of years, and its leaf extract has been consumed as a botanical dietary supplement for decades. Ginkgo biloba extract is a complex mixture with numerous components, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones, and is one of the most widely sold botanical dietary supplements worldwide. Concerns about potential health risks for the general population have been raised because of the widespread human exposure to Ginkgo biloba and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities in rodents. The National Toxicology Program conducted 2-year gavage studies on one Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and concluded that there was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of this extract in mice based on an increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatoblastoma. Recently, Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been classified as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects from experimental studies both in vitro and in vivo to human case reports (caused by ginkgo seeds or leaves), and also summarizes the negative results from relatively large clinical trials.

  6. [Advances in the experimental analysis of behavior: issues of choice behavior, comparative cognition, and human language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, T; Yamamoto, J; Jitsumori, M

    1994-12-01

    As the opportunity to contact with related areas has increased, the study of of the experimental analysis of behavior has experienced revolutionary changes. Some of the most active and important areas-studies of choice, comparative cognition, and human language--are reviewed to acquaint readers. Studies of CHOICE have linked to the molar theories of behavioral economics and behavioral ecology, which promoted research of choice by animals under uncertainty conditions. Further approach has been made to integrate the molar and molecular analyses on the basis of the ideas of behavior dynamics. COMPARATIVE COGNITION is a part of a larger field including cognitive science, behavioral neuroscience, and biological science. Recent developments, aided with a comparative perspective, made significant contributions to our understanding of the phylogeny and ontogeny of cognition. Advances in analysis of human behavior provided tools to study behavioral aspects of semantics, syntax, and pragmatics of HUMAN LANGUAGE. Using the paradigm of stimulus equivalence, the emergence of stimulus relations, stimulus-stimulus networks, hierarchical structure of verbal behavior, and other language-related behaviors have been investigated.

  7. Application of Imaging Techniques to Mechanics of Materials and Structures, Volume 4 : Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This the fourth volume of six from the Annual Conference of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, 2010, brings together 58 chapters on Application of Imaging Techniques to Mechanics of Materials and Structure. It presents findings from experimental and computational investigations involving a range of imaging techniques including Recovery of 3D Stress Intensity Factors From Surface Full-field Measurements, Identification of Cohesive-zone Laws From Crack-tip Deformation Fields, Application of High Speed Digital Image Correlation for Vibration Mode Shape Analysis, Characterization of Aluminum Alloys Using a 3D Full Field Measurement, and Low Strain Rate Measurements on Explosives Using DIC.

  8. Association of two techniques of frontal sinus radiographic analysis for human identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonan Ferreira da SILVA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The analysis of images with human identificationpurpose is a routine activity in the departments of forensic medicine, especially when is necessary to identify burned bodies, skeletal remains or corpses in advanced stage of decomposition. Case report: The feasibility and reliability of the analysis of the morphoradiographic image of the frontal sinus is showed, displayed in a posteroanterior (PA radiography of skull produced in life compared to another produced post-death. Conclusion: The results obtained in the radiographic comparison through the association of two different techniques of analysis of the frontal sinus allowed a positive correlation of the identity of the disappeared person with the body in an advanced stage of decomposition.

  9. A new technique for fractal analysis applied to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, E; Brammer, M; Alarcon, G; Binnie, C

    1992-11-09

    Application of a new method of fractal analysis to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) signals is reported. 'Frameshift-Richardson' (FR) analysis involves estimation of fractal dimension (1 EEG data; it is suggested that this technique offers significant operational advantages over use of algorithms for FD estimation requiring preliminary reconstruction of EEG data in phase space. FR analysis was found to reduce substantially the volume of EEG data, without loss of diagnostically important information concerning onset, propagation and evolution of ictal EEG discharges. Arrhythmic EEG events were correlated with relatively increased FD; rhythmic EEG events with relatively decreased FD. It is proposed that development of this method may lead to: (i) enhanced definition and localisation of initial ictal changes in the EEG presumed due to multi-unit activity; and (ii) synoptic visualisation of long periods of EEG data.

  10. Current Methods to Assess Human Cutaneous Blood Flow: An Updated Focus on Laser-Based-Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Roustit, Matthieu

    2016-07-01

    Several noninvasive techniques have been developed using laser light interaction in the skin to explore the skin's microcirculation. Combined with laser Doppler or LSCI, reactivity tests are used to explore skin endothelial and neurovascular function in humans, including PORH, LTH, PIV, and iontophoresis of vasodilators. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests have been possible through topical or intradermal delivery of drugs that produce elevated local concentrations. Skin microvascular function has also been proposed as a prognostic biomarker or for evaluating the effect of drugs. Comprehension of the physiological pathways, together with recent technological improvements in microcirculation imaging, has provided reliable and reproducible tools to study skin microcirculation.

  11. A survey of imagery techniques for semantic labeling of human-vehicle interactions in persistent surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2011-06-01

    Understanding and semantic annotation of Human-Vehicle Interactions (HVI) facilitate fusion of Hard sensor (HS) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) in a cohesive way. By characterization, classification, and discrimination of HVI patterns pertinent threats may be realized. Various Persistent Surveillance System (PSS) imagery techniques have been proposed in the past decade for identifying human interactions with various objects in the environment. Understanding of such interactions facilitates to discover human intentions and motives. However, without consideration of incidental context, reasoning and analysis of such behavioral activities is a very challenging and difficult task. This paper presents a current survey of related publications in the area of context-based Imagery techniques applied for HVI recognition, in particular, it discusses taxonomy and ontology of HVI and presents a summary of reported robust image processing techniques for spatiotemporal characterization and tracking of human targets in urban environments. The discussed techniques include model-based, shape-based and appearance-based techniques employed for identification and classification of objects. A detailed overview of major past research activities related to HVI in PSS with exploitation of spatiotemporal reasoning techniques applied to semantic labeling of the HVI is also presented.

  12. Nanolesions induced by heavy ions in human tissues: Experimental and theoretical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Bleicher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of energetic heavy ions are attracting increasing interest for their applications in cancer therapy and protection against space radiation. The cascade of events leading to cell death or late effects starts from stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale and the corresponding lesions in biological molecules, primarily DNA. We have developed experimental techniques to visualize DNA nanolesions induced by heavy ions. Nanolesions appear in cells as “streaks” which can be visualized by using different DNA repair markers. We have studied the kinetics of repair of these “streaks” also with respect to the chromatin conformation. Initial steps in the modeling of the energy deposition patterns at the micrometer and nanometer scale were made with MCHIT and TRAX models, respectively.

  13. The surface properties of SOA generated from limonene and toluene using specific molecular probes: exploration of a new experimental technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Demirdjian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A new experimental technique of characterizing the aerosol-atmosphere surface has been explored using three examples: the secondary organic aerosols (SOA resulting from the reaction of limonene with O3 and from the photooxidation of toluene in comparison with the combustion aerosol (soot from a toluene diffusion flame. Rather than investigating the bulk composition of the aerosol by complete chemical analysis and identification of the many dozens if not more of constituent compounds we have interrogated the type and number of functional groups located at the aerosol surface by interacting them with specific molecular probes such as O3, NO2, N(CH33, and NH2OH to probe for the presence of oxidizable sites, acidic sites and carbonyl functionalities, respectively, that are present on the surface of the aerosol particle. In practice, typical amounts of one to a few mg of laboratory-generated SOA of limonene, toluene and soot have been deposited on a PTFE membrane filter that subsequently has been transferred to a molecular flow reactor used for the titration reaction of the surface functional groups by the molecular probes. Absolute amounts Ni with i=O3, NO2, N(CH33, NH2OH of probe molecules taken up by the filter sample measured using molecular beam sampling mass spectrometry have been converted into the number of surface group functionalities per unit surface area S using the aerosol particle distribution function (PDF of limonene and toluene SOA and the BET total surface area of toluene flame soot to result in Ni/S. Arguments are presented that support the transfer of the PDF of the suspended to the aerosol collected on the Teflon filter.

  14. Nanosizing of a poorly soluble drug: technique optimization, factorial analysis, and pharmacokinetic study in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed I

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Elsayed,1 Aly Ahmed Abdelbary,1 Ahmed Hassen Elshafeey1,21Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, ON, CanadaContext: Diacerein (DCN has low aqueous solubility (3.197 mg/L and, consequently, low oral bioavailability (35%–56%. To increase both the solubility and dissolution rate of DCN while maintaining its crystalline nature, high pressure homogenization was used but with only a few homogenization cycles preceded by a simple bottom-up technique.Methods: The nanosuspensions of DCN were prepared using a combined bottom-up/top-down technique. Different surfactants – polyvinyl alcohol, sodium deoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate – with different concentrations were used for the stabilization of the nanosuspensions. Full factorial experimental design was employed to investigate the influence of formulation variables on nanosuspension characteristics using Design-Expert® Software. Particle size (PS, zeta potential, saturation solubility, in vitro dissolution, and drug crystallinity were studied. Moreover, the in vivo performance of the optimized formula was assessed by bioavailability determination in healthy human volunteers.Results: The concentration of surfactant had a significant effect on both the PS and polydispersity index values. The 1% surfactant concentration showed the lowest PS and polydispersity index values compared with other concentrations. Both type and concentration of surfactant had significant effects on the zeta potential. Formula F8 (containing 1% sodium deoxycholate and Formula F12 (containing 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate had the highest desirability values (0.952 and 0.927, respectively. Hence, they were selected for further characterization. The saturated solubility and mean dissolution time, in the case of F8 and F12, were significantly higher than the coarse drug

  15. A 540-[Formula: see text] Duty Controlled RSSI With Current Reusing Technique for Human Body Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaeeun; Lee, Yongsu; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2016-08-01

    An ultra-low-power duty controlled received signal strength indicator (RSSI) is implemented for human body communication (HBC) in 180 nm CMOS technology under 1.5 V supply. The proposed RSSI adopted 3 following key features for low-power consumption; 1) current reusing technique (CR-RSSI) with replica bias circuit and calibration unit, 2) duty controller, and 3) reconfigurable gm-boosting LNA. The CR-RSSI utilizes stacked amplifier-rectifier-cell (AR-cell) to reuse the supply current of each blocks. As a result, the power consumption becomes 540 [Formula: see text] with +/-2 dB accuracy and 75 dB dynamic range. The replica bias circuit and calibration unit are adopted to increase the reliability of CR-RSSI. In addition, the duty controller turns off the RSSI when it is not required, and this function leads 70% power reduction. At last, the gm-boosting reconfigurable LNA can adaptively vary its noise and linearity performance with respect to input signal strength. Fro current reusing technique m this feature, we achieve 62% power reduction in the LNA. Thanks to these schemes, compared to the previous works, we can save 70% of power in RSSI and LNA.

  16. The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Neil J; Jalilzadeh, Aidin; Didham, Raphael K; Soboleva, Tanya; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2013-12-22

    Humankind's ongoing battle with pest species spans millennia. Pests cause or carry disease, damage or consume food crops and other resources, and drive global environmental change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal control, but such approaches are costly, of varying efficiency and often have ethical issues. Thus, pest management via control of reproductive output is increasingly considered an optimal solution. One of the most successful such 'fertility control' strategies developed to date is the sterile male technique (SMT), in which large numbers of sterile males are released into a population each generation. However, this approach is time-consuming, labour-intensive and costly. We use mathematical models to test a new twist on the SMT, using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations that affect male, but not female reproductive fitness. 'Trojan females' carrying such mutations, and their female descendants, produce 'sterile-male'-equivalents under natural conditions over multiple generations. We find that the Trojan female technique (TFT) has the potential to be a novel humane approach for pest control. Single large releases and relatively few small repeat releases of Trojan females both provided effective and persistent control within relatively few generations. Although greatest efficacy was predicted for high-turnover species, the additive nature of multiple releases made the TFT applicable to the full range of life histories modelled. The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control.

  17. Innovative techniques for estimating illegal activities in a human-wildlife-management conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Cross

    Full Text Available Effective management of biological resources is contingent upon stakeholder compliance with rules. With respect to disease management, partial compliance can undermine attempts to control diseases within human and wildlife populations. Estimating non-compliance is notoriously problematic as rule-breakers may be disinclined to admit to transgressions. However, reliable estimates of rule-breaking are critical to policy design. The European badger (Meles meles is considered an important vector in the transmission and maintenance of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in cattle herds. Land managers in high bTB prevalence areas of the UK can cull badgers under license. However, badgers are also known to be killed illegally. The extent of illegal badger killing is currently unknown. Herein we report on the application of three innovative techniques (Randomized Response Technique (RRT; projective questioning (PQ; brief implicit association test (BIAT for investigating illegal badger killing by livestock farmers across Wales. RRT estimated that 10.4% of farmers killed badgers in the 12 months preceding the study. Projective questioning responses and implicit associations relate to farmers' badger killing behavior reported via RRT. Studies evaluating the efficacy of mammal vector culling and vaccination programs should incorporate estimates of non-compliance. Mitigating the conflict concerning badgers as a vector of bTB requires cross-disciplinary scientific research, departure from deep-rooted positions, and the political will to implement evidence-based management.

  18. Demonstration of transplacental transmission of a human isolate of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in an experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, E; Galindo, R C; Breshears, M A; Kocan, K M; Blouin, E F; de la Fuente, J

    2013-11-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, first identified as a pathogen of sheep in Europe, more recently has been recognized as an emerging tick-borne pathogen of humans in the U.S. and Europe. Transmission of A. phagocytophilum is reported to be by ticks, primarily of the genus Ixodes. While mechanical and transplacental transmission of the type genus organism, A. marginale, occur in addition to tick transmission, these modes of transmission have not been considered for A. phagocytophilum. Recently, we developed a sheep model for studying host-tick-pathogen interactions of the human NY-18 A. phagocytophilum isolate. Sheep were susceptible to infection with this human isolate and served as a source of infection for I. scapularis ticks, but they did not display clinical signs of disease, and the pathogen was not apparent in stained blood smears. In the course of these experiments, one sheep unexpectedly gave birth to a lamb 5 weeks after being experimentally infected by inoculation with the pathogen propagated in HL-60 cells. The lamb was depressed and not feeding and was subsequently euthanized 18 h after birth. Tissues were collected at necropsy for microscopic examination and PCR to confirm A. phagocytophilum infection. At necropsy, the stomach contained colostrum, the spleen was moderately enlarged and thickened with conspicuous lymphoid follicles, and mesenteric lymph nodes were mildly enlarged and contained moderate infiltrates of eosinophils and neutrophils. Blood, spleen, heart, skin and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes tested positive for A. phagocytophilum by PCR, and sequence analysis confirmed that the lamb was infected with the NY-18 isolate. Transplacental transmission should therefore be considered as a means of A. phagocytophilum transmission and may likely contribute to the epidemiology of tick-borne fever in sheep and other mammals, including humans.

  19. Spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques study of the interaction between oxymetholone and human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-11-15

    In this study, the binding of oxymetholone (OXM), a doping drug, to human serum albumin (HSA) was explored at pH 7.40 by spectroscopic methods including spectrofluorimetry, three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3D EEM), UV–vis absorption, resonance rayleigh scattering (RRS) and molecular docking. The fluorescence results showed that there was a considerable quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA upon binding to OXM by static quenching mechanism. The Stern–Volmer quenching constants (K{sub SV}) between OXM and HSA at three different temperatures 295, 303, 308 K, were obtained as 4.63×10{sup 4}, 3.05×10{sup 4} and 1.49×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively. Furthermore this interaction was confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometric and RRS techniques. The binding site number, n, apparent binding constant, K{sub b}, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔS, ΔH and ΔG) were measured at different temperatures. The Van der Waals and hydrogen-bond forces were found to stabilize OXM–HSA complex. The distance (r) between the donor and acceptor was obtained from Förster's theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.67 nm. The 3D EEM showed that OXM slightly changes the secondary structure of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular docking was employed for identification of drug binding sites and interaction of OXM with amino acid residues. - Highlights: • The binding of OXM as a doping drug with HSA was studied by different techniques. • The binding constant of HSA–OXM was calculated. • The binding site of OXM on HSA was characterized with molecular docking. • The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to fluorescence technique.

  20. Experimental investigation of vitreous humour motion within a human eye model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria delle Strutture, delle Acque e del Terreno, University of L' Aquila (Italy); Stocchino, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Ambientale, University of Genova (Italy); Cafferata, Chiara [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Ambientale, University of Genova (Italy)

    2005-10-07

    We present an experimental study of the vitreous motion induced by saccadic eye movements. A magnified model of the vitreous chamber has been employed, consisting of a spherical cavity carved in a perspex cylindrical container, which is able to rotate with a prescribed time law. Care has been taken to correctly reproduce real saccadic eye movements. The spherical cavity is filled with glycerol and the flow field is measured on the equatorial plane orthogonal to the axis of rotation, through the PIV technique. Visualizations of the fully three-dimensional flow suggest that it essentially occurs on planes perpendicular to the axis of rotation, the motion orthogonal to such planes being smaller by three to four orders of magnitude. Theoretical results, based on a simplified solution, are in very good agreement with the experimental findings. The maximum value of the shear stress at the wall, which is thought to play a possibly important role in the pathogenesis of retinal detachment, does not significantly depend on the amplitude of saccadic movements. This suggests that relatively small eye rotations, being much more frequent than large movements, are mainly responsible for vitreous stresses on the retina. Results also illustrate the dependence of the maximum shear stress at the wall from the vitreous viscosity.

  1. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  2. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a fast multielemental technique for human placenta sample analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, E.; Ricketts, P.; Fletcher, H.; Karydas, A. G.; Migliori, A.; Leani, J. J.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.; Voutchkov, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present contribution, benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been evaluated as a cost-effective multielemental analytical technique for human placenta analysis. An easy and rapid sample preparation consisting of suspending 50 mg of sample in 1 mL of a Triton 1% solution in deionized water showed to be the most suitable for this kind of samples. However, for comparison purposes, an acidic microwave acidic digestion procedure was also applied. For both sample treatment methodologies, limits of detection for most elements were in the low mg/kg level. Accurate and precise results were obtained using internal standardization as quantification approach and applying a correction factor to compensate for absorption effects. The correction factor was based on the proportional ratio between the slurry preparation results and those obtained for the analysis of a set of human placenta samples analysed by microwave acidic digestion and ICP-AES analysis. As a study case, the developed TXRF methodology was applied for multielemental analysis (K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr) of several healthy women's placenta samples from two regions in Jamaica.

  3. Analysis of human cancer prostate tissues using FTIR microspectroscopy and SRIXE techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2001-05-01

    It is known that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of human tissues are specific and can be used to discriminate between various disease states. In this study, cancer and healthy parts of prostate tissues were examined. The human prostate tissues were obtained during surgical operation. Sections of samples were mounted onto Mylar foils and measured by both FTIR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) methods. Neighboring sections of tissues analyzed by FTIR and SRIXE were also examined by a histopathologist. Since the SRIXE technique is suitable for trace element analysis the two-dimensional scans on both cancerous and non-cancerous parts of the prostate tissues were done in order to find elemental distribution of trace elements. The single point analysis on selected areas were also performed. Then the same samples were studied in the mid infrared region on Excalibur spectrometer with infrared microscope UMA-500 equipped with an automatic xy-stage and video camera. Both FTIR spectra and elemental distribution show differences between cancerous and non-cancerous parts of the analyzed tissues.

  4. Classification of human colonic tissues using FTIR spectra and advanced statistical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwielly, A.; Argov, S.; Salman, A.; Bogomolny, E.; Mordechai, S.

    2010-04-01

    One of the major public health hazards is colon cancer. There is a great necessity to develop new methods for early detection of cancer. If colon cancer is detected and treated early, cure rate of more than 90% can be achieved. In this study we used FTIR microscopy (MSP), which has shown a good potential in the last 20 years in the fields of medical diagnostic and early detection of abnormal tissues. Large database of FTIR microscopic spectra was acquired from 230 human colonic biopsies. Five different subgroups were included in our database, normal and cancer tissues as well as three stages of benign colonic polyps, namely, mild, moderate and severe polyps which are precursors of carcinoma. In this study we applied advanced mathematical and statistical techniques including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), on human colonic FTIR spectra in order to differentiate among the mentioned subgroups' tissues. Good classification accuracy between normal, polyps and cancer groups was achieved with approximately 85% success rate. Our results showed that there is a great potential of developing FTIR-micro spectroscopy as a simple, reagent-free viable tool for early detection of colon cancer in particular the early stages of premalignancy among the benign colonic polyps.

  5. Are PrP(C)s involved in some human myelin diseases? Relating experimental studies to human pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veber, Daniela; Scalabrino, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated that cobalamin (Cbl) deficiency increases normal cellular prion (PrP(C)) levels in rat spinal cord (SC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and decreases PrP(C)-mRNA levels in rat SC. Repeated intracerebroventricular administrations of anti-octapeptide repeat-PrP(C)-region antibodies to Cbl-deficient (Cbl-D) rats prevent SC myelin lesions, and the administrations of PrP(C)s to otherwise normal rats cause SC white matter lesions similar to those induced by Cbl deficiency. Cbl positively regulates SC PrP(C) synthesis in rat by stimulating the local synthesis of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which also induces the local synthesis of PrP(C)-mRNAs, and downregulating the local synthesis of tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α, thus preventing local PrP(C) overproduction. We have clinically demonstrated that PrP(C) levels are increased in the CSF of patients with subacute combined degeneration (SCD), unchanged in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and decreased in the CSF and SC of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), regardless of its clinical course. We conclude that SCD (human and experimental) is a neurological disease due to excess PrP(C) without conformational change and aggregation, that the increase in PrP(C) levels in SCD and Cbl-D polyneuropathy and their decrease in MS CNS make them antipodian myelin diseases in terms of quantitative PrP(C) abnormalities, and that these abnormalities are related to myelin damage in the former, and impede myelin repair in the latter.

  6. Experimental investigation of airborne contaminant transport by a human wake moving in a ventilated aircraft cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussou, Stephane B.

    The air ventilation system in jetliners provides a comfortable and healthy environment for passengers. Unfortunately, the increase in global air traffic has amplified the risks presented by infectious aerosols or noxious material released during flight. Inside the cabin, air typically flows continuously from overhead outlets into sidewall exhausts in a circular pattern that minimizes secondary flow between adjacent seat rows. However, disturbances frequently introduced by individuals walking along an aisle may alter air distribution, and contribute to spreading of contaminants. Numerical simulation of these convoluted transient flow phenomena is difficult and complex, and experimental assessment of contaminant distribution in real cabins often impractical. A fundamental experimental study was undertaken to examine the transport phenomena, to validate computations and to improve air monitoring systems. A finite moving body was modeled in a 10:1 scale simplified aircraft cabin equipped with ventilation, at a Reynolds number (based on body diameter) of the order of 10,000. An experimental facility was designed and constructed to permit measurements of the ventilation and wake velocity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Contaminant migration was imaged using the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. The effect of ventilation was estimated by comparison with a companion baseline study. Results indicate that the evolution of a downwash predominant behind finite bodies of small aspect ratio is profoundly perturbed by the ventilation flow. The reorganization of vortical structures in the near-wake leads to a shorter longitudinal recirculation region. Furthermore, mixing in the wake is modified and contaminant is observed to convect to higher vertical locations corresponding to seated passenger breathing level.

  7. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced experimental immune activation does not impair memory functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Oberbeck, J Reiner; Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Wolf, Oliver T; Montag, Thomas; del Rey, Adriana; Gizewski, Elke R; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Systemic immune activation occurring together with release of peripheral cytokines can affect behavior and the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). However, it remains unknown whether and to what extent cognitive functions like memory and attention are affected during transient immune activation. We employed a human endotoxemia model and standardized neuropsychological tests to assess the cognitive effects of an experimental inflammation in two groups of 12 healthy young men before and after intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli, 0.4 ng/kg) or physiological saline. Endotoxin administration caused a profound transient physiological response with elevations in body temperature, number of circulating neutrophils, and increases in plasma cytokine levels [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α], and concentrations of norepinephrine, ACTH and cortisol. However, these changes in immune and neuroendocrine parameters were not associated with alterations of memory performance, selective attention or executive functions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel therapeutic strategy for experimental stroke using docosahexaenoic acid complexed to human albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belayev Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts in ischemic stroke research and significant improvements in patient care within the last decade, therapy is still insufficient. There is a compelling, urgent need for safe and effective neuroprotective strategies to limit brain injury, facilitate brain repair, and improve functional outcome. Recently, we reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3 complexed to human albumin (DHA-Alb is highly neuroprotective after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in young rats. This review highlights the potency of DHA-Alb therapy in permanent MCAo and aged rats and whether protection persists with chronic survival. We discovered that a novel therapy with DHA-Alb improved behavioral outcomes accompanied by attenuation of lesion volumes even when animals were allowed to survive three weeks after experimental stroke. This treatment might provide the basis for future therapeutics for patients suffering from ischemic stroke.

  10. Human experimentation: historical perspective of breaches of ethics in US health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth J

    2009-01-01

    Health care supervisors and managers may participate in ethical discussions and serve on ethics committees in their health care organizations. To aid them in their participation and service, this article expands upon the knowledge of ethics that they obtained in their academic training. The article provides readers with a common language based on frequently cited cases and key documents. The article traces a brief history of human experimentation, describes ethical breaches in the United States, and summarizes key documents guiding current thought on informed and voluntary consent. The article concludes with 3 common misconceptions that health care supervisors and managers will want to avoid in ethical discussions and ethical decision making. Health care supervisors and managers will be prepared to meaningfully contribute to the discussion of ethical issues and to the resolution of ethical problems in their health care organizations.

  11. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  12. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology. PMID:25538816

  13. Toxicology research for precautionary decision-making and the role of Human & Experimental Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P

    2015-01-01

    existing research on toxic hazards that have already been well characterized. Several sources of bias towards the null hypothesis can affect toxicology research, but are generally not considered, thus adding to the current inclination to avoid false positive findings. In this regard, toxicology......A key aim of toxicology is the prevention of adverse effects due to toxic hazards. Therefore, the dissemination of toxicology research findings must confront two important challenges: one being the lack of information on the vast majority of potentially toxic industrial chemicals and the other...... being the strict criteria for scientific proof usually required for decision-making in regard to prevention. The present study ascertains the coverage of environmental chemicals in four volumes of Human & Experimental Toxicology and the presentation and interpretation of research findings in published...

  14. [EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HUMAN UMBILICAL CORD MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS-ALGINATE WOUND DRESSING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Su, Meilan; Yang, Huachao; Long, Gang; Tang, Zhenrui; Huang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    To observe the growth characteristics of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) cultured on the alginate gel scaffolds and to explore the feasibility of hUCMSCs-alginate dressing for wound healing. hUCMSCs were separated from human umbilical cords and cultured in vitro. After the 4th passage cells were co-cultured with alginate gel (experimental group), the cell growth characteristics were observed under the inverted phase contrast microscope. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content was measured and the number of cells was counted at 0, 3, 6, and 9 days after culture; and the cell migration capacity was observed. The hUCMSCs were cultured without alginated gel as control. The model of full-thickness skin defects was established in 32 8-week-old Balb/c male mice and they were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=8): wounds were covered with hUCMSCs-alginate gel compound (MSC-gel group), cell supernatants-alginate gel compound (CS-gel group), 10% FBS-alginate gel compound (FBS-gel group), and 0.01 mol/L PBS-alginate compound (PBS-gel group), respectively. Wound healing rates at 5, 10, and 15 days were observed and calculated; and the wound tissues were harvested for histological and immunohistochemical staining to assess new skin conditions at 15 days after operation. hUCMSCs grew well with grape-like proliferation on the alginate gel, but no cell migration was observed at 7 days after cultivation. VEGF expression and cell number in experimental group were significantly less than those in control group at 3 days (P0.05). hUCMSCs can continuously express VEGF in alginate gel, which is necessary for wound healing. The hUCMSCs-alginate compound is probably a good wound dressing.

  15. Postural And Eye-Positional Effects On Human Biting Force: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Tabancacı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle groups affected on biting force are called temporal muscle as a major and masseter muscle as a minor. According to the human posture stability, forces of these muscles vary with the force directions. In this case, experimental investigation is strictly important such that biting force under different postural and eye- positional situations is changed. In this study, seven-male and seven-female within the age-range of 17-24 are considered corresponding to having with restorated molar tooth and without that type of tooth. With the help of specially designed biting fork, different posture- and eye-positions are investigated for experimental biting force analysis. Changes in eye-positions are not indicated significant difference for all postural positions. On one hand, it is obtained that biting force of no-filling tooth in men becomes maximum if facial muscles give full effort to biting. On the other hand, effect of facial muscles for women is not clearly noticed depending on the postural differences.

  16. Interleukin 8 Receptor Deficiency Confers Susceptibility to Acute Experimental Pyelonephritis and May Have a Human Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendéus, Björn; Godaly, Gabriela; Hang, Long; Karpman, Diana; Lundstedt, Ann-Charlotte; Svanborg, Catharina

    2000-01-01

    Neutrophils migrate to infected mucosal sites that they protect against invading pathogens. Their interaction with the epithelial barrier is controlled by CXC chemokines and by their receptors. This study examined the change in susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI) after deletion of the murine interleukin 8 receptor homologue (mIL-8Rh). Experimental UTIs in control mice stimulated an epithelial chemokine response and increased chemokine receptor expression. Neutrophils migrated through the tissues to the epithelial barrier that they crossed into the lumen, and the mice developed pyuria. In mIL-8Rh knockout (KO) mice, the chemokine response was intact, but the epithelial cells failed to express IL-8R, and neutrophils accumulated in the tissues. The KO mice were unable to clear bacteria from kidneys and bladders and developed bacteremia and symptoms of systemic disease, but control mice were fully resistant to infection. The experimental UTI model demonstrated that IL-8R–dependent mechanisms control the urinary tract defense, and that neutrophils are essential host effector cells. Patients prone to acute pyelonephritis also showed low CXC chemokine receptor 1 expression compared with age-matched controls, suggesting that chemokine receptor expression may also influence the susceptibility to UTIs in humans. The results provide a first molecular clue to disease susceptibility of patients prone to acute pyelonephritis. PMID:10993918

  17. Economic efficiency of countries' clinical review processes and competitiveness on the market of human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoliti, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research is a specific phase of pharmaceutical industry's production process in which companies test candidate drugs on patients to collect clinical evidence about safety and effectiveness. Information is essential to obtain manufacturing authorization from the national drug agency and, in this way, make profits on the market. Considering this activity, however, the public stakeholder has to face a conflict of interests. On the one side, there is society's necessity to make advances in medicine and, of course, to promote pharmaceutical companies' investments in this specific phase (new generation). On the other side, there is the duty to protect patients involved in these experimental treatments (old generation). To abide by this moral duty, a protection system was developed through the years, based on two legal institutions: informed consent and institutional review board. How should an efficient protection system that would take human experimentation into account be shaped? Would it be possible for the national protection system of patients' rights to affect the choice of whether to develop a clinical trial in a given country or not? Looking at Europe and considering a protection system that is shaped around institutional review boards, this article is an empirical work that tries to give answers to these open questions. It shows how a protection system that can minimize the time necessary to start a trial can positively affect pharmaceutical clinical research, that is, the choice of pharmaceutical companies to start innovative medical treatments in a given country.

  18. Stigmatization of obese individuals by human resource professionals: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel Katrin E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight-related stigmatization is a public health problem. It impairs the psychological well-being of obese individuals and hinders them from adopting weight-loss behaviors. We conducted an experimental study to investigate weight stigmatization in work settings using a sample of experienced human resource (HR professionals from a real-life employment setting. Methods In a cross-sectional, computer-based experimental study, a volunteer sample of 127 HR professionals (age: 41.1 ± 10.9 yrs., 56% female, who regularly make career decisions about other people, evaluated individuals shown in standardized photographs regarding work-related prestige and achievements. The photographed individuals differed with respect to gender, ethnicity, and Body Mass Index (BMI. Results Participants underestimated the occupational prestige of obese individuals and overestimated it for normal-weight individuals. Obese people were more often disqualified from being hired and less often nominated for a supervisory position, while non-ethnic normal-weight individuals were favored. Stigmatization was most pronounced in obese females. Conclusions The data suggest that HR professionals are prone to pronounced weight stigmatization, especially in women. This highlights the need for interventions targeting this stigmatization as well as stigma-management strategies for obese individuals. Weight stigmatization and its consequences needs to be a topic that is more strongly addressed in clinical obesity care.

  19. Inhibition of the recombinant human endostatin adenavirus on experimental choroidal neovascularization in rats

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    Li-Juan Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the inhibition of the recombinant human endostatin adenavirus(Ad-Eson the experimental choroidal neovascularization(CNVmodels by intravitreous injection. METHODS: Experimental CNV models were induced by semiconductor laser in 30 male Brown Norway(BNrats and randomly divided into 3 groups with 10 rats in each group. At 21d after photocoagulation, the single administration group were given intravitreous injection with Ad-Es 0.01mL; the repeated administration group were given intravitreous injection with Ad-Es 0.01mL and a repeated injection 7d later; the saline control group were given intravitreous injection with saline 0.01mL. At 7d after final administration, the leakage of fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAwas observed. Various CNV areas were measured by using laser confocal microscopy of choroidal flatmount method. Pathology and ultrastructure were observed with light microscopy, the expressions of CD105 were measured by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The leakage of CNV of the administration group abviously decreased as compared with those in the saline group, the leakage of repeated administration group decreased compared with that of single administration group(PPCONCLUSION: Ad-Es can effectively inhibit semiconductor laser induced CNV in BN rats, and the inhibition effect of repeated administration group is better than that of single administration group. It may be a useful new method in the treatment of CNV.

  20. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming.

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    Tiago M Barbosa

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001 and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001. On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475 for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247 for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one's passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer's status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures.