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Sample records for human-derived probiotic lactobacilli

  1. Viability of human-derived probiotic lactobacilli in ice cream produced with sucrose and aspartame.

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    Başyiğit, Gülden; Kuleaşan, Hakan; Karahan, Aynur G

    2006-09-01

    A mixture of human-derived probiotic strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. agilis and L. rhamnosus was used as a probiotic culture in ice cream manufacture. Viability and survival of these probiotic cultures were investigated in two different ice cream formulations. Ice cream with sucrose and ice cream with aspartame were prepared and each of these was divided into two subgroups: one with direct addition of the probiotic culture and one with milk fermented by the same probiotic culture. Ice cream samples were stored at -20 degrees C for 6 months and the survival rate of cultures were determined monthly. Probiotic cultures underwent tests for resistance to bile salts, antibiotics, acidic conditions; they were found to be highly resistant to such challenges. Chemical analysis of ice cream samples, such as determination of acidity, pH and solid matter, was also performed. The probiotic cultures remained unchanged in ice cream stored for up to 6 months regardless of the sweeteners used. Using probiotic cultures in ice cream mixes did not alter the characteristics of the product.

  2. [Estimation of Probiotic Lactobacilli Drug Resistance].

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    Bruslik, N L; Akhatova, D R; Toimentseva, A A; Abdulkhakov, S R; Ilyinskaya, O N; Yarullina, D R

    2015-01-01

    An actual problem of analysis of probiotic lactobacilli resistance to antibiotics and other drugs used in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disturbances has been for the first time solved. The levels of resistance of 19 strains of Lactobacillus (14 strains of L. fermentum, 4 strains of L.plantarum and 1 strain of L.rhamnosus) isolated from commercial probiotics and sour milk products to 14 antibiotics of various nature, i.e. β-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, vancomycin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol were determined. All the isolates were practically susceptible to the drugs of the first line antihelicobacterial therapy, i.e. amoxicillin and clarithromycin, that makes inexpedient the parallel use of the probiotics containing the above lactobacilli in the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcer, despite the lactobacilli antagonism with respect to Helicobacter pylory. Lactobacilli are as well resistant to mesalazin and can be used for correction of dysbiosis in inflammatory affections of the intestine.

  3. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

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    Virginia Ocaña

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora.

  4. Cross-talk between probiotic lactobacilli and host immune system.

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    Kemgang, T S; Kapila, S; Shanmugam, V P; Kapila, R

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which probiotic lactobacilli affect the immune system is strain specific. As the immune system is a multicompartmental system, each strain has its way to interact with it and induce a visible and quantifiable effect. This review summarizes the interplay existing between the host immune system and probiotic lactobacilli, that is, with emphasis on lactobacilli as a prototype probiotic genus. Several aspects including the bacterial-host cross-talk with the mucosal and systemic immune system are presented, as well as short sections on the competing effect towards pathogenic bacteria and their uses as delivery vehicle for antigens.

  5. Improving the Digestive Tract Robustness of Probiotic Lactobacilli

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    Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Bron, P.A.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes stress responses of probiotic lactobacilli, in relation to gastrointestinal (GI-)tract robustness. An overview is given of some newly developed tools to understand and improve stress responses of the model probiotic L. plantarum WCFS1 in relation to its GI persistence. These i

  6. Prevention of urogenital infections by oral administration of probiotic lactobacilli

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    Vedran Slačanac

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, lactobacilli are nonpathogenic part of the normal urogenital microflora and have been recognized as a barrier against colonization of unwanted (pathogen microflora. The results of many in vitro studies suggest following mechanisms of probiotic lactobacilli action in urogenital tract: adhesion to urogenital cells, competition with pathogens for adhesive sites, production of biosurfactants, co-aggregation with pathogens, production of antimicrobial substances (organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins and stimulation of immune system. From 80 different lactobacilli species isolated from human or animal intestinal and urogenital tract, only few lactobacilli strains possess optimal properties to be effective as probiotic therapeutics against infections in the urogenital tract. Combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14 was proposed as the best one for epithelial vaginal cells colonization and inhibition of uropathogens adhesion. The results of a number of clinical studies confirmed beneficial role of oral lactobacilli. However, the most of commercially available Lactobacillus strains, which are ordinary used in fermented dairy products,are seriously limited in protection of urogenital tract when they are ingested orally.

  7. Probiotic properties of lactobacilli species isolated from children's feces.

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    Tulumoglu, Sener; Yuksekdag, Zehra Nur; Beyatli, Yavuz; Simsek, Omer; Cinar, Berat; Yaşar, Esra

    2013-12-01

    In the present research, the 20 lactobacilli isolated from children feces aged 4-15 years old were investigated for their capabilities to survive at pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and in the presence of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75% bile salts, their effect on the growth of pathogens, in addition to their sensitivity against 13 selected antibiotics. All the lactobacilli strains were able to survive in low pH and bile salt conditions at pH 2.0 and 0.25% bile salt for 2 h. Moreover, all lactobacilli strains exhibited inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 11229, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213. In addition, all lactobacilli strains indicated resistance to teicoplanin, vancomycin, and bacitracin. The amount of exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the strains was 70 and 290 mg/L. The capabilities to autoaggregation and coaggregate with E. coli ATCC 11229 of the strains were also evaluated. High EPS-producing strains indicated significant autoaggregation and coaggregation capability with test bacteria (p lactobacilli could be utilized for preliminary screening in order to identify potentially probiotic bacteria suitable for human.

  8. Characterisation of probiotic properties in human vaginal lactobacilli strains

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    Pirje Hütt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal lactobacilli offer protection against recurrent urinary infections, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal candidiasis. Objective: To characterise the isolated vaginal lactobacilli strains for their probiotic properties and to compare their probiotic potential. Methods: The Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal samples by conventional culturing and identified by sequencing of the 16S rDNA fragment. Several functional properties were detected (production of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid; antagonistic activity against Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Gardnerella vaginalis; auto-aggregation and adhesiveness as well as safety (haemolytic activity, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of transferrable resistance genes. Results: A total of 135 vaginal lactobacilli strains of three species, Lactobacillus crispatus (56%, Lactobacillus jensenii (26%, and Lactobacillus gasseri (18% were characterised using several functional and safety tests. Most of L. crispatus (89% and L. jensenii (86% strains produced H2O2. The best lactic acid producers were L. gasseri (18.2±2.2 mg/ml compared to L. crispatus (15.6±2.8 mg/ml and L. jensenii (11.6±2.6 mg/ml (p<0.0001; p<0.0001, respectively. L. crispatus strains showed significantly higher anti-E. coli activity compared to L. jensenii. L. gasseri strains expressed significantly lower anticandidal activity compared to L. crispatus and L. jensenii (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference between the species in antagonistic activity against G. vaginalis. Nearly a third of the strains were able to auto-aggregate while all the tested strains showed a good ability to adhere to HeLa cells. None of the tested lactobacilli caused haemolysis. Although phenotypical resistance was not found to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin, the erm(B, tet(M, and tet(K were detected in some strains. All strains were resistant to

  9. The Probiotical Potential of Lactobacilli from Therapeutic Preventive Beverage Kurunga

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    Lidia Stoyanova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Kurunga is a dairy drink made of a mix of lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation, characterized by high biological value based on protein composition, amino acid spectrum, fatty acid composition of lipids, vitamin and mineral substances, and physiological activity of microbiota containing lactobacilli, lactococci, bifidobacteria, and yeast. Among the probiotic correctors of normal microbiota isolated from national products, lactobacilli was of particular interest, with regards to a therapeutic – preventive effect. The aim of the study was to examine the probiotic properties of lactobacilli from kurunga.Methods. We isolated lactic acid bacteria strains from kurunga. The isolated cultures were identified using common microbiological methods and phylogenetic analysis. The antibiotic activities of these strains were determined by measuring the growth inhibition zone of test cultures. The probiotic properties were measured as levels of resistance to bile and hydrochloric acids, in addition to the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity using the xanthine oxidase-cytochrome method. Proteolitic activity was determined at the various levels of pH (3.0, 4.2, 5.3, and 7.0.Results. According to the morphological, cultural, physiological, biochemical properties and the genotypic analysis of the oligonucleotides sequence of  specific genes, the most effective strain was  identified as Lactobacillus diolivorans KL-2 (GenBank database KC438372. The isolated strain suppressed the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Listeria sp., as well as Gram-negative bacteria, such as E.coli, Proteus, Salmonella sp. They also possessed fungicidal action (based on Penicillum, Aspergillus sp, and Candida sp..  The strain was resistant to the action of the bile acids at concentrations of 0.8% to 1.0% and hydrochloric acid. The strain KL-2 possessed a relatively high SOD activity (25.74 U/mg of protein, a low

  10. Vaginal lactobacilli as potential probiotics against Candida spp

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    Natalia F. Gil

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Urogenital infections affect millions of people every year worldwide. The treatment of these diseases usually requires the use of antimicrobial agents, and more recently, the use of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB cultures for the management of vaginal infections has been extensively studied. In this work, 11 vaginal lactobacilli isolates, previously obtained from healthy patients, were studied to screen microorganisms with probiotic properties against Candida spp. The LAB were tested for their ability of auto-aggregation, coaggregation with C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis, adhesion to Caco-2 epithelial cells and production of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. All lactobacilli isolates tested were able to auto-aggregate (ranging from 25.3% to 75.4% assessed at 4 hours of incubation and to co-aggregate with the four Candida species into different degrees; among them L. crispatus showed the highest scores of coaggregation. The highest amount of lactic acid was produced by L. salivarius (13.9 g/l, followed by L. johnsonii (6.5 g/l, L. acidophilus (5.5 g/l, and L. jensenii (5.4 g/l. All isolates produced H2O2 , but the highest levels (3 -10 mg/l were observed for L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, and L. vaginalis. Only L. agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii and L. ruminus were able to adhere to epithelial Caco-2 cells. Among the isolates evaluated, L agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii, and L. ruminus exhibited simultaneously several desirable properties as potential probiotic strains justifying future studies to evaluate their technological properties in different pharmaceutical preparations for human use.

  11. [Probiotic properties of industrial strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria].

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    Kovalenko, N K; Livins'ka, O P; Poltavs'ka, O A; Harmasheva, I L; Shynkarenko, L M; Oleshchenko, L T

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were isolated from the samples of dry microbial substance "Vivolac" and identified. The lactic acid bacteria were identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus. L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. paracasei. Bifidobacteria belonged to the species Bifidobacterium animalis. Manifestation of biological activity of all studied strains was investigated. It was shown, that adhesive activity of the studied strains depended on the genus of the strain: lactobacilli manifested medium adhesiveness to buccal epithelium (medium adhesive index 2.07-2.26), bifidobacteria manifested high adhesiveness (medium adhesive index 4.11-4.76). Antagonism against pathogenic and opportunistic reference strains was manifested to a greater extent to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria were resistant to aminoglycosides. Sensitivity of the studied strains to antibiotics did not depend on the genus and species of microorganism. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains were capable to survive in gastric juice and at different concentration of bile, which is promising for development of probiotic preparations on the basis of these strains.

  12. MODULATION OF GROWTH AND PROTON PUMPING ATPase ACTIVITY OF PROBIOTIC Lactobacilli BY DIETARY CUCURBITS

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    Irfan Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract predominantly harbor probiotic Lactobacilli which exert beneficial effects on human health. Aqueous extracts from fruits of Lagenaria siceraria (Ls, Luffa cylindrica (Lc and Cucurbita maxima (Cm were prepared and lyophilized. Fruit extracts were investigated for their effects on Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus. Extracts were found to enhance growth of Lactobacilli without any toxic effect (up to 1000µg/mL concentration. Minimum concentration of extracts at which growth of probiotic strains were found to be enhanced significantly were determined (103.67 µg/mL-118µg/mL and considered as effective concentration (EC or growth stimulatory concentration (GSC. Proton pumping ATPase activity of Lactobacilli were examined and found to be enhanced significantly (29.89- 61.96% in extracts treated probiotics (Lactobacilli as compared to the normal control. Inulin used as positive control and found to enhance the proton efflux activity (28.06-37.72% with respect to the control. These dietary cucurbits enhance metabolic activity of probiotic Lactobacilli by modulating their proton pumping ATPase mechanism. This study suggested that the consumption of cucurbit fruits might be a natural source of enhancing the activities of probiotic Lactobacilli in the gut.

  13. Short-term consumption of probiotic lactobacilli has no effect on acid production of supragingival plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marttinen, Aino; Haukioja, Anna; Karjalainen, Sára

    2011-01-01

    of probiotics to the plaque was assessed using PCR techniques. No probiotic-induced changes were found in the acidogenicity of plaque. Also, MS counts remained at the original level. The number of subjects with lactobacilli in plaque increased in the L. reuteri group (p¿=¿0.011) but not in the LGG group. PCR...... analysis of plaque revealed the presence of LGG in four and L. reuteri in six subjects after the use of the probiotic. The use of the lactobacilli did not affect the acidogenicity or MS levels of plaque. Short-term consumption of LGG and L. reuteri appeared not to influence the acidogenicity of plaque....

  14. Cell surface-associated compounds of probiotic lactobacilli sustain the strain-specificity dogma

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    Bron, P.A.; Tomita, S.; Mercenier, A.M.E.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic lactobacilli can positively impact on the health status of targeted (diseased) populations but efficacy depends strongly on the strain employed and the molecular basis for this phenomenon is poorly understood. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in the field of molecular

  15. Cell surface-associated compounds of probiotic lactobacilli sustain the strain-specificity dogma

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    Bron, P.A.; Tomita, S.; Mercenier, A.M.E.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic lactobacilli can positively impact on the health status of targeted (diseased) populations but efficacy depends strongly on the strain employed and the molecular basis for this phenomenon is poorly understood. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in the field of molecular pro

  16. Estimation of vaginal probiotic lactobacilli growth parameters with the application of the Gompertz model.

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    Juárez, TomásMaríaSilvina; de, LabandaElenaBru; de, RuizHolgadoAidaPesce; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2002-01-01

    Lactobacilli are widely described as probiotic microorganisms used to restore the ecological balance of different animal or human tracts. For their use as probiotics, bacteria must show certain characteristics or properties related to the ability of adherence to mucosae or epithelia or show inhibition against pathogenic microorganisms. It is of primary interest to obtain the highest biomass and viability of the selected microorganisms. In this report, the growth of seven vaginal lactobacilli strains in four different growth media and at several inoculum percentages was compared, and the values of growth parameters (lag phase time, maximum growth rate, maximum optical density) were obtained by applying the Gompertz model to the experimental data. The application and estimation of this model is discussed, and the evaluation of the growth parameters is analyzed to compare the growth conditions of lactobacilli. Thus, these results in lab experiments provide a basis for testing different culture conditions to determine the best conditions in which to grow the probiotic lactobacilli for technological applications.

  17. Impact of consumption of probiotic lactobacilli-containing yogurt on microbial composition in human feces.

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    Uyeno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-02-29

    An in vivo study was carried out to determine the effect of consuming probiotic lactobacilli-containing yogurt on the composition of microbiota in the human gut. Fifteen healthy adults ingested a daily serving of one of three commercial yogurts (two of the products contained a probiotic lactobacilli strain) for 20 days. Fecal samples at defined time points before, during, and after the period of yogurt ingestion were collected and analyzed. The fecal population of lactobacilli was determined by a culture-based method and subsequent colony PCR for the identification of species. Six predominant bacterial groups in the fecal samples were quantitatively determined based on a sequence-specific SSU rRNA cleavage method coupled with a suite of oligonucleotide probes, which was optimized for the target-specific detection of bacterial groups inhabiting human feces. In the ingestion period, one probiotic strain was detected in the feces of all five subjects who consumed the yogurt containing the strain, while the other strain was detected in three of another five subjects. The population levels of the two major groups (Bacteroides and Prevotella, and the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group) in the fecal samples tended to change in response to the ingestion but the change did not seem to be dependent on the product-specific property of each yogurt. These results suggest that the human fecal bacterial community could be altered by ingesting yogurt, although whether probiotic lactobacilli are present or absent in the yogurt does not seem to be a factor in this change.

  18. Bacteriocins and other bioactive substances of probiotic lactobacilli as biological weapons against Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

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    Ruíz, Francisco O; Pascual, Liliana; Giordano, Walter; Barberis, Lucila

    2015-04-01

    In the search of new antimicrobial agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteriocins-producing probiotic lactobacilli deserve special attention. The inhibitory effects of biosubstances such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and each bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) L23 and L60 on the growth of different gonococcal strains were investigated. Different non-treated and treated cell-free supernatants of two probiotic lactobacilli containing these metabolites were used. The aims of this work were (i) to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the biosubstances produced by two probiotic lactobacilli, estimating the proportion in which each of them is responsible for the inhibitory effect, (ii) to define their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and, (iii) to determine the potential interactions between these biosubstances against N. gonorrhoeae. The main antimicrobial metabolites were the BLIS-es L23 and L60 in comparison with other biosubstances. Proportionally, their contributions to the inhibition on the gonococcal growth were 87.28% and 80.66%, respectively. The MIC values of bacteriocins were promising since these substances, when diluted, showed considerable inhibitory activity for all gonococci. In the interaction between bacteriocins, 100% of synergism was found on the gonococcal growth. In summary, this study indicates that both L23 and L60 could potentially serve to design new bioproducts against N. gonorrhoeae.

  19. Identification of vaginal lactobacilli with potential probiotic properties isolated from women in North Lebanon.

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    Al Kassaa, Imad; Hamze, Monzer; Hober, Didier; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Drider, Djamel

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the diversity of vaginal lactobacilli in Lebanese women and to evaluate the antagonism, hydrophobicity, and safety characteristics of these strains. This study was performed on samples from 135 women who visited a gynecology clinic in the north of Lebanon, between September 2012 and January 2013. From these samples, 53 different isolates of vaginal lactobacilli were collected from vaginal swabs and identified using biochemical and molecular methods. The use of genotypic Rep-PCR fingerprinting allowed for the organization of these isolates into 23 different groups. Seven of the isolated lactobacilli were antagonistic against the following vaginal pathogens: Gardnerella vaginalis CIP7074T, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC33862, Escherichia coli CIP103982, and Candida albicans ATCC10231. The antagonistic lactobacilli strains were then identified using 16S rDNA sequence. The data of this study show that the antagonistic lactobacilli were non-hemolytic, sensitive to most antibiotic tests, free of plasmid DNA, and exhibited interesting hydrophobicity and autoaggregation properties positioning them as potential candidates for probiotic design.

  20. Growth inhibition of oral mutans streptococci and candida by commercial probiotic lactobacilli--an in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasslöf, Pamela; Hedberg, Maria; Twetman, Svante

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria are suggested to play a role in the maintenance of oral health. Such health promoting bacteria are added to different commercial probiotic products. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a selection of lactobacilli strains, used in commercially available probio...

  1. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Wells, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels

  2. Nutritionally enhanced fermented sausages as a vehicle for potential probiotic lactobacilli delivery.

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    Rubio, Raquel; Jofré, Anna; Aymerich, Teresa; Guàrdia, Maria Dolors; Garriga, Margarita

    2014-02-01

    The suitability of three potential probiotic lactobacilli strains (Lactobacillus casei CTC1677, L. casei CTC1678 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679), previously isolated from infants' faeces and characterized, and three commercial probiotic strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, L. rhamnosus GG and L. casei Shirota) was assessed during the manufacture of low-acid fermented sausages (fuets) with reduced Na(+) and fat content. The inoculated strains were successfully monitored by RAPD-PCR during the process. L. rhamnosus CTC1679 was the only strain able to grow and dominate (levels ca. 10(8)CFU/g) the endogenous lactic acid bacteria population in two independent trials, throughout the ripening process. Thus, fuet containing L. rhamnosus CTC1679 as a starter culture could be a suitable vehicle for putative probiotic bacteria delivery. All the final products recorded a satisfactory overall sensory quality without any noticeable off-flavour, and with the characteristic sensory properties of low-acid fermented sausages.

  3. Shelf life stability of lactobacilli encapsulated in raspberry powder: insights into non-dairy probiotics.

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    Anekella, Kartheek; Orsat, Valérie

    2014-06-01

    Study the shelf-life quality changes in raspberry juice with encapsulated lactobacilli (Lactobacillus rhamnosus NRRL B-4495 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL B-442) obtained by spray drying and understand the various factors involved. Raspberry powder was obtained from spray drying lactobacilli and raspberry juice with maltodextrin as an additive. Shelf life of the powder was analyzed over a period of 30 d. Acid and bile tolerance and antibiotic resistance was compared before and after spray drying. Water activity, survival, and scanning electron microscope images were also measured during the shelf life. A combination of processing conditions: inlet temperature (°C), maltodextrin to juice solids ratio and inlet feed rate (ml/min) during spray drying had a significant role on the survival of lactobacilli during shelf life. Refrigerated storage provided a higher shelf-life stability with regards to CFU/g (as high as 84% on day 0 and 98% retention by the end of 30 d) compared to room temperature storage. Probiotic properties during shelf life are affected by the processing conditions and encapsulated food matrix. Thus, understanding these aspects in vitro during shelf life gives us a brief insight into the future of non-dairy probiotics.

  4. Probiotic lactobacilli: a potential prophylactic treatment for reducing pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife.

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    Trinder, M; Bisanz, J E; Burton, J P; Reid, G

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pesticides are used in agriculture, gardening, and wildlife-control. Despite their intended toxicity to pests, these compounds can also cause harm to wildlife and humans due to their ability to potentially bioaccumulate, leach into soils, and persist in the environment. Humans and animals are commonly exposed to these compounds through agricultural practices and consumption of contaminated foods and water. Pesticides can cause a range of adverse effects in humans ranging from minor irritation, to endocrine or nervous system disruption, cancer, or even death. A convenient and cost-effective method to reduce unavoidable pesticide absorption in humans and wildlife could be the use of probiotic lactobacilli. Lactobacillus is a genus of Gram-positive gut commensal bacteria used in the production of functional foods, such as yoghurt, cheese, sauerkraut and pickles, as well as silage for animal feed. Preliminary in vitro experiments suggested that lactobacilli are able to degrade some pesticides. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1-supplemented yoghurt reduced the bioaccumulation of mercury and arsenic in pregnant women and children. A similar study is warranted to test if this approach can reduce pesticide absorption in vivo, given that the lactobacilli can also attenuate reactive oxygen production, enhance gastrointestinal barrier function, reduce inflammation, and modulate host xenobiotic metabolism.

  5. Probiotic Lactobacilli Modulate Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Activation of Conventional and Unconventional T cells and NK cells

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    Maria A Johansson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are probiotic commensal bacteria and potent modulators of immunity. When present in the gut or supplemented as probiotics, they beneficially modulate ex vivo immune responsiveness. Further, factors derived from several lactobacilli strains act immune regulato-ry in vitro. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is known to induce excessive T cell activation. In this study we aimed to investigate S. aureus-induced activation of human muco-sal associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells, γδ T cells, NK cells, as well as of conventional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. Further, we investigated if lactobacilli-derived factors could modulate their activation.PBMC were cultured with S. aureus 161:2 cell free supernatant (CFS, staphylococcal en-terotoxin A or CD3/CD28-beads alone or in combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus GG-CFS or Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri DSM 17938-CFS, and activation of T and NK cells was evaluated. S. aureus-CFS induced IFN-γ and CD107a expression as well as proliferation. Co-stimulation with lactobacilli-CFS dampened lymphocyte activation in all cell types analysed. Pre-incubation with lactobacilli-CFS was enough to reduce subsequent activation and the ab-sence of APC or APC-derived IL-10 did not prevent lactobacilli-mediated dampening. Final-ly, lactate selectively dampened activation of unconventional T cells and NK cells. In summary, we show that molecules present in the lactobacilli-CFS are able to directly dampen in vitro activation of conventional and unconventional T cells and of NK cells. This study provides novel insights on the immune modulatory nature of probiotic lactobacilli and suggests a role for lactobacilli in modulation of induced T and NK cell activation.

  6. Probiotic Lactobacilli Modulate Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Activation of Conventional and Unconventional T cells and NK Cells.

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    Johansson, Maria A; Björkander, Sophia; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Qazi, Khaleda Rahman; Salvany Celades, Maria; Bittmann, Julia; Eberl, Matthias; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotic commensal bacteria and potent modulators of immunity. When present in the gut or supplemented as probiotics, they beneficially modulate ex vivo immune responsiveness. Further, factors derived from several lactobacilli strains act immune regulatory in vitro. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is known to induce excessive T cell activation. In this study, we aimed to investigate S. aureus-induced activation of human mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells), γδ T cells, NK cells, as well as of conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Further, we investigated if lactobacilli-derived factors could modulate their activation. PBMC were cultured with S. aureus 161:2 cell-free supernatants (CFS), staphylococcal enterotoxin A or CD3/CD28-beads alone, or in combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-CFS or Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938-CFS and activation of T and NK cells was evaluated. S. aureus-CFS induced IFN-γ and CD107a expression as well as proliferation. Costimulation with lactobacilli-CFS dampened lymphocyte-activation in all cell types analyzed. Preincubation with lactobacilli-CFS was enough to reduce subsequent activation, and the absence of APC or APC-derived IL-10 did not prevent lactobacilli-mediated dampening. Finally, lactate selectively dampened activation of unconventional T cells and NK cells. In summary, we show that molecules present in the lactobacilli-CFS are able to directly dampen in vitro activation of conventional and unconventional T cells and of NK cells. This study provides novel insights on the immune-modulatory nature of probiotic lactobacilli and suggests a role for lactobacilli in the modulation of induced T and NK cell activation.

  7. Inhibitory activity in vitro of probiotic lactobacilli against oral Candida under different fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Q; Stamatova, I; Kari, K; Meurman, J H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics positively affect oral health by decreasing gum bleeding and/or reducing salivary counts of certain oral pathogens. Our aim was to investigate the inhibitory effect of six probiotic lactobacilli against opportunistic oral Candida species. Sugar utilisation by both lactobacilli and Candida was also assessed. Agar overlay assay was utilised to study growth inhibition of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Lactobacillus reuteri SD2112, Lactobacillus brevis CD2, Lactobacillus bulgaricus LB86 and L. bulgaricus LB Lact. The inhibitory effect was measured at pH 5.5, 6.4, and 7.2, respectively, and in the presence of five different carbohydrates in growth medium (glucose, fructose, lactose, sucrose, and sorbitol). Growth and final pH values were measured at two-hour time points to 24 h. L. rhamnosus GG showed the strongest inhibitory activity in fructose and glucose medium against C. albicans, followed by L. casei Shirota, L. reuteri SD2112 and L. brevis CD2. None of the lactobacilli tested affected the growth of C. krusei. Only L. rhamnosus GG produced slight inhibitory effect on C. glabrata. The lower pH values led to larger inhibition zones. Sugar fermentation profiles varied between the strains. L. casei Shirota grew in the presence of all sugars tested, whereas L. brevis CD2 could utilise only glucose and fructose. All Candida species metabolised the available sugars but the most rapid growth was observed with C. glabrata. The results suggest that commercially available probiotics differ in their inhibitory activity and carbohydrate utilisation; the above properties are modified by different pH values and sugars with more pronounced inhibition at lower pH.

  8. Manufacture of Fior di Latte cheese by incorporation of probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, F; Siragusa, S; Faccia, M; Dal Bello, F; Gobbetti, M; De Angelis, M

    2012-02-01

    This work aimed to select heat-resistant probiotic lactobacilli to be added to Fior di Latte (high-moisture cow milk Mozzarella) cheese. First, 18 probiotic strains belonging to Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Lactobacillus reuteri were screened. Resistance to heating (65 or 55°C for 10 min) varied markedly between strains. Adaptation at 42°C for 10 min increased the heat resistance at 55°C for 10 min of all probiotic lactobacilli. Heat-adapted L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus SP5 (decimal reduction time at 55°C of 227.4 min) and L. paracasei BGP1 (decimal reduction time at 55°C of 40.8 min) showed the highest survival under heat conditions that mimicked the stretching of the curd and were used for the manufacture of Fior di Latte cheese. Two technology options were chosen: chemical (addition of lactic acid to milk) or biological (Streptococcus thermophilus as starter culture) acidification with or without addition of probiotics. As determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR and 16S rRNA gene analyses, the cell density of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus SP5 and L. paracasei BGP1 in chemically or biologically acidified Fior di Latte cheese was approximately 8.0 log(10)cfu/g. Microbiological, compositional, biochemical, and sensory analyses (panel test by 30 untrained judges) showed that the use of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus SP5 and L. paracasei BGP1 enhanced flavor formation and shelf-life of Fior di Latte cheeses.

  9. Use of cheese whey for biomass production and spray drying of probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavari, Luisina; Páez, Roxana; Cuatrin, Alejandra; Reinheimer, Jorge; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The double use of cheese whey (culture medium and thermoprotectant for spray drying of lactobacilli) was explored in this study for adding value to this wastewater. In-house formulated broth (similar to MRS) and dairy media (cheese and ricotta whey and whey permeate) were assessed for their capacity to produce biomass of Lactobacillus paracasei JP1, Lb. rhamnosus 64 and Lb. gasseri 37. Simultaneously, spray drying of cheese whey-starch solution (without lactobacilli cells) was optimised using surface response methodology. Cell suspensions of the lactobacilli, produced in in house-formulated broth, were spray-dried in cheese whey-starch solution and viability monitored throughout the storage of powders for 2 months. Lb. rhamnosus 64 was able to grow satisfactorily in at least two of the in-house formulated culture media and in the dairy media assessed. It also performed well in spray drying. The performance of the other strains was less satisfactory. The growth capacity, the resistance to spray drying in cheese whey-starch solution and the negligible lost in viability during the storage (2 months), makes Lb. rhamnosus 64 a promising candidate for further technological studies for developing a probiotic dehydrated culture for foods, utilising wastewaters of the dairy industry (as growth substrate and protectant) and spray drying (a low-cost widely-available technology).

  10. Co-aggregation and growth inhibition of probiotic lactobacilli and clinical isolates of mutans streptococci: An in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette Kirstine; Hassl F, Pamela; Stecks N-Blicks, Christina

    2011-01-01

    . mutans Ingbritt) was selected as control. Co-aggregation was determined spectrophotometrically and growth inhibition was assessed with the agar overlay technique. Results. All probiotic lactobacilli showed an ability to co-aggregate with the isolated MS strains. Statistically significant differences (p...

  11. Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli levels following probiotic cheese consumption in adults: A double blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial effects of Lactobacillus species have been reported but the role of these species including Lactobacillus casei (L. casei on oral health is not well documented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ef-fects of conventional or probiotic cheese containing L.casei on salivary Streptococcus mutans (SM and Lactobacilli levels. Methods: In this double-blind controlled trial (IRCT201009144745N1, 60 adults were randomly allocated in 2 paral-lel blocks. SM and Lactobacilli count assessment were performed three times. Subjects consumed either cheese contain-ing L. casei (110[6] Cfu /g (probiotic block, n=29 or cheese without any probiotic (control block, n=31 twice daily for two weeks. Bacterial levels changes were compared using Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney Tests. Logistic regression compared changes in number of subjects with lowest and highest SM or Lactobacilli levels. Results: Statistically significant (p = 0.001 reduction of salivary SM was found in probiotic group. SM levels reduc-tion was not significant between placebo and trial groups (p = 0.46, 62% in probiotic vs. 32% in placebo group. Lacto-bacilli count changes during trial were not statistically significant inter and intra blocks (p = 0.12. Probiotic interven-tion was significantly effective in high levels (> 10[5] cfu/ml of SM (Odds Ratio 11.6, 95% CI 1.56-86.17, p = 0.017. Conclusions: Probiotic cheese containing L. casei was not effective in salivary SM levels reduction comparing to conventional cheese. Adding L. casei to cheese could be useful in decreasing SM counts in adults 18-37 years old with highest level of SM.

  12. Metabolites produced by probiotic Lactobacilli rapidly increase glucose uptake by Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddington Randal K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although probiotic bacteria and their metabolites alter enterocyte gene expression, rapid, non-genomic responses have not been examined. The present study measured accumulation of tracer (2 μM glucose by Caco-2 cells after exposure for 10 min or less to a chemically defined medium (CDM with different monosaccharides before and after anaerobic culture of probiotic Lactobacilli. Results Growth of L. acidophilus was supported by CDM with 110 mM glucose, fructose, and mannose, but not with arabinose, ribose, and xylose or the sugar-free CDM. Glucose accumulation was reduced when Caco-2 cells were exposed for 10 min to sterile CDM with glucose (by 92%, mannose (by 90%, fructose (by 55%, and ribose (by 16%, but not with arabinose and xylose. Exposure of Caco-2 cells for 10 min to bacteria-free supernatants prepared after exponential (48 h and stationary (72 h growth phases of L. acidophilus cultured in CDM with 110 mM fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83% and 45%, respectively; exposure to a suspension of the bacteria had no effect. The increase in glucose accumulation was diminished by heat-denaturing the supernatant, indicating the response of Caco-2 cells is triggered by as yet unknown heat labile bacterial metabolites, not by a reduction in CDM components that decrease glucose uptake. Supernatants prepared after anaerobic culture of L. gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, and L. johnsonii in the CDM with fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83%, 32%, 27%, and 14%, respectively. Conclusion The rapid, non-genomic upregulation of SGLT1 by bacterial metabolites is a heretofore unrecognized interaction between probiotics and the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Exploring the relationship between exposure to technological and gastrointestinal stress and probiotic functional properties of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amund, O D

    2016-09-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are considered probiotic because of their associated potential health benefits. Probiotics are commonly administered orally via incorporation into food products. Microorganisms for use as probiotics encounter stress conditions, which include acid, bile, osmotic, oxidative, heat and cold stresses. These can occur during processing and storage and during passage through the gastrointestinal tract, and can affect viability. Probiotic bacteria have to remain viable to confer any health benefits. Therefore, the ability to withstand technological and gastrointestinal stresses is crucial probiotic selection criteria. While the stress tolerance mechanisms of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are largely understood, the impact of exposure to stressful conditions on the functional properties of surviving probiotic microorganisms is not clear. This review explores the potentially positive and negative relationships between exposure to stress conditions and probiotic functional properties, such as resistance to gastric acid and bile, adhesion and colonization potential, and tolerance to antibiotics. Protective strategies can be employed to combat negative effects of stress on functional properties. However, further research is needed to ascertain synergistic relationships between exposure to stress and probiotic properties.

  14. Comparison of Microbiological and Probiotic Characteristics of Lactobacilli Isolates from Dairy Food Products and Animal Rumen Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neethu Maria Jose

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are employed in probiotic food preparations and as feed additives in poultry and livestock, due to health benefits associated with their consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the probiotic potential of ten lactobacilli strains isolated from commercial dairy food products and animal rumen contents in New Zealand. Genetic identification of the isolates revealed that all belonged to the genus Lactobacillus, specifically the species L. reuteri, L. rhamnosus and L. plantarum. All isolates did not show any haemolytic behaviour. Isolates of dairy origin showed better tolerance to low pH stress. On the other hand, rumen isolates exhibited a higher tolerance to presence of bile salts. All isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, however most were sensitive to ampicillin. Isolates of rumen origin demonstrated a higher inhibitory effect on Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella menston. Bacterial adherence of all isolates increased with a decrease in pH. This screening study on lactobacilli isolates has assessed and identified potential probiotic candidates for further evaluation.

  15. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Saxami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties.

  16. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxami, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Olga S; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Galanis, Alex

    2016-05-04

    A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties.

  17. Comparison of Microbiological and Probiotic Characteristics of Lactobacilli Isolates from Dairy Food Products and Animal Rumen Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Neethu Maria; Bunt, Craig R; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2015-04-15

    Lactobacilli are employed in probiotic food preparations and as feed additives in poultry and livestock, due to health benefits associated with their consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the probiotic potential of ten lactobacilli strains isolated from commercial dairy food products and animal rumen contents in New Zealand. Genetic identification of the isolates revealed that all belonged to the genus Lactobacillus, specifically the species L. reuteri, L. rhamnosus and L. plantarum. All isolates did not show any haemolytic behaviour. Isolates of dairy origin showed better tolerance to low pH stress. On the other hand, rumen isolates exhibited a higher tolerance to presence of bile salts. All isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, however most were sensitive to ampicillin. Isolates of rumen origin demonstrated a higher inhibitory effect on Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella menston. Bacterial adherence of all isolates increased with a decrease in pH. This screening study on lactobacilli isolates has assessed and identified potential probiotic candidates for further evaluation.

  18. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Wang, Yi; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus species on different phases of Candida albicans biofilm development. Quantification of biofilm growth and ultrastructural analyses were performed on C. albicans biofilms treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus planktonic cell suspensions as well as their supernatants. Planktonic lactobacilli induced a significant reduction (p  0.05), but significantly reduced the early stages of Candida biofilm formation (p Candida hyphal differentiation, leading to a predominance of budding growth. All lactobacilli negatively impacted C. albicans yeast-to-hyphae differentiation and biofilm formation. The inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus on C. albicans entailed both cell-cell interactions and secretion of exometabolites that may impact on pathogenic attributes associated with C. albicans colonization on host surfaces and yeast filamentation. This study clarifies, for the first time, the mechanics of how Lactobacillus species may antagonize C. albicans host colonization. Our data elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms that define the probiotic candicidal activity of lactobacilli, thus supporting their utility as an adjunctive therapeutic mode against mucosal candidal infections.

  19. Production of Organic Acids by Probiotic Lactobacilli Can Be Used to Reduce Pathogen Load in Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal-McKinney, Jason M.; Lu, Xiaonan; Duong, Tri; Larson, Charles L.; Call, Douglas R.; Shah, Devendra H.; Konkel, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic Lactobacillus can be used to reduce the colonization of pathogenic bacteria in food animals, and therefore reduce the risk of foodborne illness to consumers. As a model system, we examined the mechanism of protection conferred by Lactobacillus species to inhibit C. jejuni growth in vitro and reduce colonization in broiler chickens. Possible mechanisms for the reduction of pathogens by lactobacilli include: 1) stimulation of adaptive immunity; 2) alteration of the cecal microbiome; and, 3) production of inhibitory metabolites, such as organic acids. The Lactobacillus species produced lactic acid at concentrations sufficient to kill C. jejuni in vitro. We determined that lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus disrupted the membrane of C. jejuni, as judged by biophotonics. The spectral features obtained using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used to accurately predict bacterial viability and differentiate C. jejuni samples according to lactic acid treatment. FT-IR spectral features of C. jejuni and Lactobacillus grown in co-culture revealed that the metabolism was dominated by Lactobacillus prior to the killing of C. jejuni. Based on our results, the development of future competitive exclusion strategies should include the evaluation of organic acid production. PMID:22962594

  20. Reversal of primary root caries lesions after daily intake of milk supplemented with fluoride and probiotic lactobacilli in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Lars G; Magnusson, Kerstin; Hakestam, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To evaluate the effect of milk supplemented with fluoride and/or probiotic bacteria on primary root caries lesions (PRCL) in older adults. Materials and methods. After informed consent, 160 healthy subjects, 58-84 years of age, with at least two PRCL were recruited and randomly...... assigned to one of four parallel study groups drinking 200 ml milk once daily for 15 months. Group A consumed standard milk (placebo); Group B ingested milk supplemented with 5 ppm F and probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus rhamnosus LB21, 10(7) CFU/mL); Group C drank milk with only probiotic bacteria...... and group D milk contained only fluoride. Primary endpoints were Root Caries Index (RCI) and electric resistance measurements (ECM) carried out by one blinded single examiner. Secondary endpoints were mutans streptococci and lactobacilli counts in saliva and plaque estimated with chair-side tests. Data were...

  1. Comparison of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria effects, immune responses and rotavirus vaccines and infection in different host species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2016-04-01

    Different probiotic strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera possess significant and widely acknowledged health-promoting and immunomodulatory properties. They also provide an affordable means for prevention and treatment of various infectious, allergic and inflammatory conditions as demonstrated in numerous human and animal studies. Despite the ample evidence of protective effects of these probiotics against rotavirus (RV) infection and disease, the precise immune mechanisms of this protection remain largely undefined, because of limited mechanistic research possible in humans and investigated in the majority of animal models. Additionally, while most human clinical probiotic trials are well-standardized using the same strains, uniform dosages, regimens of the probiotic treatments and similar host age, animal studies often lack standardization, have variable experimental designs, and non-uniform and sometime limited selection of experimental variables or observational parameters. This review presents selected data on different probiotic strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and summarizes the knowledge of their immunomodulatory properties and the associated protection against RV disease in diverse host species including neonates.

  2. Survival of free and microencapsulated human-derived oral probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei SD1 in orange and aloe vera juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawee Teanpaisan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation was evaluated as a means of preserving Lactobacillus paracasei SD1, a human-derived strain with probiotic potential, in orange and aloe vera juices. The microencapsulation parameters included alginate concentration, calcium chloride concentration and hardening-time, and the efficacy of microencapsulation to preserve the survival of microencapsulated bacteria compared to free cells during exposure in fruit juices were determined. The results revealed that the viable count of free-cell form markedly decreased compared to microencapsulated form. The microencapsulation of 2% alginate (w/v and 0.05 M CaCl2 gave the best result to preserve the probiotic. It was found that viability of microencapsulated probiotic bacteria was significantly higher than free-cell in fruit juices during 8 weeks of storage time in the refrigerator. The potential probiotic trait related to inhibitory effect was not affected after microencapsulation process. In summary, the microencapsulation method may be an alternative way of preserving the viability of probiotic L. paracasei SD1.

  3. Screening of Probiotic Activities of Lactobacilli Strains Isolated from Traditional Tibetan Qula, A Raw Yak Milk Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 69 lactobacilli isolated from Tibetan Qula, a raw yak milk cheese, were screened for their potential use as probiotics. The isolates were tested in terms of: Their ability to survive at pH 2.0, pH 3.0, and in the presence of 0.3% bile salts; tolerance of simulated gastric and intestinal juices; antimicrobial activity; sensitivity against 11 specific antibiotics; and their cell surface hydrophobicity. The results show that out of the 69 strains, 29 strains (42% had survival rates above 90% after 2 h of incubation at pH values of 2.0 or 3.0. Of these 29 strains, 21 strains showed a tolerance for 0.3% bile salt. Incubation of these 21 isolates in simulated gastrointestinal fluid for 3 h revealed survival rates above 90%; the survival rate for 20 of these isolates remained above 90% after 4 h of incubation in simulated intestinal fluid. The viable counts of bacteria after incubation in simulated gastric fluid for 3 h and simulated intestinal fluid for 4 h were both significantly different compared with the counts at 0 h (p<0.001. Further screening performed on the above 20 isolates indicated that all 20 lactobacilli strains exhibited inhibitory activity against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, and Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971. Moreover, all of the strains were resistant to vancomycin and streptomycin. Of the 20 strains, three were resistant to all 11 elected antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, penicillin G, ampicillin, streptomycin, polymyxin B, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and gentamicin in this study, and five were sensitive to more than half of the antibiotics. Additionally, the cell surface hydrophobicity of seven of the 20 lactobacilli strains was above 70%, including strains Lactobacillus casei 1,133 (92%, Lactobacillus plantarum 1086-1 (82%, Lactobacillus casei 1089 (81%, Lactobacillus casei 1138 (79%, Lactobacillus buchneri 1059 (78

  4. Differential metabolism of Exopolysaccharides from probiotic Lactobacilli by the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, Alica; Saraf, Aakanksha; Martens, Eric C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are ingested as food or supplements and impart positive health benefits to consumers. Previous studies have indicated that probiotics transiently reside in the gastrointestinal tract and in addition to modulating commensal species diversity, also increase the expression of

  5. Screening of Probiotic Activities of Lactobacilli Strains Isolated from Traditional Tibetan Qula, A Raw Yak Milk Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Wang, Yanping; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Jiao, Zhen; Huang, Qunce

    2016-10-01

    In this study, 69 lactobacilli isolated from Tibetan Qula, a raw yak milk cheese, were screened for their potential use as probiotics. The isolates were tested in terms of: Their ability to survive at pH 2.0, pH 3.0, and in the presence of 0.3% bile salts; tolerance of simulated gastric and intestinal juices; antimicrobial activity; sensitivity against 11 specific antibiotics; and their cell surface hydrophobicity. The results show that out of the 69 strains, 29 strains (42%) had survival rates above 90% after 2 h of incubation at pH values of 2.0 or 3.0. Of these 29 strains, 21 strains showed a tolerance for 0.3% bile salt. Incubation of these 21 isolates in simulated gastrointestinal fluid for 3 h revealed survival rates above 90%; the survival rate for 20 of these isolates remained above 90% after 4 h of incubation in simulated intestinal fluid. The viable counts of bacteria after incubation in simulated gastric fluid for 3 h and simulated intestinal fluid for 4 h were both significantly different compared with the counts at 0 h (plactobacilli strains exhibited inhibitory activity against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, and Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971. Moreover, all of the strains were resistant to vancomycin and streptomycin. Of the 20 strains, three were resistant to all 11 elected antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, penicillin G, ampicillin, streptomycin, polymyxin B, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and gentamicin) in this study, and five were sensitive to more than half of the antibiotics. Additionally, the cell surface hydrophobicity of seven of the 20 lactobacilli strains was above 70%, including strains Lactobacillus casei 1,133 (92%), Lactobacillus plantarum 1086-1 (82%), Lactobacillus casei 1089 (81%), Lactobacillus casei 1138 (79%), Lactobacillus buchneri 1059 (78%), Lactobacillus plantarum1141 (75%), and Lactobacillus plantarum 1197 (71%). Together, these

  6. Optimizing Production of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains Isolated from Piglet Feces as Feed Additives for Weaned Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lun Chiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus johnsonii x-1d-2 and Lactobacillus mucosae x-4w-1, originally isolated from piglet feces, have been demonstrated to possess antimicrobial activities, antibiotic resistances and interleukin-6 induction ability in RAW 267.4 macrophages in our previous study. These characteristics make L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 good candidates for application in feed probiotics. In this study, soybeal meal, molasses and sodium acetate were selected to optimize the growth medium for cultivation of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1. These two strains were then freeze-dried and mixed into the basal diet to feed the weaned piglets. The effects of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 on the growth performance and fecal microflora of weaned piglets were investigated. The results showed that the bacterial numbers of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 reached a maximum of 8.90 and 9.30 log CFU/mL, respectively, when growing in optimal medium consisting of 5.5% (wt/vol soybean meal, 1.0% (wt/vol molasses and 1.0% (wt/vol sodium acetate. The medium cost was 96% lower than the commercial de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe medium. In a further feeding study, the weaned piglets fed basal diet supplemented with freeze-dried probiotic cultures exhibited higher (p<0.05 body weight gain, feed intake, and gain/feed ratio than weaned piglets fed basal diet. Probiotic feeding also increased the numbers of lactobacilli and decreased the numbers of E. coli in the feces of weaned piglets. This study demonstrates that L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 have high potential to be used as feed additives in the pig industry.

  7. Optimizing Production of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains Isolated from Piglet Feces as Feed Additives for Weaned Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Chen, Kun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus johnsonii x-1d-2 and Lactobacillus mucosae x-4w-1, originally isolated from piglet feces, have been demonstrated to possess antimicrobial activities, antibiotic resistances and interleukin-6 induction ability in RAW 267.4 macrophages in our previous study. These characteristics make L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 good candidates for application in feed probiotics. In this study, soybeal meal, molasses and sodium acetate were selected to optimize the growth medium for cultivation of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1. These two strains were then freeze-dried and mixed into the basal diet to feed the weaned piglets. The effects of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 on the growth performance and fecal microflora of weaned piglets were investigated. The results showed that the bacterial numbers of L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 reached a maximum of 8.90 and 9.30 log CFU/mL, respectively, when growing in optimal medium consisting of 5.5% (wt/vol) soybean meal, 1.0% (wt/vol) molasses and 1.0% (wt/vol) sodium acetate. The medium cost was 96% lower than the commercial de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe medium. In a further feeding study, the weaned piglets fed basal diet supplemented with freeze-dried probiotic cultures exhibited higher (ppiglets fed basal diet. Probiotic feeding also increased the numbers of lactobacilli and decreased the numbers of E. coli in the feces of weaned piglets. This study demonstrates that L. johnsonii x-1d-2 and L. mucosae x-4w-1 have high potential to be used as feed additives in the pig industry.

  8. Differential metabolism of Exopolysaccharides from probiotic Lactobacilli by the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, Alica; Saraf, Aakanksha; Martens, Eric C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are ingested as food or supplements and impart positive health benefits to consumers. Previous studies have indicated that probiotics transiently reside in the gastrointestinal tract and in addition to modulating commensal species diversity, also increase the expression of g

  9. Challenges in translational research on probiotic lactobacilli: from in vitro assays to clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Mercenier, A.M.E.; Wells, J.

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects of certain probiotic strains have been established in the treatment and prevention of various immune and intestinal disorders in humans, including allergic diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases and diarrhoea. The proposed mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory effects of pro

  10. Antagonistic activity of probiotic lactobacilli against human enteropathogenic bacteria in homemade tvorog curd cheese from Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Masoumikia

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Homemade tvorog curd cheese in Azerbaijan harbor a variety of probiotics with industrial applications as well as potentiality to be preserved in a biobank for the future medicinal applications especially against antibiotic resistant pathogenes.

  11. A comprehensive approach to determine the probiotic potential of human-derived Lactobacillus for industrial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoret, V; Perezlindo, M J; Vinderola, G; Reinheimer, J; Binetti, A

    2013-05-01

    Specific strains should only be regarded as probiotics if they fulfill certain safety, technological and functional criteria. The aim of this work was to study, from a comprehensive point of view (in vitro and in vivo tests), three Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus paracasei JP1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 64 and Lactobacillus gasseri 37) isolated from feces of local newborns, determining some parameters of technological, biological and functional relevance. All strains were able to adequately grow in different economic culture media (cheese whey, buttermilk and milk), which were also suitable as cryoprotectants. As selective media, LP-MRS was more effective than B-MRS for the enumeration of all strains. The strains were resistant to different technological (frozen storage, high salt content) and biological (simulated gastrointestinal digestion after refrigerated storage in acidified milk, bile exposure) challenges. L. rhamnosus 64 and L. gasseri 37, in particular, were sensible to chloramphenicol, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin, increased the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage and induced the proliferation of IgA producing cells in small intestine when administered to mice. Even when clinical trails are still needed, both strains fulfilled the main criteria proposed by FAO/WHO to consider them as potential probiotics for the formulation of new foods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening of potential probiotic bacteria from Lactobacilli strains%益生乳杆菌的筛选研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姗姗; 张俊娟; 杨雪娟; 韩俊华; MonetaJadwiga; 张柏林; 裴家伟

    2012-01-01

    以分离保存的15株乳杆菌为研究对象,从中筛选益生乳杆菌两株.通过检测乳杆菌的疏水性和自聚性,得到表面疏水性和自聚性均较高的菌株为Ind-3、CH10和M8.其中,乳杆菌CH10和M8在模拟胃肠环境下活菌数均达到106 mL-1以上.通过灌胃乳杆菌CH10和M8,表明小鼠体重增加明显高与对照组,且实验组小鼠粪便中的β-半乳糖苷酶活性明显高于对照组.灌胃两株乳杆菌后,小鼠肠道内双歧杆菌与乳杆菌活菌数提高了,且肠杆菌、肠球菌和产气英膜梭菌的生长繁殖受到不同程度的抑制,而对照组无明显变化.结果表明筛选出的两株乳杆菌可以促进小鼠对营养物质的吸收,提高肠道内有益菌的数量,抑制有害菌的生长繁殖,或许能够改善寄主肠道的微生态环境.%15 Lactobadlli strain swere used for the screening of probiotic bacteria, in which 2 strains, i.e., Lactobadllus saiivarius CH10 and Lacto-bacillus murinus M8, showed potential probiotic properties. In vitro the hydrophobicity and auto-aggregation of these candidate bacteria were tested to find three strains out of 15 lactobacilli had high surface hydrophobicity and auto-aggregation, i.e., strain Ind-3, strain CH10 and strain M8. Simulation of gastrointestinal conditions revealed that only the viable cells of strains CH10 and M8 exceeded over 106 mL-1 at pH 2.5 and in the presence of 0.3% bile salt after incubation at 37℃ for 6 h. Mice fed with strain CH10 and M8 got higher body weight than the control. The mice fed with strains CH10 and M8 had higher β-galactosidase activity in their fecal, and the live numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in their intestinal gut were promoted. However, no significant changes in β—galactosidase activity, and the live numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the control were observed. Meanwhile, the growth inhibition of Entaobaclena, Entaococcus and Clostridium perfnngens from the intestinal micro

  13. Immunomodulation by probiotic lactobacilli in layer and meat-type chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, M.E.; Kramer, J.; Hulst-van Arkel, van der M.C.; Heres, L.; Jeurissen, S.H.M.; Boersma, W.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    1. The aim of the experiments was to evaluate whether selected probiotic lactobacillus strains have different immunomodulating effects in layer- and meat-type strain chickens. 2. Humoral and cellular specific and non-specific immune responses were studied by experiments on cellular proliferation, en

  14. Probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM® modifies subpopulations of fecal lactobacilli and Clostridium difficile in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J; Forssten, Sofia; Aakko, Juhani; Granlund, Linda; Rautonen, Nina; Salminen, Seppo; Viitanen, Matti; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2012-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiota and with immunosenescence. Probiotics have the potential to modify a selected part of the intestinal microbiota as well as improve immune functions and may, therefore, be particularly beneficial to elderly consumers. In this randomized, controlled cross-over clinical trial, we assessed the effects of a probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on the intestinal microbiota and fecal immune markers of 31 elderly volunteers and compared these effects with the administration of the same cheese without probiotics. The probiotic cheese was found to increase the number of L. rhamnosus and L. acidophilus NCFM in the feces, suggesting the survival of the strains during the gastrointestinal transit. Importantly, probiotic cheese administration was associated with a trend towards lower counts of Clostridium difficile in the elderly, as compared with the run-in period with the plain cheese. The effect was statistically significant in the subpopulation of the elderly who harbored C. difficile at the start of the study. The probiotic cheese was not found to significantly alter the levels of the major microbial groups, suggesting that the microbial changes conferred by the probiotic cheese were limited to specific bacterial groups. Despite that the administration of the probiotic cheese to the study population has earlier been shown to significantly improve the innate immunity of the elders, we did not observe measurable changes in the fecal immune IgA concentrations. No increase in fecal calprotectin and β-defensin concentrations suggests that the probiotic treatment did not affect intestinal inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the administration of probiotic cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM, was associated with specific changes in the intestinal microbiota, mainly affecting specific subpopulations of intestinal lactobacilli and C

  15. Characterization and Selection of Lactobacilli with Probiotic Properties from Cow’s Raw Milk of “Bororo” Cattle Breeders in Dschang (Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambou Ngoufack François

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at isolating potential probiotic lactobacilli strains from cow’s raw milk collected near the small cattle breeders in Dschang (Cameroon and applying established in vitro tests to screen those strains that could be used as novel probiotic strains in the food industry. Thirty four lactobacilli isolates obtained from raw cow’s milk were characterized and selected according to their preliminary probiotic properties including tolerance to acid and bile salts, ability to assimilate cholesterol, sensitivity to antibiotics and antimicrobial activities. Among the several requirements, the acid tolerance as well as the bile salt tolerance was strain dependent. Nine isolates exhibited the highest surviving percentage at pH 3 and 2. Six acid tolerant isolates presented an excellent tolerance at 0.2 and 0.4 % bile salts. The acid tolerant and bile tolerant isolates were sensitive to most of the antibiotics tested. Six acid and bile tolerant isolates (6M, 11M, 12M, 21M, 48M exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli. These isolates reduced between 20.35 and 45.21 mg of cholesterol per g (dry weight of cells in vitro. They were identified using API 50CH kits and repetitive genomic element-PCR (Rep-PCR fingerprinting as Lactobacillus plantarum. According to the obtained results, these Lactobacillus plantarum strains (6M 11M, 12M, 21M and 48M were found to be the most promising strains with preliminary probiotic properties.

  16. Comparative analysis of the potential probiotic abilities of lactobacilli of human origin and from fermented vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, twelve strains of Lactobacillus plantarum derived from spontaneously fermented vegetables (carrots and beetroot and traditionally prepared sauerkraut were compared for their potential probiotic abilities with seven Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of human origin. The tested strains were investigated for some technological properties and in vitro functional characteristics for potential probiotic strains. Selection probiotic criteria included the ability of the strains to withstand conditions similar to the digestive tract, antimicrobial activity against a wide range of intestinal pathogens and sensitivity to antibiotics. The total acidity in milk was generally higher in intestinal strains in relation to plant strains. The ability of the tested strains to survive simulated gastric conditions showed a greater resistance of the human strains at a low pH 2.5 and the presence of pepsin, while in the presence of bile salts and pancreatin, some intestinal strains were more sensitive compared to plant strains. A wide spectrum of antimicrobial activities was observed in all tested strains. Most of the plant strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and vancomycin but sensitive to ampicillin and penicillin, while only some intestinal strains were resistant to these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46010

  17. Differential Metabolism of Exopolysaccharides from Probiotic Lactobacilli by the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; Saraf, Aakanksha; Martens, Eric C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-06-15

    Probiotic microorganisms are ingested as food or supplements and impart positive health benefits to consumers. Previous studies have indicated that probiotics transiently reside in the gastrointestinal tract and, in addition to modulating commensal species diversity, increase the expression of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in resident commensal bacterial species. In this study, it is demonstrated that the human gut commensal species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron efficiently metabolizes fructan exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesized by probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain 121 while only partially degrading reuteran and isomalto/malto-polysaccharide (IMMP) α-glucan EPS polymers. B. thetaiotaomicron metabolized these EPS molecules via the activation of enzymes and transport systems encoded by dedicated polysaccharide utilization loci specific for β-fructans and α-glucans. Reduced metabolism of reuteran and IMMP α-glucan EPS molecules may be due to reduced substrate binding by components of the starch utilization system (sus). This study reveals that microbial EPS substrates activate genes for carbohydrate metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and suggests that microbially derived carbohydrates provide a carbohydrate-rich reservoir for B. thetaiotaomicron nutrient acquisition in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Potencial probiótico de lactobacilos de origem suína = Potential probiotic lactobacilli of pig origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Mangoni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O uso de probiótico na alimentação animal tem sido indicado, por reduzir a mortalidade resultante da colonização intestinal por micro-organismos patógenos, melhorar o desempenho e as características de produção sem deixar resíduos na carne. O experimento teve como objetivo isolar, a partir de amostras de fezes de suínos na fase de aleitamento, cepas de lactobacilos visando sua identificação como probióticos. Foram isoladas 92 colônias, posteriormente submetidas à prova de catalase e 60 tiveram resultados negativos. Estas colônias negativas foram submetidas à coloração de Gram foi avaliada suamorfologia. Destas, 16 apresentaram formas de bacilos. Esses isolados foram comparados pela sua habilidade de resistência em pH 3,0, crescimento na presença de sais biliares, fenol, lisozima, e sua capacidade de hidrofobicidade e antagônica. Os isolados L03, L04, L08 e L15, identificados neste trabalho apresentam melhores características para uso como probiótico, em função de demonstrar melhor comportamento sobre as condições ácidas, crescendo na presença de sais biliares e fenol, apresentando alta percentagem de hidrofobicidade quanto à presença de Escherichia coli.The use of probiotic in animal nutrition has been identified as reducing mortality resulting from intestinal colonization by pathogenic micro-organisms, improving productive performance andcharacteristics, leaving no residue in meat. The experiment aimed to isolate lactobacilli from fecal samples of suckling swine, in order to be identified as probiotics. Ninety-two colonies were isolated; these pre-selected colonies were subjected to catalase analysis, for which 60 were negative. The 60 colonies were subjected to Gram-negative stain and evaluated for their morphology. Of these, 16 had forms of bacilli. These isolates were compared for their ability to resist pH 3.0, grow in the presence of bile salts, phenol, lysozyme, as well as their hydrophobicity and

  19. Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli modulations in young children on consumption of probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Richa Polka; Damle, Satyawan Gangaram; Chawla, Amrita

    2011-11-01

    To compare the levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in saliva of school children, before and after consumption of probiotic and control ice-cream. A double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial was carried out in forty, 12-14 year-old children, with no clinically detectable caries. The selected children were randomized equally into two groups I and II. Following an initial run-in period of 1 week, children in group I and II were given ice-creams 'A' and 'B', respectively, for 10 days. Being a cross-over study, the ice-creams were interchanged in the two groups after a 2-week wash-out period. Saliva samples at baseline and follow-up were assessed using Dentocult SM and Dentocult LB kits. On statistical evaluation, it was seen that probiotic ice-cream brought about a statistically significant reduction (p-value = 0.003) in salivary mutans streptococci levels with no significant effect on lactobacilli levels. In conclusion, probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 ATCC27536 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 can reduce the levels of certain caries-associated micro-organisms in saliva.

  20. Effect of the probiotic Lactobacilli reuteri (Prodentis in the management of periodontal disease: a preliminary randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Vivekananda

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Lactobacilli reuteri (Prodentis alone and in combination with scaling and root planing (SRP in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of volunteers with chronic periodontitis. Methods: Thirty, otherwise systemically healthy, chronic periodontitis patients (19 males and 11 females, aged between 34 and 50 years were included. The study period was 42 days. ‘Split-mouth’ design was used for the SRP, which was performed on day 0; two quadrants (either right or left were treated with SRP whereas the remaining two quadrants were left untreated. The participants received a toothbrush, toothpaste, and brushing instructions. L. reuteri Prodentis lozenges (1×108 CFU DSM17938 + 1×108 CFU ATCC PTA 5289 or the corresponding placebo lozenges were taken twice daily from day 21 to day 42. Statistical analysis was done for comparisons of clinical parameters (Plaque Index (PI, Gingival Index (GI, Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL and microbiological levels of the pathogens Aggregibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, and Prevotella intermedia (Pi. All p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Assessments were made on day 0 before SRP treatment, on day 21 before administration of the lozenges, and on day 42. Results: At day 42, the PI, GI, and GBI were significantly reduced by all treatment modalities. When ranked, the amount of PI, GI and GBI reduction by the different treatments was SRP + Prodentis > Prodentis > SRP + placebo > placebo; all differences were statistically significant. For PPD and CAL, the best result was obtained with the SRP + Prodentis treatment. PPD was reduced from 5.08±0.75 to 3.78±0.61 mm (p<0.001 and CAL from 3.93±0.93 to 2.85±0.74 mm (p<0.001. Prodentis, either alone or following SRP, reduced Aa, Pi, and Pg by 1 log10 unit

  1. 乳酸杆菌益生作用机制的研究进展%Mechanism of Action of Probiotic Function of Lactobacilli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章文明; 汪海峰; 刘建新

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli have been widely applied to exert health benefits for human and animals. This article reviewed the recent advances in the mechanisms underlying the health-promoting functions of Lactobacilli. Lactobacilli can secrete antimicrobial compounds (lactic acid, H2O2 or bacteriocin) , or compete with pathogenic bacteria for nutrient or attachment site in the intestinal tract. Probiotic Lactobacilli are suggested to strengthen the epithelial barrier by induction of mucin secretion or prevention of epithelial cell apoptosis. This review focused on Lactobacilli surface factors such as surface protein, teichoic acids and peptidoglycan, and their intestinal receptors (C-type lectin receptor, toll-like receptor, and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, NLRs). Their combination may modulate immune signaling pathways and promote immune function in the gut, resulting in beneficial effects on host.%乳酸杆菌作为益生菌广泛用于人和动物.本文综述了乳酸杆菌改善宿主健康的机制.乳酸杆菌可通过产生抗菌物质如乳酸、过氧化氢、细菌素,或者通过竞争营养或肠道黏附位点来抑制致病菌;通过诱导黏附素的分泌或阻止细胞凋亡而增强肠道的屏障功能,从而保护肠道.文章重点讨论了乳酸杆菌表面成分(表面蛋白、脂磷壁酸和肽聚糖)与肠道受体(C型凝集素受体、Toll样受体和Nod样受体),阐述了他们结合后启动免疫调节信号,调控肠道免疫功能以发挥改善健康作用的机制.

  2. In vitro evaluation of the safety and probiotic properties of Lactobacilli isolated from chicken and calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujnakova, Dobroslava; Strakova, Eva; Kmet, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    A total of 73 chicken and calves isolates were diagnosed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of flight mass spectrometry (Maldi-Tof MS). After a preliminary subtractive screening based on the high acid tolerance at pH 2.5 and bile resistance at 0.3% oxgall, twenty isolates belonging to the species Lactobacillus salivarius, Lactobacillus agilis, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus murinus and Lactobacillus amylovorus were in vitro screened for the safety assessment and probiotic properties, including antibiotics susceptibility patterns, biochemical activity and potential for competitive exclusion of biofilm producing pathogens determined by crystal violet and/or quantitative Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (FISH) assays utilizing 5'Cy 3 labelled probe Enter1432 for enteric group. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed according to the ISO norm 10932. The sixteen strains were susceptible to certain antimicrobial agents, except for two chicken (L. salivarius 12K, L. agilis 13K) and two calves (L. reuteri L10/1, L. murinus L9) isolates with the presence non wild-type ECOFFs (epidemiological cut-off) for gentamicin (≥256 μg ml(-1)), tetracycline (≥128 μg ml(-1)), kanamycin (≥256 μg ml(-1)) and streptomycin (≥96 μg ml(-1)). The two referenced chicken isolates gave positive aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and tet(L) PCR results. The wild-type ECOFFs isolates were subjected to the apiZYM analysis for enzyme profile evaluation and amino acid decarboxylase activities determined by qualitative plate method and multiplex PCR for the detection of four genes involved in the production of histamine (histidine decarboxylase, hdc), tyramine (tyrosine decarboxylase, tyrdc) and putrescine (via eithers ornithine decarboxylase, odc, or agmatine deiminase, agdi). From examined strains only two chicken isolates (L. reuteri 14K; L. salivarius 15K) had no harmful β-glucuronidase, β-glucosidase activities connected with detrimental effects in

  3. Characterization of Probiotic Abilities of Lactobacilli Isolated from Iranian Koozeh Traditional Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakoli Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eight lactic isolates including Lactobacillus plantarum (MT.ZH193, MT.ZH293, MT.ZH393 and MT.ZH593, L. casei (MT.ZH493, L. pentosus (MT.ZH693, and L. fermentum (MT.ZH893 and MT.ZH993 were identified from an Iranian traditional cheese “Koozeh Paneer” using the morphological, phenotypical, biochemical and molecular characterization and then their probiotic characteristics were compared. Results showed that the lactic isolates of L. plantarum (MT.ZH293 and L. fermentum (MT.ZH893 and MT.ZH993 were resistant to all the used bile salts up to concentrations of 0.3 to 2.0%. All the strains showed low sensitivity to the presence of conjugated bile salts. L. plantarum MT.ZH293 exhibited the highest enzymatic activity of β-galactosidase and survival rate in a simulated stomach duodenum passage. L. casei MT.ZH493 generated the highest amount of hydrogen peroxide, followed by L. fermentum MT.ZH993 and L. plantarum MT.ZH593. Although the most selected LAB isolates had a moderate cell surface hydrophobicity, L. plantarum MT. ZH593 expressed the highest cell surface hydrophobicity. L. fermentum MT.ZH893 had strong resistance to all the antibiotics tested such as amoxicillin, ceftriaxon, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin. Five lactic strains of L. plantarum (MT.ZH193, MT.ZH393 and MT.ZH593 and L. fermentum (MT.ZH893 and MT.ZH993 inhibited the growth of the tested foodborne pathogens including Escherichia coli PTCC5052, Salmonella enterica, Enetrococcus hirea, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and Intestinal Barrier-protective Activities of Commensal Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in Thoroughbreds: Role of Probiotics in Diarrhea Prevention in Neonatal Thoroughbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Soichi; Suzuki, Takuya; Wasano, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Fumihiko; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Tomonori; Nagamine, Natsuko; Tsurumachi, Takashi; Sugaya, Kiyoshi; Akita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Misako; Takagi, Kunihiko; Inoue, Yoshinobu; Asai, Yo; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    We previously isolated the commensal bacteria lactobacilli and bifidobacteria from the Thoroughbred intestine and prepared the horse probiotics LacFi(TM), consisting of Lactobacillus ruminis KK14, L. equi KK 15, L. reuteri KK18, L. johnsonii KK21, and Bifidobacterium boum HU. Here, we found that the five LacFi(TM) constituent strains remarkably suppressed pro-inflammatory interleukin-17 production in mouse splenocytes stimulated with interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β. The protective effects of the probiotic on impaired intestinal barrier function were evaluated in Caco-2 cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-α. Evaluation of transepithelial resistance showed that all the strains exhibited intestinal barrier protective activity, with significant suppression of barrier impairment by L. reuteri KK18. The LacFi(TM) constituent strains were detected in neonatal LacFi(TM)-administered Thoroughbred feces using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and culture methods. These five strains were found to be the predominant lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the intestinal microbiota of LacFi(TM)-administered Thoroughbreds. Administration of LacFi(TM) to neonatal Thoroughbreds decreased diarrhea incidence from 75.9% in the control group (n=29 neonatal Thoroughbreds) to 30.7% in the LacFi(TM)-administered group (n=101 neonatal Thoroughbreds) immediately after birth to 20 weeks after birth. LacFi(TM) treatment also prevented diarrhea especially at and around 4 weeks and from 10 to 16 weeks. The duration of diarrhea was also shorter in the probiotics-administered group (7.4 ± 0.8 days) than in the control group (14.0 ± 3.2 days). These results indicate that the LacFi(TM) probiotics regulates intestinal function and contributes to diarrhea prevention.

  5. [Antagonism of lactobacilli, oral streptococci and staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinets, Iu V; Beliaeva, E A; Ganina, E B; Troshin, A V; Chervinets, A V

    2015-01-01

    From the oral cavity of healthy young people aged 18-22 years there were isolated 26 strains of lactobacilli, 28 streptococci, including the pathogenic and opportunistic strains, and 32 strains of staphylococci, 10 of which were methicillin-resistant S.aureus. Oral lactobacilli possessed by a high probiotic potential, showing high antagonism to methicillin-resistant staphylococci, pathogenic and opportunistic streptococci and enterococci. Oral lactobacilli showed medium and high adhesive activity that determines their high adaptive capacity. Staphylococci and streptococci in 90.3% of cases have not an antagonistic effect on lactobacilli. Isolated lactobacilli can be used as probiotic strains for oral administration.

  6. 猪肠道来源乳杆菌的益生特性研究%Potential Probiotic Properties of Lactobacilli Isolated from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红; 戴春燕

    2011-01-01

    通过体外耐酸、耐胆盐和抗氧化活性分析法研究了猪肠道来源的5株乳杆菌的潜在益生特性。结果表明,5株乳酸杆菌均能耐受pH3.0。菌株PCL 3对pH 2.0具有良好耐受能力。受试菌株对0.3%~1.0%的牛胆盐具有良好的耐受能力,1%(w/v)胆盐处理4h,所有受试菌株的存活率均高于80%。抗氧化活性分析表明,菌株具有一定的体外清除羟自由基和DPPH自由基能力。%Five strains of lactobacilli which were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of pig were evaluated for probiotic potential with the pH and bile salts tolerance,and antioxidative activities.The results showed that all strains grew well at acid condition(pH 3.0,3h of incubation).Among 5 lactobacilli strains,PCL3 showed good tolerance to pH 2.0 for 3h.All strains could survive in the medium at 0.3%-1% bile salts.PCL3 possessed the highest ability of bile salts tolerance.Bioactivity tests in vitro showed that the all strains displayed ability to scavenge hydroxyl and DPPH radicals.

  7. Enrofloxacin and Probiotic Lactobacilli Influence PepT1 and LEAP-2 mRNA Expression in Poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, Ivelina; Milanova, Aneliya; Danova, Svetla; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/119949997

    2016-01-01

    Expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP-2) in chickens can be influenced by food deprivation, pathological conditions and drug administration. Effect of three putative probiotic Lactobacillus strains and enrofloxacin on the expression of PepT1

  8. Enrofloxacin and Probiotic Lactobacilli Influence PepT1 and LEAP-2 mRNA Expression in Poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, Ivelina; Milanova, Aneliya; Danova, Svetla; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/119949997

    2016-01-01

    Expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP-2) in chickens can be influenced by food deprivation, pathological conditions and drug administration. Effect of three putative probiotic Lactobacillus strains and enrofloxacin on the expression of PepT1 an

  9. Human mucosal in vivo transcriptome responses to three lactobacilli indicate how probiotics may modulate human cellular pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Troost, F.J.; Meer, van der C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Brummer, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, specific representatives of bacterial species that are a common part of the human microbiota, are proposed to deliver health benefits to the consumer by modulation of intestinal function through largely unknown molecular mechanisms. To explore in vivo mucosal responses of healthy

  10. Comparison of the immunomodulatory properties of three probiotic strains of Lactobacilli using complex culture systems: prediction for in vivo efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Mileti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While the use of probiotics to treat or prevent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been proposed, to this point the clinical benefits have been limited. In this report we analyzed the immunological activity of three strains of Lactobacillus to predict their in vivo efficacy in protecting against experimental colitis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the immunological properties of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB8826, L. rhamnosus GG (LGG, L. paracasei B21060 and pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium (SL1344. We studied the stimulatory effects of these different strains upon dendritic cells (DCs either directly by co-culture or indirectly via conditioning of an epithelial intermediary. Furthermore, we characterized the effects of these strains in vivo using a Dextran sulphate sodium (DSS model of colitis. We found that the three strains exhibited different abilities to induce inflammatory cytokine production by DCs with L. plantarum being the most effective followed by LGG and L. paracasei. L. paracasei minimally induced the release of cytokines, while it also inhibited the potential of DCs to both produce inflammatory cytokines (IL-12 and TNF-alpha and to drive Th1 T cells in response to Salmonella. This effect on DCs was found under both direct and indirect stimulatory conditions - i.e. mediated by epithelial cells - and was dependent upon an as yet unidentified soluble mediator. When tested in vivo, L. plantarum and LGG exacerbated the development of DSS-induced colitis and caused the death of treated mice, while, conversely L. paracasei was protective. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a new property of probiotics to either directly or indirectly inhibit DC activation by inflammatory bacteria. Moreover, some immunostimulatory probiotics not only failed to protect against colitis, they actually amplified the disease progression. In conclusion, caution must be exercised when choosing a probiotic strain to treat IBD.

  11. Screening of Lactobacilli derived from chicken feces and partial characterization of Lactobacillus acidophilus A12 as an animal probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Yun, Cheol-Won; Kim, Seung Wook; Chang, Hyo-Ihl; Kang, Chang-Won; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2008-02-01

    This study was performed to screen and select Lactobacillus strains from chicken feces for probiotic use in animals. Of these strains, strain A12 had the highest immunostimulatory effect. Therefore, strain A12 was characterized as a potential probiotic. Strain A12 was tentatively identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus A12, using the API 50 CHL kit based on a 99.9% homology. L. acidophilus A12 was highly resistant to artificial gastric juice (pH 2.5) and bile acid (oxgall). Based on results from the API ZYM kit, leucine arylamidase, crystine arylamidase, acid phosphatase, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase, alpha-galactosidase, beta- galactosidase, alpha-glucosidase, beta-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-beta- glucosamidase were produced by strain A12. L. acidophilus A12 showed resistance to several antibiotics (nisin, gentamycin, and erythromycin). The amount of interleukin (IL)-1alpha in 20x concentrated supernatant from L. acidophilus A12 was approximately 156 pg/ml. With regard to antioxidant activity, L. acidophilus A12 supernatant showed 60.6% DPPH radical scavenging activity. These results demonstrate the potential use of L. acidophilus A12 as a health-promoting probiotics.

  12. Isolation and characterization of lactobacilli from human faeces and indigenous fermented foods for their potential application as probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Hemanti; Jariwala, Ruchi; Bagchi, Tamishraha

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to select Lactobacillus strains from various sources on the basis of their probiotic attributes, such as acid and bile tolerance, binding to intestinal cells, and antimicrobial activity. Twelve isolates were obtained from human and food sources and were evaluated against standard probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Isolates were also studied for their antibiotic susceptibility. Isolate Lactobacillus fermentum GPI-6 showed the best survival profile at 0.3% and 1% bile salt, as compared with LGG. Isolates Lactobacillus plantarum GRI-2 and Lactobacillus salivarius GPI-4 showed no reduction in survival rate at pH 2.5. As expected, isolates showed strain-specific differences when comparing various attributes. Isolates GPI-4, GPI-7, and FA-5 showed better adhesion to HT-29, while isolate GPI-4 adhered better to Caco-2 cells than did LGG. However, when studying their ability to compete with Escherichia coli O26:H11, isolates GPI-6 and GPI-7 significantly inhibited E. coli adhesion to both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells compared with LGG. In conclusion, isolates GPI-4, GPI-7, and FA-5 showed excellent binding ability and antagonistic activity and better tolerance to acidic pH (pH 2.5) and to different bile salt concentrations in comparison with LGG, and hence, they could be considered as potential probiotic candidates.

  13. Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Ample research has described multiple biological activities of probiotics in animals and in humans. Probiotics interfere with local and systemic immune reactions and thus exert an influence on the barrier function of the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, attempting inflammatory bowel disease treatment with probiotics seems reasonable. In fact, a growing number of trials have studied the therapeutic effects in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Promising results have been found and in some, indications such as maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis and pouchitis guidelines recommend therapy with probiotics already today. However, many open questions still remain and the urgent need for high-quality trials requires much more research in the future.

  14. [Probiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the currently available literature, which includes well-designed clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, certain effects can be ascribed to probiotics as a general class. It is accepted that sufficient evidence has accumulated to support the concept of benefits of certain probiotics; it is reasonable to expect that evidence gained from a defined class of live microbes might be appropriate for certain, but not all, health outcomes. Moreover there is a need for clear communication to consumers and health-care providers of the activity of differentiate probiotic products.

  15. Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "probiotic" was first used in 1965, by Lilly and Stillwell, to describe substances secreted by one organism which stimulate the growth of another. The use of antibiotics, immunosuppressive therapy and irradiation, amongst other means of treatment, may cause alterations in the composition and have an effect on the GIT flora. Therefore, the introduction of beneficial bacterial species to GI tract may be a very attractive option to re-establish the microbial equilibrium and prevent disease. Prebiotic is a non-digestible food ingredient that confers benefits on the host by selectively stimulating one bacterium or a group of bacteria in the colon with probiotic properties. Both probiotics and prebiotics are together called as Synbiotics. Various bacterial genera most commonly used in probiotic preparations are Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Escherichia, Enterococcus, Bacillus and Streptococcus . Some fungal strains belonging to Saccharomyces have also been used. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical conditions- ranging from infantile diarrhoea, necrotizing enterocolitis, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, relapsing Clostridium difficle colitis, Helicobacter pylori infections, inflammatory bowel disease to cancer, female uro-genital infection and surgical infections. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG has proven beneficial affects on intestinal immunity. It increases the number of IgA and other immunoglobulins secreting cells in the intestinal mucosa. It also stimulates local release of interferons. It facilitates antigen transport to underlying lymphoid cells, which serves to increase antigen uptake in Peyer′s patches. Probiotics are live microorganisms, so it is possible that they may result in infection in the host. The risk and morbidity of sepsis due to probiotic bacteria should be weighed against the potential for sepsis due to more pathological bacteria and the morbidity of diseases for which probiotic bacteria

  16. Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V; Garg, R

    2009-01-01

    The term "probiotic" was first used in 1965, by Lilly and Stillwell, to describe substances secreted by one organism which stimulate the growth of another. The use of antibiotics, immunosuppressive therapy and irradiation, amongst other means of treatment, may cause alterations in the composition and have an effect on the GIT flora. Therefore, the introduction of beneficial bacterial species to GI tract may be a very attractive option to re-establish the microbial equilibrium and prevent disease. Prebiotic is a non-digestible food ingredient that confers benefits on the host by selectively stimulating one bacterium or a group of bacteria in the colon with probiotic properties. Both probiotics and prebiotics are together called as Synbiotics. Various bacterial genera most commonly used in probiotic preparations are Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Escherichia, Enterococcus, Bacillus and Streptococcus . Some fungal strains belonging to Saccharomyces have also been used. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical conditions- ranging from infantile diarrhoea, necrotizing enterocolitis, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, relapsing Clostridium difficle colitis, Helicobacter pylori infections, inflammatory bowel disease to cancer, female uro-genital infection and surgical infections. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG has proven beneficial affects on intestinal immunity. It increases the number of IgA and other immunoglobulins secreting cells in the intestinal mucosa. It also stimulates local release of interferons. It facilitates antigen transport to underlying lymphoid cells, which serves to increase antigen uptake in Peyer's patches. Probiotics are live microorganisms, so it is possible that they may result in infection in the host. The risk and morbidity of sepsis due to probiotic bacteria should be weighed against the potential for sepsis due to more pathological bacteria and the morbidity of diseases for which probiotic bacteria are being used as

  17. A snapshot into the uptake and utilization of potential oligosaccharide prebiotics by probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria as accessed by transcriptomics, functional genomics, and recombinant protein characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joakim Mark

    and lifestyle diseases are currently well documented. Selective utilization, of primarily non-digestible carbohydrates, termed prebiotics, by probiotics has been identified as an attribute of probiotic action, however the molecular mechanisms of prebiotics utilization and in particular the specificities...... of carbohydrate transporters and glycoside hydrolases that confer this remain largely unknown, limiting a robust understanding for the basis of selective utilization of known prebiotics and the discovery and documentation of novel prebiotics. The aim of this Ph.D. thesis was to identify the genes involved...... with uptake and catabolism of potential prebiotics by the probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 as model organisms, using DNA whole genome microarrays and by in silico pathway re-construction to identify key genes for further functional analysis by gene...

  18. Enhanced Immunostimulating Activity of Lactobacilli-Mimicking Materials by Controlling Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Koji; Kumano, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yuichi; Oyama, Naho; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Moriyama, Kaoru; Shida, Kan; Nomoto, Koji; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Koumoto, Kazuya; Matsui, Jun

    2015-08-19

    The design and synthesis of materials capable of activating the immune system in a safe manner is of great interest in immunology and related fields. Lactobacilli activate the innate immune system of a host when acting as probiotics. Here, we constructed lactobacilli-mimicking materials in which polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complexes (PS-PGs) derived from lactobacilli were covalently conjugated to the surfaces of polymeric microparticles with a wide variety of sizes, ranging from 200 nm to 3 μm. The artificial lactobacilli successfully stimulated macrophages without cytotoxicity. Importantly, we found that the size of artificial lactobacilli strongly influenced their immunostimulating activities, and that artificial lactobacilli of 1 μm exhibited 10-fold higher activity than natural lactobacilli. One major advantage of the artificial lactobacilli is facile control of size, which cannot be changed in natural lactobacilli. These findings provide new insights into the design of materials for immunology as well as the molecular biology of lactobacillus.

  19. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (Pantibiotics treatment was -1·4 ± 1·1, -1·2 ± 1·1, 2·6 ± 1·1 points/four weeks (Pprobiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  20. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  1. Survival and bioactivities of selected probiotic lactobacilli in yogurt fermentation and cold storage: New insights for developing a bi-functional dairy food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutella, Giuseppina Sefora; Tagliazucchi, Davide; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    In previous work, we demonstrated that two probiotic strains, namely Lactobacillus casei PRA205 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus PRA331, produce fermented milks with potent angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Here, we tested these strains for the survivability and the release of antihypertensive and antioxidant peptides in yogurt fermentation and cold storage. For these purposes three yogurt batches were compared: one prepared using yogurt starters alone (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus 1932 and Streptococcus thermophilus 99), and the remaining two containing either PRA205 or PRA331 in addition to yogurt starters. Despite the lower viable counts at the fermentation end compared to PRA331, PRA205 overcame PRA331 in survivability during refrigerated storage for 28 days, leading to viable counts (>10(8) CFU/g) higher than the minimum therapeutic threshold (10(6) CFU/g). Analyses of in vitro ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of peptide fractions revealed that yogurt supplemented with PRA205 displays higher amounts of antihypertensive and antioxidant peptides than that produced with PRA331 at the end of fermentation and over storage. Two ACE-inhibitory peptides, Valine-Proline-Proline (VPP) and Isoleucine-Proline-Proline (IPP), were identified and quantified. This study demonstrated that L. casei PRA205 could be used as adjunct culture for producing bi-functional yogurt enriched in bioactive peptides and in viable cells, which bring health benefits to the host as probiotics.

  2. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A.; Alaa H. Al-Charrakh; Bara Hamid AL-Greitty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effec...

  3. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A.; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; AL-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results: Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. Conclusion: The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very

  4. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H; Al-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-04-01

    Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very selective in order not to kill the beneficial bacteria

  5. Mechanisms and therapeutic effectiveness of lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aponte, Maria; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is not a silent ecosystem but exerts several physiological and immunological functions. For many decades, lactobacilli have been used as an effective therapy for treatment of several pathological conditions displaying an overall positive safety profile. This review summarises the mechanisms and clinical evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of lactobacilli. We searched Pubmed/Medline using the keyword ‘Lactobacillus’. Selected papers from 1950 to 2015 were chosen on the basis of their content. Relevant clinical and experimental articles using lactobacilli as therapeutic agents have been included. Applications of lactobacilli include kidney support for renal insufficiency, pancreas health, management of metabolic imbalance, and cancer treatment and prevention. In vitro and in vivo investigations have shown that prolonged lactobacilli administration induces qualitative and quantitative modifications in the human gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem with encouraging perspectives in counteracting pathology-associated physiological and immunological changes. Few studies have highlighted the risk of translocation with subsequent sepsis and bacteraemia following probiotic administration but there is still a lack of investigations on the dose effect of these compounds. Great care is thus required in the choice of the proper Lactobacillus species, their genetic stability and the translocation risk, mainly related to inflammatory disease-induced gut mucosa enhanced permeability. Finally, we need to determine the adequate amount of bacteria to be delivered in order to achieve the best clinical efficacy decreasing the risk of side effects. PMID:26578541

  6. Mechanisms and therapeutic effectiveness of lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aponte, Maria; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is not a silent ecosystem but exerts several physiological and immunological functions. For many decades, lactobacilli have been used as an effective therapy for treatment of several pathological conditions displaying an overall positive safety profile. This review summarises the mechanisms and clinical evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of lactobacilli. We searched Pubmed/Medline using the keyword 'Lactobacillus'. Selected papers from 1950 to 2015 were chosen on the basis of their content. Relevant clinical and experimental articles using lactobacilli as therapeutic agents have been included. Applications of lactobacilli include kidney support for renal insufficiency, pancreas health, management of metabolic imbalance, and cancer treatment and prevention. In vitro and in vivo investigations have shown that prolonged lactobacilli administration induces qualitative and quantitative modifications in the human gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem with encouraging perspectives in counteracting pathology-associated physiological and immunological changes. Few studies have highlighted the risk of translocation with subsequent sepsis and bacteraemia following probiotic administration but there is still a lack of investigations on the dose effect of these compounds. Great care is thus required in the choice of the proper Lactobacillus species, their genetic stability and the translocation risk, mainly related to inflammatory disease-induced gut mucosa enhanced permeability. Finally, we need to determine the adequate amount of bacteria to be delivered in order to achieve the best clinical efficacy decreasing the risk of side effects.

  7. A snapshot into the metabolism of isomalto-oligosaccharides in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Hachem, Maher; Møller, Marie Sofie; Andersen, Joakim Mark

    2013-01-01

    of IMO by probiotics, however, remains vaguely described. We have used genomic, transcriptomic, enzymatic, and biophysical analyses to explore IMO utilization routes in probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria as represented by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl...

  8. Safety Assessment of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

    Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

  9. Importance of lactobacilli in food and feed biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraffa, Giorgio; Chanishvili, Nina; Widyastuti, Yantyati

    2010-01-01

    The genus Lactobacillus is a heterogeneous group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with important implications in food fermentation. The ability to colonize a variety of habitats is a direct consequence of the wide metabolic versatility of this group of LAB. Consequently, lactobacilli have been used for decades in food preservation, as starters for dairy products, fermented vegetables, fish and sausages as well as silage inoculants. Lactobacilli have also been proposed as probiotics and microbial cell factories for the production of nutraceuticals. However, a wide range of applications of lactobacilli in food biotechnology remains potential, whereas a number of important strains still need to be discovered and characterized. This article provides an overview of the taxonomy of lactobacilli and describes four of the most significant case studies on the application of this group of LAB in food and feed biotechnology, including their use as probiotics, dairy starters, silage inoculants, and microbial cell factories. The importance of access to and exchange of biological material within and between different strain collections as a crucial step in expanding the range of different biotechnological applications of lactobacilli is also emphasized.

  10. Selection of lactobacilli for chicken probiotic adjuncts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garriga; Pascual; Monfort; Hugas

    1998-01-01

    ...: their ability to inhibit all the indicator strains; a high adhesion efficiency to the epithelial cells of chickens and also their resistance to a number of antibiotics, monensin, bile salts and pH 3·0...

  11. Liver abscess and bacteremia caused by lactobacillus: role of probiotics? Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherid, Muhammed; Samo, Salih; Sulaiman, Samian; Husein, Husein; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-11-18

    Lactobacilli are non-spore forming, lactic acid producing, gram-positive rods. They are a part of the normal gastrointestinal and genitourinary microbiota and have rarely been reported to be the cause of infections. Lactobacilli species are considered non-pathogenic organisms and have been used as probiotics to prevent antibiotic associated diarrhea. There are sporadic reported cases of infections related to lactobacilli containing probiotics. In this paper we discuss a case of an 82 year old female with liver abscess and bacteremia from lactobacillus after using probiotics containing lactobacilli in the course of her treatment of Clostridium difficile colitis. The Lactobacillus strain identification was not performed and therefore, both commensal microbiota and the probiotic product should be considered as possible sources of the strain. Lactobacilli can lead to bacteremia and liver abscesses in some susceptible persons and greater awareness of this potential side effect is warranted with the increasing use of probiotics containing lactobacilli.

  12. Role of Nitric Oxide Produced by Lactobacilli in Relaxation of Intestinal Smooth Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarullina, D R; Mikheeva, R O; Sabirullina, G I; Zelenikhin, P V; Ilinskaya, O N; Sitdikova, G F

    2016-01-01

    Application of NO-producing lactobacilli to a rat jejunum segment induced muscle relaxation that was potentiated after activation of bacterial NO production with NO synthase substrate L-arginine. Similar changes in the intestinal contractile activity were observed in response to exogenous NO formed by sodium nitroprusside. These results indicated the involvement of NO synthesized by probiotic lactobacilli in the regulation of the intestinal motor function.

  13. A snapshot into the metabolism of isomalto-oligosaccharides in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Hachem, Maher; Møller, Marie Sofie; Andersen, Joakim Mark

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the prebiotic potential of isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMO), comprising α-(1,6)-gluco-oligosaccharides and panose, which selectively stimulate the growth of probiotic bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. The protein machinery conferring the utilization...... of IMO by probiotics, however, remains vaguely described. We have used genomic, transcriptomic, enzymatic, and biophysical analyses to explore IMO utilization routes in probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria as represented by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl...

  14. A multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in older people admitted to hospital: the PLACIDE study protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Stephen J; Wareham, Kathie; Bradley, Caroline; Harris, Wyn; Dhar, Anjan; Brown, Helga; Foden, Alwyn; Cheung, Way Yee; Gravenor, Michael B; Plummer, Sue; Phillips, Ceri J; Mack, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    .... This study aims to test the hypothesis that administration of a probiotic comprising two strains of lactobacilli and two strains of bifidobacteria alongside antibiotic treatment prevents antibiotic associated diarrhoea...

  15. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62-82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8-31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans.

  16. Probiotics: current trends in the treatment of diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sujatha S; Jalgaonkar, Sharmila; Shahani, S; Kulkarni, Vijaya N

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, research into and public interest in probiotics and probiotic foods have risen. Lactobacilli and bifidobacterium are the most commonly used probiotics while yoghurt and kefir are popular foods containing probiotics. Probiotics have been used to manage diarrhoea. Many things cause diarrhoea, including bacterial, viral and protozoal infections, radiation and antibiotic therapy. Different studies have found that probiotics may also enhance the immune response, reduce serum cholesterol, prevent colonic cancer, prevent dental caries, prevent ulcers due to Helicobacter pylori, maintain urogenital health, and ameliorate hepatic encephalopathy. Further studies are required to establish their role in these conditions.

  17. Lactobacilli Activate Human Dendritic Cells that Skew T Cells Toward T Helper 1 Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-06

    Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702; and Department of Food Science, North Carolina State University...as safe when ad- ministered as probiotics . Because DCs can naturally or therapeu- tically encounter lactobacilli, we investigated the effects of...mucosal sites. Many Lactobacillus species are normal members of the human gut microflora and most are regarded as safe when administered as probiotics

  18. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    J Nowroozi; M Mirzaii; M. Norouzi

    2004-01-01

    Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and...

  19. Potencial probiótico de lactobacilos de origem suína - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i3.9826 Potential probiotic lactobacilli of pig origin - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i3.9826

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana de Almeida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O uso de probiótico na alimentação animal tem sido indicado, por reduzir a mortalidade resultante da colonização intestinal por micro-organismos patógenos, melhorar o desempenho e as características de produção sem deixar resíduos na carne. O experimento teve como objetivo isolar, a partir de amostras de fezes de suínos na fase de aleitamento, cepas de lactobacilos visando sua identificação como probióticos. Foram isoladas 92 colônias, posteriormente submetidas à prova de catalase e 60 tiveram resultados negativos. Estas colônias negativas foram submetidas à coloração de Gram foi avaliada sua morfologia. Destas, 16 apresentaram formas de bacilos. Esses isolados foram comparados pela sua habilidade de resistência em pH 3,0, crescimento na presença de sais biliares, fenol, lisozima, e sua capacidade de hidrofobicidade e antagônica. Os isolados L03, L04, L08 e L15, identificados neste trabalho apresentam melhores características para uso como probiótico, em função de demonstrar melhor comportamento sobre as condições ácidas, crescendo na presença de sais biliares e fenol, apresentando alta percentagem de hidrofobicidade quanto à presença de Escherichia coli.The use of probiotic in animal nutrition has been identified as reducing mortality resulting from intestinal colonization by pathogenic micro-organisms, improving productive performance and characteristics, leaving no residue in meat. The experiment aimed to isolate lactobacilli from fecal samples of suckling swine, in order to be identified as probiotics. Ninety-two colonies were isolated; these pre-selected colonies were subjected to catalase analysis, for which 60 were negative. The 60 colonies were subjected to Gram-negative stain and evaluated for their morphology. Of these, 16 had forms of bacilli. These isolates were compared for their ability to resist pH 3.0, grow in the presence of bile salts, phenol, lysozyme, as well as their hydrophobicity and

  20. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  1. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-06-01

    ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureusbiofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species ITALIC! Lactobacilluscan alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is hypothesized that these effects of lactobacilli require direct physical contact between lactobacilli, staphylococci and the epithelium. Indeed, lactobacilli only reduced ITALIC! S. aureus-induced inflammatory cytokine expression when allowed physical contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Furthermore, a reduction in toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion only occurred when a probiotic ITALIC! Lactobacillusstrain was allowed contact, but not when being physically separated from ITALIC! S. aureus Bacterial-probe atomic force microscopy demonstrated that lactobacilli and staphylococci strongly adhere to epithelial cells, while lactobacilli adhere stronger to staphylococci than staphylococci to each other, giving lactobacilli opportunity to penetrate and reside in staphylococcal biofilms, as visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescence ITALIC! in situhybridization probes. These results identify that physical contact and biochemical signaling by lactobacilli are intrinsically linked mechanisms that reduce virulence of ITALIC! S. aureusbiofilm.

  2. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kavita R; Naik, Suresh R; Vakil, Babu V

    2015-12-01

    The health benefits imparted by probiotics and prebiotics as well as synbiotics have been the subject of extensive research in the past few decades. These food supplements termed as functional foods have been demonstrated to alter, modify and reinstate the pre-existing intestinal flora. They also facilitate smooth functions of the intestinal environment. Most commonly used probiotic strains are: Bifidobacterium, Lactobacilli, S. boulardii, B. coagulans. Prebiotics like FOS, GOS, XOS, Inulin; fructans are the most commonly used fibers which when used together with probiotics are termed synbiotics and are able to improve the viability of the probiotics. Present review focuses on composition and roles of Probiotics, Prebiotics and Synbiotics in human health. Furthermore, additional health benefits like immune-modulation, cancer prevention, inflammatory bowel disease etc. are also discussed. Graphical abstractPictorial summary of health benefits imparted by probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics.

  3. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many literature data show that probiotics may modulate the intestinal microflora composition and may have immunomodulatory effect. Based on this hypothesis, probiotics are supposed to confer benefits to allergic diseases. Administration of probiotics when a natural population of indigenous intestinal bacteria is still developing could theoretically influence immune development by favoring the balance between Th1 and Th2 inflammatory responses. For this reason, some studies have evaluated the potential impact of probiotics supplementation in the prevention of atopic dermatitis, with contrasting results. Clinical improvement in immunoglobulin (IgE-sensitized (atopic eczema following probiotic supplementation has been reported in some published studies and the therapeutic effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis seemed to be encouraging. However, as far as the usefulness of probiotics as a prevention strategy is concerned, results are still inconclusive. In fact, the clinical benefits of probiotic therapy depend upon numerous factors, such as the type of bacteria, dosing regimen, delivery method and other underlying host factors, such as age and diet. More studies are still needed to definitively prove the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic eczema.

  4. Probiotics for caries prevention and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, S; Keller, M K

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the microbiota for restoring and maintaining health is a growing issue in medical science. A search for relevant clinical trials on the use of probiotic bacteria as a potential and clinically applicable anti-caries measure was performed. According to predetermined criteria, papers...... of heterogeneity among the included investigations hampered the analysis. Significant reductions of mutans streptococci in saliva or plaque following daily intake of probiotic lactobacilli or bifidobacteria were reported in 12 out of 19 papers, whereas 3 reported an increase of lactobacilli. Three caries trials...... in preschool children and the elderly demonstrated prevented fractions of between 21% and 75% following regular intakes of milk supplemented with L. rhamnosus. No adverse effects or potential risks were reported. The currently available literature does not exclude the possibility that probiotic bacteria can...

  5. Acid production in dental plaque after exposure to probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Mette K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli in health maintenance has raised the question of potential risks. One possible side effect could be an increased acidogenicity in dental plaque. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic lactobacilli on plaque lactic acid (LA production in vitro and in vivo. Methods In the first part (A, suspensions of two lactobacilli strains (L. reuteri DSM 17938, L. plantarum 299v were added to suspensions of supragingival dental plaque collected from healthy young adults (n=25. LA production after fermentation with either xylitol or fructose was analyzed. In the second part (B, subjects (n=18 were given lozenges with probiotic lactobacilli (L. reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 or placebo for two weeks in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over trial. The concentration of LA in supragingival plaque samples was determined at baseline and after 2 weeks. Salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS and lactobacilli were estimated with chair-side methods. Results Plaque suspensions with L. reuteri DSM 17938 produced significantly less LA compared with L. plantarum 299v or controls (p Conclusion Lactic acid production in suspensions of plaque and probiotic lactobacilli was strain-dependant and the present study provides no evidence of an increase in plaque acidity by the supply of selected probiotic lactobacilli when challenged by fructose or xylitol. The study protocol was approved by The Danish National Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (protocol no H-2-2010-112. Trial registration NCT01700712

  6. Toward an Alternative Therapeutic Approach for Skin Infections: Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacilli Against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Zaki, Noha M

    2013-09-01

    The wide spread of antimicrobial resistance has urged the need of alternative therapeutic approach. In this context, probiotic lactobacilli have been reported for the prevention and treatment of many gastrointestinal and urogenital infections. However, very little is known about their antagonistic activity against skin pathogens. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of lactobacilli to interfere with pathogenesis features of two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 49 lactobacilli were recovered, identified and tested for their antagonistic activities against the aforementioned pathogens. Of these, eight isolates were capable of blocking the adherence of pathogens to mammalian cells independent of the skin pathogen tested or model adopted. Moreover, three Lactobacillus isolates (LRA4, LC2 and LR5) effectively prevented the pathogen internalization into epithelial cells in addition to potentiating phagocyte-mediated pathogen killing. Interestingly, the lactobacilli LC2, LF9 and LRA4 markedly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates in coculture experiments. Besides, the lactobacilli LRA4, LC2, LR5 and LF9 have counteracted pathogen cytotoxicity. Taken together, the present study revealed some inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens. Moreover, it revealed two lactobacilli, namely LC2 and LRA4, with antagonistic capacity against different virulence determinants of skin pathogens. These lactobacilli are considered promising probiotic candidates that may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for skin infections.

  7. Exogenous lactobacilli mitigate microbial changes associated with grain fermentation (corn, oats, and wheat) by equine fecal microflora ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereal grains are often included in equine diets. When starch intake exceeds foregut digestion starch will reach the hindgut, impacting microbial ecology. Probiotics (e.g., lactobacilli) are reported to mitigate GI dysbioses in other species. This study was conducted to determine the effect of star...

  8. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nowroozi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and concentrated cell free culture after treatment with α-amylase, lysozyme and trypsin was determined. The isolated bacteria were Lacto. plantarum, Lacto delbruekii, Lacto. acidophilus, Lacto. brevis. The isolated bacteria had strong activity against indicator strains. The antibacterial activity was stable at 100ºC for 10 min and at 56ºC for 30 min, but activity was lost after autoclaving. The maximum production of plantaricin was obtained at 25 - 30ºC at pH 6.5. Because, lactobacilli that used to process sausage fermentation are producing antimicrobial activity with heat stability bacteriocin, so, these bacteria may be considered to be a healthy probiotic diet. Lactobacilli originally isolated from meat products are the best condidates as probiotic bacteria to improve the microbiological safety of these foods.

  9. Comparison of the CLSI guideline and ISO/IDF standard for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Sigrid; Zitz, Ulrike; Birru, Firew H; Gollan, Dagmar; Gołoś, Aleksandra K; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2014-12-01

    Lactobacilli play a crucial role as probiotics and as starter cultures in the production of fermented foods. Although lactobacilli are a technologically useful and beneficial group of bacteria, a few members of them have been rarely correlated with bacterial infections. Correspondingly, clinicians are interested in the antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is also relevant for commercially applied lactobacilli as bacterial strains harboring transferable antibiotic resistance genes should not be used in fermented and probiotic foods. Therefore, two methods were developed by different organizations, which were compared within this study. For this purpose, 22 Lactobacillus-type strains were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antibiotics following the procedures of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the International Organization of Standardization (ISO)/International Dairy Federation (IDF). Crucial discrepancies between both procedures were detected mainly due to the different AST media. Hence, half of the strains tested did not consistently grow in the CLSI medium, whereas all showed evaluable growth in the ISO/IDF medium. However, some antibiotics were influenced by the latter medium. In particular, low levels of essential agreement between both methods were obtained with seven antibiotics. Accordingly, different interpretative criteria are needed for both procedures to distinguish resistant from susceptible strains.

  10. Survival of pathogenic and lactobacilli species of fermented olives during simulated human digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Noé eArroyo López; Stephanie eBlanquet-Diot; Sylvain eDenis; Jonathan eThevenot; Sandrine eChalancon; Monique eAlric; Francisco Rodriguez Gomez; Verónica eRomero-Gil; Rufino eJimenez Diaz; Antonio eGarrido Fernández

    2014-01-01

    The present survey uses a dynamic gastric and small intestinal model to assess the survival of one pathogenic (Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL 933) and three lactobacilli bacteria with probiotic potential (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB2 and Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB4) during their passage through the human gastrointestinal tract using fermented olives as the food matrix. The data showed that the survival of the E. coli strain in the stomach and duodenum was ve...

  11. Impact of oral Lactobacillus acidophilus gavage on rooster seminal and cloacal Lactobacilli concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiess, A S; Hirai, J H; Triplett, M D; Parker, H M; McDaniel, C D

    2016-08-01

    The use of antibiotics in poultry is being heavily scrutinized, therefore alternatives such as probiotics are being investigated. Lactobacilli spp. are a commonly used bacteria in formulating probiotics, and the addition of Lactobacilli to broiler diets has demonstrated increased growth rates, stimulated immune systems, and reduced pathogen loads in the gastro-intestinal tract ( GI: ) tract. However, previous research has shown that when rooster semen is directly exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) sperm quality is reduced. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to determine if oral administration of L. acidophilus increases the concentration of Lactobacilli in semen as well as the cloaca. A total of 30 roosters were used: 15 roosters were gavaged with 1X PBS (Control) and 15 roosters were gavaged with 10(7) cfu/mL of L. acidophilus (Treated). All roosters were gavaged for 14 consecutive days. Semen was collected on a 3 d interval, and cloacal swabs were collected on a 2 d interval, beginning on the first day prior to oral administration. Semen and cloacal swabs were serial diluted, and 100 μL of each dilution was then plated on Man, Rogosa, Sharpe ( MRS: ) agar plates. All plates were incubated for 48 h at 37°C under anaerobic conditions and counted. All Lactobacilli counts were first log transformed, then log transformed (day 0) pre-counts were subtracted from the log transformed day counts providing log differences for the analysis. Seminal Lactobacilli counts were not altered by treatments. However, the main effect of treatment (P = 0.026) for cloacal counts indicated that roosters gavaged with Lactobacilli yielded higher counts than the controls. Additionally, cloaca samples also demonstrated a treatment by day interaction trend (P = 0.082), where Lactobacilli was higher in the L. acidophilus gavaged roosters than the controls only on days 3, 5, 13, and 15. In conclusion, the addition of L. acidophilus to the male breeder diet

  12. Effect of Chocobar Ice Cream Containing Bifidobacterium on Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Daryani, Hemasha; Sharda, Archana J; Asawa, Kailash; Batra, Mehak; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of chocobar ice cream containing bifidobacteria on salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. A double-blind, randomised controlled trial was conducted with 30 subjects (18 to 22 years of age) divided into 2 groups, test (chocobar ice cream with probiotics) and control (chocobar ice cream without probiotics). The subjects were instructed to eat the allotted chocobar ice cream once daily for 18 days. Saliva samples collected at intervals were cultured on Mitis Salivarius agar and Rogosa agar and examined for salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U-test, Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Postingestion in the test group, a statistically significant reduction (p ice cream containing probiotic bifidobacteria may reduce salivary levels of mutans streptococci in young adults.

  13. Importance of Molecular Methods to Determine Whether a Probiotic is the Source of Lactobacillus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroutcheva, Alla; Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu; Lolans, Karen; de Montigny, Danielle; Carrière, Serge; Sokalski, Stephen; Trick, William E; Weinstein, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of probiotic products for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Bio-K+(®) is a commercial probiotic product comprising three strains of lactobacilli--Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285(®), Lact. casei LBC80R(®) and Lact. rhamnosus CLR2(®)--that have been applied to prevent CDI. Generally considered as safe, lactobacilli have potential to cause bacteremia, endocarditis and other infections. The source of Lactobacillus bacteremia can be normal human flora or lactobacilli-containing probiotic. The aim of this study was to assess whether probiotic lactobacilli caused bacteremia and to show the value of molecular identification and typing techniques to determine probiotic and patient strain relatedness. We report an episode of Lactobacillus bacteremia in a 69-year-old man admitted to a hospital with severe congestive heart failure. During his hospitalization, he required long-term antibiotic therapy. Additionally, the patient received Bio-K+(®) probiotic as part of a quality improvement project to prevent CDI. Subsequently, Lactobacillus bacteremia occurred. Two independent blinded laboratory evaluations, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA fingerprint analysis (rep-PCR), were performed to determine whether the recovered Lact. acidophilus originated from the probiotic product. Ultimately, the patient strain was identified as Lact. casei and both laboratories found no genetic relation between the patient's strain and any of the probiotic lactobacilli. This clinical case of lactobacillus bacteremia in the setting of probiotic exposure demonstrates the value of using discriminatory molecular methods to clearly determine whether there were a link between the patient's isolate and the probiotic strains.

  14. How Probiotic Reduce Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khalesi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common gastrointestinal disorder in children that may lead to anxiety, frequent physician visits and school absenteeism. The aim of this study is to reviewe effects of probiotic for irritable bowel syndrome.   Materials and Methods: This study review articles about probiotic for irritable bowel syndrome in pubmed and google scholar.   Results: Multiple etiologic factors were suggested for IBS, including psychosocial factors, altered gastrointestinal motility,   malfermentation of food residues and changes in the intestinal micro flora. It is reported that patients with IBS have a great homogeneity in the fecal flora with a decrease in lactobacilli, coliforms and bifidobacteria in comparison to healthy individuals. The beneficial effects of probiotics in IBS could be explained by increasing the mass of beneficial bacteria such as lactobacilli strains in the digestive tract, decreasing bacterial overgrowth in the small bowel. Recently it was also demonstrated that some lactobacilli strains may modulate intestinal pain attacks by inducing the expression of μ-opioid and cannabinoid receptors in the intestinal epithelial cells. Probiotics can also reinforce the intestinal mucosal barrier and normalize the motility of the digestive tract and its visceral sensitivity and reversing the imbalance between the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines so that suggested as a therapeutic option for IBS.   Conclusion: Probiotic has been suggested as a therapeutic option for IBS by modulation pathophysiologic events in these patients. Keyword: Probiotic, IBS, Children.

  15. Lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle induce pro- and anti-infiammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Helwig; Stefan Schreiber; Massimo Campieri; Karen M Lammers; Fernando Rizzello; Patricia Brigidi; Verena Rohleder; Elisabetta Caramelli; Paolo Gionchetti; Juergen Schrezenmeir; Ulrich R Foelsch

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) with the cell debris and cell extraction of different probiotic strains is similar or Species specific.METHODS: Three strains of bifidobacteria, 4 strains of lactobacilli, and E. colinissle were sonicated and centrifuged in order to divide them into cell extract and cell debris. PBMNC were separated by density gradient and incubated for 36 h with either the cell debris or the cell extract of single strains of probiotic bacteria in doses from 102 to 108 CFU/mL. Cell supernatants were taken and interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, and tumor necosis factor (TNF)-α were determined by El ISA.RESULTS: Depending on the species super-family, the strains had different stimulation patterns. Except for both L. casei strains, the cell extract of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli had less stimulating capacity than cell debris, whereas the cell extract of E. coli nissle had similar stimulating properties to that of the cell debris of the strain and significantly more stimulating capacity than that of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. The cell debris of bifidobacteria stimulated more cytokine release than the cell debris of lactobacilli. The cell debris of lactobacilli did not have a stimulating capacity when lower concentrations were used. Neither cell extraction nor cell debris had an inhibitory effect on the production of the tested cytokines by stimulated PBMNC.CONCLUSION: The incubation of probiotic strains,which have been used in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, with immunocompetent cells leads to different species specific reactions. High IL-10 response to cell debris of bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle can be found. This corresponds to positive effects of bifidobacteria and E.coli nissle in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease compared to negative outcomes obtained with lactobacilli.

  16. Recent insight in α-glucan metabolism in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Goh, Yong Jun; Viborg, Alexander Holm

    2014-01-01

    biochemically understood activities in bifidobacteria compared to lactobacilli, where important members have been recently described at the molecular level. This review presents some aspects of α-glucan metabolism in probiotic bacteria and highlights vague issues that merit experimental effort, especially...

  17. Bacterial vaginosis: a review on clinical trials with probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Vitali, Beatrice; Mosca, Luciana

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal syndrome afflicting fertile, premenopausal and pregnant women. BV is associated with important adverse health conditions and infectious complications. Therapy with oral or local recommended antibiotics is often associated with failure and high rates of recurrences. The dominance of lactobacilli in healthy vaginal microbiota and its depletion in BV has given rise to the concept of oral or vaginal use of probiotic Lactobacillus strains for treatment and prevention of BV. This review investigated the evidence for the use of a single strain or cocktail of probiotics, administered orally or intravaginally, either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics for the treatment of BV. Lactobacilli use in BV is supported by positive results obtained in some clinical trials. The majority of clinical trials yielding positive results have been performed using probiotic preparations containing high doses of lactobacilli suggesting that, beside strain characteristics, the amount of exogenously applied lactobacilli could have a role in the effectiveness of the product. However, substantial heterogeneity in products, trial methodologies and outcome measures do not provide sufficient evidence for or against recommending probiotics for the treatment of BV.

  18. PROBIOTIC POTENCY OF LACTOBACILLUS SPP. ISOLATED FROM SUMBAWA MARE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Sujaya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was deigned to elucidate the potency of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from sumbawa mare milk to be developed as a probiotic. Sixteen lacobacilli were screened based on their resitancy to a model of gastric juice at pH 2, 3, and 4, then followed by their resistncy to small intestional fluid model containing deoxycholic. Three lactobacilli i.e. Lactobacillus sp. SKA13, Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG49 were found to be resistentent to gastric juice at pH 3 and 4. However, there were no lactobacilli resisted to pH 2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG49 were able to reach the colon even after being expossed to a model of intestinal fluid containing 0,4 mM deoxycholate and pancreatine. Therefore, these isolates have a potency to be developed as probiotic lactobacilli. Nevertherless, these lactobcailli could probably transform cholic acid into secondary bile acids, which were not expected to be found in the probiotic, and this capability is not appropriate for probiotic. This character is worthly to be studied since it has never been reported in lactobacilli.

  19. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-04

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  20. Probiotics: Healthy bugs and nourishing elements of diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vijayendra; Berwal, Vikas; Solanki, Neeraj; Malik, Narender Singh

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics is based on the concept that adding the right live microbes to the complex human system can result in physiological benefits. The benefit of fermented milk in human diet has been acknowledged since Vedic times; however, the scientific interest in this field was evoked by Ellie Metchinkoff who recommended that people should consume fermented milk containing lactobacilli to prolong their lives, as accelerated aging is due to autointoxication caused by the toxins produced by the gut microflora. They have been used to improve gastrointestinal health and their attractiveness has evinced interest to study their role in the promotion of oral health also. Studies have been widely carried out to establish the role of intestinal lactobacilli as probiotic to treat various gastrointestinal disorders, but only limited studies are available on the oral use of probiotics. The probiotic products usually contain lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, and their demand in the market is growing day by day. This paper provides an overview of various studies in the literature that emphasize on the role of probiotics to combat oral diseases and encourages more research in this field.

  1. Probiotics in prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea: meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Aloysius L; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Cooke, Jonathan; Bulpitt, Christopher J

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy of probiotics in prevention and treatment of diarrhoea associated with the use of antibiotics. Design Meta-analysis; outcome data (proportion of patients not getting diarrhoea) were analysed, pooled, and compared to determine odds ratios in treated and control groups. Identification Studies identified by searching Medline between 1966 and 2000 and the Cochrane Library. Studies reviewed Nine randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of probiotics. Results Two of the nine studies investigated the effects of probiotics in children. Four trials used a yeast (Saccharomyces boulardii), four used lactobacilli, and one used a strain of enterococcus that produced lactic acid. Three trials used a combination of probiotic strains of bacteria. In all nine trials, the probiotics were given in combination with antibiotics and the control groups received placebo and antibiotics. The odds ratio in favour of active treatment over placebo in preventing diarrhoea associated with antibiotics was 0.39 (95% confidence interval 0.25 to 0.62; P<0.001) for the yeast and 0.34 (0.19 to 0.61; P<0.01 for lactobacilli. The combined odds ratio was 0.37 (0.26 to 0.53; P<0.001) in favour of active treatment over placebo. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggests that probiotics can be used to prevent antibiotic associated diarrhoea and that S boulardii and lactobacilli have the potential to be used in this situation. The efficacy of probiotics in treating antibiotic associated diarrhoea remains to be proved. A further large trial in which probiotics are used as preventive agents should look at the costs of and need for routine use of these agents. What is already known on this topicProbiotics are well known for their microbiological properties and have been used to treat gastrointestinal and vaginal mucosal infectionsConflicting results have prevented probiotics from being accepted as viable alternatives to conventional treatments for antibiotic associated

  2. Administration of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum affects the diversity of murine intestinal lactobacilli, but not the overall bacterial community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Egert, M.G.G.; Jimenez-Valera, M.; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.; Ruiz-Bravo, A.; Smidt, H.; Monteoliva-Sanchez, M.

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli are normal inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of many mammalian hosts. Their administration as probiotics in functional foods is currently a frequent practice, mainly because of their benefits to host health. It is therefore of interest to study the impact of administration

  3. Normal and tumour cervical cells respond differently to vaginal lactobacilli, independent of pH and lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevaseli, Elahe; Shirzad, Mahdieh; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer is a human papilloma virus (HPV)-related cancer, but most HPV infections are transient or intermittent and resolve spontaneously. Thus, other factors, such as cervical microflora, which are dominated by lactobacilli, must be involved in invasive cervical carcinoma development after HPV infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that lactobacilli have antitumour effects, and it is possible that vaginal lactobacilli prevent cervical cancer. Here we examined the proliferative and apoptotic responses of normal and tumour cervical cells to common vaginal lactobacilli components by investigating human normal fibroblast-like cervical (normal cervical) and HeLa (cervical tumour) cell responses to Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus crispatus. The effects of different lactobacilli components, such as culture supernatants, cytoplasmic extracts, cell-wall extracts and live cells, were determined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, trypan blue staining, lactate dehydrogenase assay and colorimetric caspase-3 activity assay. Changes in caspase-3 and human chorionic gonadotropin β (hCGβ) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Tumour cell growth inhibition by culture supernatants was higher than that by pH- and lactate-adjusted controls. However, the effects of the supernatants on normal cells were similar to those of lactate-adjusted controls. Apoptosis was inhibited by supernatants, which was consistent with higher hCGβ expression since hCG inhibits apoptosis. Our study demonstrated that common vaginal lactobacilli exert cytotoxic effects on cervical tumour cells, but not on normal cells, and that this cytotoxicity is independent of pH and lactate. Our results encourage further studies on the interaction between lactobacilli and cervical cells, and administration of common vaginal lactobacilli as probiotics.

  4. Improved growth and viability of lactobacilli in the presence of Bacillus subtilis (natto), catalase, or subtilisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, T; Ametani, A; Kiuchi, K; Kaminogawa, S

    2000-10-01

    In an effort to demonstrate the potential usefulness of Bacillus subtilis (natto) as a probiotic, we examined the effect of this organism on the growth of three strains of lactobacilli co-cultured aerobically in vitro. Addition of B. subtilis (natto) to the culture medium resulted in an increase in the number of viable cells of all lactobacilli tested. Since B. subtilis (natto) can produce catalase, which has been reported to exhibit a similar growth-promoting effect on lactobacilli, we also examined the effect of bovine catalase on the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri JCM 1112 and L. acidophilus JCM 1132. Both catalase and B. subtilis (natto) enhanced the growth of L. reuteri JCM 1112, whereas B. subtilis (natto) but not catalase enhanced the growth of L. acidophilus JCM 1132. In a medium containing 0.1 mM hydrogen peroxide, its toxic effect on L. reuteri JCM 1112 was abolished by catalase or B. subtilis (natto). In addition, a serine protease from B. licheniformis, subtilisin, improved the growth and viability of L. reuteri JCM 1112 and L. acidophilus JCM 1132 in the absence of hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that B. subtilis (natto) enhances the growth and (or) viability of lactobacilli, possibly through production of catalase and subtilisin.

  5. In vitro development of resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI in Lactobacilli strains as perspective attenuation of gastrointestinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Raj K; Sinha, Vartika; Mishra, Ritesh; Kannan, Ambrose

    2011-05-01

    Inadvertent intake of inorganic arsenic and chromium through drinking water and food causing their toxic insults is a major health problem. Intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli play important regulatory roles on intestinal homeostasis, and their loss is known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Probiotic Lactobacilli resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI could be an importantfactorfor the perspective attenuation of Gl-disorders caused by these toxic metals/metalloid. In the present study resistance of arsenite (up to 32 ppm), Cr-VI (up to 64 ppm), and arsenite plus Cr-VI (32 ppm each) were developed under in vitro condition following chronological chronic exposures in Lactobacilli strains. Comparative study of biochemical parameters such as membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents; dehydrogenase and esterase activity tests, which are respective indicators for respiratory and energy producing processes, and the general heterotrophic activity of cells, of resistant strains showed similarities with their respective normal parent strains. The resistant strains were also found to be sensitive to antibiotics. Findings indicate that these resistant probiotic Lactobacilli would be useful in the prophylactic interventions of arsenic and chromium GI-toxicity.

  6. [Genetic identification and study of the ability of lactobacilli isolated from the oral cavity of healthy individuals to form biofilms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinets, Iu V; Botina, S G; Glazova, A A; Koroban, N V; Chervinets, V M; Samoukina, A M; Gavrilova, O A; Lebedev, D V; Mironov, A Iu

    2011-02-01

    The highly antagonistic lactobacillus strains isolated from the oral cavity of human individuals were genetically passported as L. fermentum 39, L. rhamnosus 50, and L. rhamnosus 24, by applying the RAPD-PCR technique with two types of primers (M13, MSP). These lactobacillus strains showed high degrees of autoaggregation, surface hydrophobicity, coaggregation, and adhesion. These characteristics determine the obvious capacity of lactobacilli to form biofilms, which may be used to design new probiotic agents.

  7. Interference Between Lactobacilli And Group A Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interference Between Lactobacilli And Group A Streptococcus pyogenes : An Expansion To The Concept Of ... New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology ... However, little is known about their health benefits in respiratory and skin infections.

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG as an Effective Probiotic for Murine Giardiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Goyal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut microflora is an important constituent in the intestinal mucosal barrier and has been introduced as the concept of probiotic therapy that beneficially affects the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to explore the protective potential of various lactobacilli strains for murine giardiasis. By experimentation, it was found that the probiotic supplementation of either Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, or L. rhamnosus GG, 7 days prior to inoculation with G. lamblia trophozoites, reduced the rate of cyst excretion compared with Giardia-infected mice. Interestingly, L. GG was found to be the most effective probiotic in reducing the duration of giardia cycle and acts as an effective prophylactic probiotic for murine giardiasis but needs to be clinically correlated due to entirely different human microflora.

  9. Profiles and technological requirements of urogenital probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina

    2015-09-15

    Probiotics, defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host, are considered a valid and novel alternative for the prevention and treatment of female urogenital tract infections. Lactobacilli, the predominant microorganisms of the healthy human vaginal microbiome, can be included as active pharmaceutical ingredients in probiotics products. Several requirements must be considered or criteria fulfilled during the development of a probiotic product or formula for the female urogenital tract. This review deals with the main selection criteria for urogenital probiotic microorganisms: host specificity, potential beneficial properties, functional specifications, technological characteristics and clinical trials used to test their effect on certain physiological and pathological conditions. Further studies are required to complement the current knowledge and support the clinical applications of probiotics in the urogenital tract. This therapy will allow the restoration of the ecological equilibrium of the urogenital tract microbiome as well as the recovery of the sexual and reproductive health of women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  12. Effect of dietary probiotic and high stocking density on the performance, carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress indicators of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Özcan; Köksal, Bekir H; Tatlı, Onur; Sevim, Ömer; Ahsan, Umair; Üner, Aykut G; Ulutaş, Pınar A; Beyaz, Devrim; Büyükyörük, Sadık; Yakan, Akın; Önol, Ahmet G

    2015-10-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dietary probiotic supplementation and stocking density on the performance, relative carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress markers of broilers. One-day-old Ross 308 male broiler chickens (n = 480) were allocated to 4 experimental groups for 42 d. Each treatment had 8 replicates of 15 chicks each. Two groups were subjected to a high stocking density (HSD) of 20 birds/m² and the other 2 groups were kept at low stocking density (LSD) of 10 birds/m². A basal diet supplemented with probiotic 1 and 0.5 g/kg of diet (in starter and finisher diets, respectively) was fed to 2 treatments, one with HSD and the other with LSD, thereby making a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. There was no interaction between stocking density (LSD and HSD) and dietary probiotic (supplemented and unsupplemented) for all the variables. Feed intake and weight gain were significantly low and feed conversion ratio was poor in broilers at HSD. Dietary probiotic significantly enhanced the feed intake and weight gain in starter phase only. Dietary probiotic supplementation had no effect (P > 0.05) on total aerobs, Salmonella sp., and Lactobacilli populations in the intestines of broilers. However, HSD reduced the Lactobacilli population only (P probiotic did not affect the relative carcass yield and weight of lymphoid organs. Serum malondialdehyde, corticosterone, nitric oxide, and plasma heterophil:lymphocyte ratio were not affected either by stocking density or dietary probiotic supplementation. In conclusion, HSD negatively affected the performance and intestinal Lactobacilli population of broilers only, whereas probiotic supplementation enhanced the performance of broilers during the starter phase only. Total aerobes, Salmonella, Lactobacilli carcass yield, and stress indicators of broilers were not affected by the dietary supplementation of probiotic under the conditions of the present study.

  13. Probiotics for human lactational mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, L; Arroyo, R; Espinosa, I; Marín, M; Jiménez, E; Rodríguez, J M

    2014-06-01

    The use of culture-dependent and -independent techniques to study the human milk microbiota and microbiome has revealed a complex ecosystem with a much greater diversity than previously anticipated. The potential role of the milk microbiome appears to have implications not only for short- and long-term infant health but also for mammary health. In fact, mammary disbiosis, which may be triggered by a variety of host, microbial and medical factors, often leads to acute, subacute or subclinical mastitis, a condition that represents the first medical cause for undesired weaning. Multiresistance to antibiotics, together with formation of biofilms and mechanisms for evasion of the host immune response, is a common feature among the bacterial agents involved. This explains why this condition uses to be elusive to antibiotic therapy and why the development of new strategies for mastitis management based on probiotics is particularly appealing. In fact, selected lactobacilli strains isolated from breast milk have already shown a high efficacy for treatment.

  14. Use of lactobacilli and their pheromone-based regulatory mechanism in gene expression and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, D B; Mathiesen, G; Eijsink, V G H; Nes, I F

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacilli are common microorganisms in diverse vegetables and meat products and several of these are also indigenous inhabitants in the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract of humans and animals where they are believed to have health promoting effects on the host. One of the highly appreciated probiotic effects is their ability to inhibit the growth of pathogens by producing antimicrobial peptides, so-called bacteriocins. Production of some bacteriocins has been shown to be strictly regulated through a quorum-sensing based mechanism mediated by a secreted peptide-pheromone (also called induction peptide; IP), a membrane-located sensor (histidine protein kinase; HPK) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). The interaction between an IP and its sensor, which is highly specific, leads to activation of the cognate RR which in turn binds to regulated promoters and activates gene expression. The HPKs and RRs are built up by conserved modules, and the signalling between them within a network is efficient and directional, and can easily be activated by exogenously added synthetic IPs. Consequently, components from such regulatory networks have successfully been exploited in construction of a number of inducible gene expression systems. In this review, we discuss some well-characterised quorum sensing networks involved in bacteriocin production in lactobacilli, with special focus on the use of the regulatory components in gene expression and on lactobacilli as potential delivery vehicle for therapeutic and vaccine purposes.

  15. The effect of probiotic fermented milk and inulin on the functions and microecology of the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairanen, Ulla; Piirainen, Laura; Gråsten, Soile; Tompuri, Tuomo; Mättö, Jaana; Saarela, Maria; Korpela, Riitta

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effects of a probiotic fermented milk and inulin on gastrointestinal function and microecology. The study was double-blinded and comprised 66 healthy adults (22 male, 44 female), mean age 40 years (range, 22-60 years). After a 12-d baseline period the subjects were randomized to consume, for 3 weeks, 3x200 ml daily of either (1) a fermented milk with probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum BB536, Bifidobacterium spp. 420 and Lactobacillus acidophilus 145), (2) a fermented milk with the same probiotics plus 4 g inulin, or (3) a control fermented milk. During the last 7 d of the baseline and the intervention periods, the subjects kept a record of their defaecation frequency and gastrointestinal symptoms, and collected all their faeces. Intestinal transit time, stool weight and faecal enzyme activities were measured. Thirty-nine subjects were randomized to give faecal samples for analysis of pH and microbes, including lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides and Clostridium perfringens. Consumption of fermented milk with probiotics or with probiotics and inulin increased the faecal number of lactobacilli (P=0.009, P=0.003) and bifidobacteria (P=0.046, P=0.038) compared with the baseline. Compared with the control fermented milk, both active products increased lactobacilli (P=0.005, ANCOVA). Subjects consuming fermented milk with probiotics and inulin suffered from gastrointestinal symptoms, especially flatulence, more than the others (P<0.001). In conclusion, the probiotic fermented milk product had a positive effect by increasing the number of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the colon. Inulin did not alter this effect but it increased gastrointestinal symptoms.

  16. Stability of lactobacilli encapsulated in various microbial polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Pranteda, María Luján; Poncelet, Denis; Náder-Macías, María Elena; Arcos, Antonio; Aguilera, Margarita; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Various microbial polymers, namely xanthan gum, gellan gum, pullulan gum and jamilan, were tested as a suitable encapsulating material for Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 1815 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103. Resulting capsules were also studied for their pH and simulated gastrointestinal conditions tolerance. The morphology of the microcapsules was studied using scanning electron microscopy. pH tolerance was tested at pH 2.0, 3.5, 5.0 and 6.5 over a 6h incubation period. Simulated gastrointestinal conditions were assayed with simulated gastric and pancreatic juices and simulated bile over a 24h incubation period. Suspensions of probiotic organisms were used as a control. The results from encapsulation with microbial polymers indicate that mixtures of 1% xanthan gum with 0.75% gellan gum and 1% jamilan with 1% gellan gum were the most suitable for microencapsulation. Results for the pH tolerance tests showed no improvement in the viability of cells in relation to the control, except for pH 2.0 where lactobacilli encapsulated in xanthan:gellan gum (1%:0.75%) prolonged their viability by 6h exposure. Xanthan:gellan gum (1%:0.75%) was the most effective of the encapsulating materials tested in protecting L. plantarum and L. rhamnosus against simulated bile, improving its viability in 1-2 logCFU when compared with control. The results of this study suggest that microbial polymers are an interesting source of encapsulating material that should be taken into account for prospective studies of probiotic encapsulation for oral delivery applications. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation and characterization of faecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli isolated from dogs and primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strompfová, Viola; Lauková, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Although bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been suggested beneficial for the host and are components of many probiotics and competitive exclusion mixtures, the knowledge on abundance, metabolic and probiotic characteristics in isolates from dogs and monkeys is still limited. The present study was aimed to isolate Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains (faeces of 22 dogs and of 5 primates: Cebus apella, Eulemur fulvus, Erythrocebus patas, Macaca fascicularis, Papio hamadryas) with the MALDI-TOF identification system Lactobacillus murinus, Bifidobacterium animalis and Pediococcus acidilactici were more frequently isolated species in dogs while Lactobacillus plantarum was isolated in several species of primates. Ten strains of 6 species were assayed for enzymatic activities (only Lactobacillus reuteri strains showed no undesirable enzymatic activity), antimicrobial susceptibility (detected higher minimum inhibitory concentration levels for tetracycline and gentamicin), and inhibitory activity against 15 indicator bacteria. All strains inhibited Gram-negative indicators while lactobacilli showed larger inhibition zones than bifidobacteria. L. reuteri II/3b/a (isolate from M. fascicularis) showed the best antimicrobial properties. Resistance to bile (0.3% w/v) was observed in all tested strains (no decrease of CFU/ml) whereas the decrease of 68.4-94.4% (after 90 min exposition) and 78.4-99.9% CFU/ml (after 180 min) depending on the strain was detected in the artificial gastric juice.

  18. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, S Y; Cheah, Y K; Seow, H F; Sandai, D; Than, L T L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Reduction of salivary mutans streptococci in orthodontic patients during daily consumption of yoghurt containing probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cildir, Sule Kavaloglu; Germec, Derya; Sandalli, Nuket

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that probiotic supplements in dairy products may affect the oral microbial ecology, but the effect in orthodontic patients has not previously been reported. The aim of the present study was to examine whether short-term consumption of fruit yogurt containing...... probiotic bifidobacteria would affect the levels of salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. A double-blind, randomized crossover study was performed and 24 healthy adolescents (12-16 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment were followed over four periods...... reduction of salivary mutans streptococci was recorded after probiotic yogurt consumption (P

  20. Divergent signaling pathways regulate IL-12 production induced by different species of Lactobacilli in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Yacine; Rizzello, Valeria; Cavaliere, Riccardo; Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Barberi, Chiara; Oliveri, Daniela; Pezzino, Gaetana; Costa, Gregorio; Meddah, Aicha Tirtouil; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that different strains of Lactobacilli differ in their ability to regulate IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs), as some strains are stronger inducer of IL-12 while other are not and can even inhibit IL-12 production stimulated by IL-12-inducer Lactobacilli. In this report we demonstrate that Lactobacillus reuteri 5289, as previously described for other strains of L. reuteri, can inhibit DC production of IL-12 induced by Lactobacilllus acidophilus NCFM. Remarkably, L. reuteri 5289 was able to inhibit IL-12 production induced not only by Lactobacilli, as so far reported, but also by bacteria of different genera, including pathogens. We investigated in human DCs the signal transduction pathways involved in the inhibition of IL-12 production induced by L. reuteri 5289, showing that this potential anti-inflammatory activity, which is also accompanied by an elevated IL-10 production, is associated to a prolonged phosphorilation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Improved understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms exerted by Lactobacilli is crucial for a more precise employment of these commensal bacteria as probiotics in human immune-mediated pathologies, such as allergies or inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Parolin

    Full Text Available Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17 by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection.

  2. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, Carola; Marangoni, Antonella; Laghi, Luca; Foschi, Claudio; Ñahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Calonghi, Natalia; Cevenini, Roberto; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17) by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection.

  3. Survival of probiotic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract of experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Darmov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of methodology for the identification of certified probiotic microorganisms in the intestinal contents of white mice and uinea pigs and study of their survival in the gastrointestinal tract of experimental animals. Rifampicin-resistant bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were used in the experiments. Cultures of microorganisms that have retained the species features were administered orally for 14 days and the number of viable bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were determined by sowing of feces in a dense nutrient medium with rifampicin. Probiotic microorganisms administered orally to experimental animals for 14 days are detected in the feces on the second day of the experiment. Live probiotic bacteria ceases completely to be detected in the feces of animals 3 days after the termination of their oral administration. Using the developed universal method of differentiation of probiotic microorganisms entering the living organisms and strains of their own intestinal microflora a significant decrease (4–7 orders of magnitude in survival of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the organisms of experimental animals was shown, followed by a lack of probiotic effect.

  4. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus and Lactobacillus Casei on the Behavior of Colorectal Tumor Cells

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    H Atapour Mashhad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic microorganisms are living normal flora of human body that have nutritional value and health benefits when administered in adequate amounts. The health benefits include prevention of bacterial diarrhea, skin eczema and recently understood, prevention and control of various cancers, as well. Different mechanisms such as stimulating the immune system, modifying the composition of gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract normal flora and prevention of the carcinogenic activity of fecal enzymes have been identified for their probiotic activity. Due to the high density of the normal flora in the gut and also preferentially sporadic nature of colorectal cancers, these cancers are among the main candidates of treatment trials with probiotics. In this study, direct effects of probiotic lactobacilli on colon cancer tumor cells were studied. Methods: Supernatant fluid and bacterial extracts were prepared and CaCo-2 cells were treated by these materials. Subsequently, the effects of the aforesaid elements were evaluated on cell proliferation, cell necrosis and cell apoptosis by MTT assay, LDH assay and caspase-3 activity. Results: The supernatants of lactobacilli decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis but they did not have any effect on cell necrosis. In contrast, when cancerous cells were treated by lactobacilli extract, it lead to cell necrosis in addition to reduction in cell proliferation and increase in cell apoptosis. Conclusion: The use of lactobacillus probiotics may reduce proliferation of tumor cells in the early stages of colorectal cancers.

  5. AI-2 signalling is induced by acidic shock in probiotic strains of Lactobacillus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslehi Jenabian, Saloomeh; Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    Survival and ability to respond to various environmental stresses such as low pH are important factors for lactobacilli for their function as probiotics. LuxS-mediated quorum sensing mechanism, which is based on the production of universal signal molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), regulates...... important physiological traits and a variety of adaptive processes in different bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic stress on LuxS-mediated quorum sensing (AI-2 signalling) in four probiotic strains of different Lactobacillus species. Initially, the production of AI-2...... study, the luxS gene appears to have a clear role in acidic stress response in probiotic lactobacilli. This might be important in the survival of these bacteria during the passage through the gastrointestinal tract, and further influence the cell-to-cell communication among bacteria in the intestinal...

  6. Bacillus probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Simon M

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial spore formers are being used as probiotic supplements for use in animal feeds, for human dietary supplements as well as in registered medicines. Their heat stability and ability to survive the gastric barrier makes them attractive as food additives and this use is now being taken forward. While often considered soil organisms this conception is misplaced and Bacilli should be considered as gut commensals. This review summarises the current use of Bacillus species as probiotics, their safety, mode of action as well as their commercial applications.

  7. Human lactobacilli as supplementation of clindamycin to patients with bacterial vaginosis reduce the recurrence rate; a 6-month, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryttig Kjeld R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to investigate if supplementary lactobacilli treatment could improve the initial cure rate after vaginal clindamycin therapy, and secondly, if lactobacilli as repeated adjunct treatment during 3 menstrual cycles could lengthen the time to relapse after initial cure. Methods Women (n = 100 with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed by Amsel criteria were after informed consent offered vaginal clindamycin therapy followed by vaginal gelatine capsules containing either 109 freeze-dried lactobacilli or identical placebo capsules for 10 days during 3 menstrual cycles in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Results The initial intent to treat (ITT analysis for the one-month cure rate was 64% in the lactobacilli group and 78% in the placebo group (p > 0.05. However, any patient with missing or unclassified smears at the initial visit who continued the study and whose next smear indicated a cure was included in the cured group; the study also excluded two of the patients in the lactobacilli group who reported that they did not take any vaginal capsules. With consideration to these population changes, the initial cure rate would be 77% in the lactobacilli group. The 76 cured women were followed for 6 menstrual cycles or until relapse within that time span. At the end of the study, 64.9% (24/37 of the lactobacilli treated women were still BV-free compared to 46.2% (18/39 of the placebo treated women. Comparison of the two groups regarding "Time from cure to relapse" was statistically significant (p = 0.027 in favour of the lactobacilli treatment. Adjuvant therapy with lactobacilli contributed significantly to avoidance of relapse with a proportional Hazard Risk ratio (HR of 0.73 (0.54–0.98 (p Conclusion The study shows that supplementary treatment combining two different strains of probiotic lactobacilli does not improve the efficacy of BV therapy during the first month of treatment

  8. In vitro screening of probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotic glucooligosaccharides to select effective synbiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimoud, Julien; Durand, Henri; Courtin, Céline; Monsan, Pierre; Ouarné, Françoise; Theodorou, Vassilia; Roques, Christine

    2010-10-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics have been demonstrated to positively modulate the intestinal microflora and could promote host health. Although some studies have been performed on combinations of probiotics and prebiotics, constituting synbiotics, results on the synergistic effects tend to be discordant in the published works. The first aim of our study was to screen some lactic acid bacteria on the basis of probiotic characteristics (resistance to intestinal conditions, inhibition of pathogenic strains). Bifidobacterium was the most resistant genus whereas Lactobacillus farciminis was strongly inhibited. The inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was strain dependent but lactobacilli were the most effective, especially L. farciminis. The second aim of the work was to select glucooligosaccharides for their ability to support the growth of the probiotics tested. We demonstrated the selective fermentability of oligodextran and oligoalternan by probiotic bacteria, especially the bifidobacteria, for shorter degrees of polymerisation and absence of metabolism by pathogenic bacteria. Thus, the observed characteristics confer potential prebiotic properties on these glucooligosaccharides, to be further confirmed in vivo, and suggest some possible applications in synbiotic combinations with the selected probiotics. Furthermore, the distinctive patterns of the different genera suggest a combination of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria with complementary probiotic effects in addition to the prebiotic ones. These associations should be further evaluated for their synbiotic effects through in vitro and in vivo models.

  9. Effect of doxycycline and Lactobacillus probiotics on mRNA expression of ABCC2 in small intestines of chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Milanova, A.; Pavlova, I; Yordanova, V.; Danova, S.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics and antibiotics are widely used in poultry and may alter drug bioavailability by affecting the expression of intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters. Therefore the aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacilli probiotics, administered alone or in combination with doxycycline, on the expression of ABCB1 (gene, encoding P-glycoprotein), ABCC2 (gene, encoding multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (gene, encoding breast cancer r...

  10. Postbiotic Modulation of Retinoic Acid Imprinted Mucosal-like Dendritic Cells by Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri 17938 In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are widely used as probiotics with beneficial effects on infection-associated diarrhea, but also used in clinical trials of e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis and inflammatory bowel diseases. The possibility of using probiotic metabolic products, so-called postbiotics, is desirable as it could prevent possible side effects of live bacteria in individuals with a disturbed gut epithelial barrier. Here, we studied how Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 cell-free supernatant (L. reuteri-CF...

  11. The extracellular biology of the lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, M.; Hols, P.; Bernard, E.; Rolain, T.; Zhou, M.; Siezen, R.J.; Bron, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacilli belong to the lactic acid bacteria, which play a key role in industrial and artisan food raw-material fermentation, including a large variety of fermented dairy products. Next to their role in fermentation processes, specific strains of Lactobacillus are currently marketed as health-pro

  12. Comparison of detection methods for vaginal lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, I; Kiiker, R; Oopkaup, H; Lapp, E; Rööp, T; Truusalu, K; Štšepetova, J; Truu, J; Mändar, R

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli offer protection against microbiota imbalance and genitourinary tract infections. We compared vaginal lactobacilli in 50 Estonian women of child-bearing age applying culture-based methods, quantitative PCR and next-generation sequencing (NGS). The culture-based methods found three different lactobacilli: Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus gasseri. Using NGS revealed the presence of L. crispatus in 76%, Lactobacillus iners in 52%, L. jensenii in 47% and L. gasseri in 33% of the samples. According to qPCR, L. iners was present in 67% and L. crispatus in 64% of the samples. The proportions of L. crispatus revealed by qPCR and NGS were in good correlation (R=0.79, P0.05). Good concordance for L. crispatus was also found between the results of the culture-based method and qPCR. Finally, good overlap between the results of the culture-based method and NGS was revealed: in case of a positive NGS result for L. crispatus, the same species was isolated in 95% of samples. The corresponding percentages were 82% for L. jensenii and 86% for L. gasseri. Our data indicate fairly general concordance of the three methods for detecting vaginal lactobacilli, except for L. iners. This points out the importance of standardisation of techniques, and the respective studies should involve cultures applying a medium suitable for the fastidious L. iners.

  13. Selective carbohydrate utilization by lactobacilli and bifidobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, D.; O'Connell Motherway, M.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Nauta, A.; Sinderen, van D.

    2013-01-01

    Aim - To evaluate the ability of specific carbohydrates, including commercially available products, to support the growth of representatives of two well-known groups of gut commensals, namely lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Methods and Results - Sixty-eight bacterial strains, representing 29 human-

  14. Fermentation adaptability of three probiotic Lactobacillus strains to oat, germinated oat and malted oat substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ponce, A; Nevárez-Morillón, G; Ortega-Rívas, E; Pérez-Vega, S; Salmerón, I

    2014-10-01

    Functional foods targeting the improvement of gastrointestinal health are widely recognized; of these, dairy-based probiotics are the most popular. Thus, the design of nondairy probiotics applying fruits, vegetables and cereals has raised great interest in the healthy food sector. The objective of this work was to assess the potential of germinated and malted oat substrates to support the growth of the probiotic cultures Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Fermentations were carried out with distinctive oat substrates at inoculum levels of 3, 5 and 7% v/v, substrate concentrations of 3, 5 and 7% w/v and with sucrose addition 1·5% w/v. Lag phase profiles, maximum growth rates and maximal growths were evaluated; protein and sugar contents were also quantified. There was no significant effect (P > 0·05) of the inoculum size on the fermentation kinetics; however, oat media significantly affected the growth kinetics. In simple oat media, Lact. acidophilus exhibited biphasic growth patterns. Lactobacillus growth patterns were significantly affected (P probiotic lactobacilli. Significance and impact of the study: In this work, the effect of oat media composition and fermentation conditions on the growth kinetics of three probiotic lactobacilli was determined. The variation in the inoculum levels did not have a significant effect on the probiotic cultures growth. Results revealed that protein supplemented simple, germinated and malted oat enhanced the cell viability of the probiotic lactobacilli; Lactobacillus casei exhibited better growth adaptability. The results also highlight that different weight in volume oat substrate concentrations has particular effects on Lact. casei growth kinetics. Our results contribute to a better understanding of oat-based media formulations as substrates for probiotic cultures.

  15. Vaginal Microbiota and the Use of Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cribby

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The human vagina is inhabited by a range of microbes from a pool of over 50 species. Lactobacilli are the most common, particularly in healthy women. The microbiota can change composition rapidly, for reasons that are not fully clear. This can lead to infection or to a state in which organisms with pathogenic potential coexist with other commensals. The most common urogenital infection in premenopausal women is bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition characterized by a depletion of lactobacilli population and the presence of Gram-negative anaerobes, or in some cases Gram-positive cocci, and aerobic pathogens. Treatment of BV traditionally involves the antibiotics metronidazole or clindamycin, however, the recurrence rate remains high, and this treatment is not designed to restore the lactobacilli. In vitro studies have shown that Lactobacillus strains can disrupt BV and yeast biofilms and inhibit the growth of urogenital pathogens. The use of probiotics to populate the vagina and prevent or treat infection has been considered for some time, but only quite recently have data emerged to show efficacy, including supplementation of antimicrobial treatment to improve cure rates and prevent recurrences.

  16. [Microbiota in women; clinical applications of probiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Suárez, Evaristo; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Pérez-Moreno, Jimena

    2015-07-18

    The main function of vaginal microbiota is to protect the mucosa against the colonization and growth of pathogenic microorganisms. This microbiota is modified by hormonal activity. Its maximum concentration and effectiveness occurs during the fertile period, where there is a predominance of lactobacilli. When it is reduced (microbiota dysbiosis) leads to bacterial vaginosis and candida vaginitis which are common diseases in women. Consequently, instillation of lactobacilli in the vagina has beneficial effects on the symptomatology and prognosis of these illnesses. Breast milk is one of the key factors in the development of gut microbiota of the infant. There is an enteric-breast circulation, which is higher at the end of pregnancy and during breastfeeding. This circulation could explain the modulation of the breast microbiota by using probiotics. It could have a positive impact not only for the health of the mother, who would reduce the incidence of mastitis, but also for their infant. The use of probiotics is a hopeful alternative in various gynecological pathologies. However, it's is necessary first some well-designed, randomized trials with standardized methods and with a significant number of patients in order to confirm its benefits and allow us its use in protocols.

  17. Probiotic features of two oral Lactobacillus isolates

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    Gordana Zavisic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we checked lactobacilli strains of human origin for their potential as probiotic. Samples were collected from oral mucosa of 16 healthy individuals, out of which twenty isolates were obtained and two of them were selected and identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (G1 and L. casei (G3. Both isolates exhibited antagonistic action towards pathogenic microorganisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella abony, and Clostridium sporogenes, but not on the growth of Candida albicans. The bacteriocin activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6358-P was shown only by L. plantarum G1. Moreover, the isolates G1 and G3 showed good viability in the acid gastric environment and in the gut environment containing bovine bile salts. The viability of G1 and G3 isolates in the gastrointestinal tract, and the adhesion to the intestinal mucosa were also confirmed in vivo. The biochemical tests of blood samples revealed lower levels of serum triglycerides and cholesterol, as well as reduced activity of alkaline phosphatase in all lactobacilli-treated Wistar rats, compared to control ones. No toxicity for NMRI Ham mice was observed. According to our experimental results, these findings imply that L. plantarum G1 and L. casei G3 could be characterized as potential probiotics.

  18. Gastroenteric pathology and probiotics: from myth to scientific evidence. Current aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, G

    2009-09-01

    Starting from Metchnikoff's theory of cell-mediated immunity and work on lactobacillus over 100 years ago, more and more applications for probiotics have been developed. Research into the health properties of probiotics has focused primarily on two areas: the interaction between intestinal microflora and enterocytes and the immune system and the use of probiotic products in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases in adults and children. This review examines recent studies on the clinical use of monostrain and multistrain probiotic products in gastroenterology. The most widely studied strains are lactobacilli and yeasts, specifically, Lacto-bacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomices boulardii; the gastrointestinal disorders most commonly treated with probiotics are inflammatory bowel disease and dysbiosis, both of which clinically manifest as diarrhea.

  19. Safety of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Ouwehand, Arthur C.; Salminen, Seppo

    2004-01-01

    The use of probiotics in foods has increased significantly and there are more and more products available with high numbers of viable probiotics. This article reviews the safety information on probiotic microorganisms. A literature search and assessment of safety data on current probiotics were undertaken. No significant safety concerns for current probiotics were observed. The available data attest to the safety of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium probiotics. In conclusion, current probioti...

  20. Genetic mechanisms of prebiotic oligosaccharide metabolism in probiotic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    Recent insights into the relationship between the human gut and its resident microbiota have revolutionized our appreciation of this symbiosis and its impact on health and disease development. Accumulating evidence on probiotic and prebiotic interventions has demonstrated promising effects on promoting gastrointestinal health by modulating the microbiota toward the enrichment of beneficial microorganisms. However, the precise mechanisms of how prebiotic nondigestible oligosaccharides are metabolized by these beneficial microbes in vivo remain largely unknown. Genome sequencing of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria has revealed versatile carbohydrate metabolic gene repertoires dedicated to the catabolism of various oligosaccharides. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the genetic mechanisms involved in the utilization of prebiotic fructooligosaccharides, β-galactooligosaccharides, human milk oligosaccharides, and other prebiotic candidates by these probiotic microbes.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus oris J-1, a Potential Probiotic Isolated from the Human Oral Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli can exert health-promoting effects in the human oral microbiome through many mechanisms, including pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus oris J-1, that was isolated from the oral cavity of a health child. PMID:27634996

  2. Probiotics in the Treatment of Diverticular Disease. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Bellisario, Cristina; Hassan, Cesare; Zullo, Angelo; Esposito, Gianluca; Annibale, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Diverticular disease is a common gastrointestinal condition. Low-grade inflammation and altered intestinal microbiota have been identified as factors contributing to abdominal symptoms. Probiotics may lead to symptoms improvement by modifying the gut microbiota and are promising treatments for diverticular disease. The aim of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of probiotics in diverticular disease in terms of remission of abdominal symptoms and prevention of acute diverticulitis. According to PRISMA, we identified studies on diverticular disease patients treated with probiotics (Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane). The quality of these studies was evaluated by the Jadad scale. Main outcomes measures were remission of abdominal symptoms and prevention of acute diverticulitis. 11 studies (2 double-blind randomized placebo-controlled, 5 open randomized, 4 non-randomized open studies) were eligible. Overall, diverticular disease patients were 764 (55.1% females, age 58-75 years). Three studies included patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease, 4 studies with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in remission, 4 studies with complicated or acute diverticulitis. Mainly (72.7%) single probiotic strains had been used, most frequently Lactobacilli. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 24 months. Interventions were variable: in 8 studies the probiotic was administered together with antibiotic or anti-inflammatory agents and compared with the efficacy of the drug alone; in 3 studies the probiotic was compared with a high-fibre diet or used together with phytoextracts. As an outcome measure, 4 studies evaluated the occurrence rate of acute diverticulitis, 6 studies the reduction of abdominal symptoms, and 6 studies the recurrence of abdominal symptoms. Meta-analysis on the efficacy of probiotics in diverticular disease could not be performed due to the poor quality of retrieved studies. This systematic review showed that high-quality data on the

  3. Mg(2+) improves the thermotolerance of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Zhang and Lactobacillus plantarum P-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Huang, S; Wang, J; Jan, G; Jeantet, R; Chen, X D

    2017-04-01

    Food-related carbohydrates and proteins are often used as thermoprotectants for probiotic lactobacilli during industrial production and processing. However, the effect of inorganic salts is rarely reported. Magnesium is the second-most abundant cation in bacteria, and commonly found in various foods. Mg(2+) homeostasis is important in Salmonella and has been reported to play a critical role in their thermotolerance. However, the role of Mg(2+) in thermotolerance of other bacteria, in particular probiotic bacteria, still remains a hypothesis. In this study, the effect of Mg(2+) on thermotolerance of probiotic lactobacilli was investigated in three well-documented probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Zhang and Lactobacillus plantarum P-8, in comparison with Zn(2+) and Na(+) . Concentrations of Mg(2+) between 10 and 50 mmol l(-1) were found to increase the bacterial survival upon heat challenge. Remarkably, Mg(2+) addition at 20 mmol l(-1) led to a 100-fold higher survival of L. rhamnosus GG upon heat challenge. This preliminary study also showed that Mg(2+) shortened the heat-induced extended lag time of bacteria, which indicated the improvement in bacterial recovery from thermal injury. In order to improve the productivity and stability of live probiotics, extensive investigations have been carried out to improve thermotolerance of probiotics. However, most of these studies focused on the effects of carbohydrates, proteins or amino acids. The roles of inorganic salts in various food materials, which have rarely been reported, should be considered when incorporating probiotics into these foods. In this study, Mg(2+) was found to play a significant role in the thermotolerance of probiotic lactobacilli. A novel strategy may be available in the near future by employing magnesium salts as protective agents of probiotics during manufacturing process. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus Gorbach-Goldin (GG: A Top Well-Researched Probiotic Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Papizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, living microorganisms which when used in adequate amounts, have health benefits on the host, have attracted a considerable deal of interest in the biotechnology market. Various prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes have been studied for probiotic purposes in human and animals. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the main probiotic genera; however, there are reports on the probiotic potential of strains belonging to Bacillus, Lactococcus, Pediococcus and also some yeast species. Lactobacillus species are regarded as the most investigated beneficial microbes for human and either animal probiotic development due to: a anti-inflammatory effects, b anti-allergic features, c secretion of antimicrobial compounds, d develops in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and e many Lactobacilli have been Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Among Lactobacilli, Lactobacillus rhamnosus Gorbach-Goldin (GG is known among the most in-detail studied strains and is regarded as a top well-researched and commercialized probiotic strain in the industrial biotechnology. Strain GG is a commercially significant probiotic which was originally isolated from the healthy human gastrointestinal tract in 1983. The documents studied this strain were reviewed here and it is shown that such successful strains in the probiotic market have been extensively studied from the probiotic traits and safety point of views and a minor part of the documents concerned the bioprocessing issues. Also, we showed that the beneficial and negative effects of this strain has been investigated in various clinical trial systems when it became commercialized. Various aspects of this strain are here reviewed, comparatively.

  5. Survival of pathogenic and lactobacilli species of fermented olives during simulated human digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Noé eArroyo López

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present survey uses a dynamic gastric and small intestinal model to assess the survival of one pathogenic (Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL 933 and three lactobacilli bacteria with probiotic potential (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB2 and Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB4 during their passage through the human gastrointestinal tract using fermented olives as the food matrix. The data showed that the survival of the E. coli strain in the stomach and duodenum was very low, while its transit through the distal parts (jejunum and ileum resulted in an increase in the pathogen population. The production of Shiga toxins by this enterohemorrhagic microorganism in the ileal effluents of the in vitro system was too low to be detected by ELISA assays. On the contrary, the three lactobacilli species assayed showed a considerable resistance to the gastric digestion, but not to the intestinal one, which affected their survival, and was especially evident in the case of both L. pentosus strains. In spite of this, high population levels for all assayed microorganisms were recovered at the end of the gastrointestinal passage. The results obtained in the present study show the potential use of table olives as a vehicle of beneficial microorganisms to the human body, as well as the need for good hygienic practices on the part of olive manufacturers in order to avoid the possibility of contamination by food-borne pathogens.

  6. Survival of pathogenic and lactobacilli species of fermented olives during simulated human digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-López, Francisco N; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Denis, Sylvain; Thévenot, Jonathan; Chalancon, Sandrine; Alric, Monique; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco; Romero-Gil, Verónica; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The present survey uses a dynamic gastric and small intestinal model to assess the survival of one pathogenic (Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL 933) and three lactobacilli bacteria with probiotic potential (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. pentosus TOMC-LAB2, and L. pentosus TOMC-LAB4) during their passage through the human gastrointestinal tract using fermented olives as the food matrix. The data showed that the survival of the E. coli strain in the stomach and duodenum was very low, while its transit through the distal parts (jejunum and ileum) resulted in an increase in the pathogen population. The production of Shiga toxins by this enterohemorrhagic microorganism in the ileal effluents of the in vitro system was too low to be detected by ELISA assays. On the contrary, the three lactobacilli species assayed showed a considerable resistance to the gastric digestion, but not to the intestinal one, which affected their survival, and was especially evident in the case of both L. pentosus strains. In spite of this, high population levels for all assayed microorganisms were recovered at the end of the gastrointestinal passage. The results obtained in the present study show the potential use of table olives as a vehicle of beneficial microorganisms to the human body, as well as the need for good hygienic practices on the part of olive manufacturers in order to avoid the possibility of contamination by food-borne pathogens.

  7. Adhesive Properties and Acid-Forming Activity of Lactobacilli and Streptococci Under Inhibitory Substances, Such as Nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, L; Harutyunyan, K; Harutyunyan, N; Melik-Andreasyan, G; Trchounian, A

    2016-06-01

    One of the main requirements for probiotics is their ability to survive during passage through gastrointestinal tract and to maintain their activity at different adverse conditions. The aim of the study was to look for the strains of lactobacilli and streptococci with high adhesive properties even affected by inhibitory substances, such as nitrates (NO3 (-)). To study the adhesion properties hemagglutination reaction of bacterial cells with red blood cells of different animals and humans was used. The acid formation ability of bacteria was determined by the method of titration after 7 days of incubation in the sterile milk. These properties were investigated at different concentrations of NO3 (-). The high concentration (mostly ≥2.0 %) NO3 (-) inhibited the growth of both lactobacilli and streptococci, but compared with streptococcal cultures lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus Ep 317/402, have shown more stability and higher adhesive properties. In addition, the concentrations of NO3 (-) of 0.5-2.0 % decreased the acid-forming activity of the strains, but even under these conditions they coagulated milk and, in comparison to control, formed low acidity in milk. Thus, the L. acidophilus Ep 317/402 with high adhesive properties has demonstrated a higher activity of NO3 (-) transformation.

  8. A new lactobacilli in vivo expression system for the production and delivery of heterologous proteins at mucosal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Thibault; Mansour, Nahla M; Bahr, May M A; Martin, Rebeca; Florent, Isabelle; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2016-07-01

    Food-grade lactic acid bacteria, such as lactobacilli, represent good candidates for the development of mucosal vectors. Indeed, they are generally recognized as safe microorganisms and some strains display beneficial effects (probiotics). In this study, we described a new lactobacilli in vivo expression (LIVE) system for the production and delivery of therapeutic molecules at mucosal surfaces. The versatility and functionality of this system was successfully validated in several lactobacilli species; furthermore, we assessed in vivo LIVE system in two different mouse models of human pathologies: (i) a model of therapy against intestinal inflammation (inflammatory bowel diseases) and (ii) a model of vaccination against dental caries. We demonstrated that Lactobacillus gasseri expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 under LIVE system efficiently delivered the recombinant protein at mucosal surfaces and display anti-inflammatory effects. In the vaccination model against caries, LIVE system allowed the heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans antigen GbpB by L. gasseri, leading to a stimulation of the host immune response.

  9. Antipathogenic activity of probiotics against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile in anaerobic batch culture systems: is it due to synergies in probiotic mixtures or the specificity of single strains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero-Sariñena, Sandra; Barlow, Janine; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn R; Rowland, Ian

    2013-12-01

    Probiotics are currently being investigated for prevention of infections caused by enteric pathogens. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of three single probiotics: Lactobacillus casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30184 (PXN 35), Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) and a probiotic mixture containing the above strains plus twelve other strains belonging to the Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Lactococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus genera on the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile using pH-controlled anaerobic batch cultures containing mixed faecal bacteria. Changes in relevant bacterial groups and effects of probiotic addition on survival of the two pathogens were assessed over 24 h. Quantitative analysis of bacterial populations revealed that there was a significant increase in lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria numbers, depending on probiotic addition, compared with the control (no added probiotic). There was also a significant reduction in S. Typhimurium and C. difficile numbers in the presence of certain probiotics compared with controls. Of the probiotic treatments, two single strains namely L. casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), and B. breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) were the most potent in reducing the numbers of S. Typhimurium and C. difficile. In addition, the supplementation with probiotics into the systems influenced some fermentations parameters. Acetate was found in the largest concentrations in all vessels and lactate and formate were generally detected in higher amounts in vessels with probiotic addition compared to controls.

  10. Eradication of Salmonella Typhimurium in broiler chicks by combined use of P22 bacteriophage and probiotic

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    Guilherme Augusto Marietto Gonçalves

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that the phage therapy is effective in controlling the number of colony-forming unit (CFU of Salmonella spp. in chicken gut. This paper describes the protective effect of phage and Lactobacilli administration on Salmonella infection in 1-day-old chicks. We administered the bacteriophage P22 in a single dose and a probiotic mixture of four species of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus once a day for one week. Samples were analyzed every 48 hours, and intestinal eradication of S. Typhimurium was confirmed after treatments. We observed an increase in the size of duodenal villi and cecal crypts, as well as an increase in body weight in groups that received daily doses of Lactobacilli. This study confirms the efficiency of bacteriophage therapy in controlling salmonellosis in chicks and the beneficial effect of Lactobacilli mixtures in the weight gain of the birds.

  11. Inhibition of C. difficile and C. perfringens by commercial and potential probiotic strains and their in-vitro growth characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.;

    2012-01-01

    and their growth characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of commercial and potential probiotic on C. difficile and C. perfringens and assess their growth characteristics in-vitro. The inhibitory effect of a cell free probiotic supernatant of 17 commercial bacterial...... strains (Lactobacilli n=16, Bifidobacteria n=1) on growth of clostridia spp was assessed in an agar well diffusion assay and broth co-culture experiment, using supernatant harvested at different growth phases and with and without pH adjustment. To study growth characteristics MRS broth was adjusted to pH2...... it was harvested. 10/17 probiotic supernatants inhibited C. difficile in a pH dependant manner when harvested in the stationary growth phase. In the broth co-culture 5/17 probiotics inhibited C. perfringens and 10/17 inhibited C. difficile both in a pH dependant manner. All probiotic strains were able to grow at p...

  12. Effect of chewing gums containing the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on oral malodour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette K; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjörg

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of chewing gums containing probiotic bacteria on oral malodour. The null hypothesis was that no difference would be displayed compared with placebo gums. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five healthy young adults with self-reported malodorous morning breath completed...... this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The design included run-in and wash-out periods interspersed by two intervention periods of 14 days each. The subjects were instructed to chew one gum in the morning and one in the evening containing either two strains of probiotic lactobacilli (L...... lower in the probiotic group compared with the placebo group (p probiotic chewing...

  13. Short-term effect of ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 on the number of salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Esber; Kuscu, Ozgur Onder; Selvi Kuvvetli, Senem; Kavaloglu Cildir, Sule; Sandalli, Nuket; Twetman, Svante

    2008-06-01

    Probiotic bacteria are thought to reduce the risk of some infectious diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine whether or not short-term consumption of ice-cream containing bifidobacteria can affect the salivary levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in young adults. A double-blind, randomized crossover study was performed and 24 healthy subjects (mean age 20 years) were followed over 4 periods. During periods 2 and 4 (10 days each), they ingested 100 ml (53 g) ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 once daily or a control ice-cream without viable bacteria. Periods 1 and 3 were run-in and washout periods, respectively. Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli were enumerated with chair-side kits at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. A statistically significant reduction (pice-cream. A decline of high mutans streptococci counts was also seen after intake of the control ice-cream, but the difference compared to baseline was not statistically significant. The salivary lactobacilli levels were unaltered after both regimes. Daily consumtion of ice-cream containing probiotic bifidobacteria may reduce the salivary levels of mutans streptococci in young adults.

  14. [Autochthonous microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Juan Evaristo

    2015-02-07

    The autochthonous microbiota is the community of microorganisms that colonizes the skin and mucosal surfaces. The symbiosis is, generally, mutualistic but it can become parasitic due to immune response alterations. The skin microbiota includes bacteria (95%), lipophilic fungi and mites. In the digestive apparatus, each cavity presents its own microbiota, which reaches its target organ during the perinatal period, originating complex and stable communities (homeostasis). The vaginal microbiota varies with the endocrine activity, significantly increasing during the fertile and pregnancy periods, when lactobacilli are the most abundant organisms. Four are the main benefits of the autochthonous microbiota: i) delivery of essential nutrients, such as vitamins and some amino acids; ii) utilization of undigestible diet components, the colonic microbiota degrades complex glycans and fulfils almost 20% of the calories present in a normal diet; iii) development of the immune system: the continuous contact with the immune system maintains it alert and in good shape to repel pathogens efficaciously and iv) microbial antagonism, hinders colonization of our mucosal surfaces by alochthonous, potentially pathogenic, organisms. This works through three mechanisms: colonization interference, production of antimicrobials and co-aggregation with the potential pathogens. The microbiota can, sporadically, produce damages: opportunistic endogenous infections and generation of carcinogenic compounds. Probiotics are "live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the consumer". Prebiotics are undigestible glycans that enhance the growth or activity of the intestinal microbiota, thus generating a health benefit. Synbiotics are mixes of probiotics and prebiotics that exert a synergistic health effect. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. IN VITRO SCREENING OF LOCALLY ISOLATED LACTOBACILLUS SPECIES FOR PROBIOTIC PROPERTIES

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    M. ASHRAF, M. ARSHAD, M. SIDDIQUE AND G. MUHAMMAD1

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the probiotic properties of locally isolated lactobacilli in-vitro conditions. For this purpose, intestinal contents (n=20 were collected from crop, gizzard, ileum and caecum of adult healthy chicks and conventional yogurt samples (n=20 were procured from the local market for the isolation of lactobacilli. These samples were mixed homogeneously in sterilized phosphate buffer saline (PBS separately. Samples from both sources were inoculated on deMan Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS agar. L. acidophilus 3, L. rhamnosus and L. salivarius were isolated from intestinal contents, while L. delbrucekii ssp bulgaricus and L. paracasei ssp paracasei 1 were isolated from yogurt samples. These lactobacilli were identified through standard API-50 CHL system and then screened for resistance against bile salt, acidic pH, gastric transit and ability to inhibit pathogens as well as survival under different storage temperatures. Tolerance level was found variable (P<0.05 among all the tested species of lactobacillus. All the tested species, except L. delbrucekii and L. paracasei, showed good survival (P<0.05. All lactobacilli inhibited the growth of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, except L. delbrucekii that showed significantly (P<0.05 low antimicrobial effect. The results showed that L. acidophilus 3, L. rhamnosus and L. salivarius fulfilled the criteria of in-vitro screening for probiotic properties.

  16. Investigation of antibacterial, acid and bile tolerance properties of lactobacilli isolated from Koozeh cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanzadazar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus strains are a major part of the probiotics, microflora of the intestine and of fermented dairy products, and are found in a variety of environments. The aim of this study was to find out the ability of bile and acid tolerance and antibacterial properties of the twenty eight isolates of three group lactobacilli namely Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus delbruki. For this purpose Twenty eight different Lactobacillus strains that isolated from Koozeh cheese as a traditional cheese were screened. The acid tolerance test was studied under pH 2.0 and 3.0 with 7.5 as control. The cell count for the acid tolerance test was obtained at an interval of 0, 1, 2 and 3 hours respectively and was pour plated on Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS agar to be incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. All cells were selected for bile tolerance test in MRS broth containing bile concentrations of 0% as control and 0.3% as test. Then cell counts were enumerated after 24 hours of incubation on MRS agar. Results showed twenty seven isolates did not have ability to tolerate acid and bile salts and antimicrobial activity against four indicator bacteria included Eshirichia coli, Listeria monocytogenesis, bacillus cereus, Salmonella entritidis. Only one Isolate namely Lactobacillus casei could tolerate acid and bile salt and had antibacterial activity against of L. monocytogenesis. Therefore we can consider this strain as a native probiotic but extra examinations was required.

  17. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa.

  18. Behavior of lactobacilli isolated from fermented slurry (ben-saalga in gnotobiotic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Turpin

    Full Text Available Most bacterial strains, which have been studied so far for their probiotic functions, are extensively used by manufacturers in developed countries. In our work, we sought to study a mix (called BSL comprising three strains belonging to Lactobacillus fermentum, L. paraplantarum and L. salivarius, that were isolated from a traditional African pearl millet based fermented slurry. Our objective was to study this BSL cocktail in gnotobiotic rats, to evaluate their survival and their behavior in the digestive tract conditions. After a single oral inoculation of germfree rats with BSL, the species established stably in the digestive tract with the following hierarchy of abundance: L. salivarius> L. plantarum> L. fermentum. BSL cocktail was metabolically active since it produced 50 mM lactate and it expressed genes involved in binding mechanism in the caecum. Furthermore, the global morphology of the colon epithelium was not disturbed by the BSL cocktail. BSL cocktail did not modify mucus content and host mucus-related genes (MUC1, MUC2, MUC3 or resistin-like molecule β. The cocktail of lactobacilli enhanced the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA at a level comparable to what was observed in conventional rats. PCNA was involved in proliferation and DNA repair, but the presence of the cocktail did not provoke proliferative events (with Ki67 as indicator, so we suppose BSL may help gut preservation. This work is the first step towards the selection of strains that are derived from traditional fermented food to formulate new probiotic mixture.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIOCIN FROM PROBIOTIC LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM

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    A. Jayachitra*, C.M. Sukanya and N. Krithiga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In our study, the sample (cheese was selected for isolation and identification of Lactobacillus species as local probiotic isolate. The strain was subjected to microscopic and macroscopic investigations for probiotic selection. The world health organization criteria (WHO were applied to all Lactobacillus species against E. coli, P. areoginosa, S. aerus, Chromobacterium, Serratia and A. flavus, antibiotic sensitivity test, acid and bile tolerance test, heamolytic activity. Antimicrobial compound called bacteriocin was partially purified. The Lactobacillus species was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and specific catalase gene was also amplified. Data showed that Lactobacillus plantarum has a high inhibitory activity, tolerant to bile and acid, highly resistant to many antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptide was partially purified, characterized and bacteriocin produced by L. plantarum remained constant activity after heating at 121oC for 10 min. L. plantarum may be an alternative and promising way for eradicating many diseases. L. plantarum produces antimicrobial metabolites can give reasonable assurance of the control of pathogenic microorganisms. Increase the number of food-poisoning patients, the inhibition of the bacterial growth or production of enterotoxin such as verotoxins by administrating Lactobacilli bacteriocins would be of great importance. Lactobacillus fulfills the basic criteria required for probiotic strains which survive in in-vitro condition. The experimental strain exhibited strong antibacterial and antifungal activities against the pathogens. L. plantarum has high probiotic potential for eradicating many diseases, mainly the suppression of A. flavus which produce Aflatoxin. Pharmaceutical and nutritional industries are exploring more natural treatments for health conscious consumers as natural treatments have been effective.

  20. Evaluation of probiotic characteristics of newly isolated Lactobacillus spp.: immune modulation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Yun, Hyun Sun; Cho, Kyu Won; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun; Chun, Taehoon; Kim, Bongjoon; Whang, Kwang Youn

    2011-08-02

    In the current study, the probiotic potential of approximately 350 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Korean infant feces and Kimchi was investigated. Common probiotic properties of the bacterial strains, such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance and adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29 cells), were examined. Some strains were found to have immune modulatory and antimicrobial properties. Antagonistic activity against a panel of pathogenic bacteria was found to be strain dependent. To evaluate the immune modulatory activity of the strains, lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ secretion was determined in conjunction with cell proliferation. Some strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, L. fermentum and L. plantarum exhibited increased IFN-γ levels and lymphocyte proliferation. To evaluate the effects of these immune modulating lactobacilli on host life span, Caenorhabditis elegans was used as an in vivo model. Nematodes that were supplied heat-killed lactobacilli as a food source exhibited obvious differences in life span compared with those fed Escherichia coli OP50. The mean life span (determined as mean percent survival) of worms fed L. plantarum CJLP133 and L. fermentum LA12 was 13.89% and 13.69% greater, respectively, than that of control nematodes after 21 days (P=0.036 and 0.043, respectively). In addition, some of safety profiles, including hemolytic type, gelatin hydration and degradation of urea, were found to be positive. These newly identified lactobacilli hold promise for use as probiotic agents, feed additives and/or in food applications.

  1. Use of Probiotics as Prophylaxis for Postoperative Infections

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    Peter Mangell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative bacterial infections are common despite prophylactic administration of antibiotics. The wide-spread use of antibiotics in patients has contributed to the emergence of multiresistant bacteria. A restricted use of antibiotics must be followed in most clinical situations. In surgical patients there are several reasons for an altered microbial flora in the gut in combination with an altered barrier function leading to an enhanced inflammatory response to surgery. Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that probiotics (mainly lactobacilli may reduce the number of potentially pathogenia bacteria (PPM and restore a deranged barrier function. It is therefore of interest to test if these abilities of probiotics can be utilized in preoperative prophylaxis. These factors may be corrected by perioperative administration of probiotics in addition to antibiotics. Fourteen randomized clinical trials have been presented in which the effect of such regimens has been tested. It seems that in patients undergoing liver transplantation or elective surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract prophylactic administration of different probiotic strains in combination with different fibers results in a three-fold reduction in postoperative infections. In parallel there seems to be a reduction in postoperative inflammation, although that has not been studied in a systematic way. The use of similar concepts in colorectal surgery has not been successful in reducing postoperative infections. Reasons for this difference are not obvious. It may be that higher doses of probiotics with longer duration are needed to influence microbiota in the lower gastrointestinal tract or that immune function in colorectal patients may not be as important as in transplantation or surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The favorable results for the use of prophylactic probiotics in some settings warrant further controlled studies to elucidate potential

  2. Probiotics and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Pavitra; Saini, Himani; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics utilize the naturally occurring bacteria to confer health benefits. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and are being mainly utilized for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and disease; however, recently, several studies have suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to understand the potential mechanism of action of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize their observed effects wi...

  3. Probiotic characters of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus are a result of the ongoing gene acquisition and genome minimization evolutionary trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papizadeh, Moslem; Rohani, Mahdi; Nahrevanian, Hossein; Javadi, Abdolreza; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza

    2017-08-18

    Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus are the main probiotic genera. Collectively, these two genera harbor over 200 species among which are many strains have been introduced as probiotics. These health-promoting microbes confer health benefits upon the host and so used in food productions and as supplements. Considering the economic importance of probiotics, the biochemistry, genomics, phylogeny and physiology of such genera have been exhaustively studied. According to the genomic data, the probiotic capabilities are strain specific which may be a result of the niche-specialization of the genomes of these bacteria to certain ecological niches like gastrointestinal tract of a diverse range of animals. These microbes have a wide distribution but the culture-based studies and either genomics data suggest selective affinity of some Lactobacillus and either Bifidobacterium species to certain ecological niches. An ongoing genome degradation, which is thought to be a result of passage through an evolutionary bottleneck, is the major trend in the evolution of lactobacilli. Further, evolutionary events resulted into two categories of lactobacilli: habitat generalists and habitat specialists. In place, the main trend in the evolution of bifidobacteria tend to be the gene acquisition. However, probiotic features are the results of a co-evolutionary relationship between these bacteria and their hosts and the aforementioned evolutionary tends have driven the evolution of these probiotic genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Oral Candida in Frail Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft-Bodi, E; Jørgensen, M R; Keller, M K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a daily intake of probiotic lactobacilli on the prevalence and counts of oral Candida in frail elderly patients living in nursing homes. The study had a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled design with 2 parallel arms. The study group...... and evening). The intervention period was 12 wk, and saliva and plaque samples were collected at baseline and follow-up. The primary end point was prevalence of high Candida counts assessed from chairside tests. Secondary end points were levels of dental plaque and gingival inflammation. The groups were...... balanced at baseline. The attrition rate to follow-up was 19%. There was a statistically significant reduction in the prevalence of high Candida counts in the probiotic group but not in the placebo group, and the difference was statistically significant in both saliva and plaque (P

  5. Characterization of autochthonous Lactobacillus paracasei strains on potential probiotic ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Radulović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from traditional made cheeses constitute a reservoir of unexplored potential in biotechnology. In this study four autochthonous lactobacilli strains, isolated from traditional white brined cheeses and identified as Lactobacillus paracasei (08, 564, 05 and 02, were investigated on potential probiotic ability. The investigation comprised sensitivity to simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions, antimicrobial activity against wide range of pathogens, antibiotic resistance as well as autoaggregation ability. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was used as referent strain. Three tested strains grew well in simulated gastrointestinal conditions, but their sensitivity was greater on bile acids and pancreatin compared with pepsin low pH 2.5. The examined strains had different sensitivity to antibiotics, but three strains showed very good antimicrobial activity to pathogens. All strains demonstrated very good autoaggregation ability. For three of four examined strains of Lb. paracasei probiotic potential was similar with referent strain Lb. rhamnosus GG, determined in vitro

  6. Changes in vaginal microbiota following antimicrobial and probiotic therapy

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    Jean M. Macklaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The composition of the vaginal microbiota is known to be important for health. When infections occur, antimicrobial therapy is often poorly efficacious. Objective and design: We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize changes in the bacterial microbiota following oral antimicrobial and probiotic interventions. Results: While the bacterial vaginal profiles of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were dominated by lactobacilli as in healthy women, and unchanged by therapy, Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella, Atopobium, Sneathia, and Megasphaera dominated the vagina of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV, and treatment with tinidazole plus Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14+L. rhamnosus GR-1 resulted in an increased relative abundance of indigenous L. iners or L. crispatus. Conclusions: The ability to restore homeostasis provides a rationale for conjoint use of probiotics with antibiotic treatment of BV.

  7. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. On-going research in our lab aims at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid...... bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... buffy coats by negative isolation using non-NK lineage specific antibodies and magnetic beads. NK cells were incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA and cytokine concentrations were...

  8. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

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    Icy D’Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecules offer the opportunity to further investigate their effects for food, nutrition, environment andhealth. This review highlights advances in native probiotics and recombinant probiotics expressing native and recombinant molecules for food, nutrition, environment and health.

  9. Blueberry husks and probiotics attenuate colorectal inflammation and oncogenesis, and liver injuries in rats exposed to cycling DSS-treatment.

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    Asa Håkansson

    Full Text Available Long-term colonic inflammation promotes carcinogenesis and histological abnormalities of the liver, and colorectal tumours frequently arise in a background of dysplasia, a precursor of adenomas. Altered colonic microbiota with an increased proportion of bacteria with pro-inflammatory characteristics, have been implicated in neoplastic progression. The composition of the microbiota can be modified by dietary components such as probiotics, polyphenols and dietary fibres. In the present study, the influence of probiotics in combination with blueberry husks on colorectal carcinogenesis and subsequent liver damage was evaluated.Colorectal tumours were induced in rats by cyclic treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS. Blueberry husks and a mixture of three probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15159, Lactobacillus gasseri, DSM 16737 and Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313 supplemented a basic diet fortified with oats. The condition of the rats was monitored using a disease activity index (DAI. A qualitative and quantitative histological judgement was performed on segments of distal colon and rectum and the caudate lobe of the liver. The formation of short-chain fatty acids, bacterial translocation, the inflammatory reaction and viable count of lactobacilli and Enterobaceriaceae were addressed.Blueberry husks with or without probiotics significantly decreased DAI, and significantly reduced the number of colonic ulcers and dysplastic lesions. With a decreased proportion of blueberry husk in the diet, the probiotic supplement was needed to achieve a significant decrease in numbers of dysplastic lesions. Probiotics decreased faecal viable count of Enterobacteriaceae and increased that of lactobacilli. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics lowered the proportion of butyric acid in distal colon, and decreased the haptoglobin levels. Probiotics mitigated hepatic injuries by decreasing parenchymal infiltration and the incidence of stasis and

  10. A comparative study of the effect of probiotics on cariogenic biofilm model for preventing dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-08-01

    Dental caries is induced by oral biofilm containing Streptococcus mutans. Probiotic bacteria were mainly studied for effect on the gastrointestinal tract and have been known to promote human health. However, the information of probiotics for oral health has been lack yet. In this study, we investigated influence of various probiotics on oral bacteria or cariogenic biofilm and evaluated candidate probiotics for dental caries among them. The antimicrobial activity of the spent culture medium of probiotics for oral streptococci was performed. Probiotics were added during the biofilm formation with salivary bacteria including S. mutans. The oral biofilms were stained with a fluorescent dye and observed using the confocal laser scanning microscope. To count bacteria in the biofilm, the bacteria were plated on MSB and BHI agar plates after disrupting the biofilm and cultivated. Glucosyltransferases (gtfs) expression of S. mutans and integration of lactobacilli into the biofilm were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Among probiotics, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited growth of oral streptococci. Moreover, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited formation of cariogenic biofilm model. The expression of gtfs was significantly reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The integration of L. rhamnosus into the biofilm model did not exhibit. However, L. acidophilus and L casei integrated into the biofilm model. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus may inhibit oral biofilm formation by decreasing glucan production of S. mutans and antibacterial activity and did not integrate into oral biofilm, which can be a candidate for caries prevention strategy.

  11. Probiotics for managing caries and periodontitis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Deborah; Paris, Sebastian; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-05-01

    Probiotics might be beneficial to prevent or treat caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. We aimed to appraise trials assessing probiotics for managing caries and periodontal disease. We included randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of probiotics versus (placebo) control with regards to Streptococcus mutans [SM], lactobacilli [LB], periodontal pathogens numbers, gingivitis, oral hygiene, caries incidence/experience increment, or periodontitis. Meta-analysis and trial-sequential-analysis were performed. Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Central) were screened. 50 studies (3247 participants) were included. Studies were mainly performed in children and used lactobacilli (45); bifidobacteria (12) or other genus (3). Probiotics significantly increased the chance of reducing SM (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.23/3.92) or LB (OR: 2.84; 1.34/6.03)Probiotics significantly reduced bleeding-on-probing (SMD: -1.15; -1.68/-0.62) and gingival index (SMD: -0.86; -1.52/-0.20), but not plaque index (SMD: -0.34; -0.89/0.21). Caries incidence was not significantly reduced (OR: 0.60; 0.35/1.04), neither was caries experience (SMD: -0.26; -0.55/0.03) or CAL (SMD: -0.46; -0.84/0.08). In contrast, probing-pocket depths (SMD: -0.86; -1.55/-0.17) were significantly reduced. Data was quantitatively insufficient for conclusive findings, and risk of bias was high. Current evidence is insufficient for recommending probiotics for managing dental caries, but supportive towards managing gingivitis or periodontitis. Future studies should only record bacterial numbers alongside accepted disease markers or indicators. Probiotic therapy could be used for managing periodontal diseases. For caries, further studies should ascertain both efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  13. Probiotic Use in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Usta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that produce a benefit to host by improving microbial balance in the gut, when provided in adequate amounts from food and supplements. Probiotics, taken with foods or food supplements are bacteria or yeasts. They act by reducing the number of pathogens and harmful bacteria, by changing microbial metabolism and by improving the immune system. They are in capsule, tablet, cachet or powdered form. In randomised controlled trials with probiotics, the prevention of acute infectious diarrhea in healthy infants and children had shown moderate benefits. The effect of probiotics in acute viral diarrhea is well studied. More research is needed to determine the effect of probiotics in antibiotic associated diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, helicobacter pylori infection, constipation and extraintestinal infections. There are positive results with probiotics in atopic diseases and preventing necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants. Studies continue for the effectiveness of the probiotics in various clinical conditions in children.

  14. Survival and synergistic growth of mixed cultures of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with prebiotic oligosaccharides in a gastrointestinal tract simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Adamberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotics, especially in combination with non-digestible oligosaccharides, may balance the gut microflora while multistrain preparations may express an improved functionality over single strain cultures. In vitro gastrointestinal models enable to test survival and growth dynamics of mixed strain probiotics in a controlled, replicable manner. Methods: The robustness and compatibility of multistrain probiotics composed of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with mixed prebiotics (galacto-, fructo- and xylo-oligosaccharides or galactooligosaccharides and soluble starch were studied using a dynamic gastrointestinal tract simulator (GITS. The exposure to acid and bile of the upper gastrointestinal tract was followed by dilution with a continuous decrease of the dilution rate (de-celerostat to simulate the descending nutrient availability of the large intestine. The bacterial numbers and metabolic products were analyzed and the growth parameters determined. Results: The most acid- and bile-resistant strains were Lactobacillus plantarum F44 and L. paracasei F8. Bifidobacterium breve 46 had the highest specific growth rate and, although sensitive to bile exposure, recovered during the dilution phase in most experiments. B. breve 46, L. plantarum F44, and L. paracasei F8 were selected as the most promising strains for further studies. Conclusions: De-celerostat cultivation can be applied to study the mixed bacterial cultures under defined conditions of decreasing nutrient availability to select a compatible set of strains.

  15. Lactobacilli-Host mutualism: "learning on the fly".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Renata C; Leulier, François

    2014-08-29

    Metazoans establish with microorganisms complex interactions for their mutual benefits. Drosophila, which has already proven useful host model to study several aspects of innate immunity and host-bacteria pathogenic associations has become a powerful model to dissect the mechanisms behind mutualistic host-microbe interactions. Drosophila microbiota is composed of simple and aerotolerant bacterial communities mostly composed of Lactobacillaceae and Acetobactereaceae. Drosophila mono- or poly-associated with lactobacilli strains constitutes a powerful model to dissect the complex interplay between lactobacilli and host biologic traits. Thanks to the genetic tractability of both Drosophila and lactobacilli this association model offers a great opportunity to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we review our current knowledge about how the Drosophila model is helping our understanding of how lactobacilli shapes host biology.

  16. Bacteria and chocolate: a successful combination for probiotic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemiers, S; Marzorati, M; Verstraete, W; Van de Wiele, T

    2010-06-30

    In this work, chocolate has been evaluated as a potential protective carrier for oral delivery of a microencapsulated mixture of Lactobacillus helveticus CNCM I-1722 and Bifidobacterium longum CNCM I-3470. A sequential in vitro setup was used to evaluate the protection of the probiotics during passage through the stomach and small intestine, when embedded in dark and milk chocolate or liquid milk. Both chocolates offered superior protection (91% and 80% survival in milk chocolate for L. helveticus and B. longum, respectively compared to 20% and 31% found in milk). To simulate long-term administration, the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME) was used. Plate counts, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and quantitative PCR showed that the two probiotics successfully reached the simulated colon compartments. This led to an increase in lactobacilli and bifidobacteria counts and the appearance of additional species in the fingerprints. These data indicate that the coating of the probiotics in chocolate is an excellent solution to protect them from environmental stress conditions and for optimal delivery. The simulation with our gastrointestinal model showed that the formulation of a probiotic strain in a specific food matrix could offer superior protection for the delivery of the bacterium into the colon. The chocolate example could act as a trigger for new research to identify new balanced matrices.

  17. Metabolism of oligosaccharides and starch in lactobacilli: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eGänzle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides, compounds that are composed of 2 – 10 monosaccharide residues, are major carbohydrate sources in habitats populated by lactobacilli. Moreover, oligosaccharide metabolism is essential for ecological fitness of lactobacilli. Disaccharide metabolism by lactobacilli is well understood; however, few data on the metabolism of higher oligosaccharides are available. Research on the ecology of intestinal microbiota as well as the commercial application of prebiotics has shifted the interest from (digestible disaccharides to (indigestible higher oligosaccharides. This review provides an overview on oligosaccharide metabolism in lactobacilli. Emphasis is placed on maltodextrins, isomalto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides, and raffinose-family oligosaccharides. Starch is also considered. Metabolism is discussed on the basis of metabolic studies related to oligosaccharide metabolism, information on the cellular location and substrate specificity of carbohydrate transport systems, glycosyl hydrolases and phorphorylases, and the presence of metabolic genes in genomes of 28 strains of lactobacilli. Metabolic pathways for disaccharide metabolism often also enable the metabolism of tri- and tetrasaccharides. However, with the exception of amylase and levansucrase, metabolic enzymes for oligosaccharide conversion are intracellular and oligosaccharide metabolism is limited by transport. This general restriction to intracellular glycosyl hydrolases differentiates lactobacilli from other bacteria that adapted to intestinal habitats, particularly Bifidobacterium spp.

  18. Comparison of Selective Media for the Enumeration of Probiotic Enterococci from Animal Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Johann Domig

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The project »Methods for the Official Control of Probiotics Used as Feed Additives« has been undertaken to develop and validate methods for the selective enumeration and strain identification of six probiotic microorganism genera (enterococci, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, pediococci, bacilli and yeast. A diversity of media has been used for the detection, isolation and enumeration of enterococci. Aiming at the selective enumeration of enterococci (mainly Enterococcus faecium present in probiotic animal feeds, either as a single component or in combination with other microorganisms, an extensive screening of published methods for culturing and enumerating enterococci was carried out. A collection of enterococcal strains used as probiotics in animal feeds and of isolates as well as reference strains from culture collections was established. Moreover, selected strains of lactobacilli, pediococci and streptococci were included for reference purposes. Based on a multitude of publications, twelve commercially available media were selected for testing and then compared with regard to their usefulness and selectivity. Bile esculin azide (BEA agar showed good selectivity and pronounced growth of most enterococcal strains. Good reproducibility and electivity (esculin hydrolysis as well as no influence of the feed matrix on the colony counts and a simple preparation procedure formed the basis for the proposed enumeration protocol. This work formed the basis for the enumeration protocol that was adapted to ISO format and validated in a collaborative study involving twenty laboratories from twelve European countries.

  19. Clinical Uses of Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Saif Ul

    2016-02-01

    Probiotics are live nonpathogenic microorganisms. Many of these microorganisms are part of the normal human gut flora, where they live in a symbiotic relationship. Probiotics have been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI medical conditions. However, the data supporting their use are often conflicting, especially for non-GI-associated illnesses. The strongest evidence supporting the use of probiotics is related to the treatment of acute diarrhea and pouchitis. Atopic eczema in children and genitourinary infections are the only non-GI-related medical conditions where probiotics may have some beneficial effects. Product selection and dosing are not the same in all conditions, and the beneficial effects of each probiotic strain cannot be generalized.The purpose of this article is to provide most recent information about probiotics and its uses. In contrast with previously published reviews on probiotics, we also discuss the composition of various products (Table 1), indications for their use (Table 2), product selection, and dosing of probiotics.Probiotics are safe and appear to exert some beneficial effects in GI-related illnesses. The use of probiotics in non-GI illnesses is not sufficiently supported by current data.

  20. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  1. Probiotics: Safety and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Probiotics Safety and Side Effects Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... Says About the Safety and Side Effects of Probiotics Whether probiotics are likely to be safe for ...

  2. Inhibition of HIV and HSV infection by vaginal lactobacilli in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Modarressi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study The cervico-vaginal mucosa which is populated with microflora (mostly includes lactobacilli is the portal of entry for sexually transmitted pathogens.MethodsThe in vitro anti-viral effect of vaginal and non-vaginal lactobacillus was evaluated using single cycle HIV-1 replication and HSV-2 plaque reduction assays. The XTT proliferation assay was used to monitor the cellular toxicity. The in vivo anti-HSV-1 activity was evaluated in BALB/c mouse model by monitoring skin lesion and immune response development. Results and major conclusion DMEM culture supernatant of L. Gasseri and L. fermentum (PH 7.3 did not show toxic effect but inhibited 50% of HIV replication at 12 and 31% concentrations, respectively. Coculture of L. gasseri (1000 CFU/ target cell showed mild cytotoxicity but inhibited 68% of HIV replication. The supernatant of L. crispatus inhibited 50% of HSV replication at 4% and also co-culture of L. gasseri, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus revokes almost all of the HSV multiplication. Culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus had significant virucidal effect against the HIV and HSV and inhibited HSV infection in a stage before viral entry to the target cells. Alive L. gasseri cells showed high potential for inhibiting HSV-1 infection in vivo condition. Current data indicates that lactobacilli supernatant encompasses components with neutralizing activity against HIV and HSV and it would be a determinant factor for viral diseases transmission and promising lead for anti-viral probiotic design.

  3. Oral Treatment of Chickens with Lactobacilli Influences Elicitation of Immune Responses ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbin, Jennifer T.; Gong, Joshua; Orouji, Shahriar; Esufali, Jessica; Mallick, Amirul I.; Parvizi, Payvand; Shewen, Patricia E.; Sharif, Shayan

    2011-01-01

    Commensal microbes in the intestine are in constant interaction with host cells and play a role in shaping the immune system. Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus salivarius are members of the chicken intestinal microbiota and have been shown to induce different cytokine profiles in mononuclear cells in vitro. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of these bacteria individually or in combination on the induction of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. The birds received lactobacilli weekly via oral gavage starting on day of hatch and subsequently, at 14 and 21 days, were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), Newcastle disease virus vaccine, and infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. Antibody responses in serum were measured weekly for 4 weeks beginning on the day of primary immunization. The cell-mediated immune response was evaluated at 21 days postimmunization by measurement of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in splenocytes stimulated with inactivated vaccine antigens. L. salivarius-treated birds had significantly more serum antibody to SRBC and KLH than birds that were not treated with probiotics. L. salivarius-treated birds also had decreased cell-mediated immune responses to recall antigen stimulation. L. reuteri treatment did not significantly affect the systemic immune response, while L. acidophilus treatment increased the antibody response to KLH. These results indicate that systemic antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses can be modulated by oral treatment with lactobacilli but that these bacteria may vary in their ability to modulate the immune response. PMID:21734067

  4. Inhibition of HIV and HSV infection by vaginal lactobacilli in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollahi Rezvan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and the purpose of the study The cervico-vaginal mucosa which is populated with microflora (mostly includes lactobacilli is the portal of entry for sexually transmitted pathogens. Methods The in vitro anti-viral effect of vaginal and non-vaginal lactobacillus was evaluated using single cycle HIV-1 replication and HSV-2 plaque reduction assays. The XTT proliferation assay was used to monitor the cellular toxicity. The in vivo anti-HSV-1 activity was evaluated in BALB/c mouse model by monitoring skin lesion and immune response development. Results and major conclusion DMEM culture supernatant of L. Gasseri and L. fermentum (PH 7.3 did not show toxic effect but inhibited 50% of HIV replication at 12 and 31% concentrations, respectively. Co-culture of L. gasseri (1000 CFU/ target cell showed mild cytotoxicity but inhibited 68% of HIV replication. The supernatant of L. crispatus inhibited 50% of HSV replication at 4% and also co-culture of L. gasseri, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus revokes almost all of the HSV multiplication. Culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus had significant virucidal effect against the HIV and HSV and inhibited HSV infection in a stage before viral entry to the target cells. Alive L. gasseri cells showed high potential for inhibiting HSV-1 infection in vivo condition. Current data indicates that lactobacilli supernatant encompasses components with neutralizing activity against HIV and HSV and it would be a determinant factor for viral diseases transmission and promising lead for anti-viral probiotic design.

  5. The longitudinal effect of a multi-strain probiotic on the intestinal bacterial microbiota of neonatal foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Guardabassi, Luca; Staempfli, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: The microbiota plays a key role in health and disease. Probiotics are a potential way to therapeutically modify the intestinal microbiota and prevent disease. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotics on the bacterial microbiota...... of foals during and after administration. STUDY DESIGN: Randomised placebo controlled field trial. METHODS: Thirty-eight healthy neonatal foals enrolled in a prior study were selected. The foals had received a multi-strain probiotic (four Lactobacillus spp 3-4x10(3) cfu/g each, Bifidobacterium animalis spp...... or class level between treatment groups at any age (all p>0.08) but some significant changes in relative abundance of families. Probiotic administration did not result in an increased relative abundance of lactobacilli or bifidobacteria at any age (Lactobacillus: p = 0.95, p = 0.1 and p = 0...

  6. Screening of Lactobacillus strains of domestic goose origin against bacterial poultry pathogens for use as probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of human and animal mucous membranes, including the avian gastrointestinal tract. Recently, increasing attention has been given to their probiotic, health-promoting capacities, among which their antagonistic potential against pathogens plays a key role. A study was conducted to evaluate probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from feces or cloacae of domestic geese. Among the 104 examined isolates, previously identified to the species level by whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and analysis of 16S-23S regions of rDNA, dominated Lactobacillus salivarius (35%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18%) and Lactobacillus ingluviei (11%). All lactobacilli were screened for antimicrobial activity toward Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, and Riemerella anatipestifer using the agar slab method and the well diffusion method. Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum exhibited particularly strong antagonism toward all of the indicator strains. In the agar slab method, the highest sensitivity to Lactobacillus was observed in R. anatipestifer and P. multocida, and the lowest in E. coli and S. aureus. The ability to produce H₂O₂was exhibited by 92% of isolates, but there was no correlation between the rate of production of this reactive oxygen species and the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus sp. All lactobacilli showed resistance to pH 3.0 and 3.5 and to 2% bile. The data demonstrate that Lactobacillus isolates from geese may have probiotic potential in reducing bacterial infections. The antibacterial activity of the selected lactobacilli is mainly due to lactic acid production by these bacteria. The selected Lactobacillus strains that strongly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria, and were also resistant to low pH and bile salts, can potentially restore the balance

  7. Protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro

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    Đurašević Siniša F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium (Cd-induced genotoxicity was studied in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro. Male Wistar rats, Rattus norvegicus, were treated for five weeks with (i CdCl2 (70 ppm in the drinking water, (ii a mixture of lyophilized probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. acidophilus and Bifido-bacterium longum (5×108 cfu/g of food, or (iii CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria. In addition, single cells obtained from the untreated rat liver were exposed to CdCl2 (70 ppm, probiotic bacteria (1.28 mg/ml, or CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria, for 15 min at 22°C in the dark. The level of Cd-induced DNA damage in hepatocytes was determined by the comet assay. The obtained results show that probiotic bacteria significantly reduced Cd-induced genotoxicity, both in vivo and in vitro (20% and 48%, respectively. Moreover, the toxicity of Cd to lactobacilli in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats was significantly decreased in the probiotic-treated animals. The binding of Cd2+ to probiotic bacteria was proposed as the most probable protection mechanism. [Acknowledgments. This research was financially supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Government of Serbia, projects No 172058 and 173023

  8. Effect of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on white spot lesion development in orthodontic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gizani, Sotiria; Petsi, Georgia; Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of daily intake of lozenges containing probiotic bacteria on white spot lesion (WSL) formation as well as on salivary lactobacilli (LB) and mutans streptococci (MS) counts, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment...... and randomly allocated to a test or placebo group. Subjects in the test group were instructed to take one probiotic lozenge containing two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri once daily. An identical lozenge without active bacteria was used in the placebo group. Dental plaque, WSL, and salivary MS and LB levels....../CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Daily intake of probiotic lozenges did not seem to affect the development of WSL during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances....

  9. Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri has antifungal effects on oral Candida species in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Rose; Kragelund, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2017-01-01

    Background: An alternative approach for managing Candida infections in the oral cavity by modulating the oral microbiota with probiotic bacteria has been proposed.  Objective: The aim was to investigate the antifungal potential of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC...... PTA 5289) against six oral Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis, and C. parapsilosis).  Design: The lactobacilli were tested for their ability to co-aggregate with and inhibit the growth of the yeasts assessed by spectrophotometry and the agar overlay.......  Conclusions: L. reuteri exhibited antifungal properties against five of the six most common oral Candida species. Further, the results reconfirms that the probiotic capacity of L. reuteri is strain specific....

  10. Probiotics and Oral Health

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Harini Priya

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanis...

  11. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Icy D’Silva

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecule...

  12. Position paper on probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Tijsseling, I.A.; Pekelharing, P.R.; Rombouts, F M

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Probiotics, used to supplement normal daily nutrition, are therefore an important element in consumer health and should be made available as widely as possible. The regulatory status of probiotics has yet to be established on an international level. That is also the finding of a report by the Food and agriculture organization of the United Nations and the World health organizati...

  13. Probiotic fermented dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Tamime

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Fermented dairy products are the most popular vehicle used in theindustry for the implantation of the probiotic microflora in humans. Therefore this paper provides an overview of new knowledge on probiotic fermented dairy products. It involves historical developments, commercial probiotic microorganisms and products, and their therapeutic properties, possibilities of quality improvement of different types of newly developed fermented dairy products together with fermented goat’s milk products.

  14. The influence of probiotics on the cervical malignancy diagnostics quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Živko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Probiotics help to provide an optimum balance in the intestines. Probiotics species competitive block toxic substances and growth of unwanted bacteria and yeast species while they compete for the space and food. Lactogyn® is the first oral probiotics on Serbian market dedicated to maintaining a normal vaginal flora. Lactogyn® contains two well studied probiotics strains - Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14. Both of them are considered as probiotic agents with therapeutic properties increase the population of beneficial lactobacillus organisms within the vagina. The aim of this study was to exam an influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 on results of cervical smear cytological testing including detection of atypical cells, detection of false positive and false negative findings as well as on vaginal microflora content in patients with vaginal infection signs and symptoms. Methods. Totally 250 women with signs of vaginal infection were selected to participate in the study. The study group comprised 125 patients taking studied probiotic strains along with specific anti-infective therapy. The control group comprised, also, 125 patients taking anti-infective agents, only. Probiotic preparation (Lactogyn ® capsules was administered orally (one capsule daily during 4 weeks. Before and six weeks after beginning of the therapy a cervical smear cytological test (the Papanicolaou test, as well as microbiological examination of the vaginal smear were performed. Results. Number of cases of inflammation and atypical squamous cells of undeterminated significance (ASCUS in the study group were significantly higher before administration of the probiotic preparation. The number of lactobacilli was significantly higher, and the number of pathogenic microorganisms lower in the group treated with this preparation. Conclusion. The application of probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus

  15. Probiotics in digestive diseases: focus on Lactobacillus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, F; Pace, M; Quartarone, G

    2015-12-01

    that use differential media to select for specific populations of bacteria according to their metabolic requirements. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species are by and large the most commonly used probiotics. Strictly speaking, however, the term "probiotic" should be reserved for live microbes that have been shown in controlled human studies to provide a health benefit. Taking into account patients suffering from the most common gastrointestinal diseases, in whose establishment the GI microbiota plays a key role, probiotics have to be considered as very promising agents, capable of beneficially modulating the intestinal ecosystem, which is perturbed in cases of dysbiosis. Although more clinical data are still needed to better assess the clinical relevance of probiotics, to date, procariota such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli strains, and eucariota such as some Saccharomyces strains are among the most widely used agents in GIT disorders. LGG is a well-known probiotic strain that was isolated more than 20 years ago by Goldin and Gorbach from a faecal sample of a healthy adult, based on several selection criteria: high adhesion in vitro, high resistance against gastric acidity and high antimicrobial activity against pathogens such as Salmonella. In vivo studies have also shown a good persistence of LGG in the human GIT. Since its isolation, LGG has become one of the best clinically documented probiotic strains. A growing body of evidence suggests benefits such as prevention and relief of various types of diarrhoea, and treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile colitis. Thus, with respect to both adaptation to the GIT and probiotic effects, LGG can be regarded as a prototypical probiotic strain.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Probiotic, Lactobacillus pentosus MP-10, Isolated from Fermented Aloreña Table Olives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Montoro, Beatriz; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Hidalgo Pestaña, Marina; Caballero Gómez, Natacha; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Gálvez, Antonio; Benomar, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    We report here a 3,698,214-bp complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus strain, MP-10, isolated from brines of naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives; it is considered the largest sequenced genome among lactobacilli to date. The annotated genome sequence revealed the presence of 3,558 open reading frames (ORFs) and 87 structural RNAs. PMID:27634988

  17. Taxonomy of Probiotic Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Giovanna E.; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    When referring to probiotics, one refers to probiotic strains, i.e., the microbial individuals, sub-cultures of billion of almost identical cells ideally derived from the same mother cell. Therefore, beneficial effects attributed to probiotics are ascribed in fact to specific strains. However, these strains have to be, by law, clearly identified at the species level (Pineiro and Stanton, 2007). In fact, probiotics have to be safe for consumption, and the evaluation of QPS - qualified presumption of safety - status by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) (Opinion, 2007) is discussed for species, not for single strains.

  18. A REVIEW ON PROBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan Dilnawaz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are harmless bacteria that help the well being of the host animal and contribute, directly or indirectly to protect the host animal against harmful bacterial pathogens. They are also called “friendly bacteria” or “good bacteria”. Probiotics are available to consumers mainly in the form of dietary supplements and foods. They can be used as Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. In controlled clinical trials probiotic bacteria have demonstrated a benefit in treating gastrointestinal diseases, including infectious diarrhea in children, recurrent Clostridium difficile induced infection, and some inflammatory bowel diseases. This evidence has led to the proof of principle that probiotic bacteria can be used as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate human diseases. Scientists have found that probiotic bacteria can thrive and function in the human digestive tract along with the existing microorganisms. There currently exists good evidence for the therapeutic use of probiotics in infectious diarrhea in children, recurrent Clostridium difficile induced infections and postoperative pouchitis. The possible benefit in other gastrointestinal infections, prevention of postoperative bacterial translocation, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease continues to emerge. The field of probiotics is developing rapidly as evidenced by expansion of research and increased familiarity of probiotics to the general public. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to influence the immune system through several molecular mechanisms.

  19. Recent achievements in preventive dentistry by introducing a new probiotic toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majstorović, Martina; Vranić, Dubravka Negovetić; Szirovicza, Lajos

    2013-12-01

    Artificially synthesized probiotic from Lactobacillus strain, contained in the tested toothpaste, led to an innovative approach in preventive dentistry. A new concept resulting from this research can be explained due to possible mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria, according to which equilibrium of hostile bacterial flora is achieved by mechanical elimination of cariogenic bacteria from the mouth. This research was conducted during a 4-week period on a randomly selected Croatian sample of 50 participants, with the aim to investigate the efficacy of the first probiotic toothpaste ever produced in Croatia. CRT tests (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, FL-9494 Schaan/Liechtenstein) were used and individually administrated to each participant to assess the number of Streptococci and Lactobacilli. Saliva samples were tested before, as well as 2 and 4 weeks after using the tested toothpaste. After having had obtained detailed information on the research protocol, participants signed informed consent, and strictly following the instructions, brushed their teeth exclusively using the tested toothpaste and toothbrush of the same manufacturer over the 4 week period. Statistical results obtained after 4 weeks of using the probiotic toothpaste showed significant reduction in the number of participants who, prior to commencing the study, were diagnosed a high number of cariogenic bacteria. The number of participants with the high number of streptococci was significantly reduced from 78.4 to 26.5%, as well as the number of participants with the high number of Lactobacilli, which significantly dropped down from 52.9 to 26.5%. The results indicate a significant efficacy of the tested toothpaste, which can be attributed to the effect of the contained synthetized probiotic substance. Therefore, this research reveals a new achievement in innovative technologies, based on which probiotics can be used with purpose of maintaining balance of bacterial flora within the oral cavity, particularly

  20. Correlation between API 50 CH and multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the identification of vaginal lactobacilli in isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Melo Brolazo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of Lactobacillus sp. strains by phenotypic methods may lead to doubtful results possibly interfering in the reliability of the epidemiological and probiotics studies. Therefore this study aimed to determine the best methodology for the identification of the large diversity of lactobacilli species found in the vagina by comparing two techniques, one based on their biochemical profile and other employing molecular biology. A carbohydrate fermentation test (API 50 CH was compared with multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the identification of species of vaginal lactobacilli from 135 healthy women. The kappa index was used to evaluate agreement between the methods. Using the molecular technique, L. crispatus (32.6%, L. jensenii (25% and L. gasseri (20.6% were the most frequent species. However, using the biochemical technique, the most frequent species were: L. acidophilus (34.8%, L. crispatus (27.2% and L. fermentum (13%. Although L. acidophilus was the most frequent specie found by biochemical tests, no strain of this microorganism was detected by PCR. Agreement between the methods was low for identification of all the most common species. Although rates of L. crispatus detected were similar using both methods (32.6% and 27.2%, agreement between them was relatively low (kappa = 0.52. Conclusions: Our results confirmed the limitation of the biochemical method and the applicability of a previously published molecular method (Multiplex PCR for the identification of lactobacilli in the vaginal tract, focusing on further necessity of its improvement for also targeting L. vaginalis and L. iners.

  1. Evaluation of the Intestinal Colonizing Potential and Immunomodulating Capacity of Lactobacilli Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, Karyn I; Addo, Richard T; D'Souza, Martin J

    2016-05-01

    Lactobacilli species get degraded by acidic conditions in the stomach. Thus, the objective of this study was to (1) formulate and characterize gastro-resistant Lactobacilli microspheres and (2) evaluate the ability of Lactobacilli microspheres to colonize the intestine and their capacity to have an immunomodulating effect in vivo. The product yield and the encapsulation efficiency were 45% and 100%, respectively. The average microsphere particle size was 5 μm. Lactobacilli microspheres were most stable at 4°C and showed a better suspendibility in distilled water. Without encapsulation, the viability of bacteria decreased within 30 min. In the case of Lactobacilli microspheres, no Lactobacilli were released in the first 3 h, and highest release was observed at 4 h, thus, suggesting the significance of encapsulation of Lactobacilli. Lactobacilli microspheres maintained intestinal colonization only during the dosing period, and the serum IgG, serum IgA, fecal, intestinal, nasal IgA, and the serum interleukin-1β levels were higher in the Lactobacilli microsphere group compared with the blank microsphere and the lactobacilli solution group, suggesting that the Lactobacilli microspheres were more gastro-resistant and, hence, showed positive effects compared with the Lactobacilli solution. However, the Lactobacilli microspheres did not have a significant effect on the tumor necrosis factor-α levels.

  2. Topical application of probiotics in skin: adhesion, antimicrobial and antibiofilm in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, E G; Moreira, D A; Gullón, P; Gullón, B; Cardelle-Cobas, A; Tavaria, F K

    2017-02-01

    When skin dysbiosis occurs as a result of skin disorders, probiotics can act as modulators, restoring microbial balance. Several properties of selected probiotics were evaluated so that their topical application could be considered. Adhesion, antimicrobial, quorum sensing and antibiofilm assays were carried out with several probiotic strains and tested against selected skin pathogens. All tested strains displayed significant adhesion to keratin. All lactobacilli with the exception of Lactobacillus delbrueckii, showed antimicrobial activity against skin pathogens, mainly due to organic acid production. Most of them also prevented biofilm formation, but only Propioniferax innocua was able to break down mature biofilms. This study demonstrates that although all tested probiotics adhered to human keratin, they showed limited ability to prevent adhesion of some potential skin pathogens. Most of the tested probiotics successfully prevented biofilm formation, suggesting that they may be successfully used in the future as a complement to conventional therapies in the treatment of a range of skin disorders. The topically used probiotics may be a natural, targeted treatment approach to several skin disorders and a complement to conventional therapies which present many undesirable side effects. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Cellular injuries of spray-dried Lactobacillus spp. isolated from kefir and their impact on probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golowczyc, Marina A; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G

    2011-01-05

    The injuries caused by spray drying (SD) of three potential probiotic lactobacilli isolated from kefir grains and the impact on some probiotic properties, were evaluated. Results demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum 83114 and L. kefir 8321 showed a slight reduction of viability (0.11 and 0.29 log CFU/ml respectively) after SD process, and L. kefir 8348 was found to be more sensitive to the process with a reduction in viability of 0.70 log CFU/ml. Neither membrane damage, evaluated by increased sensitivity to NaCl, lysozyme, bile salt and penicillin G, nor changes in acidifying activity in MRS and milk by lactobacilli were detected after SD. L. plantarum 83114 and L. kefir 8321 after SD did not lose their capacity to adhere to intestinal cells. Nevertheless, L. kefir 8348 showed a significant loss of adhesion capacity after SD. In addition, rehydrated spray-dried L. kefir 8321 retained the ability to protect against Salmonella invasion of intestinal cells. This effect was observed when L. kefir is co-incubated with Salmonella before invasion assay. This work shows that the membrane integrity evaluated by indirect methods and some probiotic properties of lactobacilli isolated from kefir did not change significantly after SD, and these powders could be used in functional foods applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Selected lactobacilli and bifidobacteria development in solid state fermentation using soybean paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez de Olmos, Antonieta; Correa Deza, Maria Alejandra; Garro, Marisa S

    At present, consumers are looking for more natural foods so as to improve health through their active compounds. Within this context, soybean is an excellent substrate due to its beneficial effects on consumers' health. Moreover, lactic cultures are widely used in the food industry to improve the technological, nutritional and functional characteristics of fermented foods. It is interesting to find new matrices in which to transport these starter cultures (potentially probiotic microorganisms). The aim of this research was to obtain a solid state fermentation system from soybean to analyze the behavior of selected lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, with the potential to develop a functional vegetarian food to serve as carrier for the microorganisms. A soybean solid substrate system was optimized by selecting the relationship of the main processing parameters. Homogeneous soybean pastes with different moisture content (60-80%) were obtained and used as substrate and support for solid substrate fermentation. Moisture, inoculum size and temperature were optimized: 80%, 4%, 37°C, respectively. L. rhamnosus CRL 981 was chosen as the best starter to use in this kind of fermentation, showing high acidification and cell counts at 24h of fermentation and increased specific growth rate in tested soybean pastes. It was demonstrated that the selected soybean paste could be used as a carrier of these microorganisms having probiotic potential for the production of vegetarian foods. Moreover, these microorganisms are able to modify the substrate to enhance their nutritional and functional characteristics, which would change the soybean into a more attractive product for consumers. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Position paper on probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsseling, I.A.; Pekelharing, P.R.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Probiotics, used to supplement normal daily nutrition, are therefore an important element in consumer health and should be made available as widely as possible. The regulatory status o

  6. Position paper on probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsseling, I.A.; Pekelharing, P.R.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Probiotics, used to supplement normal daily nutrition, are therefore an important element in consumer health and should be made available as widely as possible. The regulatory status o

  7. Position paper on probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsseling, I.A.; Pekelharing, P.R.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Probiotics, used to supplement normal daily nutrition, are therefore an important element in consumer health and should be made available as widely as possible. The regulatory status

  8. Probiotic abilities of riboflavin-overproducing Lactobacillus strains: a novel promising application of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Mattia P; Russo, Pasquale; Capozzi, Vittorio; López, Paloma; Fiocco, Daniela; Spano, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    The probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum strains, capable of overproducing riboflavin, was investigated. The riboflavin production was quantified in co-cultures of lactobacilli and human intestinal epithelial cells, and the riboflavin overproduction ability was confirmed. When milk and yogurt were used as carrier matrices, L. plantarum and L. fermentum strains displayed a significant ability to survive through simulated gastrointestinal transit. Adhesion was studied on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Both strains adhered strongly on Caco-2 cells, negatively influenced the adhesion of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and strongly inhibited the growth of three reference pathogenic microbial strains. Resistance to major antibiotics and potential hemolytic activity were assayed. Overall, this study reveals that these Lactobacillus stains are endowed with promising probiotic properties and thus are candidates for the development of novel functional food which would be both enriched in riboflavin and induce additional health benefits, including a potential in situ riboflavin production, once the microorganisms colonize the host intestine.

  9. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor.

  10. Analysis of Lactobacillus Products for Phages and Bacteriocins That Inhibit Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an unexplained loss of vaginal lactobacilli. Previously, we have identified certain vaginal lactobacilli-released phages that can inhibit in vitro other vaginal lactobacilli. However, there is no apparent route for phages to be transmitted among women. The purpose of this study was to identify whether certain Lactobacillus products commonly used by women release phages or bacteriocins that can inhibit vaginal lactobacilli.

  11. Probiotics and microbiota composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2016-06-02

    Accumulated evidence, corroborated by a new systematic review by Kristensen et al. (Genome Med 8:52, 2016), suggests that probiotics do not significantly impact the fecal microbiota composition of healthy subjects. Nevertheless, physiological benefits have been associated with probiotic consumption by healthy people. Some studies have suggested that probiotics may impact the function of colonizing microbes, although this needs to be further studied. An alternative hypothesis is that probiotics may promote homeostasis of the gut microbiota, rather than change its composition. This hypothesis warrants investigation as a possible mechanism for how probiotics may benefit healthy people.Please see related article: http://genomemedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13073-016-0300-5 .

  12. Probiotics:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Singh; Basavaraj Kallali; Ajay Kumar; Vidhi Thaker

    2011-01-01

    The field of probiotics is an evolving field. Probiotics were first introduced to the world as a functional ingredient in dairy products, breakfast cereals and snacks. Unknown to many, probiotics offer health benefits that go beyond the scope of supporting digestive health. Research continues to emerge, supporting the use of different probiotic strains in a variety of conditions. The research now suggests that these“healthy”bacteria have beneficial effects on gastrointestinal dysfunctions, including diarrhea, as well as the immune system and conditions such as allergy, in children, adults, and in the oral cavity. Research on the horizon will develop a better understanding of the concepts of how colonizing microbes and probiotics can influence human health.

  13. [Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Rybka, Joanna; Gackowska, Lidia

    2014-11-17

    The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host's immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20x10(12) probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host's oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot'a), 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals' eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients.

  14. Delivery routes for probiotics: Effects on broiler performance, intestinal morphology and gut microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen G. Olnood

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Four delivery routes, via, feed, water, litter and oral gavage, were examined for their efficacy in delivering a novel probiotic of poultry origin, Lactobacillus johnsonii, to broilers. Seven treatments of 6 replicates each were allocated using 336 one-day-old Cobb broiler chicks. The treatments consisted of a basal diet with the probiotic candidate, L. johnsonii, added to the feed, and three treatments with L. johnsonii added to the drinking water, sprayed on the litter, or gavaged orally. In addition, a positive control treatment received the basal diet supplemented with zinc-bacitracin (ZnB, 50 mg/kg. The probiotic strain of L. johnsonii was detected in the ileum of the chicks for all four delivery routes. However, the addition of L. johnsonii as a probiotic candidate did not improve body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio of broiler chickens raised on litter during the 5-week experimental period regardless of the route of administration. The probiotic treatments, regardless of the routes of delivery, affected (P < 0.05 the pH of the caecal digesta and tended (P = 0.06 to affect the pH of the ileal digesta on d 7, but the effect disappeared as the birds grew older. All probiotic treatments reduced the number of Enterobacteria in the caeca on d 21, and tended (P < 0.054 to reduce it in the ileum and caeca on d 7 and in the ileum on d 21 compared with the controls. The probiotic also tended to increase the number of lactic acid bacteria and lactobacilli in the ileum and caeca on d 7, but this trend was not evident on d 21. The trend appeared most pronounced when the probiotic was delivered orally or via litter. The probiotic also decreased (P < 0.05 the population of Clostridium perfringens rapidly from an early age to d 21 in the caeca, leading to a 3-fold decrease in the number of C. perfringens between d 7 and 21. It also showed that the probiotic treatment presented the lowest number of C. perfringens in the caeca. Delivery

  15. Characterization of vaginal lactobacilli in women after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosian, G; Radosz-Komoniewska, H; Pietrzak, B; Ekiel, A; Kamiński, P; Aptekorz, M; Doleżych, H; Samulska, E; Jóźwiak, J

    2012-04-01

    Limited number of publications described vaginal microflora after kidney transplantation. Our PubMed search revealed only 18 publications including words "vaginal bacteria & kidney transplant" in the period of 1978-2011. The aim of this study was to characterize lactobacilli isolated from vaginal swabs of women after kidney transplantation, compared with healthy women. Eighteen renal transplant recipients (mean age 36.1) and 20 healthy women (mean age 36.0) were evaluated. Lactobacilli were cultured on MRS and Columbia blood agars. Biochemical identification with API 50 CHL (bioMerieux, Marcy L'Etoile, France) and multiplex PCR according to Song et al. was performed. Lactobacilli were tested for production of H(2)O(2). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of selected antimicrobial agents were determined with E-tests (bioMerieux, Marcy L'Etoile, France) and interpreted with CLSI and EUCAST criteria. No bacterial vaginosis was found among studied women. Two strains of group I were identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii; 18 strains as Lactobacillus gasseri and 15 strains as Lactobacillus crispatus. Only 3 strains from group II were not identified by species-specific mPCR. Group IV was represented with 2 unidentified strains. Vaginal lactobacilli isolated from healthy women represented more homogenous group compared with heterogenous renal transplant recipients. Biochemical identification of lactobacilli by API 50 CHL kits was concordant with mPCR results only in 7 cases (17.5%), all 7 strains were identified as L. crispatus. Majority (93%) of lactobacilli were H(2)O(2) producers. All isolated lactobacilli (100%) demonstrated high resistance to metronidazole (MIC > 256 μg/ml). Only 2 strains resistant to vancomycin (MICs: 32 and 256 μg/ml respectively), in the study and control group, and one to moxifloxacin (MIC = 32 μg/ml), were found. Resistance to metronidazole and vancomycin was concordant in CLSI and EUCAST (2010) criteria. Although significant

  16. Probiotics for the prevention and treatment of allergies, with an emphasis on mode of delivery and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Satya; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Rodes, Laetitia; Kahouli, Imen; Malhotra, Meenakshi

    2014-01-01

    Allergy, also termed type I hypersensitivity, is defined as a "disease following a response by the immune system to an otherwise innocuous antigen". The prevalence of allergies is high and escalating, with almost half the populations of North America and Europe having allergies to one or more common environmental antigens. Although rarely life-threatening allergies cause much distress and pose an important economic burden. Recent studies demonstrate the importance of the commensal bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract, termed the microbiota, in stimulating and modulating the immune system. This goes hand-in-hand with the hygiene hypothesis, proposed by Strachan in 1989. With this in mind, the use of pre- and probiotics has gained interest to prevent and treat allergies through modulation of the gut microbiota and the immune system. Probiotics, namely Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, are live microorganisms that can be incorporated in the diet in the form of functional foods or dietary supplements to beneficially influence the host. In recent studies, probiotic formulations demonstrated the capability to successfully modulate allergic rhinitis, atopic disorders and food-related allergies. A number of probiotic mechanisms of action are involved in controlling hypersensitivity responses, many of which are still not yet understood. Microencapsulation has gained importance as a device for the oral delivery of probiotic cells and may play an important role in the development of a successful probiotic formulation to treat and prevent allergies. Despite the promising research on probiotic biotherapeutics, further investigations are required to develop a successful therapeutic to treat and prevent allergies.

  17. Effect of traditional leafy vegetables on the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Muhammad Arshad; Baijnath, Himansu; Odhav, Bharti

    2014-12-01

    Traditional leafy vegetables, apart from being a staple in the diet of most of sub-Saharan Africa, are an essential part of traditional medicine and are used daily by traditional healers in the region to treat a wide variety of ailments. In this study, a batch culture technique was used to investigate whether 25 infusions from 22 traditional leafy vegetables stimulated the growth of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus lactis, Lactobacillus reuteri and Bifidobacterium longum in pure culture. High performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the inulin content of the infusions. Sonchus oleraceus stimulated all four strains and Taraxacum officinale stimulated three strains. In total, 18 plants stimulated at least one of the four probiotic strains. The inulin content of the infusions varied between 2.5% and 3.6%, with Asparagus sprengeri containing the highest percentage. These results indicate that traditional leafy vegetables do stimulate the growth of the selected lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in pure culture and contain inulin. These infusions can now be tested for prebiotic potential using mixed culture systems or human hosts.

  18. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lettat Abderzak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Results Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P. Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. Conclusion This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated.

  19. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Results Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C) or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P) or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P) or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P). Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. Conclusion This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated. PMID:22812531

  20. Interactions of lactobacilli with the host immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to better understand the molecular mechanism of host res-ponses to probiotics. Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate immune responses in epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial effects on the immune system. Carefully selected

  1. [Probiotics as functional food products: manufacture and approaches to evaluating of the effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Iu M; Sheveleva, S A

    2014-01-01

    This review concerns the issues of foodfortifications and the creation of functional foods (FF) and food supplements based on probiotics and covers an issue of approaches to the regulation of probiotic food products in various countries. The status of functional foods, optimizing GIT functions, as a separate category of FF is emphasized. Considering the strain-specificity effect of probiotics, the minimum criteria used for probiotics in food products are: 1) the need to identify a probiotics at genus, species, and strain levels, using the high-resolution techniques, 2) the viability and the presence of a sufficient amount of the probiotic in product at the end of shelf life, 3) the proof of functional characteristics inherent to probiotic strains, in the controlled experiments. The recommended by FA O/WHO three-stage evaluation procedure offunctional efficiency of FF includes: Phase I--safety assessment in in vitro and in vivo experiments, Phase II--Evaluation in the Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled trial (DBRPC) and Phase III--Post-approval monitoring. It is noted that along with the ability to obtain statistically significant results of the evaluation, there are practical difficulties of conducting DBRPC (duration, costs, difficulties in selection of target biomarkers and populations). The promising approach for assessing the functional efficacy of FF is the concept of nutrigenomics. It examines the link between the human diet and the characteristics of his genome to determine the influence of food on the expression of genes and, ultimately, to human health. Nutrigenomic approaches are promising to assess the impact of probiotics in healthy people. The focusing on the nutrigenomic response of intestinal microbial community and its individual populations (in this regard the lactobacilli can be very informative) was proposed.

  2. Probiotics for preventive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Gut flora and probiotics have potential to affect health and disease far beyond the gut. There is increasing evidence that probiotics have beneficial effects in preventing a wide range of conditions and improving health. Randomized, double-blind studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of probiotics for preventing various diarrheal illnesses as well as allergic disorders. Evidence for their efficacy for use in the prevention and treatment of bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections is also mounting. In addition, probiotics may be useful for preventing respiratory infections, dental caries, necrotizing enterocolitis, and certain aspects of inflammatory bowel disease. Data also suggest that probiotics may promote good health in day care and work settings, and may enhance growth in healthy as well as ill and malnourished children. Results from meta-analyses and systematic reviews that combine results of studies from different types of probiotics to examine the effects in any disease state should be interpreted with caution. Specific strains are effective in specific disease states. No 2 probiotics are exactly alike; we should not expect reproducible results from studies that employ different species or strains, variable formulations, and diverse dosing schedules.

  3. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF PROBIOTIC TABLETS CONTAINING ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Lone* and J. A. Dhole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate probiotic tablets containing anti-inflammatory drug Mesalazine. Matrix tablets were prepared using Sodium alginate and Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS as matrix forming components, with three different combinations by wet granulation method. The granules were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index and Hausners ratio. The tablets were subjected to weight variation, hardness, friability and drug content test and invitro release studies. Additionally the tablets were tested for contents of viable cell counts of probiotic lactobacilli using standard plate count (SPC method. Invitro release studies revealed that all formulations qualified both stages for release of the drug i.e. acid stage and buffer stage 1. The release profiles were affected by variable concentrations of sodium alginate when combined with HPMC-AS. The combination at 1:2 (SA2 prevented the escape of both actives more effectively than the other two formulations at all the three stages of dissolution test. A few numbers of bacterial cells were lost in acid stage as well as in the subsequent buffer stage1. However, at the end of buffer stage 2 the viable cell count for L .acidophilus, were found to be 9 × 109 CFU. The combinations of HPMCAS (HF and sodium alginate together increased acid tolerance of probiotic lactobacilli strain added in matrix tablets.

  5. Probiotics in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Leah; Jacobs, Susan E; Garland, Suzanne M

    2012-09-01

    Probiotics are micro-organisms that confer health benefits on the host. Postulated mechanisms include: increasing resistance of the mucosal barrier to migration of bacteria and their toxins by strengthening intestinal cell junctions, modification of host response to microbial products, augmentation of immunoglobulin A mucosal responses, enhancement of enteral nutrition to inhibit the growth of pathogens; production of antimicrobial proteins; and competitive exclusion of potential pathogens. Published meta-analyses and systematic reviews report the effects of probiotics on important clinical outcomes in neonates. This paper will review the evidence for probiotic supplementation in neonatology, with a focus on preterm infants.

  6. Effect of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp . lactis DN-173010 probiotic on dental plaque and saliva in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, G S; Cenci, M S; Azevedo, M S; Epifanio, M; Jones, M H

    2014-01-01

    To assess how consumption of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DN-173010 probiotic for a period of 2 weeks affects salivary and dental plaque levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. A crossover, double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed with 26 volunteers. The study was divided into four periods. During periods 2 and 4, the volunteers ingested yogurt containing probiotic or control yogurt daily for 2 weeks. Periods 1 and 3 were a 1-week run-in period and 4-week washout period, respectively. Saliva and dental plaque samples were collected from each participant at the end of each period. Mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and total cultivable microorganisms were counted. Values were compared between groups and across periods with the Wilcoxon's test. There was no difference between the yogurt containing probiotic and the control yogurt for any of the studied variables (all p > 0.05). A reduction in counts of total cultivable microorganisms was observed in dental plaque samples after ingestion of either yogurts (both p < 0.05 vs. baseline), but not in saliva (p < 0.05). Daily ingestion of yogurt with or without B. animalis subsp. lactis for a period of 2 weeks was beneficial in reducing total microbial counts in dental plaque. Therefore, no additional benefits were achieved by the use of the tested probiotic strain.

  7. Inhibition of beet molasses alcoholic fermentation by lactobacilli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essia Ngang, J.J.; Letourneau, F.; Wolniewicz, E.; Villa, P. (Amiens Univ., 80 (France). Lab. de Chimie Organique et Cinetique)

    1990-08-01

    Alcohol production rate decreases as the concentration of bacterial contaminants increases. In complex medium, such as beet molasses, an alternative mechanism can be used by homofermentative lactic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Lactic acid and associated products, especially acetic acid, are liberated into the medium. The inhibition induced by these metabolites was reinforced by the presence of viable lactobacilli. (orig.).

  8. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and Lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinke, T.; Kneist, S.; de Soet, J.J.; Kuhlisch, E.; Mauersberger, S.; Forster, A.; Klimm, W.

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed,

  9. Effects of vaginal lactobacilli in Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Di Pietro, Marisa; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Nardis, Chiara; Gentile, Massimo; Sessa, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that abnormal vaginal flora lacking lactobacilli facilitates the acquisition of several sexually transmitted diseases including Chlamydia trachomatis. C. trachomatis, the most common bacterial agent of genital infections worldwide, can progress from the lower to upper reproductive tract and induce severe sequelae. The ability of C. trachomatis to develop into a persistent form has been suggested as key pathogenetic mechanism underlying chronic infections and sequelae. The aim of our study was to investigate the C. trachomatis interaction with vaginal microbiota analyzing the effects of Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis and L. salivarius) on the different phases of C. trachomatis developmental cycle. In addition, the effect of lactobacilli on persistent chlamydial forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection has also been evaluated. Our results demonstrated significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication by vaginal lactobacilli. L. brevis was significantly more effective than L. salivarius (plactobacilli to protect from infection is strain-dependent. Lactobacilli had an adverse effect on elementary chlamydial bodies (plactobacilli toward persistent C. trachomatis forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection. A significant increase in the production of C. trachomatis infectious progeny was observed in C. trachomatis/HSV-2 coinfection in the presence of L. brevis (p=0.01) despite a significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication (p=0.028). Our data suggest that a healthy vaginal microbiota can reduce the risk of acquiring C. trachomatis infection and counteract the development of persistent chlamydial forms.

  10. Probiotics for the Prevention of Pediatric Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Shelby R; Vargas, Ashley J

    ), along with their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). For overall pooled results on the incidence of diarrhea, sensitivity analyses included available case versus extreme-plausible analyses and random- versus fixed-effect models. To explore possible explanations for heterogeneity, a priori subgroup analysis was conducted on probiotic strain, dose, definition of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and risk of bias. We also conducted post hoc subgroup analyses by patient diagnosis, single versus multi-strain, industry sponsorship, and inpatient status. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcomes was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. Overall, 23 studies (3938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Trials included treatment with either Bacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium butyricum, Lactobacilli spp., Lactococcus spp., Leuconostoc cremoris, Saccharomyces spp., or Streptococcus spp., alone or in combination. Eleven studies used a single-strain probiotic, four combined two probiotic strains, three combined three probiotic strains, one combined four probiotic strains, two combined seven probiotic strains, one included ten probiotic strains, and one study included two probiotic arms that used three and two strains, respectively. The risk of bias was determined to be high or unclear in 13 studies and low in 10 studies. Available case (patients who did not complete the studies were not included in the analysis) results from 22/23 trials reporting on the incidence of diarrhea show a precise benefit from probiotics compared to active, placebo, or no treatment control. The incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 8% (163/1992) compared to 19% (364/1906) in the control group (RR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.35-0.61; I2 = 55%, 3898 participants). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence for this outcome was moderate. This benefit remained statistically significant in an extreme-plausible (60% of children lost to follow-up in

  11. Urinary metabolomic fingerprinting after consumption of a probiotic strain in women with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Llorach, Rafael; Marinic, Jelena; Tulipani, Sara; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Jiménez, Esther; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Infectious mastitis is a common condition among lactating women, with staphylococci and streptococci being the main aetiological agents. In this context, some lactobacilli strains isolated from breast milk appear to be particularly effective for treating mastitis and, therefore, constitute an attractive alternative to antibiotherapy. A (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach was applied to detect metabolomic differences after consuming a probiotic strain (Lactobacillus salivarius PS2) in women with mastitis. 24h urine of women with lactational mastitis was collected at baseline and after 21 days of probiotic (PB) administration. Multivariate analysis (OSC-PLS-DA and hierarchical clustering) showed metabolome differences after PB treatment. The discriminant metabolites detected at baseline were lactose, and ibuprofen and acetaminophen (two pharmacological drugs commonly used for mastitis pain), while, after PB intake, creatine and the gut microbial co-metabolites hippurate and TMAO were detected. In addition, a voluntary desertion of the pharmacological drugs ibuprofen and acetaminophen was observed after probiotic administration. The application of NMR-based metabolomics enabled the identification of the overall effects of probiotic consumption among women suffering from mastitis and highlighted the potential of this approach in evaluating the outcomes of probiotics consumption. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been applied in women with mastitis during lactation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Performance in nondairy drinks of probiotic L. casei strains usually employed in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Mario; Cárdenas, Pamela; Staffolani, Martín; Ciappini, María C; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    The increase in vegetarianism as dietary habit and the increased allergy episodes against dairy proteins fuel the demand for probiotics in nondairy products. Lactose intolerance and the cholesterol content of dairy products can also be considered two additional reasons why some consumers are looking for probiotics in other foods. We aimed at determining cell viability in nondairy drinks and resistance to simulated gastric digestion of commercial probiotic lactobacilli commonly used in dairy products. Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and L. casei BGP 93 were added to different commercial nondairy drinks and viability and resistance to simulated gastric digestion (pH 2.5, 90 min, 37 °C) were monitored along storage (5 and 20 °C). For both strains, at least one nondairy drink was found to offer cell counts around 7 log orders until the end of the storage period. Changes in resistance to simulated gastric digestion were observed as well. Commercial probiotic cultures of L. casei can be added to commercial fruit juices after a carefull selection of the product that warrants cell viability. The resistance to simulated gastric digestion is an easy-to-apply in vitro tool that may contribute to product characterization and may help in the choice of the food matrix when no changes in cell viability are observed along storage. Sensorial evaluation is mandatory before marketing since the product type and storage conditions might influence the sensorial properties of the product due to the possibility of growth and lactic acid production by probiotic bacteria.

  13. Effects of probiotics on the growth performance and intestinal micro flora of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin-bo; Xu, Qian-qian; Yang, Cun-jin; Yang, Xin; Lv, Le; Yin, Chun-hua; Liu, Xiao-lu; Yan, Hai

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotics have been used in poultry industry for decades to promote growth and protect animals from diseases, followed by various side effects. In efforts of searching for a better alternative, probiotic is of extensive attention. We investigated the effects of Bacillus subtitles, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Candida utilis and Lactobacillus acidophilus as 0.1% (W/W) feed additives on broiler growth performance and intestinal microflora. The results showed the probiotics treatments significantly improved growth of broilers. Broilers supplemented with B. subtilis and L. acidophilus weighed 18.4% and 10.1% more than birds in control group at 42 days of age. Furthermore the feed conversion ratios of the birds in the two groups were also improved, decreasing 9.1% and 12.9%, respectively. Further study indicated a significant increase of cecal Lactobacilli concentration in briolers supplemented with probiotics, expecially in L. acidophilus treatment group. Meanwhile, the count of cecal Actinomyces in birds treated with probiotics was significantly lower compared with the control group. In conclusion, probiotics such as B. subtitles and L. acidophilus are good alternatives to antibiotics in promoting growth resulting from a beneficial modulation of the intestinal micro flora, which leads to increased efficiency of intestinal digestion in the host animal.

  14. Assessment of potentially probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizerwetter-Świda, M; Binek, M

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to isolate lactobacilli from chicken droppings and to select strains with the most promising probiotic properties. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from a flock of healthy laying hens. The first selection criterion was the ability to inhibit the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis. Then the tolerance to low pH and bile salt, the ability to coaggregate with pathogenic bacteria and hydrogen peroxide production were evaluated. Four isolates showing the best antagonistic activity against Salmonella Enetritidis were selected for further research. All isolates tested tolerated low pH and bile salt, likewise all produced hydrogen peroxide. They efficiently coaggregated with C. perfringens and relatively less with E. coli. Isolate 03'04 displayed above-average results in all criteria, thus it is considered as a potential probiotic for chickens, and will be further evaluated for health promoting effect in animals. The results presented in this study confirm the strain specific probiotic properties and prove the probiotic potential of isolate 03'04. Strong antagonistic properties against C. perfringens exhibited by certain Lactobacillus strains indicate the possibility to use them as a component of probiotic supplement in necrotic enteritis of poultry.

  15. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Accelerates Gastric Ulcer Healing by Stimulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Poonam; De Simone, Claudio; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effect and mechanism of probiotics on diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GI) including gastric ulcers are limited despite extensive work and promising results of this therapeutic option for other GI diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (a mixture of eight probiotic bacteria including Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria and Streptococcus species) heals acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. VSL#3 was administered orally at low (6×109 bacteria) or high (1.2×1010 bacteria) dosages from day 3 after ulcer induction for 14 consecutive days. VSL#3 treatments significantly enhanced gastric ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby VSL#3 exerted its protective effects, we quantified the gene expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, protein and expression of stomach mucin-Muc5ac, regulatory cytokine-IL-10, COX-2 and various growth factors. Of all the components examined, only expression and protein production of VEGF was increased 332-fold on day 7 in the ulcerated tissues of animals treated with VSL#3. Predictably, animals treated with VEGF neutralizing antibody significantly delayed gastric ulcer healing in VSL#3 treated animals. This is the first report to demonstrate high efficacy of the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in enhancing gastric ulcer healing. Probiotic efficacy was effective at higher concentrations of VSL#3 by specifically increasing the expression and production of angiogenesis promoting growth factors, primarily VEGF. PMID:23484048

  16. Potential use of probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekachai Chukeatirote

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics (Greek: for life are commonly defined as mono- or mixed cultures of live microbes that, when applied to animal or human, possess a beneficial effect on health of the host. These beneficial effects include disease treatment and prevention as well as improvement of nutrients’ digestion and absorption. Probiotic microorganisms are generally, albeit not exclusively, lactic acid bacteria (LAB including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei, L. plantarum, and L. rhamnosus. However, use of other bacterial species such as Bacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. as probiotic strains has also been described in several commercial products. This article intends to present an up-to-date version regarding probiotics, strains currently used and health benefit obtained from their consumption.

  17. Probiotics and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig

    resistance and blood lipid profile among others. Probiotics which are health promoting bacteria can potentially be used to affect the GM and thereby change metabolic outcomes of the host. Animal studies have shown associations between intake of probiotics and appetite regulation, but currently no human...... studies have investigated this effect. Supplementation with different probiotic strains have been shown to have an effect on blood lipid profiles in both animals and humans and the mechanisms behind have been studied in vitro and in rodents. The aim of the present thesis was to examine in an ex vivo...... intestine, in an animal study and in two human studies the effect of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8 (W8) on appetite regulation, blood lipids and blood fatty acids. In addition, it was investigated if W8 had an effect on the fecal microbiota of the human...

  18. Probiotics: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... P, et al. Probiotics, prebiotics, and the host microbiome: the science of translation. Annals of the New ... Health , USA.gov National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892

  19. Probiotics and Their Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başar Uymaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing demand to use the microorganisms, supporting consumer health and stimulating immune system, in food production. The role of probiotics which are one of the most important group of this microorganisms on the preventation of gastrointestinal diseases and treatment and development of normal gastrointestinal flora were determinated by clinical trials. On the other hand, studies on the strain-dependent food preservation effects and the potentials for treatment of different diseases of probiotics are ongoing. Probiotic preparats that have effective potential especially for the treatment acute diarrhea in children and antibiotic associated diarrhea have been developed. In this review, newsworthy information on the criteria for probiotic strain selection, curing potentials and their application possibilities were presented.

  20. Probiotic and prebiotic-probiotic PEC microparticles for sustaining and enhancing intestinal probiotic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshitha, K; Kulkarni, P K; Vaghela, Rudra; Kumar Varma, V Naga Sravan; Deshpande, D Rohan; Hani, Umme

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) microparticles composing Lactobacillus Acidophilus (probiotic) and Fructo oligosaccharide-Lactobacillus Acidophilus (prebiotic-probiotic), for sustaining and enhancing intestinal growth of probiotic bacteria. Gum Karaya-Chitosan(GK-CH) was used to fabricate PEC microparticles by extrusion method. The prepared microparticles were characterized for FT-IR, DSC and particle size and evaluated for percentage yield, swelling, surface morphology, entrapment rate and further studied for influence of prebiotic over probiotic growth. The fabricated PEC microparticles composed of Probiotic and Prebiotic- Probiotic have exhibited sustainability of probiotic bacteria for 12 hrs in GIT conditions and presence of prebiotic in the preparation enhanced the probiotic cell growth. Hence, it can be concluded that PEC between GK-CH was found to be successful in sustaining cell release and presence of prebiotic was found to enhance the probiotic cell growth.

  1. The Effect of Iranian Customary Used Probiotic Yogurt on the Children’s Salivary Cariogenic Microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nozari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Dental caries is the most common disease of child-hood. Using probiotics has recently been introduced to reduce the incidence of dental caries.It consists of live microbial food supplements that beneficially affect the host, and hence are considered an alternative way to eradicate the infections. Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of consumption of probi-otic yogurt on the children’s salivary cariogenic microflora. Materials and Method: A double-blind randomized study was performed recruit-ing 2 parallel groups; 24 healthy children in the case and 25 children in the control group. All healthy children were followed- up over 4 periods. Periods 1 and 3 were wash-out periods with duration of 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. During periods 2 and 4 (2weeks duration each, the case group consumed 200g yogurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis (1×106 per gram once daily and the control group consumed normal yogurt. Salivary Streptococci mutans and Lactobacilli were enumerated before and after the yogurt consumption periods. Pre- and post-treatment values within and between regimens were compared using the t-test and paired samples. Results: There was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts in the control group, but for Streptococcus mutans, the count reduction between phases 1 and 4 was statistically significant (p= 0.009. In the case group, neither the Streptococcus mutans count nor the Lactobacilli count was significantly reduced. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, short-term daily consumption of probiotic yogurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis could not reduce the levels of salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli in 6 to 12 year-old children, while normal yogurt could reduce the Streptococcus mutans counts significantly.

  2. Probiotics: "living drugs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, G W

    2001-06-15

    The uses, mechanisms of action, and safety of probiotics are discussed. Probiotics are live microorganisms or microbial mixtures administered to improve the patient's microbial balance, particularly the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and the vagina. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii and the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, strain GG, have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Other probiotics that have demonstrated at least some promise as prophylaxis for this type of diarrhea are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, and Enterococcus faecium. The use of S. boulardii as an adjunctive treatment to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin has been found in controlled studies to decrease further recurrences of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Other gastrointestinal disorders for which probiotics have been studied include traveler's diarrhea, acute infantile diarrhea, and acute diarrhea in adults. Several Lactobacillus species given in yogurt or in tablet or suppository form have shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for vaginal infections. Lactobacillus strains have also been examined as a treatment for urinary-tract infections. Putative mechanisms of action of probiotics include production of pathogen-inhibitory substances, inhibition of pathogen attachment, inhibition of the action of microbial toxins, stimulation of immunoglobulin A, and trophic effects on intestinal mucosa. The available probiotics are considered nonpathogenic, but even benign microorganisms can be infective when a patient is severely debilitated or immunosuppressed. Probiotics have demonstrated an ability to prevent and treat some infections. Effective use of probiotics could decrease patients' exposure to antimicrobials. Additional controlled studies are needed to clearly define the safety and efficacy of these agents.

  3. Clinical studies involving probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Degnan, Fred H

    2012-01-01

    Researchers from a diverse array of scientific disciplines have focused and continue to focus on opportunities and areas for responsible clinical research involving the possible beneficial health effects of “probiotics.” Investigators and researchers should be aware that not all clinical research involving probiotics reasonably falls within the requirements of the “investigational new drug” (IND) rubric administered and enforced by the US Food and Drug Administration. In determining whether a...

  4. Microbiota and probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Corpino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota, the collection of microorganisms peacefully coexisting with their human host, colonize virtually every surface of the human body exposed to the external environment. The complex community of microorganisms living in the digestive tract, the gut microbiota, is determined by the delivery mode, prematurity, sex, genetics and subsequent environmental exposures (diet, drugs. It has also been claimed that the constant interaction between the host and the gut microbiota influences the health of the host. Probiotics are defined as live non-pathogenic microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts can replicate and colonize in sufficient numbers the gastrointestinal tract. This is the main reason for the use of probiotics in different clinical settings where they may act as biomodulators of the intestinal microbiota. The therapeutic efficacy of probiotics has been evaluated in randomized controlled trials for various diseases. In this paper, the usage and the efficacy of probiotics in different conditions like necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, diarrhea, functional gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies are analyzed.The usefulness of a probiotic treatment is affected by many factors including: bacterial strain, duration of administration, disease and age and not all products marketed as probiotics provide the same safety and efficacy. Therefore, comparative studies to assess the most effective formulations, timing and the optimal length of therapy are mandatory.

  5. [Probiotics for the treatment of infant colic: a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, Jimena; Taboada Castro, Luz; Tolín Hernani, Mar; Sánchez Sánchez, César; Álvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo

    2015-02-07

    Infant colic is a prevalent physiological event of healthy children under 3 months of age which can disrupt the child's home environment. Despite its benign natural history, sometimes requires a therapeutic approach. Numerous therapeutical lines have been proposed although its pathogenesis remains unknown and multifactorial. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the infant colic. Several studies have shown less bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in infant colic meanwhile Escherichia, Klebsiella, Serratia, Vibrio, Yersinia and Pseudomonas are more prominent in colon. The probiotic strain L. reuteri DSM 17938, when administered once daily to 10⁸ cfu / day, seems to have the most scientific evidence up to date in the treatment of infant colic, without significant side effects.

  6. The Role of Probiotics on the Microbiota: Effect on Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, Esther; Pérez de Heredia, Fátima; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2016-06-01

    The microbiota and the human host maintain a symbiotic association. Nowadays, metagenomic analyses are providing valuable knowledge on the diversity and functionality of the gut microbiota. However, with regard to the definition of a "healthy microbiota" and the characterization of the dysbiosis linked to obesity, there is still not a clear answer. Despite this fact, attempts have been made to counteract obesity through probiotic supplementation. A literature search of experimental studies relevant to the topic was performed in PubMed database with the keywords "probiotic" and "obesity" and restricted to those with "Lactobacillus" or "Bifidobacterium" in the title. So far, evidence of an antiobesity effect of different lactobacilli and bifidobacteria has been mainly obtained from animal models of dietary-induced obesity. Using these experimental models, a substantial number of studies have reported reductions in weight gain and, in particular, fat tissue mass at different locations following administration of bacteria, as compared with controls. Antiatherogenic and anti-inflammatory effects-including regulation of expression of lipogenic and lipolytic genes in the liver, reduction in liver steatosis, improvement of blood lipid profile and glucose tolerance, decreased endotoxemia, and regulation of inflammatory pathways-are also reported in many of them. The number of human studies focused on probiotic administration for obesity management is still very scarce, and it is too soon to judge their potential efficacy, especially when considering the fact that the actions of probiotics are always strain specific and the individual response varies according to intrinsic factors, the overall composition of diet, and their interactions.

  7. Individual responses of mother sows to a probiotic Enterococcus faecium strain lead to different microbiota composition in their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I C; Pieper, R; Neumann, K; Zentek, J; Vahjen, W

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant gilts were fed the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB10415 (SF68) one month before birth of piglets. DNA extracts of sow faeces taken in weekly intervals as well as extracts from the intestine of their offspring during the suckling period at 12 and 26 days of life were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR. DGGE profiles of faecal bacterial communities from three out of six probiotic-fed sows were distinctly different from the control and other probiotic-fed sows at all time points after probiotic supplementation. The probiotic-fed sows and their offspring were therefore divided into non-responder (n=3) and responder (n=3) groups. The probiotic strain significantly increased faecal lactobacilli cell numbers in mother sows, which could be assigned to a significant increase of Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Responding sows showed a more pronounced increase than non-responding sows. Similarly, suckling piglets from non-responding and responding sows showed numeric and significant differences for different bacterial groups and species. DGGE profiles of suckling piglets from responding sows also grouped more closely than profiles from control animals. Non-metric multiscaling of suckling piglets showed the same tendency for suckling piglets, but not for post-weaning piglets. This study showed that the probiotic E. faecium strain modified the faecal microbiota of sows. This modification is carried over to their offspring, but leads to changes that do not mirror the quantitative composition in the mother sow. Individual variations in the bacterial composition of mother sows before probiotic feed intake may influence the impact of a probiotic in sows and their offspring.

  8. Microbiological and molecular characterization of commercially available probiotics containing Bacillus clausii from India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Vania; Molinari, Paola; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2016-11-21

    Probiotics are actively used for treatment of diarrhoea, respiratory infections, and prevention of infectious gastrointestinal diseases. The efficacy of probiotics is due to strain-specific features and the number of viable cells; however, several reports of deviations from the label in the actual content of strains in probiotic products are a matter of concern. Most of the available data on quality focuses on probiotic products containing lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria, while very few data are available on spore-forming probiotics. The present study evaluates the label claims for spore count and species identification in five commercial probiotic products marketed in India and Pakistan that claim to contain Bacillus clausii: Tufpro, Ecogro, Enterogermina, Entromax, and Ospor. Bacterial enumeration from three batches was done by microbiological plating methods by two independent operators. Species identification was done using PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, and determination of the total amount of species present in the products was done using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis followed by DNA sequencing of the excised bands. Plate count methods demonstrated poor correlations between quantitative label indications and bacteria recovered from plates for Tufpro, Ecogro, and Ospor. The 16S rRNA analysis performed on bacteria isolated from plate counts showed that only Enterogermina and Ospor contained homogenous B. clausii. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that only Enterogermina had a homogenous B. clausii population while other products had mixed bacterial populations. In conclusion, the current analysis clearly demonstrates that of the five analysed commercial probiotics, only Enterogermina followed the label claims. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the most abundant Lactobacillus species in chicken gastrointestinal tract and potential use as probiotics for genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fang, Mingjian; Hu, Yanping; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-07-01

    The count and diffusion of Lactobacilli species in the different gastrointestinal tract (GI) regions of broilers were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the probiotic characteristics of six L. reuteri species isolated from broilers' GI tract were also investigated to obtain the potential target for genetic engineering. Lactobacilli had the highest diversity in the crop and the lowest one in the cecum. Compared with the lower GI tract, more Lactobacilli were found in the upper GI tract. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. johnsonii, L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. salivarius, and L. aviarius were the predominant Lactobacillus species and present throughout the GI tract of chickens. Lactobacillus reuteri was the most abundant Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 had good probiotic characteristics that would be a potential and desirable target for genetic engineering. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Probiotics for severe trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rijkers, Ger T

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics are live micro-organisms with a health promoting effect. Because of their immunomodulating capacity as well as improvement of gut barrier function, probiotics have the capacity to prevent infectious complications in a variety of clinical settings. Now selected probiotics show potential for improving the clinical outcome of severe trauma patients.

  11. Lactobacilli Modulate Epithelial Cytoprotection through the Nrf2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Desai, Chirayu; Darby, Trevor M; Luo, Liping; Wolfarth, Alexandra A; Scharer, Christopher D; Ardita, Courtney S; Reedy, April R; Keebaugh, Erin S; Neish, Andrew S

    2015-08-25

    An optimal gut microbiota influences many beneficial processes in the metazoan host. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate and function in symbiont-induced host responses have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we report that cellular ROS enzymatically generated in response to contact with lactobacilli in both mice and Drosophila has salutary effects against exogenous insults to the intestinal epithelium via the activation of Nrf2 responsive cytoprotective genes. These data show that the xenobiotic-inducible Nrf2 pathway participates as a signaling conduit between the prokaryotic symbiont and the eukaryotic host. Indeed, our data imply that the capacity of lactobacilli to induce redox signaling in epithelial cells is a highly conserved hormetic adaptation to impel cellular conditioning to exogenous biotic stimuli. These data also highlight the role the microbiota plays in eukaryotic cytoprotective pathways and may have significant implications in the characterization of a eubiotic microbiota.

  12. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  13. Protective effect of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus strain on infection with pathogenic bacteria in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizerwetter-Swida, M; Binek, M

    2009-01-01

    The probiotic potential of a Lactobacillus salivarius 3d strain isolated from chicken faeces was assessed in one day old chickens. Lactobacillus salivarius 3d was administered per os at a concentration of 10(8) cfu in 100 microl of PBS. The chickens were then challenged with pathogenic bacteria: Salmonella Enteritidis, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens. Samples of caecal contents and livers were collected after 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after infection. Lactobacilli and pathogenic bacterial cell counts were determined in the samples. This study showed that L. salivarius 3d reduced the number of Salmonella Enteritidis and Clostridium perfringens in the group of chickens treated with Lactobacillus. Therefore it may be concluded that L. salivarius 3d may be used as a potential probiotic for chickens.

  14. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  15. Isolation of antifungally active lactobacilli from edam cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuma, S.; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Plocková, M.

    2007-01-01

    The antifungal activity of 322 lactobacilli strains isolated from Edam cheese at different stages of the ripening process was tested against Fusarium proliferatum M 5689 using a dual overlay spot assay. Approximately 21% of the isolates showed a certain level of inhibitory activity. Seven strains...... as Lb. paracasei and three as Lb. fermentum. Lb. paracasei ST 68 was chosen for further testing as antifungal protective adjunct for Edam cheese production.  ...

  16. Antibiotic resistances of intestinal lactobacilli isolated from wild boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Viviana; Bayer, Katharina; Kern, Corinna; Goelß, Florian; Fibi, Silvia; Wegl, Gertrude

    2014-01-10

    Acquired antibiotic resistances have been reported in lactobacilli of various animal and food sources, but there are no data from wild boar. The objective was a preliminary examination of the antibiotic resistance prevalence of intrinsically vancomycin-resistant lactobacilli isolated from wild boar intestines and analysis of the genetic determinants implicated. Out of three wild boars, 121 lactobacilli were recovered and grouped according to their whole cell protein patterns. Initial phenotypic screening revealed that all were susceptible to erythromycin (2 μg/ml), but 30 were resistant to tetracycline (32 μg/ml). Based on Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR clustering, 64 strains were selected as representative genotypes for identification and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified four species: (i) L. mucosae (n=57), (ii) L. reuteri (n=47), (iii) L. fermentum (n=12), and (iv) L. murinus (n=5). Most heterofermentative strains displayed low MICs for ampicillin (AMP), chloramphenicol (CHL), streptomycin (STR), kanamycin (KAN), gentamicin (GEN), erythromycin (ERY), quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D), and clindamycin (CLI). Atypical MICs were found mainly in L. mucosae and L. reuteri for TET, KAN, STR, AMP and CHL, but except the TET MICs of L. mucosae mostly at low level. L. murinus strains revealed atypical MICs for aminoglycosides, and/or CHL, AMP, CLI. PCR screening detected tet(W) in 12 and tet(M) in one of heterofermentative strains, as well as the aph(3')-III kanamycin gene in L. murinus. This is the first report showing acquired antibiotic resistance determinants in intestinal lactobacilli of wild boar origin.

  17. Beneficial Properties of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lye Huey; Balakrishnan, Kunasundari; Thiagarajah, Kokila; Mohd Ismail, Nor Ismaliza; Yin, Ooi Shao

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that can be found in fermented foods and cultured milk, and are widely used for the preparation of infant food. They are well-known as “health friendly bacteria”, which exhibit various health beneficial properties such as prevention of bowel diseases, improving the immune system, for lactose intolerance and intestinal microbial balance, exhibiting antihypercholesterolemic and antihypertensive effects, alleviation of postmenopausal disorders, and reducing traveller’s diarrhoea. Recent studies have also been focused on their uses in treating skin and oral diseases. In addition to that, modulation of the gut-brain by probiotics has been suggested as a novel therapeutic solution for anxiety and depression. Thus, this review discusses on the current probiotics-based products in Malaysia, criteria for selection of probiotics, and evidences obtained from past studies on how probiotics have been used in preventing intestinal disorders via improving the immune system, acting as an antihypercholesterolemic factor, improving oral and dermal health, and performing as anti-anxiety and anti-depressive agents. PMID:27688852

  18. PROBIOTICS, PREBIOTICS AND SYNBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta V. Chauhan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of Probiotics have been recognized and explored for over a century. Probiotics consist of bacteria or yeasts and can be considered functional foods that can re-colonize and restore the microflora symbiosis of the intestinal tract. Several health benefits associated with the Probiotics in various diseases includes Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD, Colon Cancer, Rotavirus-associated diarhoea, H.Pylori infection and Liver disease etc. Prebiotics are “non-digestible food ingredients that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon”. Dietary modulation of the gut microflora by Prebiotics is designed to improve health by stimulating numbers and/or activities of Probiotics like Bifidobacteria and Lactobacill.This review also discuss the results of randomized controlled clinical trials that used Prebiotics to treat IBD, Hypertension, Colon Cancer, Diabetes and Hepatic Encephalopathy as well as their potential applications. The combination of Probiotics and Prebiotics is known as Synbiotics. Recently Synbiotics have been proposed as a new therapeutic option in Pediatric surgery, Digestive organ surgery, Liver disease and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS. This article provides the overview of how Pro-, Pre- and Synbiotics contribute towards various health benefits.

  19. Molecular characterization of lactobacilli isolated from fermented idli batter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Jayaprabha Agaliya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are non pathogenic organism widely distributed in nature typically involved in a large number of spontaneous food fermentation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the bacteriocinogenic lactobacilli from fermented idli batter which can find application in biopreservation and biomedicine. Eight most promising lactobacilli were chosen from twenty two isolates based on their spectrum of activity against other lactic acid bacteria and pathogens. The eight lactobacilli were characterized based on the various classical phenotypic tests, physiological tests and biochemical tests including various carbohydrate utilization profiles. All isolates were homo fermentative, catalase, and gelatin negative. Molecular characterization was performed by RAPD, 16S rRNA analysis, 16S ARDRA, and Multiplex PCR for species identification. RAPD was carried out using the primer R2 and M13. Five different clusters were obtained based on RAPD indicating strain level variation. 16S rRNA analysis showed 99 to 100% homology towards Lactobacillus plantarum. The restriction digestion pattern was similar for all the isolates with the restriction enzyme AluI. The subspecies were identified by performing Multiplex PCR using species specific primer. Among the five clusters, three clusters were clearly identified as Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis.

  20. Molecular characterization of lactobacilli isolated from fermented idli batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaliya, Perumal Jayaprabha; Jeevaratnam, Kadirvelu

    2013-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are non pathogenic organism widely distributed in nature typically involved in a large number of spontaneous food fermentation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the bacteriocinogenic lactobacilli from fermented idli batter which can find application in biopreservation and biomedicine. Eight most promising lactobacilli were chosen from twenty two isolates based on their spectrum of activity against other lactic acid bacteria and pathogens. The eight lactobacilli were characterized based on the various classical phenotypic tests, physiological tests and biochemical tests including various carbohydrate utilization profiles. All isolates were homo fermentative, catalase, and gelatin negative. Molecular characterization was performed by RAPD, 16S rRNA analysis, 16S ARDRA, and Multiplex PCR for species identification. RAPD was carried out using the primer R2 and M13. Five different clusters were obtained based on RAPD indicating strain level variation. 16S rRNA analysis showed 99 to 100% homology towards Lactobacillus plantarum. The restriction digestion pattern was similar for all the isolates with the restriction enzyme AluI. The subspecies were identified by performing Multiplex PCR using species specific primer. Among the five clusters, three clusters were clearly identified as Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis.

  1. Encapsulation of Probiotics for use in Food Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlović, Verica; Nedović, Viktor A.; Kailasapathy, Kasipathy; Zuidam, Nicolaas Jan

    The history of the role of probiotics for human health is one century old and several definitions have been derived hitherto. One of them, launched by Huis in't Veld and Havenaar (1991) defines probiotics as being “mono or mixed cultures of live microorganisms which, when applied to a man or an animal (e.g., as dried cells or as a fermented product), beneficially affect the host by improving the properties of the indigenous microflora”. Probiotics are living microorganisms which survive gastric, bile, and pancreatic secretions, attach to epithelial cells and colonize the human intestine (Del Piano et al. 2006). It is estimated that an adult human intestine contains more than 400 different bacterial species (Finegold et al. 1977) and approximately 1014 bacterial cells (which is approximately ten times the total number of eukaryotic cells in the human body). The bacterial cells can be classified into three categories, namely, beneficial, neutral or harmful, with respect to human health. Among the beneficial bacteria are Bifidobacterium and Lactobacilli. The proportion of bifidobacteria represents the third most common genus in the gastrointestinal tract, while Bacteroides predominates at 86% of the total flora in the adult gut, followed by Eubacterium. Infant-type bifidobacteria B. bifidum are replaced with adult-type bifidobacteria, B. longum and B. adolescentis. With weaning and aging, the intestinal flora profile changes. Bifidobacteria decrease, while certain kinds of harmful bacteria increase. Changes in the intestinal flora are affected not only by aging but also by extrinsic factors, for example, stress, diet, drugs, bacterial contamination and constipation. Therefore, daily consumption of probiotic products is recommended for good health and longevity. There are numerous claimed beneficial effects and therapeutic applications of probiotic bacteria in humans, such as maintenance of normal intestinal microflora, improvement of constipation, treatment of

  2. Novel encapsulation improves recovery of probiotic strains in fecal samples of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Volker; Waugh, Sheldon; Byrd, Doratha; Simpson, Damion; Ukhanova, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Probiotic supplements can contribute to maintaining health and ameliorating various disease symptoms. Probiotics can be delivered in many forms with crucial differences in their survival during gastrointestinal (GI) passage. Previously, a novel encapsulation, Probiotic Pearls™ Acidophilus, Integrative Therapeutics, LLC, USA (Pearls), was shown to increase survival in vitro after exposure to gastric conditions. Here, we compare fecal recovery in human volunteers consuming Pearls or a conventional hard-shelled gelatin capsule. We performed a randomized double-blinded, two-armed trial, with six healthy subjects in each 12-day study arm. In fecal samples collected at baseline, twice during the intervention period, and after washout, we compared colony counts between the two encapsulation methods. The identity of the colonies was confirmed by colony morphology, strain-specific PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We further performed a comprehensive 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to identify differential effects on overall microbiota composition. We detected an average log increase in bifidobacteria of 0.152 cfu/g with gelatin and 0.651 cfu/g with Pearls capsules (p > 0.05). Total lactobacilli counts increased in both groups with no difference between the groups. However, the supplemented Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM decreased to baseline levels within 7 days after end of supplementation with gelatin capsules while 3.11 log cfu/g higher counts compared to baseline (p = 0.05) remained for Pearls. Targeted qPCR largely confirmed the trends observed by viable plate counts. Protecting the probiotic strains by Pearls encapsulation results in higher recovery rates of the supplemented lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in fecal samples and increased persistence, suggesting an improved survival and viability that might increase efficacy towards achieving desired health benefits.

  3. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongaerts, Ger; Severijnen, René; Timmerman, Harro

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics and lactulose. This influenced our view of the effect of antibiotics, prebiotics, e.g., lactulose, and probiotics on intestinal bacteria in the treatment of HE. Intestinal ammonia arises from aminoacids after bacterial de-amination and not from urea making urease-positive bacteria irrelevant. Antibiotics are not preferred in the treatment of HE, since ammonia-producing antibiotic-resistant bacteria may survive and replace ammonia-producing antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. Intestinal prebiotics are carbohydrate-like compounds, such as lactulose and resistant starch, that beneficially affects host's health in a different manner than normal food. In the small bowel prebiotics are not absorbed and digested, but are fermented in the colon by colonic bacteria. Fermentation of prebiotics yields lactic, acetic and butyric acids, as well as gas especially hydrogen (H2). The massive H2 volumes cause rapid intestinal hurry and thus massive amounts of colonic bacteria, not only urease-positive bacteria, but also deaminating bacteria, are removed and intestinal uptake of toxic bacterial metabolites, e.g., ammonia, reduced. As living non-pathogenic micro-organisms, probiotics beneficially affect the host's health by fermenting non-absorbed sugars, especially in the small bowel. Thus, they reduce the substrate of the other bacteria, and simultaneously they create a surplus of fermentation products which may affect the non-probiotic flora. Regarding the fermentation products (lactic acid, ethanol, acetic acid and CO2) five groups of probiotic micro-organisms are known. It is argued that probiotic, CO2-producing (facultatively) heterolactic lactobacilli, i.e., lactobacilli, that produce

  4. Probiotics and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2015-01-01

    Complications of pregnancy are associated with adverse outcomes for mother and baby in the short and long term. The gut microbiome has been identified as a key factor for maintaining health outside of pregnancy and could contribute to pregnancy complications. In addition, the vaginal and the recently revealed placental microbiome are altered in pregnancy and may play a role in pregnancy complications. Probiotic supplementation could help to regulate the unbalanced microflora composition observed in obesity and diabetes. Here, the impact of probiotic supplementation during pregnancy and infancy is reviewed. There are indications for a protective role in preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, vaginal infections, maternal and infant weight gain and allergic diseases. Large, well-designed randomised controlled clinical trials along with metagenomic analysis are needed to establish the role of probiotics in adverse pregnancy and infancy outcomes.

  5. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Beasley, DeAnna E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain hu...

  6. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Beasley, DeAnna E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain hu...

  7. Probiotics in 2015: Their Scope and Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The field of probiotics continues to evolve and progress. This paper reviews several situations within the probiotic field that are of current interest, including review of the scope of the proper use of the term "probiotic," use of systematic reviews and meta-analyses for probiotics, regulatory challenges to doing human research on probiotics in the United States, medical recommendations for probiotic use, and safety assurance for probiotics used for vulnerable populations. The greatest need in the probiotic field remains well-conducted and well-reported human trials, to better define the functionality of probiotics for different indications and populations.

  8. Administration of a multistrain probiotic product (VSL#3) to women in the perinatal period differentially affects breast milk beneficial microbiota in relation to mode of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Capobianco, Daniela; Miccheli, Alfredo; Praticò, Giulia; Campagna, Giuseppe; Laforgia, Nicola; Capursi, Teresa; Baldassarre, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation to a mother during the perinatal period can have a positive impact on the breast milk composition. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, during late pregnancy and lactation, on breast milk levels of beneficial bacteria and some functional components (oligosaccharides and lactoferrin) potentially able to have a positive influence on the microbiota. Breast milk microbiota was analyzed by conventional and quantitative real-time PCR. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 66 women took daily either the probiotic (n=33) or a placebo (n=33). Intergroup analysis demonstrated that the amounts of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were significantly higher in the colostrum and mature milk of the mothers taking VSL#3 in comparison to those taking placebo. The analysis of bacterial strains and species present in breast milk of VSL#3 supplemented mothers indicated that the administered probiotic microorganisms did not pass from maternal gut to mammary gland. In women with vaginal delivery, significantly higher amounts of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were detected in colostrum and mature milk of probiotic treated group in comparison to placebo group, whereas no significant difference was observed between groups in women who had caesarean section, neither in colostrum nor in mature milk. Milk levels of oligosaccharides and lactoferrin were similar in placebo and probiotic supplemented groups at all timepoints and regardless of the mode of delivery. Our results indicate a probiotic-dependent modulation of breast milk microbiota in vaginally delivering women, possibly exerted through a systemic effect.

  9. Probiotics for allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C E

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics, given either as a supplement or in infant foods, have been evaluated in randomised controlled trials for allergy prevention. Here, the aim is to give an overview of the results from these primary prevention studies and to discuss current strategies. In most studies, single strains or a mixture of strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have been used--prenatally, postnatally or perinatally. Several meta-analyses have reported a moderate benefit of probiotics for eczema prevention, and the most consistent effect has been observed with a combined perinatal intervention in infants at high risk of allergic disease due to familial predisposition. In a recent meta-analysis, the use of multi-strain probiotics appeared to be most effective for eczema prevention. No preventive effect has been shown for other allergic manifestations. As long-term follow-up data on later onset allergic conditions (asthma and allergic rhinitis) are available only from a few of the initiated studies, reports from ongoing follow-up studies that are adequately powered to examine long-term outcomes are anticipated to provide more insight. Arguably, the differences in many aspects of study design and the use of different probiotic strains and combinations have made direct comparison difficult. To date, expert bodies do not generally recommend probiotics for allergy prevention, although the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in their recently developed guidelines suggests considering using probiotics in pregnant women, during breastfeeding and/or to the infant if at high risk of developing allergic disease (based on heredity). However, in concordance with other expert bodies, the WAO guideline panel stressed the low level of evidence and the need for adequately powered randomised controlled trials and a more standardised approach before clinical recommendations on specific strains, dosages and timing can be given.

  10. Probiotics: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Triggered by the growing knowledge on the link between the intestinal microbiome and human health, the interest in probiotics is ever increasing. The authors aimed to review the recent literature on probiotics, from definitions to clinical benefits, with emphasis on children. SOURCES: Relevant literature from searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and recent consensus statements were reviewed. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: While a balanced microbiome is related to health, an imbalanced microbiome or dysbiosis is related to many health problems both within the gastro-intestinal tract, such as diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease, and outside the gastro-intestinal tract such as obesity and allergy. In this context, a strict regulation of probiotics with health claims is urgent, because the vast majority of these products are commercialized as food (supplements, claiming health benefits that are often not substantiated with clinically relevant evidence. The major indications of probiotics are in the area of the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal related disorders, but more data has become available on extra-intestinal indications. At least two published randomized controlled trials with the commercialized probiotic product in the claimed indication are a minimal condition before a claim can be sustained. Today, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the best-studied strains. Although adverse effects have sporadically been reported, these probiotics can be considered as safe. CONCLUSIONS: Although regulation is improving, more stringent definitions are still required. Evidence of clinical benefit is accumulating, although still missing in many areas. Misuse and use of products that have not been validated constitute potential drawbacks.

  11. Probiotics and food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Anna Maria; Valsecchi, Chiara; Caimmi, Silvia; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Alessia; Leoni, Maria Chiara; Caimmi, Davide; Miraglia del Giudice, Michele; Leonardi, Salvatore; La Rosa, Mario; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2013-07-29

    The exact prevalence of food allergy in the general population is unknown, but almost 12% of pediatric population refers a suspicion of food allergy. IgE mediated reactions to food are actually the best-characterized types of allergy, and they might be particularly harmful especially in children. According to the "hygiene hypothesis" low or no exposure to exogenous antigens in early life may increase the risk of allergic diseases by both delaying the development of the immune tolerance and limiting the Th2/Th1 switch. The critical role of intestinal microbiota in the development of immune tolerance improved recently the interest on probiotics, prebiotics, antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acid, folate and vitamins, which seem to have positive effects on the immune functions.Probiotics consist in bacteria or yeast, able to re-colonize and restore microflora symbiosis in intestinal tract. One of the most important characteristics of probiotics is their safety for human health. Thanks to their ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and to modulate and stabilize the composition of gut microflora, probiotics bacteria may play an important role in the regulation of intestinal and systemic immunity. They actually seem capable of restoring the intestinal microbic equilibrium and modulating the activation of immune cells.Several studies have been recently conducted on the role of probiotics in preventing and/or treating allergic disorders, but the results are often quite contradictory, probably because of the heterogeneity of strains, the duration of therapy and the doses administered to patients. Therefore, new studies are needed in order to clarify the functions and the utility of probiotics in food allergies and ion other types of allergic disorders.

  12. Prevalence of lactobacilli in normal women and women with bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooruk, Aksorntong; Utto, Parada; Teanpaisan, Rawee; Piwat, Supatcharin; Chandeying, Nutthaporn; Chandeying, Verapol

    2013-05-01

    To study the prevalence and the number of lactobacilli in normal subjects and in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV). The studied subjects consisted of 60 normal and 60 BV women. The diagnosis of BV was based on at least three of five indicators of Chandeying criteria. The vaginal specimens were collected and cultured on MRS plates for determination of lactobacilli counts. The number of lactobacilli was highly significant (p < 0.001) in the women with diagnosis of BK and the mean count of lactobacilli in BV was markedly decreased (5.3 +/- 1.8 log colony-forming unit--CFU/ml), compared with normal women (8.8 +/- 2.9 log CFU/ml). Among the treated BV group, follow-up vaginal specimen was encountered in 47 of 60 cases (78.3%). The proportion of lactobacilli isolation was slightly increased from 12 (25.5%) to 15 (31.9%) in 47 cases. Concordance with quantitative settlement of lactobacilli in BV was increased from 1.4 +/- 2.6 log CFU/ml, to 1.8 +/- 2.9 log CFU/ml in treated BV. Treated BV the lactobacilli had not restored significance (p = 0.5831), as well as the total bacteria. Lactobacilli dominantly occur in healthy women, and markedly decline in BV. However, the vaginal ecosystem is dynamically changed in the lactobacilli of either normal or BV women.

  13. A Genomic View of Lactobacilli and Pediococci Demonstrates that Phylogeny Matches Ecology and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinshui; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming; Gänzle, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Lactobacilli are used widely in food, feed, and health applications. The taxonomy of the genus Lactobacillus, however, is confounded by the apparent lack of physiological markers for phylogenetic groups of lactobacilli and the unclear relationships between the diverse phylogenetic groups. This study used the core and pan-genomes of 174 type strains of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus to establish phylogenetic relationships and to identify metabolic properties differentiating phylogenetic groups. The core genome phylogenetic tree separated homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci from heterofermentative lactobacilli. Aldolase and phosphofructokinase were generally present in homofermentative but not in heterofermentative lactobacilli; a two-domain alcohol dehydrogenase and mannitol dehydrogenase were present in most heterofermentative lactobacilli but absent in most homofermentative organisms. Other genes were predominantly present in homofermentative lactobacilli (pyruvate formate lyase) or heterofermentative lactobacilli (lactaldehyde dehydrogenase and glycerol dehydratase). Cluster analysis of the phylogenomic tree and the average nucleotide identity grouped the genus Lactobacillus sensu lato into 24 phylogenetic groups, including pediococci, with stable intra- and intergroup relationships. Individual groups may be differentiated by characteristic metabolic properties. The link between phylogeny and physiology that is proposed in this study facilitates future studies on the ecology, physiology, and industrial applications of lactobacilli.

  14. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Tabassi, Z; Naghibi Rad, M; Rahimi Foroushani, A; Khorammian, H; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to excess body weight and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines primarily during the third trimester, pregnancy is associated with elevated insulin resistance. To our knowledge, no report is available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum insulin levels in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance and serum insulin levels of Iranian pregnant women. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 primigravida pregnant women with singleton pregnancy at their third trimester were participated. We randomly assigned participants to consume 200 g per day of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10⁷ colony-forming units. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance score. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR score, significant differences were found comparing changes in these variables between probiotic and conventional yogurts (changes from baseline in serum insulin levels: +1.2±1.2 vs +5.0±1.1 μIU/ml, respectively, P=0.02; and in HOMA-IR score: -0.2±0.3 vs 0.7±0.2, respectively, P=0.01). It is concluded that in contrast to conventional yogurt, daily consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks maintains serum insulin levels and might help pregnant women prevent developing insulin resistance.

  15. A multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in older people admitted to hospital: the PLACIDE study protocol

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    Allen Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhoea complicates 5–39% of courses of antibiotic treatment. Major risk factors are increased age and admission to hospital. Of particular importance is C. difficile associated diarrhoea which occurs in about 4% of antibiotic courses and may result in severe illness, death and high healthcare costs. The emergence of the more virulent 027 strain of C. difficile has further heightened concerns. Probiotics may prevent antibiotic associated diarrhoea by several mechanisms including colonization resistance through maintaining a healthy gut flora. Methods This study aims to test the hypothesis that administration of a probiotic comprising two strains of lactobacilli and two strains of bifidobacteria alongside antibiotic treatment prevents antibiotic associated diarrhoea. We have designed a prospective, parallel group trial where people aged 65 years or more admitted to hospital and receiving one or more antibiotics are randomly allocated to receive either one capsule of the probiotic or a matching placebo daily for 21 days. The primary outcomes are the frequency of antibiotic associated and C. difficile diarrhoea during 8–12 weeks follow-up. To directly inform routine clinical practice, we will recruit a sufficient number of patients to demonstrate a 50% reduction in the frequency of C. difficile diarrhoea with a power of 80%. To maximize the generalizability of our findings and in view of the well-established safety record of probiotics, we will recruit a broad range of medical and surgical in-patients from two different health regions within the UK. Discussion Antibiotic associated diarrhoea constitutes a significant health burden. In particular, current measures to prevent and control C. difficile diarrhoea are expensive and disrupt clinical care. This trial may have considerable significance for the prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea in hospitals. Trial registration International

  16. The role of intestinal microflora and probiotic bacteria in prophylactic and development of colorectal cancer

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    Ewa Wasilewska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota comprises a large and diverse range of microorganisms whose activities have a significant impact on health. It interacts with its host at both the local and systemic level, resulting in a broad range of beneficial or detrimental outcomes for nutrition, infections, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. The current paper reviews research on the role of intestinal microflora in colorectal cancer development. Especially a protective effect of beneficial bacteria and probiotics on the risk of cancer development is highly discussed. There is substantial experimental evidence that the beneficial gut bacteria and their metabolism have the potential to inhibit the development and progression of neoplasia in the large intestine. Most of the data derive, however, from experimental and animal trials. Over a dozen well-documented animal studies have been published, wherein it has been clearly revealed that some lactic acid bacteria, especially lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, inhibit initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. Studies on cancer suppression in humans as a result of the consumption of probiotics are still sparse. Nevertheless, some epidemiological and interventional studies seem to confirm the bacterial anticancerogenic activity also in human gut. The mechanism by which probiotics may inhibit cancer development is unknown. Probiotics increase the amount of beneficial bacteria and decrease the pathogen level in the gut, consequently altering metabolic, enzymatic and carcinogenic activity in the intestine, decreasing inflammation and enhancing immune function, which may contribute to cancer defense.

  17. Diet, but not oral probiotics, effectively reduces urinary oxalate excretion and calciumoxalate supersaturation

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    Lieske, John C.; Tremaine, William J.; De Simone, Claudio; O’Connor, Helen M.; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effect of a controlled diet and two probiotic preparations on urinary oxalate excretion, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone formation, in patients with mild hyperoxaluria. Patients were randomized to a placebo, a probiotic, or a synbiotic preparation. This tested whether these probiotic preparations can increase oxalate metabolism in the intestine and/or decrease oxalate absorption from the gut. Patients were maintained on a controlled diet to remove the confounding variable of differing oxalate intake from food. Urinary oxalate excretion and calcium oxalate supersaturation on the controlled diet were significantly lower compared with baseline on a free-choice diet. Neither study preparation reduced urinary oxalate excretion nor calcium oxalate supersaturation. Fecal lactobacilli colony counts increased on both preparations, whereas enterococcal and yeast colony counts were increased on the synbiotic. Total urine volume and the excretion of oxalate and calcium were all strong independent determinants of urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Hence, dietary oxalate restriction reduced urinary oxalate excretion, but the tested probiotics did not influence urinary oxalate levels in patients on a restricted oxalate diet. However, this study suggests that dietary oxalate restriction is useful for kidney stone prevention. PMID:20736987

  18. Meta-analysis of probiotics and/or prebiotics for the prevention of eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dan; Zhou, Wenli; Lun, Zhi Jun; Mu, Xin; Wang, Dong Xuan; Wu, Hui

    2013-10-01

    The efficacy of probiotics and/or prebiotics for preventing eczema in infants remains unclear. This meta-analysis evaluated published studies on pro/prebiotics for eczema prevention, investigating bacterial strain efficacy and changes to the allergy status of the children involved. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were analysed, irrespective of bacterial strains used in the pro/prebiotics. Studies of pregnant women, nursing mothers and infants receiving pro/prebiotics were included. All infant participants were assessed within 2 years of birth. Incidences of eczema and systemic sensitization were measured by weighted relative risk ratios (RRR). The 14 studies on probiotics had a pooled RRR of 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62, 0.78). Three studies on prebiotic consumption showed a RRR of 0.80 (95% CI: 0.54, 1.18). One study of mixed pro/prebiotic (synbiotic) strains found a RRR ratio of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.99). No consistent sensitization changes were found. Only the combination of nonspore lactobacilli and bifidobacteria reduced the incidence of eczema. This meta-analysis found that probiotics or synbiotics may reduce the incidence of eczema in infants aged <2 years. Systemic sensitization did not change following probiotic administration.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactobacillus Rhamnosus

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    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactobacilli are a bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract. Some species of this genus have probiotic properties. The most common of these is Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a microoganism, generally regarded as safe (GRAS. It is also a homofermentative L-(+-lactic acid producer. The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of the phenotypic and genotypic diversity. However, the studies of the genus were conducted mostly with the unequally distributed, non-random choice of species for sequencing; thus, there is only one representative genome from the Lactobacillus rhamnosus clade available to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the genome sequencing of selected strains of Lactobacilli. Methods: 109 samples were isolated from national domestic dairy products in the laboratory of Center for life sciences. After screaning isolates for probiotic properties, a highly active Lactobacillus spp strain was chosen. Genomic DNA was extracted according to the manufacturing protocol (Wizard® Genomic DNA Purification Kit. The Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain was identified as the highly active Lactobacillus strain accoridng to its morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties, and a genotypic analysis. Results: The genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was sequenced using the Roche 454 GS FLX (454 GS FLX platforms. The initial draft assembly was prepared from 14 large contigs (20 all contigs by the Newbler gsAssembler 2.3 (454 Life Sciences, Branford, CT. Conclusion: A full genome-sequencing of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria was made during the study.

  20. Selection of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus strains towards their inhibitory activity against poultry enteropathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizerwetter-Swida, Magdalena; Binek, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacilli were isolated from chicken gastrointestinal tract and examined for their potentially probiotic properties towards their inhibitory activity against poultry enteropathogenic bacteria. Biochemical tests, ITS-PCR and cell wall protein analysis were used to characterize the Lactobacillus isolates. The identification of isolated Lactobacillus strains based on phenotypic properties was not always satisfactory. ITS-PCR together with protein profile were found to be helpful in strain identification. Lactobacilli were tested for the inhibitory activity against selected strains of poultry enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens). Examined supernatants from Lactobacillus broth cultures demonstrated major antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens. Lower antimicrobial activity were observed against E. coli and Salmonella Enteritidis. The strongest inhibition effect were obtained using supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain 3D. Results received from this study confirmed that identification of Lactobacillus spp. is often tedious. Some isolates, which are in vitro antagonistic against enteropathogenic bacteria may be considered as potential candidates for poultry probiotics, especially in controlling necrotic enteritis caused by C. perfringens.

  1. Development of synbiotics with inulin, palatinose, alpha-cyclodextrin and probiotic bacteria.

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    Pranckute, Raminta; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kuisiene, Nomeda; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    Success in creating a synbiotic depends on compatibility between the chosen components--prebiotic and probiotic. In this work the interactions between Lactobacillus sp. strains isolated from yogurts and type strains of Lactobacillus sp. and Lactococcus sp., and the dependence of their growth and antibacterial activity on three oligosaccharides (OS)--palatinose, inulin and alpha-cyclodextrin were investigated. All isolated lactobacilli produce antibacterial compounds, which possibly are the bacteriocins of Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 strain. Results of growth analysis with different OS revealed that part of lactobacilli isolated from yogurts can effectively ferment inulin and may be used for the development of synbiotics. Palatinose and Lactobacillus acidophilus could be used as symbiotics with effective antibacterial activity. One of the types of Lactococcus sp. strains can assimilate palatinose and alpha-cyclodextrin, so they both can be used as components of synbiotics with the investigated lactococci. Results of this analysis suggest that the investigated isolated and type strains of Lactobacillus sp. and Lactoccocus sp. can be useful as probiotics in the development of synbiotics. Together with prebiotics--palatinose, inulin and alpha-cyclodextrin, the synbiotics, which could regulate not only the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, but also their antibacterial activity, can be created.

  2. Probiotics as an Immune Modulator.

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    Kang, Hye-Ji; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are nonpathogenic live microorganism that can provide a diverse health benefits on the host when consumed in adequate amounts. Probiotics are consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, underlying mechanism of action is still unclear and efficacy of probiotic administration is quite different depending on the type of strains and the amounts of doses. We and others have suggested that live probiotics or their metabolites could interact with diverse immune cells (antigen presenting cells and T cells) and confer them to have immunoregulatory functions. Through this interaction, probiotics could contribute to maintaining immune homeostasis by balancing pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. However, the effect of probiotics in prevention or modulation of ongoing disease is quite diverse even within a same species. Therefore, identification of functional probiotics with specific immune regulatory property is a certainly important issue. Herein, we briefly review selection methods for immunomodulatory probiotic strains and the mechanism of action of probiotics in immune modulation.

  3. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  4. Properties of probiotics and encapsulated probiotics in food

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    V. Hazal Ozyurt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are microorganisms which confer health benefi ts upon application in suffi ciently-high viable cell amounts. Probiotics are typically members of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species commonly associated with human gastrointestinal tracts. In the recent past, there has been a rising interest in producing functional foods containing encapsulated probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have been reported using dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream as food carrier, and non-dairy products like meat, fruits, cereals, chocolate, etc. However, the industrial sector contains only few encapsulated probiotic products. Probiotics have been developed by several companies in a capsule or a tablet form. The review compiles probiotics, encapsulation technology and cell life in the food matrices.

  5. Properties of probiotics and encapsulated probiotics in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, V Hazal; Ötles, Semih

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms which confer health benefits upon application in sufficiently-high viable cell amounts. Probiotics are typically members of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species commonly associated with human gastrointestinal tracts. In the recent past, there has been a rising interest in producing functional foods containing encapsulated probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have been reported using dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream as food carrier, and non-dairy products like meat, fruits, cereals, chocolate, etc. However, the industrial sector contains only few encapsulated probiotic products. Probiotics have been developed by several companies in a capsule or a tablet form. The review compiles probiotics, encapsulation technology and cell life in the food matrices.

  6. Probiotic fermented sausage: viability of probiotic microorganisms and sensory characteristics.

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    Rouhi, M; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are from functional foods that bring health benefits for humans. Nowadays, a major development in functional foods is related to food containing probiotic cultures, mainly lactic acid bacteria or bifidobacteria. Probiotics must be alive and ingested in sufficient amounts to exert the positive effects on the health and the well-being of the host. Therefore, viability of probiotic products (the minimum viable probiotic cells in each gram or milliliter of product till the time of consumption) is their most important characteristic. However, these organisms often show poor viability in fermented products due to their detrimental conditions. Today, the variety of fermented meat products available around the world is nearly equal to that of cheese. With meat products, raw fermented sausages could constitute an appropriate vehicle for such microorganisms into the human gastrointestinal tract. In present article, the viability of probiotic microorganisms in fermented sausage, the main factors affect their viability, and the sensorial characteristics of final product are discussed.

  7. Study on Probiotic Icecream

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    Cristina Cota

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Use of probiotics in human diet benefits the consumers by regulating intestinal transit and immune system. Using various foods as a vehicle for probiotics has become increasingly popular practice. Based on these considerations, we wanted to study the possibility of obtaining icecream which contains viable microorganism cells with probiotic role. I chose ice cream because it is a product with a high nutrient content both for microorganisms and consumers. The main objective of this paper is to study the ability of different strains of probiotics to remain viable in the matured icecream compared to icecream stored at -5°C. Five samples of icecream were prepared, all after the same recipe. Molasses was used as a sweetener. The difference between the five types of ice cream consisted of the milk used, which was inoculated with different strains: Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium infantis 4BN, Lactobacillus casei 4BN, Bifidobacterium breve 4BN and a mix prepared from the strains mentioned above. We determined the fat content of the icecream, using the butirometric method and its acidity by titration with NaOH. The results obtained were compared with the acidity and the fat content (determined using the Röse-Gottlieb extraction method of the homemade icecream. Viable cell counting was performed by Trypane-Blue method and then the Fourier-IR spectra of the samples were evaluated. The cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strain and the bacterial cells in the mix proliferated the best, both in matured icecream and in icecream stored at -5°C. Most of the cells belonging to other strains of bacteria remained viable, but not all. Given these results, we can consider the molasses sweetened icecream as a suitable food product to carry certain types of probiotics.

  8. Properties of probiotics and encapsulated probiotics in food

    OpenAIRE

    V. Hazal Ozyurt; Semih Ötles

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms which confer health benefi ts upon application in suffi ciently-high viable cell amounts. Probiotics are typically members of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species commonly associated with human gastrointestinal tracts. In the recent past, there has been a rising interest in producing functional foods containing encapsulated probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have been reported using dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream as food carrier, and non-da...

  9. Synergy of Astragalus polysaccharides and probiotics (Lactobacillus and Bacillus cereus) on immunity and intestinal microbiota in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S P; Zhao, X J; Wang, J Y

    2009-03-01

    Probiotics and Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) can modulate systemic immunity and intestinal microbiota in animals and human beings. It is still unknown if the combined application of probiotics and APS in feed has synergistic effects on immunity and intestinal microbiota. To address this issue, this study was designed to investigate the synergistic effects on immunity and intestinal microbiota in chicks. A total of 240 female Hy-Line chicks were assigned to 4 treatments. Four treatments were fed the same corn-soy meal control diet; however, treatments 2, 3, and 4 were supplemented (per kg of feed) with 220 mg of APS, 4 x 10(10) cfu probiotics, and dual treatment, respectively. Parameters evaluated included serum Newcastle disease antibody titer, peripheral blood acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase-positive (ANAE(+)) T-lymphocyte percentage, immune organ relative weights and histological changes, and selected intestinal tract bacteria. Compared with the control, Newcastle disease antibody titer, ANAE(+) T-lymphocyte percentage, immune organ relative weights, histological changes, as well as lactobacilli and Bacillus cereus numbers significantly increased (P Bacillus cereus, and E.coli numbers compared with the APS or probiotics treatments (P probiotics combined with APS administration in feed displayed synergistic modulation effects on immunity and intestinal microbiota, which is very important for the exploration of new prebiotics.

  10. Toward Probiotict Food Product from Meat Through Isolation and Identification Lactic Acid Bacteria As Probiotic Culture Stater

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    Yunilas Yunilas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic food products of meat can provide extensive benefits, to increase the shelf life and nutritional value also improve the taste. The use of lactic acid bacteria culture (LAB derived from the isolation of the meat and the addition of probiotic cultures (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in fermented sausage processing is expected to produce a probiotic sausage products with nutritional value, and better shelf life and improve health. This study aimed to isolate and identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB of meat as a starter culture fermented sausages. The parameters observed were gram test, catalase, motility, gas production, type of fermentation, growth at various temperatures and pH. The results were obtained 28 isolates, 17 isolates were able to produce acid and 8 of them are lactic acid bacteria (LAB with the characteristics of gram-positive, catalase negative, not motile, produces gas, are hetero and homo fermentative, optimum growth temperature of 300C and a few of them are able to grow on pH 3.5. Lactic acid bacteria that able to be combined with probiotics as sausage starter culture to the probiotic food products of meat.

  11. Effect of doxycycline and Lactobacillus probiotics on mRNA expression of ABCC2 in small intestines of chickens.

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    Milanova, A; Pavlova, I; Yordanova, V; Danova, S

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics and antibiotics are widely used in poultry and may alter drug bioavailability by affecting the expression of intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters. Therefore the aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacilli probiotics, administered alone or in combination with doxycycline, on the expression of ABCB1 (gene, encoding P-glycoprotein), ABCC2 (gene, encoding multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (gene, encoding breast cancer resistance protein) mRNAs in chicken using RT-PCR. Duc one-day-old chicks (n=24) were divided equally in four groups: untreated control, probiotics supplemented group, probiotics plus doxycycline treated chickens and antibiotic administered group. Expression of ABCC2 mRNA was affected by doxycycline or by combination of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis and L. bulgaricus and the antibiotic in the intestines. These results can be used as a basis for further functional studies to prove the beneficial effect on limitation of the absorption of toxins and improvement of efflux of endogenous substances and xenobiotics when the combination of doxycycline and Lactobacillus spp. probiotics are administered to poultry.

  12. Potential of Microalgae and Lactobacilli in Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles

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    Dariush Shanehbandi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of nanoparticles has been extensively increased in last decades. Nanoparticles of noble metals such as gold, platinum and especially silver are widely applied in medical and pharmaceutical applications. Although, variety of physical and chemical methods has been developed for production of metal nanoparticles, because of destructive effects of them on environment, biosynthetic methods have been suggested as a novel alternative. Some bacteria and microalgae have different ranges of potentiality to uptake metal ions and produce nanoparticles during detoxification process. In the present work, we study the potential of three Lactobacilli and three algal species in production of AgNPs in different concentrations of silver nitrate. Methods: Utilizing AAS, XRD and TEM methods, Nannochloropsis oculata, Dunaliella salina and Chlorella vulgaris as three algal species in addition to three Lactobacilli including L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. reuteri were monitored for production of silver nanoparticles. Three concentrations of AgNO3 (0.001, 0.002, 0.005 M and two incubation times (24h and 48h were included in this study. Results: Our findings demonstrated that C. vulgaris, N. oculata and L. acidophilus have the potential of nanosilver production in a culture medium containing 0.001 M of AgNO3 within 24 hours. Also L. casei and L. reuteri species exhibited their potential for production of silver nanoparticles in 0.002 M concentration of AgNO3 in 24 hours. The size range of particles was approximately less than 15 nm. The uptake rate of silver in the five species was between 1.0 to 2.7 mg/g of dry weight. Nanoparticle production was not detected in other treatments and the algae Dunaliella. Conclusion: The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles in all of three Lactobacilli and two algal species including N. oculata and C. vulgaris was confirmed.

  13. Probiotics in the prevention of recurrences of bacterial vaginosis.

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    Parma, Marta; Stella Vanni, Valeria; Bertini, Marco; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in women during their fertile years. BV prevalence runs from 10%-50%, in part due to the high rate of recurrence after standard treatment. Women with BV may experience a decreased quality of life and are at risk of serious obstetric complications. Limited data are available regarding optimal management strategies for preventing recurrence of BV, emphasizing the importance of the availability of a comprehensive source of scientific information and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical relevance of the recurrence of BV and to collect and review data about prophylactic approaches based on probiotic supplementation with lactobacilli (LB). A review of the literature was performed, based on combinations of the following keywords: bacterial vaginosis, bacterial vaginosis recurrences, vaginal discharge, vaginal flora, LB, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and probiotic supplementation. The studies were evaluated in terms of the cure rates for BV, incidence of recurrence of BV, decrease in patients' discomfort, maintenance of a healthy vaginal recolonization, and occurrence of complications and side effects. Recurrence of BV after standard therapy is a relevant clinical problem, with an incidence of 30%-40% and a significant impact on women's quality of life and on their risk of infrequent but serious obstetric complications. Therefore, finding effective prophylactic therapies to avoid or decrease the recurrence of BV is important. Even when they are effective, typical antibacterial regimens for long-term maintenance are known to have side effects. Different schemes of treatment with exogenous LB have proven effective in preventing recurrence of BV, even in patients at high risk for relapse. Probiotic supplementation with vaginal LB proved to be crucial in hindering bacteria growth after antibiotic therapy; therefore this intervention may be considered a new

  14. Features of fiber fermentation under bifidobacteria and lactobacilli (in vitro

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    Sedakova Valentina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental data on the study of fermentation of dietary fibers of different origin under the action of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Citrus and apple pectin, flax fiber and glucose were used as substrate. The dynamics of the process was determined by the dependence of the content of short-chain fatty acids (propionic, butyric, valeric in the analyzed systems on time. Qualitative and quantitative composition of shot-chain fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography. It was found that the amount of metabolites (propionic, butyric and isovaleric acids depends both on the type of the fermentable substrate, and the type of bacteria used for fermentation.

  15. Life in the littoral zone: lactobacilli losing the plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, P

    2005-04-01

    Recurrent bacterial vaginosis is a challenge for those affected by it, and their physicians. Our inability to prevent relapse after treatment, may be because of the flawed approach of using antibiotics to treat a condition that is an imbalance rather than an infection. The maintenance of a healthy lactobacillus population offers an approach to preventing relapse: the problem is how best to do this. Physiological approaches such as the use of hydrogen peroxide, lactic acid, and exogenous lactobacilli need to be explored further. The role of bacterial vaginosis as a risk factor for acquisition of HIV and other STIs is a further impetus to attempting to prevent bacterial vaginosis from recurring.

  16. Risk and safety of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Shira; Snydman, David R

    2015-05-15

    Probiotics have been used safely for years. Safety outcomes are inconsistently reported in published clinical trials. In 2011, a report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concluded that, although the existing probiotic clinical trials reveal no evidence of increased risk, "the current literature is not well equipped to answer questions on the safety of probiotics in intervention studies with confidence." Critics point out that the preponderance of evidence, including the long history of safe probiotic use as well as data from clinical trials, and animal and in vitro studies all support the assumption that probiotics are generally safe for most populations. Theoretical risks have been described in case reports, clinical trial results and experimental models, include systemic infections, deleterious metabolic activities, excessive immune stimulation in susceptible individuals, gene transfer and gastrointestinal side effects. More research is needed to properly describe the incidence and severity of adverse events related to probiotics.

  17. Impact of probiotic drugs, based on Enterobacter faecium autostrains, on human intestinal microflora in confined habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Batov, Alexey; Usanova, Nonna

    The aim of research: Investigation of influence of probiotic drugs based on autostrains of Enter-obacter faecium, selected from the crew in long term isolation experiment in confined habitat. It is known that during long-term presence in confined habitat the risk of infectious diseases increases. One of the main infectious risk occurs during first 20 days of isolation as a result of exchange of strains and stress-mediated disbacterioses. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate activities of probiotics to avoid this risk. Furthermore, in case of super long term autonomous flight there should be possibilities of application of autochthonous microflora strains as pro-biotics to strengthen colonial resistance of crews. Materials and methods: In the experiment there were used probiotic drugs based on autostrains of E. faecium, selected from the crew before the experiment. Probiotic drugs were consumed during 30 days since the beginning of the experiment with the break of consumption between 10th to 19th day. Results: Comparing the state of intestinal microflora of the crew on the baseline and 14th day of experiment re-vealed remarkable changes of microflora: the increasing of concentration of bifidobacteria and E. faecium (approximately 10 times), elimination of hemolytic streptococcus, yeasts, reduction of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative non-fermenting rods, lactobacilli and normal E.coli. On the 45th day of isolation, 15 days after finishing of auto-strains administration, there fere signs of restoration of disbacteriosis: the quantitative decreasing lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and normal E.coli, increasing of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative nonfermentive rods. Conclusion: Thus we managed to avoid risk of pathogenicity potential growth in first 2 decades of isolation. Application of probiotic, based on the autostrains of E. faecium leads to insignificant changes of concentration of lactobacteries, bifidobacteries, normal E. coli and to

  18. In vitro evaluation of the probiotic and functional potential of Lactobacillus strains isolated from fermented food and human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dayong; Li, Chang; Qin, Yanqing; Yin, Ronglan; Du, Shouwen; Ye, Fei; Liu, Cunxia; Liu, Hongfeng; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Jin, Ningyi

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the functional and probiotic characteristics of eight indigenous Lactobacillus strains in vitro. The selected lactobacilli include strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salicinius, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. All strains tolerated both pH 2 for 3 h and 1% bile salt for 24 h. The strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 were the most adhesive strains producing the highest quantity of EPS. Although a wide variation in the ability of the eight strains to deplete cholesterol and nitrite, antagonize pathogens, scavenge free radical, and stimulate innate immune response were observed, the strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 showed the widest range of these useful traits. Taken together, the strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 exhibited the best probiotic properties with the potential for use in the production of probiotic fermented foods.

  19. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  20. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  1. Oral Lactobacilli and Dental Caries: A Model for Niche Adaptation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, P W; Schön, C N; Saraithong, P; Li, Y; Argimón, S

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacilli have been associated with dental caries for over a century. Here, we review the pertinent literature along with findings from our own study to formulate a working hypothesis about the natural history and role of lactobacilli. Unlike most indigenous microbes that stably colonize a host, lactobacilli appear to be planktonic, opportunistic settlers that can gather and multiply only in certain restrictive niches of the host, at least within the oral cavity. We postulate that the following essential requirements are necessary for sustained colonization of lactobacilli in humans: 1) a stagnant, retentive niche that is mostly anaerobic; 2) a low pH milieu; and 3) ready access to carbohydrates. Three sites on the human body meet these specifications: caries lesions, the stomach, and the vagina. Only a handful of Lactobacillus species is found in caries lesions, but they are largely absent in caries-free children. Lactobacilli present in caries lesions represent both a major contributor to caries progression and a major reservoir to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We extend the assertion from other investigators that lactobacilli found in the GI tract originate in the oral cavity by proposing that lactobacilli in the oral cavity arise from caries lesions. This, in turn, leads us to reflect on the health implications of the lactobacilli in the mouth and downstream GI and to ponder whether these or any of the Lactobacillus species are truly indigenous to the human GI tract or the oral cavity.

  2. Adherence of clinically isolated lactobacilli to human cervical cells in competition with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielfort, Katarina; Sjölinder, Hong; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Aro, Helena

    2008-10-01

    Lactobacilli are normal inhabitants of our microbiota and are known to protect against pathogens. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human specific pathogenic bacterium that colonises the urogenital tract where it causes gonorrhoea. In this study we analysed early interactions between lactobacilli and gonococci and investigated how they compete for adherence to human epithelial cervical cells. We show that lactobacilli adhere at various levels and that the number of adherent bacteria does not correlate to the level of protection against gonococcal infection. Protection against gonococcal adhesion varied between Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus reuteri were capable of reducing gonococcal adherence while Lactobacillus rhamnosus was not. Lactobacillus strains of vaginal origin had the best capacity to remain attached to the host cell during gonococcal adherence. Further, we show that gonococci and lactobacilli interact with each other with resultant lactobacilli incorporation into the gonococcal microcolony. Hence, gonococci bind to colonised lactobacilli and this complex frequently detaches from the epithelial cell surface, resulting in reduced bacterial colonisation. Also, purified gonococcal pili are capable of removing adherent lactobacilli from the cell surface. Taken together, we reveal novel data regarding gonococcal and lactobacilli competition for adherence that will benefit future gonococcal prevention and treatments.

  3. Applications of probiotic in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Bahadır Koca

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecological impacts including emergence of a large variety of pathogens and bacterial resistance is caused in increase of productivity in aquaculture. This negatively effects are seen as a results of made applications in production cycles (such as randomly use kemoteropatik. Using probi¬otic in aquaculture is a new approach to reduce these negatively effects. In this study is submi¬ted, definition of the concept probiotic, effect mechanisms of probiotics, colonization to host, selection of probiotics, use probiotic in fish, crustacean, the mollusk and the live feed.

  4. Effects of elaidic acid, a predominant industrial trans fatty acid, on bacterial growth and cell surface hydrophobicity of lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases and coronary heart disease in human, and there are no effective ways to remove TFAs after consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of elaidic acid on bacterial growth, cell surface hydrophobicity of lactobacilli, and metabolism of elaidic acid by lactobacilli. Lactobacilli were inoculated in MRS broth containing 0, 100, 200, and 500 mg/L of elaidic acid. Viable cell counts of lactobacilli were enumerated, concentrations of elaidic acid were determined, and cell surface hydrophobicity of lactobacilli was measured. The results showed that the growth of lactobacilli was significantly inhibited by 500 mg/L of elaidic acid, however, a cell count of 8.50 log10 CFU/mL was still reached for tested lactobacilli after 24-h incubation. In particular, a reduction of elaidic acid was found for tested lactobacilli after 24-h incubation as compared to its initial concentration of 200 mg/L. However, cell surface hydrophobicity showed no correlations with the metabolism of elaidic acid by lactobacilli. Moreover, elaidic acid was able to influence cell surface hydrophobicity, and the decrease in hydrophobicity was more obvious in Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus casei compared with that in other tested lactobacilli. This study suggests that elaidic acid could change physiochemical surface properties of lactobacilli and the lactobacilli have the potential to reduce TFAs.

  5. Immunomodulatory and antimicrobial efficacy of Lactobacilli against enteropathogenic infection of Salmonella typhi: In-vitro and in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaya, Basem; Hamzawy, Mohamed A; Khalil, Mahmoud A F; Tawkol, Wael M; Sabit, Hussein

    2015-12-01

    Salmonellosis-induced diarrhea, is one of the commonest cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. Using of probiotics is viewed as a promising means for reducing the pathogenic loads of bacterial infection. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential antimicrobial and immunomodulatory efficacy of isolated lactobacillus strains against the enteropathogenic effect of S. Typhi. Different Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 13 dairy products. Their antimicrobial activities were tested against different bacterial strains. Six groups of CD1 mice were treated for 8 days as follows: group (1) untreated control; group (2) was challenged with single inoculation S. typhi, and groups (3) and (4) were treated with Lactobacillus plantarum (LA5) or Lactobacillus paracsi (LA7) for 7 days, respectively. Groups (5) and (6) were challenged with S. typhi, and then treated with either LA5 or LA 7 for 7 days, respectively. Isolated Lactobacillus showed antimicrobial activity against wide range of bacterial strains. Salmonellosis showed high widal titer, induced significant disturbance of TNF and IL-1β, while sever changes of the histological patterns of the intestinal villi and hepatocytes have been illustrated. LA5 or LA7 succeeded to eradicate typhoid infection, restore the values of inflammatory cytokines to typical levels of control group, and improve histological pictures of intestinal and hepatic tissues. It can be concluded that lactobacilli are promising candidate in protection and eradication against bacterial infection induced by S. Typhi due to its antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory activities.

  6. SURVIVAL OF MICROORGANISMS FROM MODERN PROBIOTICS IN MODEL CONDITIONS OF THE INTESTINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabluchko TV

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The staye of intestinal microflora affects the work of the whole organism. When composition of normal ibtestine microflora changes, its restoration is required. In our days a wide variety of probiotic drugs are available on the market which can be used to solve this problem. Most bacteria having probiotic properties represent the families Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which have poor resistance to acidic content of the stomach and toxic effects of bile salts. Various studies have clearly shown that in a person with normal acidic and bile secretion, the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are not detected after the passage through the duodenum, i.e., they perish before reaching the small intestines. In this study we compared the survival of different microorganisms which are contained in 9 probiotic drugs in a model of gastric and intestinal environments. Material and methods. In the laboratory of SI: “Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology, National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" the in vitro experiments have been evaluated to test the ability of different probiotic bacteria which were contained in 9 probiotic drugs to survive the impact of the model environment of the stomach and duodenum. Bacillus coagulans persistence was evaluated under impact of simulated environment of the stomach and duodenum, it also was assessed by the quantity of CFU by incubation on culture medium. The following were studied: Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum , Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. Lactis BB-12, Saccharomyces boulardii, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus clausii, Enterococcus faecium. Microorganisms were incubated for 3 hours in a model environment of the stomach (pepsin 3 g / l, hydrochloric acid of 160 mmol / l, pH 2

  7. From biocontrol to cancer, probiotics and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Colum

    2013-01-01

    This invited commentary covers the period 1997-2012 and has seen changes in terminology that progressed from "basic" and "applied" to "translational" research. In the context of Bioengineered, these changes map readily onto the processes of identifying microbial characteristics appropriate for specific applications, isolation of suitable cultures, strain or genome manipulation and exploitation of these or their metabolomes across a range of settings.   To a great degree, this commentary and my career reflect an engagement with molecular microbiology and the trialling of bacteria and derived constructs in applications ranging from intensive-scale crop protection to amelioration of gastrointestinal disease. This engagement began with laboratory and field evaluations of biocontrol, specifically use of pseudomonads effective against nematode and fungal plant pathogens, characterization of mechanisms mediating beneficial effects of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and assessment of functional foods in multinational clinical trials relating to inflammatory bowel disease. Subsequent work focused on (1) intellectual property (IP)-based medical devices for localized delivery of systemically toxic and gene cancer therapies; (2) growth of the science base supporting expansion of a multinational business including company acquisitions; (3) complementing existing inter-institutional research capabilities through development of a national industry-led collaboration; and, most recently, (4) strategic research programs at Ireland's newest medical school. My activities as outlined above parallel two distinct aspects of translational research: (1) involvement in knowledge-driven (commercial and research) organizations that brought together necessary resources and infrastructure and (2) availability of scale research funding from European Framework and Irish national programs.

  8. Analysis of natural isolates of Lactobacilli resistant to bacteriocin nisin

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    Strahinić Ivana D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The collection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB was made by isolation of microorganisms from fermented products traditionally manufactured in different geographical regions (high mountains, river valleys, seaside, etc. Among collected LAB, 51 isolates were identified as Lactobacillus sp. Results showed that all isolated lactobacilli were mesophilic strains, since they grew at 15°C and 30°C but not at 45°C. Testing the ability of isolated lactobacilli to grow in the presence of nisin revealed that Lactobacillus sp. isolates designed BGCGK4, BGHN40, BGBUK2-8, BGBUK2-7 and BGBUK2-16 were resistant to nisin. Determination of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC for nisin revealed that the most resistant isolate was Lactobacillus sp. BGCGK4. Isolate BGBUK2-16, determined as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, produces bacteriocin, named Bac217 and showed a resistance to 8000 IU/ml of nisin. Plasmid curing of BGBUK2-16 resulted in derivatives BGBUK2-16/K2 and BGBUK2-16/K4. Derivative BGBUK2-16/K2 retained resistance to Bac217 and nisin, but lost the ability to synthesise Bac217. Derivative BGBUK2-16/K4 lost concomitantly the resistance to both Bac217 and nisin.

  9. [Pre- and probiotic cosmetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmering, R; Breves, R

    2009-10-01

    The human skin provides a habitat for a variety of microorganisms, the skin microflora. There is a complex network of interactions between the microbes and cells of the epidermis. Modern analytical methods in molecular biology have revealed new insights into this complex diversity of partially unculturable microbial organisms. Most of the resident microbes on healthy skin can be regarded as being harmless or even beneficial to skin. In the case of diseases with some imbalance in microorganisms, such as impure skin/mild acne or dry skin/mild atopic dermatitis, pre- and probiotic concepts represent an effective alternative to strictly antibacterial products. Prebiotic actives rebalance the skin microflora while probiotic approaches predominantly consist of applying an inactivated microbial biomass of beneficial bacteria. Several examples of successful in vivo studies illustrate this new principle for gentle cosmetics derived from the food sector.

  10. Latest Developments in Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Frédéric; Falony, Gwen; Vuyst, Luc De

    Probiotic foods are a group of health-promoting, so-called functional foods, with large commercial interest and growing market shares (Arvanitoyannis & van Houwelingen-Koukaliaroglou, 2005). In general, their health benefits are based on the presence of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), that, when taken up in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. They are administered mostly through the consumption of fermented milks or yoghurts (Mercenier, Pavan, & Pot, 2003). In addition to their common use in the dairy industry, probiotic LAB strains may be used in other food products too, including fermented meats (Hammes & Hertel, 1998; Incze, 1998; Kröckel, 2006; Työppönen, Petäjä,& Mattila- Sandholm, 2003).

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  12. Probiotics and Their Use

    OpenAIRE

    Uymaz, Başar

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing demand to use the microorganisms, supporting consumer health and stimulating immune system, in food production. The role of probiotics which are one of the most important group of this microorganisms on the preventation of gastrointestinal diseases and treatment and development of normal gastrointestinal flora were determinated by clinical trials. On the other hand, studies on the strain-dependent food preservation effects and the potentials for treatment of different dise...

  13. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  14. Probiotics in hepatology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata; Jana Jurankova; Marcela Kopacova; Petr Vitek

    2011-01-01

    The paper provides a basic review of intestinal micro- flora and its importance in liver diseases. The intestinal microflora has many important functions, above all to maintain the microbial barrier against established as well as potential pathogens. Furthermore, it influences the motility and perfusion of the intestinal wall, stimulates the intestinal immune system and therefore also the so-called common mucosal immune system, reducing bacterial translocation and producing vitamins. Immune homeostasis at mucosal level results from a controlled response to intestinal luminal antigens. In liver cirrhosis, there are many changes in its function, mostly an increase in bacterial overgrowth and translocation. In this review, probiotics and their indications in hepatology are generally discussed. According to recent knowledge, these preparations are indicated in clinical practice only for cases of hepatic encephalopathy. Probiotics are able to decrease the permeability of the intestinal wall, and decrease bacterial translocation and endotoxemia in animal models as well as in clinical studies, which is extremely important in the prevention of complications of liver cirrhosis and infection after liver transplantation. Probiotics could limit oxidative and inflammatory liver damage and, in some situations, improve the histological state, and thus non-alcoholic steatohepatitis could be considered as another possible indication.

  15. Use of Probiotics in Aquaculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Diseases of cultured animal and environmental pollution are very important problems in aquaculture.The use of probiotics in aquaculture has more adva ntages than the use of antibiotics and chemicals in aquaculture. This review int roduces the use and mechanisms of the probiotics in aquaculture.

  16. Probiotics in transition: novel strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosálbez, Luis; Ramón, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Regulations regarding health claims made for probiotics demand their proven effectiveness and limit the array of microbial species regarded as safe for live consumption. Novel strategies such as moving to postbiotics and genetically modified probiotics may be necessary to increase the effectiveness of microbial products.

  17. The influence of starter and adjunct lactobacilli culture on the ripening of washed curd cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hynes

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten strains of lactobacillus from the CNRZ collection were tested as adjunct culture in miniature washed curd cheeses manufactured under controlled bacteriological conditions with two different starters, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL 416 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris AM2. Lactobacilli growth seemed to be dependent on the Lactobacillus strain but was not influenced by the starter strain or counts. Lactococci counts were higher in the miniature cheeses with AM2 starter and added lactobacilli than in the control cheeses without lactobacilli. Gross composition and hydrolysis of s1 casein were similar for miniature cheeses with and without lactobacilli. In the miniature cheeses manufactured with IL416 starter, the lactobacilli adjunct slightly increased the soluble nitrogen content, but that was not verified in the AM2 miniature cheeses. Phosphotungstic acid nitrogen content increased in miniature cheeses manufactured with IL416 when Lactobacillus plantarum 1572 and 1310 adjunct cultures were added. That was also verified for several Lactobacillus strains, specially Lactobacillus casei 1227, for miniature cheeses manufactured with AM2 starter. Free fatty acid content increased in miniature cheeses made with lactobacilli adjuncts 1310, 1308 and 1219 with IL416 starter, and with strains 1218, 1244 and 1308 for miniature cheeses with AM2 starter. These results indicate that production of soluble nitrogen compounds as well as free fatty acid content could be influenced by the lactobacilli adjunct, depending on the starter strain.

  18. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-09-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS.

  19. Dietary supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy: outcome on vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion

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    Vitali Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vaginal microbiota of healthy women consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the genus Lactobacillus. The activity of lactobacilli helps to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal microbiota. This role is particularly important during pregnancy because vaginal dismicrobism is one of the most important mechanisms for preterm birth and perinatal complications. In the present study, we characterized the impact of a dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, a mixture of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus strains, on the vaginal microbiota and immunological profiles of healthy women during late pregnancy. Results An association between the oral intake of the probiotic VSL#3 and changes in the composition of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant women was revealed by PCR-DGGE population profiling. Despite no significant changes were found in the amounts of the principal vaginal bacterial populations in women administered with VSL#3, qPCR results suggested a potential role of the probiotic product in counteracting the decrease of Bifidobacterium and the increase of Atopobium, that occurred in control women during late pregnancy. The modulation of the vaginal microbiota was associated with significant changes in some vaginal cytokines. In particular, the decrease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was observed only in control women but not in women supplemented with VSL#3. In addition, the probiotic consumption induced the decrease of the pro-inflammatory chemokine Eotaxin, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect on the vaginal immunity. Conclusion Dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3 during the last trimester of pregnancy was associated to a modulation of the vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion, with potential implications in preventing preterm birth. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01367470

  20. Probiotic Crescenza cheese containing Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus manufactured with high-pressure homogenized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, P; Patrignani, F; Serrazanetti, D; Vinderola, G C; Reinheimer, J A; Lanciotti, R; Guerzoni, M E

    2008-02-01

    High-pressure homogenization (HPH) is one of the most promising alternatives to traditional thermal treatment of food preservation and diversification. Its effectiveness on the deactivation of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in model systems and real food is well documented. To evaluate the potential of milk treated by HPH for the production of Crescenza cheese with commercial probiotic lactobacilli added, 4 types of cheeses were made: HPH (from HPH-treated milk), P (from pasteurized milk), HPH-P (HPH-treated milk plus probiotics), and P-P (pasteurized milk plus probiotics) cheeses. A strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was used as starter culture for cheese production. Compositional, microbiological, physicochemical, and organoleptic analyses were carried out at 1, 5, 8, and 12 d of refrigerated storage (4 degrees C). According to results obtained, no significant differences among the 4 cheese types were observed for gross composition (protein, fat, moisture) and pH. Differently, the HPH treatment of milk increased the cheese yield about 1% and positively affected the viability during the refrigerated storage of the probiotic bacteria. In fact, after 12 d of storage, the Lactobacillus paracasei A13 cell loads were 8 log cfu/ g, whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus H5 exhibited, in P-P cheese, a cell load decrease of about 1 log cfu/g with respect to the HPH-P cheese. The hyperbaric treatment had a significant positive effect on free fatty acids release and cheese proteolysis. Also, probiotic cultures affected proteolytic and lipolytic cheese patterns. No significant differences were found for the sensory descriptors salty and creamy among HPH and P cheeses as well as for acid, piquant, sweet, milky, salty, creamy, and overall acceptance among HPH, HPH-P, and P-P Crescenza cheeses.

  1. MICROENCAPSULATION-THE FUTURE OF PROBIOTIC CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawheed Amin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, there has been an explosion of probiotic cultures based health products in Indian markets. The survival of the probiotic bacteria in gastro-intestinal gut is questionable, because of the poor survival of probiotic bacteria in these products. Basically the viability of probiotic cultures is very weak in these food products. Probiotic based products are health potentiators and are associated with many health benefits. Microencapsulation of the probiotic cultures is one of the recent, demanded and highly efficient techniques. Among the different approaches proposed to improve the survival of probiotics during food manufacturing process and passage in the upper part of gastrointestinal tratct (GI tract, microencapsulation has received considerable attention. Encapsulated probiotic cultures have longer shelf life of the products. This microencapsulation technology is used to maintain the viability of probiotic bacteria during food product processing and storage. This article reviews the principles, techniques and need for microencapsulation of probiotic cultures.

  2. Database and Bioinformatics Studies of Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Wang, Bohua; Zhong, Yafen; Pow, Siok Hoon; Zeng, Xian; Qin, Chu; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Shangying; He, Weidong; Tan, Ying; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Yu Zong

    2017-09-06

    Probiotics have been widely explored for health benefits, animal cares, and agricultural applications. Recent advances in microbiome, microbiota, and microbial dark matter research have fueled greater interests in and paved ways for the study of the mechanisms of probiotics and the discovery of new probiotics from uncharacterized microbial sources. A probiotics database named PROBIO was developed to facilitate these efforts and the need for the information on the known probiotics, which provides the comprehensive information about the probiotic functions of 448 marketed, 167 clinical trial/field trial, and 382 research probiotics for use or being studied for use in humans, animals, and plants. The potential applications of the probiotics data are illustrated by several literature-reported investigations, which have used the relevant information for probing the function and mechanism of the probiotics and for discovering new probiotics. PROBIO can be accessed free of charge at http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/probio/homepage.htm .

  3. Probiotic Compared with Standard Milk for High-caries Children: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, G; Ruiz, B; Faleiros, S; Vistoso, A; Marró, M L; Sánchez, J; Urzúa, I; Cabello, R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare milk supplemented with probiotic lactobacilli with standard milk for the increment of caries in preschool children after 10 mo of intervention. The study was a triple-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Participants were children aged 2 and 3 y (n = 261) attending 16 nursery schools in a metropolitan region in Chile. Nursery schools were randomly assigned to 2 parallel groups: children in the intervention group were given 150 mL of milk supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus SP1 (10(7) CFU/mL), while children in the control group were given standard milk. Interventions took place on weekdays for 10 mo. Data were collected through a clinical examination of participants. The primary outcome measure was the increment of caries in preschool children. This was assessed using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). The dropout rate was 21%. No differences in caries prevalence were detected between the groups at baseline (P = 0.68). After 10 mo of probiotic intake, the caries prevalence was 54.4% in the probiotic group and 65.8% in the control group. The percentage of new individuals who developed cavitated lesions (ICDAS 5-6) in the control group (24.3%) was significantly higher than that in the probiotic group (9.7%). The increment of dental caries showed an odds ratio of 0.35 (P < 0.05) in favor of the probiotic group. At the cavitated lesion level, the increment of new caries lesions within the groups showed 1.13 new lesions per child in the probiotic group compared with 1.75 lesions in the control group (P < 0.05). The probiotic group showed an increment of 0.58 ± 1.17 new lesions compared with 1.08 ± 1.70 new lesions observed in the control group. The difference in caries increment was significant at the cavitated lesion level (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the regular long-term intake of probiotic-supplemented milk may reduce caries development in high-caries preschool children (Clinical

  4. Evaluation of the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated probiotic bacteria in comparison with the same uncoated strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Piano, Mario; Carmagnola, Stefania; Andorno, Silvano; Pagliarulo, Michela; Tari, Roberto; Mogna, Luca; Strozzi, Gian Paolo; Sforza, Filomena; Capurso, Lucio

    2010-09-01

    Beneficial findings concerning probiotics are increasing day by day. However, one of the most important parameter which affects the probiotic activity of a microorganism is its survival during the gastroduodenal transit. Some microencapsulation techniques could be applied to bacterial cells to improve this parameter. A comparison between the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated bacteria and the same not microencapsulated strains has been conducted in a double blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study (April to July 2005) involved 44 healthy volunteers. In particular, participants were divided into 2 groups: group A (21 participants) received a mix of probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 (LMG P-21021) and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 (DSM 16604) in an uncoated form, group B (23 participants) was given the same strains microencapsulated with a gastroresistant material. The not microencapsulated strains were administered at 5 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days, whereas the microencapsulated bacteria were given at 1 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days. At the end of the first period of treatment with probiotics a 3 weeks washout phase has been included in the study protocol. At the end of the washout period the groups were crossed: in detail, group A had the microencapsulated and group B the uncoated bacteria. The administered amounts of each strain were the same as the first treatment. The quantitative evaluation of intestinal colonization by strains microencapsulated or not microencapsulated was made by fecal samples examination at the beginning of the clinical trial, after 10 and 21 days of each treatment period. In particular, fecal heterofermentative Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria have been counted. A statistically significant increase in the fecal amounts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria was recorded in both groups at the end of each treatment compared with d0 or d42 (Ptechnique used in this study is a valid

  5. Evaluation of the functional efficacy of an antioxidative probiotic in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütt Pirje

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In persons without clinical symptom it is difficult to assess an impact of probiotics regarding its effect on health. We evaluated the functional efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 in healthy volunteers by measuring the influence of two different formulations on intestinal lactoflora, fecal recovery of the probiotic strain and oxidative stress markers of blood and urine after 3 weeks consumption. Methods Two 3-week healthy volunteer trials were performed. Open placebo controlled (OPC study participants (n = 21 consumed either goat milk or by L. fermentum ME-3 fermented goat milk (daily dose 11.8 log CFU (Colony Forming Units. Double blind randomised placebo controlled (DBRP study participants (n = 24 received either capsules with L. fermentum ME-3 (daily of dose 9.2 CFU or placebo capsules. The faecal lactoflora composition, faecal ME-3 recovery, effect of the consumption on intestinal lactoflora, and oxidative stress markers of blood (total antioxidative activity; total antioxidative status and glutathione red-ox ratio was measured. Results ME-3 was well tolerated and a significant increase in total faecal lactobacilli yet no predominance of ME-3 was detected in all study groups. Faecal recovery of ME-3 was documented by molecular methods only in fermented milk group, however the significant improvement of blood TAA (Total Antioxidative Activity and TAS (Total Antioxidative Status indices was seen both in case of fermented goat milk and capsules", yet glutathione re-ox ratio values decreased only in case of fermented by ME-3 goat milk. Conclusion The functional efficacy of both consumed formulations of an antioxidative probiotic L. fermentum ME-3 is proved by the increase of the intestinal lactobacilli counts providing putative defence against enteric infections and by reduction of the oxidative stress indices of blood and urine of healthy volunteers. In non-diseased host the probiotic health claims can

  6. Determining the genetic diversity of lactobacilli from the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Argimon, S; Li, Y; Gu, H; Zhou, X; Caufield, P W

    2010-08-01

    Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome.

  7. Determining the Genetic Diversity of Lactobacilli from the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Argimon, S.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Caufield, P. W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome. PMID:20573585

  8. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cells of the non-specific immune system lysing altered self-cells. A non-cytolytic subset of NK cells may serve a regulatory role by secreting cytokines. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cells, as consumption...... of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... buffy coats by negative isolation using non-NK lineage specific antibodies and magnetic beads. NK cells were incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria or 10 microg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA...

  9. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrese, Michael; Schrezenmeir, J

    2008-01-01

    According to the German definition, probiotics are defined viable microorganisms, sufficient amounts of which reach the intestine in an active state and thus exert positive health effects. Numerous probiotic microorganisms (e.g. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri, bifidobacteria and certain strains of L. casei or the L. acidophilus-group) are used in probiotic food, particularly fermented milk products, or have been investigated--as well as Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917, certain enterococci (Enterococcus faecium SF68) and the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii--with regard to their medicinal use. Among the numerous purported health benefits attributed to probiotic bacteria, the (transient) modulation of the intestinal microflora of the host and the capacity to interact with the immune system directly or mediated by the autochthonous microflora, are basic mechanisms. They are supported by an increasing number of in vitro and in vivo experiments using conventional and molecular biologic methods. In addition to these, a limited number of randomized, well-controlled human intervention trials have been reported. Well-established probiotic effects are: 1. Prevention and/or reduction of duration and complaints of rotavirus-induced or antibiotic-associated diarrhea as well as alleviation of complaints due to lactose intolerance. 2. Reduction of the concentration of cancer-promoting enzymes and/or putrefactive (bacterial) metabolites in the gut. 3. Prevention and alleviation of unspecific and irregular complaints of the gastrointestinal tracts in healthy people. 4. Beneficial effects on microbial aberrancies, inflammation and other complaints in connection with: inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, Helicobacter pylori infection or bacterial overgrowth. 5. Normalization of passing stool and stool consistency in subjects suffering from obstipation or an irritable colon. 6. Prevention or alleviation of allergies and atopic diseases in infants. 7

  10. Strategies for the evaluation and selection of potential vaginal probiotics from human sources: an exemplary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domig, K J; Kiss, H; Petricevic, L; Viernstein, H; Unger, F; Kneifel, W

    2014-09-01

    During the last years, the application of probiotics in gynaecological clinical practice has gained increasing relevance regarding therapy and prevention. This trend has also provoked the need for having tailored pharmaceutical preparations containing powerful microbial strains with defined properties. For the development of such preparations, several factors and criteria have to be considered, thereby not only focusing on identity and safety aspects as well as individual properties of the bacterial strains, but also on technological issues, such as stability and targeted release from the preparation. Against this background, this report exemplarily addresses the development procedure of a probiotic bacterial formulation for gynaecological application, covering the search for suitable strains, assessing their microbiological, molecular biological and physiological characterisation, and the selection for their use in clinical trials. In detail, starting with 127 presumptive lactobacilli isolates of vaginal origin, a step-by-step selection of candidate strains meeting special criteria was thoroughly examined, finally leading to a preparation consisting of four individual Lactobacillus strains that possess particular significance in women's urogenital health. Relevant issues and quality criteria of probiotic preparations used in gynecology are addressed and exemplarily introduced.

  11. Screening of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria for potential probiotic use in Iberian dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Martín, Alberto; Benito, María José; Nevado, Francisco Pérez; de Guía Córdoba, María

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria and bifibobacteria strains as potential probiotic cultures during the processing of Iberian dry fermented sausages. A total of 1000 strains were isolated from Iberian dry fermented sausages (363), and human (337) and pig faeces (300) in different culture media. Around 30% of these strains, mainly isolated from Iberian dry fermented sausages in LAMVAB agar, were pre-selected for testing as potential probiotics by their ability to grow adequately at the pH values and NaCl concentrations of these meat products during the ripening process. Of the in vitro investigations used to predict the survival of a strain in conditions present in the gastro intestinal tract, exposure to pH 2.5 showed itself to be a highly discriminating factor with only 51 out of 312 pre-selected strains resisting adequately after 1.5h of exposure. All acid-resistant isolates identified as lactobacilli originated from human faeces (Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus fermentum) and pig faeces (Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus animalis, Lactobacillus murinus, and Lactobacillus vaginalis). Pediococcus acidilactici strains were isolated from Iberian dry fermented sausages and pig faeces, whereas the greatest number of Enterococcus strains were identified as Enterococcus faecium, with this species being isolated from Iberian dry fermented sausages, and human and pig faeces. Most of these strains are promising probiotic meat culture candidates suitable for Iberian dry fermented sausages.

  12. Identification of novel anti-inflammatory probiotic strains isolated from pulque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Maravilla, Edgar; Lenoir, Marion; Mayorga-Reyes, Lino; Allain, Thibault; Sokol, Harry; Langella, Philippe; Sánchez-Pardo, María E; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts, confer health benefits on the host. Their use is more and more widespread for both prevention and treatment of diseases, including traveler’s diarrhea and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In this work, we isolated and characterized novel candidate probiotic strains from pulque (xaxtle), a traditional Mexican alcoholic fermented beverage. A total of 14 strains were obtained from xaxtle samples isolated from three different Mexican regions. Species identification was performed by biochemical methods and 16S rRNA gene targeted PCR. The isolates belonged to the Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus composti phylogenetic groups, with L. brevis being the most dominant group. Bacteria were tested for lysozyme, low pH, and bile acid resistance. Moreover, the strains were tested for adherence to human intestinal epithelial cells and screened for their immunomodulatory properties using a cellular model. Selected bacterial strains with anti-inflammatory properties were then tested in vivo in a dinitro-benzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced chronic colitis mouse model, and weight loss, gut permeability, and cytokine profiles were measured as readouts of inflammation. One of the selected strains, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LBH1068, improved mice health as observed by a reduction of weight loss, significant decreases in gut permeability, and cytokine modulation. Altogether, our results highlighted the potential of lactobacilli isolated from pulque and in particular the strain L. sanfranciscensis LBH1068 as a novel probiotic to treat IBD.

  13. Inclusion of Oat in Feeding Can Increase the Potential Probiotic Bifidobacteria in Sow Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabin Gyawali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to (i investigate the impact of feeding oat on the population of bifidobacteria and (ii evaluate their probiotic potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of supplementing sows’ gestation and lactation feed with 15% oat (prebiotic source on the levels of probiotic population in milk. We found that dietary inclusion of oat during lactation and gestation resulted in increased levels of bifidobacteria compared to lactobacilli in sow milk. Furthermore bifidobacteria within the sow milk samples were further evaluated for probiotic potential based on aggregating properties, and acid- and bile-tolerance after exposure to hydrochloric acid (pH 2.5 and bile salts (0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 1.0% and 2.0%. All isolates survived under the condition of low pH and bile 2.0%. Autoaggregation ability ranged from 17.5% to 73%. These isolates also showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7.Together our results suggest that inclusion of oat in feeding systems could have the potential to improve the intestinal health of piglets by increasing the population of bifidobacteria.

  14. Inclusion of Oat in Feeding Can Increase the Potential Probiotic Bifidobacteria in Sow Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Rabin; Minor, Radiah C; Donovan, Barry; Ibrahim, Salam A

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) investigate the impact of feeding oat on the population of bifidobacteria and (ii) evaluate their probiotic potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of supplementing sows' gestation and lactation feed with 15% oat (prebiotic source) on the levels of probiotic population in milk. We found that dietary inclusion of oat during lactation and gestation resulted in increased levels of bifidobacteria compared to lactobacilli in sow milk. Furthermore bifidobacteria within the sow milk samples were further evaluated for probiotic potential based on aggregating properties, and acid- and bile-tolerance after exposure to hydrochloric acid (pH 2.5) and bile salts (0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 1.0% and 2.0%). All isolates survived under the condition of low pH and bile 2.0%. Autoaggregation ability ranged from 17.5% to 73%. These isolates also showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7.Together our results suggest that inclusion of oat in feeding systems could have the potential to improve the intestinal health of piglets by increasing the population of bifidobacteria.

  15. Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains Stimulate the Inflammatory Response and Activate Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rocha-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli have been shown to promote health functions. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which four different strains of probiotics affected innate immunity, such as regulation of ROS, cytokines, phagocytosis, bactericidal activity, signaling by NF-κB pp65, and TLR2 activation. The production of ROS was dependent on the concentration and species of Lactobacillus. The results obtained from the tested strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus KLSD, L. helveticus IMAU70129, and L. casei IMAU60214 showed that strains induced early proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-8,TNF-α, IL-12p70, and IL-6. However, IL-1β expression was induced only by L. helveticus and L. casei strains (after 24 h stimulation. Phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of macrophages against various pathogens, such as S. aureus, S. typhimurium, and E. coli, were increased by pretreatment with Lactobacillus. The nuclear translocation NF-κB pp65 and TLR2-dependent signaling were also increased by treatment with the probiotics. Taken together, the experiments demonstrate that probiotic strains of Lactobacillus exert early immunostimulatory effects that may be directly linked to the initial inflammation of the response of human macrophages.

  16. Comparison of the kinetics of intestinal colonization by associating 5 probiotic bacteria assumed either in a microencapsulated or in a traditional, uncoated form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Mario D; Carmagnola, Stefania; Ballarè, Marco; Balzarini, Marco; Montino, Franco; Pagliarulo, Michela; Anderloni, Andrea; Orsello, Marco; Tari, Roberto; Sforza, Filomena; Mogna, Luca; Mogna, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    microencapsulated or uncoated, was undertaken by examining fecal samples at the beginning of the study (time 0), after 10 days and after 21 days of each treatment period. In particular, fecal total Lactobacilli, heterofermentative Lactobacilli, and total Bifidobacteria were quantified at each checkpoint. A genomic analysis of an appropriate number of colonies was performed to quantify individual L. rhamnosus strains among heterofermentative Lactobacilli. A statistically significant increase in the fecal amounts of total Lactobacilli, heterofermentative Lactobacilli, and total Bifidobacteria was registered in both groups at the end of each supplementation period compared with d₀ or d₄₂ (group A: P=0.0002, P=0.0001, and Ptechnique used in this study is a valid approach aimed to significantly improve the survival of strains during gastroduodenal transit, thus enhancing their probiotic value and allowing the use of a 5 times lower amount.

  17. The Basics of Probiotics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Probiotics The Basics of Probiotics Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Millions ... the facts? Photo courtest of Pixabay What Are Probiotics? Probiotics are live microorganisms (such as bacteria) that ...

  18. Probiotics: defenders of gastrointestinal habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desh D. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota play an important role in maintaining normal gastrointestinal (GI function and ensuring that changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota can promote GI function. The digestive tract is full of bacteria and many of these, including probiotics, are necessary for optimal digestive function. During bacterial gastroenteritis, harmful bacteria invade the digestive tract causing unpleasant symptoms and upsetting the balance between good and bad bacteria. Supplemental probiotics can help restore this balance. Studies have demonstrated that probiotics can often help reduce the severity of symptoms such as diarrhea and may help accelerate recovery. Probiotics are therapeutic preparations of live microorganisms administered in sufficient dosage to be beneficial to health. The therapeutic effects of these microorganisms appear to be strain specific. Primal Defense®, a unique, probiotic, bacterial compound, contains probiotics that support gut flora balance, promote consistent bowel function, control stomach acid levels to quickly eliminate burning sensation in the stomach and maintain immune system response. The probiotics in Primal Defense® maximize the benefits of a healthy diet by supporting normal absorption and assimilation of nutrients in the gut. Nearly 75% of our immune defenses are located in the digestive tract, so maintaining a favorable bacterial balance in the intestines (ideally 80% good or neutral bacteria to 20% bad or harmful bacteria is crucial to achieving and maintaining optimum health.

  19. Effects of Lactobacillus Probiotic, P22 Bacteriophage and Salmonella Typhimurium on the Heterophilic Burst Activity of Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GA Marietto-Gonçalves

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the constant evolution of industrial poultry production and the global emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics there has been an increasing interest in alternatives for the treatment of poultry salmonellosis, such as phage therapy and probiotics. The present study evaluated the effects of the oral administration of the bacteriophage P22 and of a probiotic, consisting of four Lactobacillus species, on the level of circulating heterophils containing a superoxide anion of one-day-old broilers challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium for seven days. It was concluded that the treatment with a probiotic with lactobacilli of broilers experimentally infected with Salmonella spp eliminates this pathogen by increasing the circulating levels of reactive heterophils. When chicks are treated with a probiotic and a bacteriophage, the agent is eliminated with no changes in circulating reactive heterophil counts. It is also concluded that the heterophils of day-old chicks are not capable of producing superoxide anion. However, this capacity is detected after 48 h of life, indicating that heterophils mature as birds age.

  20. Production of RS4 from rice starch and its utilization as an encapsulating agent for targeted delivery of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Gani, Asir; Gani, Adil; Shah, Asima; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad

    2018-01-15

    The research reported in this article is based on the hypothesis that crosslinking of starch can make it a potential wall material for targeted delivery of probiotics by altering its digestion. Three probiotic strains namely Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum were microencapsulated with resistant starch. Encapsulation yield (%) of resistant starch microspheres was in the range of 43.01-48.46. The average diameter of resistant starch microparticles was in the range of 45.53-49.29μm. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy of microcapsules showed peaks in the region of 900-1300cm(-1) and 2918-2925cm(-1) which corresponds to the presence of bacteria. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) showed better thermal stability of resistant starch microcapsules. Microencapsulated probiotics survived well in simulated gastrointestinal conditions and adverse heat conditions. The viability of the microcapsulated lactobacilli also remained high (>7 log cfu g(-1)) for 2months at 4°C. The results revealed that resistant starch is the potential new delivery carrier for oral administration of probiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholic acid is accumulated spontaneously, driven by membrane Delta pH, in many lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurdi, P; van Veen, HW; Tanaka, H; Mierau, [No Value; Konings, WN; Tannock, GW; Tomita, F; Yokota, A

    2000-01-01

    Many lactobacilli from various origins were found to apparently lack cholic acid extrusion activity. Cholic acid was accumulated spontaneously, driven by the transmembrane proton gradient. Accumulation is a newly identified kind of interaction between intestinal microbes and unconjugated bile acids

  2. Expanding the biotechnology potential of lactobacilli through comparative genomics of 213 strains and associated genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhihong; Harris, Hugh M. B.; McCann, Angela; Guo, Chenyi; Argimón, Silvia; Zhang, Wenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Jeffery, Ian B; Cooney, Jakki C.; Kagawa, Todd F.; Liu, Wenjun; Song, Yuqin; Salvetti, Elisa; Wrobel, Agnieszka; Rasinkangas, Pia; Parkhill, Julian; Rea, Mary C.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, François P.; Paul Ross, R.; Yang, Ruifu; Briner, Alexandra E.; Felis, Giovanna E.; de Vos, Willem M.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Caufield, Page W.; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Heping; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli are a diverse group of species that occupy diverse nutrient-rich niches associated with humans, animals, plants and food. They are used widely in biotechnology and food preservation, and are being explored as therapeutics. Exploiting lactobacilli has been complicated by metabolic diversity, unclear species identity and uncertain relationships between them and other commercially important lactic acid bacteria. The capacity for biotransformations catalysed by lactobacilli is an untapped biotechnology resource. Here we report the genome sequences of 213 Lactobacillus strains and associated genera, and their encoded genetic catalogue for modifying carbohydrates and proteins. In addition, we describe broad and diverse presence of novel CRISPR-Cas immune systems in lactobacilli that may be exploited for genome editing. We rationalize the phylogenomic distribution of host interaction factors and bacteriocins that affect their natural and industrial environments, and mechanisms to withstand stress during technological processes. We present a robust phylogenomic framework of existing species and for classifying new species. PMID:26415554

  3. Expanding the biotechnology potential of lactobacilli through comparative genomics of 213 strains and associated genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhihong; Harris, Hugh M B; McCann, Angela; Guo, Chenyi; Argimón, Silvia; Zhang, Wenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Jeffery, Ian B; Cooney, Jakki C; Kagawa, Todd F; Liu, Wenjun; Song, Yuqin; Salvetti, Elisa; Wrobel, Agnieszka; Rasinkangas, Pia; Parkhill, Julian; Rea, Mary C; O'Sullivan, Orla; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, François P; Paul Ross, R; Yang, Ruifu; Briner, Alexandra E; Felis, Giovanna E; de Vos, Willem M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Caufield, Page W; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Heping; O'Toole, Paul W

    2015-09-29

    Lactobacilli are a diverse group of species that occupy diverse nutrient-rich niches associated with humans, animals, plants and food. They are used widely in biotechnology and food preservation, and are being explored as therapeutics. Exploiting lactobacilli has been complicated by metabolic diversity, unclear species identity and uncertain relationships between them and other commercially important lactic acid bacteria. The capacity for biotransformations catalysed by lactobacilli is an untapped biotechnology resource. Here we report the genome sequences of 213 Lactobacillus strains and associated genera, and their encoded genetic catalogue for modifying carbohydrates and proteins. In addition, we describe broad and diverse presence of novel CRISPR-Cas immune systems in lactobacilli that may be exploited for genome editing. We rationalize the phylogenomic distribution of host interaction factors and bacteriocins that affect their natural and industrial environments, and mechanisms to withstand stress during technological processes. We present a robust phylogenomic framework of existing species and for classifying new species.

  4. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Probiotics, prebiotics, and microencapsulation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarao, Loveleen Kaur; Arora, M

    2017-01-22

    The development of a suitable technology for the production of probiotics is a key research for industrial production, which should take into account the viability and the stability of the organisms involved. Microbial criteria, stress tolerance during processing, and storage of the product constitute the basis for the production of probiotics. Generally, the bacteria belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium have been used as probiotics. Based on their positive qualities, probiotic bacteria are widely used in the production of food. Interest in the incorporation of the probiotic bacteria into other products apart from dairy products has been increasing and represents a great challenge. The recognition of dose delivery systems for probiotic bacteria has also resulted in research efforts aimed at developing probiotic food outside the dairy sector. Producing probiotic juices has been considered more in the recent years, due to an increased concern in personal health of consumers. This review focuses on probiotics, prebiotics, and the microencapsulation of living cells.

  6. Probiotics as potential antioxidants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vijendra; Shah, Chandni; Mokashe, Narendra; Chavan, Rupesh; Yadav, Hariom; Prajapati, Jashbhai

    2015-04-15

    Probiotics are known for their health beneficial effects and are established as dietary adjuncts. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects. In this view, there is interest to find the potential probiotic strains that can exhibit antioxidant properties along with health benefits. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that probiotics exhibit antioxidant potential. In this view, consumption of probiotics alone or foods supplemented with probiotics may reduce oxidative damage, free radical scavenging rate, and modification in activity of crucial antioxidative enzymes in human cells. Incorporation of probiotics in foods can provide a good strategy to supply dietary antioxidants, but more studies are needed to standardize methods and evaluate antioxidant properties of probiotics before they can be recommended for antioxidant potential. In this paper, the literature related to known antioxidant potential of probiotics and proposing future perspectives to conduct such studies has been reviewed.

  7. A Gastroenterologist’s Guide to Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Matthew A

    2012-01-01

    The enteric microbiota contributes to gastrointestinal health and its disruption has been associated with many disease states. Some patients consume probiotic products in attempts to manipulate the intestinal microbiota for health benefit. It is important for gastroenterologists to improve their understanding of the mechanisms of probiotics and the evidence that support their use in practice. Clinical trials have assessed the therapeutic effects of probiotics for several disorders, including antibiotic-or Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and the inflammatory bowel diseases. Although probiotic research is a rapidly evolving field, there are sufficient data to justify a trial of probiotics for treatment or prevention of some of these conditions. However, the capacity of probiotics to modify disease symptoms is likely to be modest and varies among probiotic strains—not all probiotics are right for all diseases. The current review provides condition-specific rationale for using probiotics as therapy and literature-based recommendations. PMID:22504002

  8. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Sunil D Saroj; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit ad...

  9. Comparison of culture-dependent and independent approaches to characterize fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartieri, Andrea; Simone, Marta; Gozzoli, Caterina; Popovic, Mina; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Amaretti, Alberto; Raimondi, Stefano; Rossi, Maddalena

    2016-04-01

    Different culture-dependent and independent methods were applied to investigate the population of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the feces of five healthy subjects. Bacteria were isolated on MRS, a complex medium supporting growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, and on three selective media for bifidobacteria and two for lactobacilli. Taxonomic characterization of the isolates was carried out by RAPD-PCR and partial 16S sequencing. The selectivity of genus-specific media was also investigated by challenging colonies from MRS plates to grow onto each medium. In parallel, a quantitative and qualitative description of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria was obtained by FISH, qPCR, TRFLP, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bifidobacteria did not fail to grow on their specific media and were easily isolated and enumerated, showing comparable quantitative data among culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The Bifidobacterium species identified on plates and those extracted from TRFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequencing were mostly overlapping. Selective media for lactobacilli gave unsuitable results, being too stringent or too permissive. The quantification of lactobacilli through selective plates, qPCR, FISH, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing gave unreliable results. Therefore, unlike bifidobacteria, intestinal lactobacilli are still problematic in terms of quantification and accurate profiling at level of species and possibly of strains by both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques.

  10. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Nagy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM to digital processing (dTEM, and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM. Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm, but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm. These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics.

  11. Probiotic Properties of Lactobacillus Strains Isolated from Tibetan Kefir Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yongchen; Lu, Yingli; Wang, Jinfeng; Yang, Longfei; Pan, Chenyu; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Tibetan kefir grains. Three Lactobacillus isolates identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus LA15, Lactobacillus plantarum B23 and Lactobacillus kefiri D17 that showed resistance to acid and bile salts were selected for further evaluation of their probiotic properties. The 3 selected strains expressed high in vitro adherence to Caco-2 cells. They were sensitive to gentamicin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol and resistant to vancomycin with MIC values of 26 µg/ml. All 3 strains showed potential bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity, cholesterol assimilation and cholesterol co-precipitation ability. Additionally, the potential effect of these strains on plasma cholesterol levels was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats in 4 treatment groups were fed the following experimental diets for 4 weeks: a high-cholesterol diet, a high-cholesterol diet plus LA15, a high-cholesterol diet plus B23 or a high-cholesterol diet plus D17. The total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the serum were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in the LAB-treated rats compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet without LAB supplementation. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in groups B23 and D17 were significantly (P<0.05) higher than those in the control and LA15 groups. Additionally, both fecal cholesterol and bile acid levels were significantly (P<0.05) increased after LAB administration. Fecal lactobacilli counts were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the LAB treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, the 3 strains were detected in the rat small intestine, colon and feces during the feeding trial. The bacteria levels remained high even after the LAB administration had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that these strains may be used in the future as probiotic starter cultures for manufacturing

  12. Specific probiotics or 'fecal transplantation'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem consists mainly of the enteric flora and to a large extent determines intestinal but also extraintestinal health and disease. General alterations and specific molecular changes of intestinal bacteria cause local as well as systemic immune reactions. Nonantibiotic treatment of the enteric flora has a long tradition and spans a range of different interventions from nutrition to specific probiotics and complete fecal transplantation. When comparing therapy to specific probiotics and fecal transplantation, several aspects need to be considered, like biological consequences, safety and therapeutic evidence. The introduction of probiotics into therapy occurred more than hundred years ago. In contrast, experiences with fecal transplantation are more recent and more limited. Safety issues have not been definitively clarified. Because of the different biological activities of probiotics and fecal transplantation, it can be hypothesized that they may play different roles in the treatment of various diseases. More research is needed before the details, safety and therapeutic effects of bacteriotherapy for IBD become sufficiently clear.

  13. Probiotics and prebiotics in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dan W; Greer, Frank R

    2010-12-01

    This clinical report reviews the currently known health benefits of probiotic and prebiotic products, including those added to commercially available infant formula and other food products for use in children. Probiotics are supplements or foods that contain viable microorganisms that cause alterations of the microflora of the host. Use of probiotics has been shown to be modestly effective in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in (1) treating acute viral gastroenteritis in healthy children; and (2) preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in healthy children. There is some evidence that probiotics prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in very low birth weight infants (birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g), but more studies are needed. The results of RCTs in which probiotics were used to treat childhood Helicobacter pylori gastritis, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic ulcerative colitis, and infantile colic, as well as in preventing childhood atopy, although encouraging, are preliminary and require further confirmation. Probiotics have not been proven to be beneficial in treating or preventing human cancers or in treating children with Crohn disease. There are also safety concerns with the use of probiotics in infants and children who are immunocompromised, chronically debilitated, or seriously ill with indwelling medical devices. Prebiotics are supplements or foods that contain a nondigestible food ingredient that selectively stimulates the favorable growth and/or activity of indigenous probiotic bacteria. Human milk contains substantial quantities of prebiotics. There is a paucity of RCTs examining prebiotics in children, although there may be some long-term benefit of prebiotics for the prevention of atopic eczema and common infections in healthy infants. Confirmatory well-designed clinical research studies are necessary.

  14. Characterisation of Lactobacilli from eweʼs and goatʼs milk for their further processing re-utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kološta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Raw ewe's and goat's milk is a good source for isolation of wild lactobacilli which are able to bring unique processing properties in development of dairy products - cheeses or fermented dairy products. 34 strains of lactobacilli were isolated, purified and identified from fermented ewe's and goat's dairy products. These products were processed without thermal treatment and without using of any commercial starters. After preliminary selection, the final collection of 5 strains was established. The strains were identified as: Lbc. plantarum (2, Lbc. paraplantarum (1, Lbc. paracasei (1 and Lbc. johnsonii (1. Except two strains, all were able to coagulate milk. After hydrolysis of lactose in milk, two strains were able to form sensorial attractive coagulate too. All of the strains were homofermentative, they produced lactic acid but they did not produce CO2. Their ability to produce diacetyl was low. They did not show strong proteolytic activity. All strains grew at 30 °C and 37 °C, however Lbc. johnsonii much slower at 30 °C than the others. Except Lbc. johnsonii, all strains tolerated 2% concentration of NaCl and even in presence of 5% concentration of NaCl their growth was inhibited only moderately. All of characterized strains can be provisionally used as starter or starter adjuncts in dairy technology, during production of cheeses or fermented milk products from pasteurised milk. These results will be used in further processing studies of isolated strains and will be supplemented with other properties e.g. safety, probiotic and antimicrobial properties.

  15. Probiotic Meat Products and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Özbay Doğu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meat and meat products are the basic building blocks of nutrition and are recognized as good sources of high biological value proteins, group B vitamins, minerals as well as some other bioactive compounds. The trend today is the development of novel food for special health use, called functional food, to promote human health and well-being of consumers. The trends are based on either reducing the content of unhealthy substances (like salt or improving the content of substances with healthy benefits (like probiotics. Thus, it may also change the perspective of consumers towards meat products which associated with coronary artery disease. Meat is an ideal structure for probiotic microorganisms. Probiotic meat products are obtained by addition of probiotic to fermented meat products. These probiotic meat products are offered both healthy and improved taste and flavor, but also as safe food to consumer. Thus, when these probiotic meat products ensure flavor and nutritional to consumers, additionally they have a positive impact on their health.

  16. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  17. Use of Probiotics in Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cruz, Patricia; Ibáñez, Ana L.; Monroy Hermosillo, Oscar A.; Ramírez Saad, Hugo C.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of aquaculture as an industry has accelerated over the past decades; this has resulted in environmental damages and low productivity of various crops. The need for increased disease resistance, growth of aquatic organisms, and feed efficiency has brought about the use of probiotics in aquaculture practices. The first application of probiotics occurred in 1986, to test their ability to increase growth of hydrobionts (organisms that live in water). Later, probiotics were used to improve water quality and control of bacterial infections. Nowadays, there is documented evidence that probiotics can improve the digestibility of nutrients, increase tolerance to stress, and encourage reproduction. Currently, there are commercial probiotic products prepared from various bacterial species such as Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., Enterococcus sp., Carnobacterium sp., and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among others, and their use is regulated by careful management recommendations. The present paper shows the current knowledge of the use of probiotics in aquaculture, its antecedents, and safety measures to be carried out and discusses the prospects for study in this field. PMID:23762761

  18. Probiotic Properties of Lactobacillus crispatus 2,029: Homeostatic Interaction with Cervicovaginal Epithelial Cells and Antagonistic Activity to Genitourinary Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Vyacheslav; Khlebnikov, Valentin; Kosarev, Igor; Bairamova, Guldana; Vasilenko, Raisa; Suzina, Natalia; Machulin, Andrey; Sakulin, Vadim; Kulikova, Natalia; Vasilenko, Nadezhda; Karlyshev, Andrey; Uversky, Vladimir; Chikindas, Michael L; Melnikov, Vyacheslav

    2014-12-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 isolated upon investigation of vaginal lactobacilli of healthy women of reproductive age was selected as a probiotic candidate. The aim of the present study was elucidation of the role of L. crispatus 2029 in resistance of the female reproductive tract to genitourinary pathogens using cervicovaginal epithelial model. Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 has surface layers (S-layers), which completely surround cells as the outermost component of their envelope. S-layers are responsible for the adhesion of lactobacilli on the surface of cervicovaginal epithelial cells. Study of interactions between L. crispatus 2029 and a type IV collagen, a major molecular component of epithelial cell extracellular matrix, showed that 125I-labeled type IV collagen binds to lactobacilli with high affinity (Kd = (8.0 ± 0.7) × 10(-10) M). Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 consistently colonized epithelial cells. There were no toxicity, epithelial damage and apoptosis after 24 h of colonization. Electronic microscope images demonstrated intimate association between L. crispatus 2029 and epithelial cells. Upon binding to epithelial cells, lactobacilli were recognized by toll-like 2/6 receptors. Lactobacillus crispatus induced NF-κB activation in epithelial cells and did not induce expression of innate immunity mediators IL-8, IL-1β, IL-1α and TNF-α. Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 inhibited IL-8 production in epithelial cells induced by MALP-2 and increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, maintaining the homeostasis of female reproductive tract. Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 produced H2O2 and provided wide spectrum of antagonistic activity increasing colonization resistance to urinary tract infections by bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis associated agents.

  19. Probiotics and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig

    -armed parallel four weeks intervention study with W8 (1010 CFU) or placebo capsules was performed on young, normal to overweight participants. In the four weeks intervention study the effects of W8 on appetite, blood lipids, SCD1 activity and fecal microbiota were also investigated. Finally, associations between......Summary There is emerging focus on the gut microbiota’s (GM) effects on health. GM is suggested to be a contributing factor to the rapid development of obesity and its related diseases like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The omposition of the GM has been associated with weight, insulin...... intestine, in an animal study and in two human studies the effect of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8 (W8) on appetite regulation, blood lipids and blood fatty acids. In addition, it was investigated if W8 had an effect on the fecal microbiota of the human...

  20. Sauerkraut: A Probiotic Superfood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Orgeron II

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sauerkraut could potentially be a probiotic superfood. Sauerkraut does not require the use of a starter culture to cultivate these beneficial bacteria. All that is needed is a measure of salt and the cabbage. Naturally made, unprocessed sauerkraut contains probiotic microorganisms called Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB. LAB is one of the most significant organisms and has established benefits. For example, Lactic Acid Bacteria has established benefits with the treatment of diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, infections (urogenital, urinary and candida. LAB have also been shown to enhance immune system function to help prevent various illnesses and promote lactose digestion. Nevertheless, there is very little conclusive evidence on how much LAB is in sauerkraut and if there is enough present to confer benefits. Purpose: Determine if various serving sizes of homemade sauerkraut (2 Tbsp., ½ cup, & 1 cup meets the recommended CFU range in comparison to a control (supplement probiotic. Methods: Sauerkraut was prepared with no starter culture. Modified Lactobacillus Media was used to culture LAB. The capsule serving (0.8g was diluted with 99.2g PBS (1/100 and 10g of sauerkraut was diluted with 90g PBS (1/10. For serial dilutions, 1mL of each of the samples was diluted into 9 mL MRS broth for the dilutions (10 -1 -10 -10 . Then 1mL from each test tube is transferred into corresponding petri dishes. Melted Lactobacillus MRS agar is then mixed into each of the petri dishes. All petri dishes are then placed into a candle light jar and placed in an incubator at 37 degrees Celsius (98.6 o F for 5 days. After five days, the petri dishes with 25-250 visible cultures were counted. The number counted was multiplied by the dilution which gave the total number CFUs/g. The LAB concentration of the sauerkraut was calculated by multiplying the CFU/g times the serving size. Results: The results were calculated as the mean of CFUs recorded from

  1. β-d-glucan as an enteric delivery vehicle for probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Adil; Shah, Asima; Ahmad, Mudasir; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Masoodi, F A

    2017-08-26

    Three strains of probiotics L. casei, L. acidophilus and B. bifidum were encapsulated in β-d-glucan matrix using freeze drying technique in order to increase survivability during their journey through GI tract. The encapsulation efficiency (%) of β-d-glucan varied significantly with Bifidobacteria showing low survival rate than Lactobacilli. SEM images revealed a partially collapsed structure with bacterial cells distributed randomly in the matrix. Further absorption band between 1300 and 900cm(-1) in FTIR spectra shows the presence of bacterial proteins and nucleic acids. For encapsulated β-d-glucan maximum degree of swelling was observed at pH 3 and 4, whereas when the pH value was increased to 6.5 the encapsulated β-d-glucan started their disintegration. In vitro release studies revealed that the microcapsules start to dissolve upon entry to the small intestine where it is needed most. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of Probiotic Strains from Human Milk in Breastfed Infants with Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamtu Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and industrial exploitation of probiotics from human milk is a goal for worldwide milk biotechnology centres because of their modulation effect on the immune system in infants and adults. In the proposed study we have analysed fermentation patterns of Lactobacilli isolated from human milk, the reliability of API 50 CH carbohydrate fermentation system and a possible link between lactose concentrations and fermentation profiles on carbohydrates. We had succesfully identified three species of Lactobacillus (paracasei ssp paracasei, fermentum, acidophilus and one unsatisfactory identification of Lactoccocus lactis ssp lactis. These strains had different carbohydrate fermentation patterns but with common characteristics and showed no statistically significant correlations between their carbohydrate metabolic trends and lactose concentrations in the milk samples.

  3. Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Vasama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX, neosaxitoxin (neoSTX, gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3, C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2 from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2 was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2% was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%. There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo.

  4. Antifungal activity of two Lactobacillus strains with potential probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaldo, Gisela A; Barberis, Carla; Pascual, Liliana; Dalcero, Ana; Barberis, Lucila

    2012-07-01

    Aflatoxin (highly toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by fungi) contamination is a serious problem worldwide. Modern agriculture and animal production systems need to use high-quality and mycotoxin-free feedstuffs. The use of microorganisms to preserve food has gained importance in recent years due to the demand for reduced use of chemical preservatives by consumers. Lactic acid bacteria are known to produce various antimicrobial compounds that are considered to be important in the biopreservation of food and feed. Lactobacillus rhamnosus L60 and Lactobacillus fermentum L23 are producers of secondary metabolites, such as organic acids, bacteriocins and, in the case of L60, hydrogen peroxide. The antifungal activity of lactobacilli strains was determined by coculture with Aspergillus section Flavi strains by two qualitative and one quantitative methods. Both L23 and L60 completely inhibited the fungal growth of all aflatoxicogenic strains assayed. Aflatoxin B (1) production was reduced 95.7-99.8% with L60 and 27.5-100% with L23. Statistical analysis of the data revealed the influence of L60 and L23 on growth parameters and aflatoxin B (1) production. These results are important given that these aflatoxicogenic fungi are natural contaminants of feed used for animal production, and could be effectively controlled by Lactobacillus L60 and L23 strains with probiotic properties.

  5. The application of autochthonous potential of probiotic lactobacillus plantarum 564 in fish oil fortified yoghurt production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Zorica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the survival of autochthonous, potentially probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum 564, and the influence of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-3 (omega-3 PUFA fish oil fortification on the sensory quality of yoghurt. Three variants of yoghurt were produced using starter cultures of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus (Chr. Hansen, Denmark, and the potentially probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 564 (Culture Collection of the Department for Industrial Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade as follows: (1 without omega-3 PUFA; (2 with 100 mg/l omega-3 PUFA; and (3 with 200mg/l omega-3 PUFA. The survival of potential probiotic Lb. plantarum 564, the changes of starter bacteria counts, changes of pH values, as well as sensory evaluation, were examined during 3 weeks of yoghurt storage. Cells of Lb. plantarum 564 were maintained at >108 cfug−1. Starter bacteria counts were >107 cfug−1 for streptococci and >106 cfug−1 for lactobacilli. The changes of pH were within normal pH of fermented milks. Sensory evaluation showed that all variants of yoghurt produced with Lb. plantarum 564 and 2 concentrations of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids had a high sensory quality (above 90% of maximal quality, and which did not change significantly throughout the examined storage period. Although the sensory quality of the control sample was evaluated as better, the experimental samples fortified with fish oil were also characterized with very acceptable sensory properties. Results of high viability of potential probiotic Lb. plantarum 564, as well as very acceptable yoghurt sensory properties, indicate that this strain can be successfully used in the production of yoghurt fortified with PUFA omega-3 fish oil as a new functional dairy product. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 046010 i br. 046009

  6. Probiotics as potential biotherapeutics in the management of type 2 diabetes - prospects and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Harsh; Rashmi, Hogarehalli Mallappa; Batish, Virender Kumar; Grover, Sunita

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a looming epidemic worldwide, affecting almost all major sections of society, creating burdens on global health and economy. A large number of studies have identified a series of multiple risk factors such as genetic predisposition, epigenetic changes, unhealthy lifestyle, and altered gut microbiota that cause increased adiposity, β-cell dysfunction, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, adiposity, dyslipidaemia, metabolic endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, intestinal permeability (leaky gut), defective secretion of incretins and oxidative stress associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recent studies have proposed multifactorial interventions including dietary manipulation in the management of T2D. The same interventions have also been recommended by many national and international diabetes associations. These studies are aimed at deciphering the gut microbial influence on health and disease. Interestingly, results from several genomic, metagenomic and metabolomic studies have provided substantial information to target gut microbiota by dietary interventions for the management of T2D. Probiotics particularly lactobacilli and bifidobacteria have recently emerged as the prospective biotherapeutics with proven efficacy demonstrated in various in vitro and in vivo animal models adequately supported with their established multifunctional roles and mechanism of action for the prevention and disease treatment. The dietary interventions in conjunction with probiotics - a novel multifactorial strategy to abrogate progression and development of diabetes - hold considerable promise through improving the altered gut microbial composition and by targeting all the possible risk factors. This review will highlight the new developments in probiotic interventions and future prospects for exploring probiotic therapy in the prevention and control of lifestyle diseases like T2D.

  7. Fermented Aloreña table olives as a source of potential probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez Montoro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A collection of 31 Lactobacillus pentosus strains isolated from naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives were screened in depth in the present study for their probiotic potential. Several strains could be considered promising probiotic candidates since they showed good growth capacity and survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions (acidic pH of 1.5, up to 4% of bile salts and 5 mM of nitrate, good ability to auto-aggregate which may facilitate their adhesion to host cells as multiple aggregates and the subsequent displacement of pathogens. Moreover, co-aggregation of lactobacilli with pathogenic bacteria was shown with Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella Enteriditis as good defense strategy against gut and food pathogens. Furthermore, they exhibited adherence to intestinal and vaginal cell lines, such property could be reinforced by their capacity of biofilm formation which is also important in food matrices such as the olive surface. Their antagonistic activity against pathogenic bacteria by means of acids and plantaricins, and also their different functional properties may determine their efficacy not only in the gastro-intestinal tract but also in food matrices. Besides their ability to ferment several prebiotics, the new evidence in the present study was their capacity to ferment lactose which reinforces their use in different food matrices including dairy as a dietary adjunct to improve lactose digestibility. Lactobacillus pentosus CF2-10N was selected to have best probiotic profile being of great interest in further studies. In conclusion, spontaneous fermented Aloreña table olives are considered a natural source of potential probiotic Lb. pentosus to be included as adjunct functional cultures in different fermented foods.

  8. Fermented Aloreña Table Olives as a Source of Potential Probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, Beatriz Pérez; Benomar, Nabil; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Castillo Gutiérrez, Sonia; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2016-01-01

    A collection of 31 Lactobacillus pentosus strains isolated from naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives were screened in depth in the present study for their probiotic potential. Several strains could be considered promising probiotic candidates since they showed good growth capacity and survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions (acidic pH of 1.5, up to 4% of bile salts and 5 mM of nitrate), good ability to auto-aggregate which may facilitate their adhesion to host cells as multiple aggregates and the subsequent displacement of pathogens. Moreover, co-aggregation of lactobacilli with pathogenic bacteria was shown with Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Enteritidis as good defense strategy against gut and food pathogens. Furthermore, they exhibited adherence to intestinal and vaginal cell lines, such property could be reinforced by their capacity of biofilm formation which is also important in food matrices such as the olive surface. Their antagonistic activity against pathogenic bacteria by means of acids and plantaricins, and also their different functional properties may determine their efficacy not only in the gastro-intestinal tract but also in food matrices. Besides their ability to ferment several prebiotics, the new evidence in the present study was their capacity to ferment lactose which reinforces their use in different food matrices including dairy as a dietary adjunct to improve lactose digestibility. Lactobacillus pentosus CF2-10N was selected to have the best probiotic profile being of great interest in further studies. In conclusion, spontaneous fermented Aloreña table olives are considered a natural source of potential probiotic L. pentosus to be included as adjunct functional cultures in different fermented foods. PMID:27774088

  9. Effects of probiotic on intestinal mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Hong Cui; Xue-Qing Chen; Cun-Long Chen; Ji-De Wang; Yu-Jie Yang; Yong Cun; Jin-Bao Wu; Yu-Hu Liu; Han-Lei Dan; Yan-Ting Jian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of probiotic on intestinal mucosae of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and to evaluate the role of probiotic in preventing the relapse of UC.METHODS: Thirty patients received treatment with sulphasalazine (SASP) and glucocorticoid and then were randomly administered bifid triple viable capsule (BIFICO) (1.26 g/d), or an identical placebo (starch) for 8 wk. Fecal samples were collected for stool culture 2 wk before and after the randomized treatments. The patients were evaluated clinically, endoscopically and histologically after 2 mo of treatment or in case of relapse of UC. p65 and IκB expressions were determined by Western blot analysis.DNA-binding activity of NF-κB in colonic nuclear extracts was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). mRNA expressions of cytokines were identified by semi-quantitative assay, reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: Three patients (20%) in the BIFICO group had relapses during 2-mo follow-up period, compared with 14 (93.3%) in placebo group (P<0.01). The concentration of fecal lactobacilli, bifidobacteria was significantly increased in BIFICO-treated group only (P<0.01).The expressions of NF-κB p65 and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were significantly attenuated in the treatment group than that in control (P<0.05). The mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines was elevated in comparison with the control group.CONCLUSION: The probiotic could impede the activation of NF-κB, decrease the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β and elevate the expression of IL-10.These results suggest that oral administration of this new probiotic preparation is effective in preventing flare-ups of chronic UC. It may become a prophylactic drug to decrease the relapse of UC.

  10. Probiotic Supplements Failed to Prevent Babies' Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167008.html Probiotic Supplements Failed to Prevent Babies' Infections Benefits of ... 3, 2017 MONDAY, July 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds ...

  11. The role of acidification in the inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by vaginal lactobacilli during anaerobic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Jeremy J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal lactobacilli protect the female genital tract by producing lactic acid, bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide or a local immune response. In bacterial vaginosis, normal lactobacilli are replaced by an anaerobic flora and this may increase susceptibility to Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a facultative anaerobe. Bacterial interference between vaginal lactobacilli and N. gonorrhoeae has not been studied in liquid medium under anaerobic conditions. By co-cultivating N. gonorrhoeae in the presence of lactobacilli we sought to identify the relative contributions of acidification and hydrogen peroxide production to any growth inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae. Methods Three strains of N. gonorrhoeae distinguishable by auxotyping were grown in the presence of high concentrations (107-108 cfu/mL of three vaginal lactobacilli (L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii in an anerobic liquid medium with and without 2-(N-morpholino-ethanesulfonic (MES buffer. Fusobacterium nucleatum was used as an indicator of anaerobiosis. Bacterial counts were performed at 15, 20 and 25 h; at 25 h pH and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured. Results Growth of F. nucleatum to >108 cfu/mL at 25 h confirmed anaerobiosis. All bacteria grew in the anaerobic liquid medium and the addition of MES buffer had negligible effect on growth. L. crispatus and L. gasseri produced significant acidification and a corresponding reduction in growth of N. gonorrhoeae. This inhibition was abrogated by the addition of MES. L. jensenii produced less acidification and did not inhibit N. gonorrhoeae. Hydrogen peroxide was not detected in any experiment. Conclusions During anaerobic growth, inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae by the vaginal lactobacilli tested was primarily due to acidification and abrogated by the presence of a buffer. There was no evidence of a specific mechanism of inhibition other than acid production under these conditions and, in particular, hydrogen peroxide was

  12. Probiotic Yoghurts From Ultrafiltered Concentrated Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Kozludzhova Siyka; Goranov Bogdan; Boyanova Petya; Yanakieva Velichka; Dushkova Mariya; Dinkov Kolyo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, yoghurts from ultrafiltered concentrated whole milk with a volume reduction ratio 0, 2 and 3 with three different probiotic yoghurt starters were obtained. Their physiological, microbiological and rheological properties were examined. The concentrated probiotic yoghurts had high concentration of viable cells of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (over 1010cfu/cm3). For the preparation of concentrated probiotic yoghurts the most appropriate volume red...

  13. Immunomodulation and anticancer potentials of yogurt probiotic

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Alok; Mishra, Vijendra Kumar; Mohammad, Ghulam

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microbial food ingredients that produce several beneficial ef-fects to human health. Probiotic bacteria have been mostly investigated in the prevention and treatment of different gastrointestinal diseases and allergies. Probiotic products, however, are usually consumed by the general, healthy population but not much is known on their immu-nomodulatory effects in healthy adults. It is not fully clear how probiotics exert their benefi-cial effects on health, but o...

  14. Selection of lactic acid bacteria from Brazilian kefir grains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanirati, Débora Ferreira; Abatemarco, Mário; Sandes, Sávio Henrique de Cicco; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini; Neumann, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian kefir is a homemade fermented beverage that is obtained by incubating milk or a brown sugar solution with kefir grains that contribute their different microbiological compositions. It is highly important to isolate and characterize microorganisms from Brazilian kefir grains to obtain starter cultures for the industrial production of a standardized commercial kefir. Thus, the present study aimed to isolate lactic acid bacteria from eight kefir grains that were propagated in milk or sugar solutions from five different locations in Brazil and to select Lactobacillus isolates based on desirable in vitro probiotic properties. One hundred eight isolates from both substrates were identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and/or 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were determined to belong to the following 11 species from the genera: Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus (L.), and Oenococcus. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus kefiri, and Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens were isolated only from milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus perolens, Lactobacillus parafarraginis, Lactobacillus diolivorans, and Oenococcus oeni were isolated exclusively from sugar water grains. When the microbial compositions of four kefir grains were evaluated with culture-independent analyses, L. kefiranofaciens was observed to predominant in milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus hilgardii was most abundant in sugar water kefir. Unfortunately, L. hilgardii was not isolated from any grain, although this bacteria was detected with a culture-independent methodology. Fifty-two isolated Lactobacilli were tested for gastric juice and bile salt tolerance, antagonism against pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and surface hydrophobicity. Three Lactobacillus strains (L. kefiranofaciens 8U, L. diolivorans 1Z, and Lactobacillus casei 17U) could be classified as potential probiotics. In conclusion, several lactic acid bacteria that could be used in combination with yeasts as starter

  15. An overview of probiotics and prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Gareth C

    This article reviews the origins and background of probiotics. Evidence for the potential mechanisms of probiotics and prebiotics, and their interactions with the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system are discussed. Evidence is examined for the use of probiotics to treat infantile diarrhoea, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and atopic dermatitis.

  16. 林蛙肠道内容物中乳酸菌的分离与鉴定%Isolation and Identification of Lactobacilli from the Contents in Intestinal Tract of Rana cheinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯磊; 李洋; 袁敦良; 王立杰; 马程远

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]The research aimed to discuss the suitable lactobacilli for tadpole. [ Method]Lactobacilli were isolated from the content of intestinal tract in different species of Rana chinensis and identified by biochemical test. [Result]Three strains of bacteria were successfully isolated from the content of intestinal tract of R. chinensis. Through Gram staining and biochemical identification, the three strains of bacteria were confirmed as the same species of Streptococcus lactis. [ Conclusion] The research could provide good bacteria for preparing probiotics preparations and oral vaccines.%[目的]探索适用于蝌蚪的乳酸菌.[方法]从不同林蛙肠道内容物中分离乳酸菌,并对其进行生化鉴定.[结果]成功从林蛙肠道内容物中分离出3株细菌.通过革兰氏染色和生化鉴定,可确定这3株细菌为同一种乳酸链球菌.[结论]该研究可为益生素类制剂和口服疫苗的制备提供优良的菌种.

  17. Effective survival of immobilized Lactobacillus casei during ripening and heat treatment of probiotic dry-fermented sausages and investigation of the microbial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidira, Marianthi; Karapetsas, Athanasios; Galanis, Alex; Kanellaki, Maria; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2014-02-01

    The aim was the assessment of immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat in the production of probiotic dry-fermented sausages and the investigation of the microbial dynamics. For comparison, sausages containing either free L. casei ATCC 393 or no starter culture were also prepared. During ripening, the numbers of lactobacilli exceeded 7 log cfu/g, while a drastic decrease was observed in enterobacteria, staphylococci and pseudomonas counts. Microbial diversity was further studied applying a PCR-DGGE protocol. Members of Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, Carnobacterium, Brochothrix, Bacillus and Debaryomyces were the main microbial populations detected. Microbiological and strain-specific multiplex PCR analysis confirmed that the levels of L. casei ATCC 393 in the samples after 66 days of ripening were above the minimum concentration for conferring a probiotic effect (≥ 6 log cfu/g). However, after heat treatment, this strain was detected at the above levels, only in sausages containing immobilized cells.

  18. Probiotics and infantile atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akelma AZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Zülfikar Akelma,1 Aziz Alper Biten2 1Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Unit, Ankara Kecioren Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2General Directorate of Management Services, Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Pediatric eczema is a common disease which causes economic and social burden. Its incidence differs among the societies, with an incidence reported to reach up to 20% in developed countries. Eczema is the first allergic disease seen in the childhood, and it is recognized as a precursor for the development of atopic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in the forthcoming years of children. Increased incidence of eczema in recent years has led to new research in epidemiology, prevention, and intervention of this disease. It is no doubt important to treat itching, rash, and excoriation of the skin; however, treatment of pediatric eczema should not be considered only as a treatment of skin lesions. Considering skin treatment as the tip of the iceberg, proper management of the allergic processes can be accepted as the rest of the iceberg. The role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic eczema is yet to be clarified. Evidence presented by existing studies suggesting that probiotics may prevent pediatric eczema is not strong enough. A positive effect, if any, may be related with onset time, dose, duration, and use of specific probiotics. To date, there is no strong evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of eczema; however, administration of probiotics in breast-feeding mothers in the prenatal period and in infants in the postnatal period can be accepted as a safe and helpful option in the prevention of eczema. Nevertheless, there are still questions to be answered in the future about probiotic administration for eczema. Clinical use of probiotics will gradually become more widespread when these questions are answered. Based on current information, the administration

  19. Role of Indigenous Lactobacilli in Gastrin-Mediated Acid Production in the Mouse Stomach ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Takashi; Kumaki, Nobue; Asami, Yukio; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the stomach is colonized by indigenous lactobacilli in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the role of such lactobacilli in the development of the stomach. For a DNA microarray analysis, germ-free BALB/c mice were orally inoculated with 109 CFU lactobacilli, and their stomachs were excised after 10 days to extract RNA. As a result, lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice showed dramatically decreased expression of the gastrin gene in comparison to germ-free mice. The mean of the log2 fold change in the gastrin gene was −4.3. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated the number of gastrin-positive (gastrin+) cells to be significantly lower in the lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice than in the germ-free mice. However, there was no significant difference in the number of somatostatin+ cells in these groups of mice. Consequently, gastric acid secretion also decreased in the mice colonized by lactobacilli. In addition, an increase in the expression of the genes related to muscle system development, such as nebulin and troponin genes, was observed in lactobacillus-associated mice. Moreover, infection of germ-free mice with Helicobacter pylori also showed the down- and upregulation of gastrin and muscle genes, respectively, in the stomach. These results thus suggested that indigenous lactobacilli in the stomach significantly affect the regulation of gastrin-mediated gastric acid secretion without affecting somatostatin secretion in mice, while H. pylori also exerts such an effect on the stomach. PMID:21803885

  20. Practical approaches to probiotics use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, Amel; Comelli, Elena M

    2014-08-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms exerting beneficial effects on the host. They can be ingested through foods or supplements and their inclusion in these products is regulated in Canada by the Health Canada Health Products and Food Branch. The aim of this article is to summarize current evidence from randomized controlled trials and guidelines from Health Canada, the World Health Organization, and internationally recognized expert committees in the hope that it will help practitioners and professionals recommending probiotics to healthy and diseased patients, with a focus on the Canadian setting. From a general perspective, probiotics can be recommended for prevention of diseases that are associated to altered intestinal ecology. Specifically, they can be recommended for prevention of upper respiratory tract infections and pouchitis, for prevention and management of necrotizing enterocolitis, bacterial vaginosis and antibiotic associated diarrhea, including Clostridium difficile infection, and for treatment of atopic eczema in cow's milk allergy and of infectious diarrhea. Additional substantiated probiotic benefits include prevention of hypercholesterolemia, management of constipation, reduction of recurrent urinary tract infections, improvement of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and reduction of antibiotics side effects in Helicobacter pylori eradication. Because probiotics are generally recognized as safe and can be removed with antimicrobial agents, their use should be considered in patients of all ages.

  1. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on lipid profiles in pregnant women: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Zatollah; Samimi, Mansoreh; Tabasi, Zohreh; Talebian, Parisa; Azarbad, Zohreh; Hydarzadeh, Zahra; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2012-09-01

    Due to enhanced fat storage primarily during the mid-pregnancy period, pregnancy is associated with elevated levels of lipid profiles. To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum lipid profiles in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on lipid profiles of Iranian pregnant women. This randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial was performed among 70 pregnant women, primigravida, aged 18-30 years old who were carrying singleton pregnancy at their third trimester. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume 200 g/d of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10(7) colony-forming units. The conventional yoghurt contained the starter cultures of S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-weeks intervention to measure serum lipid profiles. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks had been resulted in a significant reduction in serum total- (-53.7 mg/dL, p=0.001), LDL- (-35.2 mg/dL, p=0.006) and HDL-cholesterol levels (-9.8 mg/dL, p=0.002) as well as serum triglyceride concentrations (-42.8 mg/dL, p=0.029), no significant differences were found comparing probiotic and conventional yogurts in terms of their effect on serum lipid profiles. Within-Group differences in conventional yogurt group revealed a significant reduction in HDL-cholesterol levels (-8.4 mg/dL, p=0.005) and borderline significant reduction in serum total cholesterol concentrations (-21.6 mg/dL, p=0.08). In conclusion, consumption of probiotic yogurt among pregnant

  2. Review: The market of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2015-11-01

    The advertising of probiotics in diary products on the market has claimed several health-improving properties, including prevention and treatment of obesity, cardiovascular diseases and cancer prophylaxis, osteoporosis and arthritis treatment, diabetes management and control of hypercholesterolemia. Therefore, it is reasonable to emphasize the perspective of a new self-care and integrative medicine season, where food industry is turned to research-oriented management with putative clinical goals to be achieved. We searched Pubmed/Medline using the terms "probiotics" and "market". Selected papers until 2013 were chosen on the basis of their content (clinical evidence-based quality). We performed an accurate investigation on the so-called "probiotic market", leading to better understanding the role of nutraceutical products in the human clinical nutrition physiology. As nutraceutical products are sold all over the world, information, provided by this review may be useful to evaluate their potential impact on human health.

  3. Short term effect of mechanical plaque control on salivary concentration of S. mutans and lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, S

    1986-08-01

    All visible plaque was professionally removed from teeth of 40 children who were highly infected with S. mutans and lactobacilli. Shortly before and after the removal of plaque the concentrations of those bacteria were assessed in saliva stimulated by chewing. S. mutans and lactobacilli correlated well at baseline but not after plaque elimination, e.g. more than 80% of children who were heavily infected with S. mutans could be identified by a lactobacillus test at baseline. After the elimination of plaque, the mean concentration of S. mutans dropped by 64% but lactobacilli remained unchanged. The results indicate that oral hygiene measures taken by the patient prior to sampling of saliva may mask the true concentration of salivary S. mutans and complicate the identification of high caries risk patients.

  4. Simplified sampling methods for estimating levels of lactobacilli in saliva in dental clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabre, P; Martinsson, T; Gahnberg, L

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether estimation of lactobacilli was possible with simplified saliva sampling methods. Dentocult LB (Orion Diagnostica AB, Trosa, Sweden) was used to estimate the number of lactobacilli in saliva sampled by 3 different methods from 96 individuals: (i) Collecting and pouring stimulated saliva over a Dentocult dip-slide; (ii) direct licking of the Dentocult LB dip-slide; (iii) contaminating a wooden spatula with saliva and pressing against the Dentocult dip-slide. The first method was in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and selected as the 'gold standard'; the other 2 methods were compared with this result. The 2 simplified methods for estimating levels of lactobacilli in saliva showed good reliability and specificity. Sensitivity, defined as the ability to detect individuals with a high number of lactabacilli in saliva, was sufficient for the licking method (85%), but significantly reduced for the wooden spatula method (52%).

  5. Probiotics in oral health--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yadav; Lingamneni, Benhur; Reddy, Deepika

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are dietary supplements containing potentially beneficial bacteria or yeasts. Probiotics are live microorganisms thought to be beneficial to the host organism and, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria are the most common types of microbes used as probiotics. Probiotics strengthen the immune system to combat allergies, stress, exposure to toxic substances and other diseases. There are reports of beneficial use in HIV infections and cancers.These products help in stimulating oral health promoting flora, and suppress the pathologic colonization and disease spread. Probiotics can be bacteria, molds and yeast, but most probiotics are bacteria. In recent years, there has been a lot of interest in the use of probiotics in maintaining good oral health and treating oral infections. Their use in premalignant and malignant oral disorders is yet to be probed.

  6. The status of probiotics supplementation during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noroyono Wibowo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been known for their use in medical field for quite a long time. Strong evidences are now available for the use of probiotics in clinical setting. One of the current issues on this topic is the use of probiotics in pregnancy. Recent studies showed that probiotics may be safe and beneficial for prenatal supplementation. In this review, we highlighted several proven use of probiotics supplementation in pregnant women. A few selected strains of probiotics showed promising outcome to prevent preterm labor and preeclampsia, and to reduce atopic eczema but not asthma and wheezing, in offspring of women who had prenatal probiotics supplementation. The mechanism of action responsible for this effect is closely related to the regulation of T cells, although the exact pathways are not defined yet.

  7. Probiotics to adolescents with obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøbel, Rikke Juul; Larsen, Nadja; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The connections between gut microbiota, energy homeostasis, and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized. We aimed to investigate the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33 on a series of biomarkers related to in...... to inflammation and the metabolic syndrome (MS) in adolescents with obesity.......The connections between gut microbiota, energy homeostasis, and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized. We aimed to investigate the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33 on a series of biomarkers related...

  8. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licciardi Paul V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of healthy mucosal immune responses. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that have the capacity to alter the composition of bacterial species in the intestine that can in turn influence the production of fermentation-derived metabolites. Principal among these metabolites are the short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate that have potent anti-inflammatory activities important in regulating immune function at the intestinal mucosal surface. Therefore strategies aimed at restoring the microbiota profile may be effective in the prevention or treatment of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis Probiotic bacteria have diverse effects including altering microbiota composition, regulating epithelial cell barrier function and modulating of immune responses. The precise molecular mechanisms mediating these probiotic effects are not well understood. Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors important in the epigenetic control of host cell responses. It is hypothesized that the biological function of probiotics may be a result of epigenetic modifications that may explain the wide range of effects observed. Studies delineating the effects of probiotics on short-chain fatty acid production and the epigenetic actions of short-chain fatty acids will assist in understanding the association between microbiota and allergic or autoimmune disorders. Testing the hypothesis We propose that treatment with

  9. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOECONOMIC REASONABILITY OF USING PROBIOTIC ENTEROCOCCUS STRAIN FOR THE COMPLEX DEVELOPMENTAL CARE PROGRAM FOR PREMATURE INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Gonchar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Possibilities of using probiotic enterococci in premature neonates undergoing inpatient antibacterial therapy remains understudied. The article is aimed at analyzing clinical and pharmacoeconomic reasonability of using probiotic Enterococcus faecium L3 strain in premature infants with very low body weight in the framework of complex inpatient developmental care. Patients and methods. 55 children randomized into 2 groups were observed: the control group (n = 26 was undergoing standard developmental care program, the primary group (n = 29 was introduced liquid probiotic Enterococcus faecium L3 strain (titer — 108 CFU/ml or more (0.5 ml TID for 14 days after attaining the enteral feeding volume of 5.0 ml. Results. Analysis of the clinical symptoms characteristic of non-smooth course of developmental care over premature infants helped to reveal higher frequency of infectious complications in the control group children than in the primary group (14 [53.8%] vs. 6 [20.7%]; p < 0.05. Acute food intolerance was observed less frequently in the primary group than in the control group (6 [20.7%] vs. 10 [38.5%], p > 0.05. The primary group's children featured significant decrease in the frequency of monocytosis, positive changes of intestinal microbiotic composition (increase in the amount of bifidum bacteria, lactobacilli, enterococci, decrease in the amount of Clostridium difficile and antibiotic-resistant clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. Conclusion. Favorable outcome of developmental care over premature infants (absence of infectious complications was less expensive in the primary group's children.

  10. Isolation and Identification of three Lactobacilli and Research on Antimicrobia Activity in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; XU Li

    2009-01-01

    Collected from the broiler cecal contents, bacteria were isolated and purified. These isolated and purified Lactobacilli were detected by acidity and bile salt tolerant test, then three better tolerant strains were screened out. These three strains were conducted to observe the morphous through microscope, perform Gram stain, and to identify their physiological and biochemical characteristics. The results showed that L1 was L.casei, L2 was L.gasseri and L3 was L.graminis. With Oxford Cup mcthod, these three Lactobacilli were detected for their bacteriostasis. Results showed that L1, L2 and L3 strains had strong antibacterial activities to E. coli and Salmonella.

  11. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Miller

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N=21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli abundance. We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4 to 7.8. Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99. Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  12. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Beasley, DeAnna E; Dunn, Robert R; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4-7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  13. Lactobacilli differentially modulate expression of cytokines and maturation surface markers in murine dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne; Pestka, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    with greatest capacity to induce IL-12 were most effective. Remarkably, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM12246, a poor IL-12 inducer, inhibited IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-alpha induction by the otherwise strong cytokine inducer L. casei CHCC3139, while IL-10 production remained unaltered. In analogous fashion, L. reuteri...... in the capacity to induce IL-12 and TNF-a production in the DC. Similar but less pronounced differences were observed among lactobacilli in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10. Although all strains up-regulated surface MHC class II and B7-2 (CD86), which is indicative of DC maturation, those lactobacilli...

  14. Presence of lactobacilli in the intestinal content of freshwater fish from a river and from a farm with a recirculation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucio Galindo, A.; Hartemink, R.; Schrama, J.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram-positive and catalase negative rods commonly found in lactic acid fermented foods and in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds. Few studies have described lactobacilli in freshwater fish. We analysed the presence of lactobacilli in the intestines of young and adult fr

  15. Effect of Probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UBL S22 and Prebiotic Fructo-oligosaccharide on Serum Lipids, Inflammatory Markers, Insulin Sensitivity, and Gut Bacteria in Healthy Young Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Single-Blind Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Kumar, Manoj; Das, Nilita; Kumar, S Nishanth; Challa, Hanumanth R; Nagpal, Ravinder

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of 6-week supplementation of a probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius UBL S22 with or without prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on serum lipid profiles, immune responses, insulin sensitivity, and gut lactobacilli in 45 healthy young individuals. The patients were divided into 3 groups (15/group), that is, placebo, probiotic, and synbiotic. After 6 weeks, a significant reduction (P cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides and increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed in the probiotic as well as in the synbiotic group when compared to placebo; however, the results of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were more pronounced in the synbiotic group. Similarly, when compared to the placebo group, the serum concentrations of inflammatory markers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α were significantly (P counts of total lactobacilli and a decrease (P coliforms and Escherichia coli was observed in both the experimental groups after 6 weeks of ingestion. Overall, the combination of L salivarius with FOS was observed to be more beneficial than L salivarius alone, thereby advocating that such synbiotic combinations could be therapeutically exploited for improved health and quality of life.

  16. Isolation, enumeration, molecular identification and probiotic potential evaluation of lactic acid bacteria isolated from sheep milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B. Acurcio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria species were molecularly identified in milk from Lacaune, Santa Inês and crossbred sheep breeds and their in vitro probiotic potential was evaluated. The species identified were Enterococcus faecium (56.25%, E. durans (31.25% and E. casseliflavus (12.5%. No other lactic acid bacteria species, such as lactobacilli, was identified. Most of the isolated enterococci were resistant to gastric pH (2.0 and to 0.3% oxgall. All tested enterococci were resistant to ceftazidime, oxacillin and streptomycin and sensible to clindamycin, erythromycin and penicillin. The resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline and vancomycin varied among tested species. All tested enterococci strongly inhibited (P<0.05 Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, moderately inhibited E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus and did not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium and also one E. durans sample isolated from sheep milk. Four samples of E. faecium, one of E. durans and one of E. casseliflavus presented the best probiotic potential.

  17. Isolation, identification and physiological study of Lactobacillus fermentum LPB for use as probiotic in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reque Elizete de F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to isolate and identify microorganisms for probiotic use for chickens. Selection of strains included various criteria such as agreement with bio-safety aspects, viability during storage, tolerance to low pH/ gastric juice, bile, and antimicrobial activity. The strains were isolated from the crop, proventriculus, gizzard, ileum and caeca of chicken. Decimal dilution of the contents of these segments were mixed with MRS medium and incubated for 48 h at 37°C under anaerobiosis. The identity of the culture was based on characteristics of lactobacilli as presented in the Bergey?s Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, carrying out bacterioscopy (morphology, Gram stain, growth at 15 and 45°C, and fermentation of different carbon sources. Based on these criteria, Lactobacillus fermentum LPB was identified and tested for probiotic use for chickens. The isolate was evaluated for poultry feeds supplement. The results showed that in comparison to the presence and effects of antibiotics, L. fermentum LPB implantation resulted in a similar effect as that of antibiotics manifested by feed efficiency in growth of chicks.

  18. Survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotic strains in peach jam during storage at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Lucia Randazzo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The survival of six probiotic wild strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was compared with that of a type strain during 78 days of storage at 25 and 5 ºC in peach synthetic medium (PSM and commercial peach jam (PJ. Changes in viable cell counts, pH values, sugar content, and colour parameters were monitored. All strains exhibited better performances in PJ than in PSM, showing count values higher than 7 Log cfu g-1 up to 78 days of storage at 5 ºC. Almost all wild strains remained above the critical value of 6 Log cfu g-1 in samples stored at 25 ºC up to 45 days, while the Lb. rhamnosus GG type strain, used as control, was not able to survive later than 15 days. In the synthetic medium used, the strains showed better survival in the samples incubated at 25 ºC, remaining viable above the critical level up to 45 days of storage, except for the strain H12. The probiotic cultures added to jam did not significantly change the colour parameters of the product; however the metabolism of lactobacilli did cause changes in the pH and in the composition of sugars.

  19. Effect of Probiotic (VSL#3 and Omega-3 on Lipid Profile, Insulin Sensitivity, Inflammatory Markers, and Gut Colonization in Overweight Adults: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of probiotic (VSL#3 and omega-3 fatty acid on insulin sensitivity, blood lipids, and inflammation, we conducted a clinical trial in 60 overweight (BMI>25, healthy adults, aged 40–60 years. After initial screening the subjects were randomized into four groups with 15 per group. The four groups received, respectively, placebo, omega-3 fatty acid, probiotic VSL#3, or both omega-3 and probiotic, for 6 weeks. Blood and fecal samples were collected at baseline and after 6 weeks. The probiotic (VSL#3 supplemented group had significant reduction in total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and VLDL and had increased HDL (P<0.05 value. VSL#3 improved insulin sensitivity (P<0.01, decreased hsCRP, and favorably affected the composition of gut microbiota. Omega-3 had significant effect on insulin sensitivity and hsCRP but had no effect on gut microbiota. Addition of omega-3 fatty acid with VSL#3 had more pronounced effect on HDL, insulin sensitivity and hsCRP. Subjects with low HDL, insulin resistance, and high hsCRP had significantly lower total lactobacilli and bifidobacteria count and higher E. coli and bacteroides count.

  20. Assessment of efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of atopic dermatitis%益生菌治疗成人特应性皮炎疗效评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜丽亚; 郭震; 戴景斌; 赵炳波

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价益生菌治疗成人特应性皮炎( AD)的疗效。方法:40例AD患者随机分为A组和B组,A组给予抗组胺药、0.05%地奈德乳膏及益生菌制剂,B组仅给予抗组胺药和0.05%地奈德乳膏,两组均治疗12周。20名健康者作为对照。治疗前、后及治疗后2个月用SCORAD和VAS法进行病情评分,并用PCR荧光定量法检测受试者粪便中的细菌水平。结果:治疗结束时,A组、B组评分较治疗前均显著降低(P<0.01);停药2个月时,A组评分仍低于治疗前(P<0.01),而此时B组评分与治疗前相比无统计学差异。治疗前A、B组双歧杆菌及乳酸杆菌的数量明显低于健康对照组(P<0.01)。治疗结束及停药2个月时,A组两种杆菌较治疗前均显著增加(P<0.01),B组两种杆菌较治疗前均无显著差异。结论:益生菌可通过增加肠道双歧杆菌及乳酸杆菌菌群而改善病情并延缓复发。%Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of probiotics for the treatment of adult AD patients. Methods:Forty patients were enrolled in this study and divided into two groups:the patients in the probiotics group were treated with antihistamine,topical steroid and probiotics. The patients in the non-probiotics group were treated with antihistamine and topical steroid only. The course of the treatment was 12 weeks. Twenty healthy people were used as control. The disease severity was assessed by SCORAD and VAS score at base-line,week 12 and month 2 after stopping the treatment. The change in fecal microbiota was detected by PCR. Results:The SCORAD and VAS scores were significantly reduced in the two groups ( P<0.01) after the treat-ment,compared with those before the treatment. At month 2 after stopping the treatment, the SCORAD and VAS scores continued to be lower than those at baseline in the probiotics group ( P<0.01),but not in the non-probiotics group. Before the treatment, the amount of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacilli in

  1. Protective Effects of a Novel Probiotic Strain of Lactobacillus plantarum JSA22 from Traditional Fermented Soybean Food Against Infection by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Song, Jin; Choi, Hye Sun

    2015-04-01

    Lactobacillus species have been shown to enhance intestinal epithelial barrier function, modulate host immune responses, and suppress the growth of pathogenic bacteria, yeasts, molds, and viruses. Thus, lactobacilli have been used as probiotics for treating various diseases, including intestinal disorders, and as biological preservatives in the food and agricultural industries. However, the molecular mechanisms used by lactobacilli to suppress pathogenic bacterial infections have been poorly characterized. We previously isolated Lactobacillus plantarum JSA22 from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, which possessed high enzymatic, fibrinolytic, and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens. In this study, we investigated the effects of L. plantarum JSA22 on the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium-induced cytotoxicity by stimulating the host immune response in intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that coincubation of S. Typhimurium and L. plantarum JSA22 with intestinal epithelial cells suppressed S. Typhimurium infection, S. Typhimurium-induced NF-kappaB activation, and IL-8 production, and lowered the phosphorylation of both Akt and p38. These data indicated that L. plantarum JSA22 has probiotic properties, and can inhibit S. Typhimurium infection of intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings can be used to develop therapeutic and prophylactic agents against pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  3. Prophylactic Probiotics for Preterm Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rie; Greisen, Gorm; Schrøder, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major morbidity and cause of mortality in preterm neonates. Probiotics seem to have a beneficial role in preventing NEC, which is confirmed in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We therefore aimed to review and confirm the effica...

  4. African fermented foods and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Mathara, Julius Maina; Abriouel, Hikmate; Benomar, Nabil; Reid, Gregor; Galvez, Antonio; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2014-11-03

    Africa has an age old history of production of traditional fermented foods and is perhaps the continent with the richest variety of lactic acid fermented foods. These foods have a large impact on the nutrition, health and socio-economy of the people of the continent, often plagued by war, drought, famine and disease. Sub-Saharan Africa is the world's region with the highest percentage of chronically malnourished people and high child mortality. Further developing of traditional fermented foods with added probiotic health features would be an important contribution towards reaching the UN Millennium Development Goals of eradication of poverty and hunger, reduction in child mortality rates and improvement of maternal health. Specific probiotic strains with documented health benefits are sparsely available in Africa and not affordable to the majority of the population. Furthermore, they are not used in food fermentations. If such probiotic products could be developed especially for household food preparation, such as cereal or milk foods, it could make a profound impact on the health and well-being of adults and children. Suitable strains need to be chosen and efforts are needed to produce strains to make products which will be available for clinical studies. This can gauge the impact of probiotics on consumers' nutrition and health, and increase the number of people who can benefit.

  5. PROBIOTICS BASED ON TRANSGENIC MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. А. Starovoitova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern tendencies of recombinant microorganisms creation for obtaining on their basis a new effective biopreparations (probiotics with wider spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties were considered. A lot of attention was focused on the main genera of perspective bacteria for creation of recombinant probiotics particularly: Lactococcus, Bifidobac terium,Bacillus, Escherichia. The main created Ukrainian and foreign gene-modified strains, that are widely used today in creation of effective recombinant biopreparations were characterized. Some fundamental directions and methods of gene-modified strains obtaining, which are used in getting effective biopreparations that used for therapy and prophylactic illness were reported, under which this group of pharmaceutical drugs were not used earlier. The safety matters of probiotics using on basis of genemodified strains were examined. Medical and veterinary biopreparations on basis of recombinant microorganisms could be used directly and effectively for therapy and prophylaxis of different illness, beginning from disbacteriosis up to cardiovascular diseases. It is related with some probiotic microorganisms ability for lowering of serum cholesterol at the host organism.

  6. The use of probiotics in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, N V

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to present comprehensive notes for the use of probiotics in aquaculture. Probiotics have been proven to be positive promoters of aquatic animal growth, survival and health. In aquaculture, intestines, gills, the skin mucus of aquatic animals, and habitats or even culture collections and commercial products, can be sources for acquiring appropriate probiotics, which have been identified as bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) and nonbacteria (bacteriophages, microalgae and yeasts). While a bacterium is a pathogen to one aquatic animal, it can bring benefits to another fish species; a screening process plays a significant role in making a probiotic species specific. The administration of probiotics varies from oral/water routine to feed additives, of which the latter is commonly used in aquaculture. Probiotic applications can be either mono or multiple strains, or even in combination with prebiotic, immunostimulants such as synbiotics and synbiotism, and in live or dead forms. Encapsulating probiotics with live feed is a suitable approach to convey probiotics to aquatic animals. Dosage and duration of time are significant factors in providing desired results. Several modes of actions of probiotics are presented, while some others are not fully understood. Suggestions for further studies on the effects of probiotics in aquaculture are proposed. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with probiotics. An etiopathogenic approach at last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixquert Jiménez, M

    2009-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional digestive disorder, and may affect 11-20% of the adult population in industrialized countries. In accordance with Rome III criteria (2006) IBS involves abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbance, which are not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Several hypotheses attempt to account for the pathophysiology of IBS, but the etiology still remains uncertain or obscure, perhaps multifactorial. Abnormalities in colonic microflora have recently been suggested in such patients, as has abnormal small-intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), or in particular a significant reduction in the amount of intraluminal Bifidobacteria or Lactobacilli, with consequences like the production of colonic gas, and motility or sensitivity disturbances of the intestinal tract. The disorder is difficult to treat, and the wide spectrum of non-drug and drug treatments shows our ignorance about the cause of the condition. Newer drugs, both pro- and anti-serotonin, have failed to show long-term efficacy or have been withdrawn due to concerns about harmful effects. Recent research has provided increasing support for the idea that disturbances of intestinal microbiota occur in patients with IBS, and that such abnormalities may contribute to IBS symptoms. Studies in Scandinavian countries in the last ten years emphasize the role of probiotics in the modulation of intestinal microbiota, and as a consequence in the regulation of the motility and hypersensitivity of the digestive tract. Although results between studies are difficult to compare because of differences in study design, probiotic dose, strain, and duration of therapy, some studies show symptom improvement. Lactobacilli are found among the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointestinal tract, and Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp) is one of the species frequently isolated from the human mucosa, which is capable of surviving the low pH of the stomach and duodenum

  8. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with probiotics: An etiopathogenic approach at last?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bixquert Jiménez

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is the most common functional digestive disorder, and may affect 11-20% of the adult population in industrialized countries. In accordance with Rome III criteria (2006 IBS involves abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbance, which are not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Several hypotheses attempt to account for the pathophysiology of IBS, but the etiology still remains uncertain or obscure, perhaps multifactorial. Abnormalities in colonic microflora have recently been suggested in such patients, as has abnormal small-intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO, or in particular a significant reduction in the amount of intraluminal Bifidobacteria or Lactobacilli, with consequences like the production of colonic gas, and motility or sensitivity disturbances of the intestinal tract. The disorder is difficult to treat, and the wide spectrum of non-drug and drug treatments shows our ignorance about the cause of the condition. Newer drugs, both pro- and anti-serotonin, have failed to show long-term efficacy or have been withdrawn due to concerns about harmful effects. Recent research has provided increasing support for the idea that disturbances of intestinal microbiota occur in patients with IBS, and that such abnormalities may contribute to IBS symptoms. Studies in Scandinavian countries in the last ten years emphasize the role of probiotics in the modulation of intestinal microbiota, and as a consequence in the regulation of the motility and hypersensitivity of the digestive tract. Although results between studies are difficult to compare because of differences in study design, probiotic dose, strain, and duration of therapy, some studies show symptom improvement. Lactobacilli are found among the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointestinal tract, and Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp is one of the species frequently isolated from the human mucosa, which is capable of surviving the low pH of the stomach and

  9. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus Reduces Organophosphate Pesticide Absorption and Toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, Mark; McDowell, Tim W; Daisley, Brendan A; Ali, Sohrab N; Leong, Hon S; Sumarah, Mark W; Reid, Gregor

    2016-10-15

    major societal concern. Although the long-term effects of low-dose pesticide exposure for humans and wildlife remain largely unknown, logic suggests that these chemicals are not aligned with ecosystem health. This observation is most strongly supported by the agricultural losses associated with honeybee population declines, known as colony collapse disorder, in which pesticide usage is a likely trigger. Lactobacilli are bacteria used as beneficial microorganisms in fermented foods and have shown potentials to sequester and degrade environmental toxins. This study demonstrated that commonly used probiotic strains of lactobacilli could sequester, but not metabolize, organophosphate pesticides (parathion and chlorpyrifos). This Lactobacillus-mediated sequestration was associated with decreased intestinal absorption and insect toxicity in appropriate models. These findings hold promise for supplementing human, livestock, or apiary foods with probiotic microorganisms to reduce organophosphate pesticide exposure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Y Z 5 Things To Know About Probiotics Share: Probiotics are live microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are ... microorganisms, you might have a better understanding of probiotics. The body, especially the lower gastrointestinal tract (the ...

  11. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity.

  12. Effect of Calcium Supplementation on Growth, Nutrient Digestibility and Fecal Lactobacilli in Dairy Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yuangklang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Based on earlier studies in veal calves and rats, the hypothesis tested was that high calcium intakes by ruminating dairy calves reduce fat digestibility, but do not affect growth performance due to enhanced colonization of the intestine with lactobacilli. Approach: In dairy calves that were fed on a combination of milk replacer, concentrate on grass hay, the effects of supplemental calcium on growth, nutrient digestibility and fecal lactobacilli were studied. Four concentrates with different levels of calcium were used. Results: Final body weight and weight gain were raised by the calcium level in the concentrate in a dose-dependent, linear fashion. Apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and crude fat were not influenced by the level of calcium in the concentrate. The number of fecal lactobacilli was significantly increased by higher dietary calcium levels, the effect having a linear trend. Calcium intake did not change the number of fecal E. coli. The apparent absorptions of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium were lowered in a linear, dose-dependent fashion by the calcium level in the concentrate. Conclusion: Increased calcium intakes stimulate weight gain in dairy calves fed a combination of milk replacer, concentrate and grass hay. This calcium effect may be related to an enhanced colonization of the intestine with lactobacilli.

  13. Sample handling factors affecting the enumeration of lactobacilli and cellulolytic bacteria in equine feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives were to compare media types and evaluate the effects of fecal storage time and temperature on the enumeration of cellulolytic bacteria and lactobacilli from horses. Fecal samples were collected from horses (n = 3) and transported to the lab (CO2, 37 ºC, 0.5 h). The samples were assign...

  14. Lactobacillus hayakitensis, L. equigenerosi and L. equi, predominant lactobacilli in the intestinal flora of healthy thoroughbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Nakano, Akiyo; Shimazu, Mitsuharu; Toh, Hidehiro; Nakajima, Fumihiko; Nagayama, Masahiro; Hisamatsu, Shin; Kato, Yukio; Takagi, Misako; Takami, Hideto; Akita, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Minoru; Masaoka, Toshio; Murakami, Masaru

    2009-06-01

    To detect the predominant lactobacilli in the intestinal flora of healthy thoroughbreds, we isolated lactobacilli from the feces of nine thoroughbreds (five males and four females; 0-15-year-old). The isolated lactobacilli comprise 17 species (37 strains), and they were classified into five groups: Lactobacillus salivarius (6 species), L. reuteri (6 species), Lactobacillus delbrueckii (3 species), L. buchneri (1 species) and L. vitulinus (1 species). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, we identified 3 other phylogenetic relatives belonging to the genus Lactobacillus. These results suggest that the intestinal flora of thoroughbreds may comprise many species of the genus Lactobacillus. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analyses of the 340-bp fragments of the 16S rRNA genes from the same nine fecal samples showed that L. hayakitensis, L. equigenerosi and L. equi are contained in all the samples, suggesting that these species are predominant lactobacilli in the intestinal flora of thoroughbreds.

  15. Effect of oregano essential oil on chicken lactobacilli and E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horosová, K; Bujnáková, D; Kmet, V

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the oregano essential oil (EO) on lactobacilli and E. coli isolated from chicken was showed in the series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of amikacin, apramycin, streptomycin, neomycin against E. coli strains increased after oral application of EO.

  16. CORRELATION BETWEEN HYDROPHOBICITY AND RESISTANCE TO NONOXYNOL-9 AND VANCOMYCIN FOR UROGENITAL ISOLATES OF LACTOBACILLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TOMECZEK, L; REID, G; CUPERUS, PL; MCGROARTY, JA; VANDERMEI, HC; BRUCE, AW; KHOURY, AE; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1992-01-01

    Seven clinical isolates of lactobacilli were found to be relatively hydrophobic with a mean water-contact angle of 66 +/- 15 degrees, and to be susceptible to 1% nonoxynol-9 and vancomycin. However, seven other strains were relatively hydrophilic with a mean water-contact angle of 32 +/- 13 degrees,

  17. ADHESION OF LACTOBACILLI TO URINARY CATHETERS AND DIAPERS - EFFECT OF SURFACE-PROPERTIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REID, G; LAM, D; BRUCE, AW; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen strains of lactobacilli were tested for their ability to adhere to commercial devices used in the urinary tract. Although it appeared that the most hydrophilic organisms adhered in highest numbers, there was no significant correlation between water contact angle and adhesiveness to catheter

  18. Cooperation between Lactococcus lactis and nonstarter lactobacilli in the formation of cheese aroma from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieronczyk, Agnieszka; Skeie, Siv; Langsrud, Thor; Yvon, Mireille

    2003-02-01

    In Gouda and Cheddar type cheeses the amino acid conversion to aroma compounds, which is a major process for aroma formation, is essentially due to lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In order to evaluate the respective role of starter and nonstarter LAB and their interactions in cheese flavor formation, we compared the catabolism of phenylalanine, leucine, and methionine by single strains and strain mixtures of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 and three mesophilic lactobacilli. Amino acid catabolism was studied in vitro at pH 5.5, by using radiolabeled amino acids as tracers. In the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, which is essential for amino acid transamination, the lactobacillus strains degraded less amino acids than L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763, and produced mainly nonaromatic metabolites. L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 produced mainly the carboxylic acids, which are important compounds for cheese aroma. However, in the reaction mixture containing glutamate, only two lactobacillus strains degraded amino acids significantly. This was due to their glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity, which produced alpha-ketoglutarate from glutamate. The combination of each of the GDH-positive lactobacilli with L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 had a beneficial effect on the aroma formation. Lactobacilli initiated the conversion of amino acids by transforming them mainly to keto and hydroxy acids, which subsequently were converted to carboxylic acids by the Lactococcus strain. Therefore, we think that such cooperation between starter L. lactis and GDH-positive lactobacilli can stimulate flavor development in cheese.

  19. Exogenous lactobacilli mitigate microbial changes associated with grain fermentation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereal grains are often included in equine diets. Sugars and starch in grains can be digested and absorbed in the small intestine, but a high proportion of grain in the diet can allow starch to reach the hindgut, disturbing the microbial ecology. Streptococci and lactobacilli both catabolize starch ...

  20. Homo- and heterofermentative lactobacilli differently affect sugarcane-based fuel ethanol fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antagonism between by yeast and lactobacilli is largely dependent on the initial population of each organism. While homo-fermentative lactobacillus present higher inhibitory effect upon yeast when in equal cell number, in industrial fuel ethanol conditions where high yeast cell densities prevail...

  1. [Efficacy of combined 5-nitroimidazole and probiotic therapy of bacterial vaginosis: randomized open trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S; Vatcheva-Dobrevski, R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to identify the clinical and microbiological effect of 5-nitroimidazol therapy for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and in combination with probiotics and the influence of such therapy upon vaginal flora. Women (n = 539) with bacterial vaginosis who meet the criteria were included in the study. They were randomized into two groups with the following therapeutic regimes: in the first group (n = 242 women) the treatment included applications of 2g BID tinidazole for two days and vaginal suppositories of 1000 mg metronidazol at day 1 and 3 (T+M). In the second group (n = 297) the women were cured with the same treatment as those in the first group. In addition to it from the fifth day of the treatment was added a topical administration of vaginal probiotic which contains species of alive lactobacilli: Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (T+M+P). The efficacy from the therapy was evaluated using the clinical compliances of the women, the data from the clinical examination and the microbiological tests results. The results showed expected increase of clinical therapy efficacy (Amsel - criteria) from 42.8% (T+M; n = 211/242) to 84.06% (T+M+P; n = 274/297) in groups and of microbiological efficacy (Nugent) from 44.7% (T+M; n = 211/242) to 83.3% (T+M+P; n = 274/297), in follow up 35-40 days from the beginning of treatment. The percentage of women with normal vaginal flora on 35-40 day after the therapy increase with 57% in the (T+M) first group while in the second group (T+M+P) with 94%. Combining the therapies of 5-nitroimidazoles and vaginal probiotic reduce bacterial vaginosis recurrence and restores permanently normal vaginal flora.

  2. Selective enumeration of probiotic microorganisms in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Reza; Mortazavian, Amir M; Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh

    2012-02-01

    Cheese is a dairy product which has a good potential for delivery of probiotic microorganisms into the human intestine. To be considered to offer probiotic health benefits, probiotics must remain viable in food products above a threshold level (e.g., 10(6) cfu g(-1)) until the time of consumption. In order to ensure that a minimal number of probiotic bacteria is present in the cheese, reliable methods for enumeration are required. The choice of culture medium for selective enumeration of probiotic strains in combination with starters depends on the product matrix, the target group and the taxonomic diversity of the bacterial background flora in the product. Enumeration protocol should be designed as a function of the target microorganism(s) to be quantified in the cheese. An overview of some series of culture media for selective enumeration of commercial probiotic cultures is presented in this review.

  3. Lactobacilli inhibit cervical cancer cell migration in vitro and reduce tumor burden in vivo through upregulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Wang, Hong; Du, Xingxing; Yu, Wenna; Jiang, Jingwen; Geng, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaobing; Fan, Xiuhua; Ma, Cuiqing

    2017-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of Lactobacillus and the potential mechanisms. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays were carried out to determine suitable doses for investigating the inhibitory effect of lactobacilli on cell migration ability of HeLa and U14 cells in vitro. In addition, western blot assays were performed to investigate the possible mechanisms corresponding to its antitumor effects. Furthermore, a xenograft mouse model was established for investigating the E-cadherin expression in tumor tissues after treatment with lactobacilli. Our results showed that live lactobacilli [multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1,000:1] significantly possessed inhibitory effects on cell migration ability of cervical cancer cells. Lactobacilli (MOI: 1,000:1) significantly upregulated E-cadherin expressions in HeLa and U14 cells (p<0.05). On the contrary, our results showed that inactivated lactobacilli could not affect the E-cadherin expression levels in HeLa and U14 cells. Similar to the western blot assay, immunohistochemistry results also indicated that lactobacilli treatment significantly upregulated E-cadherin in tumor tissues (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results above suggest that lactobacilli have the potential for inhibiting the migratory ability of cervical cancer cell lines, and the possible pharmacological mechanism may be closely related to the upregulation of E-cadherin.

  4. Probiotic high-fat dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Šebestová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis was to summarise the current knowledge about application of probiotic culture of microorganisms into high-fat food matrixes (dairy or non-dairy) and their potential for devolepment of probiotic cookies. Probiotics are defined as living microorganisms which provide specific health benefits when consumed in a certain amount. They could be consumed in the form of commercially available food with added value or as nutritional supplements. The most common strains of...

  5. The role of probiotics in digestive health

    OpenAIRE

    Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2015-01-01

    Arthur C Ouwehand Active Nutrition, DuPont Nutrition and Health, Kantvik, Finland Abstract: Although probiotics have documented health benefits outside the gastrointestinal tract, digestive health remains the key benefit for probiotics. Advances in technology have made even more in-depth analyses of the intestinal microbiota possible. Nevertheless, a healthy microbiota cannot be defined due to individual differences and changes with age. Probiotics, in general, will not cure or prevent disea...

  6. Probiotics and prebiotics: health claim substantiation

    OpenAIRE

    Salminen, Seppo; van Loveren, Henk

    2012-01-01

    ‘Probiotics’ and ‘prebiotics’ by definition should have health benefits. Health claims on microorganisms proposed as probiotics and probiotic stimulating agents (prebiotics) suggest that there is a relationship between the specific food and maintaining good health or that the food can reduce the risk of a disease. The Health Claim Regulation in European Union aims at a level consumer protection. Thereby, health claim assessment focuses on defining the probiotics and prebiotics, assessing the ...

  7. [Probiotics in gastroenterology -- from a different angle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2013-02-24

    After a short overview of the history of probiotics, the author presents the development of human intestinal microflora based on the newest genetic data and the microbiological features of main probiotics. The indications of probiotic administration have been defined and extended in recent years. The author reviews significant results of probiotic treatment in some gastrointestinal diseases based on meta-analytical data. Probiotics are useful in preventing and treating diarrhoea caused by antibiotics and Clostridium difficile caused diarrhoea. In the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, preparations containing certain Lactobacillus,Bifidobacterium strains or Saccaromyces boulardii could enhance by 5-10% the rate of successful eradication and reduce the incidence and severity of the side effects. Some symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and thus the quality of life can be improved by probiotics. Their beneficial effect in ulcerative colitis was proven, while in Crohn's disease has not yet been defined. The use of probiotics is not included in guidelines, with the exception of the Maastricht IV/Florence consensus. For each disease it is advisable to use probiotics containing strains only with proven beneficial effect. The efficiency of preparations containing mixed strains has not yet been properly investigated. The author reviews the rare but potentially serious side effects of probiotics. In Hungary, there are many probiotic preparations available which can be purchased in pharmacies without prescription: their use is more empirical than evidence-based. The European Food Safety Authority has recently rejected claims for probiotics to be classed as medicines given the lack of convincing evidence on the effects of probiotics on human health and well-being. Clearly, further research is needed to collect evidence which could be incorporated into the international guidelines.

  8. Production and Biomedical Applications of Probiotic Biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariq, Anila; Saeed, Ayesha

    2016-04-01

    Biosurfactants have been widely used for environmental and industrial applications. However, their use in medical field is still limited. Probiotic biosurfactants possess an immense antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, antitumor, and antibiofilm potential. Moreover, they have an additional advantage over conventional microbial surfactants because probiotics are an integral part of normal human microflora and their biosurfactants are innocuous to human. So, they can be effectively exploited for medicinal use. Present review is aimed to discourse the production and biomedical applications of probiotic biosurfactants.

  9. Probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Tibetan kefir grains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen Zheng

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from Tibetan kefir grains. Three Lactobacillus isolates identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus LA15, Lactobacillus plantarum B23 and Lactobacillus kefiri D17 that showed resistance to acid and bile salts were selected for further evaluation of their probiotic properties. The 3 selected strains expressed high in vitro adherence to Caco-2 cells. They were sensitive to gentamicin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol and resistant to vancomycin with MIC values of 26 µg/ml. All 3 strains showed potential bile salt hydrolase (BSH activity, cholesterol assimilation and cholesterol co-precipitation ability. Additionally, the potential effect of these strains on plasma cholesterol levels was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Rats in 4 treatment groups were fed the following experimental diets for 4 weeks: a high-cholesterol diet, a high-cholesterol diet plus LA15, a high-cholesterol diet plus B23 or a high-cholesterol diet plus D17. The total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the serum were significantly (P<0.05 decreased in the LAB-treated rats compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet without LAB supplementation. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in groups B23 and D17 were significantly (P<0.05 higher than those in the control and LA15 groups. Additionally, both fecal cholesterol and bile acid levels were significantly (P<0.05 increased after LAB administration. Fecal lactobacilli counts were significantly (P<0.05 higher in the LAB treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, the 3 strains were detected in the rat small intestine, colon and feces during the feeding trial. The bacteria levels remained high even after the LAB administration had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that these strains may be used in the future as probiotic starter cultures for

  10. An analysis of online messages about probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinich Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Internet websites are a resource for patients seeking information about probiotics. We examined a sample of 71 websites presenting probiotic information. We found that descriptions of benefits far outnumbered descriptions of risks and commercial websites presented significantly fewer risks than noncommercial websites. The bias towards the presentation of therapeutic benefits in online content suggests that patients are likely interested in using probiotics and may have unrealistic expectations for therapeutic benefit. Gastroenterologists may find it useful to initiate conversations about probiotics within the context of a comprehensive health management plan and should seek to establish realistic therapeutic expectations with their patients.

  11. Probiotics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lee E; Gogineni, Vijaya; Malesker, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate amounts, provide benefits to the host. The benefits include either a shortened duration of infections or decreased susceptibility to pathogens. Proposed mechanisms of beneficial effects include improving gastrointestinal barrier function, modification of the gut flora by inducing host cell antimicrobial peptides and/or local release of probiotic antimicrobial factors, competition for epithelial adherence, and immunomodulation. With increasing intensive care unit (ICU) antibacterial resistance rates and fewer new antibiotics in the research pipeline, focus has been shifted to non-antibiotic approaches for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections. Probiotics offer promise to ICU patients for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infections, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our current understanding of probiotics is confounded by inconsistency in probiotic strains studied, optimal dosages, study durations, and suboptimal sample sizes. Although probiotics are generally safe in the critically ill, adverse event monitoring must be rigorous in these vulnerable patients. Delineation of clinical differences of various effective probiotic strains, their mechanisms of action, and optimal dosing regimens will better establish the role of probiotics in various disorders. However, probiotic research will likely be hindered in the future given a recent ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  12. Growth of probiotic bacteria and bifidobacteria in a soy yogurt formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnworth, E R; Mainville, I; Desjardins, M-P; Gardner, N; Fliss, I; Champagne, C

    2007-05-01

    Soy beverage and cows' milk yogurts were produced with Steptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 4356) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (IM 025). The drop in pH during fermentation was faster in the soy beverage than in cows' milk, but the final pH values were similar. Yogurts were prepared with a yogurt starter in conjunction with either the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (La-1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (GG) or human derived bifidobacteria. The presence of the probiotic bacteria did not affect the growth of the yogurt strains. Approximately 2 log increases in both L. rhamnosus GG and L. johnsonii La-1 were observed when each was added with the yogurt strains in both cows' milk and the soy beverage. Two of the five bifidobacteria strains grew well in the cows' milk and soy beverage during fermentation with the yogurt bacteria. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses showed that the probiotic bacteria and the bifidobacteria were using different sugars to support their growth, depending on whether the bacteria were growing in cows' milk or soy beverage.

  13. 细菌性阴道病微生态与益生菌%Microecology, bacterial vaginosis and probiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈定树; 梁平; 彭敏飞

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is the most common cause of vaginitis in women of childbearing age. The disorder represents a complex change in vaginal flora characterized by a reduction in the prevalence and concentration of lactobacilli. Probiotics enriched in lactobacilli have been proposed as an effective and alternative tool to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In vitro studies have suggested that certain specific strains of lactobacilli are able to inhibit the adherence of Gardnerella vagi-nalis to the vaginal epithelium and /or produce H3O2, lactic acid and/or bacteriocins, which inhibit the growth of bacteria causing BV. This is of outstanding interest due to the central role of polyamines in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis.%细菌性阴道病(BV)是育龄妇女阴道炎的最常见原因,其特征是栖居在阴道内的乳酸杆菌减少导致阴道菌群平衡失调的复杂变化.用乳酸杆菌替代抗生素是治疗BV的一种有效的治疗措施.乳酸杆菌产生过氧化氢、乳酸、杆菌素能抑制引起BV的细菌生长.多胺在BV的病理机制中有重要作用.本研究拟综述BV患者阴道菌群的变化,免疫防御反应,阴道乳酸杆菌对BV的影响,多胺的意义,益生菌在治疗选择中的作用.

  14. A randomised controlled trial of probiotics for the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery associated with bacterial vaginosis: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krauss-Silva Leticia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis increases the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery at less than 34 weeks of gestation. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the early administration of selected lactobacilli strains (probiotics to pregnant women with asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis/intermediate-degree infections to prevent spontaneous premature delivery and associated neonatal morbidity. Methods/Design Asymptomatic pregnant women at less than 20 weeks of gestation, with no indication of elective preterm delivery, with a vaginal pH ≥ 4.5 and Nugent score > 3 were randomly assigned to the placebo or intervention group (oral administration of selected lactobacilli up to the 24th to 26th week of gestation. The randomisation was stratified for the history of premature delivery (HPD and blocked. The allocation was concealed, and the participating health professionals and patients were blinded. The primary outcome was preterm delivery ( Results In total, 4,204 pregnant women were screened; 320 and 324 individuals were respectively randomly assigned to the placebo and intervention groups, and 62% finished the trial. None of the randomised patients were lost to follow-up. For the non-HPD stratum, the intent-to-treat relative risks of spontaneous premature birth at Conclusions The efficacy of the tested probiotics to prevent preterm delivery among women without a history of preterm delivery was not determined because the study sample was insufficient to estimate statistically significant intent-to-treat effects; additional studies are needed to evaluate this intervention among these women. Trial registration Trial registration at NIH register: NCT00303082. Sources of funding: the Brazilian Health Ministry and the State of Rio de Janeiro Research Foundation.

  15. Probiotics and lung immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for microbe-based therapeutic approaches to asthma and respiratory infection. However, to date, clinical trials of probiotics in the treatment of respiratory disease have met with limited success. It is becoming clear that to identify the true therapeutic potential of microbes we must move away from a purely empirical approach to clinical trials and adopt knowledge-based selection of candidate probiotics strains, dose, and means of administration. Animal models have played a key role in the identification of mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory capacity of specific bacteria. Microbe-induced changes in dendritic cell phenotype and function appear key to orchestrating the multiple pathways, involving inter alia, T cells, natural killer cells, and alveolar macrophages, associated with the protective effect of probiotics. Moving forward, the development of knowledge-based strategies for microbe-based therapeutics in respiratory disease will be aided by greater understanding of how specific bacterial structural motifs activate unique combinations of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells and thus direct desired immune responses.

  16. Probiotic Lactococcus lactis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Khemariya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis plays a critical role in food, dairy and health sectors. In food and dairy industries, it is found in production processes of various fermented products such as sausages, pickled vegetables, beverages such as beer and wine, breads, soymilk kefir, sour milk, butter, cream, fresh cheese and different types of cheeses, like Cheddar, Colby, Cottage cheese, Camembert, cream cheese, Roquefort and Brie. Additionally, there is an increasing interest towards the possible health benefits of the probiotic activity of this organism which generally is species and strain specific and depends upon the survival in gastrointestinal tract with sufficient number. Certain strains have the ability to produce antimicrobial peptide called nisin which exhibits preservative potential. Therefore, application of bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis in food and dairy sectors to preserve foods as a natural way and contributing health promoting attributes due to probiotic activity would definitely fulfil today’s consumer demands. This paper aimed to review the adaptation, antibiotic resistance, therapeutic and preservation potential of bacteriocinogenic and probiotic Lactococcus lactis.

  17. Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aline Corado; Bueno, Allain Amador; de Souza, Rávila Graziany Machado; Mota, João Felipe

    2014-06-17

    Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic β cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes.

  18. Probiotics, gut microbiota and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, M-J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is a huge complex ecosystem where microbiota, nutrients, and host cells interact extensively, a process crucial for the gut homeostasis and host development with a real partnership. The various bacterial communities that make up the gut microbiota have many functions including metabolic, barrier effect, and trophic functions. Hence, any dysbiosis could have negative consequences in terms of health and many diseases have been associated to impairment of the gut microbiota. These close relationships between gut microbiota, health, and disease, have led to great interest in using probiotics (i.e. live micro-organisms), or prebiotics (i.e. non-digestible substrates) to positively modulate the gut microbiota to prevent or treat some diseases. This review focuses on probiotics, their mechanisms of action, safety, and major health benefits. Health benefits remain to be proven in some indications, and further studies on the best strain(s), dose, and algorithm of administration to be used are needed. Nevertheless, probiotic administration seems to have a great potential in terms of health that justifies more research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. What are probiotics? Attempts to functional definition of probiotics to improve credibility of probiotics in support of animal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, W.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The broad and vague definitions of probiotics have resulted in high expectations and as a result thereof to disappointments in usage to cure serious diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity in humans and to improve performance in farm animals. Probiotics should not be considered as panaceas

  20. What are probiotics? Attempts to functional definition of probiotics to improve credibility of probiotics in support of animal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, W.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The broad and vague definitions of probiotics have resulted in high expectations and as a result thereof to disappointments in usage to cure serious diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity in humans and to improve performance in farm animals. Probiotics should not be considered as panaceas

  1. Immunology and probiotic impact of the newborn and young children intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Stavropoulou, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    Human body has developed a holistic defence system, which mission is either to recognize and destroy the aggressive invaders or to evolve mechanisms permitting to minimize or restore the consequences of harmful actions. The host immune system keeps the capital role to preserve the microbial intestinal balance via the barrier effect. Specifically, pathogenic invaders such as, bacteria, parasites, viruses and other xenobiotic invaders are rejected out of the body via barriers formed by the skin, mucosa and intestinal flora. In case physical barriers are breached, the immune system with its many components comes into action in order to fence infection. The intestine itself is considered as an "active organ" due to its abundant bacterial flora and to its large metabolic activity. The variation among different species or even among different strains within a species reflects the complexity of the genetic polymorphism which regulates the immune system functions. Additionally factors such as, gender, particular habits, smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, religion, age, gender, precedent infections and vaccinations must be involved. Hormonal profile and stress seems to be associated to the integrity microbiota and inducing immune system alterations. Which bacterial species are needed for inducing a proper barrier effect is not known, but it is generally accepted that this barrier function can be strongly supported by providing benefic alimentary supplements called functional foods. In this vein it is stressed the fact that early intestinal colonization with organisms such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria and possibly subsequent protection from many different types of diseases. Moreover, this benefic microflora dominated but Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli support the concept of their ability to modify the gut microbiota by reducing the risk of cancer following their capacity to decrease β-glucoronidase and carcinogen levels. Because of their beneficial roles in the

  2. Role of probiotics and functional foods in health: gut immune stimulation by two probiotic strains and a potential probiotic yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado Galdeano, Carolina; Novotny Nuñez, Ivanna; Carmuega, Esteban; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Perdigón, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that show the benefits on the health attributed to the probiotic consumptions. Most of the studies were performed using animal models and only some of them were validated in controlled human trials. The present review is divided in two sections. In the first section we describe how the probiotic microorganisms can interact with the intestinal epithelial cells that are the first line of cell in the mucosal site, focusing in the studies of two probiotic strains: Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 (actually Lactobacillus paracasei CNCMI-1518) and Lactobacillus casei CRL 431. Then we describe same beneficial effects attributed to probiotic administration and the administration of fermented milks containing these microorganisms or potential probiotic yoghurt, principally on the immune system and on the intestinal barrier in different experimental mouse models like enteropathogenic infection, malnutrition, cancer and intestinal inflammation.

  3. Lactobacilli vs antibiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: A randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.J. Beerepoot (Mariëlle); G. ter Riet; S. Nys (Sita); W. van der Wal (Willem); C.A. de Borgie (Corianne); T.M. de Reijke (Theo); J.M. Prins (Jan); J. Koeijers (Jeanne); A. Verbon (Annelies); E.E. Stobberingh (Ellen); S.E. Geerlings (Suzanne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Growing antibiotic resistance warrants studying nonantibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Use of lactobacilli appears to be promising. Methods: Between January 2005 and August 2007, we randomized 252 postmenopausal women with recurrent UTIs taki

  4. Immunomodulation by probiotics: efficacy and safety evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam J; Opperhuizen A; Loveren H van; TOX

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are non-pathogenic bacteria that are used as functional food components with claimed health-promoting effects. In the European Union probiotics are regulated via the Novel Foods Regulation (258/97/EC). This regulation is only applied to strains that were not used before 1997 and concerns

  5. Towards understanding molecular modes of probiotic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marco, M.L.; Pavan, S.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that certain microorganisms might be beneficial to human health is highlighted by the numerous consumer products containing probiotic bacteria. Probiotics are typically administered in food that, following entry into the gastro-intestinal tract, results in measurable health-promoting

  6. Probiotics and its Applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are living bacteria that can benefit our health. They may reduce the overgrowth of pathogens and are used in the form of food and food supplements. Probiotics which is being commonly used for the management of intestinal tract problems has recently been used to promote oral health. The concept of administering beneficial bacteria with a view to replace harmful microbes by useful ones is revived by probiotic concept. In oral cavity probiotics form a biofilm that is protective against oral diseases. Probiotics can compete for adhesion sites as well as for nutrients and growth factors with cariogenic, halithogenic, fungal and periodontal pathogens thereby inhibiting their growth. Thus they may be useful in preventing and treating various oral diseases. Probiotics with gene therapy are capable of yielding amazing success in intercepting and treating diseases. A literature search in Pub-Med, Google scholar, EBSCO HOST, SciELO, ScienceDirect database was done for English articles, using the following search terms: and ldquo;probiotics and rdquo; , and ldquo;oral health and rdquo;, and ldquo;dentistry and rdquo;; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of article is to provide an insight about probiotics and their applications in dentistry. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 703-723

  7. Towards understanding molecular modes of probiotic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marco, M.L.; Pavan, S.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that certain microorganisms might be beneficial to human health is highlighted by the numerous consumer products containing probiotic bacteria. Probiotics are typically administered in food that, following entry into the gastro-intestinal tract, results in measurable health-promoting

  8. Immunomodulating potential of supplementation with probiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Larsen, C.N.; Kæstel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Certain probiotic microorganisms have been found beneficial in the treatment of immune-related diseases and may also affect immune function in healthy people. Intervention studies of probiotics in healthy humans are urgently required. Here, the immunomodulating potential of Bifidobacterium animalis...

  9. Immunomodulation by probiotics: efficacy and safety evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam J; Opperhuizen A; Loveren H van; TOX

    2005-01-01

    Probiotics are non-pathogenic bacteria that are used as functional food components with claimed health-promoting effects. In the European Union probiotics are regulated via the Novel Foods Regulation (258/97/EC). This regulation is only applied to strains that were not used before 1997 and concerns

  10. Probiotics: a comprehensive approach toward health foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Devi, Mridula

    2014-01-01

    Food products containing probiotics and prebiotics are an important development in Health foods, which enhance health promoting microbial flora in the intestine. Probiotic refers to viable microorganism that promotes or support a beneficial balance of the autochthonous microbial population of the gastrointestinal tract. A number of genera of bacteria (and yeast) are used as probiotics, including Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, and Enterococcus, but the main species believed to have probiotic characteristics are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp., and L. casei. Probiotics can reduce diarrheal incidence, lactose intolerance, lower serum cholesterol, stimulate the immune system, control infections, act as antibiotics, suppress tumors, and protect against colon or bladder cancer by maintaining a healthy intestinal microflora balance. Lactic acid bacteria produce biopreservatives such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and bacteriocins that are used to retard both spoilage and the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Food, particularly dairy products are considered as an ideal vehicle for delivering probiotic bacteria to the human gastrointestinal tract. Cereals being rich source of prebiotics such as β-glucan and arabinoxylan, galacto-, and fructooligosaccharides are considered for development of probiotic foods. Good manufacturing practices must be applied in the manufacture of probiotic foods with quality assurance, and shelf-life conditions established.

  11. Food formats for effective delivery of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Marco, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria are increasingly incorporated into food products intended to confer health benefits in the human gut and beyond. Little is known about how the food matrix and product formulation impacts probiotic functionality, even though such information is essential to scientific understanding and regulatory substantiation of health benefits. The food format has the potential to affect probiotic survival, physiology, and potentially efficacy, but few comparative studies in humans have been conducted. Human studies should account for the effects of the food base on human health and the bioactive components present in the foods that may augment or diminish interactions of the probiotic with the human host. Some studies show that food ingredients such as prebiotics and milk components can improve probiotic survival during the shelf life of foods, which may enhance probiotic efficacy through increased dose effects. Furthermore, there are indications that synbiotic products are more effective than either probiotics or prebiotics alone. Identification of probiotic adaptations to the food and gut environments holds promise for determining the specific cell components and potential bacterial-food interactions necessary for health benefits and determining how these factors are affected by changes in food formulation and host diet. These studies, combined with controlled human studies, are important future research activities for advancing this field.

  12. Molecular approaches to study probiotic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaughan, E.E.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Satokari, R.; Collins, J.K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2000-01-01

    Functional foods comprising probiotic bacteria are receiving increasing attention from the scientific community and science funding agencies [1]. An essential aspect relating to the functionality of probiotic-based foods is to develop molecular methods to determine the presence, activity and viabili

  13. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  14. Probiotics-mediated suppression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Stephanie S Y; Wan, Murphy L Y; El-Nezami, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer prevention or/and treatment through their abilities to modulate intestinal microbiota and host immune response. Although most of the recent reviews have focused on the potential role of probiotics against colon cancer, only few of them include the probiotic effect on extraintestinal cancers. The present review covers the most important findings from the literature published during the past 20 months (from January 2015 to August 2016) regarding the probiotics-mediated suppression of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers and the underlying mechanisms. A comprehensive literature search in Pubmed, Science direct and Google scholar databases was conducted to locate all relevant articles that investigated the effect of probiotics on prevention/treatment of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers. Different mechanisms for the beneficial effects of probiotics against cancer were also discussed, mainly via modulation of gut microbiota which thereby influences host metabolism and immunity. Despite laboratory-based studies having demonstrated encouraging outcomes that probiotics possess antitumor effects, the benefits should not be exaggerated before we get more results from human clinical trials. These are very important before the medical community can accept the use of probiotics as an alternative therapy for cancer control.

  15. Immunomodulating potential of supplementation with probiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Larsen, C.N.; Kæstel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Certain probiotic microorganisms have been found beneficial in the treatment of immune-related diseases and may also affect immune function in healthy people. Intervention studies of probiotics in healthy humans are urgently required. Here, the immunomodulating potential of Bifidobacterium animalis...

  16. Safety assessment of probiotics for human use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, Louis MA; Haller, Dirk; Hammerman, Cathy; Heimbach, James; Hörmannsperger, Gabriele; Huys, Geert; Levy, Dan D; Lutgendorff, Femke; Mack, David; Phothirath, Phoukham; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Vaughan, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The safety of probiotics is tied to their intended use, which includes consideration of potential vulnerability of the consumer or patient, dose and duration of consumption, and both the manner and frequency of administration. Unique to probiotics is that they are alive when administered, and unlike other food or drug ingredients, possess the potential for infectivity or in situ toxin production. Since numerous types of microbes are used as probiotics, safety is also intricately tied to the nature of the specific microbe being used. The presence of transferable antibiotic resistance genes, which comprises a theoretical risk of transfer to a less innocuous member of the gut microbial community, must also be considered. Genetic stability of the probiotic over time, deleterious metabolic activities, and the potential for pathogenicity or toxicogenicity must be assessed depending on the characteristics of the genus and species of the microbe being used. Immunological effects must be considered, especially in certain vulnerable populations, including infants with undeveloped immune function. A few reports about negative probiotic effects have surfaced, the significance of which would be better understood with more complete understanding of the mechanisms of probiotic interaction with the host and colonizing microbes. Use of readily available and low cost genomic sequencing technologies to assure the absence of genes of concern is advisable for candidate probiotic strains. The field of probiotic safety is characterized by the scarcity of studies specifically designed to assess safety contrasted with the long history of safe use of many of these microbes in foods. PMID:21327023

  17. Mutans streptococci and lactobacilli on healthy and carious teeth in the same mouth of children with and without dental caries

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, C. S.; Mogodiri, R.; Cleaton-Jones, P. E.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mutans streptococci and lactobacilli contribute towards the microbial challenge of dental caries. A comparison was made between numbers of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in plaque from primary teeth in healthy children and between caries-free teeth and carious lesions in the same mouth of children with caries. The study group comprised 107 nursery-school children with a clinically healthy dentition and 117 children with caries. After a dental examination with mirror...

  18. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention.

  19. Probiotic bacteria induce a 'glow of health'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Levkovich

    Full Text Available Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this 'glow of health' display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary changes mimicking peak health and reproductive fitness characteristic of much younger animals. Eating probiotic yogurt triggered epithelial follicular anagen-phase shift with sebocytogenesis resulting in thick lustrous fur due to a bacteria-triggered interleukin-10-dependent mechanism. Aged male animals eating probiotics exhibited increased subcuticular folliculogenesis, when compared with matched controls, yielding luxuriant fur only in probiotic-fed subjects. Female animals displayed probiotic-induced hyperacidity coinciding with shinier hair, a feature that also aligns with fertility in human females. Together these data provide insights into mammalian evolution and novel strategies for integumentary health.

  20. Preventative effects of a probiotic,Lactobacillus salivarius ssp.salivarius,in the TNBS model of rat colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura Peran; Julio Galvez; Desiree Camuesco; Monica Comalada; Ana Nieto; Angel Concha; Maria Paz Diaz-Ropero; Monica Olivares; Jordi Xaus; Antonio Zarzuelo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of a probiotic Lactobacillus sakuvarius ssp.salivariusCECT5713 in the TNBS model of rat colitis.METHODS: Female Wistar rats (180-200 g) were used in this study. A group of rats were administered orally the probiotic L. salivarius ssp. salivarius (5×108 CFU suspended in 0.5 mL of skimmed milk) daily for 3 wk. Two additional groups were used for reference, a non-colitic and a control colitic without probiotic treatment, which received orally the vehicle used to administer the probiotic. Two weeks after starting the experiment, the rats were rendered colitic by intracolonic administration of 10 mg of TNBS dissolved in 0.25 mL of 500 mL/L ethanol. One week after colitis induction, all animals were killed and colonic damage was evaluated both histologically and biochemically. The biochemical studies performed in colonic homogenates include determination of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity,glutathione (GSH) content, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In addition, the luminal contents obtained from colonic samples were used for microbiological studies, in order to determine Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria counts.RESULTS: Treatment of colitic rats with L. salivarius ssp.salivarius resulted in amelioration of the inflammatory response in colitic rats, when compared with the corresponding control group without probiotic treatment. This antiinflammatory effect was evidenced macroscopically by a significant reduction in the extent of colonic necrosis and/or inflammation induced by the administration of TNBS/ethanol (2.3+0.4 cm vs3.4+0.3 cm in control group,P<0.01) and histologically by improvement of the colonic architecture associated with a reduction in the neutrophil infiltrate in comparison with non-treated colitic rats. The latter was confirmed biochemically by a significant reduction of colonic MPO

  1. Antibacterial efficacy of Salvadora persica as a cleansing teeth towards Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlina Sih Mahanani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salvadora persica is a traditional chewing stick for cleaning teeth that it is known Siwak. Several studies have demonstrated the antimicrobial effects of Salvadora persica. Purpose: This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of Salvadora persica in several modified preparation against the salivary Streptoccocus mutans and Lactobacilli. Methods: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial study with crossover design was used. The study comprised of 5 groups, per group consisted of 14 healthy dental students who had good oral hygiene. Each participant was given 5 intervention to clean their teeth using, electric toothbrush modified with siwak, electric toothbrush with siwak toothpaste (colgate kayu sugi toothpaste, electric toothbrush with general toothpaste (colgate total toothpaste, original siwak chewing stick and normal saline. The wash out periode each intervention was 3 days. Patients’ saliva was used to quantify the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli using caries risk test (CRT kit from Vivadent. Results: The results showed that there was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli risk score after cleansing different intervention except electric toothbrush modified with siwak. However, there was no significant difference for Streptococcus mutans (p=0.158 and Lactobacilli (p=0.396 risk score reduction when comparison was done between the groups. Conclusion: The original siwak chewing stick has antimicrobial effects similar to toothbrushing with general toothpaste and salvadora persica toothpaste. However, electric toothbrush modified with siwak has no effect on microbial reduction.Latar belakang: Salvadora persica adalah pembersih gigi tradisional yang lebih dikenal dengan sebutan Siwak. Beberapa penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Salvadora persica memiliki daya antibakteri. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui efektivitas Salvadora persica dalam berbagai bentuk sediaan untuk membersihkan

  2. Sources, isolation, characterisation and evaluation of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Luis; Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gil, Angel

    2013-01-01

    According to the FAO and the WHO, probiotics are 'live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host'. The strains most frequently used as probiotics include lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria, which are isolated from traditional fermented products and the gut, faeces and breast milk of human subjects. The identification of microorganisms is the first step in the selection of potential probiotics. The present techniques, including genetic fingerprinting, gene sequencing, oligonucleotide probes and specific primer selection, discriminate closely related bacteria with varying degrees of success. Additional molecular methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis/temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridisation, are employed to identify and characterise probiotics. The ability to examine fully sequenced genomes has accelerated the application of genetic approaches to the elucidation of the functional roles of probiotics. One of the best-demonstrated clinical benefits of probiotics is the prevention and treatment of acute and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea;however, there is mounting evidence for a potential role for probiotics in the treatment of allergies and intestinal, liver and metabolic diseases. There are various mechanisms by which probiotics exert their beneficial effects: regulation of intestinal permeability, normalisation of host intestinal microbiota, improvement of gut immune barrier function, and adjustment between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The number of studies carried out to test the effects of probiotics in vitro and in animals is enormous. However, the most reliable method of assessing the therapeutic benefits of any probiotic strain is the use of randomised, placebo-controlled trials, which are reviewed in this article [corrected].

  3. The Use of Probiotics in Gastrointestinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Madsen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are living microorganisms that can affect the host in a beneficial manner. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and activity of probiotic bacteria already established in the colon. Efficacy of probiotic compounds has been shown in a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. Lactobacillus GG alone, or the combination of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Streptococcus thermophilus, is effective in the treatment of Clostridium difficile, as well as in preventing the frequency and severity of infectious acute diarrhea in children. Prevention of antibiotic-induced diarrhea with the concomitant administration of either Lactobacillus GG or Saccharomyces boulardii has been demonstrated. The most successful studies involve the use of Lactobacillus GG at a dose of 1×1010 viable organisms per day and the yeast boulardii at a dose of 1 g/day. A probiotic preparation (VSL#3 - 6 g/day that uses a combination of three species of Bifidobacterium, four strains of Lactobacillus and one strain of Streptocccus has shown promise in maintaining remission in ulcerative colitis and pouchitis, as well as in preventing the postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease. The mechanism of action of probiotics may include receptor competition, effects on mucin secretion or probiotic immunomodulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Oral administration of probiotic compounds has been demonstrated to be well tolerated and safe. However, while probiotics have the potential to improve human health and to prevent and treat some diseases, major improvements are needed in labelling and quality assurance procedures for probiotic compounds. In addition, well planned and controlled clinical studies are necessary to delineate fully the potential for probiotic compounds.

  4. Use of Probiotics in Fermented Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Palamutoğlu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a negative judgements among consumers about meat and meat products, in human nutrition meat and meat products are important for nutrient components which they contain essential nutrients. Intensively produced fermented meat product such as sucuk in our country and lactic acid bacteria (LAB are used for production of various fermented sausages all over the world. LAB primarily used in order to increase the food safety of such products. LAB with probiotic properties have effect on product taste, flavour and aroma as well as the positive effects on functional and physiological properties. Positive effects of probiotics in human health and product properties in the absence of any adverse effects various cultures have been used for the production of probiotic fermented meat products. In the production of such products prepared dough which have meat and fat in the matrix form a suitable vehicle for probiotic cells. During production of products formation of lactic acid reduced the pH, during ripening conditions water activity reduced so these factors adversely affect viability of probiotic cells. For this reason protecting probiotic cultures from negative effects during exposure in the product and vitality of cells in human gastro-intestinal system to continue operating for consumption to be provided during the order process the cells are coated with microencapsuation. The use of probiotic microorganisms isolated from various foods is being investigated for the production of sausages. Studies on the effects of probiotics on human health of meat products are also needed. In this study the probiotic microorganisms used in the production of probiotic fermented sausages were investigated.

  5. Overview of technology developments in probiotic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Stanton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are ‘live microorganisms which, when administrated in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host’ (FAO/WHO, 2001. This requirement, i.e. that the probiotic bacteria must be in viable form at the time of consumption, poses a number of technical challenges from food processing perspectives. Environmental stresses encountered during food processing include acid exposure during food fermentations, extremes in temperatures encountered during drying processes, in addition to oxidative, osmotic, and food matrix stresses. Furthermore, the ingested bacteria must remain viable during gastric transit, to reach the site of action in viable form to exert the probiotic effects. This imposes further stresses, as the gastrointestinal tract is naturally designed to impede the passage of microorganisms with low pH encountered in the stomach and the detergent-like properties of bile encountered in the duodenum. A number of approaches have been investigated in order to minimise the damage caused by exposure to such stresses experienced by probiotics during food processing and gastric transit. Approaches for protection of probiotic viability during food processing and shelf life include manipulation of bacterial cell physiology, application of prelethal stress to the cultures during cell preparation, selection of appropriate drying conditions, and optimisation of reconstitution conditions after drying. Furthermore, probiotic viability losses can be minimised by selection of appropriate food carriers for their delivery to the intestine. In this respect, the composition and physical nature of the food matrix can have profound effects on the stability of live probiotics during gastric transit. Encapsulation of probiotics is another approach to positively affect viability of probiotics in some matrices. Furthermore, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying bacterial survival in hostile environments in order to develop efficacious

  6. Mucosal immunity and probiotics in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-07-01

    Teleost mucosal immunity has become the subject of unprecedented research studies in recent years because of its diversity and defining characteristics. Its immune repertoire is governed by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) which are divided into gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissues (GIALT). The direct contact with its immediate environment makes the mucosal surfaces of fish susceptible to a wide variety of pathogens. The inherent immunocompetent cells and factors in the mucosal surfaces together with the commensal microbiota have pivotal role against pathogens. Immunomodulation is a popular prophylactic strategy in teleost and probiotics possess this beneficial feature. Most of the studies on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in fish mainly discussed their impacts on systemic immunity. In contrast, few of these studies discussed the immunomodulatory features of probiotics in mucosal surfaces and are concentrated on the influences in the gut. Significant attention should be devoted in understanding the relationship of mucosal immunity and probiotics as the present knowledge is limited and are mostly based on extrapolations of studies in humans and terrestrial vertebrates. In the course of the advancement of mucosal immunity and probiotics, new perspectives in probiotics research, e.g., probiogenomics have emerged. This review affirms the relevance of probiotics in the mucosal immunity of fish by revisiting and bridging the current knowledge on teleost mucosal immunity, mucosal microbiota and immunomodulation of mucosal surfaces by probiotics. Expanding the knowledge of immunomodulatory properties of probiotics especially on mucosal immunity is essential in advancing the use of probiotics as a sustainable and viable strategy for successful fish husbandry.

  7. Effects of typified propolis on mutans streptococci and lactobacilli: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Anauate-Netto, Camillo; UNIBAN; Marcucci, Maria Cristina; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Paulino, Niraldo; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Anido-Anido, Andréa; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Amore, Ricardo; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Mendonça, Sergio de; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Borelli Neto, Laurindo; UNIBAN Bandeirante Anhanguera University; Bretz, Walter Antonio; New York University

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine in arandomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinicaltrial the effects of typified propolis and chlorhexidinerinses on salivary levels of mutans streptococci (MS)and lactobacilli (LACT). Methods: One hundredpatients were screened for salivary levels of MS>100,000 CFUs/mL of saliva. All patients presentedwith at least one cavitated decayed surface. Sixtypatients met entry criteria. Subjects were adults 18-55 years old. After restoration ...

  8. Antibacterial efficacy of Salvadora persica as a cleansing teeth towards Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Erlina Sih Mahanani; Mohd Fadhli Khamis; Erry Mochamad Arief; Siti Nabilah Mat Rippin; Zainul Ahmad Rajion

    2012-01-01

    Background: Salvadora persica is a traditional chewing stick for cleaning teeth that it is known Siwak. Several studies have demonstrated the antimicrobial effects of Salvadora persica. Purpose: This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of Salvadora persica in several modified preparation against the salivary Streptoccocus mutans and Lactobacilli. Methods: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial study with crossover design was used. The study comprised of 5 groups, per group consist...

  9. Administration of Lactobacilli to growing kids: effects on bio-morphologic traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Chiofalo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The worry for the environment and sanitary risks, consequent to an excessive use of industrial products in zootechny, it has driven the attention and the agreement on alternative productive systems. The lactobacilli are living micro-organisms that, added to the food, produce some beneficial effects through the constitution of a healthier and more favourable gastro-enteric environment for the digestive and absorption processes (Parker, 1990...

  10. Diversity in proteinase specificity of thermophilic lactobacilli as revealed by hydrolysis of dairy and vegetable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; Espeche Turbay, María Beatriz; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira María

    2013-09-01

    Ability of industrially relevant species of thermophilic lactobacilli strains to hydrolyze proteins from animal (caseins and β-lactoglobulin) and vegetable (soybean and wheat) sources, as well as influence of peptide content of growth medium on cell envelope-associated proteinase (CEP) activity, was evaluated. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (CRL 581 and 654), L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (CRL 454 and 656), Lactobacillus acidophilus (CRL 636 and 1063), and Lactobacillus helveticus (CRL 1062 and 1177) were grown in a chemically defined medium supplemented or not with 1 % Casitone. All strains hydrolyzed mainly β-casein, while degradation of αs-caseins was strain dependent. Contrariwise, κ-Casein was poorly degraded by the studied lactobacilli. β-Lactoglobulin was mainly hydrolyzed by CRL 656, CRL 636, and CRL 1062 strains. The L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis strains, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656, and L. helveticus CRL 1177 degraded gliadins in high extent, while the L. acidophilus and L. helveticus strains highly hydrolyzed soy proteins. Proteinase production was inhibited by Casitone, the most affected being the L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis species. This study highlights the importance of proteolytic diversity of lactobacilli for rational strain selection when formulating hydrolyzed dairy or vegetable food products.

  11. Characterization of tetracycline resistance lactobacilli