WorldWideScience

Sample records for human-computer interaction techniques

  1. Minimal mobile human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Ali, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the widespread adoption of personal, mobile computing devices in everyday life, has allowed entry into a new technological era in Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The constant change of the physical and social context in a user's situation made possible by the portability of

  2. Occupational stress in human computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M J; Conway, F T; Karsh, B T

    1999-04-01

    There have been a variety of research approaches that have examined the stress issues related to human computer interaction including laboratory studies, cross-sectional surveys, longitudinal case studies and intervention studies. A critical review of these studies indicates that there are important physiological, biochemical, somatic and psychological indicators of stress that are related to work activities where human computer interaction occurs. Many of the stressors of human computer interaction at work are similar to those stressors that have historically been observed in other automated jobs. These include high workload, high work pressure, diminished job control, inadequate employee training to use new technology, monotonous tasks, por supervisory relations, and fear for job security. New stressors have emerged that can be tied primarily to human computer interaction. These include technology breakdowns, technology slowdowns, and electronic performance monitoring. The effects of the stress of human computer interaction in the workplace are increased physiological arousal; somatic complaints, especially of the musculoskeletal system; mood disturbances, particularly anxiety, fear and anger; and diminished quality of working life, such as reduced job satisfaction. Interventions to reduce the stress of computer technology have included improved technology implementation approaches and increased employee participation in implementation. Recommendations for ways to reduce the stress of human computer interaction at work are presented. These include proper ergonomic conditions, increased organizational support, improved job content, proper workload to decrease work pressure, and enhanced opportunities for social support. A model approach to the design of human computer interaction at work that focuses on the system "balance" is proposed.

  3. Modeling multimodal human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Starcevic, D.

    2004-01-01

    Incorporating the well-known Unified Modeling Language into a generic modeling framework makes research on multimodal human-computer interaction accessible to a wide range off software engineers. Multimodal interaction is part of everyday human discourse: We speak, move, gesture, and shift our gaze

  4. Language evolution and human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudin, Jonathan; Norman, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the issues that confront designers of interactive computer systems also appear in natural language evolution. Natural languages and human-computer interfaces share as their primary mission the support of extended 'dialogues' between responsive entities. Because in each case one participant is a human being, some of the pressures operating on natural languages, causing them to evolve in order to better support such dialogue, also operate on human-computer 'languages' or interfaces. This does not necessarily push interfaces in the direction of natural language - since one entity in this dialogue is not a human, this is not to be expected. Nonetheless, by discerning where the pressures that guide natural language evolution also appear in human-computer interaction, we can contribute to the design of computer systems and obtain a new perspective on natural languages.

  5. Proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Saul; Honbaek, Kasper; Quigley, Aaron; Reiterer, Harald; Rädle, Roman

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, anthropologist Edward Hall coined the term "proxemics." Proxemics is an area of study that identifies the culturally dependent ways in which people use interpersonal distance to understand and mediate their interactions with others. Recent research has demonstrated the use of proxemics in human-computer interaction (HCI) for supporting users' explicit and implicit interactions in a range of uses, including remote office collaboration, home entertainment, and games. One promise of pro...

  6. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Gianluca; Gatteschi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  7. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Paravati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  8. Fundamentals of human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Monk, Andrew F

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction aims to sensitize the systems designer to the problems faced by the user of an interactive system. The book grew out of a course entitled """"The User Interface: Human Factors for Computer-based Systems"""" which has been run annually at the University of York since 1981. This course has been attended primarily by systems managers from the computer industry. The book is organized into three parts. Part One focuses on the user as processor of information with studies on visual perception; extracting information from printed and electronically presented

  9. Introduction to human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Originally published in 1989 this title provided a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the burgeoning discipline of human-computer interaction for students, academics, and those from industry who wished to know more about the subject. Assuming very little knowledge, the book provides an overview of the diverse research areas that were at the time only gradually building into a coherent and well-structured field. It aims to explain the underlying causes of the cognitive, social and organizational problems typically encountered when computer systems are introduced. It is clear and co

  10. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  11. Human-Computer Interaction The Agency Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, José

    2012-01-01

    Agent-centric theories, approaches and technologies are contributing to enrich interactions between users and computers. This book aims at highlighting the influence of the agency perspective in Human-Computer Interaction through a careful selection of research contributions. Split into five sections; Users as Agents, Agents and Accessibility, Agents and Interactions, Agent-centric Paradigms and Approaches, and Collective Agents, the book covers a wealth of novel, original and fully updated material, offering:   ü  To provide a coherent, in depth, and timely material on the agency perspective in HCI ü  To offer an authoritative treatment of the subject matter presented by carefully selected authors ü  To offer a balanced and broad coverage of the subject area, including, human, organizational, social, as well as technological concerns. ü  To offer a hands-on-experience by covering representative case studies and offering essential design guidelines   The book will appeal to a broad audience of resea...

  12. Human-computer interaction : Guidelines for web animation

    OpenAIRE

    Galyani Moghaddam, Golnessa; Moballeghi, Mostafa

    2006-01-01

    Human-computer interaction in the large is an interdisciplinary area which attracts researchers, educators, and practioners from many differenf fields. Human-computer interaction studies a human and a machine in communication, it draws from supporting knowledge on both the machine and the human side. This paper is related to the human side of human-computer interaction and focuses on animations. The growing use of animation in Web pages testifies to the increasing ease with which such multim...

  13. Mobile human-computer interaction perspective on mobile learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying a Mobile Human Computer Interaction (MHCI) view to the domain of education using Mobile Learning (Mlearning), the research outlines its understanding of the influences and effects of different interactions on the use of mobile technology...

  14. Human-Computer Interaction and Information Management Research Needs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In a visionary future, Human-Computer Interaction HCI and Information Management IM have the potential to enable humans to better manage their lives through the use...

  15. Benefits of Subliminal Feedback Loops in Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Ritter

    2011-01-01

    A lot of efforts have been directed to enriching human-computer interaction to make the user experience more pleasing or efficient. In this paper, we briefly present work in the fields of subliminal perception and affective computing, before we outline a new approach to add analog communication channels to the human-computer interaction experience. In this approach, in addition to symbolic predefined mappings of input to output, a subliminal feedback loop is used that provides feedback in evo...

  16. Measuring Multimodal Synchrony for Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Ramseyer, Fabian; Sourin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nonverbal synchrony is an important and natural element in human-human interaction. It can also play various roles in human-computer interaction. In particular this is the case in the interaction between humans and the virtual humans that inhabit our cyberworlds. Virtual humans need to adapt their

  17. Humor in Human-Computer Interaction : A Short Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Niculescu, Andreea; Valitutti, Alessandro; Banchs, Rafael E.; Joshi, Anirudha; Balkrishan, Devanuj K.; Dalvi, Girish; Winckler, Marco

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a short survey on humor in human-computer interaction. It describes how humor is designed and interacted with in social media, virtual agents, social robots and smart environments. Benefits and future use of humor in interactions with artificial entities are discussed based on

  18. The Past, Present and Future of Human Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Churchill, Elizabeth

    2018-01-16

    Human Computer Interaction (HCI) focuses on how people interact with, and are transformed by computation. Our current technology landscape is changing rapidly. Interactive applications, devices and services are increasingly becoming embedded into our environments. From our homes to the urban and rural spaces, we traverse everyday. We are increasingly able toヨoften required toヨmanage and configure multiple, interconnected devices and program their interactions. Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques are being used to create dynamic services that learn about us and others, that make conclusions about our intents and affiliations, and that mould our digital interactions based in predictions about our actions and needs, nudging us toward certain behaviors. Computation is also increasingly embedded into our bodies. Understanding human interactions in the everyday digital and physical context. During this lecture, Elizabeth Churchill -Director of User Experience at Google- will talk about how an emerging landscape invites us to revisit old methods and tactics for understanding how people interact with computers and computation, and how it challenges us to think about new methods and frameworks for understanding the future of human-centered computation.

  19. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design...... and understanding of audio-based mobile systems are evolving to offer new perspectives on interaction and design and support such systems to be applied in areas, such as the humanities....

  20. Human-computer interaction and management information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    ""Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Applications"" offers state-of-the-art research by a distinguished set of authors who span the MIS and HCI fields. The original chapters provide authoritative commentaries and in-depth descriptions of research programs that will guide 21st century scholars, graduate students, and industry professionals. Human-Computer Interaction (or Human Factors) in MIS is concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. It is distinctiv

  1. Humans, computers and wizards human (simulated) computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Norman; McGlashan, Scott; Wooffitt, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Using data taken from a major European Union funded project on speech understanding, the SunDial project, this book considers current perspectives on human computer interaction and argues for the value of an approach taken from sociology which is based on conversation analysis.

  2. Multimodal Information Presentation for High-Load Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation addresses multimodal information presentation in human computer interaction. Information presentation refers to the manner in which computer systems/interfaces present information to human users. More specifically, the focus of our work is not on which information to present, but

  3. The epistemology and ontology of human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip A.E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic:

  4. Choice of Human-Computer Interaction Mode in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Hondori, Hossein; Khademi, Maryam; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; Lopes, Cristina V; Cramer, Steven C

    2016-03-01

    Advances in technology are providing new forms of human-computer interaction. The current study examined one form of human-computer interaction, augmented reality (AR), whereby subjects train in the real-world workspace with virtual objects projected by the computer. Motor performances were compared with those obtained while subjects used a traditional human-computer interaction, that is, a personal computer (PC) with a mouse. Patients used goal-directed arm movements to play AR and PC versions of the Fruit Ninja video game. The 2 versions required the same arm movements to control the game but had different cognitive demands. With AR, the game was projected onto the desktop, where subjects viewed the game plus their arm movements simultaneously, in the same visual coordinate space. In the PC version, subjects used the same arm movements but viewed the game by looking up at a computer monitor. Among 18 patients with chronic hemiparesis after stroke, the AR game was associated with 21% higher game scores (P = .0001), 19% faster reaching times (P = .0001), and 15% less movement variability (P = .0068), as compared to the PC game. Correlations between game score and arm motor status were stronger with the AR version. Motor performances during the AR game were superior to those during the PC game. This result is due in part to the greater cognitive demands imposed by the PC game, a feature problematic for some patients but clinically useful for others. Mode of human-computer interface influences rehabilitation therapy demands and can be individualized for patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Human-Computer Interaction, Tourism and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.

    We present a state of the art of the human-computer interaction aimed at tourism and cultural heritage in some cities of the European Mediterranean. In the work an analysis is made of the main problems deriving from training understood as business and which can derail the continuous growth of the HCI, the new technologies and tourism industry. Through a semiotic and epistemological study the current mistakes in the context of the interrelations of the formal and factual sciences will be detected and also the human factors that have an influence on the professionals devoted to the development of interactive systems in order to safeguard and boost cultural heritage.

  6. Human-computer systems interaction backgrounds and applications 3

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikowski, Juliusz; Mroczek, Teresa; Wtorek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    This book contains an interesting and state-of the art collection of papers on the recent progress in Human-Computer System Interaction (H-CSI). It contributes the profound description of the actual status of the H-CSI field and also provides a solid base for further development and research in the discussed area. The contents of the book are divided into the following parts: I. General human-system interaction problems; II. Health monitoring and disabled people helping systems; and III. Various information processing systems. This book is intended for a wide audience of readers who are not necessarily experts in computer science, machine learning or knowledge engineering, but are interested in Human-Computer Systems Interaction. The level of particular papers and specific spreading-out into particular parts is a reason why this volume makes fascinating reading. This gives the reader a much deeper insight than he/she might glean from research papers or talks at conferences. It touches on all deep issues that ...

  7. From Human-Computer Interaction to Human-Robot Social Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Toumi, Tarek; Zidani, Abdelmadjid

    2014-01-01

    Human-Robot Social Interaction became one of active research fields in which researchers from different areas propose solutions and directives leading robots to improve their interactions with humans. In this paper we propose to introduce works in both human robot interaction and human computer interaction and to make a bridge between them, i.e. to integrate emotions and capabilities concepts of the robot in human computer model to become adequate for human robot interaction and discuss chall...

  8. Institutionalizing human-computer interaction for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Digitalization is the societal change process in which new ICT-based solutions bring forward completely new ways of doing things, new businesses and new movements in the society. Digitalization also provides completely new ways of addressing issues related to global health. This paper provides an overview of the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and in what way the field has contributed to international development in different regions of the world. Additionally, it outlines the United Nations' new sustainability goals from December 2015 and what these could contribute to the development of global health and its relationship to digitalization. Finally, it argues why and how HCI could be adopted and adapted to fit the contextual needs, the need for localization and for the development of new digital innovations. The research methodology is mostly qualitative following an action research paradigm in which the actual change process that the digitalization is evoking is equally important as the scientific conclusions that can be drawn. In conclusion, the paper argues that digitalization is fundamentally changing the society through the development and use of digital technologies and may have a profound effect on the digital development of every country in the world. But it needs to be developed based on local practices, it needs international support and to not be limited by any technological constraints. Particularly digitalization to support global health requires a profound understanding of the users and their context, arguing for user-centred systems design methodologies as particularly suitable.

  9. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ancău Dorina; Roman Nicolae-Marius; Ancău Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for er...

  10. Evidence Report: Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina; Ezer, Neta; Vos, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction (HCI) encompasses all the methods by which humans and computer-based systems communicate, share information, and accomplish tasks. When HCI is poorly designed, crews have difficulty entering, navigating, accessing, and understanding information. HCI has rarely been studied in an operational spaceflight context, and detailed performance data that would support evaluation of HCI have not been collected; thus, we draw much of our evidence from post-spaceflight crew comments, and from other safety-critical domains like ground-based power plants, and aviation. Additionally, there is a concern that any potential or real issues to date may have been masked by the fact that crews have near constant access to ground controllers, who monitor for errors, correct mistakes, and provide additional information needed to complete tasks. We do not know what types of HCI issues might arise without this "safety net". Exploration missions will test this concern, as crews may be operating autonomously due to communication delays and blackouts. Crew survival will be heavily dependent on available electronic information for just-in-time training, procedure execution, and vehicle or system maintenance; hence, the criticality of the Risk of Inadequate HCI. Future work must focus on identifying the most important contributing risk factors, evaluating their contribution to the overall risk, and developing appropriate mitigations. The Risk of Inadequate HCI includes eight core contributing factors based on the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS): (1) Requirements, policies, and design processes, (2) Information resources and support, (3) Allocation of attention, (4) Cognitive overload, (5) Environmentally induced perceptual changes, (6) Misperception and misinterpretation of displayed information, (7) Spatial disorientation, and (8) Displays and controls.

  11. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancău Dorina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for error decoding.

  12. A Software Framework for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a software framework we designed and implemented for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface. The proposed framework is based on publish / subscribe architecture, which allows developers and researchers to conveniently configure, test and

  13. Stereo Vision for Unrestricted Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Eldridge, Ross; Rudolph, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Human computer interfaces have come long way in recent years, but the goal of a computer interpreting unrestricted human movement remains elusive. The use of stereo vision in this field has enabled the development of systems that begin to approach this goal. As computer technology advances we come ever closer to a system that can react to the ambiguities of human movement in real-time. In the foreseeable future stereo computer vision is not likely to replace the keyboard or mouse. There is at...

  14. APPLYING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of UIMS (User Interface Management System), a system using a variety of artificial intelligence techniques to build knowledge-based user interfaces combining functionality and information from a variety of computer systems that maintain, test, and configure customer telephone...... and data networks. Three artificial intelligence (AI) techniques used in UIMS are discussed, namely, frame representation, object-oriented programming languages, and rule-based systems. The UIMS architecture is presented, and the structure of the UIMS is explained in terms of the AI techniques....

  15. Virtual reality/ augmented reality technology : the next chapter of human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xing

    2015-01-01

    No matter how many different size and shape the computer has, the basic components of computers are still the same. If we use the user perspective to look for the development of computer history, we can surprisingly find that it is the input output device that leads the development of the industry development, in one word, human-computer interaction changes the development of computer history. Human computer interaction has been gone through three stages, the first stage relies on the inpu...

  16. Applying systemic-structural activity theory to design of human-computer interaction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bedny, Gregory Z; Bedny, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has gained recognition as an important field in ergonomics. HCI draws on ideas and theoretical concepts from computer science, psychology, industrial design, and other fields. Human-Computer Interaction is no longer limited to trained software users. Today people interact with various devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and laptops. How can you make such interaction user friendly, even when user proficiency levels vary? This book explores methods for assessing the psychological complexity of computer-based tasks. It also p

  17. The Past, Present and Future of Human Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Churchill, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    into our environments. From our homes to the urban and rural spaces, we traverse everyday. We are increasingly able toヨoften required toヨmanage and configure multiple, interconnected devices and program their interactions. Artificial intelligence (AI

  18. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith

    2013-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction 2011 (IHCI 2011) was held at Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic from August 29 - August 31, 2011. This conference was third in the series, following IHCI 2009 and IHCI 2010 held in January at IIIT Allahabad, India. Human computer interaction is a fast growing research area and an attractive subject of interest for both academia and industry. There are many interesting and challenging topics that need to be researched and discussed. This book aims to provide excellent opportunities for the dissemination of interesting new research and discussion about presented topics. It can be useful for researchers working on various aspects of human computer interaction. Topics covered in this book include user interface and interaction, theoretical background and applications of HCI and also data mining and knowledge discovery as a support of HCI applications.

  19. Situated dialog in speech-based human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Raux, Antoine; Lane, Ian; Misu, Teruhisa

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a survey of the state-of-the-art in the practical implementation of Spoken Dialog Systems for applications in everyday settings. It includes contributions on key topics in situated dialog interaction from a number of leading researchers and offers a broad spectrum of perspectives on research and development in the area. In particular, it presents applications in robotics, knowledge access and communication and covers the following topics: dialog for interacting with robots; language understanding and generation; dialog architectures and modeling; core technologies; and the analysis of human discourse and interaction. The contributions are adapted and expanded contributions from the 2014 International Workshop on Spoken Dialog Systems (IWSDS 2014), where researchers and developers from industry and academia alike met to discuss and compare their implementation experiences, analyses and empirical findings.

  20. Visualization of hierarchically structured information for human-computer interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Suh Hyun; Lee, J. K.; Choi, I. K.; Kye, S. C.; Lee, N. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-11-01

    Visualization techniques can be used to support operator's information navigation tasks on the system especially consisting of an enormous volume of information, such as operating information display system and computerized operating procedure system in advanced control room of nuclear power plants. By offering an easy understanding environment of hierarchically structured information, these techniques can reduce the operator's supplementary navigation task load. As a result of that, operators can pay more attention on the primary tasks and ultimately improve the cognitive task performance. In this report, an interface was designed and implemented using hyperbolic visualization technique, which is expected to be applied as a means of optimizing operator's information navigation tasks. 15 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs. (Author)

  1. Human-computer interaction handbook fundamentals, evolving technologies and emerging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This second edition of The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook provides an updated, comprehensive overview of the most important research in the field, including insights that are directly applicable throughout the process of developing effective interactive information technologies. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base, as well as visionary perspectives and developments that fundamentally transform the way in which researchers and practitioners view the discipline. As the seminal volume of HCI research and practice, The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook feature

  2. Advancements in Violin-Related Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    of human intelligence and emotion is at the core of the Musical Interface Technology Design Space, MITDS. This is a framework that endeavors to retain and enhance such traits of traditional instruments in the design of interactive live performance interfaces. Utilizing the MITDS, advanced Human...

  3. Computerized Cognitive Rehabilitation: Comparing Different Human-Computer Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglini, Silvana; Alloni, Anna; Cattani, Barbara; Panzarasa, Silvia; Pistarini, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    In this work we describe an experiment involving aphasic patients, where the same speech rehabilitation exercise was administered in three different modalities, two of which are computer-based. In particular, one modality exploits the "Makey Makey", an electronic board which allows interacting with the computer using physical objects.

  4. Transnational HCI: Humans, Computers and Interactions in Global Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertesi, Janet; Lindtner, Silvia; Shklovski, Irina

    2011-01-01

    , but as evolving in relation to global processes, boundary crossings, frictions and hybrid practices. In doing so, we expand upon existing research in HCI to consider the effects, implications for individuals and communities, and design opportunities in times of increased transnational interactions. We hope...... to broaden the conversation around the impact of technology in global processes by bringing together scholars from HCI and from related humanities, media arts and social sciences disciplines....

  5. The Human-Computer Interaction of Cross-Cultural Gaming Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Joyram; Norcio, Anthony F.; Van Der Veer, Jacob J.; Andre, Charles F.; Miller, Zachary; Regelsberger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the cultural dimensions of the human-computer interaction that underlies gaming strategies. The article is a desktop study of existing literature and is organized into five sections. The first examines the cultural aspects of knowledge processing. The social constructs technology interaction is discussed. Following this, the…

  6. Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction Design Education: Teaching Affordance Design for Emerging Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Anthony; Matei, Sorin Adam

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of human-computer interaction design (HCID) over the last 20 years suggests that there is a growing need for educational scholars to consider new and more applicable theoretical models of interactive product design. The authors suggest that such paradigms would call for an approach that would equip HCID students with a better…

  7. HCI^2 Workbench: A Development Tool for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Wenzhe, Shi; Pantic, Maja

    In this paper, we present a novel software tool designed and implemented to simplify the development process of Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction (MHCI) systems. This tool, which is called the HCI^2 Workbench, exploits a Publish / Subscribe (P/S) architecture [13] [14] to facilitate efficient

  8. Implementations of the CC'01 Human-Computer Interaction Guidelines Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaris, Bill; Wainer, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E.; Stalvey, RoxAnn H.; Shannon, Christine; Leventhal, Laura; Barnes, Julie; Wright, John; Schafer, J. Ben; Sanders, Dean

    2007-01-01

    In today's technology-laden society human-computer interaction (HCI) is an important knowledge area for computer scientists and software engineers. This paper surveys existing approaches to incorporate HCI into computer science (CS) and such related issues as the perceived gap between the interests of the HCI community and the needs of CS…

  9. Eye Tracking Based Control System for Natural Human-Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebai Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye movement can be regarded as a pivotal real-time input medium for human-computer communication, which is especially important for people with physical disability. In order to improve the reliability, mobility, and usability of eye tracking technique in user-computer dialogue, a novel eye control system with integrating both mouse and keyboard functions is proposed in this paper. The proposed system focuses on providing a simple and convenient interactive mode by only using user’s eye. The usage flow of the proposed system is designed to perfectly follow human natural habits. Additionally, a magnifier module is proposed to allow the accurate operation. In the experiment, two interactive tasks with different difficulty (searching article and browsing multimedia web were done to compare the proposed eye control tool with an existing system. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM measures are used to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of our system. It is demonstrated that the proposed system is very effective with regard to usability and interface design.

  10. Eye Tracking Based Control System for Natural Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuebai; Liu, Xiaolong; Yuan, Shyan-Ming; Lin, Shu-Fan

    2017-01-01

    Eye movement can be regarded as a pivotal real-time input medium for human-computer communication, which is especially important for people with physical disability. In order to improve the reliability, mobility, and usability of eye tracking technique in user-computer dialogue, a novel eye control system with integrating both mouse and keyboard functions is proposed in this paper. The proposed system focuses on providing a simple and convenient interactive mode by only using user's eye. The usage flow of the proposed system is designed to perfectly follow human natural habits. Additionally, a magnifier module is proposed to allow the accurate operation. In the experiment, two interactive tasks with different difficulty (searching article and browsing multimedia web) were done to compare the proposed eye control tool with an existing system. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) measures are used to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of our system. It is demonstrated that the proposed system is very effective with regard to usability and interface design.

  11. The Study on Human-Computer Interaction Design Based on the Users’ Subconscious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyuan

    2017-09-01

    Human-computer interaction is human-centered. An excellent interaction design should focus on the study of user experience, which greatly comes from the consistence between design and human behavioral habit. However, users’ behavioral habits often result from subconsciousness. Therefore, it is smart to utilize users’ subconscious behavior to achieve design's intention and maximize the value of products’ functions, which gradually becomes a new trend in this field.

  12. Appearance-based human gesture recognition using multimodal features for human computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dan; Gao, Hua; Ekenel, Hazim Kemal; Ohya, Jun

    2011-03-01

    The use of gesture as a natural interface plays an utmost important role for achieving intelligent Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Human gestures include different components of visual actions such as motion of hands, facial expression, and torso, to convey meaning. So far, in the field of gesture recognition, most previous works have focused on the manual component of gestures. In this paper, we present an appearance-based multimodal gesture recognition framework, which combines the different groups of features such as facial expression features and hand motion features which are extracted from image frames captured by a single web camera. We refer 12 classes of human gestures with facial expression including neutral, negative and positive meanings from American Sign Languages (ASL). We combine the features in two levels by employing two fusion strategies. At the feature level, an early feature combination can be performed by concatenating and weighting different feature groups, and LDA is used to choose the most discriminative elements by projecting the feature on a discriminative expression space. The second strategy is applied on decision level. Weighted decisions from single modalities are fused in a later stage. A condensation-based algorithm is adopted for classification. We collected a data set with three to seven recording sessions and conducted experiments with the combination techniques. Experimental results showed that facial analysis improve hand gesture recognition, decision level fusion performs better than feature level fusion.

  13. USING RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION TO DESIGN TECHNOLOGY FOR RESILIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Arminda Guerra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Research in human computer interaction (HCI) covers both technological and human behavioural concerns. As a consequence, the contributions made in HCI research tend to be aware to either engineering or the social sciences. In HCI the purpose of practical research contributions is to reveal unknown insights about human behaviour and its relationship to technology. Practical research methods normally used in HCI include formal experiments, field experiments, field studies, interviews, ...

  14. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  15. Engageability: a new sub-principle of the learnability principle in human-computer interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Chimbo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The learnability principle relates to improving the usability of software, as well as users’ performance and productivity. A gap has been identified as the current definition of the principle does not distinguish between users of different ages. To determine the extent of the gap, this article compares the ways in which two user groups, adults and children, learn how to use an unfamiliar software application. In doing this, we bring together the research areas of human-computer interaction (HCI, adult and child learning, learning theories and strategies, usability evaluation and interaction design. A literature survey conducted on learnability and learning processes considered the meaning of learnability of software applications across generations. In an empirical investigation, users aged from 9 to 12 and from 35 to 50 were observed in a usability laboratory while learning to use educational software applications. Insights that emerged from data analysis showed different tactics and approaches that children and adults use when learning unfamiliar software. Eye tracking data was also recorded. Findings indicated that subtle re- interpretation of the learnability principle and its associated sub-principles was required. An additional sub-principle, namely engageability was proposed to incorporate aspects of learnability that are not covered by the existing sub-principles. Our re-interpretation of the learnability principle and the resulting design recommendations should help designers to fulfill the varying needs of different-aged users, and improve the learnability of their designs. Keywords: Child computer interaction, Design principles, Eye tracking, Generational differences, human-computer interaction, Learning theories, Learnability, Engageability, Software applications, Uasability Disciplines: Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Studies, Computer science, Observational Studies

  16. Human-Computer Interaction Handbook Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jacko, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    The third edition of a groundbreaking reference, The Human--Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications raises the bar for handbooks in this field. It is the largest, most complete compilation of HCI theories, principles, advances, case studies, and more that exist within a single volume. The book captures the current and emerging sub-disciplines within HCI related to research, development, and practice that continue to advance at an astonishing rate. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base as well as visionary perspe

  17. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  18. Real-time non-invasive eyetracking and gaze-point determination for human-computer interaction and biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Ashit; Morookian, John-Michael; Monacos, S.; Lam, R.; Lebaw, C.; Bond, A.

    2004-01-01

    Eyetracking is one of the latest technologies that has shown potential in several areas including human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological problems in individuals.

  19. Human-computer interaction for alert warning and attention allocation systems of the multimodal watchstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermayer, Richard W.; Nugent, William A.

    2000-11-01

    The SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego is currently developing an advanced Multi-Modal Watchstation (MMWS); design concepts and software from this effort are intended for transition to future United States Navy surface combatants. The MMWS features multiple flat panel displays and several modes of user interaction, including voice input and output, natural language recognition, 3D audio, stylus and gestural inputs. In 1999, an extensive literature review was conducted on basic and applied research concerned with alerting and warning systems. After summarizing that literature, a human computer interaction (HCI) designer's guide was prepared to support the design of an attention allocation subsystem (AAS) for the MMWS. The resultant HCI guidelines are being applied in the design of a fully interactive AAS prototype. An overview of key findings from the literature review, a proposed design methodology with illustrative examples, and an assessment of progress made in implementing the HCI designers guide are presented.

  20. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  1. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  2. Human-Computer Interaction and Sociological Insight: A Theoretical Examination and Experiment in Building Affinity in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Michael Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The juxtaposition of classic sociological theory and the, relatively, young discipline of human-computer interaction (HCI) serves as a powerful mechanism for both exploring the theoretical impacts of technology on human interactions as well as the application of technological systems to moderate interactions. It is the intent of this dissertation…

  3. Twenty Years of Creativity Research in Human-Computer Interaction: Current State and Future Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich Pedersen, Jonas; Biskjaer, Michael Mose; Dalsgaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Creativity has been a growing topic within the ACM community since the 1990s. However, no clear overview of this trend has been offered. We present a thorough survey of 998 creativity-related publications in the ACM Digital Library collected using keyword search to determine prevailing approaches......, topics, and characteristics of creativity-oriented Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research. . A selected sample based on yearly citations yielded 221 publications, which were analyzed using constant comparison analysis. We found that HCI is almost exclusively responsible for creativity......-oriented publications; they focus on collaborative creativity rather than individual creativity; there is a general lack of definition of the term ‘creativity’; empirically based contributions are prevalent; and many publications focus on new tools, often developed by researchers. On this basis, we present three...

  4. Integrated multimodal human-computer interface and augmented reality for interactive display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Marius S.; Sundareswaran, Venkataraman; Chen, S.; Behringer, Reinhold; Tam, Clement K.; Chan, M.; Bangayan, Phil T.; McGee, Joshua H.

    2000-08-01

    We describe new systems for improved integrated multimodal human-computer interaction and augmented reality for a diverse array of applications, including future advanced cockpits, tactical operations centers, and others. We have developed an integrated display system featuring: speech recognition of multiple concurrent users equipped with both standard air- coupled microphones and novel throat-coupled sensors (developed at Army Research Labs for increased noise immunity); lip reading for improving speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments, three-dimensional spatialized audio for improved display of warnings, alerts, and other information; wireless, coordinated handheld-PC control of a large display; real-time display of data and inferences from wireless integrated networked sensors with on-board signal processing and discrimination; gesture control with disambiguated point-and-speak capability; head- and eye- tracking coupled with speech recognition for 'look-and-speak' interaction; and integrated tetherless augmented reality on a wearable computer. The various interaction modalities (speech recognition, 3D audio, eyetracking, etc.) are implemented a 'modality servers' in an Internet-based client-server architecture. Each modality server encapsulates and exposes commercial and research software packages, presenting a socket network interface that is abstracted to a high-level interface, minimizing both vendor dependencies and required changes on the client side as the server's technology improves.

  5. Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Valerdi Luz María

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tridimensional representations stimulate cognitive processes that are the core and foundation of human-computer interaction (HCI. Those cognitive processes take place while a user navigates and explores a virtual environment (VE and are mainly related to spatial memory storage, attention, and perception. VEs have many distinctive features (e.g., involvement, immersion, and presence that can significantly improve HCI in highly demanding and interactive systems such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI. BCI is as a nonmuscular communication channel that attempts to reestablish the interaction between an individual and his/her environment. Although BCI research started in the sixties, this technology is not efficient or reliable yet for everyone at any time. Over the past few years, researchers have argued that main BCI flaws could be associated with HCI issues. The evidence presented thus far shows that VEs can (1 set out working environmental conditions, (2 maximize the efficiency of BCI control panels, (3 implement navigation systems based not only on user intentions but also on user emotions, and (4 regulate user mental state to increase the differentiation between control and noncontrol modalities.

  6. Multi-step EMG Classification Algorithm for Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Peng; Barreto, Armando; Adjouadi, Malek

    A three-electrode human-computer interaction system, based on digital processing of the Electromyogram (EMG) signal, is presented. This system can effectively help disabled individuals paralyzed from the neck down to interact with computers or communicate with people through computers using point-and-click graphic interfaces. The three electrodes are placed on the right frontalis, the left temporalis and the right temporalis muscles in the head, respectively. The signal processing algorithm used translates the EMG signals during five kinds of facial movements (left jaw clenching, right jaw clenching, eyebrows up, eyebrows down, simultaneous left & right jaw clenching) into five corresponding types of cursor movements (left, right, up, down and left-click), to provide basic mouse control. The classification strategy is based on three principles: the EMG energy of one channel is typically larger than the others during one specific muscle contraction; the spectral characteristics of the EMG signals produced by the frontalis and temporalis muscles during different movements are different; the EMG signals from adjacent channels typically have correlated energy profiles. The algorithm is evaluated on 20 pre-recorded EMG signal sets, using Matlab simulations. The results show that this method provides improvements and is more robust than other previous approaches.

  7. USING OLFACTORY DISPLAYS AS A NONTRADITIONAL INTERFACE IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Efe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smell has its limitations and disadvantages as a display medium, but it also has its strengths and many have recognized its potential. At present, in communications and virtual technologies, smell is either forgotten or improperly stimulated, because non controlled odorants present in the physical space surrounding the user. Nonetheless a controlled presentation of olfactory information can give advantages in various application fields. Therefore, two enabling technologies, electronic noses and especially olfactory displays are reviewed. Scenarios of usage are discussed together with relevant psycho-physiological issues. End-to-end systems including olfactory interfaces are quantitatively characterised under many respects. Recent works done by the authors on field are reported. The article will touch briefly on the control of scent emissions; an important factor to consider when building scented computer systems. As a sample application SUBSMELL system investigated. A look at areas of human computer interaction where olfaction output may prove useful will be presented. The article will finish with some brief conclusions and discuss some shortcomings and gaps of the topic. In particular, the addition of olfactory cues to a virtual environment increased the user's sense of presence and memory of the environment. Also, this article discusses the educational aspect of the subsmell systems.

  8. Design of a compact low-power human-computer interaction equipment for hand motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianwei; Jin, Wenguang

    2017-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) raises demand of convenience, endurance, responsiveness and naturalness. This paper describes a design of a compact wearable low-power HCI equipment applied to gesture recognition. System combines multi-mode sense signals: the vision sense signal and the motion sense signal, and the equipment is equipped with the depth camera and the motion sensor. The dimension (40 mm × 30 mm) and structure is compact and portable after tight integration. System is built on a module layered framework, which contributes to real-time collection (60 fps), process and transmission via synchronous confusion with asynchronous concurrent collection and wireless Blue 4.0 transmission. To minimize equipment's energy consumption, system makes use of low-power components, managing peripheral state dynamically, switching into idle mode intelligently, pulse-width modulation (PWM) of the NIR LEDs of the depth camera and algorithm optimization by the motion sensor. To test this equipment's function and performance, a gesture recognition algorithm is applied to system. As the result presents, general energy consumption could be as low as 0.5 W.

  9. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Jason J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's colorectal cancer (CRC screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  10. How should Fitts' Law be applied to human-computer interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, D. J.; Holden, K.; Adam, S.; Rudisill, M.; Magee, L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper challenges the notion that any Fitts' Law model can be applied generally to human-computer interaction, and proposes instead that applying Fitts' Law requires knowledge of the users' sequence of movements, direction of movement, and typical movement amplitudes as well as target sizes. Two experiments examined a text selection task with sequences of controlled movements (point-click and point-drag). For the point-click sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the diagonal across the text object in the direction of pointing (rather than the horizontal extent of the text object) as the target size provided the best fit for the pointing time data, whereas for the point-drag sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the vertical size of the text object as the target size gave the best fit. Dragging times were fitted well by Fitts' Law models that used either the vertical or horizontal size of the terminal character in the text object. Additional results of note were that pointing in the point-click sequence was consistently faster than in the point-drag sequence, and that pointing in either sequence was consistently faster than dragging. The discussion centres around the need to define task characteristics before applying Fitts' Law to an interface design or analysis, analyses of pointing and of dragging, and implications for interface design.

  11. User involvement in the design of human-computer interactions: some similarities and differences between design approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.M.; Long, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a general review of user involvement in the design of human-computer interactions, as advocated by a selection of different approaches to design. The selection comprises User-Centred Design, Participatory Design, Socio-Technical Design, Soft Systems Methodology, and Joint

  12. Using GOMS and NASA-TLX to Evaluate Human-Computer Interaction Process in Interactive Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramkumar, A.; Stappers, P.J.; Niessen, W.J.; Adebahr, S; Schimek-Jasch, T; Nestle, U; Song, Y.

    2016-01-01

    HCI plays an important role in interactive medical image segmentation. The Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules (GOMS) model and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire are different methods that are often used to evaluate the HCI

  13. HCI^2 Framework: A software framework for multimodal human-computer interaction systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel software framework for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface (MHCI) systems. The proposed software framework, which is called the HCI∧2 Framework, is built upon publish/subscribe (P/S) architecture. It implements a

  14. The Importance of Human-Computer Interaction in Radiology E-learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Harder, Annemarie M; Frijlingh, Marissa; Ravesloot, Cécile J; Oosterbaan, Anne E; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2016-01-01

    With the development of cross-sectional imaging techniques and transformation to digital reading of radiological imaging, e-learning might be a promising tool in undergraduate radiology education. In this systematic review of the literature, we evaluate the emergence of image interaction

  15. Ontology for assessment studies of human-computer-interaction in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machno, Andrej; Jannin, Pierre; Dameron, Olivier; Korb, Werner; Scheuermann, Gerik; Meixensberger, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    New technologies improve modern medicine, but may result in unwanted consequences. Some occur due to inadequate human-computer-interactions (HCI). To assess these consequences, an investigation model was developed to facilitate the planning, implementation and documentation of studies for HCI in surgery. The investigation model was formalized in Unified Modeling Language and implemented as an ontology. Four different top-level ontologies were compared: Object-Centered High-level Reference, Basic Formal Ontology, General Formal Ontology (GFO) and Descriptive Ontology for Linguistic and Cognitive Engineering, according to the three major requirements of the investigation model: the domain-specific view, the experimental scenario and the representation of fundamental relations. Furthermore, this article emphasizes the distinction of "information model" and "model of meaning" and shows the advantages of implementing the model in an ontology rather than in a database. The results of the comparison show that GFO fits the defined requirements adequately: the domain-specific view and the fundamental relations can be implemented directly, only the representation of the experimental scenario requires minor extensions. The other candidates require wide-ranging extensions, concerning at least one of the major implementation requirements. Therefore, the GFO was selected to realize an appropriate implementation of the developed investigation model. The ensuing development considered the concrete implementation of further model aspects and entities: sub-domains, space and time, processes, properties, relations and functions. The investigation model and its ontological implementation provide a modular guideline for study planning, implementation and documentation within the area of HCI research in surgery. This guideline helps to navigate through the whole study process in the form of a kind of standard or good clinical practice, based on the involved foundational frameworks

  16. Human Computer Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Human Computer Music Performance (HCMP) is the study of music performance by live human performers and real-time computer-based performers. One goal of HCMP is to create a highly autonomous artificial performer that can fill the role of a human, especially in a popular music setting. This will require advances in automated music listening and understanding, new representations for music, techniques for music synchronization, real-time human-computer communication, music generation, sound synt...

  17. The Importance of Human-Computer Interaction in Radiology E-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, Annemarie M; Frijlingh, Marissa; Ravesloot, Cécile J; Oosterbaan, Anne E; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2016-04-01

    With the development of cross-sectional imaging techniques and transformation to digital reading of radiological imaging, e-learning might be a promising tool in undergraduate radiology education. In this systematic review of the literature, we evaluate the emergence of image interaction possibilities in radiology e-learning programs and evidence for effects of radiology e-learning on learning outcomes and perspectives of medical students and teachers. A systematic search in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, ERIC, and PsycInfo was performed. Articles were screened by two authors and included when they concerned the evaluation of radiological e-learning tools for undergraduate medical students. Nineteen articles were included. Seven studies evaluated e-learning programs with image interaction possibilities. Students perceived e-learning with image interaction possibilities to be a useful addition to learning with hard copy images and to be effective for learning 3D anatomy. Both e-learning programs with and without image interaction possibilities were found to improve radiological knowledge and skills. In general, students found e-learning programs easy to use, rated image quality high, and found the difficulty level of the courses appropriate. Furthermore, they felt that their knowledge and understanding of radiology improved by using e-learning. In conclusion, the addition of radiology e-learning in undergraduate medical education can improve radiological knowledge and image interpretation skills. Differences between the effect of e-learning with and without image interpretation possibilities on learning outcomes are unknown and should be subject to future research.

  18. Developing Human-Computer Interface Models and Representation Techniques(Dialogue Management as an Integral Part of Software Engineering)

    OpenAIRE

    Hartson, H. Rex; Hix, Deborah; Kraly, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    The Dialogue Management Project at Virginia Tech is studying the poorly understood problem of human-computer dialogue development. This problem often leads to low usability in human-computer dialogues. The Dialogue Management Project approaches solutions to low usability in interfaces by addressing human-computer dialogue development as an integral and equal part of the total system development process. This project consists of two rather distinct, but dependent, parts. One is development of ...

  19. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary

  20. Quality of human-computer interaction - results of a national usability survey of hospital-IT in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bundschuh Bettina B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the increasing functionality of medical information systems, it is hard to imagine day to day work in hospitals without IT support. Therefore, the design of dialogues between humans and information systems is one of the most important issues to be addressed in health care. This survey presents an analysis of the current quality level of human-computer interaction of healthcare-IT in German hospitals, focused on the users' point of view. Methods To evaluate the usability of clinical-IT according to the design principles of EN ISO 9241-10 the IsoMetrics Inventory, an assessment tool, was used. The focus of this paper has been put on suitability for task, training effort and conformity with user expectations, differentiated by information systems. Effectiveness has been evaluated with the focus on interoperability and functionality of different IT systems. Results 4521 persons from 371 hospitals visited the start page of the study, while 1003 persons from 158 hospitals completed the questionnaire. The results show relevant variations between different information systems. Conclusions Specialised information systems with defined functionality received better assessments than clinical information systems in general. This could be attributed to the improved customisation of these specialised systems for specific working environments. The results can be used as reference data for evaluation and benchmarking of human computer engineering in clinical health IT context for future studies.

  1. Gaze-and-brain-controlled interfaces for human-computer and human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkin S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human-machine interaction technology has greatly evolved during the last decades, but manual and speech modalities remain single output channels with their typical constraints imposed by the motor system’s information transfer limits. Will brain-computer interfaces (BCIs and gaze-based control be able to convey human commands or even intentions to machines in the near future? We provide an overview of basic approaches in this new area of applied cognitive research. Objective. We test the hypothesis that the use of communication paradigms and a combination of eye tracking with unobtrusive forms of registering brain activity can improve human-machine interaction. Methods and Results. Three groups of ongoing experiments at the Kurchatov Institute are reported. First, we discuss the communicative nature of human-robot interaction, and approaches to building a more e cient technology. Specifically, “communicative” patterns of interaction can be based on joint attention paradigms from developmental psychology, including a mutual “eye-to-eye” exchange of looks between human and robot. Further, we provide an example of “eye mouse” superiority over the computer mouse, here in emulating the task of selecting a moving robot from a swarm. Finally, we demonstrate a passive, noninvasive BCI that uses EEG correlates of expectation. This may become an important lter to separate intentional gaze dwells from non-intentional ones. Conclusion. The current noninvasive BCIs are not well suited for human-robot interaction, and their performance, when they are employed by healthy users, is critically dependent on the impact of the gaze on selection of spatial locations. The new approaches discussed show a high potential for creating alternative output pathways for the human brain. When support from passive BCIs becomes mature, the hybrid technology of the eye-brain-computer (EBCI interface will have a chance to enable natural, fluent, and the

  2. Proceedings of the 5th Danish Human-Computer Interaction Research Symposium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Nielsen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Lene Nielsen DEALING WITH REALITY - IN THEORY Gitte Skou PetersenA NEW IFIP WORKING GROUP - HUMAN WORK INTERACTION DESIGN Rikke Ørngreen, Torkil Clemmensen & Annelise Mark-Pejtersen CLASSIFICATION OF DESCRIPTIONS USED IN SOFTWARE AND INTERACTION DESIGN Georg Strøm OBSTACLES TO DESIGN IN VOLUNTEER BASED...... for the symposium, of which 14 were presented orally in four panel sessions. Previously the symposium has been held at University of Aarhus 2001, University of Copenhagen 2002, Roskilde University Center 2003, Aalborg University 2004. Torkil Clemmensen & Lene Nielsen Copenhagen, November 2005 CONTENT INTRODUCTION...

  3. Design Science in Human-Computer Interaction: A Model and Three Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestopnik, Nathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Humanity has entered an era where computing technology is virtually ubiquitous. From websites and mobile devices to computers embedded in appliances on our kitchen counters and automobiles parked in our driveways, information and communication technologies (ICTs) and IT artifacts are fundamentally changing the ways we interact with our world.…

  4. Trends in Human-Computer Interaction to Support Future Intelligence Analysis Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Oblong Industries Inc. (Oblong, 2011). In addition to the camera-based gesture interaction (Figure 4), this system offers a management capability...EyeTap Lumus Eyewear LOE FogScreen HP LiM PC Microvision PEK and SHOWWX Pico Projectors Head Mounted Display Chinese Holo Screen 10 Advanced Analyst

  5. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, M.; Nijboer, F.; Broek, E.L. van den; Fairclough, S.; Nijholt, A.

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This

  6. Brain-Computer Interfaces. Applying our Minds to Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Desney S.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person’s mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science

  7. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Nijboer, Femke; van den Broek, Egon; Fairclough, Stephen; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Bohus, Dan; Aghajan, Hamid; Nijholt, Antinus; Cassell, Justine; Epps, Julien

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to "act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This

  8. Brain-Computer Interfaces Applying Our Minds to Human-computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Desney S

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person's mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science fiction stories. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging technologies have started to turn these myths into a reality, and are providing us with the ability to interface directly with the human brain. This ability is made possible through the use of sensors that monitor physical p

  9. AirDraw: Leveraging Smart Watch Motion Sensors for Mobile Human Computer Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sajjadi, Seyed A; Moazen, Danial; Nahapetian, Ani

    2017-01-01

    Wearable computing is one of the fastest growing technologies today. Smart watches are poised to take over at least of half the wearable devices market in the near future. Smart watch screen size, however, is a limiting factor for growth, as it restricts practical text input. On the other hand, wearable devices have some features, such as consistent user interaction and hands-free, heads-up operations, which pave the way for gesture recognition methods of text entry. This paper proposes a new...

  10. Guest Editorial Special Issue on Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Santos, E.; Pentland, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2009-01-01

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  11. Ergonomic guidelines for using notebook personal computers. Technical Committee on Human-Computer Interaction, International Ergonomics Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Piccoli, B; Smith, M J; Sotoyama, M; Sweitzer, G; Villanueva, M B; Yoshitake, R

    2000-10-01

    In the 1980's, the visual display terminal (VDT) was introduced in workplaces of many countries. Soon thereafter, an upsurge in reported cases of related health problems, such as musculoskeletal disorders and eyestrain, was seen. Recently, the flat panel display or notebook personal computer (PC) became the most remarkable feature in modern workplaces with VDTs and even in homes. A proactive approach must be taken to avert foreseeable ergonomic and occupational health problems from the use of this new technology. Because of its distinct physical and optical characteristics, the ergonomic requirements for notebook PCs in terms of machine layout, workstation design, lighting conditions, among others, should be different from the CRT-based computers. The Japan Ergonomics Society (JES) technical committee came up with a set of guidelines for notebook PC use following exploratory discussions that dwelt on its ergonomic aspects. To keep in stride with this development, the Technical Committee on Human-Computer Interaction under the auspices of the International Ergonomics Association worked towards the international issuance of the guidelines. This paper unveils the result of this collaborative effort.

  12. A mobile Nursing Information System based on human-computer interaction design for improving quality of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Wei; Liu, Cheng-Li

    2012-06-01

    A conventional Nursing Information System (NIS), which supports the role of nurse in some areas, is typically deployed as an immobile system. However, the traditional information system can't response to patients' conditions in real-time, causing delays on the availability of this information. With the advances of information technology, mobile devices are increasingly being used to extend the human mind's limited capacity to recall and process large numbers of relevant variables and to support information management, general administration, and clinical practice. Unfortunately, there have been few studies about the combination of a well-designed small-screen interface with a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical nursing. Some researchers found that user interface design is an important factor in determining the usability and potential use of a mobile system. Therefore, this study proposed a systematic approach to the development of a mobile nursing information system (MNIS) based on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction (M-HCI) for use in clinical nursing. The system combines principles of small-screen interface design with user-specified requirements. In addition, the iconic functions were designed with metaphor concept that will help users learn the system more quickly with less working-memory. An experiment involving learnability testing, thinking aloud and a questionnaire investigation was conducted for evaluating the effect of MNIS on PDA. The results show that the proposed MNIS is good on learning and higher satisfaction on symbol investigation, terminology and system information.

  13. Using Noninvasive Brain Measurement to Explore the Psychological Effects of Computer Malfunctions on Users during Human-Computer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M. Hirshfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s technologically driven world, there is a need to better understand the ways that common computer malfunctions affect computer users. These malfunctions may have measurable influences on computer user’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses. An experiment was conducted where participants conducted a series of web search tasks while wearing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and galvanic skin response sensors. Two computer malfunctions were introduced during the sessions which had the potential to influence correlates of user trust and suspicion. Surveys were given after each session to measure user’s perceived emotional state, cognitive load, and perceived trust. Results suggest that fNIRS can be used to measure the different cognitive and emotional responses associated with computer malfunctions. These cognitive and emotional changes were correlated with users’ self-report levels of suspicion and trust, and they in turn suggest future work that further explores the capability of fNIRS for the measurement of user experience during human-computer interactions.

  14. After-effects of human-computer interaction indicated by P300 of the event-related brain potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, M; Huber, R

    1998-05-01

    After-effects of human-computer interaction (HCI) were investigated by using the P300 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP). Forty-nine subjects (naive non-users, beginners, experienced users, programmers) completed three paper/pencil tasks (text editing, solving intelligence test items, filling out a questionnaire on sensation seeking) and three HCI tasks (text editing, executing a tutor program or programming, playing Tetris). The sequence of 7-min tasks was randomized between subjects and balanced between groups. After each experimental condition ERPs were recorded during an acoustic discrimination task at F3, F4, Cz, P3 and P4. Data indicate that: (1) mental after-effects of HCI can be detected by P300 of the ERP; (2) HCI showed in general a reduced amplitude; (3) P300 amplitude varied also with type of task, mainly at F4 where it was smaller after cognitive tasks (intelligence test/programming) and larger after emotion-based tasks (sensation seeking/Tetris); (4) cognitive tasks showed shorter latencies; (5) latencies were widely location-independent (within the range of 356-358 ms at F3, F4, P3 and P4) after executing the tutor program or programming; and (6) all observed after-effects were independent of the user's experience in operating computers and may therefore reflect short-term after-effects only and no structural changes of information processing caused by HCI.

  15. Human computer interaction and communication aids for hearing-impaired, deaf and deaf-blind people: Introduction to the special thematic session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives ail overview and extends the Special Thematic Session (STS) oil research and development of technologies for hearing-impaired, deaf, and deaf-blind people. The topics of the session focus oil special equipment or services to improve communication and human computer interaction....... The papers are related to visual communication using captions, sign language, speech-reading, to vibro-tactile stimulation, or to general services for hearing-impaired persons....

  16. Une approche pragmatique cognitive de l'interaction personne/système informatisé A Cognitive Pragmatic Approach of Human/Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Saint-Pierre

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, nous proposons une approche inférentielle de l'interaction humain/ordinateur. C'est par la prise en compte de l'activité cognitive de l'utilisateur pendant son travail avec un système que nous voulons comprendre ce type d'interaction. Ceci mènera à une véritable évaluation des interfaces/utilisateurs et pourra servir de guide pour des interfaces en développement. Nos analyses décrivent le processus inférentiel impliqué dans le contexte dynamique d'exécution de tâche, grâce à une catégorisation de l'activité cognitive issue des verbalisations recueillies auprès d'utilisateurs qui " pensent à haute voix " en travaillant. Nous présentons des instruments méthodologiques mis au point dans notre recherche pour l'analyses et la catégorisation des protocoles. Les résultats sont interprétés dans le cadre de la théorie de la pertinence de Sperber et Wilson (1995 en termes d'effort cognitif dans le traitement des objets (linguistique, iconique, graphique... apparaissant à l'écran et d'effet cognitif de ces derniers. Cette approche est généralisable à tout autre contexte d'interaction humain/ordinateur comme, par exemple, le télé-apprentissage.This article proposes an inferential approach for the study of human/computer interaction. It is by taking into account the user's cognitive activity while working at a computer that we propose to understand this interaction. This approach leads to a real user/interface evaluation and, hopefully, will serve as guidelines for the design of new interfaces. Our analysis describe the inferential process involved in the dynamics of task performance. The cognitive activity of the user is grasped by the mean of a " thinking aloud " method through which the user is asked to verbalize while working at the computer. Tools developped by our research team for the categorization of the verbal protocols are presented. The results are interpreted within the relevance theory

  17. SPATIO-TEMPORAL CLUSTERING OF MOVEMENT DATA: AN APPLICATION TO TRAJECTORIES GENERATED BY HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McArdle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in ubiquitous positioning technologies and their increasing availability in mobile devices has generated large volumes of movement data. Analysing these datasets is challenging. While data mining techniques can be applied to this data, knowledge of the underlying spatial region can assist interpreting the data. We have developed a geovisual analysis tool for studying movement data. In addition to interactive visualisations, the tool has features for analysing movement trajectories, in terms of their spatial and temporal similarity. The focus in this paper is on mouse trajectories of users interacting with web maps. The results obtained from a user trial can be used as a starting point to determine which parts of a mouse trajectory can assist personalisation of spatial web maps.

  18. Accident sequence analysis of human-computer interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, C.-F.; Chen, W.-H.

    2000-01-01

    It is important to predict potential accident sequences of human-computer interaction in a safety-critical computing system so that vulnerable points can be disclosed and removed. We address this issue by proposing a Multi-Context human-computer interaction Model along with its analysis techniques, an Augmented Fault Tree Analysis, and a Concurrent Event Tree Analysis. The proposed augmented fault tree can identify the potential weak points in software design that may induce unintended software functions or erroneous human procedures. The concurrent event tree can enumerate possible accident sequences due to these weak points

  19. Service Interaction Flow Analysis Technique for Service Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Olli; Kinnula, Marianne; Syrjanen, Anna-Liisa

    2017-01-01

    Service interaction flows are difficult to capture, analyze, outline, and represent for research and design purposes. We examine how variation of personalized service flows in technology-mediated service interaction can be modeled and analyzed to provide information on how service personalization...... could support interaction. We have analyzed service interaction cases in a context of technology-mediated car rental service. With the analysis technique we propose, inspired by Interaction Analysis method, we were able to capture and model the situational service interaction. Our contribution regarding...... technology-mediated service interaction design is twofold: First, with the increased understanding on the role of personalization in managing variation in technology-mediated service interaction, our study contributes to designing service management information systems and human-computer interfaces...

  20. Sensor-based assessment of the in-situ quality of human computer interaction in the cars : final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Human attention is a finite resource. When interrupted while performing a task, this : resource is split between two interactive tasks. People have to decide whether the benefits : from the interruptive interaction will be enough to offset the loss o...

  1. Cooperation in human-computer communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kronenberg, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to simulate cooperation in human-computer communication to model the communicative interaction process of agents in natural dialogs in order to provide advanced human-computer interaction in that coherence is maintained between contributions of both agents, i.e. the human user and the computer. This thesis contributes to certain aspects of understanding and generation and their interaction in the German language. In spontaneous dialogs agents cooperate by the pro...

  2. Ubiquitous human computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a drawing pin and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This paper explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring.

  3. Human computer interactions in next-generation of aircraft smart navigation management systems: task analysis and architecture under an agent-oriented methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino-Rodríguez, José M; García-Herrero, Jesús; Besada-Portas, Juan; Ravelo-García, Antonio G; Travieso-González, Carlos; Alonso-Hernández, Jesús B

    2015-03-04

    The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS) that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI) for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers' indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications.

  4. Human Computer Interactions in Next-Generation of Aircraft Smart Navigation Management Systems: Task Analysis and Architecture under an Agent-Oriented Methodological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino-Rodríguez, José M.; García-Herrero, Jesús; Besada-Portas, Juan; Ravelo-García, Antonio G.; Travieso-González, Carlos; Alonso-Hernández, Jesús B.

    2015-01-01

    The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS) that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI) for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers’ indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications. PMID:25746092

  5. What is the value of embedding artificial emotional prosody in human computer interactions? Implications for theory and design in psychological science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. C. Mitchell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In computerised technology, artificial speech is becoming increasingly important, and is already used in ATMs, online gaming and healthcare contexts. However, today’s artificial speech typically sounds monotonous, a main reason for this being the lack of meaningful prosody. One particularly important function of prosody is to convey different emotions. This is because successful encoding and decoding of emotions is vital for effective social cognition, which is increasingly recognised in human-computer interaction contexts. Current attempts to artificially synthesise emotional prosody are much improved relative to early attempts, but there remains much work to be done due to methodological problems, lack of agreed acoustic correlates, and lack of theoretical grounding. If the addition of synthetic emotional prosody is not of sufficient quality, it may risk alienating users instead of enhancing their experience. So the value of embedding emotion cues in artificial speech may ultimately depend on the quality of the synthetic emotional prosody. However, early evidence on reactions to synthesised nonverbal cues in the facial modality bodes well. Attempts to implement the recognition of emotional prosody into artificial applications and interfaces have perhaps been met with greater success, but the ultimate test of synthetic emotional prosody will be to critically compare how people react to synthetic emotional prosody vs. natural emotional prosody, at the behavioural, socio-cognitive and neural levels.

  6. Human Computer Interactions in Next-Generation of Aircraft Smart Navigation Management Systems: Task Analysis and Architecture under an Agent-Oriented Methodological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Canino-Rodríguez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers’ indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications.

  7. Handbook of human computation

    CERN Document Server

    Michelucci, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses the emerging area of human computation, The chapters, written by leading international researchers, explore existing and future opportunities to combine the respective strengths of both humans and machines in order to create powerful problem-solving capabilities. The book bridges scientific communities, capturing and integrating the unique perspective and achievements of each. It coalesces contributions from industry and across related disciplines in order to motivate, define, and anticipate the future of this exciting new frontier in science and cultural evolution. Reade

  8. A Qualitative Analysis of NASA’s Human Computer Interaction Group Examining the Root Causes of Focusing on Derivative System Improvements Versus Core User Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    toward qualitative analysis methods where they excelled at user research and workflow process analysis consistent with their formal training, rather...to a single one (e.g., one type of user research or graphic design) at larger Silicon Valley firms. The core competency of the design team tended...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF NASA’S HUMAN COMPUTER

  9. Investigation and evaluation into the usability of human-computer interfaces using a typical CAD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickett, J D

    1987-01-01

    This research program covers three topics relating to the human-computer interface namely, voice recognition, tools and techniques for evaluation, and user and interface modeling. An investigation into the implementation of voice-recognition technologies examines how voice recognizers may be evaluated in commercial software. A prototype system was developed with the collaboration of FEMVIEW Ltd. (marketing a CAD package). A theoretical approach to evaluation leads to the hypothesis that human-computer interaction is affected by personality, influencing types of dialogue, preferred methods for providing helps, etc. A user model based on personality traits, or habitual-behavior patterns (HBP) is presented. Finally, a practical framework is provided for the evaluation of human-computer interfaces. It suggests that evaluation is an integral part of design and that the iterative use of evaluation techniques throughout the conceptualization, design, implementation and post-implementation stages will ensure systems that satisfy the needs of the users and fulfill the goal of usability.

  10. Interactive segmentation techniques algorithms and performance evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jia; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on interactive segmentation techniques, which have been extensively studied in recent decades. Interactive segmentation emphasizes clear extraction of objects of interest, whose locations are roughly indicated by human interactions based on high level perception. This book will first introduce classic graph-cut segmentation algorithms and then discuss state-of-the-art techniques, including graph matching methods, region merging and label propagation, clustering methods, and segmentation methods based on edge detection. A comparative analysis of these methods will be provided

  11. Artifical Intelligence for Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Th.S.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-proceedings of two events discussing AI for Human Computing: one Special Session during the Eighth International ACM Conference on Multimodal Interfaces (ICMI 2006), held in Banff, Canada, in November 2006, and a Workshop organized in conjunction

  12. Human-computer interaction fundamentals and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Gerard Jounghyun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction What HCI Is and Why It Is Important Principles of HCI     ""Know Thy User""      Understand the Task      Reduce Memory Load      Strive for Consistency      Remind Users and Refresh Their Memory      Prevent Errors/Reversal of Action      Naturalness SummaryReferences Specific HCI Guidelines Guideline Categories Examples of HCI Guidelines      Visual Display Layout (General HCI Design)      Information Structuring and Navigation (General HCI Design)      Taking User Input (General H

  13. Aesthetic Approaches to Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume consists of revised papers from the First International Workshop on Activity Theory Based Practical Methods for IT Design. The workshop took place in Copenhagen, Denmark, September 2-3, 2004. The particular focus of the workshop was the development of methods based on activity theory ...

  14. Measuring Appeal in Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neben, Tillmann; Xiao, Bo Sophia; Lim, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Appeal refers to the positive emotional response to an aesthetic, beautiful, or in another way desirable stimulus. It is a recurring topic in information systems (IS) research, and is important for understanding many phenomena of user behavior and decision-making. While past IS research on appeal...

  15. Handbook of human-computer interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helander, Martin; Landauer, Thomas K; Prabhu, Prasad V

    1997-01-01

    ... of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior wr...

  16. Hyperfine interactions measured by nuclear orientation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenier, R.

    1982-01-01

    This report concerns the use of hyperfine interaction to magnetism measurements and to the determination of the nuclear structure of Terbium isotopes by the low temperature nuclear orientation technique. In the first part we show that the rhodium atom does not support any localized moment in the chromium matrix. The hyperfine magnetic field at the rhodium nuclear site follows the Overhauser distribution, and the external applied magnetic field supports a negative Knight shift of 16%. In the second part we consider the structure of neutron deficient Terbium isotopes. We introduce a coherent way of evaluation and elaborate a new nuclear thermometer. The magnetic moments allows to strike on the studied states configuration. The analysis of our results shows a decrease of the nuclear deformation for the lighter isotopes [fr

  17. The Next Wave: Humans, Computers, and Redefining Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, William

    2018-01-01

    The Augmented/Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at KSC is dedicated to " exploration into the growing computer fields of Extended Reality and the Natural User Interface (it is) a proving ground for new technologies that can be integrated into future NASA projects and programs." The topics of Human Computer Interface, Human Computer Interaction, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Mixed Reality are defined; examples of work being done in these fields in the AVR Lab are given. Current new and future work in Computer Vision, Speech Recognition, and Artificial Intelligence are also outlined.

  18. Survey as a group interactive teaching technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GOREA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smooth running of the educational process and the results depend a great deal on the methods used. The methodology of teaching offers a great variety of teaching techniques that the teacher can make use of in the teaching/learning process. Such techniques as brainstorming, the cube, KLW, case study, Venn diagram, and many other are familiar to the teachers and they use them effectively in the classroom. The present article proposes a technique called ‘survey’, which has been successfully used by the author as a student-centered speaking activity in foreign language classes. It has certain advantages especially if used in large groups. It can be adapted for any other discipline in the case when the teacher wishes to offer the students space for cooperative activity and creativity.

  19. Techniques and architectures for 3D interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Spatial scientific datasets are all around us, and 3D visualization is a powerful tool to explore details and structures within them. When dealing with complex spatial structures, interactive Virtual Reality (VR) systems can potentially improve exploration over desktop-based systems. However, from

  20. Handbook of mathematical techniques for wavestructure interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Linton, CM

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe Water-Wave ProblemThe Linearised EquationsInteraction of a Wave with a StructureReciprocity RelationsEnergy of the Fluid MotionEIGENFUNCTION EXPANSIONSIntroductionConstruction of Vertical EigenfunctionTwo-Dimensional ProblemsThree-Dimensional ProblemsMatched Eigenfunction ExpansionsMULTIPOLE EXPANSIONSIntroductionIsolated ObstaclesMultiple BodiesINTEGRAL EQUATIONSSource DistributionGreen's TheoremThin ObstaclesInterior ProblemsFree-Surface ProblemsNumerical Evaluation of Green's functions

  1. Interactive data visualization foundations, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Matthew; Keim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Visualization is the process of representing data, information, and knowledge in a visual form to support the tasks of exploration, confirmation, presentation, and understanding. This book is designed as a textbook for students, researchers, analysts, professionals, and designers of visualization techniques, tools, and systems. It covers the full spectrum of the field, including mathematical and analytical aspects, ranging from its foundations to human visual perception; from coded algorithms for different types of data, information and tasks to the design and evaluation of new visualization techniques. Sample programs are provided as starting points for building one's own visualization tools. Numerous data sets have been made available that highlight different application areas and allow readers to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different visualization methods. Exercises, programming projects, and related readings are given for each chapter. The book concludes with an examination of several existin...

  2. Human computer confluence applied in healthcare and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle; Gaggioli, Andrea; Ferscha, Alois; Dunne, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Human computer confluence (HCC) is an ambitious research program studying how the emerging symbiotic relation between humans and computing devices can enable radically new forms of sensing, perception, interaction, and understanding. It is an interdisciplinary field, bringing together researches from horizons as various as pervasive computing, bio-signals processing, neuroscience, electronics, robotics, virtual & augmented reality, and provides an amazing potential for applications in medicine and rehabilitation.

  3. BUILD-IT : a computer vision-based interaction technique for a planning tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Fjeld, M.; Krueger, H.; Bichsel, M.; Leonhardt, U.; Meier, M.; Thimbleby, H.; O'Conaill, B.; Thomas, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Shows a method that goes beyond the established approaches of human-computer interaction. We first bring a serious critique of traditional interface types, showing their major drawbacks and limitations. Promising alternatives are offered by virtual (or immersive) reality (VR) and by augmented

  4. mobile phone interaction techniques for rural economy development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    presented. KEY WORDS: Interaction Techniques, Mobile phone, User Interface, ICT, Rural Development. ... and services must be designed to use available facilities ... detachable memory cards. .... access health information from the Internet.

  5. Use of interactive teaching techniques to introduce mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Teaching techniques included didactic lectures, case based discussion ... Conclusion: Interactive teaching provided a learning experience for both ... Keywords: Mental Health; Teaching; Resource-poor; Pilot; Innovative; Somaliland ...

  6. Mobile phone interaction techniques for rural economy development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to identify the various researches on interaction techniques and user interface design as a first step to the design of suitable mobile interactions and user interfaces for rural users. This research project is also aimed at socio-economic development and adding value to mobile phone users in ...

  7. Applying Human Computation Methods to Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Human Computation methods such as crowdsourcing and games with a purpose (GWAP) have each recently drawn considerable attention for their ability to synergize the strengths of people and technology to accomplish tasks that are challenging for either to do well alone. Despite this increased attention, much of this transformation has been focused on…

  8. Feedback Loops in Communication and Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex; Nijholt, Antinus; Huang, Thomas S.

    Building systems that are able to analyse communicative behaviours or take part in conversations requires a sound methodology in which the complex organisation of conversations is understood and tested on real-life samples. The data-driven approaches to human computing not only have a value for the

  9. Analytical techniques for the study of polyphenol-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklar Ulrih, Nataša

    2017-07-03

    This mini review focuses on advances in biophysical techniques to study polyphenol interactions with proteins. Polyphenols have many beneficial pharmacological properties, as a result of which they have been the subject of intensive studies. The most conventional techniques described here can be divided into three groups: (i) methods used for screening (in-situ methods); (ii) methods used to gain insight into the mechanisms of polyphenol-protein interactions; and (iii) methods used to study protein aggregation and precipitation. All of these methods used to study polyphenol-protein interactions are based on modifications to the physicochemical properties of the polyphenols or proteins after binding/complex formation in solution. To date, numerous review articles have been published in the field of polyphenols. This review will give a brief insight in computational methods and biosensors and cell-based methods, spectroscopic methods including fluorescence emission, UV-vis adsorption, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and light scattering techniques including small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, and calorimetric techniques (isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry), microscopy, the techniques which have been successfully used for polyphenol-protein interactions. At the end the new methods based on single molecule detection with high potential to study polyphenol-protein interactions will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed as well as the thermodynamic, kinetic or structural parameters, which can be obtained. The other relevant biophysical experimental techniques that have proven to be valuable, such electrochemical methods, hydrodynamic techniques and chromatographic techniques will not be described here.

  10. A Human/Computer Learning Network to Improve Biodiversity Conservation and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kelling, Steve; Gerbracht, Jeff; Fink, Daniel; Lagoze, Carl; Wong, Weng-Keen; Yu, Jun; Damoulas, Theodoros; Gomes, Carla

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe eBird, a citizen-science project that takes advantage of the human observational capacity to identify birds to species, which is then used to accurately represent patterns of bird occurrences across broad spatial and temporal extents. eBird employs artificial intelligence techniques such as machine learning to improve data quality by taking advantage of the synergies between human computation and mechanical computation. We call this a Human-Computer Learning Network,...

  11. My4Sight: A Human Computation Platform for Improving Flu Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Akupatni, Vivek Bharath

    2015-01-01

    While many human computation (human-in-the-loop) systems exist in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to solve problems that can't be solved by computers alone, comparatively fewer platforms exist for collecting human knowledge, and evaluation of various techniques for harnessing human insights in improving forecasting models for infectious diseases, such as Influenza and Ebola. In this thesis, we present the design and implementation of My4Sight, a human computation system develope...

  12. Nonactivation interaction techniques in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nonactivation interaction analytical methods are based on the interaction processes of nuclear and X-ray radiation with a sample, leading to their absorption and backscattering, to the ionization of gases or excitation of fluorescent X-ray by radiation, but not to the activation of determined elements. From the point of view of environmental analysis, the most useful nonactivation interaction techniques are X-ray fluorescence by photon or charged particle excitation, ionization of gases by nuclear radiation, elastic scattering of charged particles and backscattering of beta radiation. The significant advantage of these methods is that they are nondestructive. (author)

  13. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  14. Technique of studying the interaction of charges of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yefremov, E.I.; Kravtsov, V.S.; Myachina, N.I.; Rodak, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is presented for studying the interaction of explosive charges which includes recording of the velocity of detonation of the studied charges, measurement of mechanical stresses developing in this case in the medium and determination of granulometric composition of the model with simultaneous and diverse initiation.

  15. Virtual reality in medicine-computer graphics and interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, M; Krapichler, C; Lösch, A; Englmeier, K H; van Eimeren, W

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes several new visualization and interaction techniques that enable the use of virtual environments for routine medical purposes. A new volume-rendering method supports shaded and transparent visualization of medical image sequences in real-time with an interactive threshold definition. Based on these rendering algorithms two complementary segmentation approaches offer an intuitive assistance for a wide range of requirements in diagnosis and therapy planning. In addition, a hierarchical data representation for geometric surface descriptions guarantees an optimal use of available hardware resources and prevents inaccurate visualization. The combination of the presented techniques empowers the improved human-machine interface of virtual reality to support every interactive task in medical three-dimensional (3-D) image processing, from visualization of unsegmented data volumes up to the simulation of surgical procedures.

  16. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  17. Safety Metrics for Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveson, Nancy G; Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems.This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  18. Interactive floating windows: a new technique for stereoscopic video games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerebecki, Chris; Stanfield, Brodie; Tawadrous, Mina; Buckstein, Daniel; Hogue, Andrew; Kapralos, Bill

    2012-03-01

    The film industry has a long history of creating compelling experiences in stereoscopic 3D. Recently, the video game as an artistic medium has matured into an effective way to tell engaging and immersive stories. Given the current push to bring stereoscopic 3D technology into the consumer market there is considerable interest to develop stereoscopic 3D video games. Game developers have largely ignored the need to design their games specifically for stereoscopic 3D and have thus relied on automatic conversion and driver technology. Game developers need to evaluate solutions used in other media, such as film, to correct perceptual problems such as window violations, and modify or create new solutions to work within an interactive framework. In this paper we extend the dynamic floating window technique into the interactive domain enabling the player to position a virtual window in space. Interactively changing the position, size, and the 3D rotation of the virtual window, objects can be made to 'break the mask' dramatically enhancing the stereoscopic effect. By demonstrating that solutions from the film industry can be extended into the interactive space, it is our hope that this initiates further discussion in the game development community to strengthen their story-telling mechanisms in stereoscopic 3D games.

  19. Human-computer interface glove using flexible piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Seo, Jeonggyu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Park, Jung-Min

    2017-05-01

    In this note, we propose a human-computer interface glove based on flexible piezoelectric sensors. We select polyvinylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric material for the sensors because of advantages such as a steady piezoelectric characteristic and good flexibility. The sensors are installed in a fabric glove by means of pockets and Velcro bands. We detect changes in the angles of the finger joints from the outputs of the sensors, and use them for controlling a virtual hand that is utilized in virtual object manipulation. To assess the sensing ability of the piezoelectric sensors, we compare the processed angles from the sensor outputs with the real angles from a camera recoding. With good agreement between the processed and real angles, we successfully demonstrate the user interaction system with the virtual hand and interface glove based on the flexible piezoelectric sensors, for four hand motions: fist clenching, pinching, touching, and grasping.

  20. Experimental comparison of particle interaction measurement techniques using optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    Optical tweezers has become a powerful and common tool for sensitive determination of electrostatic interactions between colloidal particles. Recently, two techniques, 'blinking' tweezers and direct force measurements, have become increasingly prevalent in investigations of inter-particle potentials. The 'blinking' tweezers method acquires physical statistics of particle trajectories to determine drift velocities, diffusion coefficients, and ultimately colloidal forces as a function of the center-center separation of two particles. Direct force measurements monitor the position of a particle relative to the center of an optical trap as the separation distance between two continuously trapped particles is gradually decreased. As the particles near each other, the displacement from the trap center for each particle increases proportional to the inter-particle force. Although commonly employed in the investigation of interactions of colloidal particles, there exists no direct comparison of these experimental methods in the literature. In this study, an experimental apparatus was developed capable of performing both methods and is used to quantify electrostatic potentials between particles in several particle/solvent systems. Comparisons are drawn between the experiments conducted using the two measurement techniques, theory, and existing literature. Forces are quantified on the femto-Newton scale and results agree well with literature values

  1. Overview Electrotactile Feedback for Enhancing Human Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Daniel S.; Caesarendra, Wahyu

    2018-04-01

    To achieve effective interaction between a human and a computing device or machine, adequate feedback from the computing device or machine is required. Recently, haptic feedback is increasingly being utilised to improve the interactivity of the Human Computer Interface (HCI). Most existing haptic feedback enhancements aim at producing forces or vibrations to enrich the user’s interactive experience. However, these force and/or vibration actuated haptic feedback systems can be bulky and uncomfortable to wear and only capable of delivering a limited amount of information to the user which can limit both their effectiveness and the applications they can be applied to. To address this deficiency, electrotactile feedback is used. This involves delivering haptic sensations to the user by electrically stimulating nerves in the skin via electrodes placed on the surface of the skin. This paper presents a review and explores the capability of electrotactile feedback for HCI applications. In addition, a description of the sensory receptors within the skin for sensing tactile stimulus and electric currents alsoseveral factors which influenced electric signal to transmit to the brain via human skinare explained.

  2. Individual Difference Effects in Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    service staff. The subjects who participated in the experiment constituted the organization’s decision network . The subjects were presented the same...at the centek of an information-collection network . From the center of this network , the person can access and conmunicate with a variety of...with reverse video option) in slot 3; a software-controlled switch (i.e., the Videx " Softswitch ") for switching between 40- and 80-column display

  3. Questioning Mechanisms During Tutoring, Conversation, and Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Robert J. Seidel Dept. Psicologia Basica OERI US Army Research Institute Univ. Barcelona 555 New Jersey Ave., NW 5001 Eisenhower Ave. 08028 Barcelona...having a different set of random starting weights in the weight space and running the simulation 10 times. As a crude, but conservative estimate, a GOP

  4. Impact of Cognitive Architectures on Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    activation, reinforced learning, emotion, semantic memory , episodic memory , and visual imagery.12 In 2010 Rosenbloom created a variant of the Soar...being added to almost every new version. In 2004 Nuxoll and Laird added episodic memory to the Soar architecture.11 In 2008 Laird presented...York (NY): Psychology Press; 2014; p. 1–50. 11. Nuxoll A, Laird JE. A cognitive model of episodic memory integrated with a general cognitive

  5. Brain-Computer Interfaces Revolutionizing Human-Computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Graimann, Bernhard; Allison, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) establishes a direct output channel between the human brain and external devices. BCIs infer user intent via direct measures of brain activity and thus enable communication and control without movement. This book, authored by experts in the field, provides an accessible introduction to the neurophysiological and signal-processing background required for BCI, presents state-of-the-art non-invasive and invasive approaches, gives an overview of current hardware and software solutions, and reviews the most interesting as well as new, emerging BCI applications. The book is intended not only for students and young researchers, but also for newcomers and other readers from diverse backgrounds keen to learn about this vital scientific endeavour.

  6. Questioning Mechanisms during Tutoring, Conversation, and Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Dialogue Paterris Researchers in discourse processing. sociology, and sociolinguistics have analy/ed prominent dialogue patterns (Clark & Schaefer...78284-7801 Dr. M. Diane Langston Dr. Marcy Lansman Richard Lanterman ICL North America University of North Carolina Commandant (G-PWP) 11490 Commerce

  7. Human-Computer Interaction Software: Lessons Learned, Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    domain communi- Iatelligent s t s s Me cation. Users familiar with problem Inteligent support systes. High-func- anddomains but inxperienced with comput...8217i. April 1987, pp. 7.3-78. His research interests include artificial intel- Creating better HCI softw-are will have a 8. S.K Catrd. I.P. Moran. arid

  8. Eye Detection and Tracking for Intelligent Human Computer Interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Lijun

    2006-01-01

    .... In this project, Dr. Lijun Yin has developed a new algorithm for detecting and tracking eyes under an unconstrained environment using a single ordinary camera or webcam. The new algorithm is advantageous in that it works in a non-intrusive way based on a socalled Topographic Context approach.

  9. Interaction techniques for radiology workstations: impact on users' productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M. Stella

    2004-04-01

    As radiologists progress from reading images presented on film to modern computer systems with images presented on high-resolution displays, many new problems arise. Although the digital medium has many advantages, the radiologist"s job becomes cluttered with many new tasks related to image manipulation. This paper presents our solution for supporting radiologists" interpretation of digital images by automating image presentation during sequential interpretation steps. Our method supports scenario based interpretation, which group data temporally, according to the mental paradigm of the physician. We extended current hanging protocols with support for "stages". A stage reflects the presentation of digital information required to complete a single step within a complex task. We demonstrated the benefits of staging in a user study with 20 lay subjects involved in a visual conjunctive search for targets, similar to a radiology task of identifying anatomical abnormalities. We designed a task and a set of stimuli which allowed us to simulate the interpretation workflow from a typical radiology scenario - reading a chest computed radiography exam when a prior study is also available. The simulation was possible by abstracting the radiologist"s task and the basic workstation navigation functionality. We introduced "Stages," an interaction technique attuned to the radiologist"s interpretation task. Compared to the traditional user interface, Stages generated a 14% reduction in the average interpretation.

  10. Human Computation An Integrated Approach to Learning from the Crowd

    CERN Document Server

    Law, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Human computation is a new and evolving research area that centers around harnessing human intelligence to solve computational problems that are beyond the scope of existing Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms. With the growth of the Web, human computation systems can now leverage the abilities of an unprecedented number of people via the Web to perform complex computation. There are various genres of human computation applications that exist today. Games with a purpose (e.g., the ESP Game) specifically target online gamers who generate useful data (e.g., image tags) while playing an enjoy

  11. HCIDL: Human-computer interface description language for multi-target, multimodal, plastic user interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Gaouar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available From the human-computer interface perspectives, the challenges to be faced are related to the consideration of new, multiple interactions, and the diversity of devices. The large panel of interactions (touching, shaking, voice dictation, positioning … and the diversification of interaction devices can be seen as a factor of flexibility albeit introducing incidental complexity. Our work is part of the field of user interface description languages. After an analysis of the scientific context of our work, this paper introduces HCIDL, a modelling language staged in a model-driven engineering approach. Among the properties related to human-computer interface, our proposition is intended for modelling multi-target, multimodal, plastic interaction interfaces using user interface description languages. By combining plasticity and multimodality, HCIDL improves usability of user interfaces through adaptive behaviour by providing end-users with an interaction-set adapted to input/output of terminals and, an optimum layout. Keywords: Model driven engineering, Human-computer interface, User interface description languages, Multimodal applications, Plastic user interfaces

  12. Clustering: An Interactive Technique to Enhance Learning in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambron, Joanna

    1988-01-01

    Explains an interdisciplinary approach to biology and writing which increases students' mastery of vocabulary, scientific concepts, creativity, and expression. Describes modifications of the clustering technique used to summarize lectures, integrate reading and understand textbook material. (RT)

  13. Review of liquid-tank interaction analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Based on a literature survey, various models of increasing sophistication and complexity are presented which might be used to assess the liquid tank interaction effects due to sloshing of contained high level radioactive liquid waste in storage tanks at the NFS site. In addition, the effects of liquid damping, tank bending modes, and nonlinearity of the sloshing liquid are discussed. The results of the survey indicate that due to the compexities encountered in adequately modeling the system, due to the approximations which must be made as regards the tank boundary conditions, and due to the assumptions which must be made regarding the liquid waste dynamic character, the liquid tank interaction at NFS can not be adequately theoretically modeled. It is therefore recommended that experimental scale model tests be performed to assess the effects of liquid tank interaction during seismic excitation of the NFS waste tanks

  14. Input Devices and Interaction Techniques for VR-Enhanced Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luigi; Pietro, Giuseppe De

    Virtual Reality (VR) technologies make it possible to reproduce faithfully real life events in computer-generated scenarios. This approach has the potential to simplify the way people solve problems, since they can take advantage of their real life experiences while interacting in synthetic worlds.

  15. Pedagogical implications on interactive techniques of teaching non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    the ESP course, create proper learning environment and evoke students' interest ... (ESL) in a broad context and teaching students professional terminology in .... practice of foreign language education, but applying interactive methods of ... students acquire the experience in cross-cultural competence, which is essential in.

  16. Interactive Exploration of Big Scientific Data: New Representations and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmervik, Jon M; Barrowclough, Oliver J D

    2016-01-01

    Although splines have been in popular use in CAD for more than half a century, spline research is still an active field, driven by the challenges we are facing today within isogeometric analysis and big data. Splines are likely to play a vital future role in enabling effective big data exploration techniques in 3D, 4D, and beyond.

  17. Fluid Structure Interaction Techniques For Extrusion And Mixing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valette, Rudy; Vergnes, Bruno; Coupez, Thierry

    2007-05-01

    This work focuses on the development of numerical techniques devoted to the simulation of mixing processes of complex fluids such as twin-screw extrusion or batch mixing. In mixing process simulation, the absence of symmetry of the moving boundaries (the screws or the rotors) implies that their rigid body motion has to be taken into account by using a special treatment We therefore use a mesh immersion technique (MIT), which consists in using a P1+/P1-based (MINI-element) mixed finite element method for solving the velocity-pressure problem and then solving the problem in the whole barrel cavity by imposing a rigid motion (rotation) to nodes found located inside the so called immersed domain, each sub-domain (screw, rotor) being represented by a surface CAD mesh (or its mathematical equation in simple cases). The independent meshes are immersed into a unique background computational mesh by computing the distance function to their boundaries. Intersections of meshes are accounted for, allowing to compute a fill factor usable as for the VOF methodology. This technique, combined with the use of parallel computing, allows to compute the time-dependent flow of generalized Newtonian fluids including yield stress fluids in a complex system such as a twin screw extruder, including moving free surfaces, which are treated by a "level set" and Hamilton-Jacobi method.

  18. Human Computing and Machine Understanding of Human Behavior: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex; Nijholt, Antinus; Huang, Thomas; Quek, F.; Yang, Yie

    2006-01-01

    A widely accepted prediction is that computing will move to the background, weaving itself into the fabric of our everyday living spaces and projecting the human user into the foreground. If this prediction is to come true, then next generation computing, which we will call human computing, should

  19. Comparison of gesture and conventional interaction techniques for interventional neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettig, Julian; Saalfeld, Patrick; Luz, Maria; Becker, Mathias; Skalej, Martin; Hansen, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Interaction with radiological image data and volume renderings within a sterile environment is a challenging task. Clinically established methods such as joystick control and task delegation can be time-consuming and error-prone and interrupt the workflow. New touchless input modalities may have the potential to overcome these limitations, but their value compared to established methods is unclear. We present a comparative evaluation to analyze the value of two gesture input modalities (Myo Gesture Control Armband and Leap Motion Controller) versus two clinically established methods (task delegation and joystick control). A user study was conducted with ten experienced radiologists by simulating a diagnostic neuroradiological vascular treatment with two frequently used interaction tasks in an experimental operating room. The input modalities were assessed using task completion time, perceived task difficulty, and subjective workload. Overall, the clinically established method of task delegation performed best under the study conditions. In general, gesture control failed to exceed the clinical input approach. However, the Myo Gesture Control Armband showed a potential for simple image selection task. Novel input modalities have the potential to take over single tasks more efficiently than clinically established methods. The results of our user study show the relevance of task characteristics such as task complexity on performance with specific input modalities. Accordingly, future work should consider task characteristics to provide a useful gesture interface for a specific use case instead of an all-in-one solution.

  20. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  1. Toward accelerating landslide mapping with interactive machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, André; Lachiche, Nicolas; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Kerle, Norman; Puissant, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Despite important advances in the development of more automated methods for landslide mapping from optical remote sensing images, the elaboration of inventory maps after major triggering events still remains a tedious task. Image classification with expert defined rules typically still requires significant manual labour for the elaboration and adaption of rule sets for each particular case. Machine learning algorithm, on the contrary, have the ability to learn and identify complex image patterns from labelled examples but may require relatively large amounts of training data. In order to reduce the amount of required training data active learning has evolved as key concept to guide the sampling for applications such as document classification, genetics and remote sensing. The general underlying idea of most active learning approaches is to initialize a machine learning model with a small training set, and to subsequently exploit the model state and/or the data structure to iteratively select the most valuable samples that should be labelled by the user and added in the training set. With relatively few queries and labelled samples, an active learning strategy should ideally yield at least the same accuracy than an equivalent classifier trained with many randomly selected samples. Our study was dedicated to the development of an active learning approach for landslide mapping from VHR remote sensing images with special consideration of the spatial distribution of the samples. The developed approach is a region-based query heuristic that enables to guide the user attention towards few compact spatial batches rather than distributed points resulting in time savings of 50% and more compared to standard active learning techniques. The approach was tested with multi-temporal and multi-sensor satellite images capturing recent large scale triggering events in Brazil and China and demonstrated balanced user's and producer's accuracies between 74% and 80%. The assessment also

  2. An intelligent multi-media human-computer dialogue system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J. G.; Bettinger, K. E.; Byoun, J. S.; Dobes, Z.; Thielman, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sophisticated computer systems are being developed to assist in the human decision-making process for very complex tasks performed under stressful conditions. The human-computer interface is a critical factor in these systems. The human-computer interface should be simple and natural to use, require a minimal learning period, assist the user in accomplishing his task(s) with a minimum of distraction, present output in a form that best conveys information to the user, and reduce cognitive load for the user. In pursuit of this ideal, the Intelligent Multi-Media Interfaces project is devoted to the development of interface technology that integrates speech, natural language text, graphics, and pointing gestures for human-computer dialogues. The objective of the project is to develop interface technology that uses the media/modalities intelligently in a flexible, context-sensitive, and highly integrated manner modelled after the manner in which humans converse in simultaneous coordinated multiple modalities. As part of the project, a knowledge-based interface system, called CUBRICON (CUBRC Intelligent CONversationalist) is being developed as a research prototype. The application domain being used to drive the research is that of military tactical air control.

  3. Investigating Pedagogical Techniques in Classroom Interactions at a CELTA Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Shidur

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the similarities and dissimilarities of using pedagogical techniques in classroom interactions, taken place whilst teaching a known language and an unknown language in a CELTA training classroom context. For this purpose, the classroom interactions in unknown and known languages were analysed according to the qualitative…

  4. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off,

  5. Development of safety analysis and constraint detection techniques for process interaction errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chin-Feng; Tsai, Shang-Lin; Tseng, Wan-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Among the new failure modes introduced by computer into safety systems, the process interaction error is the most unpredictable and complicated failure mode, which may cause disastrous consequences. This paper presents safety analysis and constraint detection techniques for process interaction errors among hardware, software, and human processes. Among interaction errors, the most dreadful ones are those that involve run-time misinterpretation from a logic process. We call them the 'semantic interaction errors'. Such abnormal interaction is not adequately emphasized in current research. In our static analysis, we provide a fault tree template focusing on semantic interaction errors by checking conflicting pre-conditions and post-conditions among interacting processes. Thus, far-fetched, but highly risky, interaction scenarios involve interpretation errors can be identified. For run-time monitoring, a range of constraint types is proposed for checking abnormal signs at run time. We extend current constraints to a broader relational level and a global level, considering process/device dependencies and physical conservation rules in order to detect process interaction errors. The proposed techniques can reduce abnormal interactions; they can also be used to assist in safety-case construction.

  6. Development of safety analysis and constraint detection techniques for process interaction errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Chin-Feng, E-mail: csfanc@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Computer Science and Engineering Dept., Yuan-Ze University, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Shang-Lin; Tseng, Wan-Hui [Computer Science and Engineering Dept., Yuan-Ze University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Among the new failure modes introduced by computer into safety systems, the process interaction error is the most unpredictable and complicated failure mode, which may cause disastrous consequences. This paper presents safety analysis and constraint detection techniques for process interaction errors among hardware, software, and human processes. Among interaction errors, the most dreadful ones are those that involve run-time misinterpretation from a logic process. We call them the 'semantic interaction errors'. Such abnormal interaction is not adequately emphasized in current research. In our static analysis, we provide a fault tree template focusing on semantic interaction errors by checking conflicting pre-conditions and post-conditions among interacting processes. Thus, far-fetched, but highly risky, interaction scenarios involve interpretation errors can be identified. For run-time monitoring, a range of constraint types is proposed for checking abnormal signs at run time. We extend current constraints to a broader relational level and a global level, considering process/device dependencies and physical conservation rules in order to detect process interaction errors. The proposed techniques can reduce abnormal interactions; they can also be used to assist in safety-case construction.

  7. Cold crucible technique for interaction test of molten corium with structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Kwang Soon; An, Sang Mo; Min, Beong Tae; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2012-01-01

    During a severe accident, the molten corium might interact with several structures in a nuclear power plant such as core peripheral structures, lower plenum, lower head vessel, and external structures of a reactor vessel. The interaction of the molten corium with the structure depends on the molten corium composition, temperature, structural materials, and environmental conditions such as pressure and humidity. For example, the interaction of a metallic molten corium containing metal uranium (U) and zirconium (Zr) with the oxidized steel structure (Fe 2O3 ) is affected by not only thermal ablation but oxidation reduction reaction because the oxidation quotients of the U and Zr are higher than that of Fe. KAERI set up an experimental facility and technique using a cold crucible melting method to verify the interaction mechanism between the metallic molten corium and structural materials. This technique includes the generation of the metallic melt, melt delivery, measurement of the interaction process, and post analyses after the test

  8. Survey on Chatbot Design Techniques in Speech Conversation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sameera A. Abdul-Kader; Dr. John Woods

    2015-01-01

    Human-Computer Speech is gaining momentum as a technique of computer interaction. There has been a recent upsurge in speech based search engines and assistants such as Siri, Google Chrome and Cortana. Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques such as NLTK for Python can be applied to analyse speech, and intelligent responses can be found by designing an engine to provide appropriate human like responses. This type of programme is called a Chatbot, which is the focus of this study. This pap...

  9. A Planar-Fluorescence Imaging Technique for Studying Droplet-Turbulence Interactions in Vaporizing Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Dom A.; Coy, E.

    1990-01-01

    Droplet turbulence interactions directly affect the vaporization and dispersion of droplets in liquid sprays and therefore play a major role in fuel oxidizer mixing in liquid fueled combustion systems. Proper characterization of droplet turbulence interactions in vaporizing sprays require measurement of droplet size velocity and size temperature correlations. A planar, fluorescence imaging technique is described which is being developed for simultaneously measuring the size, velocity, and temperature of individual droplets in vaporizing sprays. Preliminary droplet size velocity correlation measurements made with this technique are presented. These measurements are also compared to and show very good agreement with measurements made in the same spray using a phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  10. Introduction to analytical techniques of beam-target interactions and resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruste, J.

    1995-08-01

    For several years, new analysis and observation techniques have been developed, which have considerably improved material research. Almost all these techniques are based on the interaction of a beam of 'primary particles' (electrons, photons, ions, particles, etc) with target. Correct and appropriate use of these techniques requires a good knowledge of these interactions and their consequences (emissions of 'secondary particles', modifications of the primary beam and target, etc). The first part of this report deals with the radiation/material interactions according to the nature of the radiation and its energy. The nature and consequences of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave, a beam of electrons, ions and neutrons are examined over an extended range of energy from MeV to MeV. Certain notions such as the analysis area, spatial resolutions or limits of detection can also be defined. In the second part, some of the most important and widespread techniques of analysis and observation are compared in terms of properties and performance. In particular, there is a brief principle of the technique, nature of the data obtained, spatial resolution, and the limits of detection with today's methods permit. (author). 5 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs

  11. A Model-based Framework for Risk Assessment in Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems. This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions. Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  12. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Ashcroft, Colby K; O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-08-15

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically "pushing" a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques.

  13. [Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xiu-ping

    2015-09-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA) and proteins in the environment. These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules, which is significant for biology, biochemistry, nutrition, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, and environmental science. In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and their application for different metal species interaction with biomolecules such as DNA, HSA, and GSH. The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitively probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules, provides direct evidences for the formation of different metal species--biomolecule adducts. In addition, the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules, and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.

  14. Probing the interactions of mitoxantrone with biomimetic membranes with electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieciecka, Dorota; Królikowska, Agata; Krysinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Abstract: Mitoxantrone – an anticancer drug – was used to probe the interactions of this class of cytostatic molecules with biomimetic monolayers. The drug effect was monitored with electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), as well as spectroscopic techniques (surface enhanced Raman scattering), during its passive partitioning/penetration through the mixed Langmuir and Langmuir–Blodgett monolayers after their transfer on gold electrodes. This approach allowed us to discriminate between the drug interactions with hydrophilic head-group region and hydrophobic alkyl chains moiety of such monolayers

  15. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    Sound propagation techniques model the effect of the environment on sound waves and predict their behavior from point of emission at the source to the final point of arrival at the listener. Sound is a pressure wave produced by mechanical vibration of a surface that propagates through a medium such as air or water, and the problem of sound propagation can be formulated mathematically as a second-order partial differential equation called the wave equation. Accurate techniques based on solving the wave equation, also called the wave-based techniques, are too expensive computationally and memory-wise. Therefore, these techniques face many challenges in terms of their applicability in interactive applications including sound propagation in large environments, time-varying source and listener directivity, and high simulation cost for mid-frequencies. In this dissertation, we propose a set of efficient wave-based sound propagation techniques that solve these three challenges and enable the use of wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications. Firstly, we propose a novel equivalent source technique for interactive wave-based sound propagation in large scenes spanning hundreds of meters. It is based on the equivalent source theory used for solving radiation and scattering problems in acoustics and electromagnetics. Instead of using a volumetric or surface-based approach, this technique takes an object-centric approach to sound propagation. The proposed equivalent source technique generates realistic acoustic effects and takes orders of magnitude less runtime memory compared to prior wave-based techniques. Secondly, we present an efficient framework for handling time-varying source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation. The source directivity is represented as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic sources. This spherical harmonic-based representation of source directivity can support analytical, data

  16. Fluorophores, environments, and quantification techniques in the analysis of transmembrane helix interaction using FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadria, Ambalika S; Senes, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been widely used as a spectroscopic tool in vitro to study the interactions between transmembrane (TM) helices in detergent and lipid environments. This technique has been instrumental to many studies that have greatly contributed to quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern helix-helix interactions in the membrane. These studies have also improved our understanding of the biological role of oligomerization in membrane proteins. In this review, we focus on the combinations of fluorophores used, the membrane mimetic environments, and measurement techniques that have been applied to study model systems as well as biological oligomeric complexes in vitro. We highlight the different formalisms used to calculate FRET efficiency and the challenges associated with accurate quantification. The goal is to provide the reader with a comparative summary of the relevant literature for planning and designing FRET experiments aimed at measuring TM helix-helix associations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. TECHNIQUES AND ALGORITHMS OF INTERACTIVE AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Kravtsov A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The author performed a research with the purpose of improving visualization of three-dimensional objects by means of augmented reality technology with the use of massively available mobile devices as a platform. This article summarizes the main results and provides suggestions for future research. Since graphical user interfaces made it to the consumer market about 30 years ago, interaction with the computer has not changed significantly. The focus of current user interface techniques is only...

  18. Cultural differences in human-computer interaction towards culturally adaptive human-machine interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Heimgärtner, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Es wird eine Methode zur Bestimmung von quantitativ klassifizierenden kulturellen Variablen der Mensch-Maschine-Interaktion (MMI) präsentiert und in einem Werkzeug für die interkulturelle Interaktionsanalyse umgesetzt. Rüdiger Heimgärtner zeigt, dass MMI anhand der kulturell geprägten Interaktionsmuster des Benutzers automatisch an dessen kulturellen Hintergrund angepasst werden kann. Empfehlungen für das Design interkultureller Benutzungsschnittstellen sowie für die Architekturbildung kulturell-adaptiver Systeme runden die Arbeit ab. Der Arbeitsbericht der Dissertation ist in elektronischer F

  19. Monitoring glycolipid transfer protein activity and membrane interaction with the surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohvo-Rekilä, Henna; Mattjus, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) is a protein capable of binding and transferring glycolipids. GLTP is cytosolic and it can interact through its FFAT-like (two phenylalanines in an acidic tract) motif with proteins localized on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum. Previous in vitro work with GLTP has focused mainly on the complete transfer reaction of the protein, that is, binding and subsequent removal of the glycolipid from the donor membrane, transfer through the aqueous environment, and the final release of the glycolipid to an acceptor membrane. Using bilayer vesicles and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, we have now, for the first time, analyzed the binding and lipid removal capacity of GLTP with a completely label-free technique. This technique is focused on the initial steps in GLTP-mediated transfer and the parameters affecting these steps can be more precisely determined. We used the new approach for detailed structure-function studies of GLTP by examining the glycolipid transfer capacity of specific GLTP tryptophan mutants. Tryptophan 96 is crucial for the transfer activity of the protein and tryptophan 142 is an important part of the proteins membrane interacting domain. Further, we varied the composition of the used lipid vesicles and gained information on the effect of membrane properties on GLTP activity. GLTP prefers to interact with more tightly packed membranes, although GLTP-mediated transfer is faster from more fluid membranes. This technique is very useful for the study of membrane-protein interactions and lipid-transfer rates and it can easily be adapted to other membrane-interacting proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ENDORSING REFLECTIVE TECHNIQUES TO PROLIFERATE STUDENTS’ INTERACTIONS AND UTTERANCES IN A DISCUSSION FORUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwito Wihadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High Intermediate-2 students’ brief responses in a discussion forum cause a long-expected discussion last in a couple of minutes in mixed-ability classes, depicting a minority of students are overtly dominant, while others are precisely passive. What yields discussions endure immaturely stems from both unclear roles of participants and their inadequate techniques to expand both interactions and spoken discourse. Therefore, Teacher-researcher assigned each participant in a discussion group of three to put reflection into practice, referring to the self-selected and discussed topics. The data were gained through non-participant observations, in which the teacher-researcher observed and recorded a singled-out group. A sample recording was, subsequently, transcribed and analyzed regarding with the number of exchanges in a five-minute discussion intake and the number of content words that students generated. It was found that employing reflective techniques, students were able to keep a particular topic being discussed at full. As a result, the number of content words multiplied. These findings resulted classroom teachers in insightful use of reflective techniques as one of the ways to proliferate students’ benefits in a discussion forum. Adequately practiced, students would be able to employ the techniques preponderantly, multiplying interactions among discussion members.

  1. A field comparison of multiple techniques to quantify groundwater - surface-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinzón, Ricardo; Ward, Adam S; Hatch, Christine E; Wlostowski, Adam N; Singha, Kamini; Gooseff, Michael N.; Haggerty, Roy; Harvey, Judson; Cirpka, Olaf A; Brock, James T

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater–surface-water (GW-SW) interactions in streams are difficult to quantify because of heterogeneity in hydraulic and reactive processes across a range of spatial and temporal scales. The challenge of quantifying these interactions has led to the development of several techniques, from centimeter-scale probes to whole-system tracers, including chemical, thermal, and electrical methods. We co-applied conservative and smart reactive solute-tracer tests, measurement of hydraulic heads, distributed temperature sensing, vertical profiles of solute tracer and temperature in the stream bed, and electrical resistivity imaging in a 450-m reach of a 3rd-order stream. GW-SW interactions were not spatially expansive, but were high in flux through a shallow hyporheic zone surrounding the reach. NaCl and resazurin tracers suggested different surface–subsurface exchange patterns in the upper ⅔ and lower ⅓ of the reach. Subsurface sampling of tracers and vertical thermal profiles quantified relatively high fluxes through a 10- to 20-cm deep hyporheic zone with chemical reactivity of the resazurin tracer indicated at 3-, 6-, and 9-cm sampling depths. Monitoring of hydraulic gradients along transects with MINIPOINT streambed samplers starting ∼40 m from the stream indicated that groundwater discharge prevented development of a larger hyporheic zone, which progressively decreased from the stream thalweg toward the banks. Distributed temperature sensing did not detect extensive inflow of ground water to the stream, and electrical resistivity imaging showed limited large-scale hyporheic exchange. We recommend choosing technique(s) based on: 1) clear definition of the questions to be addressed (physical, biological, or chemical processes), 2) explicit identification of the spatial and temporal scales to be covered and those required to provide an appropriate context for interpretation, and 3) maximizing generation of mechanistic understanding and reducing costs of

  2. A structural approach to constructing perspective efficient and reliable human-computer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balint, L.

    1989-01-01

    The principles of human-computer interface (HCI) realizations are investigated with the aim of getting closer to a general framework and thus, to a more or less solid background of constructing perspective efficient, reliable and cost-effective human-computer interfaces. On the basis of characterizing and classifying the different HCI solutions, the fundamental problems of interface construction are pointed out especially with respect to human error occurrence possibilities. The evolution of HCI realizations is illustrated by summarizing the main properties of past, present and foreseeable future interface generations. HCI modeling is pointed out to be a crucial problem in theoretical and practical investigations. Suggestions concerning HCI structure (hierarchy and modularity), HCI functional dynamics (mapping from input to output information), minimization of human error caused system failures (error-tolerance, error-recovery and error-correcting) as well as cost-effective HCI design and realization methodology (universal and application-oriented vs. application-specific solutions) are presented. The concept of RISC-based and SCAMP-type HCI components is introduced with the aim of having a reduced interaction scheme in communication and a well defined architecture in HCI components' internal structure. HCI efficiency and reliability are dealt with, by taking into account complexity and flexibility. The application of fast computerized prototyping is also briefly investigated as an experimental device of achieving simple, parametrized, invariant HCI models. Finally, a concise outline of an approach of how to construct ideal HCI's is also suggested by emphasizing the open questions and the need of future work related to the proposals, as well. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs

  3. Experimental Study on the Molten Corium Interaction with Structure by Induction Heating Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Min, Beong Tae; Hong, Seong Ho; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The corium compositions strongly depend on the accident scenarios, and thus the melt generation technique for various melt compositions is essential to investigate the corium-structural material interaction characteristics according to the accident scenarios. Since 1997, KAERI has several years of experiences with melt generation to investigate the material ablation characteristics and steam explosion phenomena. Based on the experiences of the TROI (Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water) facility for the steam explosion experiments, the VESTA (Verification of Ex-vessel corium STAbilization) test facility was designed and constructed in 2010 for the development of a core catcher under the APR+ project. At the same time, the VESTA-S (VESTA-Small) was established for small scale material ablation experiments. Some experimental results were reported for the interactions of metallic or oxidic melt with the structural materials such as special concrete or penetration weld. The objective of this paper is to provide the specific features of the VESTA and VESTA-S facilities including information on the melt generation technique adopted for the facilities. Some issues are also addressed in this paper for further facility improvement. In the present paper, the principles of induction heating adopted for the VESTA and VESTA-S facilities were summarized briefly and the system features for the melt-structural material interaction experiments were explained. As a major characteristic of the VESTA facility, up to 400 kg of corium melt is expected to be generated using the currently installed system. The jet impingement effect on the material ablation characteristics was demonstrated successfully in the VESTA facility. In the VESTA-S facility, the small scale material ablation experiments by long term melt interaction were performed properly by adopting the melt delivery method. However, for a more realistic severe accident simulation, we need to improve the melt temperature

  4. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  5. Uncertainty in soil-structure interaction analysis arising from differences in analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslenikov, O.R.; Chen, J.C.; Johnson, J.J.

    1982-07-01

    This study addresses uncertainties arising from variations in different modeling approaches to soil-structure interaction of massive structures at a nuclear power plant. To perform a comprehensive systems analysis, it is necessary to quantify, for each phase of the traditional analysis procedure, both the realistic seismic response and the uncertainties associated with them. In this study two linear soil-structure interaction techniques were used to analyze the Zion, Illinois nuclear power plant: a direct method using the FLUSH computer program and a substructure approach using the CLASSI family of computer programs. In-structure response from two earthquakes, one real and one synthetic, was compared. Structure configurations from relatively simple to complicated multi-structure cases were analyzed. The resulting variations help quantify uncertainty in structure response due to analysis procedures

  6. Interactions between heavy metals and photosynthetic materials studied by optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Agostiano, Angela

    2009-11-01

    In this work studies on rapid inhibitory interactions between heavy metals and photosynthetic materials at different organization levels were carried out by optical assay techniques, investigating the possibility of applications in the heavy metal detection field. Spinach chloroplasts, thylakoids and Photosystem II proteins were employed as biotools in combination with colorimetric assays based on dichlorophenol indophenole (DCIP) photoreduction and on fluorescence emission techniques. It was found that copper and mercury demonstrated a strong and rapid photosynthetic activity inhibition, that varied from proteins to membranes, while other metals like nickel, cobalt and manganese produced only slight inhibition effects on all tested photosynthetic materials. By emission measurements, only copper was found to rapidly influence the photosynthetic material signals. These findings give interesting information about the rapid effects of heavy metals on isolated photosynthetic samples, and are in addition to the literature data concerning the effects of growth in heavy metal enriched media.

  7. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the needs of ground-based researcher-analysts to access real-time engineering data in the form of processed information has expanded rapidly. Fortunately, the capacity to deliver that information has also expanded. The development of advanced display systems is essential to the success of a research test activity. Those developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR), range from simple alphanumerics to interactive mapping and graphics. These unique display systems are designed not only to meet basic information display requirements of the user, but also to take advantage of techniques for optimizing information display. Future ground-based display systems will rely heavily not only on new technologies, but also on interaction with the human user and the associated productivity with that interaction. The psychological abilities and limitations of the user will become even more important in defining the difference between a usable and a useful display system. This paper reviews the requirements for development of real-time displays; the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and interactivity of displays; and an analysis of some existing WATR displays.

  8. Simulation technique for slurries interacting with moving parts and deformable solids with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Kamrin, Ken

    2018-04-01

    A numerical method for particle-laden fluids interacting with a deformable solid domain and mobile rigid parts is proposed and implemented in a full engineering system. The fluid domain is modeled with a lattice Boltzmann representation, the particles and rigid parts are modeled with a discrete element representation, and the deformable solid domain is modeled using a Lagrangian mesh. The main issue of this work, since separately each of these methods is a mature tool, is to develop coupling and model-reduction approaches in order to efficiently simulate coupled problems of this nature, as in various geological and engineering applications. The lattice Boltzmann method incorporates a large eddy simulation technique using the Smagorinsky turbulence model. The discrete element method incorporates spherical and polyhedral particles for stiff contact interactions. A neo-Hookean hyperelastic model is used for the deformable solid. We provide a detailed description of how to couple the three solvers within a unified algorithm. The technique we propose for rubber modeling/coupling exploits a simplification that prevents having to solve a finite-element problem at each time step. We also developed a technique to reduce the domain size of the full system by replacing certain zones with quasi-analytic solutions, which act as effective boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann method. The major ingredients of the routine are separately validated. To demonstrate the coupled method in full, we simulate slurry flows in two kinds of piston valve geometries. The dynamics of the valve and slurry are studied and reported over a large range of input parameters.

  9. Spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques study of the interaction between oxymetholone and human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-11-15

    In this study, the binding of oxymetholone (OXM), a doping drug, to human serum albumin (HSA) was explored at pH 7.40 by spectroscopic methods including spectrofluorimetry, three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3D EEM), UV–vis absorption, resonance rayleigh scattering (RRS) and molecular docking. The fluorescence results showed that there was a considerable quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA upon binding to OXM by static quenching mechanism. The Stern–Volmer quenching constants (K{sub SV}) between OXM and HSA at three different temperatures 295, 303, 308 K, were obtained as 4.63×10{sup 4}, 3.05×10{sup 4} and 1.49×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively. Furthermore this interaction was confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometric and RRS techniques. The binding site number, n, apparent binding constant, K{sub b}, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔS, ΔH and ΔG) were measured at different temperatures. The Van der Waals and hydrogen-bond forces were found to stabilize OXM–HSA complex. The distance (r) between the donor and acceptor was obtained from Förster's theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.67 nm. The 3D EEM showed that OXM slightly changes the secondary structure of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular docking was employed for identification of drug binding sites and interaction of OXM with amino acid residues. - Highlights: • The binding of OXM as a doping drug with HSA was studied by different techniques. • The binding constant of HSA–OXM was calculated. • The binding site of OXM on HSA was characterized with molecular docking. • The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to fluorescence technique.

  10. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan S. Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle.

  11. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  12. Design Principles for Interactive Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book addresses the crucial intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI) and software engineering by asking both what users require from interactive systems and what developers need to produce well-engineered software. Needs are expressed as...

  13. Effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system component for human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edwin B; Walls, Richard T; Reilly, Frank D

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of a first year medical school human anatomy course. Existing data from 9 years of instruction involving 856 students were used to determine (1) the effect of web-based interactive instructional techniques on written exam item performance and (2) differences between student opinions of the benefit level of five different types of interactive learning objects used. The interactive learning objects included Patient Case studies, review Games, Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP), Flashcards, and unit Quizzes. Exam item analysis scores were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) for students receiving the instructional treatment incorporating the web-based interactive learning objects than for students not receiving this treatment. Questionnaires using a five-point Likert scale were analysed to determine student opinion ratings of the interactive learning objects. Students reported favorably on the benefit level of all learning objects. Students rated the benefit level of the Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP) highest, and this rating was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than all other learning objects. This study suggests that web-based interactive instructional techniques improve student exam performance. Students indicated a strong acceptance of Simulated Interactive Patient learning objects.

  14. CHARACTERISATION OF MULTIPHASE FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION USING NON-INTRUSIVE OPTICAL TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. AL-ATABI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine experimentally the effectiveness of passive drag reduction techniques (which involve adjusting surface geometry within a chaotic multiphase flow system. To quantify the intrusion and disturbance caused, a liquid-air blast atomiser continuously discharges within a test section of air at atmospheric pressure, with a circular cylinder placed 25 cylinder diameters (250 mm downstream of the nozzle. This cylinder is then replaced with other cylinders which have modified surface geometry. The data was obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and determines the fluid motion resulting from spray structure interaction of a liquid spray with a circular cylinder. Subtraction of non intruded spray images from intruded spray images at the same locations, using the time averaged analysis allows the direct comparison of the amount of disturbance each geometric variant has on the spray. Using this data alongside velocity profiles time averaged trends were compared. Drag reduction from V-shaped grooves provides the greatest disturbance reduction. This is due to the reduced shear stress around its cross section and the addition of small liquid eddies within each V-groove creates a gliding surface. These features proved to be most effective when monitoring drag reduction in multiphase flow-structure interaction.

  15. Physically-Based Interactive Flow Visualization Based on Schlieren and Interferometry Experimental Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brownlee, C.

    2011-11-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph, interferometry, and schlieren imaging for centuries, which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. Interferometry tracks changes in phase-shift resulting in bands appearing. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraph, schlieren and interferometry images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Applications of our method to multifield data and custom application-dependent color filter creation are explored. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are finally presented. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Experimental evaluation of multimodal human computer interface for tactical audio applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Starcevic, D.; Jovanov, E.; Oy, S.

    2002-01-01

    Mission critical and information overwhelming applications require careful design of the human computer interface. Typical applications include night vision or low visibility mission navigation, guidance through a hostile territory, and flight navigation and orientation. Additional channels of

  17. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  18. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanoparticles via plasma-liquid interaction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, N.; Yasin, H. M.; Younus, M.; Ahmed, W.; Rehman, N. U.; Zakaullah, M.; Iqbal, M. Zafar

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of non-functionalized gold nanoparticles is interesting owing to their potential applications in sensing and biomedicine. We report on the synthesis of surfactant-free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by Plasma-Liquid Interaction (PLI) technique, using micro-atmospheric pressure D.C. plasma. The effects of discharge parameters, such as discharge current, precursor concentration and gas flow rates on the structure and morphology of AuNPs have been investigated. Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) was employed to estimate the UV radiation intensity and OH radical density. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) optical spectroscopy were employed to study the morphology and structure of AuNPs. The normalized intensities of UV radiation and OH radical density found to increase with increase in discharge current. We observed that the particle size can be tuned by controlling any of the following parameters: intensity of the UV radiation, OH radical density, and concentration of the Au precursor. Interestingly, we found that addition of 1% Ar in the feedstock gas results in formation of relatively uniform size distribution of nanoparticles. The surfactant-free AuNPs, due to their bare-surface, exhibit excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties. The SERS study of Rhodamine 6G using AuNPs as substrates, shows significant Raman enhancement and fluorescence quenching, which makes our technique a potentially powerful route to detection of trace amounts of dangerous explosives and other materials.

  19. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  20. Techniques to assess acoustic-structure interaction in liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. Benjamin

    Acoustoelasticity is the study of the dynamic interaction between elastic structures and acoustic enclosures. In this dissertation, acoustoelasticity is considered in the context of liquid rocket engine design. The techniques presented here can be used to determine which forcing frequencies are important in acoustoelastic systems. With a knowledge of these frequencies, an analyst can either find ways to attenuate the excitation at these frequencies or alter the system in such a way that the prescribed excitations do result in a resonant condition. The end result is a structural component that is less susceptible to failure. The research scope is divided into three parts. In the first part, the dynamics of cylindrical shells submerged in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) are considered. The shells are bounded by rigid outer cylinders. This configuration gives rise to two fluid-filled cavities---an inner cylindrical cavity and an outer annular cavity. Such geometries are common in rocket engine design. The natural frequencies and modes of the fluid-structure system are computed by combining the rigid wall acoustic cavity modes and the in vacuo structural modes into a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalue veering is observed near the intersections of the curves representing natural frequencies of the rigid wall acoustic and the in vacuo structural modes. In the case of a shell submerged in LH2, system frequencies near these intersections are as much as 30% lower than the corresponding in vacuo structural frequencies. Due to its high density, the frequency reductions in the presence of LOX are even more dramatic. The forced responses of a shell submerged in LH2 and LOX while subject to a harmonic point excitation are also presented. The responses in the presence of fluid are found to be quite distinct from those of the structure in vacuo. In the second part, coupled mode theory is used to explore the fundamental features of

  1. Impact of familiarity on information complexity in human-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakaev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative measure of information complexity remains very much desirable in HCI field, since it may aid in optimization of user interfaces, especially in human-computer systems for controlling complex objects. Our paper is dedicated to exploration of subjective (subject-depended aspect of the complexity, conceptualized as information familiarity. Although research of familiarity in human cognition and behaviour is done in several fields, the accepted models in HCI, such as Human Processor or Hick-Hyman’s law do not generally consider this issue. In our experimental study the subjects performed search and selection of digits and letters, whose familiarity was conceptualized as frequency of occurrence in numbers and texts. The analysis showed significant effect of information familiarity on selection time and throughput in regression models, although the R2 values were somehow low. Still, we hope that our results might aid in quantification of information complexity and its further application for optimizing interaction in human-machine systems.

  2. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  3. Concrete - Opalinus clay interaction: in-situ experiment and technique for coring undisturbed interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, U.; Dolder, F.; Jenni, A.; Schwyn, B.; Frieg, B.; Eul, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Interactions near interfaces are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and resultant diffusive transport, and are predicted to lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influences properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Reactive transport modelling predictions and laboratory and in situ studies revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. An increase in porosity in the cement close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone adjacent to the interface is commonly predicted and observed. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at demonstrating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected at a realistic spatial scale and under saturated conditions. A duration of 20 years is foreseen during which reaction progress should become measurable and thus comparable to laboratory experiments and modelling predictions. Companion studies address cement hydration, and develop new high-resolution techniques for phase identification using μ-X-ray diffraction at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The field experiment at Mont Terri comprises two vertical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 9 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on three different binders: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted by silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica). The characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after 2 years of alteration are presented in a companion contribution (Jenni et al.). A key issue is the repeat recovery of

  4. Interactions of trace metals with hydrogels and filter membranes used in DET and DGT techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmo, Oyvind A; Davison, William; Zhang, Hao

    2008-08-01

    Equilibrium partitioning of trace metals between bulk solution and hydrogels/filter was studied. Under some conditions, trace metal concentrations were higher in the hydrogels or filter membranes compared to bulk solution (enrichment). In synthetic soft water, enrichment of cationic trace metals in polyacrylamide hydrogels decreased with increasing trace metal concentration. Enrichment was little affected by Ca and Mg in the concentration range typically encountered in natural freshwaters, indicating high affinity but low capacity binding of trace metals to solid structure in polyacrylamide gels. The apparent binding strength decreased in the sequence: Cu > Pb > Ni approximately to Cd approximately to Co and a low concentration of cationic Cu eliminated enrichment of weakly binding trace metal cations. The polyacrylamide gels also had an affinity for fulvic acid and/or its trace metal complexes. Enrichment of cationic Cd in agarose gel and hydrophilic polyethersulfone filter was independent of concentration (10 nM to 5 microM) but decreased with increasing Ca/ Mg concentration and ionic strength, suggesting that it is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. However, Cu and Pb were enriched even after equilibration in seawater, indicating that these metals additionally bind to sites within the agarose gel and filter. Compared to the polyacrylamide gels, agarose gel had a lower affinity for metal-fulvic complexes. Potential biases in measurements made with the diffusive equilibration in thin-films (DET) technique, identified by this work, are discussed.

  5. Study of DNA interactions with bifenthrin by spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; Zhang, Guowen; Ma, Yadi; Zhang, Yepeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between bifenthrin (BF) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. It was found that BF molecular could intercalate into the base pairs of ctDNA as evidenced by significant increases in absorption intensity, fluorescence polarization and relative viscosity of ctDNA, decrease in iodide quenching effect, and induced CD spectral changes. The association constant of BF with ctDNA was evaluated to be in the order of 104 L mol-1. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was primarily driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces, as the values of the enthalpy change (ΔH) and the entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be -31.13 ± 1.89 kJ mol-1 and -22.79 ± 1.21 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. The results of FT-IR spectra and molecular docking showed that a specific binding mainly existed between BF and adenine and guanine bases.

  6. Zinc phthalocyanine thin film and chemical analyte interaction studies by density functional theory and vibrational techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, G S S; Singh, Sukhwinder; Kumar, Ranjan; Tripathi, S K; Kaur, Sarvpreet; Sathe, Vasant

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of zinc phthalocyanine have been deposited on KBr and glass substrates by the thermal evaporation method and characterized by the x-ray diffraction, optical, infrared and Raman techniques. The observed x-ray diffraction and infrared absorption spectra of as-deposited thin films suggest the presence of an α crystalline phase. Infrared and Raman spectra of thin films after exposure to vapours of ammonia and methanol have also been recorded. Shifts in the position of some IR and Raman bands in the spectra of exposed films have been observed. Some bands also show changes in their intensity on exposure. Increased charge on the phthalocyanine ring and out-of-plane distortion of the core due to interaction between zinc phthalocyanine and vapour molecules involving the fifth coordination site of the central metal ion may be responsible for the band shifts. Changes in the intensity of bands are interpreted in terms of the lowering of molecular symmetry from D 4h to C 4v due to doming of the core. Molecular parameters and Mulliken atomic charges of zinc phthalocyanine and its complexes with methanol and ammonia have been calculated from density functional theory. The binding energy of the complexes have also been calculated. Calculated values of the energy for different complexes suggest that axially coordinated vapour molecules form the most stable complex. Calculated Mulliken atomic charges show net charge transfer from vapour molecules to the phthalocyanine ring for the most stable complex.

  7. High resolution imaging of particle interactions in a large bubble chamber using holographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, Homaira.

    1988-01-01

    Particle interactions were recorded holographically in a large volume of the 15-foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab. This cryogenic bubble chamber was filled with a heavy Neon-Hydrogen mixture and was exposed to a wideband neutrino beam with mean energy of 150 GeV. The use of holography in combination with conventional photography provides a powerful tool for direct detection of short-lived particles. Holography gives a high resolution over a large depth of field which can not be achieved with conventional photography. A high-power pulsed ruby laser was used as the holographic light source. Since short pulses of some 50 ns duration at the required energy were found to give rise to boiling during the chamber's expansion, a reduction of the instantaneous power at a given energy was required to suppress this unwanted after-effect. This was achieved by developing a unique technique for stretching the pulses using an electro-optic feedback loop. One hundred thousand holograms were produced during a wide-band neutrino experiment (E-632, 1985) using a dark-field holographic system. Analysis of a sample of holograms shows a resolution of 150 μm was achieved in an ovoidal shape fiducial volume of 0.48 m 3 % of the 14 m 3 total fiducial volume of the chamber

  8. Tensor representation techniques for full configuration interaction: A Fock space approach using the canonical product format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Auer, Alexander A; Espig, Mike

    2016-06-28

    In this proof-of-principle study, we apply tensor decomposition techniques to the Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) wavefunction in order to approximate the wavefunction parameters efficiently and to reduce the overall computational effort. For this purpose, the wavefunction ansatz is formulated in an occupation number vector representation that ensures antisymmetry. If the canonical product format tensor decomposition is then applied, the Hamiltonian and the wavefunction can be cast into a multilinear product form. As a consequence, the number of wavefunction parameters does not scale to the power of the number of particles (or orbitals) but depends on the rank of the approximation and linearly on the number of particles. The degree of approximation can be controlled by a single threshold for the rank reduction procedure required in the algorithm. We demonstrate that using this approximation, the FCI Hamiltonian matrix can be stored with N(5) scaling. The error of the approximation that is introduced is below Millihartree for a threshold of ϵ = 10(-4) and no convergence problems are observed solving the FCI equations iteratively in the new format. While promising conceptually, all effort of the algorithm is shifted to the required rank reduction procedure after the contraction of the Hamiltonian with the coefficient tensor. At the current state, this crucial step is the bottleneck of our approach and even for an optimistic estimate, the algorithm scales beyond N(10) and future work has to be directed towards reduction-free algorithms.

  9. Analysis of jet-airfoil interaction noise sources by using a microphone array technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Vincent; Davy, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the characterization of jet noise sources and jet-airfoil interaction sources by using microphone array data. The measurements were carried-out in the anechoic open test section wind tunnel of Onera, Cepra19. The microphone array technique relies on the convected, Lighthill's and Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings' acoustic analogy equation. The cross-spectrum of the source term of the analogy equation is sought. It is defined as the optimal solution to a minimal error equation using the measured microphone cross-spectra as reference. This inverse problem is ill-posed yet. A penalty term based on a localization operator is therefore added to improve the recovery of jet noise sources. The analysis of isolated jet noise data in subsonic regime shows the contribution of the conventional mixing noise source in the low frequency range, as expected, and of uniformly distributed, uncorrelated noise sources in the jet flow at higher frequencies. In underexpanded supersonic regime, a shock-associated noise source is clearly identified, too. An additional source is detected in the vicinity of the nozzle exit both in supersonic and subsonic regimes. In the presence of the airfoil, the distribution of the noise sources is deeply modified. In particular, a strong noise source is localized on the flap. For high Strouhal numbers, higher than about 2 (based on the jet mixing velocity and diameter), a significant contribution from the shear-layer near the flap is observed, too. Indications of acoustic reflections on the airfoil are also discerned.

  10. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  11. Using Tablet PCs in Classroom for Teaching Human-Computer Interaction: An Experience in High Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, André Constantino; Marques, Daniela; de Oliveira, Rodolfo Francisco; Noda, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The use of computers in the teaching and learning process is investigated by many researches and, nowadays, due the available diversity of computing devices, tablets are become popular in classroom too. So what are the advantages and disadvantages to use tablets in classroom? How can we shape the teaching and learning activities to get the best of…

  12. Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Internet Residency: Implications for Both Personal Life and Teaching/Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crearie, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances over the last decade have had a significant impact on the teaching and learning experiences students encounter today. We now take technologies such as Web 2.0, mobile devices, cloud computing, podcasts, social networking, super-fast broadband, and connectedness for granted. So what about the student use of these types of…

  13. Guidelines for the use of vibro-tactile displays in human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2002-01-01

    Vibro-tactile displays convey messages by presenting vibration to the user's skin. In recent years, the interest in and application of vibro-tactile displays is growing. Vibratory displays are introduced in mobile devices, desktop applications and even in aircraft [1]. Despite the growing interest,

  14. A Single Camera Motion Capture System for Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryuzo; Stenger, Björn

    This paper presents a method for markerless human motion capture using a single camera. It uses tree-based filtering to efficiently propagate a probability distribution over poses of a 3D body model. The pose vectors and associated shapes are arranged in a tree, which is constructed by hierarchical pairwise clustering, in order to efficiently evaluate the likelihood in each frame. Anew likelihood function based on silhouette matching is proposed that improves the pose estimation of thinner body parts, i. e. the limbs. The dynamic model takes self-occlusion into account by increasing the variance of occluded body-parts, thus allowing for recovery when the body part reappears. We present two applications of our method that work in real-time on a Cell Broadband Engine™: a computer game and a virtual clothing application.

  15. Risk Issues in Developing Novel User Interfaces for Human-Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Klinker, Gudrun; Huber, Manuel; Tö nnis, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. All rights are reserved. When new user interfaces or information visualization schemes are developed for complex information processing systems, it is not readily clear how much they do, in fact, support and improve users' understanding and use of such systems. Is a new interface better than an older one? In what respect, and in which situations? To provide answers to such questions, user testing schemes are employed. This chapter reports on a range of risks pertaining to the design and implementation of user interfaces in general, and to newly emerging interfaces (3-dimensionally, immersive, mobile) in particular.

  16. An Innovative Solution Based on Human-Computer Interaction to Support Cognitive Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Cogollor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution focuses its objective in describing the design and implementation of an innovative system to provide cognitive rehabilitation. People who will take advantage of this platform suffer from a post-stroke disease called Apraxia and Action Disorganisation Syndrome (AADS. The platform has been integrated at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and tries to reduce the stay in hospital or rehabilitation center by supporting self-rehabilitation at home. So, the system acts as an intelligent machine which guides patients while executing Activities of Daily Living (ADL, such as preparing a simple tea, by informing them about the errors committed and possible actions to correct them. A short introduction to other works related to stroke, patients to work with, how the system works and how it is implemented are provided in the document. Finally, some relevant information from experiment made with healthy people for technical validation is also shown.

  17. Modeling Goal-Directed User Exploration in Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    sculptures architecture Theater Musicians & Composers Cinema , Television, & Broadcasting Music Dance Musical Instruments” The text entered for the...Pirolli, Chen & Pitkow, 2001), Scent- based Navigation and Information Foraging in the ACT cognitive architecture 1.0 (SNIF-ACT 1.0; Pirolli & Fu...2003) is the first of two process models of Web navigation based on Information Foraging Theory and implemented in the ACT-R cognitive architecture

  18. Incorporating a Human-Computer Interaction Course into Software Development Curriculums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Thomas N.; Cummings, Jeffrey; Healy, R. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Individuals have increasing options on retrieving information related to hardware and software. Specific hardware devices include desktops, tablets and smart devices. Also, the number of software applications has significantly increased the user's capability to access data. Software applications include the traditional web site, smart device…

  19. Cognitive engineering in the design of human-computer interaction and expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvendy, G.

    1987-01-01

    The 68 papers contributing to this book cover the following areas: Theories of Interface Design; Methodologies of Interface Design; Applications of Interface Design; Software Design; Human Factors in Speech Technology and Telecommunications; Design of Graphic Dialogues; Knowledge Acquisition for Knowledge-Based Systems; Design, Evaluation and Use of Expert Systems. This demonstrates the dual role of cognitive engineering. On the one hand cognitive engineering is utilized to design computing systems which are compatible with human cognition and can be effectively and be easily utilized by all individuals. On the other hand, cognitive engineering is utilized to transfer human cognition into the computer for the purpose of building expert systems. Two papers are of interest to INIS

  20. A Data Collection and Representation Framework for Software and Human-Computer Interaction Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-04

    by Miara , Musselman, Navarro, and Shneiderman [ Miara et al. 1983] they found that indentation correlated strongly with comprehension. They tested 47...Dissertation, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, August 1996. MIARA , R.J., MUSSELMAN, JA., NAVARRO, JA., AND SHNEIDERMAN, B. 1983. Program Indentation and

  1. Risk Issues in Developing Novel User Interfaces for Human-Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Klinker, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. All rights are reserved. When new user interfaces or information visualization schemes are developed for complex information processing systems, it is not readily clear how much they do, in fact, support and improve users\\' understanding and use of such systems. Is a new interface better than an older one? In what respect, and in which situations? To provide answers to such questions, user testing schemes are employed. This chapter reports on a range of risks pertaining to the design and implementation of user interfaces in general, and to newly emerging interfaces (3-dimensionally, immersive, mobile) in particular.

  2. Investigating the Human Computer Interaction Problems with Automated Teller Machine Navigation Menus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kevin; King, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The automated teller machine (ATM) has become an integral part of our society. However, using the ATM can often be a frustrating experience as people frequently reinsert cards to conduct multiple transactions. This has led to the research question of whether ATM menus are designed in an optimal manner. This paper aims to address the…

  3. Knowledge Management of Web Financial Reporting in Human-Computer Interactive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Yujing; Xu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Handling and analyzing to web financial data is becoming a challenge issue in knowledge management and education to accounting practitioners. eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), which is a type of web financial reporting, describes and recognizes financial items by tagging metadata. The goal is to make it possible for financial reports…

  4. Evaluation of an Interactive Workshop Designed to Teach Practical Welfare Techniques to Beef Cattle Caretakers and Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Reneé; Hanthorn, Christy; Danielson, Jared; Burzette, Rebecca; Coetzee, Johann; Griffin, D. Dee; Ramirez, Alejandro; Dewell, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to evaluate the use of an interactive workshop designed to teach novel practical welfare techniques to beef cattle caretakers and decision makers. Following training, respondents reported being more likely to use or recommend use of local anesthesia for dehorning and castration and were more inclined to use meloxicam…

  5. Psychosocial and Cultural Modeling in Human Computation Systems: A Gamification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Haack, Jereme N.; Butner, R. Scott

    2013-11-20

    “Gamification”, the application of gameplay to real-world problems, enables the development of human computation systems that support decision-making through the integration of social and machine intelligence. One of gamification’s major benefits includes the creation of a problem solving environment where the influence of cognitive and cultural biases on human judgment can be curtailed through collaborative and competitive reasoning. By reducing biases on human judgment, gamification allows human computation systems to exploit human creativity relatively unhindered by human error. Operationally, gamification uses simulation to harvest human behavioral data that provide valuable insights for the solution of real-world problems.

  6. Hypoalgesic effects of three different manual therapy techniques on cervical spine and psychological interaction: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Perez, Jose Luis; Lopez-Lopez, Almudena; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Suarez, Emilio; Rojas, Javier; Bishop, Mark D; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which psychological factors interact with a particular manual therapy (MT) technique to induce hypoalgesia in healthy subjects. Seventy-five healthy volunteers (36 female, 39 males), were recruited in this double-blind, controlled and parallel study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: High velocity low amplitude technique (HVLA), joint mobilization, or Cervical Lateral glide mobilization (CLGM). Pressure pain threshold (PPT) over C7 unilaterally, trapezius muscle and lateral epicondyle bilaterally, were measured prior to single technique MT was applied and immediately after to applied MT. Pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety and kinesiophobia were evaluated before treatment. The results indicate that hypoalgesia was observed in all groups after treatment in the neck and elbow region (P < 0.05), but mobilization induces more hypoalgesic effects. Catastrophizing interacted with change over time in PPT, for changes in C7 and in manipulation group. All the MT techniques studied produced local and segmental hypoalgesic effects, supporting the results of previous studies studying the individual interventions. Interaction between catastrophizing and HVLA technique suggest that whether catastrophizing level is low or medium, the chance of success is high, but high levels of catastrophizing may result in poor outcome after HVLA intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02782585. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Complex Interaction Mechanisms between Dislocations and Point Defects Studied in Pure Aluminium by a Two-Wave Acoustic Coupling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremnes, O.; Progin, O.; Gremaud, G.; Benoit, W.

    1997-04-01

    Ultrasonic experiments using a two-wave coupling technique were performed on 99.999% pure Al in order to study the interaction mechanisms occurring between dislocations and point defects. The coupling technique consists in measuring the attenuation of ultrasonic waves during low-frequency stress cycles (t). One obtains closed curves () called signatures whose shape and evolution are characteristic of the interaction mechanism controlling the low-frequency dislocation motion. The signatures observed were attributed to the interaction of the dislocations with extrinsic point defects. A new interpretation of the evolution of the signatures measured below 200 K with respect to temperature and stress frequency had to be established: they are linked to depinning of immobile point defects, whereas a thermally activated depinning mechanism does not fit the observations. The signatures measured between 200 and 370 K were interpreted as dragging and depinning of extrinsic point defects which are increasingly mobile with temperature.

  8. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MODELLING THE DELAMINATION FAILURE ALONG THE CFRP-CFST BEAM INTERACTION SURFACE USING DIFFERENT FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMED W. AL-ZAND

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear finite element (FE models are prepared to investigate the behaviour of concrete-filled steel tube (CFST beams strengthened by carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP sheets. The beams are strengthened from the bottom side only by varied sheet lengths (full and partial beam lengths and then subjected to ultimate flexural loads. Three surface interaction techniques are used to implement the bonding behaviour between the steel tube and the CFRP sheet, namely, full tie interaction (TI, cohesive element (CE and cohesive behaviour (CB techniques using ABAQUS software. Results of the comparison between the FE analysis and existing experimental study confirm that the FE models with the TI technique could be applicable for beams strengthened by CFRP sheets with a full wrapping length; the technique could not accurately implement the CFRP delamination failure, which occurred for beams with a partial wrapping length. Meanwhile, the FE models with the CE and CB techniques are applicable in the implementation of both CFRP failures (rapture and delamination for both full and partial wrapping lengths, respectively. Where, the ultimate loads' ratios achieved by the FE models using TI, CE and CB techniques about 1.122, 1.047 and 1.045, respectively, comparing to the results of existing experimental tests.

  10. A Discussion of Interactive Storytelling Techniques for Use in a Serious Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses a collection of interactive storytelling systems to provide an overview of state-of-the-art methods of narrative management and of enabling social interaction between users and virtual agents. This is done to inform the construction of a social cues and training demonstrator (a

  11. Rational behavior in decision making. A comparison between humans, computers and fast and frugal strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, C.C.P.

    2007-01-01

    Rational behavior in decision making. A comparison between humans, computers, and fast and frugal strategies Chris Snijders and Frits Tazelaar (Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands) Real life decisions often have to be made in "noisy" circumstances: not all crucial information is

  12. Human Computation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  13. Contextual Interaction Design Research: Enabling HCI

    OpenAIRE

    Murer , Martin; Meschtscherjakov , Alexander; Fuchsberger , Verena; Giuliani , Manuel; Neureiter , Katja; Moser , Christiane; Aslan , Ilhan; Tscheligi , Manfred

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has always been about humans, their needs and desires. Contemporary HCI thinking investigates interactions in everyday life and puts an emphasis on the emotional and experiential qualities of interactions. At the Center for Human-Computer Interaction we seek to bridge meandering strands in the field by following a guiding metaphor that shifts focus to what has always been the core quality of our research field: Enabling HCI, as a leitmo...

  14. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  15. Virtual Reality Techniques for Eliciting Empathy and Cultural Awareness: Affective Human-Virtual World Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Chirino-Klevans, Ivonne

    2017-01-01

    On the average human beings have about 50,000 thoughts every day. If we consider that thoughts influence how we feel there is little doubt that the way we perceive reality will strongly correlate with how we act upon that reality. Let’s contextualize this thinking process within the realm of global business where interacting with individuals from other cultural backgrounds is the norm. Our own perceptions and stereotypes towards those cultural groups will strongly influence how we interact wi...

  16. A Visualization Technique for Accessing Solution Pool in Interactive Methods of Multiobjective Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Filatovas, Ernestas; Podkopaev, Dmitry; Kurasova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Interactive methods of multiobjective optimization repetitively derive Pareto optimal solutions based on decision maker’s preference information and present the obtained solutions for his/her consideration. Some interactive methods save the obtained solutions into a solution pool and, at each iteration, allow the decision maker considering any of solutions obtained earlier. This feature contributes to the flexibility of exploring the Pareto optimal set and learning about the op...

  17. Physically-Based Interactive Flow Visualization Based on Schlieren and Interferometry Experimental Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brownlee, C.; Pegoraro, V.; Shankar, S.; McCormick, Patrick S.; Hansen, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph, interferometry

  18. Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99 in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text chat communications, manipulation of procedureschecklists, cataloguingannotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit andor other EVA systems.

  19. Active Learning in PhysicsTechnology and Research-based Techniques Emphasizing Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Physics education research has shown that learning environments that engage students and allow them to take an active part in their learning can lead to large conceptual gains compared to traditional instruction. Examples of successful curricula and methods include Peer Instruction, Just in Time Teaching, RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Scale-Up, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). An active learning environment is often difficult to achieve in lecture sessions. This presentation will demonstrate the use of sequences of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) that use real experiments often involving real-time data collection and display combined with student interaction to create an active learning environment in large or small lecture classes. Interactive lecture demonstrations will be done in the area of mechanics using real-time motion probes and the Visualizer. A video tape of students involved in interactive lecture demonstrations will be shown. The results of a number of research studies at various institutions (including international) to measure the effectiveness of ILDs and guided inquiry conceptual laboratories will be presented.

  20. Carboxyterfenadine antacid interaction monitoring by UV spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Shehnaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carboxyterfenadine, a primary metabolite of terfenadine, a second generation antihistaminic compound was introduced in therapy as a successor of terfenadine due to its cardiac arrhythmia. There are number of drug interactions of fexofenadine with erythromycin, ketoconazole and alike reported in the literature. In this paper, fexofenadine antacid interaction has been studied in presence of sodium bicarbonate, megaldrate, calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium trisilicate, simethicone (dimethylpolysiloxane and calcium hydroxide by UV–Vis spectrophotometer and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. These in vitro fexofenadine–antacid interactions were carried out in simulated gastric and intestinal juices and in buffer of pH 7.4 (simulating blood pH on BP 2005 dissolution apparatus. The results show non-concordant availability of fexofenadine envisaged due to formation of unstable charge transfer complexes.

  1. Bolt-Grout Interactions in Elastoplastic Rock Mass Using Coupled FEM-FDM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Deb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical procedure based on finite element method (FEM and finite difference method (FDM for the analysis of bolt-grout interactions are introduced in this paper. The finite element procedure incorporates elasto-plastic concepts with Hoek and Brown yield criterion and has been applied for rock mass. Bolt-grout interactions are evaluated based on finite difference method and are embedded in the elasto-plastic procedures of FEM. The experimental validation of the proposed FEM-FDM procedures and numerical examples of a bolted tunnel are provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for practical applications.

  2. Integrality and separability of multitouch interaction techniques in 3D manipulation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Anthony; Casiez, Géry; Grisoni, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Multitouch displays represent a promising technology for the display and manipulation of data. While the manipulation of 2D data has been widely explored, 3D manipulation with multitouch displays remains largely unexplored. Based on an analysis of the integration and separation of degrees of freedom, we propose a taxonomy for 3D manipulation techniques with multitouch displays. Using that taxonomy, we introduce Depth-Separated Screen-Space (DS3), a new 3D manipulation technique based on the separation of translation and rotation. In a controlled experiment, we compared DS3 with Sticky Tools and Screen-Space. Results show that separating the control of translation and rotation significantly affects performance for 3D manipulation, with DS3 performing faster than the two other techniques.

  3. Normal and friction stabilization techniques for interactive rigid body constraint-based contact force computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, yet simple, method for stabilization of normal forces. A normal stabilization term, carefully designed from hypotheses about interactive usability, is added to the contact force problem. Further, we propose friction stabilization as a completely new stabilization paradigm...

  4. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli, E-mail: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Bryant, Stephen H., E-mail: bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    2016-02-25

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

  5. Secondary Implementation of Interactive Engagement Teaching Techniques: Choices and Challenges in a Gulf Arab Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, G. W.; Isakovic, A. F.; Fawwaz, O.; Bawa'aneh, M. S.; El-Kork, N.; Makkiyil, S.; Qattan, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on efforts to design the "Collaborative Workshop Physics" (CWP) instructional strategy to deliver the first interactive engagement (IE) physics course at Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KU), United Arab Emirates (UAE). To our knowledge, this work reports the first calculus-based, introductory mechanics…

  6. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

  7. Using interactive problem-solving techniques to enhance control systems education for non English-speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, L. A.; Chaar, L.; Toms, C.

    2010-03-01

    Interactive learning is beneficial to students in that it allows the continual development and testing of many skills. An interactive approach enables students to improve their technical capabilities, as well as developing both verbal and written communicative ability. Problem solving and communication skills are vital for engineering students; in the workplace they will be required to communicate with people of varying technical abilities and from different linguistic and engineering backgrounds. In this paper, a case study is presented that discusses how the traditional method of teaching control systems can be improved. 'Control systems' is a complex engineering topic requiring students to process an extended amount of mathematical formulae. MATLAB software, which enables students to interactively compare a range of possible combinations and analyse the optimal solution, is used to this end. It was found that students became more enthusiastic and interested when given ownership of their learning objectives. As well as improving the students' technical knowledge, other important engineering skills are also improved by introducing an interactive method of teaching.

  8. Calibration and statistical techniques for building an interactive screen for learning of alphabets by children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riby Abraham Boby

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the implementation details of a portable interactive device called Image-projective Desktop Varnamala Trainer. The device uses a projector to produce a virtual display on a flat surface. For enabling interaction, the information about a user’s hand movement is obtained from a single two-dimensional scanning laser range finder in contrast with a camera sensor used in many earlier applications. A generalized calibration process to obtain exact transformation from projected screen coordinate system to sensor coordinate system is proposed in this article and implemented for enabling interaction. This permits production of large interactive displays with minimal cost. Additionally, it makes the entire system portable, that is, display can be produced on any planar surface like floor, tabletop, and so on. The calibration and its performance have been evaluated by varying screen sizes and the number of points used for calibration. The device was successfully calibrated for different screens. A novel learning-based methodology for predicting a user’s behaviour was then realized to improve the system’s performance. This has been experimentally evaluated, and the overall accuracy of prediction was about 96%. An application was then designed for this set-up to improve the learning of alphabets by the children through an interactive audiovisual feedback system. It uses a game-based methodology to help students learn in a fun way. Currently, it has bilingual (Hindi and English user interface to enable learning of alphabets and elementary mathematics. A user survey was conducted after demonstrating it to school children. The survey results are very encouraging. Additionally, a study to ascertain the improvement in the learning outcome of the children was done. The results clearly indicate an improvement in the learning outcome of the children who used the device over those who did not.

  9. Exploring Machine Learning Techniques Using Patient Interactions in Online Health Forums to Classify Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Brant Wah Kwong

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of personal health messages collected from online message forums to predict drug safety using natural language processing and machine learning techniques. Drug safety is defined as any drug with an active safety alert from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is believed that this is the first…

  10. Relationship-Centered Counseling: The Integrative Interaction of Relationship and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Eugene W., Jr.

    Efforts toward integration and eclecticism in counseling and psychotherapy reflect continuing interest in systematically blending theoretical commonalties and eclectically using a variety of techniques across different schools of therapy in the hope of achieving a constituent working model that pools the strengths of different theories and…

  11. Evaluation of the effect of polymorphism on G-quadruplex-ligand interaction by means of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, S.; Ferrer, A.; Benabou, S.; Aviñó, A.; Eritja, R.; Gargallo, R.

    2018-05-01

    Guanine-rich sequences may fold into highly ordered structures known as G-quadruplexes. Apart from the monomeric G-quadruplex, these sequences may form multimeric structures that are not usually considered when studying interaction with ligands. This work studies the interaction of a ligand, crystal violet, with three guanine-rich DNA sequences with the capacity to form multimeric structures. These sequences correspond to short stretches found near the promoter regions of c-kit and SMARCA4 genes. Instrumental techniques (circular dichroism, molecular fluorescence, size-exclusion chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) and multivariate data analysis were used for this purpose. The polymorphism of G-quadruplexes was characterized prior to the interaction studies. The ligand was shown to interact preferentially with the monomeric G-quadruplex; the binding stoichiometry was 1:1 and the binding constant was in the order of 105 M-1 for all three sequences. The results highlight the importance of DNA treatment prior to interaction studies.

  12. The operator technique in the theory of the rare earth ion interaction with ligand nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeenok, O.A.; Eremin, M.V.; Khutsishvili, O.G.

    1986-01-01

    The tensor structure of the operator of rare earth ion interaction with nuclei of close ligands conditioned by virtual processes of charge transport is established. It is taken into account that virtual processes of electron transport from the ligand can take place to the non-filled 4f-, void 5d- and 6s- and preliminarily excited 5p-shells of the rare earth ion. Effects of 4f- and 5d-state mixing by the odd crystal field are considered for the first time. In contrast to the usual multipole-dipole interaction the given one is characterized by anomalously greater significance of highest multipole momenta of the rare earth ion and in the common case it does not have axial symmetry. The theory is compared with data on double electron-nuclear resonance and radiofrequency discrete saturation, taking CaF 2 :Ce 3+ impurity centers as an example

  13. Probing Enzyme-Surface Interactions via Protein Engineering and Single-Molecule Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The overall objective of this research was to exploit protein engineering and fluorescence single-molecule methods to...enhance our understanding of the interaction of proteins and surfaces. Given this objective, the specific aims of this research were to: 1) exploit the...incorporation of unnatural amino acids in proteins to introduce single-molecule probes (i.e., fluorophores for fluorescence resonance energy transfer

  14. Recommendation Techniques for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction and Drug Repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Salvatore; Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The usage of computational methods in drug discovery is a common practice. More recently, by exploiting the wealth of biological knowledge bases, a novel approach called drug repositioning has raised. Several computational methods are available, and these try to make a high-level integration of all the knowledge in order to discover unknown mechanisms. In this chapter, we review drug-target interaction prediction methods based on a recommendation system. We also give some extensions which go beyond the bipartite network case.

  15. Human Computer Collaboration at the Edge: Enhancing Collective Situation Understanding with Controlled Natural Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-06

    conversational agent with information exchange disabled until the end of the experiment run. The meaning of the indicator in the top- right of the agent... Human Computer Collaboration at the Edge: Enhancing Collective Situation Understanding with Controlled Natural Language Alun Preece∗, William...email: PreeceAD@cardiff.ac.uk †Emerging Technology Services, IBM United Kingdom Ltd, Hursley Park, Winchester, UK ‡US Army Research Laboratory, Human

  16. On the use of the spectroscopic techniques to model the interactions between radionuclides and solid minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, E. [IPN, Paris XI University, 91406 Orsay (France)]. e-mail: simoni@ipno.in2p3.fr

    2004-07-01

    In order to determine the radionuclides sorption constants on solid natural minerals, both thermodynamic and structural investigations, using spectroscopic techniques, are presented. The natural clays, that could be used as engineering barrier in the nuclear waste geological repository, are rather complex minerals. Therefore, in order to understand how these natural materials retain the radionuclides, it is necessary first to perform these studies on simple substrates such as phosphates, oxides and silicates (as powder and single crystal as well) and then extrapolate the obtained results on the natural minerals. As examples, the main results on the sorption processes of the hexavalent uranium onto zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) and lanthanum phosphate (LaPO{sub 4}) are presented. The corresponding sorption curves are simulated using the results obtained with the following spectroscopic techniques: laser induced spectro fluorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Exafs). Finally, the thermodynamic sorption constants are calculated. (Author)

  17. Protein-Flavonoid Interaction Studies by a Taylor Dispersion Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Technique: A Novel Method to Assess Biomolecular Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preejith P. Vachali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are common polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. These pigments have important pharmacological relevance because emerging research suggests possible anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties as well other beneficial health effects. These compounds are relatively hydrophobic molecules, suggesting the role of blood transport proteins in their delivery to tissues. In this study, we assess the binding interactions of four flavonoids (kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, and resveratrol with human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in the blood, and with glutathione S-transferase pi isoform-1 (GSTP1, an enzyme with well-characterized hydrophobic binding sites that plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics with reduced glutathione, using a novel Taylor dispersion surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique. For the first time, HSA sites revealed a high-affinity binding site for flavonoid interactions. Out of the four flavonoids that we examined, quercetin and kaempferol showed the strongest equilibrium binding affinities (KD of 63 ± 0.03 nM and 37 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. GSTP1 displayed lower affinities in the micromolar range towards all of the flavonoids tested. The interactions of flavonoids with HSA and GSTP1 were studied successfully using this novel SPR assay method. The new method is compatible with both kinetic and equilibrium analyses.

  18. Characterization of the interaction between 3-Oxotabersonine and two serum albumins by using spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qing; Yan, Jin; He, Jiawei; Bai, Keke [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Hui, E-mail: lihuilab@sina.com [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2013-06-15

    3-Oxotabersonine (OTAB) is a component of Voacanga africana, which is a type of traditional drug in Africa widely used for treating diseases. This study examines the interaction of OTAB with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions. The interaction between OTAB and BSA/HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling under simulated physiological conditions. The experimental results confirm that the quenching mechanism is a static quenching process. The binding site number (n) and the apparent binding constant (K) were measured at various temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, namely, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS), were calculated. Furthermore, the structural changes in the serum albumin that affected the OTAB binding were determined using FT-IR. The binding site was assumed to be located in site I of the BSA/HSA (subdomain IIA). -- Highlights: ► Make use of the 3-Oxotabersonine firstly extracted from seeds of Voacanga africana Stapf to study the drug–protein system. ► Use two kinds of similar structure serum albumins to do a comparative study. ► FT-IR was used to study the conformational change of BSA and HSA. ► Use the BSA and HSA structure obtained from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank for molecular docking.

  19. Characterization of the interaction between 3-Oxotabersonine and two serum albumins by using spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qing; Yan, Jin; He, Jiawei; Bai, Keke; Li, Hui

    2013-01-01

    3-Oxotabersonine (OTAB) is a component of Voacanga africana, which is a type of traditional drug in Africa widely used for treating diseases. This study examines the interaction of OTAB with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions. The interaction between OTAB and BSA/HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling under simulated physiological conditions. The experimental results confirm that the quenching mechanism is a static quenching process. The binding site number (n) and the apparent binding constant (K) were measured at various temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, namely, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS), were calculated. Furthermore, the structural changes in the serum albumin that affected the OTAB binding were determined using FT-IR. The binding site was assumed to be located in site I of the BSA/HSA (subdomain IIA). -- Highlights: ► Make use of the 3-Oxotabersonine firstly extracted from seeds of Voacanga africana Stapf to study the drug–protein system. ► Use two kinds of similar structure serum albumins to do a comparative study. ► FT-IR was used to study the conformational change of BSA and HSA. ► Use the BSA and HSA structure obtained from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank for molecular docking

  20. From interatomic interaction potentials via Einstein field equation techniques to time dependent contact mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzer, N

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the principle differences between rheological or simple stress tests like the uniaxial tensile test to contact mechanical tests and the differences between quasistatic contact experiments and oscillatory ones, this study resorts to effective first principles. This study will show how relatively simple models simulating bond interactions in solids using effective potentials like Lennard-Jones and Morse can be used to investigate the effect of time dependent stress-induced softening or stiffening of these solids. The usefulness of the current study is in the possibility of deriving relatively simple dependences of the bulk-modulus B on time, shear and pressure P with time t. In cases where it is possible to describe, or at least partially describe a material by Lennard-Jones potential approaches, the above- mentioned dependences are even completely free of microscopic material parameters. Instead of bond energies and length, only specific integral parameters like Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio are required. However, in the case of time dependent (viscose) material behavior the parameters are not constants anymore. They themselves depend on time and the actual stress field, especially the shear field. A body completely consisting of so called standard linear solid interacting particles will then phenomenologically show a completely different and usually much more complicated mechanical behavior. The influence of the time dependent pressure-shear-induced Young’s modulus change is discussed with respect to mechanical contact experiments and their analysis in the case of viscose materials. (papers)

  1. New techniques to control salinity-wastewater reuse interactions in golf courses of the Mediterranean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrao, J.; Costa, M.; Rosado, V.; Gamito, P.; Santos, R.; Khaydarova, V.

    2003-04-01

    Due to the lack water around the Mediterranean regions, potable water luxurious uses - as in golf courses - are increasingly contested. In order to solve this problem, non conventional water resources (effluent, gray, recycled, reclaimed, brackish), like treated wastewater, for irrigation gained increasing role in the planning and development of additional water supplies in golf courses. In most cases, the intense use of effluent for irrigation attracted public awareness in respect of contaminating pathogens and heavy metals. The contaminating effect of salinity in soil and underground water is very often neglected. The objective of this work is to present the conventional techniques to control salinity of treated wastewater and to present some results on new clean techniques to solve this problem, in the framework of the INCO-COPERNICUS project (no. IC-15CT98-0105) "Adaptation of Efficient Water Use Criteria in Marginal Regions of Europe and Middle Asia with Scarce Sources Subject to Environmental Control, Climate Change and Socio-Economic Development" and of the INCO-DC project (no. IC18-CT98-0266) "Control of Salination and Combating Desertification Effects in the Mediterranean Region. Phase II". Saline water is the most common irrigation water in arid climates. Moreover, for each region treated wastewater is always more saline than tap water, and therefore, when treated wastewater is reused in golf courses, more salinity problems occur. Conventional techniques to combat the salination process in golf courses can be characterized by four generations: 1) Problem of root zone salination by soil leaching - two options can occur - when there is an impermeable layer, salts will be concentrated above this layer; on the other hand, when there is no impermeable layer, aquifers contamination can be observed; 2) Use of subsurface trickle irrigation - economy of water, and therefore less additional salts; however the problem of groundwater contamination due to natural rain

  2. Using X-ray spectroheliograph technique for investigations of laser-produced plasma under interaction with strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.; Dyakin, V.; Magunov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Skobelev, I.; Pikuz, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Wolowski, J.; Zielinska, E.

    1996-01-01

    A dense jet of a plasma consisting of multiply charged ions was generated in the interaction of a laser plasma with a strong external axial magnetic field. It is shown that using the high-luminosity X-ray spectroheliograph technique allows to measure plasma emission spectra with 2-dimensional spatial resolution even in the cases when these spectra have small intensities. The X-ray spectroscopy and interferometry methods are used to measure plasma parameter distributions. The dependencies of N e (z) and T e (z) measured in this paper can be used to calculate the evolution of plasma ionization state during plasma expansion. The quasihomogeneous laser jet, which appears when a laser plasma interacts with an external magnetic field can be used not only to form an active medium of a short wavelength laser, but probably also to tackle the urgent problem of transport in a laser ion injector. (orig.)

  3. Using X-ray spectroheliograph technique for investigations of laser-produced plasma under interaction with strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faenov, A. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Dyakin, V. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Magunov, A. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Pikuz, T. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Skobelev, I. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Pikuz, S. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Fizicheskij Inst.; Kasperczyk, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Pisarczyk, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-08-01

    A dense jet of a plasma consisting of multiply charged ions was generated in the interaction of a laser plasma with a strong external axial magnetic field. It is shown that using the high-luminosity X-ray spectroheliograph technique allows to measure plasma emission spectra with 2-dimensional spatial resolution even in the cases when these spectra have small intensities. The X-ray spectroscopy and interferometry methods are used to measure plasma parameter distributions. The dependencies of N{sub e}(z) and T{sub e}(z) measured in this paper can be used to calculate the evolution of plasma ionization state during plasma expansion. The quasihomogeneous laser jet, which appears when a laser plasma interacts with an external magnetic field can be used not only to form an active medium of a short wavelength laser, but probably also to tackle the urgent problem of transport in a laser ion injector. (orig.).

  4. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (K b ) of 5.74×10 3 and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  6. New techniques for experimental generation of two-dimensional blade-vortex interaction at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, E., Jr.; Yu, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two dimensional blade vortex interaction was held at NASA Langley Research Center. The first phase was a flow visualization study to document the approach process of a two dimensional vortex as it encountered a loaded blade model. To accomplish the flow visualization study, a method for generating two dimensional vortex filaments was required. The numerical study used to define a new vortex generation process and the use of this process in the flow visualization study were documented. Additionally, photographic techniques and data analysis methods used in the flow visualization study are examined.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy: An experimental technique to measure charge state distribution during ion–solid interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Prashant, E-mail: prashant@iuac.res.in; Nandi, Tapan

    2016-01-08

    Charge state distributions of {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni projectile ions passing through thin carbon foils have been studied in the energy range of 1.65–2.69 MeV/u using a novel method involving the X-ray spectroscopy technique. Interestingly the charge state distribution in the bulk shows Lorentzian behavior instead of usual Gaussian distribution. Further, different parameters of charge state distribution like mean charge state, distribution width and asymmetric parameter are determined and compared with the empirical calculations and ETACHA predictions. It is found that the X-ray measurement technique is appropriate to determine the mean charge state during the ion–solid interaction or in the bulk. Interestingly, empirical formalism predicts much lower mean charge states of the projectile ions compared to X-ray measurements which clearly indicate multi-electron capture from the target surface. The ETACHA predictions and experimental results are found to be comparable for the present energy regime. - Highlights: • New method is proposed to determine charge state distribution using X-ray technique. • Charge state distribution parameters are calculated and compared with various theoretical predictions. • X-ray technique is found to be appropriate to segregate the charge state distribution in the bulk from the target surface. • ETACHA predictions are found satisfactory in the energy range of ≥1.65 MeV/u.

  8. Use of Isotopic Techniques for the Assessment of Hydrological Interaction Surface Water and Groundwater. Rio Man - Cienaga Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio B, P.; Betancur V, T.; Dapena, C.

    2011-01-01

    This job integrates the first results from the studies ''Conceptual Hydrological Model for the middle and lower parts of the Man River basin using hydrological, hydrochemical and isotopic techniques'' (Palacio, 2011) and ''Hydrochemical and Isotopic techniques for the assessment of hydrological processes in the the wetlands of Bajo Cauca Antioquia'' (University of Antioquia and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Man river basin covers an area of 688 km 2 ; with temperatures ranging from 25 to 30 o C; The average annual rainfall is 2.800 mm. The geology of the area is composed mainly of clastic sedimentary rocks of continental origin. A hydrological model of interaction between surface water and groundwater for the lower middle of the Man River basin was obtained by the use of hydrological analysis techniques. This model was refined, adjusted and validated using isotope techniques based mainly on the analysis of spatial and temporal variance of stable isotopes found in rain water, surface bodies of water such as streams and wetlands, and in an unconfined aquifer.

  9. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bird interactions with offshore oil and gas platforms: review of impacts and monitoring techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, Robert A; Allard, Karel A; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of oil and gas platforms are currently operating in offshore waters globally, and this industry is expected to expand in coming decades. Although the potential environmental impacts of offshore oil and gas activities are widely recognized, there is limited understanding of their impacts on migratory and resident birds. A literature review identified 24 studies and reports of bird-platform interactions, most being qualitative and half having been peer-reviewed. The most frequently observed effect, for seabirds and landbirds, is attraction and sometimes collisions associated with lights and flares; episodic events have caused the deaths of hundreds or even thousands of birds. Though typically unpredictable, anecdotally, it is known that poor weather, such as fog, precipitation and low cloud cover, can exacerbate the effect of nocturnal attraction to lights, especially when coincidental with bird migrations. Other effects include provision of foraging and roosting opportunities, increased exposure to oil and hazardous environments, increased exposure to predators, or repulsion from feeding sites. Current approaches to monitoring birds at offshore platforms have focused on observer-based methods which can offer species-level bird identification, quantify seasonal patterns of relative abundance and distribution, and document avian mortality events and underlying factors. Observer-based monitoring is time-intensive, limited in spatial and temporal coverage, and suffers without clear protocols and when not conducted by trained, independent observers. These difficulties are exacerbated because deleterious bird-platform interaction is episodic and likely requires the coincidence of multiple factors (e.g., darkness, cloud, fog, rain conditions, occurrence of birds in vicinity). Collectively, these considerations suggest a need to implement supplemental systems for monitoring bird activities around offshore platforms. Instrument-based approaches, such as radar

  11. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Leufen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei. Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of

  12. Development and evaluation of a tracer-injection hydrothermal technique for studies of waste package interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.E.; Coles, D.G.; Britton, R.C.; Burnell, J.R.

    1986-11-01

    A tracer-injection system has been developed for use in characterizing reactions of waste package materials under hydrothermal conditions. High-pressure liquid chromatographic instrumentation has been coupled with Dickson-type rocking autoclaves to allow injection of selected components into the hydrothermal fluid while maintaining run temperature and pressure. Hydrothermal experiments conducted using this system included the interactions of depleted uranium oxide and Zircaloy-4 metal alloy discs with trace levels of 99 Tc and non-radioactive Cs and I in a simulated groundwater matrix. After waste-package components and simulated waste forms were pre-conditioned in the autoclave systems (usually 4 to 6 weeks), known quantities of tracer-doped fluids were injected into the autoclaves' gold reaction bag at run conditions. Time-sequenced sampling of the hydrothermal fluid providing kinetic data on the reactions of tracers with waste package materials. The injection system facilitates the design of experiments that will better define ''steady-state'' fluid compositions in hydrothermal reactions. The injection system will also allow for the formation of tracer-bearing solid phases in detectable quantities

  13. Study of plasma-material surface interaction using Langmuir probe technique during plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Akel, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we tried to understand the plasma-surface interactions by using Langmuir probes. Two different types of plasmas were studied, the first is the electropositive plasma in Argon and the second is the electronegative plasma in Sulfur Hexafluoride. In the first type, the effects of Argon gas pressure, the injection of Helium in the remote zone and the substrate bias on the measurements of the Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) and on the plasma parameters (electron density (n e ), effective electron temperature (T e ff), plasma potential (V p ) and floating potential (V f )) have been investigated. The obtained EEPFs and plasma parameters have been used to control two remote plasma processes. The first is the remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) of thin films, on silicon wafers, from Hexamethyldisoloxane (HMDSO) precursor diluted in the remote Ar-He plasma. The second is the pure Argon remote plasma treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer surface. In the second type, the plasma diagnostics were performed in the remote zone as a function of SF 6 flow rate, where relative concentrations of fluorine atoms were measured using actinometry optical emission spectroscopy; electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined using single cylindrical Langmuir probe, positive ion flux and negative ion fraction were determined using an planar probe. The silicon etching process in SF 6 plasma was studied. (author)

  14. Study of plasma-material surface interaction using langmuir probe technique during plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Akel, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tried to understand the plasma-surface interactions by using Langmuir probes. Two different types of plasmas were studied, the first is the electropositive plasma in Argon and the second is the electronegative plasma in Sulfur Hexafluoride. In the first type, the effects of Argon gas pressure, the injection of Helium in the remote zone and the substrate bias on the measurements of the Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) and on the plasma parameters (electron density (n e ), effective electron temperature (T e ff), plasma potential (V p ) and floating potential (V f )) have been investigated. The obtained EEPFs and plasma parameters have been used to control two remote plasma processes. The first is the remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) of thin films, on silicon wafers, from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) precursor diluted in the remote Ar-He plasma. The second is the pure Argon remote plasma treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer surface. In the second type, the plasma diagnostics were performed in the remote zone as a function of SF 6 flow rate, where relative concentrations of fluorine atoms were measured using actinometry optical emission spectroscopy; electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined using single cylindrical Langmuir probe, positive ion flux and negative ion fraction were determined using an planar probe. The silicon etching process in SF 6 plasma was studied. (author)

  15. The effects of soil-structure interaction modeling techniques on in-structure response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Wesley, D.A.; Almajan, I.T.

    1977-01-01

    The structure considered for this investigation consisted of the reactor containment building (RCB) and prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) for a HTGR plant. A conventional lumped-mass dynamic model in three dimensions was used in the study. The horizontal and vertical response, which are uncoupled due to the symmetry of the structure, were determined for horizontal and vertical excitation. Five different site conditions ranging from competent rock to a soft soil site were considered. The simplified approach to the overall plant analysis utilized stiffness proportional composite damping with a limited amount of soil damping consistent with US NRC regulatory guidelines. Selected cases were also analyzed assuming a soil damping value approximating the theoretical value. The results from the simplified approach were compared to those determined by rigorously coupling the structure to a frequency independent half-space representation of the soil. Finally, equivalent modal damping ratios were found by matching the frequency response at a point within the coupled soil-structure system determined by solution of the coupled and uncoupled equations of motion. The basis for comparison of the aforementioned techniques was the response spectra at selected locations within the soil-structure system. Each of the five site conditions was analyzed and in-structure response spectra were generated. The response spectra were combined to form a design envelope which encompasses the entire range of site parameters. Both the design envelopes and the site-by-site results were compared

  16. Reliability techniques and Coupled BEM/FEM for interaction pile-soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed SAHLI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of a computational code for the modelling and verification of safety in relation to limit states of piles found in foundations of current structures. To this end, it makes use of reliability techniques for the probabilistic analysis of piles modelled with the finite element method (FEM coupled to the boundary element method (BEM. The soil is modelled with the BEM employing Mindlin's fundamental solutions, suitable for the consideration of a three-dimensional infinite half-space. The piles are modelled as bar elements with the MEF, each of which is represented in the BEM as a loading line. The finite element of the employed bar has four nodes and fourteen nodal parameters, three of which are displacements for each node plus two rotations for the top node. The slipping of the piles in relation to the mass is carried out using adhesion models to define the evolution of the shaft tensions during the transfer of load to the soil. The reliability analysis is based on three methods: first order second moment (FOSM, first order reliability method and Monte Carlo method.

  17. Divers models of divalent cation interaction to calcium-binding proteins: techniques and anthology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jos A

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) are sensors of the calcium signal and several of them even shape the signal. Most of them are equipped with at least two EF-hand motifs designed to bind Ca(2+). Their affinities are very variable, can display cooperative effects, and can be modulated by physiological Mg(2+) concentrations. These binding phenomena are monitored by four major techniques: equilibrium dialysis, fluorimetry with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators, flow dialysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry. In the last quarter of the twentieth century reports on the ion-binding characteristics of several abundant wild-type CaBPs were published. With the advent of recombinant CaBPs it became possible to determine these properties on previously inaccessible proteins. Here I report on studies by our group carried out in the last decade on eight families of recombinant CaBPs, their mutants, or truncated domains. Moreover this chapter deals with the currently used methods for quantifying the binding of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) to CaBPs.

  18. Beyond Astro 101: A First Report on Applying Interactive Education Techniques to an Astronphysics Class for Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Ghez, A. M.

    2009-05-01

    Learner-centered interactive instruction methods now have a proven track record in improving learning in "Astro 101" courses for non-majors, but have rarely been applied to higher-level astronomy courses. Can we hope for similar gains in classes aimed at astrophysics majors, or is the subject matter too fundamentally different for those techniques to apply? We present here an initial report on an updated calculus-based Introduction to Astrophysics class at UCLA that suggests such techniques can indeed result in increased learning for major students. We augmented the traditional blackboard-derivation lectures and challenging weekly problem sets by adding online questions on pre-reading assignments (''just-in-time teaching'') and frequent multiple-choice questions in class ("Think-Pair-Share''). We describe our approach, and present examples of the new Think-Pair-Share questions developed for this more sophisticated material. Our informal observations after one term are that with this approach, students are more engaged and alert, and score higher on exams than typical in previous years. This is anecdotal evidence, not hard data yet, and there is clearly a vast amount of work to be done in this area. But our first impressions strongly encourage us that interactive methods should be able improve the astrophysics major just as they have improved Astro 101.

  19. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Woo, Hyun Soo; Jo, Jae Min; Lee, Min Hee

    2015-01-01

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

  20. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jae Min [Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques.

  1. Depth-of-interaction estimates in pixelated scintillator sensors using Monte Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Diksha; Sze, Christina; Bhandari, Harish; Nagarkar, Vivek; Badano, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Image quality in thick scintillator detectors can be improved by minimizing parallax errors through depth-of-interaction (DOI) estimation. A novel sensor for low-energy single photon imaging having a thick, transparent, crystalline pixelated micro-columnar CsI:Tl scintillator structure has been described, with possible future application in small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging when using thicker structures under development. In order to understand the fundamental limits of this new structure, we introduce cartesianDETECT2, an open-source optical transport package that uses Monte Carlo methods to obtain estimates of DOI for improving spatial resolution of nuclear imaging applications. Optical photon paths are calculated as a function of varying simulation parameters such as columnar surface roughness, bulk, and top-surface absorption. We use scanning electron microscope images to estimate appropriate surface roughness coefficients. Simulation results are analyzed to model and establish patterns between DOI and photon scattering. The effect of varying starting locations of optical photons on the spatial response is studied. Bulk and top-surface absorption fractions were varied to investigate their effect on spatial response as a function of DOI. We investigated the accuracy of our DOI estimation model for a particular screen with various training and testing sets, and for all cases the percent error between the estimated and actual DOI over the majority of the detector thickness was ±5% with a maximum error of up to ±10% at deeper DOIs. In addition, we found that cartesianDETECT2 is computationally five times more efficient than MANTIS. Findings indicate that DOI estimates can be extracted from a double-Gaussian model of the detector response. We observed that our model predicts DOI in pixelated scintillator detectors reasonably well.

  2. Formation of resonances with final state photons in two photon interactions, and development of calorimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, R.

    1986-07-01

    In this thesis, resonances produced in two photon interactions were investigated with the TASSO detector at PETRA. The η ' and A 2 resonances were studied in a final state of charged pions and low energy photons. The couplings of these resonances to γγ were measured: Γ γγ (η ' (958)) 5.1±0.4(stat.)±0.65(syst.) Kev, Γ γγ (A 2 (1320)) 0.90±0.27(stat.)±0.16(syst.) Kev. A search for ι(1460) and η c (2980) was initiated. Upper limits on the γγ widths of these resonances times their branching ratio to the decay channel were obtained: Γ γγ (ι→γγ) x B(ι→ρ 0 γ) γγ (η c →γγ) x B(η c →η ' π + π - ) < 2.6 keV (95% C.L.). A proportional tubes electromagnetic calorimeter operating in the proportional mode was constructed. Tower readout was incorporated. The calorimeter gave an energy resolution of σ/E = 19%/√E. Large surface, thin Gap Chambers (TGC), were developed and constructed for the OPAL hadron pole-tip-calorimeter. The TGC operate in a high gain mode. They provide large signals for both pad and strip readout, without the need for amplification. To form a hadron calorimeter, ten chambers were interlaced with 8 cm thick iron slabs between them. An energy resolution of: σ/E = 105%/√E was obtained

  3. Applying Geospatial Techniques to Investigate Boundary Layer Land-Atmosphere Interactions Involved in Tornadogensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, A. M.; Griffin, R.; Knupp, K. R.; Molthan, A.; Coleman, T.

    2017-12-01

    Northern Alabama is among the most tornado-prone regions in the United States. This region has a higher degree of spatial variability in both terrain and land cover than the more frequently studied North American Great Plains region due to its proximity to the southern Appalachian Mountains and Cumberland Plateau. More research is needed to understand North Alabama's high tornado frequency and how land surface heterogeneity influences tornadogenesis in the boundary layer. Several modeling and simulation studies stretching back to the 1970's have found that variations in the land surface induce tornadic-like flow near the surface, illustrating a need for further investigation. This presentation introduces research investigating the hypothesis that horizontal gradients in land surface roughness, normal to the direction of flow in the boundary layer, induce vertically oriented vorticity at the surface that can potentially aid in tornadogenesis. A novel approach was implemented to test this hypothesis using a GIS-based quadrant pattern analysis method. This method was developed to quantify spatial relationships and patterns between horizontal variations in land surface roughness and locations of tornadogenesis. Land surface roughness was modeled using the Noah land surface model parameterization scheme which, was applied to MODIS 500 m and Landsat 30 m data in order to compare the relationship between tornadogenesis locations and roughness gradients at different spatial scales. This analysis found a statistical relationship between areas of higher roughness located normal to flow surrounding tornadogenesis locations that supports the tested hypothesis. In this presentation, the innovative use of satellite remote sensing data and GIS technologies to address interactions between the land and atmosphere will be highlighted.

  4. Evaluation of smartphone-based interaction techniques in a CAVE in the context of immersive digital project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Kemeny, Andras; Colombet, Florent; Merienne, Frédéric; Chardonnet, Jean-Rémy; Thouvenin, Indira Mouttapa

    2014-02-01

    Immersive digital project reviews consist in using virtual reality (VR) as a tool for discussion between various stakeholders of a project. In the automotive industry, the digital car prototype model is the common thread that binds them. It is used during immersive digital project reviews between designers, engineers, ergonomists, etc. The digital mockup is also used to assess future car architecture, habitability or perceived quality requirements with the aim to reduce using physical mockups for optimized cost, delay and quality efficiency. Among the difficulties identified by the users, handling the mockup is a major one. Inspired by current uses of nomad devices (multi-touch gestures, IPhone UI look'n'feel and AR applications), we designed a navigation technique taking advantage of these popular input devices: Space scrolling allows moving around the mockup. In this paper, we present the results of a study we conducted on the usability and acceptability of the proposed smartphone-based interaction metaphor compared to traditional technique and we provide indications of the most efficient choices for different use-cases accordingly. It was carried out in a traditional 4-sided CAVE and its purpose is to assess a chosen set of interaction techniques to be implemented in Renault's new 5-sides 4K x 4K wall high performance CAVE. The proposed new metaphor using nomad devices is well accepted by novice VR users and future implementation should allow an efficient industrial use. Their use is an easy and user friendly alternative of the existing traditional control devices such as a joystick.

  5. Streamlined analysis technique for the evaluation of pellet clad interaction in PWR reload cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, Ch.; Morita, T.; Brown, J.

    2007-01-01

    For some applications, an analysis is required to explicitly demonstrate that fuel failure due to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) is prevented by the core limits and the protection system for both Condition I (normal operation) operation and for Condition II (events of moderate frequency) events. This analysis needs to address the entire range of normal operation allowed by the Technical Specifications and all Condition II transients. The obvious approach which has been utilized for many years is a simulation of normal operation power maneuvers followed by explicit Condition II transients as a function of key core parameters. This is a sampling approach and has concerns about the overall coverage of the potential space. An alternative approach is the 3D FAC power distribution analysis methodology that was based upon the Westinghouse Relaxed Axial Offset Control Strategy (RAOC) evaluation process. The 3D FAC methodology uses a parametric representation of variables affecting the power distributions, defining a grid mesh over a space of Condition I and Condition II parameters. The operation space is defined by a power range, temperature range, rod position range, axial offset range, core protection limits and representative xenon distributions. Then the 3D FAC evaluation consists of systematically calculating the 3D power distribution and margin to the core and fuel limits for each mesh point of this multi-dimensional space. The PCI margin is obtained by the comparison of the 3D power distributions over the Condition II space and the 3D maximum allowed power, which is dependent on the fuel rod history. The fuel history model utilizes the power history developed in the 3-dimensional nuclear analysis code to define local powers for the specified fuel rods to be analyzed. It tracks the rod history and provides the maximum allowed power for the point. This model is appropriate for base load operation, extended reduced power operation, return to power operation and

  6. Secondary implementation of interactive engagement teaching techniques: Choices and challenges in a Gulf Arab context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Hitt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on efforts to design the “Collaborative Workshop Physics” (CWP instructional strategy to deliver the first interactive engagement (IE physics course at Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KU, United Arab Emirates (UAE. To our knowledge, this work reports the first calculus-based, introductory mechanics course on the Arabian Peninsula using physics education research (PER-based instruction. A brief history and present context of general university and STEM teaching in the UAE is given. We present this secondary implementation (SI as a case study of a novel context and use it to determine if PER-based instruction can be successfully implemented far from the cultural context of the primary developer and, if so, how might such SIs differ from SIs within the United States (U.S. in terms of criteria for and risks to their success. With these questions in view, a prereform baseline comprised of Maryland Physics Expectations in Physics survey, Force Concept Inventory (FCI, course exam grades, and English language proficiency data are used to design a hybrid implementation of Cooperative Group Problem Solving. We find that for students with high English proficiency, normalized gain on FCI improves substantially, from ⟨g⟩=0.16±0.10 prereform to ⟨g⟩=0.47±0.08 in the CWP pilot (standard errors, indicating a successful SI. However, we also find evidence that normalized gains on FCI are strongly modulated by language proficiency and discuss likely causes. Regardless of language ability, problem-solving skill is also substantially improved and course drop-fail-withdrawal rates are cut from 50% to 24%. In particular, we find evidence in postreform student interviews that prior classroom experiences, and not broader cultural expectations about education, are the more significant cause of expectations that are at odds with the classroom norms of well-functioning PER-based instruction. We present this result as evidence

  7. Streamlined analysis technique for the evaluation of pellet clad interaction in PWR reload cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, Ch.; Morita, T.; Brown, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Nuclear Fuel Div., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    For some applications, an analysis is required to explicitly demonstrate that fuel failure due to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) is prevented by the core limits and the protection system for both Condition I (normal operation) operation and for Condition II (events of moderate frequency) events. This analysis needs to address the entire range of normal operation allowed by the Technical Specifications and all Condition II transients. The obvious approach which has been utilized for many years is a simulation of normal operation power maneuvers followed by explicit Condition II transients as a function of key core parameters. This is a sampling approach and has concerns about the overall coverage of the potential space. An alternative approach is the 3D FAC power distribution analysis methodology that was based upon the Westinghouse Relaxed Axial Offset Control Strategy (RAOC) evaluation process. The 3D FAC methodology uses a parametric representation of variables affecting the power distributions, defining a grid mesh over a space of Condition I and Condition II parameters. The operation space is defined by a power range, temperature range, rod position range, axial offset range, core protection limits and representative xenon distributions. Then the 3D FAC evaluation consists of systematically calculating the 3D power distribution and margin to the core and fuel limits for each mesh point of this multi-dimensional space. The PCI margin is obtained by the comparison of the 3D power distributions over the Condition II space and the 3D maximum allowed power, which is dependent on the fuel rod history. The fuel history model utilizes the power history developed in the 3-dimensional nuclear analysis code to define local powers for the specified fuel rods to be analyzed. It tracks the rod history and provides the maximum allowed power for the point. This model is appropriate for base load operation, extended reduced power operation, return to power operation and

  8. Secondary implementation of interactive engagement teaching techniques: Choices and challenges in a Gulf Arab context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, G. W.; Isakovic, A. F.; Fawwaz, O.; Bawa'aneh, M. S.; El-Kork, N.; Makkiyil, S.; Qattan, I. A.

    2014-12-01

    We report on efforts to design the "Collaborative Workshop Physics" (CWP) instructional strategy to deliver the first interactive engagement (IE) physics course at Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KU), United Arab Emirates (UAE). To our knowledge, this work reports the first calculus-based, introductory mechanics course on the Arabian Peninsula using physics education research (PER)-based instruction. A brief history and present context of general university and STEM teaching in the UAE is given. We present this secondary implementation (SI) as a case study of a novel context and use it to determine if PER-based instruction can be successfully implemented far from the cultural context of the primary developer and, if so, how might such SIs differ from SIs within the United States (U.S.) in terms of criteria for and risks to their success. With these questions in view, a prereform baseline comprised of Maryland Physics Expectations in Physics survey, Force Concept Inventory (FCI), course exam grades, and English language proficiency data are used to design a hybrid implementation of Cooperative Group Problem Solving. We find that for students with high English proficiency, normalized gain on FCI improves substantially, from ⟨g⟩=0.16±0.10 prereform to ⟨g⟩=0.47±0.08 in the CWP pilot (standard errors), indicating a successful SI. However, we also find evidence that normalized gains on FCI are strongly modulated by language proficiency and discuss likely causes. Regardless of language ability, problem-solving skill is also substantially improved and course drop-fail-withdrawal rates are cut from 50% to 24%. In particular, we find evidence in postreform student interviews that prior classroom experiences, and not broader cultural expectations about education, are the more significant cause of expectations that are at odds with the classroom norms of well-functioning PER-based instruction. We present this result as evidence that PER

  9. Human-computer interfaces applied to numerical solution of the Plateau problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Soares Bandeira, Ivana; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a code in Matlab to solve the Problem of Plateau numerically, and the code will include human-computer interface. The Problem of Plateau has applications in areas of knowledge like, for instance, Computer Graphics. The solution method will be the same one of the Surface Evolver, but the difference will be a complete graphical interface with the user. This will enable us to implement other kinds of interface like ocular mouse, voice, touch, etc. To date, Evolver does not include any graphical interface, which restricts its use by the scientific community. Specially, its use is practically impossible for most of the Physically Challenged People.

  10. The application of fluid structure interaction techniques within finite element analyses of water-filled transport flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.; Stojko, S.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, Finite Element (FE) analyses of water-filled transport flasks and their payloads have been carried out assuming a dry environment, mainly due to a lack of robust Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) modelling techniques. Also it has been accepted within the RAM transport industry that the presence of water would improve the impact withstand capability of dropped payloads within containers. In recent years the FE community has seen significant progress and improvement in FSI techniques. These methods have been utilised to investigate the effects of a wet environment on payload behaviour for the regulatory drop test within a recent transport licence renewal application. Fluid flow and pressure vary significantly during a wet impact and the effects on the contents become complex when water is incorporated into the flask analyses. Modelling a fluid environment within the entire flask is considered impractical; hence a good understanding of the FSI techniques and assumptions regarding fluid boundaries is required in order to create a representative FSI model. Therefore, a Verification and Validation (V and V) exercise was undertaken to underpin the FSI techniques eventually utilised. A number of problems of varying complexity have been identified to test the FSI capabilities of the explicit code LS-DYNA, which is used in the extant dry container impact analyses. RADIOSS explicit code has been used for comparison, to provide further confidence in LS-DYNA predictions. Various methods of modelling fluid are tested, and the relative advantages and limitations of each method and FSI coupling approaches are discussed. Results from the V and V problems examined provided sufficient confidence that FSI effects within containers can be accurately modelled

  11. Effects of muscle fatigue on the usability of a myoelectric human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszap, Alexander G; Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-10-01

    Electromyography-based human-computer interface development is an active field of research. However, knowledge on the effects of muscle fatigue for specific devices is limited. We have developed a novel myoelectric human-computer interface in which subjects continuously navigate a cursor to targets by manipulating a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Two-dimensional control is achieved through simultaneous adjustments of power in two frequency bands through a series of dynamic low-level muscle contractions. Here, we investigate the potential effects of muscle fatigue during the use of our interface. In the first session, eight subjects completed 300 cursor-to-target trials without breaks; four using a wrist muscle and four using a head muscle. The wrist subjects returned for a second session in which a static fatiguing exercise took place at regular intervals in-between cursor-to-target trials. In the first session we observed no declines in performance as a function of use, even after the long period of use. In the second session, we observed clear changes in cursor trajectories, paired with a target-specific decrease in hit rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  13. Use of interactive teaching techniques to introduce mental health training to medical schools in a resource poor setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Sheriff, R J; Bass, N; Hughes, P; Ade-Odunlade, P; Ismail, A; Whitwell, S; Jenkins, R

    2013-07-01

    There are currently no practising psychiatrists in Somaliland. In 2007 the first medical students graduated from universities in Somaliland without mental health training. We aimed to pilot an intensive but flexible package of mental health training to all senior medical students and interns using interactive training techniques and to evaluate its effectiveness by assessing knowledge, skills and attitudes. Teaching techniques included didactic lectures, case based discussion groups and role playing. Informal feedback informed a flexible teaching package. Assessment tools designed specifically for this course included a pre and post course MCQ exam and an OSCE. Changes in students' attitudes were evaluated using a questionnaire administered before and after the course. In addition, a questionnaire administered following the course evaluated the changes students perceived in their knowledge and attitudes to mental health. The MCQ improved from 50.7% pre course to 64.4% post course (p = 9.73 E-08). Students achieved an average overall OSCE mark of 71%. The pre and post attitudes questionnaire was most significantly different for statements relevant to aetiology, stigma and the overlap between mental and physical health. The statement most strongly agreed with after the course was 'I now understand more about the overlap between mental and physical health'. Interactive teaching provided a learning experience for both students and trainers. On site and distance learning based on the teaching described here has widened the scope of the training possible in psychiatry and allowed the provision of regular teaching, supervision and peer support in Somaliland. However, the current lack of local expertise means that important issues of sustainability need to be considered in future work.

  14. Study on the interaction of tussilagone with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Yan-Xi; Li, Yan-Cheng; Zhang, Li; Ai, Hai-Xin; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Feng; Sang, Yu-Li

    2017-12-01

    Tussilagone is a sesquiterpenoid which exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. The interaction of tussilagone with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence probe experiments, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, three-dimensional spectra and molecular docking techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results clarified that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by tussilagone was a static quenching process as a result of HSA-tussilagone (1:1) complex. Tussilagone spontaneously bound to HSA in site I (subdomain IIA), which was primarily driven by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds (ΔH° = -13.89 kJ mol-1, ΔS° = 16.39 J mol-1 K-1). The binding constant was calculated to be 2.182 × 103 L mol-1 and the binding distance was estimated to be 2.07 nm at 291 K, showing the occurrence of fluorescence energy transfer. The results of CD, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra all revealed that tussilagone induced the conformational changes of HSA. Meanwhile, the study of molecular docking also indicated that tussilagone could bind to the site I of HSA mainly by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions.

  15. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  16. A two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction technique for modelling abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S C; O'Rourke, M J

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the implementation and validation of a two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) technique that uses the finite volume (FV) method for performing simulations on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometries. This FSI technique, which was implemented in OpenFOAM, included fluid and solid mesh motion and incorporated a non-linear material model to represent AAA tissue. Fully implicit coupling was implemented, ensuring that both the fluid and solid domains reached convergence within each time step. The fluid and solid parts of the FSI code were validated independently through comparison with experimental data, before performing a complete FSI simulation on an idealized AAA geometry. Results from the FSI simulation showed that a vortex formed at the proximal end of the aneurysm during systolic acceleration, and moved towards the distal end of the aneurysm during diastole. Wall shear stress (WSS) values were found to peak at both the proximal and distal ends of the aneurysm and remain low along the centre of the aneurysm. The maximum von Mises stress in the aneurysm wall was found to be 408kPa, and this occurred at the proximal end of the aneurysm, while the maximum displacement of 2.31 mm occurred in the centre of the aneurysm. These results were found to be consistent with results from other FSI studies in the literature.

  17. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  18. Treatment of human-computer interface in a decision support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, A.S.; Duran, F.A.; Cox, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most challenging applications facing the computer community is development of effective adaptive human-computer interface. This challenge stems from the complex nature of the human part of this symbiosis. The application of this discipline to the environmental restoration and waste management is further complicated due to the nature of environmental data. The information that is required to manage environmental impacts of human activity is fundamentally complex. This paper will discuss the efforts at Sandia National Laboratories in developing the adaptive conceptual model manager within the constraint of the environmental decision-making. A computer workstation, that hosts the Conceptual Model Manager and the Sandia Environmental Decision Support System will also be discussed

  19. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  20. Interaction of the minocycline with extracelluar protein and intracellular protein by multi-spectral techniques and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qing; Wang, Yirun; Hu, Taoying; Liu, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of minocyeline (MNC) with extracelluar protein (lysozyme, LYSO) or intracellular protein (bovine hemoglobin, BHb) was investigated using multi-spectral techniques and molecular docking in vitro. Fluorescence studies suggested that MNC quenched LYSO/BHb fluorescence in a static mode with binding constants of 2.01 and 0.26 × 104 L•mol-1 at 298 K, respectively. The LYZO-MNC system was more easily influenced by temperature (298 and 310 K) than the BHb-MNC system. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding process. Based on the Förster theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distances between MNC and the inner tryptophan residues of LYSO and BHb were calculated to be 4.34 and 3.49 nm, respectively. Furthermore, circular dichroism spectra (CD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra results indicated the secondary structures of LYSO and BHb were partially destroyed by MNC with the α-helix percentage of LYZO-MNC increased (17.8-28.6%) while that of BHb-MNC was decreased (41.6-39.6%). UV-vis spectral results showed these binding interactions could cause conformational and some micro-environmental changes of LYSO and BHb. In accordance with the results of molecular docking, In LYZO-MNC system, MNC was mainly bound in the active site hinge region where Trp-62 and Trp-63 are located, and in MNC-BHb system, MNC was close to the subunit α 1 of BHb, molecular docking analysis supported the thermodynamic results well. The work contributes to clarify the mechanism of MNC with two proteins at molecular level.

  1. Arabidopsis seedling flood-inoculation technique: a rapid and reliable assay for studying plant-bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppalapati Srinivasa R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae model pathosystem is one of the most widely used systems to understand the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and plant innate immunity. Several inoculation methods have been used to study plant-pathogen interactions in this model system. However, none of the methods reported to date are similar to those occurring in nature and amicable to large-scale mutant screens. Results In this study, we developed a rapid and reliable seedling flood-inoculation method based on young Arabidopsis seedlings grown on MS medium. This method has several advantages over conventional soil-grown plant inoculation assays, including a shorter growth and incubation period, ease of inoculation and handling, uniform infection and disease development, requires less growth chamber space and is suitable for high-throughput screens. In this study we demonstrated the efficacy of the Arabidopsis seedling assay to study 1 the virulence factors of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, including type III protein secretion system (TTSS and phytotoxin coronatine (COR; 2 the effector-triggered immunity; and 3 Arabidopsis mutants affected in salicylic acid (SA- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMPs-mediated pathways. Furthermore, we applied this technique to study nonhost resistance (NHR responses in Arabidopsis using nonhost pathogens, such as P. syringae pv. tabaci, pv. glycinea and pv. tomato T1, and confirmed the functional role of FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2 in NHR. Conclusions The Arabidopsis seedling flood-inoculation assay provides a rapid, efficient and economical method for studying Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas interactions with minimal growth chamber space and time. This assay could also provide an excellent system for investigating the virulence mechanisms of P. syringae. Using this method, we demonstrated that FLS2 plays a critical role in conferring NHR against nonhost pathovars of P. syringae, but not to

  2. Investigation of the interaction of high intensity laser light with solids and hot plasma using X-ray spectroscopic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigler, A.

    1978-06-01

    This work investigates the properties of high power laser-produced plasmas by developing and applying x-ray spectroscopic methods which utilize spatial resolution. The shadow techniques which were developed in this work yield a high spatial resolution of 5-15μm together with an adequate X-ray spectral resolution for single shots of laser power flux of 2.10 13 W/cm -2 . The intensity distribution in the source is calculated from the partial shadow by numerical differentiation. The main advantage of the present method is the ability to obtain spatial information simultaneously for strong and weak spectral lines for a single shot of medium power laser. Plasma parameters were derived from H-like and He-like lines and their inner-shell satellites, which were obtained from Mg, Al and Si targets. Using shadow techniques, the sizes of the emitting regions of the various spectral lines were measured; the spatial variation of the ionization stage, the electron temperature and density were investigated. A constant electron temperature of (250+-50)eV and electron density scale-length of about 50μm were derived for an expanding plasma. An experimental investigation of the possible origin and the mechanisms responsible for the Ksub(α) radiation in laser-produced plasma was carried out. It is shown that the Ksub(α) radiation was generated by fast suprathermal electrons and originated inside the target behind the interaction zone of the shock and heat waves. Energy penetration depth and hot plasma expansion were tested by using multilayer targets, thin foils and achieving a two-dimensional spatially resolved X-ray Al spectrum. (B.G.)

  3. Studying the interaction between three synthesized heterocyclic sulfonamide compounds with hemoglobin by spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeeminejad, Samane; Assaran Darban, Reza; Beigoli, Sima; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2017-11-01

    The interaction between synthesized heterocyclic benzene sulfonamide compounds, N-(7-benzyl-56-biphenyl-2m-tolyl-7H-pyrrolo[23-d]pyrimidine-4-yl)-benzene sulfonamide (HBS 1 ), N-(7-benzyl-56-biphenyl-2-m-tolyl-7H-pyrrolo[23-d] pyrimidine-4-yl)-4-methyl- benzene sulfonamide (HBS 2 ), and N-(7-benzyl-56-biphenyl-2-m-tolyl-7H-pyrrolo[23-d]pyrimidine-4-yl)-4-chloro-benzene sulfonamide (HBS 3 ) with Hb was studied by fluorescence quenching, zeta potentional, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling techniques. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed in order to study the conformational changes, possibly due to a discrete reorganization of Trp residues during binding between HBS derivatives and Hb. The variation of the K SV value suggested that hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the complex. The K SV1 ans K SV2 values of HBS derivatives with Hb are .6 × 10 13 and 3 × 10 13  M -1 for Hb-HBS 1 , 1 × 10 13 and 4 × 10 13  M -1 for Hb-HBS 2 , .9 × 10 13 , and 6 × 10 13  M -1 for Hb-HBS 3 , respectively. The molecular distances between Hb and HBS derivatives in binary and ternary systems were estimated according to Förster's theory of dipole-dipole non-radiation energy transfer. The quantitative analysis data of circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that the binding of the three HBS derivatives to Hb induced conformational changes in Hb. Changes in the zeta potential of the Hb-HBS derivatives complexes demonstrated a hydrophobic adsorption of the anionic ligand onto the surface of Hb as well as both electrostatic and hydrophobic adsorption in the case of the complex. The modeling data thus confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of Hb with three HBS derivatives to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  4. Use of Isotopic Techniques for the Assessment of Hydrological Interactions Between Ground and Surface Waters - Rio Man, Cienaga Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio, P.; Dapena, C.; Betancur, T. [Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-07-15

    The Man River basin is located in the lower foothills of the western and central ranges of the tropical Andes, Colombia. In this area hydrological studies and hydrochemical analyses were carried out and isotopic techniques applied to describe and understand the interactions between ground and surface waters. To expand this model and to include elements other than local hydrodynamics, relationships between regional precipitation, recharge, regional flow paths and hydraulic gradients controlling water flows from big rivers to groundwater are currently being explored. Accordingly, an isotope local meteoric water line was derived and it was discovered that the relationship between ground and surface waters is similar in wet and dry seasons. Precipitation constitutes the main recharge source, base flow is important in supporting flow in rivers, streams and wetlands, and evaporation causes effects over water systems in dry periods. A tendency towards increasing air temperatures has been detected in the Man River; this change may cause negative impacts over the hydrological system, affecting evapotranspiration- recharge processes. (author)

  5. Combined spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques to study interaction of Zn (II) DiAmsar with serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade, E-mail: rezanejad@pnu.ac.ir; Hooshyar, Zari; Shafagh, Pegah; Ghiasvand, Samira; Kakavand, Nahaleh

    2014-12-15

    Zinc (II) diamine-sarcophagine (Zn (II) DiAmsar) as a water soluble hexadentate ligand was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The bindings of Zn (II) DiAmsar with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated under the simulative physiological conditions. To study this binding, the fluorescence spectra in combination with FT-IR, UV–vis, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and molecular docking techniques were used in the present work. The results indicate that Zn (II) DiAmsar quenched effectively the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA via a static quenching process. The fluorescence quenching data was also used to determine binding sites and binding constants at different temperatures. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (∆G°, ∆H°, and ∆S°) suggest that the binding process occurs spontaneously by involving hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions. The distance between HSA (or BSA) as a donor and Zn (II) DiAmsar as an acceptor was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, the docking results revealed the possible binding sites and assess the microenvironment around the bounded Zn (II) DiAmsar.

  6. The mind-writing pupil : A human-computer interface based on decoding of covert attention through pupillometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Melmi, Jean Baptiste; Van Der Linden, Lotje; Van Der Stigchel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present a new human-computer interface that is based on decoding of attention through pupillometry. Our method builds on the recent finding that covert visual attention affects the pupillary light response: Your pupil constricts when you covertly (without looking at it) attend to a bright,

  7. A Novel Wearable Forehead EOG Measurement System for Human Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jeong; Yoon, Heenam; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-06-23

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients whose voluntary muscles are paralyzed commonly communicate with the outside world using eye movement. There have been many efforts to support this method of communication by tracking or detecting eye movement. An electrooculogram (EOG), an electro-physiological signal, is generated by eye movements and can be measured with electrodes placed around the eye. In this study, we proposed a new practical electrode position on the forehead to measure EOG signals, and we developed a wearable forehead EOG measurement system for use in Human Computer/Machine interfaces (HCIs/HMIs). Four electrodes, including the ground electrode, were placed on the forehead. The two channels were arranged vertically and horizontally, sharing a positive electrode. Additionally, a real-time eye movement classification algorithm was developed based on the characteristics of the forehead EOG. Three applications were employed to evaluate the proposed system: a virtual keyboard using a modified Bremen BCI speller and an automatic sequential row-column scanner, and a drivable power wheelchair. The mean typing speeds of the modified Bremen brain-computer interface (BCI) speller and automatic row-column scanner were 10.81 and 7.74 letters per minute, and the mean classification accuracies were 91.25% and 95.12%, respectively. In the power wheelchair demonstration, the user drove the wheelchair through an 8-shape course without collision with obstacles.

  8. Controlling a human-computer interface system with a novel classification method that uses electrooculography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shang-Lin; Liao, Lun-De; Lu, Shao-Wei; Jiang, Wei-Ling; Chen, Shi-An; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2013-08-01

    Electrooculography (EOG) signals can be used to control human-computer interface (HCI) systems, if properly classified. The ability to measure and process these signals may help HCI users to overcome many of the physical limitations and inconveniences in daily life. However, there are currently no effective multidirectional classification methods for monitoring eye movements. Here, we describe a classification method used in a wireless EOG-based HCI device for detecting eye movements in eight directions. This device includes wireless EOG signal acquisition components, wet electrodes and an EOG signal classification algorithm. The EOG classification algorithm is based on extracting features from the electrical signals corresponding to eight directions of eye movement (up, down, left, right, up-left, down-left, up-right, and down-right) and blinking. The recognition and processing of these eight different features were achieved in real-life conditions, demonstrating that this device can reliably measure the features of EOG signals. This system and its classification procedure provide an effective method for identifying eye movements. Additionally, it may be applied to study eye functions in real-life conditions in the near future.

  9. Selection of suitable hand gestures for reliable myoelectric human computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Claudia F; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2015-04-09

    Myoelectric controlled prosthetic hand requires machine based identification of hand gestures using surface electromyogram (sEMG) recorded from the forearm muscles. This study has observed that a sub-set of the hand gestures have to be selected for an accurate automated hand gesture recognition, and reports a method to select these gestures to maximize the sensitivity and specificity. Experiments were conducted where sEMG was recorded from the muscles of the forearm while subjects performed hand gestures and then was classified off-line. The performances of ten gestures were ranked using the proposed Positive-Negative Performance Measurement Index (PNM), generated by a series of confusion matrices. When using all the ten gestures, the sensitivity and specificity was 80.0% and 97.8%. After ranking the gestures using the PNM, six gestures were selected and these gave sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% (96.5% and 99.3%); Hand open, Hand close, Little finger flexion, Ring finger flexion, Middle finger flexion and Thumb flexion. This work has shown that reliable myoelectric based human computer interface systems require careful selection of the gestures that have to be recognized and without such selection, the reliability is poor.

  10. Resolving the Paradox of the Active User: Stable Suboptimal Performance in Interactive Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fu, Wai-Tat; Gray, Wayne D

    2004-01-01

    ...: Cognitive Aspects of Human Computer Interaction, Cambridge, MIT Press, MA, USA] the persistent use of inefficient procedures in interactive tasks by experienced or even expert users when demonstrably more efficient procedures exist...

  11. The human interactome knowledge base (hint-kb): An integrative human protein interaction database enriched with predicted protein–protein interaction scores using a novel hybrid technique

    KAUST Repository

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos A.; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos M.; Likothanassis, Spiridon D.; Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.; Moschopoulos, Charalampos N.; Alexakos, Christos; Papadimitriou, Stergios; Mavroudi, Seferina P.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the functional components of many cellular processes and the identification of their physical protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is an area of mature academic research. Various databases have been developed containing information about

  12. The human interactome knowledge base (hint-kb): An integrative human protein interaction database enriched with predicted protein–protein interaction scores using a novel hybrid technique

    KAUST Repository

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos A.

    2013-07-12

    Proteins are the functional components of many cellular processes and the identification of their physical protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is an area of mature academic research. Various databases have been developed containing information about experimentally and computationally detected human PPIs as well as their corresponding annotation data. However, these databases contain many false positive interactions, are partial and only a few of them incorporate data from various sources. To overcome these limitations, we have developed HINT-KB (http://biotools.ceid.upatras.gr/hint-kb/), a knowledge base that integrates data from various sources, provides a user-friendly interface for their retrieval, cal-culatesasetoffeaturesofinterest and computesaconfidence score for every candidate protein interaction. This confidence score is essential for filtering the false positive interactions which are present in existing databases, predicting new protein interactions and measuring the frequency of each true protein interaction. For this reason, a novel machine learning hybrid methodology, called (Evolutionary Kalman Mathematical Modelling—EvoKalMaModel), was used to achieve an accurate and interpretable scoring methodology. The experimental results indicated that the proposed scoring scheme outperforms existing computational methods for the prediction of PPIs.

  13. iLOCi: a SNP interaction prioritization technique for detecting epistasis in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS do not provide a full account of the heritability of genetic diseases since gene-gene interactions, also known as epistasis are not considered in single locus GWAS. To address this problem, a considerable number of methods have been developed for identifying disease-associated gene-gene interactions. However, these methods typically fail to identify interacting markers explaining more of the disease heritability over single locus GWAS, since many of the interactions significant for disease are obscured by uninformative marker interactions e.g., linkage disequilibrium (LD. Results In this study, we present a novel SNP interaction prioritization algorithm, named iLOCi (Interacting Loci. This algorithm accounts for marker dependencies separately in case and control groups. Disease-associated interactions are then prioritized according to a novel ranking score calculated from the difference in marker dependencies for every possible pair between case and control groups. The analysis of a typical GWAS dataset can be completed in less than a day on a standard workstation with parallel processing capability. The proposed framework was validated using simulated data and applied to real GWAS datasets using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC data. The results from simulated data showed the ability of iLOCi to identify various types of gene-gene interactions, especially for high-order interaction. From the WTCCC data, we found that among the top ranked interacting SNP pairs, several mapped to genes previously known to be associated with disease, and interestingly, other previously unreported genes with biologically related roles. Conclusion iLOCi is a powerful tool for uncovering true disease interacting markers and thus can provide a more complete understanding of the genetic basis underlying complex disease. The program is available for download at http://www4a.biotec.or.th/GI/tools/iloci.

  14. Probing the interactions of bromchlorbuterol-HCl and phenylethanolamine A with HSA by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Huifeng; Wang, Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular docking showed that BCB/PEA was bound at sub-domain IIA of HSA. • Fluorescence lifetimes indicated that the quenching was a static quenching. • CD spectra showed that BCB/PEA changed the conformation of HSA. • The competitive binding between site markers and BCB/PEA was studied. • The mutual influence on the two drugs binding HSA was studied. - Abstract: Using fluorescence quenching, fluorescence lifetime, (UV + vis) absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking technique, the interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) with bromchlorbuterol-HCl (BCB) and phenylethanolamine A (PEA) were investigated. The quenching rate constants and binding constants for BCB/PEA with HSA were determined at T = (292.15, 302.15 and 312.15) K respectively, which were all decreased with the increase of the temperature, showing not a dynamic quenching. The fluorescence lifetime of HSA with BCB/PEA had changed little compared to that of HSA alone (τ_0), further confirming that BCB/PEA quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of HSA is a static quenching. The effects of K"+, Ca"2"+, Cu"2"+, Zn"2"+ and Fe"3"+ on the binding were studied. The analysis of the thermodynamic parameters for BCB/(PEA + HSA) showed that BCB/PEA could bind to HSA via hydrophobic force. The binding distances were determined as 2.90 and 4.11 nm for (BCB + HSA) and (PEA + HSA) based on the Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra indicated that the conformation of HSA was changed by BCB/PEA. The competitive studies for the drug with site marker suggested that both BCB and PEA were bound at Sudlow’s sites I (sub-domain IIA, also known as indometacin binding site) in HSA, and the results of the study of molecular docking also leads to the same conclusion. The competitive binding experiments for the two drugs were also performed, which further indicates that PEA and BCB could share the same binding site, and PEA has a much

  15. Interruption of People in Human-Computer Interaction: A General Unifying Definition of Human Interruption and Taxonomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McFarlane, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    .... This report asserts that a single unifying definition of user-interruption and the accompanying practical taxonomy would be useful theoretical tools for driving effective investigation of this crucial...

  16. Toward Optimization of Gaze-Controlled Human-Computer Interaction: Application to Hindi Virtual Keyboard for Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Yogesh Kumar; Cecotti, Hubert; Wong-Lin, Kongfatt; Dutta, Ashish; Prasad, Girijesh

    2018-04-01

    Virtual keyboard applications and alternative communication devices provide new means of communication to assist disabled people. To date, virtual keyboard optimization schemes based on script-specific information, along with multimodal input access facility, are limited. In this paper, we propose a novel method for optimizing the position of the displayed items for gaze-controlled tree-based menu selection systems by considering a combination of letter frequency and command selection time. The optimized graphical user interface layout has been designed for a Hindi language virtual keyboard based on a menu wherein 10 commands provide access to type 88 different characters, along with additional text editing commands. The system can be controlled in two different modes: eye-tracking alone and eye-tracking with an access soft-switch. Five different keyboard layouts have been presented and evaluated with ten healthy participants. Furthermore, the two best performing keyboard layouts have been evaluated with eye-tracking alone on ten stroke patients. The overall performance analysis demonstrated significantly superior typing performance, high usability (87% SUS score), and low workload (NASA TLX with 17 scores) for the letter frequency and time-based organization with script specific arrangement design. This paper represents the first optimized gaze-controlled Hindi virtual keyboard, which can be extended to other languages.

  17. Combining multivariate statistics and the think-aloud protocol to assess Human-Computer Interaction barriers in symptom checkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Bønes, Erlend; de la Asunción, Estela; Gabarron, Elia; Aviles-Solis, Juan Carlos; Lee, Eunji; Traver, Vicente; Sato, Keiichi; Bellika, Johan G

    2017-10-01

    Symptom checkers are software tools that allow users to submit a set of symptoms and receive advice related to them in the form of a diagnosis list, health information or triage. The heterogeneity of their potential users and the number of different components in their user interfaces can make testing with end-users unaffordable. We designed and executed a two-phase method to test the respiratory diseases module of the symptom checker Erdusyk. Phase I consisted of an online test with a large sample of users (n=53). In Phase I, users evaluated the system remotely and completed a questionnaire based on the Technology Acceptance Model. Principal Component Analysis was used to correlate each section of the interface with the questionnaire responses, thus identifying which areas of the user interface presented significant contributions to the technology acceptance. In the second phase, the think-aloud procedure was executed with a small number of samples (n=15), focusing on the areas with significant contributions to analyze the reasons for such contributions. Our method was used effectively to optimize the testing of symptom checker user interfaces. The method allowed kept the cost of testing at reasonable levels by restricting the use of the think-aloud procedure while still assuring a high amount of coverage. The main barriers detected in Erdusyk were related to problems understanding time repetition patterns, the selection of levels in scales to record intensities, navigation, the quantification of some symptom attributes, and the characteristics of the symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing a CAVE with Eye Tracking System for Human-Computer Interaction Research in 3D Visualization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hix, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this award was to purchase and install two ISCAN Inc. Eye Tracking Systems and associated equipment to create a unique set-up for research in fully immersive virtual environments (VEs...

  19. Medical students' cognitive load in volumetric image interpretation : Insights from human-computer interaction and eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijfzand, Bobby G.; Van Der Schaaf, Marieke F.; Kirschner, Femke C.; Ravesloot, Cécile J.; Van Der Gijp, Anouk; Vincken, Koen L.

    2016-01-01

    Medical image interpretation is moving from using 2D- to volumetric images, thereby changing the cognitive and perceptual processes involved. This is expected to affect medical students' experienced cognitive load, while learning image interpretation skills. With two studies this explorative

  20. Open-Box Muscle-Computer Interface: Introduction to Human-Computer Interactions in Bioengineering, Physiology, and Neuroscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa-Jiménez, M. A.; González-Gaspar, P.; Pérez-Estudillo, C.; López-Meraz, M. L.; Morgado-Valle, C.; Beltran-Parrazal, L.

    2016-01-01

    A Muscle-Computer Interface (muCI) is a human-machine system that uses electromyographic (EMG) signals to communicate with a computer. Surface EMG (sEMG) signals are currently used to command robotic devices, such as robotic arms and hands, and mobile robots, such as wheelchairs. These signals reflect the motor intention of a user before the…

  1. Custom-designed motion-based games for older adults: a review of literature in human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gerling, Kathrin; Mandryk, Regan

    2014-01-01

    Many older adults, particularly persons living in senior residences and care homes, lead sedentary lifestyles, which reduces their life expectancy. Motion-based video games encourage physical activity and might be an opportunity for these adults to remain active and engaged; however, research efforts in the field have frequently focused on younger audiences and little is known about the requirements and benefits of motion-based games for elderly players. In this paper, we present an overview ...

  2. The Validation of an Interactive Videodisc as an Alternative to Traditional Teaching Techniques: Auscultation of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branck, Charles E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study of 87 veterinary medical students at Auburn University tests the effectiveness and student acceptance of interactive videodisc as an alternative to animal experimentation and other traditional teaching methods in analyzing canine cardiovascular sounds. Results of the questionnaire used are presented, and benefits of interactive video…

  3. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  4. Real-Time, Label-Free Detection of Biomolecular Interactions in Sandwich Assays by the Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important goals in proteomics is to detect the real-time kinetics of diverse biomolecular interactions. Fluorescence, which requires extrinsic tags, is a commonly and widely used method because of its high convenience and sensitivity. However, in order to maintain the conformational and functional integrality of biomolecules, label-free detection methods are highly under demand. We have developed the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD technique for label-free, kinetic measurements of protein-biomolecule interactions. Incorporating the total internal refection geometry into the OI-RD technique, we are able to detect as low as 0.1% of a protein monolayer, and this sensitivity is comparable with other label-free techniques such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The unique advantage of OI-RD over SPR is no need for dielectric layers. Moreover, using a photodiode array as the detector enables multi-channel detection and also eliminates the over-time signal drift. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability and feasibility of the OI-RD technique by measuring the kinetics of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions in sandwich assays.

  5. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  6. Reducing wrong patient selection errors: exploring the design space of user interface techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopan, Awalin; Plaisant, Catherine; Powsner, Seth; Shneiderman, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Wrong patient selection errors are a major issue for patient safety; from ordering medication to performing surgery, the stakes are high. Widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems makes patient selection using a computer screen a frequent task for clinicians. Careful design of the user interface can help mitigate the problem by helping providers recall their patients' identities, accurately select their names, and spot errors before orders are submitted. We propose a catalog of twenty seven distinct user interface techniques, organized according to a task analysis. An associated video demonstrates eighteen of those techniques. EHR designers who consider a wider range of human-computer interaction techniques could reduce selection errors, but verification of efficacy is still needed.

  7. Large-scale symmetry-adapted perturbation theory computations via density fitting and Laplace transformation techniques: investigating the fundamental forces of DNA-intercalator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenstein, Edward G; Parrish, Robert M; Sherrill, C David; Turney, Justin M; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-11-07

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) provides a means of probing the fundamental nature of intermolecular interactions. Low-orders of SAPT (here, SAPT0) are especially attractive since they provide qualitative (sometimes quantitative) results while remaining tractable for large systems. The application of density fitting and Laplace transformation techniques to SAPT0 can significantly reduce the expense associated with these computations and make even larger systems accessible. We present new factorizations of the SAPT0 equations with density-fitted two-electron integrals and the first application of Laplace transformations of energy denominators to SAPT. The improved scalability of the DF-SAPT0 implementation allows it to be applied to systems with more than 200 atoms and 2800 basis functions. The Laplace-transformed energy denominators are compared to analogous partial Cholesky decompositions of the energy denominator tensor. Application of our new DF-SAPT0 program to the intercalation of DNA by proflavine has allowed us to determine the nature of the proflavine-DNA interaction. Overall, the proflavine-DNA interaction contains important contributions from both electrostatics and dispersion. The energetics of the intercalator interaction are are dominated by the stacking interactions (two-thirds of the total), but contain important contributions from the intercalator-backbone interactions. It is hypothesized that the geometry of the complex will be determined by the interactions of the intercalator with the backbone, because by shifting toward one side of the backbone, the intercalator can form two long hydrogen-bonding type interactions. The long-range interactions between the intercalator and the next-nearest base pairs appear to be negligible, justifying the use of truncated DNA models in computational studies of intercalation interaction energies.

  8. A Conceptual Architecture for Adaptive Human-Computer Interface of a PT Operation Platform Based on Context-Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a conceptual architecture for adaptive human-computer interface of a PT operation platform based on context-awareness. This architecture will form the basis of design for such an interface. This paper describes components, key technologies, and working principles of the architecture. The critical contents covered context information modeling, processing, relationship establishing between contexts and interface design knowledge by use of adaptive knowledge reasoning, and visualization implementing of adaptive interface with the aid of interface tools technology.

  9. Historical Overview, Current Status, and Future Trends in Human-Computer Interfaces for Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owre, Fridtjov

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 25 yr ago, the first computer-based process control systems, including computer-generated displays, appeared. It is remarkable how slowly the human-computer interfaces (HCI's) of such systems have developed over the years. The display design approach in those early days had its roots in the topology of the process. Usually, the information came from the piping and instrumentation diagrams. Later, some important additional functions were added to the basic system, such as alarm and trend displays. Today, these functions are still the basic ones, and the end-user displays have not changed much except for improved display quality in terms of colors, font types and sizes, resolution, and object shapes, resulting from improved display hardware.Today, there are two schools of display design competing for supremacy in the process control segment of the HCI community. One can be characterized by extension and integration of current practice, while the other is more revolutionary.The extension of the current practice approach can be described in terms of added system functionality and integration. This means that important functions for the plant operator - such as signal validation, plant overview information, safety parameter displays, procedures, prediction of future states, and plant performance optimization - are added to the basic functions and integrated in a total unified HCI for the plant operator.The revolutionary approach, however, takes as its starting point the design process itself. The functioning of the plant is described in terms of the plant goals and subgoals, as well as the means available to reach these goals. Then, displays are designed representing this functional structure - in clear contrast to the earlier plant topology representation. Depending on the design approach used, the corresponding displays have various designations, e.g., function-oriented, task-oriented, or ecological displays.This paper gives a historical overview of past

  10. A Novel Feature Optimization for Wearable Human-Computer Interfaces Using Surface Electromyography Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel human-computer interface (HCI using bioelectrical signals as input is a valuable tool to improve the lives of people with disabilities. In this paper, surface electromyography (sEMG signals induced by four classes of wrist movements were acquired from four sites on the lower arm with our designed system. Forty-two features were extracted from the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. Optimal channels were determined from single-channel classification performance rank. The optimal-feature selection was according to a modified entropy criteria (EC and Fisher discrimination (FD criteria. The feature selection results were evaluated by four different classifiers, and compared with other conventional feature subsets. In online tests, the wearable system acquired real-time sEMG signals. The selected features and trained classifier model were used to control a telecar through four different paradigms in a designed environment with simple obstacles. Performance was evaluated based on travel time (TT and recognition rate (RR. The results of hardware evaluation verified the feasibility of our acquisition systems, and ensured signal quality. Single-channel analysis results indicated that the channel located on the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU performed best with mean classification accuracy of 97.45% for all movement’s pairs. Channels placed on ECU and the extensor carpi radialis (ECR were selected according to the accuracy rank. Experimental results showed that the proposed FD method was better than other feature selection methods and single-type features. The combination of FD and random forest (RF performed best in offline analysis, with 96.77% multi-class RR. Online results illustrated that the state-machine paradigm with a 125 ms window had the highest maneuverability and was closest to real-life control. Subjects could accomplish online sessions by three sEMG-based paradigms, with average times of 46.02, 49.06 and 48.08 s

  11. Optimal design methods for a digital human-computer interface based on human reliability in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhang, Li; Xie, Tian; Wu, Daqing; Li, Min; Wang, Yiqun; Peng, Yuyuan; Peng, Jie; Zhang, Mengjia; Li, Peiyao; Ma, Congmin; Wu, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A complete optimization process is established for digital human-computer interfaces of Npps. • A quick convergence search method is proposed. • The authors propose an affinity error probability mapping function to test human reliability. - Abstract: This is the second in a series of papers describing the optimal design method for a digital human-computer interface of nuclear power plant (Npp) from three different points based on human reliability. The purpose of this series is to explore different optimization methods from varying perspectives. This present paper mainly discusses the optimal design method for quantity of components of the same factor. In monitoring process, quantity of components has brought heavy burden to operators, thus, human errors are easily triggered. To solve the problem, the authors propose an optimization process, a quick convergence search method and an affinity error probability mapping function. Two balanceable parameter values of the affinity error probability function are obtained by experiments. The experimental results show that the affinity error probability mapping function about human-computer interface has very good sensitivity and stability, and that quick convergence search method for fuzzy segments divided by component quantity has better performance than general algorithm.

  12. Child-Computer Interaction: ICMI 2012 special session

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Morency, L.P.; Bohus, L.; Aghajan, H.; Nijholt, Antinus; Cassell, J.; Epps, J.

    2012-01-01

    This is a short introduction to the special session on child computer interaction at the International Conference on Multimodal Interaction 2012 (ICMI 2012). In human-computer interaction users have become participants in the design process. This is not different for child computer interaction

  13. A multi-technique characterization of cronstedtite synthetized by iron-clay interaction in a step by step cooling procedure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pignatelli, I.; Mugnaioli, E.; Hybler, Jiří; Mosser-Ruck, R.; Cathelineau, M.; Michau, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2013), s. 277-289 ISSN 0009-8604 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cronstedtite * MDO polytypes * radioactive waste storage * experimental iron-clay interaction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.398, year: 2013

  14. Game Design Narrative for Learning: Appropriating Adventure Game Design Narrative Devices and Techniques for the Design of Interactive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual analysis is to investigate how contemporary video and computer games might inform instructional design by looking at how narrative devices and techniques support problem solving within complex, multimodal environments. Specifically, this analysis presents a brief overview of game genres and the role of narrative in…

  15. Nuclear techniques in the study of pollutant transport in the environment. Interaction of solutes with geological media (methodological aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This volume includes a summary of the 5-year co-ordinated research programme to use nuclear techniques for the study of the transport of pollutants (both radioactive and non-radioactive) in the environment as well as twelve individual reports of the different activities performed under the programme. These have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Modeling Users' Experiences with Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the field of Human-Computer Interaction has evolved from the study of the usability of interactive products towards a more holistic understanding of how they may mediate desired human experiences.  This book identifies the notion of diversity in usersʼ experiences with interactive products and proposes methods and tools for modeling this along two levels: (a) interpersonal diversity in usersʽ responses to early conceptual designs, and (b) the dynamics of usersʼ experiences over time. The Repertory Grid Technique is proposed as an alternative to standardized psychometric scales for modeling interpersonal diversity in usersʼ responses to early concepts in the design process, and new Multi-Dimensional Scaling procedures are introduced for modeling such complex quantitative data. iScale, a tool for the retrospective assessment of usersʼ experiences over time is proposed as an alternative to longitudinal field studies, and a semi-automated technique for the analysis of the elicited exper...

  17. Uncertainty in soil-structure interaction analysis of a nuclear power plant due to different analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.C.; Chun, R.C.; Goudreau, G.L.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Johnson, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the dynamic response analysis of the Zion reactor containment building using three different soil-structure interaction (SSI) analytical procedures: the substructure method, CLASSI; the equivalent linear finite element approach, ALUSH and the nonlinear finite element procedure, DYNA3D. Uncertainties in analyzing a soil-structure system due to SSI analysis procedures were investigated. Responses at selected locations in the structure were compared: peak accelerations and response spectra

  18. Interaction of Flavonoids from Woodwardia unigemmata with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA): Application of Spectroscopic Techniques and Molecular Modeling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Pan, Hong; Shen, Tao; Li, Peng; Chen, Yanan; Li, Zhenyu; Di, Xiaxia; Wang, Shuqi

    2017-08-09

    Phytochemical investigation on the methanol extract of Woodwardia unigemmata resulted in the isolation of seven flavonoids, including one new flavonol acylglycoside ( 1 ). The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison of literature data. The multidrug resistance (MDR) reversing activity was evaluated for the isolated compounds using doxorubicin-resistant K562/A02 cells model. Compound 6 showed comparable MDR reversing effect to verapamil. Furthermore, the interaction between compounds and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, including steady-state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and molecular docking approach. The experimental results indicated that the seven flavonoids bind to BSA by static quenching mechanisms. The negative ΔH and ΔS values indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds contributed in the binding of compounds 2 - 6 to BSA. In the case of compounds 1 and 7 systems, the hydrophobic interactions play a major role. The binding of compounds to BSA causes slight changes in the secondary structure of BSA. There are two binding sites of compound 6 on BSA and site I is the main site according to the molecular docking studies and the site marker competitive binding assay.

  19. New technique for laryngotracheal mucosa transplantation. 'Stamp' welding using indocyanine green dye and albumin interaction with diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Pankratov, M M; Gleich, L L; Rebeiz, E E; Shapshay, S M

    1995-07-01

    To investigate (1) the possibility of survival of free mucosa "stamp" grafts fixed in the airway with a new technique using indocyanine green-dyed albumin solder activated with a diode laser and (2) the degree of improvement of wound healing in the airway by applying modified microskin transplantation techniques from burn surgery to cover a relatively large wound with a few small pieces of mucosa anchored in place with the previously mentioned technique. Three (one control and two experimental) rectangular (10 x 8 mm) wounds in tracheal mucosa were produced in four experimental animals (dogs) using a carbon dioxide laser. The control wound was left uncovered. In the first experimental wound, a mucosal flap was raised and then fixed in place by a trapdoor flap method. In the second experimental wound, two small (each 2 x 3 mm) autogenous mucosa grafts were anchored onto the surface with indocyanine green-dyed albumin activated with an 810-nm diode laser. Histomorphologically, the postoperative results from three wounds were compared. The experimental wounds were completely covered by regenerated squamous cells in 1 week and by ciliated epithelium in 2 weeks after the operation despite the discrepancy in size of the graft to wound area (1:6.7) covered with the stamp mucosa. No thermal damage from the diode laser was noted in the second experimental wounds. In the control wounds, no coverage was observed at 1 week, and only squamous cells were noted 2 weeks postoperatively. All the wounds had normal ciliated epithelium coverage at 4 weeks. Transplanted stamp grafts provided similar or better healing than trapdoor flap transplants. This new technique made endoscopic mucosal grafting possible and offers a potential breakthrough in the management of laryngotracheal stenosis.

  20. Investigation of the network of preferred interactions in an artificial coiled-coil association using the peptide array technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Rezaei Araghi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We screened a randomized library and identified natural peptides that bound selectively to a chimeric peptide containing α-, β- and γ-amino acids. The SPOT arrays provide a means for the systematic study of the possible interaction space accessible to the αβγ-chimera. The mutational analysis reveals the dependence of the binding affinities of α-peptides to the αβγ-chimera, on the hydrophobicity and bulkiness of the side chains at the corresponding hydrophobic interface. The stability of the resulting heteroassemblies was further confirmed in solution by CD and thermal denaturation.

  1. Report of a consultant's meeting on nuclear analytical and isotope techniques for assessing nutrition-pollution interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Until now nutritional status and environmental pollution were mostly treated as separate issues. However, there is a tight interaction between both areas, which can be defined as one system consisting of the elements: Agent (air, water, soil), pollutant, host (compartment, age, physiological stage), and environment (geographical, socio-cultural). The interaction between the elements of the system is regulated by a complex mechanism, which is only understood in fractions. To comprehend the system and its regulation, appropriate indicators for the total system need to be verified and validated. Together with the indicators for the subsystem of the environmental conditions and the nutritional situation, the models of the regulation and accumulation of pollutants in the biological system of humans (cell, tissues and organs, individuals, populations) affecting their nutritional status can be developed. This will help to understand the wider impact of pollution on human and economic development and to develop measures to reduce and alleviate health risks. Concerns for food safety provides an example. Food safety issues and factors that contribute to nutrient compositional changes are critical to several aspects surrounding the nutrition-health-disease domain, and will continue to attract much attention in the future. Nutritional toxicology will become a major challenge in this context. There are known instances of inter-element interactions of Pb and Fe (anaemia), Hg and Se, Hg and Fe, As and Se. Se and I, Cd and Zn, among others. Similarly, placental transfer of nutrients and toxicants are of concern in relation to fetal health, and well defined studies are required to elucidate the health impact in cases where pollutant levels are above the safe levels. Populations in developing countries, particularly children, represent the largest segment of society in need of protection and multi-factorial interventions to prevent malnutrition, infectious disease and the effects of

  2. Quantifying Quality Aspects of Multimodal Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnel, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This book systematically addresses the quantification of quality aspects of multimodal interactive systems. The conceptual structure is based on a schematic view on human-computer interaction where the user interacts with the system and perceives it via input and output interfaces. Thus, aspects of multimodal interaction are analyzed first, followed by a discussion of the evaluation of output and input and concluding with a view on the evaluation of a complete system.

  3. An Interactive Learning Environment for Teaching the Imperative and Object-Oriented Programming Techniques in Various Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios

    The acquisition of problem-solving and programming skills in the era of knowledge society seems to be particularly important. Due to the intrinsic difficulty of acquiring such skills various educational tools have been developed. Unfortunately, most of these tools are not utilized. In this paper we present the programming microworlds Karel and objectKarel that support the procedural-imperative and Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) techniques and can be used for supporting the teaching and learning of programming in various learning contexts and audiences. The paper focuses on presenting the pedagogical features that are common to both environments and mainly on presenting the potential uses of these environments.

  4. A discussion of techniques used in defining the Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, B.K.; Hunt, V.; Schweitzer, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes both the general methodology used to study the current needs for a measurement control and evaluation system at Rocky Flats Plant and the recommendations for implementation into the Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System (IMECS). The study resulted in a clear assessment of the current system and recommendations for the system which will be its replacement. To arrive at the recommendations, the authors used a formal analysis approach that is based on an in-depth study of the measurement evaluation and control problems and user needs. The problems and needs were defined by interviews with present and potential users of this kind of system throughout the nuclear industry. Some of the recommendations are to provide: timely sample measurement feedback; representative measurement error estimates; a history data base of sample measurements To meet the user needs, the new system will: be interactive with user selection menus; use standards which cover the range of application; facilitate historical analysis of sample data and bookkeeping. The implementation of this program is projected to be more cost effective than the current program. Also included are the authors' recommendations to those involved in the design of a system of similar large magnitude

  5. Use of cognitive interview techniques in the development of nutrition surveys and interactive nutrition messages for low-income populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Elena T; Campbell, Marci K; Honess-Morreale, Lauren

    2002-05-01

    The effectiveness of dietary surveys and educational messages is dependent in part on how well the target audience's information processing needs and abilities are addressed. Use of pilot testing is helpful; however, problems with wording and language are often not revealed. Cognitive interview techniques offer 1 approach to assist dietitians in understanding how audiences process information. With this method, respondents are led through a survey or message and asked to paraphrase items; discuss thoughts, feelings, and ideas that come to mind; and suggest alternative wording. As part of a US Department of Agriculture-funded nutrition education project, 23 cognitive interviews were conducted among technical community college students in North Carolina. Interview findings informed the development of tailored computer messages and survey questions. Better understanding of respondents' cognitive processes significantly improved the language and approach used in this intervention. Interview data indicated 4 problem areas: vague or ineffective instructions, confusing questions and response options, variable interpretation of terms, and misinterpretation of dietary recommendations. Interviews also provided insight into the meaning of diet-related stages of change. These findings concur with previous research suggesting that cognitive interview techniques are a valuable tool in the formative evaluation and development of nutrition surveys and materials.

  6. Human Computer Confluence in Rehabilitation: Digital Media Plasticity and Human Performance Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Digital media plasticity evocative to embodied interaction is presented as a utilitarian tool when mixed and matched to target human performance potentials specific to nuance of development for those with impairment. A distinct intervention strategy trains via alternative channeling of external s...

  7. Human Computing in the Life Sciences: What does the future hold?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    In future computing environments you will be surrounded and supported by all kinds of technologies. Characteristic is that you can interact with them in a natural way: you can speak to, point at, or even frown about some piece of presented information: the environment understands your intent.

  8. Study of the Lambda-proton interaction with the femtoscopy technique in p+Nb reactions at 3.5 GeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Oliver [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Two-particle correlation functions at low relative momenta are sensitive to the size of the emission zone. By knowing the particle interaction precisely it is possible to make a detailed study of the particle's source. But turning the picture around is also possible: By knowing the source size it is possible to study final state interactions of particle pairs where the interaction strength is not well established. We use the technique of two-particle correlations in a femtoscopy measurement of proton-proton and proton-Lambda pairs, which were produced in p+Nb collisions and detected with the HADES setup, where the proton had a kinetic beam energy of 3.5 GeV. By using proton pairs we were able to extract the region of homogeneity of the p+Nb system. This information together with UrQMD transport simulations allowed us to concentrate solely on the investigation of the proton-Lambda interaction. We tested different sets of scattering parameters predicted by theoretical calculations on the experimental data and the sensitivity of the method.

  9. Interaction design challenges and solutions for ALMA operations monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietriga, Emmanuel; Cubaud, Pierre; Schwarz, Joseph; Primet, Romain; Schilling, Marcus; Barkats, Denis; Barrios, Emilio; Vila Vilaro, Baltasar

    2012-09-01

    The ALMA radio-telescope, currently under construction in northern Chile, is a very advanced instrument that presents numerous challenges. From a software perspective, one critical issue is the design of graphical user interfaces for operations monitoring and control that scale to the complexity of the system and to the massive amounts of data users are faced with. Early experience operating the telescope with only a few antennas has shown that conventional user interface technologies are not adequate in this context. They consume too much screen real-estate, require many unnecessary interactions to access relevant information, and fail to provide operators and astronomers with a clear mental map of the instrument. They increase extraneous cognitive load, impeding tasks that call for quick diagnosis and action. To address this challenge, the ALMA software division adopted a user-centered design approach. For the last two years, astronomers, operators, software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers have been involved in participatory design workshops, with the aim of designing better user interfaces based on state-of-the-art visualization techniques. This paper describes the process that led to the development of those interface components and to a proposal for the science and operations console setup: brainstorming sessions, rapid prototyping, joint implementation work involving software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers, feedback collection from a broader range of users, further iterations and testing.

  10. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; James, W.P.T.

    1993-01-01

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  11. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  12. Exploring QSARs of the interaction of flavonoids with GABA (A) receptor using MLR, ANN and SVM techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Omar; Shaik, Basheerulla; Agrawal, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models for binding affinity constants (log Ki) of 78 flavonoid ligands towards the benzodiazepine site of GABA (A) receptor complex were calculated using the machine learning methods: artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) techniques. The models obtained were compared with those obtained using multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. The descriptor selection and model building were performed with 10-fold cross-validation using the training data set. The SVM and MLR coefficient of determination values are 0.944 and 0.879, respectively, for the training set and are higher than those of ANN models. Though the SVM model shows improvement of training set fitting, the ANN model was superior to SVM and MLR in predicting the test set. Randomization test is employed to check the suitability of the models.

  13. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of the interactions between the transuranic elements and some environmental ligands by the hyphenated technique capillary electrophoresis: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topin, S.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the capabilities of the hyphenated Capillary Electrophoresis-ICP-MS technique are used to improve the knowledge on the transuranic element speciation in the environment (nuclear waste management) and in the framework of spent fuel reprocessing. Essential thermodynamical data have been determined for the first time for the interactions of the plutonium at the (5+) oxidation state (main soluble species of Pu of the surface water) in inorganic media (chloride, nitrate, sulfate, carbonate). This study enables to correct the existing model, based on the thermodynamical data of the neptunium at the (5+) oxidation state (analogue of the pentavalent plutonium). Furthermore, the hyphenated CE-ICP-MS technique has also been applied to study the interactions between DTPA, widely used in the nuclear industry, and the elements at the (3+) oxidation state (Pu, Am, Cm, Cf) and at the (4+) oxidation state (Pu, Np, Th). The results show for the first time the formation of mixed An(IV)/DTPA/OH complexes likely to play a key role on the actinide behavior in the field of the waste management. The study on the trivalent elements confirms the selectivity of DTPA versus the actinide in the framework of the actinide/lanthanide separation but proves that the covalency, responsible of the selectivity, are less important than the ionicity in the binding. (author)

  15. Probing the interaction of flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles targeted to bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Peng; Fan Hai; Liu Tao; Cui Lin; Ai Shiyun

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles (CdSe NP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated from a spectroscopic angle under simulative physiological conditions. Under pH 7.4, CdSe NP could effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via static quenching. The binding constant (K A ) was 6.38, 3.27, and 1.90x10 4 M -1 at 298, 304, and 310 K, respectively and the number of binding sites was 1.20. According to the Van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o =-77.48 kJ mol -1 , ΔS o =-168.17 J mol -1 K -1 ) indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a major role in stabilizing the BSA-CdSe complex. Besides, UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) results showed that the addition of CdSe NP changed the secondary structure of BSA and led to a decrease in α-helix. These results suggested that BSA underwent substantial conformational changes induced by flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles. - Highlights: → Estimate the binding of flower-like CdSe NP to BSA by spectroscopic methods. → Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were the major forces. →Addition of CdSe changed the micro-environmentl of BSA. → Decrease in α-helix of BSA secondary structure induced by CdSe.

  16. Investigating the spatio-temporal variability in groundwater and surface water interactions: a multi-technique approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Andersen, M. S.; Rau, G. C.; Reed, J.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Atkinson, A. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between groundwater and surface water along the Tambo and Nicholson rivers, southeast Australia, was investigated using 222Rn, Cl, differential flow gauging, head gradients, electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature profiles. Head gradients, temperature profiles, Cl concentrations and 222Rn activities all indicate higher groundwater fluxes to the Tambo River in areas of increased topographic variation where the potential to form large groundwater-surface water gradients is greater. Groundwater discharge to the Tambo River calculated by Cl mass balance was significantly lower (1.48 × 104 to 1.41 × 103 m3 day-1) than discharge estimated by 222Rn mass balance (5.35 × 105 to 9.56 × 103 m3 day-1) and differential flow gauging (5.41 × 105 to 6.30 × 103 m3 day-1) due to bank return waters. While groundwater sampling from the bank of the Tambo River was intended to account for changes in groundwater chemistry associated with bank infiltration, variations in bank infiltration between sample sites remain unaccounted for, limiting the use of Cl as an effective tracer. Groundwater discharge to both the Tambo and Nicholson rivers was the highest under high-flow conditions in the days to weeks following significant rainfall, indicating that the rivers are well connected to a groundwater system that is responsive to rainfall. Groundwater constituted the lowest proportion of river discharge during times of increased rainfall that followed dry periods, while groundwater constituted the highest proportion of river discharge under baseflow conditions (21.4% of the Tambo in April 2010 and 18.9% of the Nicholson in September 2010).

  17. Modeling Strategic Use of Human Computer Interfaces with Novel Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jane Mariano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game’s functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic

  18. Mobilization versus manipulations versus sustain apophyseal natural glide techniques and interaction with psychological factors for patients with chronic neck pain: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lopez, A; Alonso Perez, J L; González Gutierez, J L; La Touche, R; Lerma Lara, S; Izquierdo, H; Fernández-Carnero, J

    2015-04-01

    Three different types of manual therapy techniques for patients with neck pain and relationship with psychological factors has not been evaluated. To compare the effectiveness high velocity and low amplitude (HVLA) manipulation vs. posteroanterior mobilization (PA mob) vs. sustain appophyseal natural glide (SNAG) in the management of patients with neck pain and to evaluate the interaction with psychological factors. Randomized clinical trial. Primary Health Care Center. Patients with history of chronic neck pain over the last 3 months were recruited. Patients were randomly assigned to receive treatment with HVLA (N.=15), with PA mob (N.=16) or with SNAG (N.=17). One session was applied. Pain intensity of neck pain, pressure pain threshold over processus spinosus of C2 (PPT_C2) and cervical range of motion (CROM) were measured pre- and post-intervention. Pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety and kinesiophobia were assessed in baseline. ANOVAs were performed, with main effects, two-way (treatment x time) and three-way interactions (treatment x psychological variable x time) were examined. Fourthy-eight patients (mean±SD age, 36.5±8.7 years; 87.5% female). A significant interaction treatment x time was observed for VAS-rest in HVLA and AP mob groups (Ptechniques have similar immediate effects over neck pain and while under high anxiety levels a better outcome is expected after mobilization intervention, under low anxiety levels a better prognosis is expected after manipulation and SNAG intervention.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new unsymmetrical Schiff base Zn (II) and Co (II) complexes and study of their interactions with bovin serum albumin and DNA by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighipoor, Maryam; Kianfar, Ali Hossein; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2018-06-01

    Two novel tetra-coordinated Cobalt(II) and Zinc (II) chelate series with the general formula of [Co (L)·2H2O] (1) and [Zn (L)] (2) [L = N-2-hydroxyacetophenon-N‧-2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde-1,2 phenylenediimine)] with biologically active Schiff base ligands were synthesized and recognized by elemental analysis and multi-nuclear spectroscopy (IR and 1H and 13C NMR); then, their biological activities including DNA and protein interactions were studied. The interaction of the synthesized compounds with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated via fluorescence spectroscopy, showing the affinity of the complexes for these proteins with relatively high binding constant values and the changed secondary BSA structure in the presence of the complexes. The interaction of these compounds with CT-DNA was considered by UV-Vis technique, emission titration, viscosity measurements, helix melting methods, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, confirming that the complexes were bound to CT-DNA by the intercalation binding mode. Furthermore, the complexes had the capability to displace the DNA-bound MB, as shown by the competitive studies of these complexes with methylene blue (MB), thereby suggesting the intercalation mode for the competition. Finally, the theoretical studies carried out by the docking method were performed to calculate the binding constants and recognize the binding site of the BSA and DNA by the complexes. In addition, in vitro and in silico studies showed that the compounds were degradable by bacterial and fungal biodegradation activities.

  20. Human-Centered Design of Human-Computer-Human Dialogs in Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of ongoing research programs at Georgia Tech established a need for a simulation support tool for aircraft computer-based aids. This led to the design and development of the Georgia Tech Electronic Flight Instrument Research Tool (GT-EFIRT). GT-EFIRT is a part-task flight simulator specifically designed to study aircraft display design and single pilot interaction. ne simulator, using commercially available graphics and Unix workstations, replicates to a high level of fidelity the Electronic Flight Instrument Systems (EFIS), Flight Management Computer (FMC) and Auto Flight Director System (AFDS) of the Boeing 757/767 aircraft. The simulator can be configured to present information using conventional looking B757n67 displays or next generation Primary Flight Displays (PFD) such as found on the Beech Starship and MD-11.

  1. Immersion in Movement-Based Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasch, M.; Bianchi-Berthouze, N.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.; Reidsma, Dennis; Reidsma, D.; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of immersing oneself into virtual environments has been established widely. Yet to date (to our best knowledge) the physical dimension has been neglected in studies investigating immersion in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). In this paper we investigate how the concept of immersion

  2. PET-MR image fusion in soft tissue sarcoma: accuracy, reliability and practicality of interactive point-based and automated mutual information techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somer, Edward J.R.; Marsden, Paul K.; Benatar, Nigel A.; O'Doherty, Michael J.; Goodey, Joanne; Smith, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The fusion of functional positron emission tomography (PET) data with anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography images, using a variety of interactive and automated techniques, is becoming commonplace, with the technique of choice dependent on the specific application. The case of PET-MR image fusion in soft tissue is complicated by a lack of conspicuous anatomical features and deviation from the rigid-body model. Here we compare a point-based external marker technique with an automated mutual information algorithm and discuss the practicality, reliability and accuracy of each when applied to the study of soft tissue sarcoma. Ten subjects with suspected sarcoma in the knee, thigh, groin, flank or back underwent MR and PET scanning after the attachment of nine external fiducial markers. In the assessment of the point-based technique, three error measures were considered: fiducial localisation error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE). FLE, which represents the accuracy with which the fiducial points can be located, is related to the FRE minimised by the registration algorithm. The registration accuracy is best characterised by the TRE, which is the distance between corresponding points in each image space after registration. In the absence of salient features within the target volume, the TRE can be measured at fiducials excluded from the registration process. To assess the mutual information technique, PET data, acquired after physically removing the markers, were reconstructed in a variety of ways and registered with MR. Having applied the transform suggested by the algorithm to the PET scan acquired before the markers were removed, the residual distance between PET and MR marker-pairs could be measured. The manual point-based technique yielded the best results (RMS TRE =8.3 mm, max =22.4 mm, min =1.7 mm), performing better than the automated algorithm (RMS TRE =20.0 mm, max =30.5 mm, min =7.7 mm) when

  3. Spaces of interaction, places for experience

    CERN Document Server

    Benyon, David

    2014-01-01

    Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience is a book about Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), interaction design (ID) and user experience (UX) in the age of ubiquitous computing. The book explores interaction and experience through the different spaces that contribute to interaction until it arrives at an understanding of the rich and complex places for experience that will be the focus of the next period for interaction design. The book begins by looking at the multilayered nature of interaction and UX-not just with new technologies, but with technologies that are embedded in the world. Peop

  4. Neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which neutrons interact with matter such as slowing-down, diffusion, neutron absorption and moderation are described. The use of neutron techniques in industry, in moisture gages, level and interface measurements, the detection of blockages, boron analysis in ore feedstock and industrial radiography are discussed. (author)

  5. Multi-technique approach on the interaction between sugar-based surfactant n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Mohd Sajid, E-mail: smsajidali@gmail.com; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    2016-01-15

    A multi-technique approach which comprises various basic and advanced techniques, such as surface tensiometry, synchronous, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, far and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and UV–visible spectrophotometries was applied to understand the interaction between biocompatible sugar-based surfactant n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside (C{sub 12}G{sub 2}) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Formation of complex between surfactant and protein was initially confirmed by surface tension and UV absorption spectroscopy. The presence of BSA shifted the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant at higher concentration and in a similar way the UV spectrum of the BSA was altered by addition of small amount of surfactant. The interfacial properties of the complex such as π{sub cmc} (the surface pressure at the cmc), Γ{sub max} (the maximum surface excess) and A{sub min} (the minimum surface area per molecule) were also calculated. Addition of surfactant causes the quenching of BSA fluorescence and a large blue-shift at both excitation wavelengths (280 and 295 nm) owing to the hydrophobic interaction between surfactant and protein. The quenching took place via static mechanism. Extrinsic fluorescence of 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) increased as a result of the unfolding of the protein. The secondary and tertiary structure of BSA also influenced as revealed by the collective information obtained by far-UV CD, near-UV CD and FTIR spectroscopies. The increase in the size of the complex as a results of the partial unfolding was also confirmed by DLS measurements as well as resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). - Highlights: • In the presence of BSA cmc of sugar surfactant n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside increased due to the binding of BSA with surfactant. • The binding of the surfactant leads to the partial unfolding of BSA. • The conformation of BSA predominately remains the α-helical.

  6. Use of Spectroscopic, Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamic Techniques to Study the Interaction between Human Holo-Transferrin and Two Antagonist Drugs: Comparison of Binary and Ternary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saberi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the binding of ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP and aspirin (ASA to human holo-transferrin (hTf has been investigated by spectroscopic approaches (fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, resonance light scattering, as well as zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques, under simulated physiological conditions. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of the ROP and ASA drugs on the fluorescence of hTf as well as to define the binding and quenching properties of binary and ternary complexes. The synchronized fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated some micro-environmental and conformational changes around the Trp and Tyr residues with a faint red shift. Thermodynamic analysis displayed the van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions are the major acting forces in stabilizing the complexes. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of complexes are static mechanism. The effect of the drugs aggregating on the hTf resulted in an enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS intensity. The average binding distance between were computed according to the forster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The circular dichroism (CD spectral examinations indicated that the binding of the drugs induced a conformational change of hTf. Measurements of the zeta potential indicated that the combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between ROP, ASA and hTf formed micelle-like clusters. The molecular modeling confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of hTf with ROP and ASA to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  7. Designing for tangible interaction : the BUILD-IT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjeld, M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2001-01-01

    O ne of the most challenging research questions in human-computer interaction is: what will be the next generation of user interfaces? How can we interact with computers without a keyboard, monitor, and mouse? To find possible answers to these questions, scientists at the Swiss Federal Institute of

  8. To reveal the nature of interactions of human hemoglobin with gold nanoparticles having two different morphologies (sphere and star-shaped) by using various spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Madhurima; Paul, Somnath; Mitra, Ishani; Bardhan, Munmun; Bose, Mridul; Saha, Abhijit; Ganguly, Tapan

    2018-01-01

    The nature of interactions between heme protein human hemoglobin (HHb) and gold nanoparticles of two different morphologies that is GNP (spherical) and GNS (star-shaped) have been investigated by using UV-vis absorption, steady state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), time resolved fluorescence, FT-IR, and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological condition of pH ~7 at ambient and different temperatures. Analysis of the steady state fluorescence quenching of HHb in aqueous solution in the presence of GNP and GNS suggests that the nature of the quenching is of static type. The static nature of the quenching is also confirmed from time resolved data. The static type of quenching also indicates the possibility of formation of ground state complex for both HHb-GNP and HHb-GNS systems. From the measurements of Stern-Volmer (SV) constants K SV and binding constants, K A and number of binding sites it appears that HHb forms stronger binding with GNP relative to GNS. Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters indicates that the formation of HHb-GNP and HHb-GNS complexes are spontaneous molecular interaction processes (∆G<0). In both cases hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play a dominant role (∆H<0, ∆S<0). Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy further reveals that the ground state complex formations of HHb-GNP and HHb-GNS preferably occur by binding with the amino acid tyrosine through hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover the α-helicity contents of the proteins as obtained from the circular dichroism (CD) spectra appears to be marginally reduced by increasing concentrations of GNP and GNS and the α-helical structures of HHb retain its identity as native secondary structure in spite of complex formations with GNP or GNS. These findings demonstrate the efficiency of biomedical applications of GNP and GNS nanoparticles as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as drugs or drug delivery

  9. Interaction as Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    In this paper we discuss recent developments in interaction design principles for ubiquitous computing environments, specifically implications related to situated and mobile aspects of work. We present 'Interaction through Negotiation' as a general Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) paradigm, aimed...... at ubiquitous/pervasive technology and environments, with focus on facilitating negotiation in and between webs of different artifacts, humans and places. This approach is concerned with the way technology presents itself to us, both as physical entities and as conceptual entities, as well as the relations...... on several extensive empirical case studies, as well as co-operative design-sessions, we present a reflective analysis providing insights into results of the "Interaction through Negotiation" design approach in action. A very promising area of application is exception handling in pervasive computing...

  10. Interactive Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten

    Interactivity is the continuous interaction between the user and the application to solve a task. Topology optimization is the optimization of structures in order to improve stiffness or other objectives. The goal of the thesis is to explore how topology optimization can be used in applications...... on theory of from human-computer interaction which is described in Chapter 2. Followed by a description of the foundations of topology optimization in Chapter 3. Our applications for topology optimization in 2D and 3D are described in Chapter 4 and a game which trains the human intuition of topology...... optimization is presented in Chapter 5. Topology optimization can also be used as an interactive modeling tool with local control which is presented in Chapter 6. Finally, Chapter 7 contains a summary of the findings and concludes the dissertation. Most of the presented applications of the thesis are available...

  11. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis for Interaction Design Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Social media analytics is an emerging skill for organizations. Currently, developers are exploring ways to create tools for simplifying social media analysis. These tools tend to focus on gathering data, and using systems to make it meaningful. However, we contend that making social media data...... meaningful is by nature a human-computer interaction problem. We examine this problem around the emerging field of sentiment analysis, exploring criteria for designing sentiment analysis systems based in Human Computer interaction, HCI. We contend that effective sentiment analysis affects audience analysis...

  12. Conversion of IVA Human Computer Model to EVA Use and Evaluation and Comparison of the Result to Existing EVA Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, George S.; Williams, Jermaine C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methods, rationale, and comparative results of the conversion of an intravehicular (IVA) 3D human computer model (HCM) to extravehicular (EVA) use and compares the converted model to an existing model on another computer platform. The task of accurately modeling a spacesuited human figure in software is daunting: the suit restricts the human's joint range of motion (ROM) and does not have joints collocated with human joints. The modeling of the variety of materials needed to construct a space suit (e. g. metal bearings, rigid fiberglass torso, flexible cloth limbs and rubber coated gloves) attached to a human figure is currently out of reach of desktop computer hardware and software. Therefore a simplified approach was taken. The HCM's body parts were enlarged and the joint ROM was restricted to match the existing spacesuit model. This basic approach could be used to model other restrictive environments in industry such as chemical or fire protective clothing. In summary, the approach provides a moderate fidelity, usable tool which will run on current notebook computers.

  13. A study on the interaction of horse heart cytochrome c with some conventional and ionic liquid surfactants probed by ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Das, Bijan

    2018-06-05

    The interactions of a protein cytochrome c with some selected conventional and ionic liquid surfactants have been investigated at pH7.4 using ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. We used four conventional surfactants - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate (SDDS), and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10), and a surface active ionic liquid 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C 16 MeImCl). All the investigated surfactants were found to induce an unfolding of the protein cytochrome c. In presence of CTAB, SDDS and C 16 MeImCl, the heme iron atom was found to loose methionine from its axial position. Differential binding of the surfactant monomers and their micelles to the protein molecules was inferred. The ionic surfactants were found to be more effective than the nonionic one in unfolding the investigated protein. However, the extent of binding of CTAB/C 16 MeImCl to cytochrome c reaches a plateau past the critical micellization concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. For each of the cytochrome c-DTAB, cytochrome c-SDDS and cytochrome c-Mega 10 system, although there exists an inflection in the surfactant-binding, saturation point could not be detected. It has been demonstrated from the ultraviolet-visible spectral studies that the oxidation state of iron in cytochrome c does not change when the protein binds with the investigated surfactants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of low-intensity nuclear radiation dose with the human blood: Using the new technique of CR-39NTDs for an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Asaad H.; Jaafar, Mohamad S.

    2011-01-01

    Complete blood counts were analyzed for 30 samples of human blood with radiation dose rate ranging between 10 and 41 μSv/h using a Radium-226 source with different time of exposure. A new technique involving a nuclear track detector type CR-39(CR-39 NTDs) was used to estimate the alpha particle density incident on the blood samples. The results show that the ranges of alpha particle in blood samples and on the surface of CR-39NTDs vary exponentially with energy of alpha particles. This depends on the restricted energy loss and target density. Changes in the blood components due to irradiation occurred for different durations of irradiation, and the duration of irradiation that influenced the blood samples in this study was 6 min. The change in red blood cell (RBC) was negligible, so it is less affected than other blood components. In addition, most changes in the blood contents began at a low radiation dose (10.38-13.41 μSv/h). For the doses 13.41-21.77 μSv/h, platelet (PLT) counts increased rapidly and adversely with the RBC and white blood cell (WBC) due to chromosomal aberration. Besides, rapid PLT count reduction rapidly at high dose (42.1 μSv h) causes thrombocytopenia; in contrast, WBC increased, which is an indication of cancer caused due to increase in alpha particle dose. Generally, our results are in agreement with the essentials of blood content and the principles of biological radiation interaction.

  15. Understanding of CO{sub 2} interaction with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} on Si using IBA depth profiling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deokar, Geetanjali; D’Angelo, Marie; Briand, Emrick [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Deville Cavellin, Catherine, E-mail: deville@univ-paris12.fr [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Faculté des Sciences et Technologie UPEC, 61 Av., De Gaulle, Créteil F-94010 (France)

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between CO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films thermally grown on Si have been studied using {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as isotopic tracers associated with ion beam analysis (IBA) depth profiling techniques. From secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements no carbon from CO{sub 2} is detected in the silica while it is found in Si. These results suggest that CO{sub 2} diffuses through the silica. Exchanges of oxygen between CO{sub 2} and silica can be observed from {sup 18}O to {sup 16}O SIMS signals variation. The oxygen concentration depth profiles were determined quantitatively using the narrow resonance near 151 keV in the {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N nuclear reaction (Narrow Resonance Profiling, NRP). We demonstrate that two distinct oxygen exchanges processes co-exist and we determine the diffusion coefficient of the CO{sub 2} molecule in the silica at 1100 °C.

  16. Analysis of the Usage of Magnetic Force-directed Approach and Visual Techniques for Interactive Context-based Drawing of Multi-attributed Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabiniako Vitaly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors perform an analysis in order to assess adaptation of magnetic force-directed algorithms for context-based information extraction from multi-attributed graphs during visualization sessions. Theoretic standings behind magnetic force-directed approach are stated together with review on how particular features of respective algorithms in combination with appropriate visual techniques are especially suitable for improved processing and presenting of knowledge that is captured in form of graphs. The complexity of retrieving multi-attributed information within the proposed approach is handled with dedicated tools, such as selective attraction of nodes to MFE (Magnetic Force Emitter based on search criteria, localization of POI (Point of Interest regions, graph node anchoring, etc. Implicit compatibility of aforementioned tools with interactive nature of data exploration is distinguished. Description of case study, based on bibliometric network analysis is given, which is followed by the review of existing related works in this field. Conclusions are made and further studies in the field of visualization of multi-attributed graphs are defined.

  17. A study on the interaction of horse heart cytochrome c with some conventional and ionic liquid surfactants probed by ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Das, Bijan

    2018-06-01

    The interactions of a protein cytochrome c with some selected conventional and ionic liquid surfactants have been investigated at pH 7.4 using ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. We used four conventional surfactants - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate (SDDS), and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10), and a surface active ionic liquid 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MeImCl). All the investigated surfactants were found to induce an unfolding of the protein cytochrome c. In presence of CTAB, SDDS and C16MeImCl, the heme iron atom was found to loose methionine from its axial position. Differential binding of the surfactant monomers and their micelles to the protein molecules was inferred. The ionic surfactants were found to be more effective than the nonionic one in unfolding the investigated protein. However, the extent of binding of CTAB/C16MeImCl to cytochrome c reaches a plateau past the critical micellization concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. For each of the cytochrome c-DTAB, cytochrome c-SDDS and cytochrome c-Mega 10 system, although there exists an inflection in the surfactant-binding, saturation point could not be detected. It has been demonstrated from the ultraviolet-visible spectral studies that the oxidation state of iron in cytochrome c does not change when the protein binds with the investigated surfactants.

  18. Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) : An analysis, a perspective, and guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, E.L.

    2016-01-01

    Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI)’s founding elements are discussed in relation to its overarching discipline Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Its basic dimensions are identified: agent, computing machinery, and interaction, and their levels of processing: perceptual, cognitive, and affective.

  19. Cells, Agents, and Support Vectors in Interaction - Modeling Urban Sprawl based on Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Techniques in a Post-Industrial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienow, A.; Menz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since the beginning of the millennium, artificial intelligence techniques as cellular automata (CA) and multi-agent systems (MAS) have been incorporated into land-system simulations to address the complex challenges of transitions in urban areas as open, dynamic systems. The study presents a hybrid modeling approach for modeling the two antagonistic processes of urban sprawl and urban decline at once. The simulation power of support vector machines (SVM), cellular automata (CA) and multi-agent systems (MAS) are integrated into one modeling framework and applied to the largest agglomeration of Central Europe: the Ruhr. A modified version of SLEUTH (short for Slope, Land-use, Exclusion, Urban, Transport, and Hillshade) functions as the CA component. SLEUTH makes use of historic urban land-use data sets and growth coefficients for the purpose of modeling physical urban expansion. The machine learning algorithm of SVM is applied in order to enhance SLEUTH. Thus, the stochastic variability of the CA is reduced and information about the human and ecological forces driving the local suitability of urban sprawl is incorporated. Subsequently, the supported CA is coupled with the MAS ReHoSh (Residential Mobility and the Housing Market of Shrinking City Systems). The MAS models population patterns, housing prices, and housing demand in shrinking regions based on interactions between household and city agents. Semi-explicit urban weights are introduced as a possibility of modeling from and to the pixel simultaneously. Three scenarios of changing housing preferences reveal the urban development of the region in terms of quantity and location. They reflect the dissemination of sustainable thinking among stakeholders versus the steady dream of owning a house in sub- and exurban areas. Additionally, the outcomes are transferred into a digital petri dish reflecting a synthetic environment with perfect conditions of growth. Hence, the generic growth elements affecting the future

  20. A comparative evaluation plan for the Maintenance, Inventory, and Logistics Planning (MILP) System Human-Computer Interface (HCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmyer, Scott P.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to develop a tailored and effective approach to the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface (HCI) to the Maintenance, Inventory and Logistics Planning (MILP) System in support of the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). An additional task that was undertaken was to assist in the review of Ground Displays for Space Station Freedom (SSF) by attending the Ground Displays Interface Group (GDIG), and commenting on the preliminary design for these displays. Based upon data gathered over the 10 week period, this project has hypothesized that the proper HCI concept for navigating through maintenance databases for large space vehicles is one based upon a spatial, direct manipulation approach. This dialogue style can be then coupled with a traditional text-based DBMS, after the user has determined the general nature and location of the information needed. This conclusion is in contrast with the currently planned HCI for MILP which uses a traditional form-fill-in dialogue style for all data access and retrieval. In order to resolve this difference in HCI and dialogue styles, it is recommended that comparative evaluation be performed which combines the use of both subjective and objective metrics to determine the optimal (performance-wise) and preferred approach for end users. The proposed plan has been outlined in the previous paragraphs and is available in its entirety in the Technical Report associated with this project. Further, it is suggested that several of the more useful features of the Maintenance Operations Management System (MOMS), especially those developed by the end-users, be incorporated into MILP to save development time and money.

  1. Ellipsometry-based combination of isothermal sorption-desorption measurement and temperature programmed desorption technique: A probe for interaction of thin polymer films with solvent vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2018-05-01

    An environmental chamber equipped with an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer, programmatic vapor pressure control, and variable temperature substrate holder has been designed for studying polymer coating behavior during an exposure to a solvent vapor and also for probing the residual solvent in the film afterwards. Both sorption-desorption cycle at a constant temperature and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the residual solvent manifest themselves as a change of the film thickness. Monitoring of ellipsometric angles of the coating allows us to determine the thickness as a function of the vapor pressure or sample temperature. The solvent vapor pressure is precisely regulated by a computer-controlled pneumatics. TPD spectra are recorded during heating of the film in an oil-free vacuum. The vapor pressure control system is described in detail. The system has been tested on 6-170 nm thick polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(2-vinyl pyridine) films deposited on silicon substrates. Liquid toluene, water, ethanol, isopropanol, cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chlorobenzene were used to create a vapor atmosphere. Typical sorption-desorption and TPD curves are shown. The instrument achieves sub-monolayer sensitivity for adsorption studies on flat surfaces. Polymer-solvent vapor systems with strong interaction demonstrate characteristic absorption-desorption hysteresis spanning from vacuum to the glass transition pressure. Features on the TPD curves can be classified as either glass transition related film contraction or low temperature broad contraction peak. Typical absorption-desorption and TPD dependencies recorded for the 6 nm thick polystyrene film demonstrate the possibility to apply the presented technique for probing size effects in extremely thin coatings.

  2. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in Zn1.xMTxO, where MT=(V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) by means of Perturbed Angular γ . γ Correlation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, Moacir Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, a microscopic investigation of hyperfine interactions in zinc oxide samples doped with transition metals was carried out by means of Perturbed Angular γ . γ correlation technique (PAC), which is based on hyperfine interactions. This technique makes use of 111 In → 111 Cd radioactive probe nuclei, which decay through the well known γ cascade 171-245keV with an intermediate level of 245keV (I = 5 + /2 Q = 0.83b, T 1/2 = 84.5ns). First, zinc oxide samples doped with different transition metals were obtained by means of a sol-gel method for production of oxide samples. Then, samples were characterized by means of different techniques (X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy), followed by the investigation of hyperfine interactions (using PAC technique), in order to increase the understanding concerning electric quadrupole interactions in these samples, as well as the possibility of obtaining ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, which has been extensively investigated and is an aspect of high interest concerning future applications. Results obtained from measurements were analyzed and compared with the information found in literature. Discussions were made as function of different measurement temperatures, annealing procedures, particle size, type and concentration of doping elements, making possible to produce a detailed discussion as well as the physical interpretation of the results obtained, presenting the respective conclusions. (author)

  3. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  4. Large Display Interaction Using Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Large displays become more and more popular, due to dropping prices. Their size and high resolution leverages collaboration and they are capable of dis- playing even large datasets in one view. This becomes even more interesting as the number of big data applications increases. The increased screen size and other properties of large displays pose new challenges to the Human- Computer-Interaction with these screens. This includes issues such as limited scalability to the number of users, diver...

  5. Multimodal Desktop Interaction: The Face –Object-Gesture–Voice Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolas; Vlasopoulos, Anastasios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a natural user interface system based on multimodal human computer interaction, which operates as an intermediate module between the user and the operating system. The aim of this work is to demonstrate a multimodal system which gives users the ability to interact with desktop...

  6. Data Analysis Tools and Methods for Improving the Interaction Design in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Paul Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this digital era, learning from data gathered from different software systems may have a great impact on the quality of the interaction experience. There are two main directions that come to enhance this emerging research domain, Intelligent Data Analysis (IDA) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI). HCI specific research methodologies can be…

  7. Some Technical Implications of Distributed Cognition on the Design on Interactive Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that diagnosis, explanation, and tutoring, the functions of an interactive learning environment, are collaborative processes. Examines how human-computer interaction can be improved using a distributed cognition framework. Discusses situational and distributed knowledge theories and provides a model on how they can be used to redesign…

  8. Evaluation of a Bead-Free Coimmunoprecipitation Technique for Identification of Virus-Host Protein Interactions Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Bereman, Michael S; Mahoney, Jaclyn; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Gray, Stewart M; MacCoss, Michael J; Cilia Heck, Michelle

    2017-09-01

    Protein interactions between virus and host are essential for viral propagation and movement, as viruses lack most of the proteins required to thrive on their own. Precision methods aimed at disrupting virus-host interactions represent new approaches to disease management but require in-depth knowledge of the identity and binding specificity of host proteins within these interaction networks. Protein coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a high-throughput way to characterize virus-host interactomes in a single experiment. Common co-IP methods use antibodies immobilized on agarose or magnetic beads to isolate virus-host complexes in solutions of host tissue homogenate. Although these workflows are well established, they can be fairly laborious and expensive. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of using antibody-coated microtiter plates coupled with MS analysis as an easy, less expensive way to identify host proteins that interact with Potato leafroll virus (PLRV), an insect-borne RNA virus that infects potatoes. With the use of the bead-free platform, we were able to detect 36 plant and 1 nonstructural viral protein significantly coimmunoprecipitating with PLRV. Two of these proteins, a 14-3-3 signal transduction protein and malate dehydrogenase 2 (mMDH2), were detected as having a weakened or lost association with a structural mutant of the virus, demonstrating that the bead-free method is sensitive enough to detect quantitative differences that can be used to pin-point domains of interaction. Collectively, our analysis shows that the bead-free platform is a low-cost alternative that can be used by core facilities and other investigators to identify plant and viral proteins interacting with virions and/or the viral structural proteins.

  9. The Effect upon the Behavior and Attitudes of Student Teachers of Training Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers in the Use of Interaction Analysis as a Classroom Observational Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Edmund

    In a 2 1/2-year study of the application of interaction analysis (a method of classroom observation) to preservice teacher education, approximately 40 secondary student teachers were involved in an experiment during each of 3 semesters. A 2 by 2 factorial design made it possible to test the influence of 2 independent variables (student teacher…

  10. GAIML: A New Language for Verbal and Graphical Interaction in Chatbots

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Pirrone; Giuseppe Russo; Vincenzo Cannella; Daniele Peri

    2008-01-01

    Natural and intuitive interaction between users and complex systems is a crucial research topic in human-computer interaction. A major direction is the definition and implementation of systems with natural language understanding capabilities. The interaction in natural language is often performed by means of systems called chatbots. A chatbot is a conversational agent with a proper knowledge base able to interact with users. Chatbots appearance can be very sophisticated with 3D avatars and sp...

  11. Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Di-2-pyridylketone-4,4,-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT exhibits significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of its pharmacological interaction with human serum albumin (HSA and DNA remains poorly understood. Here, we aimed to elucidate the interactions of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA using MTT assays, spectroscopic methods, and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicated that addition of HSA at a ratio of 1:1 did not alter the cytotoxicity of Dp44mT, but did affect the cytotoxicity of the Dp44mT-Cu complex. Data from fluorescence quenching and UV-VIS absorbance measurements demonstrated that Dp44mT could bind to HSA with a moderate affinity (Ka = approximately 104 M−1. CD spectra revealed that Dp44mT could slightly disrupt the secondary structure of HSA. Dp44mT could also interact with Ct-DNA, but had a moderate binding constant (KEB = approximately 104 M−1. Docking studies indicated that the IB site of HSA, but not the IIA and IIIA sites, could be favorable for Dp44mT and that binding of Dp44mT to HSA involved hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force, consistent with thermodynamic results from spectral investigations. Thus, the moderate binding affinity of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA partially contributed to its antitumor activity and may be preferable in drug design approaches.

  12. Comparison of the nature of interactions of two sialic acid specific lectins Saraca indica and Sambucus nigra with N-acetylneuraminic acid by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Shuvendu [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India); Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bose, Partha P. [Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Hajipur 844101 (India); Ganguly, Tapan [School of Laser Science and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Campana, Patricia T. [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, 03828-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ghosh, Rina [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chatterjee, Bishnu P., E-mail: cbishnup@gmail.com [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-04-15

    The present paper deals with the isolation and purification of a new sialic acid binding lectin from the seed integument of Saraca indica (Ashok) and the purified lectin was designated Saracin II. Comparative studies on the interactions of saracin II and another sialic acid specific lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) with N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) were made using UV–vis absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence along with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to reveal the nature and mechanisms of binding of these two lectins with NANA. The experimental observations obtained from UV–vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrated that SNA–NANA system formed relatively stronger ground state complex than saracin II–NANA pair. CD measurements further substantiated the propositions made from steady state and time resolved spectroscopic investigations. It was inferred that during interaction of SNA with NANA, the lectin adopted a relatively looser conformation with the extended polypeptide structures leading to the exposure of the hydrophobic cavities which favoured stronger binding with NANA. - Highlights: • Of the two lectins, stronger binding of SNA with NANA is observed. • Full exposure of the hydrophobic cavities of SNA favors the stronger interactions. • Saracin II can be used for the new generation of lectin based-therapeutics.

  13. Experimental techniques; Techniques experimentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P. [GANIL CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/DSM, 14 - Caen (France)

    2007-07-01

    This lecture presents the experimental techniques, developed in the last 10 or 15 years, in order to perform a new class of experiments with exotic nuclei, where the reactions induced by these nuclei allow to get information on their structure. A brief review of the secondary beams production methods will be given, with some examples of facilities in operation or under project. The important developments performed recently on cryogenic targets will be presented. The different detection systems will be reviewed, both the beam detectors before the targets, and the many kind of detectors necessary to detect all outgoing particles after the reaction: magnetic spectrometer for the heavy fragment, detection systems for the target recoil nucleus, {gamma} detectors. Finally, several typical examples of experiments will be detailed, in order to illustrate the use of each detector either alone, or in coincidence with others. (author)

  14. The application of an emerging technique for protein-protein interaction interface mapping: the combination of photo-initiated cross-linking protein nanoprobes with mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ptáčková, Renata; Ječmen, Tomáš; Novák, Petr; Šulc, Miroslav; Hudeček, J.; Stiborová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2014), s. 9224-9241 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0627 Grant - others:Universita Karlova(CZ) 903413; Magistrát hlavního města Prahy(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023; UNCE(BE) 204025/2012 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : nanoprobes * mass spectrometry * protein-protein interactions Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  15. Molecular basis of interactions between mitochondrial proteins and hydroxyapatite in the presence of Triton X-100, as revealed by proteomic and recombinant techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takenori; Tamaki, Haruna; Katsuda, Chie; Nakatani, Kiwami; Terauchi, Satsuki; Terada, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Yasuo

    2013-08-02

    Hydroxyapatite chromatography is a very important step in the purification of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) and several members of solute carrier family 25 (Slc25) from isolated mitochondria. In the presence of Triton X-100, VDACs and Slc25 members present a peculiar property, i.e., a lack of interaction with hydroxyapatite, resulting in their presence in the flow-through fraction of hydroxyapatite chromatography. This property has allowed selective isolation of VDACs and Slc25 members from a mixture of total mitochondrial proteins. However, the reason why only these few proteins are selectively obtained in the presence of Triton X-100 from the flow-though fraction of hydroxyapatite chromatography has not yet been adequately understood. In this study, when we examined the protein species in the flow-through fractions by proteomic analysis, VDAC isoforms, Slc25 members, and some other membrane proteins were identified. All the mitochondrial proteins had in common high hydrophobicity over their entire protein sequences. When the proteins were fused to soluble proteins, the fused proteins showed affinity for hydroxyapatite even in the presence of Triton X-100. Based on these results, we discussed the molecular basis of the interactions between proteins and hydroxyapatite in the presence of Triton X-100. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Interaction of a New Antibacterial Polymer with a Supported Lipid Bilayer Measured by an in situ Label-Free Optical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Horvath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the antibacterial polymer–branched poly(ethylene imine substituted with quaternary ammonium groups, PEO and alkyl chains, PEI25QI5J5A815–with a solid supported lipid bilayer was investigated using surface sensitive optical waveguide spectroscopy. The analysis of the optogeometrical parameters was extended developing a new composite layer model in which the structural and optical anisotropy of the molecular layers was taken into consideration. Following in situ the change of optical birefringence we were able to determine the composition of the lipid/polymer surface layer as well as the displacement of lipid bilayer by the antibacterial polymer without using additional labeling. Comparative assessment of the data of layer thickness and optical anisotropy helps to reveal the molecular mechanism of antibacterial effect of the polymer investigated.

  17. Studies on the interactions of chloroquine diphosphate and phenelzine sulfate drugs with human serum albumin and human hemoglobin proteins by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunç, Sibel, E-mail: stunc@akdeniz.edu.tr; Duman, Osman, E-mail: osmanduman@akdeniz.edu.tr; Bozoğlan, Bahar Kancı

    2013-08-15

    The interactions of chloroquine diphosphate (CQP) and phenelzine sulfate (PS) drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) and human hemoglobin (HMG) proteins were investigated by various spectroscopic methods. It was found that CQP caused the fluorescence quenching of protein molecules through a static quenching mechanism, but PS did not. The values of Stern–Volmer quenching constant, bimolecular quenching constant, binding constant and number of binding site on the protein molecules were calculated for HSA–CQP and HMG–CQP systems at pH 7.4 and different temperatures. For CQP, there was only one binding site on HSA and HMG proteins and the binding affinity of HSA was higher than that of HMG. The binding constants decreased with increasing temperature. The values of negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change indicated that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the binding processes. In addition, the binding processes were spontaneous and carried out by exothermic reactions. According to Förster resonance energy transfer theory, the average binding distance between proteins and CQP was calculated as 3.72 nm for HSA–CQP system and 3.45 nm for HMG–CQP system. Circular dichroism analysis displayed that the addition of CQP led to a decrease in the α-helix amount of HSA and HMG proteins. -- Highlights: • Unlike PS, CQP was bounded by HSA and HMG proteins. • The fluorescence spectra of HSA and HMG were quenched by CQP through static mechanism. • HSA–CQP and HMG–CQP complexes were stabilized by electrostatic attraction forces. • Binding constants, thermodynamic parameters and binding distances were calculated. • The binding of CQP changed the conformational structure of HSA and HMG proteins.

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M Bavo

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results.

  19. Application of the multicriterion optimization techniques and hierarchy of computational models to the research of ion acceleration due to laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inovenkov, I. N.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Nefedov, V. V.; Ponomarenko, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we discuss how a particles-in-cell computation code can be combined with methods of multicriterion optimization (in particular the Pareto optimal solutions of the multicriterion optimization problem) and a hierarchy of computational models approach to create an efficient tool for solving a wide array of problems related to the laser-plasma interaction. In case of the computational experiment the multicriterion optimization can be applied as follows: the researcher defines the objectives of the experiment - some computable scalar values (i.e. high kinetic energy of the ions leaving the domain, least possible number of electrons leaving domain in the given direction, etc). After that the parameters of the experiment which can be varied to achieve these objectives and the constrains on these parameters are chosen (e.g. amplitude and wave-length of the laser radiation, dimensions of the plasma slab(s)). The Pareto optimality of the vector of the parameters can be seen as this: x 0 is Pareto optimal if there exists no vector which would improve some criterion without causing a simultaneous degradation in at least one other criterion. These efficient set of parameter and constrains can be selected based on the preliminary calculations in the simplified models (one or two-dimensional) either analytical or numerical. The multistage computation of the Pareto set radically reduces the number of variants which are to be evaluated to achieve the given accuracy. During the final stage we further improve the results by recomputing some of the optimal variants on the finer grids, with more particles and/or in the frame of a more detailed model. As an example we have considered the ion acceleration caused by interaction of very intense and ultra-short laser pulses with plasmas and have calculated the optimal set of experiment parameters for optimizing number and average energy of high energy ions leaving the domain in the given direction and minimizing the expulsion

  20. Use of combined microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to reveal interactions between uranium and Microbacterium sp. A9, a strain isolated from the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chapon, Virginie [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Coppin, Fréderic; Floriani, Magali [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vercouter, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DANS, DPC SEARS, LANIE, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sergeant, Claire [Univ Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Camilleri, Virginie [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Berthomieu, Catherine [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Février, Laureline, E-mail: laureline.fevrier@irsn.fr [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Microbacterium sp. A9 develops various detoxification mechanisms. • Microbacterium sp. A9 promotes metal efflux from the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 releases phosphate to prevent uranium entrance in the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 stores U intracellularly as autunite. - Abstract: Although uranium (U) is naturally found in the environment, soil remediation programs will become increasingly important in light of certain human activities. This work aimed to identify U(VI) detoxification mechanisms employed by a bacteria strain isolated from a Chernobyl soil sample, and to distinguish its active from passive mechanisms of interaction. The ability of the Microbacterium sp. A9 strain to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions at 4 °C and 25 °C was evaluated, as well as its survival capacity upon U(VI) exposure. The subcellular localisation of U was determined by TEM/EDX microscopy, while functional groups involved in the interaction with U were further evaluated by FTIR; finally, the speciation of U was analysed by TRLFS. We have revealed, for the first time, an active mechanism promoting metal efflux from the cells, during the early steps following U(VI) exposure at 25 °C. The Microbacterium sp. A9 strain also stores U intracellularly, as needle-like structures that have been identified as an autunite group mineral. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this strain exhibits a high U(VI) tolerance based on multiple detoxification mechanisms. These findings support the potential role of the genus Microbacterium in the remediation of aqueous environments contaminated with U(VI) under aerobic conditions.

  1. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in ZnO and Zn(1-X)Co(X)O by means of perturbed angular γ - γ Correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercurio, Marcio Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of high-purity ZnO and Zn (1-X) Co (X) O sample preparation methodology based on sol-gel chemical process, as well as the analysis of these samples by means of Perturbed Angular γ - γ Correlation technique (PAC). Also, X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to characterize the samples produced. In addition, Zn (1-X) Co (X) O samples were produced in an attempt to observe ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, through the variation of Co concentration, with different atmospheres and annealing temperatures. The PAC measurements were performed in a BaF 2 four-detector γ spectrometer, which allows simultaneous acquisition of 12 γ - γ delayed coincidence spectra. 111 In → 111 Cd nuclear probe was used for these measurements, which has γ cascade of 172 - 245 keV populated in the decay of 111 In by electron capture. The hyperfine fields were measured from the intermediate energy level of 245 keV in 111 Cd with spin I = 5/2 and T 1/2 = 85 ns. The results show that the developed methodology is suitable for the production of these samples, which is evidenced by the agreement with values reported on literature. (author)

  2. Understanding guide dog team interactions: design opportunities to support work and play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauser, S.; Wakkary, R.L.; Neustaedter, C.

    2014-01-01

    The visually impaired have been a longstanding and well-recognized user group addressed in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Recently, the study of sighted dog owners and their pets has gained interest in HCI. Despite this, there is a noticeable gap in the field with regards to research

  3. From fear to flow personality and information interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Heinstrom, Jannica

    2010-01-01

    From Fear to Flow explores how personality traits may influence attitude, behaviour and reaction to information. Consideration is made for individual differences in information behaviour and reasons behind individual search differences. The book reviews personality and information behaviour and discusses how personality may influence the attitude towards information. Reaction to information is examined in contexts such as everyday life, decision-making, work, studies and human-computer interaction.Introduces a little researched area which is current and needed in our Informatio

  4. Dismantling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, E.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule

  5. Dismantling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, E.

    1998-03-13

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

  6. Separation techniques: Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Chromatography is an important biophysical technique that enables the separation, identification, and purification of the components of a mixture for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Proteins can be purified based on characteristics such as size and shape, total charge, hydrophobic groups present on the surface, and binding capacity with the stationary phase. Four separation techniques based on molecular characteristics and interaction type use mechanisms of ion exchange, surface adsorption, partition, and size exclusion. Other chromatography techniques are based on the stationary bed, including column, thin layer, and paper chromatography. Column chromatography is one of the most common methods of protein purification. PMID:28058406

  7. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Riboflavin (RB) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) with human serum albumin (HSA) using different spectroscopic, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The resonance light scattering (RLS) method determined the critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in the presence and absence of L-Arg which confirmed the zeta potential results. The binding constants (K{sub a}) of HSA–RB were 2.5×10{sup 4} and 9.7×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 280 nm, also were 7.5×10{sup 3} and 7.3×10{sup 3}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that in the presence of L-Arg, the binding constant of HSA–RB was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to results in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The binding distances between HSA and RB in two- and three-component systems were estimated by the Forster theory which revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to RB occurred with a high probability. The effect of RB on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) in both systems. Docking studies demonstrated a reduction in the binding affinity between RB and HSA in the presence of L-Arg. -- Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of riboflavin with HSA in presence and absence of L-Arg. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We compared the binding mechanism of riboflavin (RB) to HSA in both systems. ► We determined critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in both systems. ► The binding site of RB on HSA in both systems has been determined.

  8. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Mahaki, Hanie

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Riboflavin (RB) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) with human serum albumin (HSA) using different spectroscopic, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The resonance light scattering (RLS) method determined the critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in the presence and absence of L-Arg which confirmed the zeta potential results. The binding constants (K a ) of HSA–RB were 2.5×10 4 and 9.7×10 3 M −1 , respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 280 nm, also were 7.5×10 3 and 7.3×10 3 , respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that in the presence of L-Arg, the binding constant of HSA–RB was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to results in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The binding distances between HSA and RB in two- and three-component systems were estimated by the Forster theory which revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to RB occurred with a high probability. The effect of RB on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) in both systems. Docking studies demonstrated a reduction in the binding affinity between RB and HSA in the presence of L-Arg. -- Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of riboflavin with HSA in presence and absence of L-Arg. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We compared the binding mechanism of riboflavin (RB) to HSA in both systems. ► We determined critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in both systems. ► The binding site of RB on HSA in both systems has been determined

  9. Translation Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss three translation techniques: literal, cultural, and artistic. Literal translation is a well-known technique, which means that it is quite easy to find sources on the topic. Cultural and artistic translation may be new terms. Whilst cultural translation focuses on matching contexts, artistic translation focuses on matching reactions. Because literal translation matches only words, it is not hard to find situations in which we should not use this technique.  Because a...

  10. Interactive Information Organization: Techniques and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    current, tour, disneyland 10 Star Tours Heralds New Type Of Show at Theme Parks; Collaborating With Lucas salamon, film, genre, picture, vietnam... disneyland 10 Star Tours Heralds New Type Of Show at Theme Parks; Collaborating With Lucas 13 Creating Fantasies: Disney’s ’Imagineers’ Build Space...inter-document similarity – to organize the search results in two very different ways. 5 tech, attract, group, park, current, tour, disneyland 10 Star

  11. A Menu Technique for Utilizing VERT Interactively

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    FIELD ft, 12) IFhtF = 1FFCF ♦ 1 RLTLPN TKArSFtH Ctlfi EiTFER R1GFT OR LEFT FANC JLSI IF ICATILN CL lr.33 I...D-49 FILE: VEKTTELE CATA Al MIDWEST S+E COMPUTER CENTER GENE HATE ^RAKE. Y AXIS X GRID Y GRID Y AXI S A PLCT. HI H 1.0

  12. Game Design to Measure Reflexes and Attention Based on Biofeedback Multi-Sensor Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inigo de Loyola Ortiz-Vigon Uriarte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-sensor system for implementing biofeedback as a human-computer interaction technique in a game involving driving cars in risky situations. The sensors used are: Eye Tracker, Kinect, pulsometer, respirometer, electromiography (EMG and galvanic skin resistance (GSR. An algorithm has been designed which gives rise to an interaction logic with the game according to the set of physiological constants obtained from the sensors. The results reflect a 72.333 response to the System Usability Scale (SUS, a significant difference of p = 0.026 in GSR values in terms of the difference between the start and end of the game, and an r = 0.659 and p = 0.008 correlation while playing with the Kinect between the breathing level and the energy and joy factor. All the sensors used had an impact on the end results, whereby none of them should be disregarded in future lines of research, even though it would be interesting to obtain separate breathing values from that of the cardio.

  13. Game Design to Measure Reflexes and Attention Based on Biofeedback Multi-Sensor Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Vigon Uriarte, Inigo de Loyola; Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya; Garcia-Chimeno, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-sensor system for implementing biofeedback as a human-computer interaction technique in a game involving driving cars in risky situations. The sensors used are: Eye Tracker, Kinect, pulsometer, respirometer, electromiography (EMG) and galvanic skin resistance (GSR). An algorithm has been designed which gives rise to an interaction logic with the game according to the set of physiological constants obtained from the sensors. The results reflect a 72.333 response to the System Usability Scale (SUS), a significant difference of p = 0.026 in GSR values in terms of the difference between the start and end of the game, and an r = 0.659 and p = 0.008 correlation while playing with the Kinect between the breathing level and the energy and joy factor. All the sensors used had an impact on the end results, whereby none of them should be disregarded in future lines of research, even though it would be interesting to obtain separate breathing values from that of the cardio. PMID:25789493

  14. Multimodal Desktop Interaction: The Face –Object-Gesture–Voice Example

    OpenAIRE

    Vidakis, Nikolas; Vlasopoulos, Anastasios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Varchalamas, Petros; Dimitriou, Michalis; Kalliatakis, Gregory; Syntychakis, Efthimios; Christofakis, John; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a natural user interface systembased on multimodal human computer interaction, whichoperates as an intermediate module between the user and theoperating system. The aim of this work is to demonstrate amultimodal system which gives users the ability to interact withdesktop applications using face, objects, voice and gestures.These human behaviors constitute the input qualifiers to thesystem. Microsoft Kinect multi-sensor was utilized as inputdevice in order to succeed the n...

  15. Influencing appraisals of emotional valence with spatial touchscreen interactions: An embodied approach to Positive Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cervera Torres, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Could bodily interactions with touchscreen interfaces influence users´s affective experiences? The present dissertation investigates, from an embodied perspective, the potential of touchscreen interfaces as "positive technologies". Positive Technology is an emergent research area within the fields of Cyberpsychology and Human-Computer Interaction interested in examining and promote the quality of user´s affective experiences. However, despite touchscreens enable the manipulation of digital co...

  16. Exploring Arduino tools and techniques for engineering wizardry

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Learn to easily build gadgets, gizmos, robots, and more using Arduino Written by Arduino expert Jeremy Blum, this unique book uses the popular Arduino microcontroller platform as an instrument to teach you about topics in electrical engineering, programming, and human-computer interaction. Whether you're a budding hobbyist or an engineer, you'll benefit from the perfectly paced lessons that walk you through useful, artistic, and educational exercises that gradually get more advanced. In addition to specific projects, the book shares best practices in programming and design that

  17. Deriving a time series of 3D glacier motion to investigate interactions of a large mountain glacial system with its glacial lake: Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar Pixel Offset-Small Baseline Subset technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Li, Zhi-wei; Wu, Li-xin; Xu, Bing; Hu, Jun; Zhou, Yu-shan; Miao, Ze-lang

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the interactions of Lake Merzbacher with the Southern Inylchek Glacier (Central Tien Shan) using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Pixel Offset-Small Baseline Subset (PO-SBAS) to derive a time series of three-dimensional (3D) glacier motion. The measurements of 3D glacier velocity were ∼17% more precise than a previous study that did not use the SBAS estimation. The velocities of the glacier were up to 58 cm/day east, 70 cm/day north, and 113 cm/day vertically. Combining these data with Landsat images indicated that movement of the glacier is sensitive to changes of Lake Merzbacher. Specifically, the entry of more lake water into the glacier during the ablation season increased englacial ablation due to thermal erosion. Moreover, ice calving begins when the lake water gradually lifts the ice dam. Calving can cause greater loss of glacier mass than normal ablation. Trying to replenish the front mass loss, the distributary accelerates and the mass loss further intensifies. A time series of the vertical velocity indicates that the glacier tongue has a huge englacial cavity. We suggest that the lake outburst is directly related to the crack of this cavity. Bursting of the lake triggers a mini-surge at the glacier tongue. The vertical velocity at the ice dam was ∼+60 cm/day before the lake outburst, and ∼-113 cm/day afterwards. After drainage of the lake, flow velocities at the distributary, do not sharply decrease because pre-drainage mass loss needs to be replenished by fast flow. Based on comparisons with previous measurements, our results indicate that the lake had an increasing influence on the glacier from 2005 to 2009. This study demonstrates that a time series of 3D glacier motion based on the PO-SBAS technique is effective for assessing the dynamics of a mountain glacial system and interactions with its glacial lake.

  18. Diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Bender, C.E.; James, E.M.; Brown, M.L.; McLeod, R.A.; Broderick, D.F.; Welch, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proper application of imaging procedures is essential to obtain needed information for diagnosis and therapy planning in patients with suspected foot and/or ankle pathology. This paper provides basic background data for the numerous imaging techniques

  19. A comparison of usability methods for testing interactive health technologies: methodological aspects and empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Monique W M

    2009-05-01

    Usability evaluation is now widely recognized as critical to the success of interactive health care applications. However, the broad range of usability inspection and testing methods available may make it difficult to decide on a usability assessment plan. To guide novices in the human-computer interaction field, we provide an overview of the methodological and empirical research available on the three usability inspection and testing methods most often used. We describe two 'expert-based' and one 'user-based' usability method: (1) the heuristic evaluation, (2) the cognitive walkthrough, and (3) the think aloud. All three usability evaluation methods are applied in laboratory settings. Heuristic evaluation is a relatively efficient usability evaluation method with a high benefit-cost ratio, but requires high skills and usability experience of the evaluators to produce reliable results. The cognitive walkthrough is a more structured approach than the heuristic evaluation with a stronger focus on the learnability of a computer application. Major drawbacks of the cognitive walkthrough are the required level of detail of task and user background descriptions for an adequate application of the latest version of the technique. The think aloud is a very direct method to gain deep insight in the problems end users encounter in interaction with a system but data analyses is extensive and requires a high level of expertise both in the cognitive ergonomics and in computer system application domain. Each of the three usability evaluation methods has shown its usefulness, has its own advantages and disadvantages; no single method has revealed any significant results indicating that it is singularly effective in all circumstances. A combination of different techniques that compliment one another should preferably be used as their collective application will be more powerful than applied in isolation. Innovative mobile and automated solutions to support end-user testing have

  20. Immersion in Movement-Based Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, Marco; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia; van Dijk, Betsy; Nijholt, Anton

    The phenomenon of immersing oneself into virtual environments has been established widely. Yet to date (to our best knowledge) the physical dimension has been neglected in studies investigating immersion in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). In movement-based interaction the user controls the interface via body movements, e.g. direct manipulation of screen objects via gestures or using a handheld controller as a virtual tennis racket. It has been shown that physical activity affects arousal and that movement-based controllers can facilitate engagement in the context of video games. This paper aims at identifying movement features that influence immersion. We first give a brief survey on immersion and movement-based interfaces. Then, we report results from an interview study that investigates how users experience their body movements when interacting with movement-based interfaces. Based on the interviews, we identify four movement-specific features. We recommend them as candidates for further investigation.

  1. Adaptive interaction a utility maximization approach to understanding human interaction with technology

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    This lecture describes a theoretical framework for the behavioural sciences that holds high promise for theory-driven research and design in Human-Computer Interaction. The framework is designed to tackle the adaptive, ecological, and bounded nature of human behaviour. It is designed to help scientists and practitioners reason about why people choose to behave as they do and to explain which strategies people choose in response to utility, ecology, and cognitive information processing mechanisms. A key idea is that people choose strategies so as to maximise utility given constraints. The frame

  2. Decomposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  3. Neutron techniques in Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    An essential part of Safeguards is the ability to quantitatively and nondestructively assay those materials with special neutron-interactive properties involved in nuclear industrial or military technology. Neutron techniques have furnished most of the important ways of assaying such materials, which is no surprise since the neutronic properties are what characterizes them. The techniques employed rely on a wide selection of the many methods of neutron generation, detection, and data analysis that have been developed for neutron physics and nuclear science in general

  4. Modelling the Interaction Levels in HCI Using an Intelligent Hybrid System with Interactive Agents: A Case Study of an Interactive Museum Exhibition Module in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rosales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology has become a necessity in our everyday lives and essential for completing activities we typically take for granted; technologies can assist us by completing set tasks or achieving desired goals with optimal affect and in the most efficient way, thereby improving our interactive experiences. This paper presents research that explores the representation of user interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system approach with agents. We evaluate interaction levels of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI with the aim of enhancing user experiences. We consider the description of interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system to provide a decision-making system to an agent that evaluates interaction levels when using interactive modules of a museum exhibition. The agents represent a high-level abstraction of the system, where communication takes place between the user, the exhibition and the environment. In this paper, we provide a means to measure the interaction levels and natural behaviour of users, based on museum user-exhibition interaction. We consider that, by analysing user interaction in a museum, we can help to design better ways to interact with exhibition modules according to the properties and behaviour of the users. An interaction-evaluator agent is proposed to achieve the most suitable representation of the interaction levels with the aim of improving user interactions to offer the most appropriate directions, services, content and information, thereby improving the quality of interaction experienced between the user-agent and exhibition-agent.

  5. Interaction Analysis and Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Edmund

    This paper describes a model that uses interaction analysis as a tool to provide feedback to a teacher in a microteaching situation. The author explains how interaction analysis can be used for teacher improvement, describes the category system used in the model, the data collection methods used, and the feedback techniques found in the model. (JF)

  6. Exploring governmentality as interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Kristian

    from an interactionistic perspective, based on Goffman’s dramaturgy. The focal point is how Goffman's concepts of interaction order, rituals, role and role performance might be an point of entry for studying the techniques the self and the techniques of domination through which governmentality operates...

  7. Interactive shape metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David T.; State, Andrei; Banks, David

    1994-01-01

    A technique for controlled metamorphosis between surfaces in 3-space is described. Well-understood techniques to produce shape metamorphosis between models in a 2D parametric space is applied. The user selects morphable features interactively, and the morphing process executes in real time on a high-performance graphics multicomputer.

  8. Astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, CR

    2013-01-01

    DetectorsOptical DetectionRadio and Microwave DetectionX-Ray and Gamma-Ray DetectionCosmic Ray DetectorsNeutrino DetectorsGravitational Radiation Dark Matter and Dark Energy Detection ImagingThe Inverse ProblemPhotographyElectronic ImagingScanningInterferometrySpeckle InterferometryOccultationsRadarElectronic ImagesPhotometryPhotometryPhotometersSpectroscopySpectroscopy SpectroscopesOther TechniquesAstrometryPolarimetrySolar StudiesMagnetometryComputers and The Internet.

  9. Presentation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froejmark, M.

    1992-10-01

    The report presents a wide, easily understandable description of presentation technique and man-machine communication. General fundamentals for the man-machine interface are illustrated, and the factors that affect the interface are described. A model is presented for describing the operators work situation, based on three different levels in the operators behaviour. The operator reacts routinely in the face of simple, known problems, and reacts in accordance with predetermined plans in the face of more complex, recognizable problems. Deep fundamental knowledge is necessary for truly complex questions. Today's technical status and future development have been studied. In the future, the operator interface will be based on standard software. Functions such as zooming, integration of video pictures, and sound reproduction will become common. Video walls may be expected to come into use in situations in which several persons simultaneously need access to the same information. A summary of the fundamental rules for the design of good picture ergonomics and design requirements for control rooms are included in the report. In conclusion, the report describes a presentation technique within the Distribution Automation and Demand Side Management area and analyses the know-how requirements within Vattenfall. If different systems are integrated, such as geographical information systems and operation monitoring systems, strict demands are made on the expertise of the users for achieving a user-friendly technique which is matched to the needs of the human being. (3 figs.)

  10. Interaction Design in a Context of Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgn, Pia; Lykke, Marianne; Missel, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Information and communication technology(ICT) mediated learning processes for people suffering from aphasia after an acquired brain injury are a relatively uncovered area of research. Helmer-Nielsen et al. (2014)[1] report about projects that study the effect of ICT-mediated speech therapists...... suffering from aphasia, with the purpose of increasing their possibilities for living independent and active lives. In the project, we design a digital environment for communication and learning for people with aphasia who require special learning processes for rebuilding language after a brain injury...... of a combination of learning theory, theories on the brain function and human-computer interaction. The user study showed the needs for collaborative learning processes with communication and social interaction as their focus, tools to support multimodality expressions and customised teaching materials...

  11. Astrophysical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchin, C R

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: detectors (optical and infrared detection; radio and microwave detection; X-ray and gamma-ray detection; cosmic ray detectors; neutrino detectors; gravitational radiation); imaging (photography; electronic imaging; scanning; interferometry; speckle interferometry; occultations; radar); photometry and photometers; spectroscopy and spectroscopes; other techniques (astrometry; polarimetry; solar studies; magnetometry). Appendices: magnitudes and spectral types of bright stars; north polar sequence; standard stars for the UBV photometric system; standard stars for the UVBY photometric system; standard stars for MK spectral types; standard stars for polarimetry; Julian date; catalogues; answers to the exercises.

  12. Llizarov technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankman, S.; Rosenberg, Z.S.; Frankel, V.; Golyakhovsky, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper illustrates the radiographic manifestations of the Ilizarov distraction technique for the correction of short and deformed limbs. The radiographs of 130 patients who underwent Ilizarov distraction at 160 sites since December 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. Reasons for correction included fracture nonunion and malunion idiopathic leg length discrepancy, achondroplasia, and neurofibromatosis with tibial pseudarthrosis. Ninety patients were adults, and 40 were children. In order to assess cortical bone development during the fixation phase, CT of the regenerate bone was performed in 17 patients. Conventional tomograms were obtained in 20 patients for the evaluation of delayed or hypoplastic union at the distraction site

  13. Experimental Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, D.; Serin, L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental techniques to be used in the new generation of high energy physics are presented. The emphasis is put on the new ATLAS and CMS detectors for the CERN LHC. For the most important elements of these detectors, a description of the underlying physics processes is given, sometimes with reference to comparable detectors used in the past. Some comparative global performances of the two detectors are also given, with reference to benchmark physics processes (detection of the Higgs boson in various mass regions, etc). (author)

  14. Co-ordinated research project on application of isotopic and nuclear techniques in the study of nutrition-pollution interactions and their impact on the nutritional status of human subjects in developing country populations. Report on the 2. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is actively contributing through coordinated research project mechanisms to the development of isotopic techniques applicable for pollution-nutrition interactions. This CRP is based on the recommendations of a consultants' meeting on: 'Nuclear Analytical and Isotope Techniques for assessing nutrition-pollution interactions', NAHRES-62. The main objective of the CRP is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants and nutrients in biological samples with a view to elucidate their interactions and the impact on human health. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge on nutrition-pollution interactions mechanisms and can be used to develop preventive strategies. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Use of non-invasive specimens (e.g. breast milk, blood, hair, urine, placenta, eventually adipose tissue for organic pollutants) as indicators to monitor the interaction between the environmental pollution (both organic and inorganic) and nutritional status. Development of protocols to assess the health impact of environmental conditions on populations living under the risk of malnutrition. Validated procedures for chemical analysis in selected environment and nutritional specimens for research in the pollutant-nutrition interaction

  15. Evaluation of Binocular Eye Trackers and Algorithms for 3D Gaze Interaction in Virtual Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Thies Pfeiffer; Ipke Wachsmuth; Marc E. Latoschik

    2009-01-01

    Tracking user's visual attention is a fundamental aspect in novel human-computer interaction paradigms found in Virtual Reality. For example, multimodal interfaces or dialogue-based communications with virtual and real agents greatly benefit from the analysis of the user's visual attention as a vital source for deictic references or turn-taking signals. Current approaches to determine visual attention rely primarily on monocular eye trackers. Hence they are restricted to the interpretation of...

  16. Industrial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for selectively extracting and storing only krypton and xenon in the waste gases that are released from a pressurized water nuclear power reactor are described. The illustrative fluorocarbon absorption system has three separation stages: an initial gas-fluorocarbon absorber, a flash chamber and fractionator for segregating all of the absorbed gases from the loaded absorber stage fluorocarbon (save for the krypton and xenon), and a stripper that receives the partially loaded fluorocarbon liquid directly from the fractionator in order to separate only the krypton and xenon. A molecular sieve filter dries the input process gas, a cartridge type solvent filter is used to remove radiation degradation products from the loaded liquid that flows from the absorber, a cold trap gas drier is provided to remove residual solvent vapor from the separated krypton and xenon, and radiation detectors automatically activate valves to establish safe conditions in the event of an accident or plant failure. (U.S.)

  17. Experimental techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P.

    2007-01-01

    This lecture presents the experimental techniques, developed in the last 10 or 15 years, in order to perform a new class of experiments with exotic nuclei, where the reactions induced by these nuclei allow to get information on their structure. A brief review of the secondary beams production methods will be given, with some examples of facilities in operation or under project. The important developments performed recently on cryogenic targets will be presented. The different detection systems will be reviewed, both the beam detectors before the targets, and the many kind of detectors necessary to detect all outgoing particles after the reaction: magnetic spectrometer for the heavy fragment, detection systems for the target recoil nucleus, γ detectors. Finally, several typical examples of experiments will be detailed, in order to illustrate the use of each detector either alone, or in coincidence with others. (author)

  18. Combinatorial techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Sane, Sharad S

    2013-01-01

    This is a basic text on combinatorics that deals with all the three aspects of the discipline: tricks, techniques and theory, and attempts to blend them. The book has several distinctive features. Probability and random variables with their interconnections to permutations are discussed. The theme of parity has been specially included and it covers applications ranging from solving the Nim game to the quadratic reciprocity law. Chapters related to geometry include triangulations and Sperner's theorem, classification of regular polytopes, tilings and an introduction to the Eulcidean Ramsey theory. Material on group actions covers Sylow theory, automorphism groups and a classification of finite subgroups of orthogonal groups. All chapters have a large number of exercises with varying degrees of difficulty, ranging from material suitable for Mathematical Olympiads to research.

  19. Two interacting Hofstadter butterflies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, A.; Bellissard, J.; Jacquod, P.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of two interacting particles in a quasiperiodic potential is addressed. Using analytical and numerical methods, we explore the spectral properties and eigenstates structure from the weak to the strong interaction case. More precisely, a semiclassical approach based on noncommutative geometry techniques is used to understand the intricate structure of such a spectrum. An interaction induced localization effect is furthermore emphasized. We discuss the application of our results on a two-dimensional model of two particles in a uniform magnetic field with on-site interaction. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Developing Visualization Techniques for Semantics-based Information Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Hall, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Information systems incorporating complex network structured information spaces with a semantic underpinning - such as hypermedia networks, semantic networks, topic maps, and concept maps - are being deployed to solve some of NASA s critical information management problems. This paper describes some of the human interaction and navigation problems associated with complex semantic information spaces and describes a set of new visual interface approaches to address these problems. A key strategy is to leverage semantic knowledge represented within these information spaces to construct abstractions and views that will be meaningful to the human user. Human-computer interaction methodologies will guide the development and evaluation of these approaches, which will benefit deployed NASA systems and also apply to information systems based on the emerging Semantic Web.

  1. Industrial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    An illustrative embodiment of the invention discloses a technique for disassembling a nuclear reactor fuel element without destroying the individual fuel pins and other structural components from which the element is assembled. A traveling bridge and trolley that span a water-filled spent fuel storage pool support a strongback. The strongback is under water and provides a working surface on which the spent fuel element is placed for inspection and for the manipulation that is associated with disassembly and assembly. To remove, in a non-destructive manner, the grids that hold the fuel pins in the proper relative positions within the element, bars are inserted through apertures in the grids with the aid of special tools. These bars are rotated to flex the adjacent grid walls and, in this way relax the physical engagement between protruding portions of the grid walls and the associated fuel pins. With the grid structure so flexed to relax the physical grip on the individual fuel pins, these pins can be withdrawn for inspection or replacement as necessary without imposing a need to destroy fuel element components. (U.S.)

  2. Interaction Design for and with the Lived Body: Some Implications of Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanæs, Dag

    2013-01-01

    : the active and embodied nature of perception, including the body’s ability to extent its sensory apparatus through digital technology; and (2) kinaesthetic creativity: the body’s ability to relate in a direct and creative fashion with the “feel” dimension of interactive products during the design process....... for his discussion of the bodily nature of embodied interaction. This article extends Dourish’s work to introduce the human-computer interaction community to ideas related to Merleau-Ponty’s concept of the lived body. It also provides a detailed analysis of two related topics: (1) embodied perception...

  3. Intelligent adaptive systems an interaction-centered design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Ming; Burns, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    A synthesis of recent research and developments on intelligent adaptive systems from the HF (human factors) and HCI (human-computer interaction) domains, this book provides integrated design guidance and recommendations for researchers and system developers. It addresses a recognized lack of integration between the HF and HCI research communities, which has led to inconsistencies between the research approaches adopted, and a lack of exploitation of research from one field by the other. The book establishes design guidance through the review of conceptual frameworks, analytical methodologies,

  4. POKEHEAD: An Open Source Interactive Headphone Based HCI Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Trento, Stefano; Goudarzi, Visda

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel interactive, human-computer interface and remote social communication system based on an augmented, hi-fidelity audio headphone platform. Specifically, this system- named Pokehead, currently utilizes the DUL embedded open-source accelerometer platform to gather 3-axis......, open source implementation. Our rapid prototype proved to be robust enough to work in performance for demonstration purposes and serves as a working proof of concept. In this paper we provide a technical description of our prototype, illustrate the context and motivation behind the project, and offer...

  5. Advanced and natural interaction system for motion-impaired users

    OpenAIRE

    Manresa Yee, Cristina Suemay

    2009-01-01

    Human-computer interaction is an important area that searches for better and more comfortable systems to promote communication between humans and machines. Vision-based interfaces can offer a more natural and appealing way of communication. Moreover, it can help in the e-accessibility component of the e-inclusion. The aim is to develop a usable system, that is, the end-user must consider the use of this device effective, efficient and satisfactory. The research's main contribution is SINA, a ...

  6. Grasp interaction with tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  7. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  8. Beam-Material Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N.V.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high- intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target , and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and envir onment in challenging current and future application

  9. Beam-Material Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Cerutti, F. [CERN

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  10. Remote monitoring system for the cryogenic system of superconducting magnets in the SuperKEKB interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K.; Ohuchi, N.; Zong, Z.; Arimoto, Y.; Wang, X.; Yamaoka, H.; Kawai, M.; Kondou, Y.; Makida, Y.; Hirose, M.; Endou, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Nakamura, T.

    2017-12-01

    A remote monitoring system was developed based on the software infrastructure of the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for the cryogenic system of superconducting magnets in the interaction region of the SuperKEKB accelerator. The SuperKEKB has been constructed to conduct high-energy physics experiments at KEK. These superconducting magnets consist of three apparatuses, the Belle II detector solenoid, and QCSL and QCSR accelerator magnets. They are each contained in three cryostats cooled by dedicated helium cryogenic systems. The monitoring system was developed to read data of the EX-8000, which is an integrated instrumentation system to control all cryogenic components. The monitoring system uses the I/O control tools of EPICS software for TCP/IP, archiving techniques using a relational database, and easy human-computer interface. Using this monitoring system, it is possible to remotely monitor all real-time data of the superconducting magnets and cryogenic systems. It is also convenient to share data among multiple groups.

  11. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-08

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowl-edge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subrou-tines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  13. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  14. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro/nano-channel : heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra - Nedea, S.V.; Steenhoven, van A.A.; Markvoort, A.J.; Spijker, P.; Giordano, D.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and

  15. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  16. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  17. Interactive balance training integrating sensor-based visual feedback of movement performance: a pilot study in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Schwenk, Michael; Grewal, Gurtej S; Honarvar, Bahareh; Schwenk, Stefanie; Mohler, Jane; Khalsa, Dharma S; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Background Wearable sensor technology can accurately measure body motion and provide incentive feedback during exercising. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness and user experience of a balance training program in older adults integrating data from wearable sensors into a human-computer interface designed for interactive training. Methods Senior living community residents (mean age 84.6) with confirmed fall risk were randomized to an intervention (IG, n?=?17) or contro...

  18. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  20. FCJ-129 Interaction Designs for Ubicomp Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrik Ekman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a journal issue invested in remarking more than once upon the undecidability hovering today around our getting into contact with ‘ubiquity’ or ‘pervasiveness’ as a potential to be further actualized in the fields of human-computer interaction (HCI, interaction design, and the cultural life worlds of information societies more generally. Affirming this undecidability is a necessity – since both of these alternatives are currently at stake, and since ‘ubiquity’ and ubicomp remain potentialities of whose actualization we are not yet sure, whether this is matter of an explicit articulation of the principal ideas or of the concrete lines of development and research making of this so many hands-on facts inherent in the interactions in our contemporary life worlds. In other words, the focus and special merit of this issue is not least to enter into the set of questions surrounding the notion of ‘interaction designs for ubicomp cultures’ – as something partaking of that which Michel Foucault would have called ‘a history of the present.’ This introduction gives a comprehensive account of current thinking and practice in this contemporary field of research in order to make a difference that makes a difference while the cultural and technical developments at stake are still undecidable, multiple, and emergent – at a fast pace, too.

  1. Development and evaluation of a head-controlled human-computer interface with mouse-like functions for physically disabled users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Martins Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to develop a pointing device controlled by head movement that had the same functions as a conventional mouse and to evaluate the performance of the proposed device when operated by quadriplegic users. METHODS: Ten individuals with cervical spinal cord injury participated in functional evaluations of the developed pointing device. The device consisted of a video camera, computer software, and a target attached to the front part of a cap, which was placed on the user's head. The software captured images of the target coming from the video camera and processed them with the aim of determining the displacement from the center of the target and correlating this with the movement of the computer cursor. Evaluation of the interaction between each user and the proposed device was carried out using 24 multidirectional tests with two degrees of difficulty. RESULTS: According to the parameters of mean throughput and movement time, no statistically significant differences were observed between the repetitions of the tests for either of the studied levels of difficulty. CONCLUSIONS: The developed pointing device adequately emulates the movement functions of the computer cursor. It is easy to use and can be learned quickly when operated by quadriplegic individuals.

  2. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  3. More playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing cost of sensor and actuator technology makes it possible to integrate physical behavior information in human-computer interactions. This leads to many new entertainment and game applications that allow or require social and physical interaction in sensor- and actuator-equipped smart environments. The topics discussed include: human-nature interaction, human-animal interaction and the interaction with tangibles that are naturally integrated in our smart environments. Digitally supported remote audience participation in artistic or sport events is also discussed. One important theme that emerges throughout the book is the involvement of users in the digital-entertainment design process or even design and implement...

  4. The 'Interactive' of Interactive Storytelling: Customizing the Gaming Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bostan , Barbaros; Marsh , Tim

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In this article, we define interactive storytelling as a gaming experience where the form and content of the game is customized in real time and tailored to the preferences and needs of the player to maximixe enjoyment. The primary focus of interactive storytelling should not be on the attributes of the technology or characteristics of the medium, such as the AI techniques, planning formalisms, story representations, etc. but on different interaction levels provided by...

  5. Narrative Cognition in Interactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio; Baceviciute, Sarune; Arief, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore some of the methodological problems related to characterizing cognitive aspects of involvement with interactive narratives using well known EEG/ERP techniques. To exemplify this, we construct an experimental EEG-ERP set-up with an interactive narrative that considers th...

  6. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  7. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  8. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  9. The application of isotopic (32P and 15N) dilution techniques to evaluate the interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria, mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium to improve the agronomic efficiency of rock phosphate for legume crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barea, J.M.; Toro, M.; Azcon, R.; Orozco, M.O.; Campos, E.; Azcon, R.

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of multifunctional microbial inoculation treatments and rock phosphate (RP) application on N and P uptake by alfalfa through the use of 15 N and 32 P isotopic dilution approaches. The microbial inocula consisted of a wild type (WT) Rhizobium meliloti strain, the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and a phosphate solubilizing rhizobacterium (Enterobacter sp.). Inoculated microorganisms were established in the root tissues and/or in the rhizosphere soil of alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L.). Improvements in N and P accumulation in alfalfa corroborate beneficial effects of Rhizobium and AM interactions. Inoculation with selected rhizobacteria improved the AM effect on N or P accumulation in both the RP-added soil and in the non RP-amended controls. Measurements of the 15 N/ 14 N ratio in plant shoots indicate an enhancement of the N 2 fixation rates in Rhizobium-inoculated AM-plants, over that achieved by Rhizobium in non-mycorrhizal plants. Whether or not RP was added, AM-inoculated plants showed a lower specific activity ( 32 P/ 31 P) than did their comparable non-mycorrhizal controls, suggesting that the plant was using otherwise unavailable P sources. The phosphate-solubilizing, AM-associated, microbiota could in fact release phosphate ions, either from the added RP or from the indigenous 'less-available' soil phosphate. A low Ca concentrations in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. Under field conditions, the inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased plant biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria improved mycorrhizal responses in soil dually receiving RP and organic matter amendments. Organic matter addition favoured RP solubilization. This, together with a tailored microbial inoculation, increased the agronomic efficiency of RP in the test soil that was Ca deficient at neutral

  10. The application of isotopic ({sup 32}P and {sup 15}N) dilution techniques to evaluate the interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria, mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium to improve the agronomic efficiency of rock phosphate for legume crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barea, J.M. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain)]. E-mail: jmbarea@eez.csic.es; Toro, M.; Azcon, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain); Orozco, M.O. [Instituto de Sistematica y Ecologia, Academia Cubana de Ciencias, Habana (Cuba); Campos, E. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y Quimica Ambiental Estacion Experimental del Zaidin (CSIC), Granada (Spain); Azcon, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain)

    2002-05-15

    A pot experiment was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of multifunctional microbial inoculation treatments and rock phosphate (RP) application on N and P uptake by alfalfa through the use of {sup 15}N and {sup 32}P isotopic dilution approaches. The microbial inocula consisted of a wild type (WT) Rhizobium meliloti strain, the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and a phosphate solubilizing rhizobacterium (Enterobacter sp.). Inoculated microorganisms were established in the root tissues and/or in the rhizosphere soil of alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L.). Improvements in N and P accumulation in alfalfa corroborate beneficial effects of Rhizobium and AM interactions. Inoculation with selected rhizobacteria improved the AM effect on N or P accumulation in both the RP-added soil and in the non RP-amended controls. Measurements of the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N ratio in plant shoots indicate an enhancement of the N{sub 2} fixation rates in Rhizobium-inoculated AM-plants, over that achieved by Rhizobium in non-mycorrhizal plants. Whether or not RP was added, AM-inoculated plants showed a lower specific activity ({sup 32}P/{sup 31}P) than did their comparable non-mycorrhizal controls, suggesting that the plant was using otherwise unavailable P sources. The phosphate-solubilizing, AM-associated, microbiota could in fact release phosphate ions, either from the added RP or from the indigenous 'less-available' soil phosphate. A low Ca concentrations in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. Under field conditions, the inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased plant biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria improved mycorrhizal responses in soil dually receiving RP and organic matter amendments. Organic matter addition favoured RP solubilization. This, together with a tailored microbial inoculation, increased the agronomic efficiency of RP in the

  11. Mixed Interaction Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas; Eriksson, E.; Hansen, T.R.

    In this paper, we describe a new interaction technique for mobile devices named Mixed Interaction Space that uses the camera of the mobile device to track the position, size and rotation of a fixed-point. In this demonstration we will present a system that uses a hand-drawn circle, colored object...... or a person’s face as a fixed-point to determine the location of the device. We use these features as a 4 dimensional input vector to a set of different applications....

  12. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  13. Means of Question-Answer Interaction for Collaborative Development Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Sosnin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of successful developing of the software intensive system (SIS is adequate conceptual interactions of stakeholders at the early stages of designing. Nowadays the success of development is extremely low. It can be increased with using artificial intelligence (AI means including models of reasoning supported by the human-computer interaction in collaborative development activity. In this paper, a number of question-answer means for modeling reasoning are suggested. Such kind of means is defined and implemented in order to get effects of integrating the collective reasoning for their positive influence on the intellectual activity of designers. Question-answer means are arranged as a specialized processor opening the possibility to question-answer programming of the tasks on the conceptual stage of designing. Suggested and investigated means can be used for solving any complicated task.

  14. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  15. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  16. Novel Techniques for Quantum State Manipulation in Mesoscopic Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lukin, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    ...-out. We showed how realistic charge manipulation and measurement techniques, combined with the exchange interaction, allowed for the robust generation and purification of four particle spin entangled...

  17. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Studying of cellular interaction of hairpin-like peptide EcAMP1 from barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L.) seeds with plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani using microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Alexey S; Yuryev, Mikhail; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Yu; Zavriev, Sergey K; Feofanov, Alexey V; Grishin, Eugene V; Rogozhin, Eugene A

    2016-11-01

    An interaction of recombinant hairpin-like cationic peptide EcAMP1 with conidia of plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani at the cellular level was studied by a combination of microscopic methods. EcAMP1 is from barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L.), and obtained by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli system. As a result, a direct relationship between hyphal growth inhibition and increasing active peptide concentration, time of incubation and fungal physiological condition has been determined. Dynamics of accumulation and redistribution of the peptide studied on fungal cellular cover and inside the conidia cells has been shown. The dynamics are dependent on time of coupling, as well as, a dissimilarity of EcAMP1 binding with cover of fungal conidia and its stepwise accumulation and diffuse localization in the cytoplasm. Correlation between structural disruption of fungal conidia and the presence of morphological changes has also been found. The correlation was found under the influence of peptide high concentrations at concentrations above 32 μM. The results indicate the presence of a binding of EcAMP1 with the surface of fungal conidia, thus, demonstrating a main specificity for its antifungal action at the cellular level. These results, however, cannot exclude the existence of attendant EcAMP1 action based on its intracellular localization on some specific targets. SCANNING 38:591-598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cogeneration techniques; Les techniques de cogeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    This dossier about cogeneration techniques comprises 12 parts dealing successively with: the advantages of cogeneration (examples of installations, electrical and thermal efficiency); the combustion turbine (principle, performances, types); the alternative internal combustion engines (principle, types, rotation speed, comparative performances); the different configurations of cogeneration installations based on alternative engines and based on steam turbines (coal, heavy fuel and natural gas-fueled turbines); the environmental constraints of combustion turbines (pollutants, techniques of reduction of pollutant emissions); the environmental constraints of alternative internal combustion engines (gas and diesel engines); cogeneration and energy saving; the techniques of reduction of pollutant emissions (pollutants, unburnt hydrocarbons, primary and secondary (catalytic) techniques, post-combustion); the most-advanced configurations of cogeneration installations for enhanced performances (counter-pressure turbines, massive steam injection cycles, turbo-chargers); comparison between the performances of the different cogeneration techniques; the tri-generation technique (compression and absorption cycles). (J.S.)

  20. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  1. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  2. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  3. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  4. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  5. Seven-step problem-based learning in an interaction design course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step PBL procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction de...... others in a single course. The evaluation results showed that the students definitely took a deep approach to learning, and indicated clearly that the students had obtained competences not only within the traditional HCI curriculum but also in terms of team-work skills.......The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step PBL procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction...... individual reports after each case in the PBL-process in order to explore the students’ inter- and intra-personal team skills development in the learning process. Different qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods have been used to obtain a thorough evaluation of PBL used as a learning method among...

  6. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  7. Interactive Sample Book (ISB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen; Lenau, Torben Anker; Guglielmi, Michel

    2009-01-01

    supervisor Torben A. Lenau. Inspiration to use smart materials Interactive textiles are still quite an unknown phenomenon to many. It is thus often difficult to communicate what kind of potentials lie within these materials. This is why the ISB project was started, as a practice based research project...... and senses in relation to integrated decoration and function primarily to indoor applications. The result of the project will be a number of interactive textiles, to be gathered in an interactive sample book (ISB), in a similar way as the sample books of wallpapers one can take home from the shop and choose...... from. In other words, it is a kind of display material, which in a simple manner can illustrate how different techniques and smart materials work. The sample book should display a number of possibilities where sensor technology, smart materials and textiles are mixed to such an extent that the textile...

  8. Challenges for Virtual Humans in Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Ruttkay, Z.M.; Huang, T; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.

    The vision of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) presumes a plethora of embedded services and devices that all endeavor to support humans in their daily activities as unobtrusively as possible. Hardware gets distributed throughout the environment, occupying even the fabric of our clothing. The environment

  9. Authentication techniques for smart cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    Smart card systems are most cost efficient when implemented as a distributed system, which is a system without central host interaction or a local database of card numbers for verifying transaction approval. A distributed system, as such, presents special card and user authentication problems. Fortunately, smart cards offer processing capabilities that provide solutions to authentication problems, provided the system is designed with proper data integrity measures. Smart card systems maintain data integrity through a security design that controls data sources and limits data changes. A good security design is usually a result of a system analysis that provides a thorough understanding of the application needs. Once designers understand the application, they may specify authentication techniques that mitigate the risk of system compromise or failure. Current authentication techniques include cryptography, passwords, challenge/response protocols, and biometrics. The security design includes these techniques to help prevent counterfeit cards, unauthorized use, or information compromise. This paper discusses card authentication and user identity techniques that enhance security for microprocessor card systems. It also describes the analysis process used for determining proper authentication techniques for a system

  10. Photoion spectroscopy of atoms using coincidence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayaishi, Tatsuji

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of atoms or molecules with photons causes many effects which are often obscured because of many decay paths from the event. To pick up an effect in the mixed-up ones, it is necessary to observe the decay path arising the effect alone. There is a coincidence technique in one of experimental means for the purpose of observing the decay path. In this article, two coincidence measurements are presented; a photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique and a threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique. Furthermore, experimental facts of rare gases atoms obtained by the techniques are reviewed. (author)

  11. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    The dissertation has been divided into two parts to accurately reflect the two distinct areas of interest pursued during my matriculation in the School of Pharmacy at West Virginia University. In Part I, I discuss research probing the nature of electron transfer in the Cytochrome P450 family of proteins, a group of proteins well-known for their role in drug metabolism. In Part II, I focus on in silico and in vitro work developed in concert to probe protein structure and protein-protein interactions involved in actin filament reorganization and cellular motility. Part I. Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are an important class of enzymes known to metabolize a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. P450s are most commonly found in liver and intestinal endothelial cells and are responsible for the metabolism of approximately 75% of pharmaceutical drugs on the market. CYP2C9---one of the six major P450 isoforms---is responsible for ˜20% of drug metabolism. Elucidation of the factors that affect in vitro drug metabolism is crucial to the accurate prediction of in vivo drug metabolism kinetics. Currently, the two major techniques for studying in vitro drug metabolism are solution-based. However, it is known that the results of solution-based studies can vary from in vivo drug metabolism. One reason suggested to account for this variation is the state of P450 oligomer formation in solution compared to the in vivo environment, where P450s are membrane-bound. To understand the details of how oligomer formation affects in vitro drug metabolism, it is imperative that techniques be developed which will allow for the unequivocal control of oligomer formation without altering other experimental parameters. Our long term goal of this research is to develop methods to more accurately predict in vivo drug metabolism from in vitro data. This section of the dissertation will discuss the development of a platform consisting of a doped silicon surface containing a large array of gold

  12. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  13. Multiquark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk'yanov, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    To study multiquark interactions (MQI) the data of experiments confirming the presence of 3q, 6q, 12q states in interacting nuclear nucleons, in hadron- and lepton-nuclear processes at high energies and high momentum transfers are considered. Experimental data on cumulative processes pointing to the existence of MQI are analyzed. Two-channel model of a nucleus (the model of interacting nucleons) in the theory of coupled channels is discussed. The behaviour of form factor of deuteron and NQI (6q) contributions to ed scattering as well as deep inelastic scattering on nuclei are studied. The data known as EMC effect are discussed. It is pointed out that introduction of the notion MQI and consideration of a nucleus as a system of nucleons with a low MQI addition will help to explain such processes as cumulative reactions, form factors of a deuteron and light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering on nuclei

  14. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  15. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  16. Interacting binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, P.P.; Pringle, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains 15 review articles in the field of binary stars. The subjects reviewed span considerably, from the shortest period of interacting binaries to the longest, symbiotic stars. Also included are articles on Algols, X-ray binaries and Wolf-Rayet stars (single and binary). Contents: Preface. List of Participants. Activity of Contact Binary Systems. Wolf-Rayet Stars and Binarity. Symbiotic Stars. Massive X-ray Binaries. Stars that go Hump in the Night: The SU UMa Stars. Interacting Binaries - Summing Up

  17. RJSplot: Interactive Graphs with R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, David; Prieto, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Data visualization techniques provide new methods for the generation of interactive graphs. These graphs allow a better exploration and interpretation of data but their creation requires advanced knowledge of graphical libraries. Recent packages have enabled the integration of interactive graphs in R. However, R provides limited graphical packages that allow the generation of interactive graphs for computational biology applications. The present project has joined the analytical power of R with the interactive graphical features of JavaScript in a new R package (RJSplot). It enables the easy generation of interactive graphs in R, provides new visualization capabilities, and contributes to the advance of computational biology analytical methods. At present, 16 interactive graphics are available in RJSplot, such as the genome viewer, Manhattan plots, 3D plots, heatmaps, dendrograms, networks, and so on. The RJSplot package is freely available online at http://rjsplot.net. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  19. Training techniques for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of commonly used training techniques in relation to cost-effective, prevention-oriented Quality Assurance are examined. Important questions are whether training techniques teach cost effectiveness and whether the techniques are, themselves, cost effective. To answer these questions, criteria for evaluating teaching techniques for cost effectiveness were developd, and then commonly used techniques are evaluated in terms of specific training program objectives. Motivation of personnel is also considered important to the success of a training program, and methods are outlined by which recognition of the academic quality of industrial training can be used as a motivational technique

  20. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Kolar, P.; Kundrat, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e + e - and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J