WorldWideScience

Sample records for human-computer dialog system

  1. Human-Centered Design of Human-Computer-Human Dialogs in Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of ongoing research programs at Georgia Tech established a need for a simulation support tool for aircraft computer-based aids. This led to the design and development of the Georgia Tech Electronic Flight Instrument Research Tool (GT-EFIRT). GT-EFIRT is a part-task flight simulator specifically designed to study aircraft display design and single pilot interaction. ne simulator, using commercially available graphics and Unix workstations, replicates to a high level of fidelity the Electronic Flight Instrument Systems (EFIS), Flight Management Computer (FMC) and Auto Flight Director System (AFDS) of the Boeing 757/767 aircraft. The simulator can be configured to present information using conventional looking B757n67 displays or next generation Primary Flight Displays (PFD) such as found on the Beech Starship and MD-11.

  2. Situated dialog in speech-based human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Raux, Antoine; Lane, Ian; Misu, Teruhisa

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a survey of the state-of-the-art in the practical implementation of Spoken Dialog Systems for applications in everyday settings. It includes contributions on key topics in situated dialog interaction from a number of leading researchers and offers a broad spectrum of perspectives on research and development in the area. In particular, it presents applications in robotics, knowledge access and communication and covers the following topics: dialog for interacting with robots; language understanding and generation; dialog architectures and modeling; core technologies; and the analysis of human discourse and interaction. The contributions are adapted and expanded contributions from the 2014 International Workshop on Spoken Dialog Systems (IWSDS 2014), where researchers and developers from industry and academia alike met to discuss and compare their implementation experiences, analyses and empirical findings.

  3. Fourth International Workshop on Spoken Dialog Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rosset, Sophie; Garnier-Rizet, Martine; Devillers, Laurence; Natural Interaction with Robots, Knowbots and Smartphones : Putting Spoken Dialog Systems into Practice

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings presents the state-of-the-art in spoken dialog systems with applications in robotics, knowledge access and communication. It addresses specifically: 1. Dialog for interacting with smartphones; 2. Dialog for Open Domain knowledge access; 3. Dialog for robot interaction; 4. Mediated dialog (including crosslingual dialog involving Speech Translation); and, 5. Dialog quality evaluation. These articles were presented at the IWSDS 2012 workshop.

  4. Towards Adaptive Spoken Dialog Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In Monitoring Adaptive Spoken Dialog Systems, authors Alexander Schmitt and Wolfgang Minker investigate statistical approaches that allow for recognition of negative dialog patterns in Spoken Dialog Systems (SDS). The presented stochastic methods allow a flexible, portable and  accurate use.  Beginning with the foundations of machine learning and pattern recognition, this monograph examines how frequently users show negative emotions in spoken dialog systems and develop novel approaches to speech-based emotion recognition using hybrid approach to model emotions. The authors make use of statistical methods based on acoustic, linguistic and contextual features to examine the relationship between the interaction flow and the occurrence of emotions using non-acted  recordings several thousand real users from commercial and non-commercial SDS. Additionally, the authors present novel statistical methods that spot problems within a dialog based on interaction patterns. The approaches enable future SDS to offer m...

  5. Utility of spoken dialog systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barnard, E

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercial successes of spoken dialog systems in the developed world provide encouragement for their use in the developing world, where speech could play a role in the dissemination of relevant information in local languages. We investigate...

  6. Care and Conversing in Dialogical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Sune Vork

    2012-01-01

    This article promotes a point of view on human interaction in terms of dialogical systems. The approach draws on recent, so-called third wave, developments in cognitive science. After an introduction to three waves in cognitive science, and their counterparts in linguistics, the article is placed...... in a tradition that is ecological, embodied and distributed. Its specific take on human interaction pursues these perspectives by claiming that language can neither be reduced to social rules in the micro-sociological domain, nor to biological properties of the individual being. As an alternative to these two...... positions, a theory of dialogical systems is developed, on the basis of current thinking within the enactive program (e.g. De Jaegher and Di Paolo, 2007), the distributed language movement (e.g. Cowley, 2011b), and values-realizing theory (e.g. Hodges, 2009). Dialogical systems are systems of co...

  7. A Dynamic Dialog System Using Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    A dialog system or a conversational agent provides a means for a human to interact with a computer system. Dialog systems use text, voice and other means to carry out conversations with humans in order to achieve some objective. Most dialog systems are created with specific objectives in mind and consist of preprogrammed conversations. The primary…

  8. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  9. Human-computer interaction and management information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    ""Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Applications"" offers state-of-the-art research by a distinguished set of authors who span the MIS and HCI fields. The original chapters provide authoritative commentaries and in-depth descriptions of research programs that will guide 21st century scholars, graduate students, and industry professionals. Human-Computer Interaction (or Human Factors) in MIS is concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. It is distinctiv

  10. Estimating Spoken Dialog System Quality with User Models

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spoken dialog systems have the potential to offer highly intuitive user interfaces, as they allow systems to be controlled using natural language. However, the complexity inherent in natural language dialogs means that careful testing of the system must be carried out from the very beginning of the design process.   This book examines how user models can be used to support such early evaluations in two ways:  by running simulations of dialogs, and by estimating the quality judgments of users. First, a design environment supporting the creation of dialog flows, the simulation of dialogs, and the analysis of the simulated data is proposed.  How the quality of user simulations may be quantified with respect to their suitability for both formative and summative evaluation is then discussed. The remainder of the book is dedicated to the problem of predicting quality judgments of users based on interaction data. New modeling approaches are presented, which process the dialogs as sequences, and which allow knowl...

  11. An intelligent multi-media human-computer dialogue system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J. G.; Bettinger, K. E.; Byoun, J. S.; Dobes, Z.; Thielman, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sophisticated computer systems are being developed to assist in the human decision-making process for very complex tasks performed under stressful conditions. The human-computer interface is a critical factor in these systems. The human-computer interface should be simple and natural to use, require a minimal learning period, assist the user in accomplishing his task(s) with a minimum of distraction, present output in a form that best conveys information to the user, and reduce cognitive load for the user. In pursuit of this ideal, the Intelligent Multi-Media Interfaces project is devoted to the development of interface technology that integrates speech, natural language text, graphics, and pointing gestures for human-computer dialogues. The objective of the project is to develop interface technology that uses the media/modalities intelligently in a flexible, context-sensitive, and highly integrated manner modelled after the manner in which humans converse in simultaneous coordinated multiple modalities. As part of the project, a knowledge-based interface system, called CUBRICON (CUBRC Intelligent CONversationalist) is being developed as a research prototype. The application domain being used to drive the research is that of military tactical air control.

  12. Safety Metrics for Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveson, Nancy G; Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems.This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  13. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aĺvaro; Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez de Gorostiza; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-07-03

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human-robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human-robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications.

  14. Human-computer systems interaction backgrounds and applications 3

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikowski, Juliusz; Mroczek, Teresa; Wtorek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    This book contains an interesting and state-of the art collection of papers on the recent progress in Human-Computer System Interaction (H-CSI). It contributes the profound description of the actual status of the H-CSI field and also provides a solid base for further development and research in the discussed area. The contents of the book are divided into the following parts: I. General human-system interaction problems; II. Health monitoring and disabled people helping systems; and III. Various information processing systems. This book is intended for a wide audience of readers who are not necessarily experts in computer science, machine learning or knowledge engineering, but are interested in Human-Computer Systems Interaction. The level of particular papers and specific spreading-out into particular parts is a reason why this volume makes fascinating reading. This gives the reader a much deeper insight than he/she might glean from research papers or talks at conferences. It touches on all deep issues that ...

  15. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human–Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aívaro; de Gorostiza Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human–robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human–robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications. PMID:26151202

  16. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human–Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alonso-Martín

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human–robot interaction (HRI, to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS, which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written text; and (ii a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot’s pro-activeness during a human–robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction. Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications.

  17. Human-Computer Interaction with Medical Decisions Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolf, Jurine A.; Holden, Kritina L.

    1994-01-01

    Decision Support Systems (DSSs) have been available to medical diagnosticians for some time, yet their acceptance and use have not increased with advances in technology and availability of DSS tools. Medical DSSs will be necessary on future long duration space missions, because access to medical resources and personnel will be limited. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) experts at NASA's Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory (HFEL) have been working toward understanding how humans use DSSs, with the goal of being able to identify and solve the problems associated with these systems. Work to date consists of identification of HCI research areas, development of a decision making model, and completion of two experiments dealing with 'anchoring'. Anchoring is a phenomenon in which the decision maker latches on to a starting point and does not make sufficient adjustments when new data are presented. HFEL personnel have replicated a well-known anchoring experiment and have investigated the effects of user level of knowledge. Future work includes further experimentation on level of knowledge, confidence in the source of information and sequential decision making.

  18. Health dialog systems for patients and consumers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bickmore, Timothy; Giorgino, Toni

    2006-01-01

    .... This article provides an overview of the theories, technologies and methodologies that are used in the construction and evaluation of these systems, along with a description of many of the systems...

  19. A Software Framework for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a software framework we designed and implemented for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface. The proposed framework is based on publish / subscribe architecture, which allows developers and researchers to conveniently configure, test and

  20. Curso Introductorio sobre el Sistema DIALOG (Introductory Course on the DIALOG System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ketty

    As an introduction to the use of the DIALOG online retrieval service, this guide presents material that was developed during a fellowship at Carlos III University, School of Library Science and Documentation, Madrid (Spain) and that is based on a course on the same subject taught in English at Texas Women's University. Although the use of DIALOG…

  1. Meaning Emergence in the Ecology of Dialogical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasmundi, S. B.; Steffensen, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an empirically based theoretical contribution to the investigation of meaningmaking in the ecology of human interaction and interactivity. It presents an ecological perspective on meaning-making that pivots on how agents pick up information directly in their organism-environment-system...... Analysis to investigate how the agents oscillate between being a multi-agent-system with shared, tightly coordinated agency and a loosely coupled dialogical system where the individuals bring forth an understanding based on their professional backgrounds and expertise. On this view, an ecological approach...... to meaning-making takes a starting point in how local interaction is constrained by previous events, emergent affordances in the environment, and real-time inter-bodily dynamics. Accordingly, meaning-making is seen as a joint activity emerging from the system's coordinative actions rather than as a result...

  2. Foreign Language Tutoring in Oral Conversations Using Spoken Dialog Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungjin; Noh, Hyungjong; Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Kyusong; Lee, Gary Geunbae

    Although there have been enormous investments into English education all around the world, not many differences have been made to change the English instruction style. Considering the shortcomings for the current teaching-learning methodology, we have been investigating advanced computer-assisted language learning (CALL) systems. This paper aims at summarizing a set of POSTECH approaches including theories, technologies, systems, and field studies and providing relevant pointers. On top of the state-of-the-art technologies of spoken dialog system, a variety of adaptations have been applied to overcome some problems caused by numerous errors and variations naturally produced by non-native speakers. Furthermore, a number of methods have been developed for generating educational feedback that help learners develop to be proficient. Integrating these efforts resulted in intelligent educational robots — Mero and Engkey — and virtual 3D language learning games, Pomy. To verify the effects of our approaches on students' communicative abilities, we have conducted a field study at an elementary school in Korea. The results showed that our CALL approaches can be enjoyable and fruitful activities for students. Although the results of this study bring us a step closer to understanding computer-based education, more studies are needed to consolidate the findings.

  3. Interaction in Information Systems - Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and analyze the role of interaction in information systems. Interaction represents dynamic relations between actors and other elements in information systems. We introduce a semi-formal notation that we use to describe a set of interaction patterns and we i...

  4. Psychosocial and Cultural Modeling in Human Computation Systems: A Gamification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Haack, Jereme N.; Butner, R. Scott

    2013-11-20

    “Gamification”, the application of gameplay to real-world problems, enables the development of human computation systems that support decision-making through the integration of social and machine intelligence. One of gamification’s major benefits includes the creation of a problem solving environment where the influence of cognitive and cultural biases on human judgment can be curtailed through collaborative and competitive reasoning. By reducing biases on human judgment, gamification allows human computation systems to exploit human creativity relatively unhindered by human error. Operationally, gamification uses simulation to harvest human behavioral data that provide valuable insights for the solution of real-world problems.

  5. HCI^2 Workbench: A Development Tool for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Wenzhe, Shi; Pantic, Maja

    In this paper, we present a novel software tool designed and implemented to simplify the development process of Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction (MHCI) systems. This tool, which is called the HCI^2 Workbench, exploits a Publish / Subscribe (P/S) architecture [13] [14] to facilitate efficient

  6. HCI^2 Framework: A software framework for multimodal human-computer interaction systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel software framework for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface (MHCI) systems. The proposed software framework, which is called the HCI∧2 Framework, is built upon publish/subscribe (P/S) architecture. It implements a

  7. Portable tongue-supported human computer interaction system design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quain, Rohan; Khan, Masood Mehmood

    2014-01-01

    Tongue supported human-computer interaction (TSHCI) systems can help critically ill patients interact with both computers and people. These systems can be particularly useful for patients suffering injuries above C7 on their spinal vertebrae. Despite recent successes in their application, several limitations restrict performance of existing TSHCI systems and discourage their use in real life situations. This paper proposes a low-cost, less-intrusive, portable and easy to use design for implementing a TSHCI system. Two applications of the proposed system are reported. Design considerations and performance of the proposed system are also presented.

  8. Development of a hand-gesture recognition system for human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Maqueda Nieto, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this Master Thesis is the analysis, design and development of a robust and reliable Human-Computer Interaction interface, based on visual hand-gesture recognition. The implementation of the required functions is oriented to the simulation of a classical hardware interaction device: the mouse, by recognizing a specific hand-gesture vocabulary in color video sequences. For this purpose, a prototype of a hand-gesture recognition system has been designed and implemented, which is c...

  9. Sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barea, Rafael; Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Ortega, Sergio; López, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes.

  10. A Model-based Framework for Risk Assessment in Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems. This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions. Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  11. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  12. A Test for Theoretical Integration: Systems Theory Framework and Dialogical Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlveen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The Systems Theory Framework (STF) is presented as an integrating and organising concept for the predominant theories of career. In order to test the integrative capacity of the STF, this research merges the STF's theoretical element of story with the Theory of Dialogical Self's model of personality. Implications for the practice of career…

  13. Computational Virtual Reality (VR) as a human-computer interface in the operation of telerobotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejczy, Antal K.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the application of computer graphics or 'virtual reality' (VR) techniques as a human-computer interface tool in the operation of telerobotic systems. VR techniques offer very valuable task realization aids for planning, previewing and predicting robotic actions, operator training, and for visual perception of non-visible events like contact forces in robotic tasks. The utility of computer graphics in telerobotic operation can be significantly enhanced by high-fidelity calibration of virtual reality images to actual TV camera images. This calibration will even permit the creation of artificial (synthetic) views of task scenes for which no TV camera views are available.

  14. Dialogic pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    –student communication, the dialogic approach is more egalitarian and focuses on the discourse exchange between the parties. Authors explore connections between dialogic pedagogy and sociocultural learning theory, and argue that dialogic interaction between teacher and learners is vital if instruction is to lead...

  15. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  16. Applying systemic-structural activity theory to design of human-computer interaction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bedny, Gregory Z; Bedny, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has gained recognition as an important field in ergonomics. HCI draws on ideas and theoretical concepts from computer science, psychology, industrial design, and other fields. Human-Computer Interaction is no longer limited to trained software users. Today people interact with various devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and laptops. How can you make such interaction user friendly, even when user proficiency levels vary? This book explores methods for assessing the psychological complexity of computer-based tasks. It also p

  17. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  18. Human-Computer Interface Development: Concepts and Systems for its Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hartson, H. Rex; Hix, Deborah

    1986-01-01

    Human-computer interface management, from a computer science viewpoint, focuses on the process of developing quality human computer interfaces, including their representation, design, implementation, execution, evaluation, and maintenance. This survey presents important concepts of interface management: dialogue independence, structural modeling, specification, rapid prototyping, holistic software engineering, control structures, and support environments, including User Interface Management S...

  19. HCI∧2 framework: a software framework for multimodal human-computer interaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel software framework for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface (MHCI) systems. The proposed software framework, which is called the HCI∧2 Framework, is built upon publish/subscribe (P/S) architecture. It implements a shared-memory-based data transport protocol for message delivery and a TCP-based system management protocol. The latter ensures that the integrity of system structure is maintained at runtime. With the inclusion of bridging modules, the HCI∧2 Framework is interoperable with other software frameworks including Psyclone and ActiveMQ. In addition to the core communication middleware, we also present the integrated development environment (IDE) of the HCI∧2 Framework. It provides a complete graphical environment to support every step in a typical MHCI system development process, including module development, debugging, packaging, and management, as well as the whole system management and testing. The quantitative evaluation indicates that our framework outperforms other similar tools in terms of average message latency and maximum data throughput under a typical single PC scenario. To demonstrate HCI∧2 Framework's capabilities in integrating heterogeneous modules, we present several example modules working with a variety of hardware and software. We also present an example of a full system developed using the proposed HCI∧2 Framework, which is called the CamGame system and represents a computer game based on hand-held marker(s) and low-cost camera(s).

  20. A Novel Wearable Forehead EOG Measurement System for Human Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jeong; Yoon, Heenam; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-06-23

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients whose voluntary muscles are paralyzed commonly communicate with the outside world using eye movement. There have been many efforts to support this method of communication by tracking or detecting eye movement. An electrooculogram (EOG), an electro-physiological signal, is generated by eye movements and can be measured with electrodes placed around the eye. In this study, we proposed a new practical electrode position on the forehead to measure EOG signals, and we developed a wearable forehead EOG measurement system for use in Human Computer/Machine interfaces (HCIs/HMIs). Four electrodes, including the ground electrode, were placed on the forehead. The two channels were arranged vertically and horizontally, sharing a positive electrode. Additionally, a real-time eye movement classification algorithm was developed based on the characteristics of the forehead EOG. Three applications were employed to evaluate the proposed system: a virtual keyboard using a modified Bremen BCI speller and an automatic sequential row-column scanner, and a drivable power wheelchair. The mean typing speeds of the modified Bremen brain-computer interface (BCI) speller and automatic row-column scanner were 10.81 and 7.74 letters per minute, and the mean classification accuracies were 91.25% and 95.12%, respectively. In the power wheelchair demonstration, the user drove the wheelchair through an 8-shape course without collision with obstacles.

  1. An Human-Computer Interactive Augmented Reality System for Coronary Artery Diagnosis Planning and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiming; Huang, Chen; Lv, Shengqing; Li, Zeyu; Chen, Yimin; Ma, Lizhuang

    2017-09-02

    In order to let the doctor carry on the coronary artery diagnosis and preoperative planning in a more intuitive and more natural way, and to improve the training effect for interns, an augmented reality system for coronary artery diagnosis planning and training (ARS-CADPT) is designed and realized in this paper. At first, a 3D reconstruction algorithm based on computed tomographic (CT) images is proposed to model the coronary artery vessels (CAV). Secondly, the algorithms of static gesture recognition and dynamic gesture spotting and recognition are presented to realize the real-time and friendly human-computer interaction (HCI), which is the characteristic of ARS-CADPT. Thirdly, a Sort-First parallel rendering and splicing display subsystem is developed, which greatly expands the capacity of student users. The experimental results show that, with the use of ARS-CADPT, the reconstruction accuracy of CAV model is high, the HCI is natural and fluent, and the visual effect is good. In a word, the system fully meets the application requirement.

  2. Categorisation of visualisation methods to support the design of Human-Computer Interaction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Katie; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    During the design of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, the creation of visual artefacts forms an important part of design. On one hand producing a visual artefact has a number of advantages: it helps designers to externalise their thought and acts as a common language between different stakeholders. On the other hand, if an inappropriate visualisation method is employed it could hinder the design process. To support the design of HCI systems, this paper reviews the categorisation of visualisation methods used in HCI. A keyword search is conducted to identify a) current HCI design methods, b) approaches of selecting these methods. The resulting design methods are filtered to create a list of just visualisation methods. These are then categorised using the approaches identified in (b). As a result 23 HCI visualisation methods are identified and categorised in 5 selection approaches (The Recipient, Primary Purpose, Visual Archetype, Interaction Type, and The Design Process). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The design of an intelligent human-computer interface for the test, control and monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaff, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The graphical intelligence and assistance capabilities of a human-computer interface for the Test, Control, and Monitor System at Kennedy Space Center are explored. The report focuses on how a particular commercial off-the-shelf graphical software package, Data Views, can be used to produce tools that build widgets such as menus, text panels, graphs, icons, windows, and ultimately complete interfaces for monitoring data from an application; controlling an application by providing input data to it; and testing an application by both monitoring and controlling it. A complete set of tools for building interfaces is described in a manual for the TCMS toolkit. Simple tools create primitive widgets such as lines, rectangles and text strings. Intermediate level tools create pictographs from primitive widgets, and connect processes to either text strings or pictographs. Other tools create input objects; Data Views supports output objects directly, thus output objects are not considered. Finally, a set of utilities for executing, monitoring use, editing, and displaying the content of interfaces is included in the toolkit.

  4. A Multimodal Dialog System for Language Assessment: Current State and Future Directions. Research Report. ETS RR-17-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suendermann-Oeft, David; Ramanarayanan, Vikram; Yu, Zhou; Qian, Yao; Evanini, Keelan; Lange, Patrick; Wang, Xinhao; Zechner, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We present work in progress on a multimodal dialog system for English language assessment using a modular cloud-based architecture adhering to open industry standards. Among the modules being developed for the system, multiple modules heavily exploit machine learning techniques, including speech recognition, spoken language proficiency rating,…

  5. Making intelligent systems team players: Case studies and design issues. Volume 1: Human-computer interaction design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Woods, David D.; Potter, Scott S.; Johannesen, Leila; Holloway, Matthew; Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Initial results are reported from a multi-year, interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. The objective is to achieve more effective human-computer interaction (HCI) for systems with real time fault management capabilities. Intelligent fault management systems within the NASA were evaluated for insight into the design of systems with complex HCI. Preliminary results include: (1) a description of real time fault management in aerospace domains; (2) recommendations and examples for improving intelligent systems design and user interface design; (3) identification of issues requiring further research; and (4) recommendations for a development methodology integrating HCI design into intelligent system design.

  6. Dialogical Preaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard

    Experiences of otherness and difference play a central role in human communication as well as in theological descriptions of the relationship between God and humans. Marlene Ringgaard Lorensen explores preaching in light of Bakhtinian theories of dialogicity and carnivalization and suggests ways ...

  7. A mobile Nursing Information System based on human-computer interaction design for improving quality of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Wei; Liu, Cheng-Li

    2012-06-01

    A conventional Nursing Information System (NIS), which supports the role of nurse in some areas, is typically deployed as an immobile system. However, the traditional information system can't response to patients' conditions in real-time, causing delays on the availability of this information. With the advances of information technology, mobile devices are increasingly being used to extend the human mind's limited capacity to recall and process large numbers of relevant variables and to support information management, general administration, and clinical practice. Unfortunately, there have been few studies about the combination of a well-designed small-screen interface with a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical nursing. Some researchers found that user interface design is an important factor in determining the usability and potential use of a mobile system. Therefore, this study proposed a systematic approach to the development of a mobile nursing information system (MNIS) based on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction (M-HCI) for use in clinical nursing. The system combines principles of small-screen interface design with user-specified requirements. In addition, the iconic functions were designed with metaphor concept that will help users learn the system more quickly with less working-memory. An experiment involving learnability testing, thinking aloud and a questionnaire investigation was conducted for evaluating the effect of MNIS on PDA. The results show that the proposed MNIS is good on learning and higher satisfaction on symbol investigation, terminology and system information.

  8. The dialogically extended mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Gangopadhyay, Nivedita; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    , we argue that language enhances our cognitive capabilities in a much more radical way: The skilful engagement of public material symbols facilitates evolutionarily unprecedented modes of collective perception, action and reasoning (interpersonal synergies) creating dialogically extended minds. We...... relate our approach to other ideas about collective minds and review a number of empirical studies to identify the mechanisms enabling the constitution of interpersonal cognitive systems....

  9. To Three or not to Three: Improving Human Computation Game Onboarding with a Three-Star System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Jacqueline; Cooper, Seth

    2017-01-01

    While many popular casual games use three-star systems, which give players up to three stars based on their performance in a level, this technique has seen limited application in human computation games (HCGs). This gives rise to the question of what impact, if any, a three-star system will have on the behavior of players in HCGs. In this work, we examined the impact of a three-star system implemented in the protein folding HCG Foldit. We compared the basic game's introductory levels with two versions using a three-star system, where players were rewarded with more stars for completing levels in fewer moves. In one version, players could continue playing levels for as many moves as they liked, and in the other, players were forced to reset the level if they used more moves than required to achieve at least one star on the level. We observed that the three-star system encouraged players to use fewer moves, take more time per move, and replay completed levels more often. We did not observe an impact on retention. This indicates that three-star systems may be useful for re-enforcing concepts introduced by HCG levels, or as a flexible means to encourage desired behaviors.

  10. A System for Sentiment Analysis of Colloquial Arabic Using Human Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afnan S. Al-Subaihin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation and evaluation of a sentiment analysis system that is conducted over Arabic text with evaluative content. Our system is broken into two different components. The first component is a game that enables users to annotate large corpuses of text in a fun manner. The game produces necessary linguistic resources that will be used by the second component which is the sentimental analyzer. Two different algorithms have been designed to employ these linguistic resources to analyze text and classify it according to its sentimental polarity. The first approach is using sentimental tag patterns, which reached a precision level of 56.14%. The second approach is the sentimental majority approach which relies on calculating the number of negative and positive phrases in the sentence and classifying the sentence according to the dominant polarity. The results after evaluating the system for the first sentimental majority approach yielded the highest accuracy level reached by our system which is 60.5% while the second variation scored an accuracy of 60.32%.

  11. A system for sentiment analysis of colloquial Arabic using human computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Subaihin, Afnan S; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2014-01-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sentiment analysis system that is conducted over Arabic text with evaluative content. Our system is broken into two different components. The first component is a game that enables users to annotate large corpuses of text in a fun manner. The game produces necessary linguistic resources that will be used by the second component which is the sentimental analyzer. Two different algorithms have been designed to employ these linguistic resources to analyze text and classify it according to its sentimental polarity. The first approach is using sentimental tag patterns, which reached a precision level of 56.14%. The second approach is the sentimental majority approach which relies on calculating the number of negative and positive phrases in the sentence and classifying the sentence according to the dominant polarity. The results after evaluating the system for the first sentimental majority approach yielded the highest accuracy level reached by our system which is 60.5% while the second variation scored an accuracy of 60.32%.

  12. Integrating Usability Engineering in the Iterative Design Process of the Land Attack Combat System (LACS) Human Computer Interface (HCI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borja, Ana T

    2004-01-01

    ...) for its intended purposes. This paper presents our approach of the usability engineering activities and the results from a 1-year Fiscal Year 2003 effort for the development of the LACS Human Computer Interface (HCI...

  13. The dialogic validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper is inspired by dialogism and the title is a paraphrase on Bakhtin's (1981) "The Dialogic Imagination". The paper investigates how dialogism can inform the process of validating inquiry-based qualitative research. The paper stems from a case study on the role of recognition in apprentic......This paper is inspired by dialogism and the title is a paraphrase on Bakhtin's (1981) "The Dialogic Imagination". The paper investigates how dialogism can inform the process of validating inquiry-based qualitative research. The paper stems from a case study on the role of recognition...

  14. A comparative evaluation plan for the Maintenance, Inventory, and Logistics Planning (MILP) System Human-Computer Interface (HCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmyer, Scott P.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to develop a tailored and effective approach to the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface (HCI) to the Maintenance, Inventory and Logistics Planning (MILP) System in support of the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). An additional task that was undertaken was to assist in the review of Ground Displays for Space Station Freedom (SSF) by attending the Ground Displays Interface Group (GDIG), and commenting on the preliminary design for these displays. Based upon data gathered over the 10 week period, this project has hypothesized that the proper HCI concept for navigating through maintenance databases for large space vehicles is one based upon a spatial, direct manipulation approach. This dialogue style can be then coupled with a traditional text-based DBMS, after the user has determined the general nature and location of the information needed. This conclusion is in contrast with the currently planned HCI for MILP which uses a traditional form-fill-in dialogue style for all data access and retrieval. In order to resolve this difference in HCI and dialogue styles, it is recommended that comparative evaluation be performed which combines the use of both subjective and objective metrics to determine the optimal (performance-wise) and preferred approach for end users. The proposed plan has been outlined in the previous paragraphs and is available in its entirety in the Technical Report associated with this project. Further, it is suggested that several of the more useful features of the Maintenance Operations Management System (MOMS), especially those developed by the end-users, be incorporated into MILP to save development time and money.

  15. Human-computer interaction in multitask situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Human-computer interaction in multitask decisionmaking situations is considered, and it is proposed that humans and computers have overlapping responsibilities. Queueing theory is employed to model this dynamic approach to the allocation of responsibility between human and computer. Results of simulation experiments are used to illustrate the effects of several system variables including number of tasks, mean time between arrivals of action-evoking events, human-computer speed mismatch, probability of computer error, probability of human error, and the level of feedback between human and computer. Current experimental efforts are discussed and the practical issues involved in designing human-computer systems for multitask situations are considered.

  16. A Real-Time Model-Based Human Motion Tracking and Analysis for Human-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lin Huang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a real-time model-based human motion tracking and analysis method for human computer interface (HCI. This method tracks and analyzes the human motion from two orthogonal views without using any markers. The motion parameters are estimated by pattern matching between the extracted human silhouette and the human model. First, the human silhouette is extracted and then the body definition parameters (BDPs can be obtained. Second, the body animation parameters (BAPs are estimated by a hierarchical tritree overlapping searching algorithm. To verify the performance of our method, we demonstrate different human posture sequences and use hidden Markov model (HMM for posture recognition testing.

  17. Values in dialogic pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In November 2014 on the Dialogic Pedagogy Journal Facebook page, there was an interesting discussion of the issue of values in dialogic pedagogy[1]. The main issue can be characterized as the following. Should dialogic pedagogy teach values? Should it avoid teaching values? Is there some kind of a third approach? The participants of the Facebook discussions were focusing on teaching values in dialogic pedagogy and not about teaching aboutvalues. On the one hand, it seems to be impossible to avoid teaching values. However, on the other hand, shaping students in some preset molding is apparently non-dialogic and uncritical (Matusov, 2009. In the former case, successful teaching is defined by how well and deeply the students accept and commit to the taught values. In the latter case, successful dialogic teaching may be defined by students’ critical examination of their own values against alternative values in a critical dialogue. Below, Eugene Matusov and Jay Lemke, active participants of this Facebook dialogue, provide their reflection on this important issue and encourage readers to join their reflective dialogue.[1] See in a public Facebook domain: https://www.facebook.com/DialogicPedagogyJournal/posts/894734337204533, https://www.facebook.com/DialogicPedagogyJournal/posts/896916850319615

  18. Foundations of Dialogic Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John

    1978-01-01

    Four defining characteristics of a dialogic approach to communication; shows each to be grounded in Husserlian phenomenology, existential phenomenology, or philosophical anthropology. Suggests that the most pressing challenge for scholars of dialogic communication is to explore views of language developed in the works of Heidegger, Gadamer, and…

  19. GT-MSOCC - A domain for research on human-computer interaction and decision aiding in supervisory control systems. [Georgia Tech - Multisatellite Operations Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    The Georgia Tech-Multisatellite Operations Control Center (GT-MSOCC), a real-time interactive simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system for unmanned earth-orbiting satellites, is described. The GT-MSOCC program for investigating a range of modeling, decision aiding, and workstation design issues related to the human-computer interaction is discussed. A GT-MSOCC operator function model is described in which operator actions, both cognitive and manual, are represented as the lowest level discrete control network nodes, and operator action nodes are linked to information needs or system reconfiguration commands.

  20. Handbook of human computation

    CERN Document Server

    Michelucci, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses the emerging area of human computation, The chapters, written by leading international researchers, explore existing and future opportunities to combine the respective strengths of both humans and machines in order to create powerful problem-solving capabilities. The book bridges scientific communities, capturing and integrating the unique perspective and achievements of each. It coalesces contributions from industry and across related disciplines in order to motivate, define, and anticipate the future of this exciting new frontier in science and cultural evolution. Reade

  1. Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments are presented along with a list of attendees. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the state-of-technology and level of maturity of several areas in human-computer interaction and to provide guidelines for focused future research leading to effective use of these facilities in the design/fabrication and operation of future high-performance engineering systems.

  2. A proposal to manage multi-task dialogs in conversational interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David GRIOL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of smart devices and recent advances in spoken language technology are currently extending the use of conversational interfaces and spoken interaction to perform many tasks. The dialog management task of a conversational interface consists of selecting the next system response considering the user's actions, the dialog history, and the results of accessing the data repositories. In this paper we describe a dialog management technique adapted to multi-task conversational systems. In our proposal, specialized dialog models are used to deal with each specific subtask of dialog objective for which the dialog system has been designed. The practical application of the proposed technique to develop a dialog system acting as a customer support service shows that the use of these specialized dialog models increases the quality and number of successful interactions with the system in comparison with developing a single dialog model.

  3. Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In September 2011 in Rome at the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research conference, Eugene Matusov (USA, Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan, Jayne White (New Zealand, and Olga Dysthe (Norway organized a symposium on Dialogic Pedagogy. Formally during the symposium and informally after the symposium several heated discussions started among the participants about the nature of dialogic pedagogy. The uniting theme of these discussions was a strong commitment by all four participants to apply the dialogic framework developed by Soviet-Russian philosopher and literary theoretician Bakhtin to education. In this special issue, Eugene Matusov (USA and Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan have developed only three of the heated issues discussed at the symposium in a form of dialogic exchanges (dialogue-disagreements. We invited our Dialogic Pedagogy colleagues Jayne White (New Zealand and Olga Dysthe (Norway to write commentaries on the dialogues. Fortunately, Jayne White kindly accepted the request and wrote her commentary. Unfortunately, Olga Dysthe could not participate due to her prior commitments to other projects. We also invited Ana Marjanovic-Shane (USA, Beth Ferholt (USA, Rupert Wegerif (UK, and Paul Sullivan (UK to comment on Eugene-Kiyotaka dialogue-disagreement.                The first two heated issues were initiated by Eugene Matusov by providing a typology of different conceptual approaches to Dialogic Pedagogy that he had noticed in education. Specifically, the debate with Kiyotaka Miyazaki (and the other two participants was around three types of Dialogic Pedagogy defined by Eugene Matusov: instrumental, epistemological, and ontological types of Dialogic Pedagogy. Specifically, Eugene Matusov subscribes to ontological dialogic pedagogy arguing that dialogic pedagogy should be built around students’ important existing or emergent life interests, concerns, questions, and needs. He challenged both instrumental dialogic

  4. Human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  5. Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene Matusov; Kiyotaka Miyazaki

    2014-01-01

    In September 2011 in Rome at the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research conference, Eugene Matusov (USA), Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan), Jayne White (New Zealand), and Olga Dysthe (Norway) organized a symposium on Dialogic Pedagogy. Formally during the symposium and informally after the symposium several heated discussions started among the participants about the nature of dialogic pedagogy. The uniting theme of these discussions was a strong commitment by all four participants ...

  6. Language evolution and human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudin, Jonathan; Norman, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the issues that confront designers of interactive computer systems also appear in natural language evolution. Natural languages and human-computer interfaces share as their primary mission the support of extended 'dialogues' between responsive entities. Because in each case one participant is a human being, some of the pressures operating on natural languages, causing them to evolve in order to better support such dialogue, also operate on human-computer 'languages' or interfaces. This does not necessarily push interfaces in the direction of natural language - since one entity in this dialogue is not a human, this is not to be expected. Nonetheless, by discerning where the pressures that guide natural language evolution also appear in human-computer interaction, we can contribute to the design of computer systems and obtain a new perspective on natural languages.

  7. Bakhtin and Buber: Problems of Dialogic Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Perlina

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications of biographical materials on Mikhail Bakhtin demonstrate that he was familiar with the writings of Martin Buber. The philosophical and aesthetic verbal expression of Buber's ideas within the time-spatial universe of Bakhtin's own awareness allows us to discuss this obvious biographical evidence in a wider cultural context. The central opposition of Buber's and Bakhtin's systems is the dialogic dichotomous pair: "Ich und Du" (I and Thou, or "myself and another." Bakhtin's dialogic imagination is rooted in the binaries of the subject-object relations which he initially formulated as "responsibility" and "addressivity," that is to say, as individual awareness and its responsiveness of life. The basic words of Bakhtin's philosophical aesthetics can be understood as the "relation to the other," and their semantics and terminological meaning are directly related to Martin Buber (his work, Ich und Du , 1923. In the 1930s-60s Bakhtin developed the concepts of responsibility and addressivity into his universal dialogic theory of speech-genres. His hierarchy of speech-genres was built in order to establish relations between different sub-genres of the novel (various types of poetic utterances and different species of individual discourse. However, the entire edifice of this dialogic system remained unfinished, and several types of dialogic relations between individual pronouncements of the characters and individual novelistic genres were not discussed by him. Buber's ideas on the dialogue can be used as a clue to one possible interpretation of the function of authoritative and internally persuasive discourses in different sub-genres of the novel (the novel of confession, the Bildungsroman , the autobiographical novel. In this article, Buber's philosophical cycle is used as an aid in reconstructing the integral whole of Bakhtin's "dialogic imagination," as this dialogic mode of thinking goes through his unfinished works: "Author and

  8. Dialogic Relations and Persuasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Cruz Pistori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show how concepts from ancient Rhetoric, as well as Dialogic Discourse Analysis (DDA notions and categories, inspired in the works of Bakhtin and the Circle, can be understood as theoretical-methodological basis for the analysis of persuasion in discourse. Two different texts, from different speech genres, are used as examples to demonstrate the persuasion in dialogic relationships expressed by broad and different spheres of human activity, in connection with the organization of social life, space and time.

  9. Doing a Dialogic Dance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    , and phenomenological approaches to arts therapy. A general characteristic of using visual methods is that they promote emergence and transformation of meanings. Typically, many associations and metaphors emerge and alter rapidly as people work collaboratively with images and stories in a workshop setting. My...... experience is that the use of visual and narrative methods is a dance with participants, which I conceptualize as a mutual meaning-making process that emerges in a specific context. In the discussion, I consider how I try to develop a dialogic dance inspired by a dialogic understanding of empowerment...... and phenomenological approach to emergence....

  10. Human Computer Interactions in Next-Generation of Aircraft Smart Navigation Management Systems: Task Analysis and Architecture under an Agent-Oriented Methodological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Canino-Rodríguez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers’ indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications.

  11. Feedback Loops in Communication and Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex; Nijholt, Antinus; Huang, Thomas S.

    Building systems that are able to analyse communicative behaviours or take part in conversations requires a sound methodology in which the complex organisation of conversations is understood and tested on real-life samples. The data-driven approaches to human computing not only have a value for the

  12. Human computer interface guide, revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Human Computer Interface Guide, SSP 30540, is a reference document for the information systems within the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP). The Human Computer Interface Guide (HCIG) provides guidelines for the design of computer software that affects human performance, specifically, the human-computer interface. This document contains an introduction and subparagraphs on SSFP computer systems, users, and tasks; guidelines for interactions between users and the SSFP computer systems; human factors evaluation and testing of the user interface system; and example specifications. The contents of this document are intended to be consistent with the tasks and products to be prepared by NASA Work Package Centers and SSFP participants as defined in SSP 30000, Space Station Program Definition and Requirements Document. The Human Computer Interface Guide shall be implemented on all new SSFP contractual and internal activities and shall be included in any existing contracts through contract changes. This document is under the control of the Space Station Control Board, and any changes or revisions will be approved by the deputy director.

  13. Dialogicality in Focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The phenomenon which dialogism addresses is human interaction. It enables us to conceptualise human interaction as intersubjective, symbolic, cultural, transformative and conflictual, in short, as complex. The complexity of human interaction is evident in all domains of human life, for example...

  14. Platons dialog Kleitofon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tortzen, Gorm

    2007-01-01

    Den korte dialog 'Kleitofon' hører til den gruppe i Corpus Platonicum, der ofte anses for at være uægte. Indledningen problematiserer dette, der gives en ny ovesættelse, og der føjes en række oplysende noter til teksten. Udgivelsesdato: April...

  15. Feedback Loops in Communication and Human Computing

    OpenAIRE

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex; Nijholt, Antinus; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-01-01

    Building systems that are able to analyse communicative behaviours or take part in conversations requires a sound methodology in which the complex organisation of conversations is understood and tested on real-life samples. The data-driven approaches to human computing not only have a value for the engineering of systems, but can also provide feedback to the study of conversations between humans and between human and machines.

  16. Dialogism in Advertising Persuasion

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Helena Cruz Pistori

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes two advertisements from the same brand, but produced in different local media: France and Brazil. It aims to pursue the interrelation and nexus needed between the verbal, visual and extraverbal dimensions to produce and understand the effects of persuasive sense. Concepts from ancient and modern Rhetoric, as well as dialogic discourse analysis notions and categories, inspired in the works of Bakhtin and the Circle, are the article’s theoretical-methodological basis. In t...

  17. Den interkonfessionelle dialog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Else Marie Wiberg

    2006-01-01

    På baggrund af en gennemgang af det 20. århundredes økumeniske hermeneutik, foreslås det i denne artikel, at den økumeniske dialog (et ord, som oversættes forskelligt af de forskellige konfessioner) erstattes af en økumenisk diskurs (jf. Michel de Certau og Lukas Vischer). Der plæderes således fo...

  18. Dialogic Global Studies for Multicultural Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakovic, Emina; Feigl, Britta Marion; Fischer, Bettina Marion; Fleck, Christopher; Galler, Lisa-Maria; Heinrich, Johannes; Kulmer, Karin; Kurzweil, Birgitta; Scholze, Markus; Sperl, Raphael Stefan; Unterkofler, Rene; Remele, Kurt; Matzenberger, Julian; Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to show a practical case of dialogic web-based learning that has provided a set of questions analysing two complex technological projects in "southern" countries with effects on multicultural equity. Design/methodology/approach: Structured online review processes in multicultural and systems science…

  19. Dialogism in Advertising Persuasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Cruz Pistori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes two advertisements from the same brand, but produced in different local media: France and Brazil. It aims to pursue the interrelation and nexus needed between the verbal, visual and extraverbal dimensions to produce and understand the effects of persuasive sense. Concepts from ancient and modern Rhetoric, as well as dialogic discourse analysis notions and categories, inspired in the works of Bakhtin and the Circle, are the article’s theoretical-methodological basis. In the chosen advertisements, we observe the tense way they reflect and refract reality and how this is expressed in concrete utterances, constructed according to genre coercions. By analyzing the produced meaning effects, we especially highlight the presence of persuasion in different dialogic relationships allowed by the texts, audience importance in effect construction of text persuasive meaning, and proximity between advertisement and epidictic genre in ancient rhetoric. Persuasive dialogic relationships express broad and different spheres of human activity, in connection with the organization of social life, space and time; in fact, they are not aimed at product purchase, but at access to a way of life, which is linked to ideological values of privilege.

  20. Minimal mobile human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Ali, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the widespread adoption of personal, mobile computing devices in everyday life, has allowed entry into a new technological era in Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The constant change of the physical and social context in a user's situation made possible by the portability of

  1. Artifical Intelligence for Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Th.S.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-proceedings of two events discussing AI for Human Computing: one Special Session during the Eighth International ACM Conference on Multimodal Interfaces (ICMI 2006), held in Banff, Canada, in November 2006, and a Workshop organized in conjunction

  2. Dialogical Theories at the Boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr Theo Niessen; Dr. Sanne Akkerman

    2011-01-01

    Within social sciences, ranging from education to psychology, sociology and anthropology, we see theories emerging that are based on the concept that our social world is existentially dialogical. According to Valsiner and Van der Veer (2000), dialogical theories referring to the work of Hermans

  3. Fundamentals of human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Monk, Andrew F

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction aims to sensitize the systems designer to the problems faced by the user of an interactive system. The book grew out of a course entitled """"The User Interface: Human Factors for Computer-based Systems"""" which has been run annually at the University of York since 1981. This course has been attended primarily by systems managers from the computer industry. The book is organized into three parts. Part One focuses on the user as processor of information with studies on visual perception; extracting information from printed and electronically presented

  4. Human Computation An Integrated Approach to Learning from the Crowd

    CERN Document Server

    Law, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Human computation is a new and evolving research area that centers around harnessing human intelligence to solve computational problems that are beyond the scope of existing Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms. With the growth of the Web, human computation systems can now leverage the abilities of an unprecedented number of people via the Web to perform complex computation. There are various genres of human computation applications that exist today. Games with a purpose (e.g., the ESP Game) specifically target online gamers who generate useful data (e.g., image tags) while playing an enjoy

  5. THE DIALOGICAL SELF IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the shift that appears to be taking place in contemporary psychoanalysis, as reflected among intersubjective approaches, from a monological conception of the self to a dialogical one. The monological self emphasizes the separation between mind, body, and external world, focusing on the representational and descriptive/referential function of language. In contrast, the dialogical self emphasizes practices, the permeable nature of relationships between subjects, and the constitutive function of language. This paper attempts to explain the growing emphasis on the dialogical self, understood from a theoretical, metatheoretical, and technical point of view, using contemporary intersubjective approaches to illustrate this shift. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  6. [Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Waterkemper, Roberta; Heidman, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter; Boehs, Astrid Egged; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and quality care provided to health services users.

  7. Distributed Language and Dialogism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Sune Vork

    2015-01-01

    This article takes a starting point in Per Linell’s (2013) review article on the book Distributed Language (Cowley, 2011a) and other contributions to the field of ‘Distributed Language’, including Cowley et al. (2010) and Hodges et al. (2012). The Distributed Language approach is a naturalistic...... and anti-representational approach to language that builds on recent developments in the cognitive sciences. With a starting point in Linell’s discussion of the approach, the article aims to clarify four aspects of a distributed view of language vis-à-vis the tradition of Dialogism, as presented by Linell...... (2009, 2013). First, the article discusses a central principle in Distributed Language, “the principle of non-locality,” and Linell’s interpretation of it; more generally, this is a discussion of contrasting views on “the locus of language” and derived methodological issues. Second, the article...

  8. Introduction to human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Originally published in 1989 this title provided a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the burgeoning discipline of human-computer interaction for students, academics, and those from industry who wished to know more about the subject. Assuming very little knowledge, the book provides an overview of the diverse research areas that were at the time only gradually building into a coherent and well-structured field. It aims to explain the underlying causes of the cognitive, social and organizational problems typically encountered when computer systems are introduced. It is clear and co

  9. Penerapan Model Human Computer Interaction (HCI Dalam Analisis Sistem Informasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prihati Prihati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information system Analysis is very important to do to produce easy, effective, efficient, and proper use system for the user. This research is meant to design and apply information system analysis model with the concept of Human Computer Interaction (HCI, Jacob Nielsen’s usability criteria which are learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors and satisfaction. The model of information system analysis Human Computer Interaction (HCI with five usability criteria can be used as a standard to analyze how far Human Computer Interaction can be applied into the system so that every weakness will be known and system maintenance can be performed. The application Human Computer Interaction model in analysis of Sistem Administrasi Sekolah (SAS produce a conclusion that only half of Human Computer Interaction concept applied into SAS Dikmenti DKI Jakarta. SAS is easy to be learned and to remember but SAS is not efficient and not yet have the ability to cope the mistake well. Users are satisfied enough with the result achieved through SAS but the facility provided by SAS is considered not enough to accommodate the need of the users.

  10. The Dialogical Jung: Otherness within the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, William E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores dialogical currents in Jung’s analytical psychology, with reference to contemporary theories of the dialogical self. The dialogical self is a notion that has gained increasing currency in psychology since the 1990s, in response to the limitations of traditional notions of the self, based on monological, encapsulated consciousness. Modern dialogical self theory construes the self as irrevocably embedded in a matrix of real and imagined dialogues with others. The theme of dialogical otherness within the self is also taken up in Jung’s analytical psychology, both in the practice of active imagination and psychotherapy and in the theory of archetypes, and a dialogical approach to inquiry is evident in Jung’s work from the outset. The implications of a dialogical re-conceptualization of analytical psychology and of analytical psychology for dialogical theory are considered in detail. PMID:25379261

  11. Dialogic Talk in Diverse Physical Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dale L.; Lelliott, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Dialogic talk, in which different ideas are considered, promotes conceptual understanding in science, and is in line with South Africa's school curriculum. The problem is that dialogic talk is difficult to facilitate and may run counter to cultural norms. As a result, classroom talk is often not dialogic. This paper reports on the nature of…

  12. Relational Leading and Dialogic Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted

    The Ph.D. thesis contributes to a relational orientation to leading, emphasizing leadership as a shared, collaborative and co-creative activity. In this paradigm major emphasis is put on dialogue and interaction. Inspired by social constructionist ideas, the thesis considers approaches to learning...... with the thesis, dialogically based practices inspired by action research with the aim to enhance collaborative knowledge building, reflexivity and dialogical skills in groups and teams were carried out, analyzed and documented. Participants included school principals, leaders of kindergartens, teachers...

  13. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  14. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  15. Enhancing Learning through Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Elspeth, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing Learning Through Human Computer Interaction is an excellent reference source for human computer interaction (HCI) applications and designs. This "Premier Reference Source" provides a complete analysis of online business training programs and e-learning in the higher education sector. It describes a range of positive outcomes for linking…

  16. The epistemology and ontology of human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip A.E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic:

  17. Perspectives on Human-Computer Interface: Introduction and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Donna; Lunin, Lois F.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses human-computer interfaces in information seeking that focus on end users, and provides an overview of articles in this section that (1) provide librarians and information specialists with guidelines for selecting information-seeking systems; (2) provide producers of information systems with directions for production or research; and (3)…

  18. Measuring Online Dialogic Conversations: A Scale Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romenti, Stefania; Valentini, Chiara; Murtarelli, Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The scope of this paper is to develop and test a measurement scale for assessing the quality of dialogic conversations among companies and digital publics in social media. It is argued that dialogic conversations are the drivers of dialogic engagement and the result of dialogic...... interactivity. Dialogic conversations are defined as sequences of communicative actions and counteractions taken by social actors for different purposes based on specific linguistic choices and characterised by diverse communicative approaches and the role played by the involved parties. Design...

  19. Empirical ethics as dialogical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Abma, T.A.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a dialogical approach to empirical ethics, based upon hermeneutic ethics and responsive evaluation. Hermeneutic ethics regards experience as the concrete source of moral wisdom. In order to gain a good understanding of moral issues, concrete detailed experiences and

  20. Den spanske dialog (2) - Praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Lone

    Kompendiet er specielt udarbejdet til 1. 2. og 3. sem.'s spanskundervisning inden for disciplinen 'Mundtlig kommunikation' på BA-studiet. Kompendiet, der anvendes parallelt med Den spanske dialog (1) - Teori, udgør grundlaget for undervisningens praktiske del. (Ej kompilering)....

  1. Den spanske dialog (1) - Teori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Lone

    Kompendiet er specielt udarbejdet til 1,2. og 3. semesters spanskundervisning inden for disciplinen 'Mundtlig kommunikation' på BA.studiet. Kompendiet, der anvendes parallelt med 'Den spanske dialog (2) - Praksis', udgør grundlaget for undervisningens teoretiske del. (Ej kompilering)....

  2. Generating socially appropriate tutorial dialog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, W. Lewis; Rizzo, Paola; Bosma, W.E.; Kole, Sander; Ghijsen, Mattijs; van Welbergen, H.; André, E.; Dybkjaer, L.; Minker, W.; Heisterkamp, P.

    Analysis of student-tutor coaching dialogs suggest that good human tutors attend to and attempt to influence the motivational state of learners. Moreover, they are sensitive to the social face of the learner, and seek to mitigate the potential face threat of their comments. This paper describes a

  3. Bakhtin's Dialogics and Rock Lyrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jeff Parker

    Rock music is ideological both implicitly (in its intrinsic valuing of change, and resistance to authority, for instance), and explicitly (in political records from activist artists such as John Lennon and U2). The texts of the rock genre offer rhetorical experiences. A dialogic conception may help scholars to account for and describe the…

  4. V and V of Lexical, Syntactic and Semantic Properties for Interactive Systems Through Model Checking of Formal Description of Dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Guillaume P.; Martinie, Celia; Palanque, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    During early phases of the development of an interactive system, future system properties are identified (through interaction with end users in the brainstorming and prototyping phase of the application, or by other stakehold-ers) imposing requirements on the final system. They can be specific to the application under development or generic to all applications such as usability principles. Instances of specific properties include visibility of the aircraft altitude, speed… in the cockpit and the continuous possibility of disengaging the autopilot in whatever state the aircraft is. Instances of generic properties include availability of undo (for undoable functions) and availability of a progression bar for functions lasting more than four seconds. While behavioral models of interactive systems using formal description techniques provide complete and unambiguous descriptions of states and state changes, it does not provide explicit representation of the absence or presence of properties. Assessing that the system that has been built is the right system remains a challenge usually met through extensive use and acceptance tests. By the explicit representation of properties and the availability of tools to support checking these properties, it becomes possible to provide developers with means for systematic exploration of the behavioral models and assessment of the presence or absence of these properties. This paper proposes the synergistic use two tools for checking both generic and specific properties of interactive applications: Petshop and Java PathFinder. Petshop is dedicated to the description of interactive system behavior. Java PathFinder is dedicated to the runtime verification of Java applications and as an extension dedicated to User Interfaces. This approach is exemplified on a safety critical application in the area of interactive cockpits for large civil aircrafts.

  5. Multimodal Information Presentation for High-Load Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation addresses multimodal information presentation in human computer interaction. Information presentation refers to the manner in which computer systems/interfaces present information to human users. More specifically, the focus of our work is not on which information to present, but

  6. DREAM: Classification scheme for dialog acts in clinical research query mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Julia; Chandar, Praveen; He, Zhe; Cimino, James; Hanauer, David; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Clinical data access involves complex but opaque communication between medical researchers and query analysts. Understanding such communication is indispensable for designing intelligent human-machine dialog systems that automate query formulation. This study investigates email communication and proposes a novel scheme for classifying dialog acts in clinical research query mediation. We analyzed 315 email messages exchanged in the communication for 20 data requests obtained from three institutions. The messages were segmented into 1333 utterance units. Through a rigorous process, we developed a classification scheme and applied it for dialog act annotation of the extracted utterances. Evaluation results with high inter-annotator agreement demonstrate the reliability of this scheme. This dataset is used to contribute preliminary understanding of dialog acts distribution and conversation flow in this dialog space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Formal specification of human-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auernheimer, Brent

    1990-01-01

    A high-level formal specification of a human computer interface is described. Previous work is reviewed and the ASLAN specification language is described. Top-level specifications written in ASLAN for a library and a multiwindow interface are discussed.

  8. Human-Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human-Computer Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    editing. fraphical interaction (Report No. CW’-CS-R8718). Human Computer Interaction 1(3), 223-274. Washington, DC National Aeronautics and Space...Co - * r LLcOPY Research Product 90-31 j LL Human- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human- Computer Dialogue DTIC...5600 62785A 790 1304 C2 LE (include Security Classification) i- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective i- Computer

  9. Document Ordering through Lockheed's DIALOG and SDC's ORBIT--A User's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Mary Margaret; Laszlo, George A.

    1980-01-01

    Provides step-by-step instructions for ordering documents online through DIALOG and ORBIT, including some helpful hints. Tables show database or independent document suppliers; list ordering commands, with examples; and explain optional commands, for the two retrieval systems. (SW)

  10. Dialogic Literacy: Contexts, Competences and Dispositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Delfino, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Dialogic Literacy is understood as being able to participate in productive dialogue with others and is a key competence for learning and active citizenship in a cultural and societal landscape shaped by the ‘participatory turn’. The article develops a definition of Dialogic Literacy based...

  11. Chronotopes in Education: Conventional and Dialogic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusov, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Bakhtin defines chronotope in his literary dialogic theory as the unity of time and space where events occur. Here, in this conceptual paper, I expand and apply this notion to education, discuss, and illustrate the three major espoused educational chronotopes that I abstracted in my analysis of educational practices around Dialogic Pedagogy. Frist…

  12. The Development of Dialogical Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Marie-France; Lafortune, Louise; Pallascio, Richard; Mongeau, Pierre; Slade, Christina; Splitter, Laurance; de la Garza, Teresa

    This study explored the manifestations of what was called "dialogical critical thinking" in elementary school students aged 10 to 12 years as they engaged in philosophical exchanges among peers. The characteristics of dialogical critical thinking and how it develops were studied over an entire school year among eight groups of students…

  13. Dialogic approaches to the study of subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Book review: Sullivan, P. (2012). Qualitative Data Analysis: Using a dialogic approach. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications Ltd. ISBN 978-1-84920-609-9......Book review: Sullivan, P. (2012). Qualitative Data Analysis: Using a dialogic approach. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications Ltd. ISBN 978-1-84920-609-9...

  14. Speech Dialogue with Facial Displays Multimodal Human-Computer Conversation

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, K; Nagao, Katashi; Takeuchi, Akikazu

    1994-01-01

    Human face-to-face conversation is an ideal model for human-computer dialogue. One of the major features of face-to-face communication is its multiplicity of communication channels that act on multiple modalities. To realize a natural multimodal dialogue, it is necessary to study how humans perceive information and determine the information to which humans are sensitive. A face is an independent communication channel that conveys emotional and conversational signals, encoded as facial expressions. We have developed an experimental system that integrates speech dialogue and facial animation, to investigate the effect of introducing communicative facial expressions as a new modality in human-computer conversation. Our experiments have shown that facial expressions are helpful, especially upon first contact with the system. We have also discovered that featuring facial expressions at an early stage improves subsequent interaction.

  15. Towards a dialogical ethics of interprofessionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine Rob

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary medical practice brings a diverse range of professions and disciplines together in greater and closer contact. This situation of increasing complexity and changing professional roles gives rise to multifaceted ethical dilemmas and theoretical and practical concerns. In this essay we argue that for multidisciplinary relationships to be facilitated and to progress towards interdisciplinary teamwork, moral agents have to go beyond orthodox ethical systems and appeal to normative theory. We will argue that conceptualising ethics as a shared social practice may provide a useful starting point. This dialogic approach places greater emphasis on open deliberation and the articulation, negotiation, exploration and generation of new ethical perspectives in the here and now of clinical practice.

  16. Multimodal Information Presentation for High-Load Human Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Y

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation addresses multimodal information presentation in human computer interaction. Information presentation refers to the manner in which computer systems/interfaces present information to human users. More specifically, the focus of our work is not on which information to present, but on how to present it, such as which modalities to use, how to spatially distribute items, et cetera. The notion ``computer'' is not limited to personal computers in their various forms. It also incl...

  17. HCI (human computer interaction): concepto y desarrollo

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos, Mari-Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The concept of human-computer interaction (HCI) is analysed from a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, including a review of the evolution of HCI from the 1950s up to the present. The author stresses the importance of incorporating HCI studies within the curricula of information science programmes.

  18. Applying Human Computation Methods to Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Human Computation methods such as crowdsourcing and games with a purpose (GWAP) have each recently drawn considerable attention for their ability to synergize the strengths of people and technology to accomplish tasks that are challenging for either to do well alone. Despite this increased attention, much of this transformation has been focused on…

  19. Deep architectures for Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noulas, A.K.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the application of Conditional Restricted Boltzmann Machines in Human Computer Interaction. These provide a well suited framework to model the complex temporal patterns produced from humans in the audio and video modalities. They can be trained in a semisupervised fashion and

  20. The Continuing Saga of Professional End-Users: Law Students Search DIALOG at the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Rosalie M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of end-user searching of online systems focuses on a study conducted at the University of Florida College of Law to determine the usefulness of DIALOG in a law school setting. Training needs are discussed, and search techniques for DIALOG are compared with those for LEXIS and Westlaw. (Four references) (LRW)

  1. Bakhtin, nursing narratives, and dialogical consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, R; Moore, K N

    1997-03-01

    Dialogical interaction is fundamental to considerations of nursing narrative, discourse, and communication. The story the patient tells is listened to, interpreted, and responded to through appropriate nursing care. Although nurses have long recognized narrative as central to humanistic nursing practice, the theoretical considerations of dialogue have received less attention with respect to nursing knowledge development. Mikhail Bakhtin, a key philosopher of narrative in the 20th century, put forward a dialogical narrative approach that is directly related to nursing concepts of narrative, interaction, and personhood and suggestive of a postmodern clinical epistemology. This article relates Bakhtin's dialogical narrative approach to nursing practice.

  2. A Dialogic Approach to Pragmatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Иштван Кечкеш

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how the limits of pragmatics - as long as it is restricted to the analysis of one utterance at a time - are overcome by including the hearer not only as interpreter who tries to understand the speaker’s utterance but as an interlocutor who tries to come to an understanding with the speaker. The goal of the paper is not to describe and analyze the dialogue approach rather explain what inner developments in the pragmatics paradigm have made it necessary to move in a dialogic direction, specifically emphasizing the importance of evaluating speaker meaning from the perspective of the speaker rather than from the perspective of the hearer and the double role of the interlocutor (speaker-hearer.

  3. Dialogics, ethnography and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernáez, Angel

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, the ethnographic method has been found to be an adequate instrument for public health and health education interventions. Nevertheless, its use contradicts certain intervention models, defined here as monologic, such as mass media campaigns and "rational actor" philosophies. Some epistemological foundations for these models were analyzed, such as the one-dimensional analysis of health/disease/care processes, the one-way communication and their hierarchical nature. In its place, a dialogic model based on the ethnographic method and organized from the criteria of multidimensionality, two-way communication and symmetry is proposed. Ethnography enables the effectiveness of interventions to be improved by providing an empirical basis for project design and allowing for social participation in health.

  4. Anglistics as a Dialogic Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Delanoy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In my article; dialogue is suggested as a basic direction for Anglistics. Such a perspective results from a normative notion of dialogue based on a set of particular criteria. In general terms; a case is made for (self-critical and respectful confrontation with other viewpoints within and beyond Anglistics to further develop existing positions and to create new forms of co-operation. While in the first two sections this concept is introduced and applied to the discipline of Anglistics; the final section is focussed on an area of major conflict in contemporary ELT debates. In fact; a dialogic approach will be suggested for dealing with two opposite tendencies; one aiming for standardization and the other for a humanistic form of education.

  5. The DIALOG Chip in the Front-End Electronics of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeddu, S; Lai, A

    2004-01-01

    We present a custom integrated circuit, named DIALOG, which is a fundamental building block in the front-end architecture of the LHCb Muon detector. DIALOG is realized in IBM 0.25 um technology, using radiation hardening layout techniques. DIALOG integrates important tools for detector time alignment procedures and time alignment monitoring on the front- end system. In particular, it integrates 16 programmable delays, which can be regulated in steps of 1 ns. Many other features, necessary for the Muon trigger operation and for a safe front-end monitoring are integrated: DIALOG generates the information used by the trigger as a combination of its 16 inputs from the Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator (ASD) chips, it generates the thresholds of the ASD, it monitors the rate of all its input channels. We describe the circuit architecture, its internal blocks and its main modes of operation.

  6. The Main Characteristics of Dialogic Interaction (Defining the Actual Tasks of Pedagogic Dialog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Yermolayeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available  The paper deals with one of the fast developing modern educational approaches – the pedagogy of dialog, based on the philosophical works and concepts of the well-known thinkers of the 20-th century: M. Buber, F. Ebner, O. Rosenshtok-Hussy, M. Bakhtin, etc. Two main directions of dialogic pedagogy are outlined – the instrumental and ontological. Within the framework of the first direction, the dialog is considered to be the main means or instrument of effective teaching used for communication skills development. According to the ontological version, the dialog is not only the instrument, but rather the dominating goal of education: it facilitates meaning- ful assimilation of skills and knowledge, including the learning ability; promotes cooperation and communal life skills; provides favorable conditions for versatile creative self-development. The supporters of this approach regard the real people, as well as the art works, nature, culture, alter ego etc, as the dialog subjects. The paper observes the main characteristics or prerequisites of dialogic interaction: dialogic attitude (emotionally ethical precondition; antinomian thinking (intellectual precondition; open outlook and creativity (precondition of personal meaning creation in the course of dialog. The comparative analysis of dialogism and non-dialogism of schoolchildren from Riga and Moscow are given regarding their behavior in conflicting situations; attitude to extremism; and reactions to bulling situations. The author is convinced that studying students’ dialogism in different age groups should be continued to improve the educational process effectiveness. Shearing the positive experience in dialogic education by Latvian and Russian colleagues can be very useful. 

  7. The Main Characteristics of Dialogic Interaction (Defining the Actual Tasks of Pedagogic Dialog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Yermolayeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  The paper deals with one of the fast developing modern educational approaches – the pedagogy of dialog, based on the philosophical works and concepts of the well-known thinkers of the 20-th century: M. Buber, F. Ebner, O. Rosenshtok-Hussy, M. Bakhtin, etc. Two main directions of dialogic pedagogy are outlined – the instrumental and ontological. Within the framework of the first direction, the dialog is considered to be the main means or instrument of effective teaching used for communication skills development. According to the ontological version, the dialog is not only the instrument, but rather the dominating goal of education: it facilitates meaning- ful assimilation of skills and knowledge, including the learning ability; promotes cooperation and communal life skills; provides favorable conditions for versatile creative self-development. The supporters of this approach regard the real people, as well as the art works, nature, culture, alter ego etc, as the dialog subjects. The paper observes the main characteristics or prerequisites of dialogic interaction: dialogic attitude (emotionally ethical precondition; antinomian thinking (intellectual precondition; open outlook and creativity (precondition of personal meaning creation in the course of dialog. The comparative analysis of dialogism and non-dialogism of schoolchildren from Riga and Moscow are given regarding their behavior in conflicting situations; attitude to extremism; and reactions to bulling situations. The author is convinced that studying students’ dialogism in different age groups should be continued to improve the educational process effectiveness. Shearing the positive experience in dialogic education by Latvian and Russian colleagues can be very useful. 

  8. Prosodic alignment in human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, N.; Katagiri, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Androids that replicate humans in form also need to replicate them in behaviour to achieve a high level of believability or lifelikeness. We explore the minimal social cues that can induce in people the human tendency for social acceptance, or ethopoeia, toward artifacts, including androids. It has been observed that people exhibit a strong tendency to adjust to each other, through a number of speech and language features in human-human conversational interactions, to obtain communication efficiency and emotional engagement. We investigate in this paper the phenomena related to prosodic alignment in human-computer interactions, with particular focus on human-computer alignment of speech characteristics. We found that people exhibit unidirectional and spontaneous short-term alignment of loudness and response latency in their speech in response to computer-generated speech. We believe this phenomenon of prosodic alignment provides one of the key components for building social acceptance of androids.

  9. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Gianluca; Gatteschi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  10. Applied human factors research at the NASA Johnson Space Center Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisill, Marianne; Mckay, Timothy D.

    1990-01-01

    The applied human factors research program performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center's Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory is discussed. Research is conducted to advance knowledge in human interaction with computer systems during space crew tasks. In addition, the Laboratory is directly involved in the specification of the human-computer interface (HCI) for space systems in development (e.g., Space Station Freedom) and is providing guidelines and support for HCI design to current and future space missions.

  11. A Dialogical Approach to Trade and Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Trujillo

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, supporters of free trade and environmentalists have regarded each other as the obstacle to development, and both sides have very different views as to what constitutes development. This article considers the various dimensions to international trade governance in the context of the environment and draws from the dialogic theory in comparative constitutional law to frame trade governance regarding the environment in a new way. It uses a dialogical approach to highlight primarily...

  12. Developing Dialogic Communication Culture in Media Education: Integrating Dialogism and Technology. Media Education Publication 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Seppo; Mononen-Aaltonen, Marja

    This book provides a review of literature and discussion of theory and practice focuses on the value of linguistic interactivity (dialogism) in technology-based instruction, particularly in the fields of second language instruction and cross-cultural communication. The bulk of the document discusses theory concerning dialogue, dialogism,…

  13. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Paravati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  14. Task search in a human computation market

    OpenAIRE

    Chilton, Lydia B.; Miller, Robert C.; Horton, John J.; Azenkot, Shiri

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand how a labor market for human computation functions, it is important to know how workers search for tasks. This paper uses two complementary methods to gain insight into how workers search for tasks on Mechanical Turk. First, we perform a high frequency scrape of 36 pages of search results and analyze it by looking at the rate of disappearance of tasks across key ways Mechanical Turk allows workers to sort tasks. Second, we present the results of a survey in which we pai...

  15. DIALOG An ASIC for timing of the LHCb muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeddu, S; Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2004-01-01

    The muon detector of the LHCb experiment at CERN plays a fundamental role in the first trigger level. It is mainly realized by means of a multi-wire proportional chambers technology and consists of about 126,000 front-end channels. High efficiency is necessary both at detector and front-end level to satisfy the trigger requirement of five hits per five muon stations with an overall efficiency of 95%. This corresponds to having a single front-end channel detection efficiency of 99% within a time window of 20 ns, and also poses the problem of an accurate time alignment of the whole detector. The problem is addressed by designing two custom integrated circuits, named DIagnostic, time Adjustment and LOGics (DIALOG) and SYNC. DIALOG integrates important tools for detector time alignment procedures and time alignment monitoring on the front-end system. Many other features, necessary for the muon trigger operation and for a safe front-end monitoring, are integrated on DIALOG.

  16. Human-computer interface controlled by the lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Marcelo Archajo; de Deus Lopes, Roseli

    2015-01-01

    Lip control system is an innovative human-computer interface specially designed for people with tetraplegia. This paper presents an evaluation of the lower lip potential to control an input device, according to Fitts' law (ISO/TS 9241-411:2012 standard). The results show that the lower lip throughput is comparable with the thumb throughput using the same input device under the same conditions. These results establish the baseline for future research studies about the lower lip capacity to operate a computer input device.

  17. Developing the human-computer interface for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina L.

    1991-01-01

    For the past two years, the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCIL) at the Johnson Space Center has been involved in prototyping and prototype reviews of in support of the definition phase of the Space Station Freedom program. On the Space Station, crew members will be interacting with multi-monitor workstations where interaction with several displays at one time will be common. The HCIL has conducted several experiments to begin to address design issues for this complex system. Experiments have dealt with design of ON/OFF indicators, the movement of the cursor across multiple monitors, and the importance of various windowing capabilities for users performing multiple tasks simultaneously.

  18. Dialogic Imagination in the Book of Deuteronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Polzin

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the profoundest insights into the syntax of narrative is the complex system of relationships between reporting and reported speech worked out in programmatic form by Voloshinov-Bakhtin in a number of groundbreaking studies (for example, in English translation, Marxism and the Philosophy of Language by V.N. Voloshinov and The Dialogic Imagination by Bakhtin. Interesting literary insights into texts that have been studied and interpreted over centuries and even milennia now await the application by present-day scholars of Bakhtin's theories. The Book of Deuteronomy offers a unique opportunity within the Bible of applying the reported/reporting speech approach of Bakhtin. The entire book of thirty-four chapters consists of a series of reported speeches of Moses framed with only about fifty-six verses by the reporting speech of the Deuteronomic narrator. The dynamic relationship of these two voices in the book provides one with a reading of Deuteronomy that significantly departs from the predominant scholarly view.

  19. Dialogic education for and from authorial agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2016-09-01

                Finally, we describe and analyze the first author’s partially successful and partially failing attempt to enact a dialogic authorial approach. It will allow the reader to both visualize and problematize a dialogic authorial approach. We will consider a case with a rich “e-paper trail” written by 11 undergraduate, pre-service teacher education students (mostly sophomores, and the instructor (Peter, the first author, pseudonym in a course on cultural diversity.  The case focuses on the university students (future teachers and their professor discussing several occasions that involved interactions between Peter and one minority child in an afterschool center. Our research questions in this empirical study were aimed at determining the successes, challenges, and failures of the dialogic authorial pedagogical approach and conditions for them

  20. Early NACA human computers at work

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    The women of the Computer Department at NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station are shown busy with test flight calculations. The computers under the direction of Roxanah Yancey were responsible for accurate calculations on the research test flights made at the Station. There were no mechanical computers at the station in 1949, but data was reduced by human computers. Shown in this photograph starting at the left are: Geraldine Mayer and Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth with Friden calculators on the their desks; Emily Stephens conferring with engineer John Mayer; Gertrude (Trudy) Valentine is working on an oscillograph recording reducing the data from a flight. Across the desk is Dorothy Clift Hughes using a slide rule to complete data calculations. Roxanah Yancey completes the picture as she fills out engineering requests for further data.

  1. Dialog og medvirkning i hjem-skolesamarbeid

    OpenAIRE

    Amble, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Mastergradsoppgave i tilpasset opplæring, avdeling for lærerutdanning og naturvitenskap, Høgskolen i Hedmark, 2015. Norsk: Dialog og medvirkning i hjem-skolesamarbeid er en masteroppgave i tilpasset opplæring ved Høgskolen i Hedmark 2015. Oppgavens hensikt er å belyse hvordan jeg kan legge til rette for at utviklingssamtalen blir en dialog der foreldrene medvirker i eget barns opplæring. Jeg har delt samtalen i to deler og skriver om den siste delen som foregår mellom de voksne. Oppg...

  2. Measuring the differences between human-human and human-machine dialogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David GRIOL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we assess the applicability of user simulation techniques to generate dialogs which are similar to real human-machine spoken interactions.To do so, we present the results of the comparison between three corpora acquired by means of different techniques. The first corpus was acquired with real users.A statistical user simulation technique has been applied to the same task to acquire the second corpus. In this technique, the next user answer is selected by means of a classification process that takes into account the previous dialog history, the lexical information in the clause, and the subtask of the dialog to which it contributes. Finally, a dialog simulation technique has been developed for the acquisition of the third corpus. This technique uses a random selection of the user and system turns, defining stop conditions for automatically deciding if the simulated dialog is successful or not. We use several evaluation measures proposed in previous research to compare between our three acquired corpora, and then discuss the similarities and differences with regard to these measures.

  3. Udforskning af dialoger om et regnehul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena

    2007-01-01

    Med introduktionen af det danske begreb 'regnehuller' om matematikvanskeligheder bliver det muligt at udforske dialoger i klasserummet med brug af værktøjer fra Augusto Boals Forumteater. Principperne i Boals tre faser præsenteres som værktøjer for læreres refleksive praksis. Ud fra datamateriale...

  4. Fostering Organizational Sustainability through Dialogical Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wals, Arjen E. J.; Schwarzin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to introduce and investigate dialogic interaction as a key element of achieving a transition towards sustainability in people, organizations and society as a whole. Furthermore "sustainability competence" as a potential outcome of such interaction is to be introduced, referring to the capacities and qualities…

  5. Human computer interaction using hand gesture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Silas; Nguyen, Hung T

    2008-01-01

    Hand gesture is a very natural form of human interaction and can be used effectively in human computer interaction (HCI). This project involves the design and implementation of a HCI using a small hand-worn wireless module with a 3-axis accelerometer as the motion sensor. The small stand-alone unit contains an accelerometer and a wireless Zigbee transceiver with microcontroller. To minimize intrusiveness to the user, the module is designed to be small (3cm by 4 cm). A time-delay neural network algorithm is developed to analyze the time series data from the 3-axis accelerometer. Power consumption is reduced by the non-continuous transmission of data and the use of low-power components, efficient algorithm and sleep mode between sampling for the wireless module. A home control interface is designed so that the user can control home appliances by moving through menus. The results demonstrate the feasibility of controlling home appliances using hand gestures and would present an opportunity for a section of the aging population and disabled people to lead a more independent life.

  6. Human-Computer Interaction The Agency Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, José

    2012-01-01

    Agent-centric theories, approaches and technologies are contributing to enrich interactions between users and computers. This book aims at highlighting the influence of the agency perspective in Human-Computer Interaction through a careful selection of research contributions. Split into five sections; Users as Agents, Agents and Accessibility, Agents and Interactions, Agent-centric Paradigms and Approaches, and Collective Agents, the book covers a wealth of novel, original and fully updated material, offering:   ü  To provide a coherent, in depth, and timely material on the agency perspective in HCI ü  To offer an authoritative treatment of the subject matter presented by carefully selected authors ü  To offer a balanced and broad coverage of the subject area, including, human, organizational, social, as well as technological concerns. ü  To offer a hands-on-experience by covering representative case studies and offering essential design guidelines   The book will appeal to a broad audience of resea...

  7. Advancements in Violin-Related Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Finesse is required while performing with many traditional musical instruments, as they are extremely responsive to human inputs. The violin is specifically examined here, as it excels at translating a performer’s gestures into sound in manners that evoke a wide range of affective qualities...... of human intelligence and emotion is at the core of the Musical Interface Technology Design Space, MITDS. This is a framework that endeavors to retain and enhance such traits of traditional instruments in the design of interactive live performance interfaces. Utilizing the MITDS, advanced Human......-Computer Interaction technologies for the violin are developed in order to allow musicians to explore new methods of creating music. Through this process, the aim is to provide musicians with control systems that let them transcend the interface itself, and focus on musically compelling performances....

  8. Human-computer interface glove using flexible piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Seo, Jeonggyu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Park, Jung-Min

    2017-05-01

    In this note, we propose a human-computer interface glove based on flexible piezoelectric sensors. We select polyvinylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric material for the sensors because of advantages such as a steady piezoelectric characteristic and good flexibility. The sensors are installed in a fabric glove by means of pockets and Velcro bands. We detect changes in the angles of the finger joints from the outputs of the sensors, and use them for controlling a virtual hand that is utilized in virtual object manipulation. To assess the sensing ability of the piezoelectric sensors, we compare the processed angles from the sensor outputs with the real angles from a camera recoding. With good agreement between the processed and real angles, we successfully demonstrate the user interaction system with the virtual hand and interface glove based on the flexible piezoelectric sensors, for four hand motions: fist clenching, pinching, touching, and grasping.

  9. On the Rhetorical Contract in Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    An exploration of the rhetorical contract--i.e., the expectations for appropriate interaction--as it develops in human-computer interaction revealed that direct manipulation interfaces were more likely to establish social expectations. Study results suggest that the social nature of human-computer interactions can be examined with reference to the…

  10. Dialogical communication and empowering social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    How to succeed in facilitating for empowering processes within social work practice is a central topic in both theoretical discussions and regarding its principles in practice. With a particular focus on how dialogical communication can play a part in order to practice empowering social work, through this text the author frames HUSK as a project facilitating the underpinning humanistic approaches in social work. Dialogical communication and its philosophical base is presented and recognized as a means to achieve empowering social work as well as highlighting the importance of the humanistic approach. The author also underscores how HUSK projects in themselves were enabled because of the required collaboration between service users, professionals, and researchers that signified HUSK. This is pinpointed as having potential for a future research agenda as well as pointing at how the outcomes of the projects may impact future social work practice when the goal is to conduct empowering social work.

  11. Dialogism and Syncretism: (ReDefinitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gatti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work seeks an adequate definition of syncretism within the theoretical context suggested by dialogism. One of the issues examined here is the usual description of syncretism as a possible dialectical operation. This discussion also points to the use of syncretism in the analysis of cultural practices. In order to do that, it refers to the work of Mikhail Bakhtin as well as the writings by researchers of his oeuvre.

  12. The BIOSIS data base: Evaluation of its indexes and the STRATBLDR, CHEMFILE, STAIRS and DIALOG systems for on-line searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, M.; Green, H. O.

    1977-01-01

    An IBM-developed program, STAIRS, was selected for performing a search on the BIOSIS file. The evaluation of the hardware and search systems and the strategies used are discussed. The searches are analyzed by type of end user.

  13. INNER DIALOGICITY OF MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova Nataliya Vladimirovna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author studies inner dialogicity as an integral property of a scientist's thinking activity, a way of a scientific idea development, one of the cognitive and discursive mechanisms of new knowledge formation, its crystallization and dementalisation in a text, as a way of search for truth. Such approach to dialogicity in the study of a scientific text makes it possible to analyze the cogitative processes proceeding in human consciousness and cognitive activity, allows to fully understand the stated scientific concept, to define pragmatic strategies of the author, to plunge into his reflexive world. On the material of medical scientific texts of N.M. Amosov and F. G. Uglov, famous scientists in the field of cardio surgery, it is established that traces of internal dialogicity manifestation in the textual space of scientists actualize the origin of new knowledge, the change of author's semantic positions, his ability to reflect, compare, analyze his own thoughts and actions, to estimate oneself and the features of thinking process which are realized in logic of a statement of the scientific concept, an explanation of concepts, terms at judgment of the points of view of contemporaries and predecessors, adherents and scientist's opponents, and also orientation to the addressee's presupposition, activization of his cogitative activity. Linguistic, discursive, verbal analysis singles out the impact on the addressee, his mental activity.

  14. Discoveries and developments in human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes contributions made to the science and practice of human-computer interaction (HCI), primarily through Human Factors and the society's annual proceedings. Research in HCI began to appear in publications associated with the Society around 1980 and has continued through the present. A search of the literature appearing in either the journal or the proceedings was done to identify the specific contributions made by researchers in this area. More than 2,300 papers were identified, some comparing the actual or predicted performance of a new device, display format, or computer-based system with an existing or alternative system. Other work describes methods for evaluating systems performance. This work has had a tremendous impact, particularly the work of Fitts, Smith and Mosier, and Virzi. Work on HCI has contributed to (a) current national and international guidelines, (b) the development of user interface management systems, (c) the provision of guidance as to where best to invest resources when evaluating computing systems, and (d) the prediction of human performance using those systems.

  15. Gesture controlled human-computer interface for the disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, Oskar M; Sawicki, Dariusz J

    2017-02-28

    The possibility of using a computer by a disabled person is one of the difficult problems of the human-computer interaction (HCI), while the professional activity (employment) is one of the most important factors affecting the quality of life, especially for disabled people. The aim of the project has been to propose a new HCI system that would allow for resuming employment for people who have lost the possibility of a standard computer operation. The basic requirement was to replace all functions of a standard mouse without the need of performing precise hand movements and using fingers. The Microsoft's Kinect motion controller had been selected as a device which would recognize hand movements. Several tests were made in order to create optimal working environment with the new device. The new communication system consisted of the Kinect device and the proper software had been built. The proposed system was tested by means of the standard subjective evaluations and objective metrics according to the standard ISO 9241-411:2012. The overall rating of the new HCI system shows the acceptance of the solution. The objective tests show that although the new system is a bit slower, it may effectively replace the computer mouse. The new HCI system fulfilled its task for a specific disabled person. This resulted in the ability to return to work. Additionally, the project confirmed the possibility of effective but nonstandard use of the Kinect device. Med Pr 2017;68(1):1-21.

  16. Religion as dialogical resource: a socio-cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucal, Aleksandar; Zittoun, Tania

    2013-06-01

    William James proposed a psychological study of religion examining people's religious experiences, and to see in what sense these were good for them. The recent developments of psychology of religion moved far from that initial proposition. In this paper, we propose a sociocultural perspective to religion that renews with that initial stance. After recalling Vygtotsky's core ideas, we suggest that religion, as cultural and symbolic system, participates to the orchestration of human activities and sense-making. Such orchestration works both from within the person, through internalized values and ideas, and from without, through the person's interactions with others, discourses, cultural objects etc. This leads us to consider religions as supporting various forms of dialogical dynamics-intra-psychological dialogues, interpersonal with present, absent or imaginary others, as well as inter-group dialogues-which we illustrate with empirical vignettes. The example of religious tensions in the Balkans in the 90's highlights how much the historical-cultural embeddedness of these dynamics can also lead to the end of dialogicality, and therefore, sense-making.

  17. Dialogic Pedagogy and Educating Preservice Teachers for Critical Multiculturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermine Abd Elkader

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the potentials of educating preservice teachers for critical multiculturalism through dialogic pedagogy. The study findings suggest that dialogic pedagogy experienced some successes in encouraging preservice teachers to revise their worldview about certain topics in the multicultural curriculum about which they were not initially open to dialogue. The study should contribute to the literature of dialogic pedagogy and multicultural education in terms of suggesting more democratic educational approaches toward teaching the controversial topics of the multicultural curriculum.

  18. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  19. Human-Computer Interfaces and OPACs: Introductory Thoughts Related to INNOPAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Helen K.

    1991-01-01

    Human-computer interface design concepts are used as the criteria for evaluating the benefits and shortcomings of San Diego State University Library's online catalog, INNOPAC (the PAC). Features discussed include integrated files, search capabilities, system availability, user interface, record-to-record links, boolean operations, subject access,…

  20. Human-Computer Interaction and Information Management Research Needs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In a visionary future, Human-Computer Interaction HCI and Information Management IM have the potential to enable humans to better manage their lives through the use...

  1. Mobile human-computer interaction perspective on mobile learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying a Mobile Human Computer Interaction (MHCI) view to the domain of education using Mobile Learning (Mlearning), the research outlines its understanding of the influences and effects of different interactions on the use of mobile technology...

  2. Impact of Cognitive Architectures on Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and, in so doing, evaluate user interfaces. In this report we will review the influence of several cognitive architectures—specifically, asking what...promises were made, what impacts were realized, and what potential impact can we reasonably expect in the future. human-computer interaction ( HCI ...human-computer interaction ( HCI ), it must harden. Their vision is for psychology to provide engineering style theory that influences the design of

  3. Fra monteret monolog til direkte dialog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Freja Sørine Adler

    2016-01-01

    Siden nedlæggelsen af montageafdelingen i DR i 2008 har dansk public service-taleradio været kritiseret for at mangle kunstneriske ambitioner. I artiklen bliver det dokumenteret, at P1 og Radio24syv vægter aktualitet, lytterengagement og lytterinteraktivitet over de tidskrævende, monterede formater....... Den kvantitative indholdsanalyse af en uges programmer i 2007 og 2015 viser et fald i formidlingsformer som oplæsning, reportage, interviews uden for studiet, dokumentar og drama. Dertil måles en stigning i studieinterviews og dialog. Gennem en dokumentanalyse vurderes det, at både DR og Radio24syv...

  4. Dialog between a Lexicographer and a Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dialog between a Lexicographer and a Translator The discussion between the authors of the paper concerns the most pressing issues encountered in natural language semantics, as well as in corpus linguistics and computational linguistics. A broad range of knowledge, allowing linguists and information scientists to work together, is required in these areas. The paper describes some primary problems of human and machine translation caused by gaps between different fields of knowledge. The authors suggest that interdisciplinary approach is required when it comes to contrastive studies in linguistics.

  5. Scaffolding and Dialogic Teaching in Mathematics Education: Introduction and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arthur; Smit, Jantien; Wegerif, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    This article has two purposes: firstly to introduce this special issue on scaffolding and dialogic teaching in mathematics education and secondly to review the recent literature on these topics as well as the articles in this special issue. First we define and characterise scaffolding and dialogic teaching and provide a brief historical overview…

  6. Exploring the Dialogic Space of Public Participation in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    in public misconceptions of science. This paper uses the dialogic space proposed by Callon et al. to explore relationships between public and science. The dialogic space spans collective versus scientific dimensions. The collective (or public) is constituted by aggregation (opinion polls) or by composition...

  7. Dialogic & Critical Pedagogies: An Interview with Ira Shor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ira; Matusov, Eugene; Marjanovic-Shane, Ana; Cresswel, lJames

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Main Editors of "Dialogic Pedagogy Journal" issued a call for papers and contributions to a wide range of dialogic pedagogy scholars and practitioners. One of the scholars who responded to our call is famous American educator Ira Shor, a professor at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. Shor has been…

  8. The Importance of Dialogic Processes to Conceptual Development in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Sibel; Wegerif, Rupert; Fujita, Taro

    2015-01-01

    We argue that dialogic theory, inspired by the Russian scholar Mikhail Bakhtin, has a distinct contribution to the analysis of the genesis of understanding in the mathematics classroom. We begin by contrasting dialogic theory to other leading theoretical approaches to understanding conceptual development in mathematics influenced by Jean Piaget…

  9. What is dialogical research, and why should we do it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur W

    2005-09-01

    Social scientists have explored the writing of Russian literary philosopher Bakhtin from a variety of perspectives, but little attempt has been made to apply Bakhtin's conception of dialogue to the conduct of research and the production of research reports. The author's questions relate to what dialogical research would look like and the ethical imperative of dialogical research.

  10. Dialogic Teaching to the High-Stakes Standardised Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Aliza; Snell, Julia; Lefstein, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Within current educational discourse, dialogic pedagogy is diametrically opposed to "teaching to the test", especially the high-stakes standardised test. While dialogic pedagogy is about critical thinking, authenticity and freedom, test preparation evokes all that is narrow, instrumental and cynical in education. In this paper, we argue…

  11. Scaffolding and dialogic teaching in mathematics education : introduction and review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Arthur|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272605778; Smit, Jantien|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314005552; Wegerif, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    This article has two purposes: firstly to introduce this special issue on scaffolding and dialogic teaching in mathematics education and secondly to review the recent literature on these topics as well as the articles in this special issue. First we define and characterise scaffolding and dialogic

  12. Handbook of human-computer interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helander, Martin; Landauer, Thomas K; Prabhu, Prasad V

    1997-01-01

    ... of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior wr...

  13. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design and und...... and understanding of audio-based mobile systems are evolving to offer new perspectives on interaction and design and support such systems to be applied in areas, such as the humanities.......Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design...

  14. Responses to Bakhtins Dialogic Origins and Dialogic Pedagogy of Grammar: Stylistics as Part of Russian Language Instruction in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazerman, Charles; Farmer, Frank; Halasek, Kay; Williams, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The three authors writing on Bakhtins essay, "Dialogic Origin and Dialogic Pedagogy of Grammar" -- Farmer, Halasek, and Williams -- respond to one another, and Bazerman provides a summative comment in the paragraphs that follow. The responses explore further some of Bakhtins thoughts concerning rhetoric and its relation to stylistics and his use…

  15. Institutionalizing human-computer interaction for global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Digitalization is the societal change process in which new ICT-based solutions bring forward completely new ways of doing things, new businesses and new movements in the society. Digitalization also provides completely new ways of addressing issues related to global health. This paper provides an overview of the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and in what way the field has contributed to international development in different regions of the world. Additionally, it outlines the United Nations’ new sustainability goals from December 2015 and what these could contribute to the development of global health and its relationship to digitalization. Finally, it argues why and how HCI could be adopted and adapted to fit the contextual needs, the need for localization and for the development of new digital innovations. The research methodology is mostly qualitative following an action research paradigm in which the actual change process that the digitalization is evoking is equally important as the scientific conclusions that can be drawn. In conclusion, the paper argues that digitalization is fundamentally changing the society through the development and use of digital technologies and may have a profound effect on the digital development of every country in the world. But it needs to be developed based on local practices, it needs international support and to not be limited by any technological constraints. Particularly digitalization to support global health requires a profound understanding of the users and their context, arguing for user-centred systems design methodologies as particularly suitable. PMID:28838309

  16. Improving the human-computer dialogue with increased temporal predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Florian; Haering, Carola; Thomaschke, Roland

    2013-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the impacts of length and variability of system response time (SRT) on user behavior and user experience (UX) in sequential computing tasks. Length is widely considered to be the most important aspect of SRTs in human-computer interaction. Research on temporal attention shows that humans adjust to temporal structures and that performance substantially improves with temporal predictability. Participants performed a sequential task with simulated office software. Duration and variability, that is, the number of different SRTs, was manipulated. Lower variability came at the expense of on average higher durations. User response times, task execution times, and failure rates were measured to assess user performance. UX was measured with a questionnaire. A reduction in variability improved user performance significantly. Whereas task load and failure rates remained constant, responses were significantly faster. Although a reduction in variability came along with, on average, increased SRTs, no difference in UX was found. Considering SRT variability when designing software can yield considerable performance benefits for the users. Although reduced variability comes at the expense of overall longer SRTs, the interface is not subjectively evaluated to be less satisfactory or demanding. Time design should aim not only at reducing average SRT length but also at finding the optimum balance of length and variability. Our findings can easily be applied in any user interface for sequential tasks. User performance can be improved without loss of satisfaction by selectively prolonging particular SRTs to reduce variability.

  17. Institutionalizing human-computer interaction for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Digitalization is the societal change process in which new ICT-based solutions bring forward completely new ways of doing things, new businesses and new movements in the society. Digitalization also provides completely new ways of addressing issues related to global health. This paper provides an overview of the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and in what way the field has contributed to international development in different regions of the world. Additionally, it outlines the United Nations' new sustainability goals from December 2015 and what these could contribute to the development of global health and its relationship to digitalization. Finally, it argues why and how HCI could be adopted and adapted to fit the contextual needs, the need for localization and for the development of new digital innovations. The research methodology is mostly qualitative following an action research paradigm in which the actual change process that the digitalization is evoking is equally important as the scientific conclusions that can be drawn. In conclusion, the paper argues that digitalization is fundamentally changing the society through the development and use of digital technologies and may have a profound effect on the digital development of every country in the world. But it needs to be developed based on local practices, it needs international support and to not be limited by any technological constraints. Particularly digitalization to support global health requires a profound understanding of the users and their context, arguing for user-centred systems design methodologies as particularly suitable.

  18. Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Paul; Lovat, Terry

    2016-12-01

    This paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives other than their own, and be attuned to the demands of inter-subjectivity. Applicable to clinical practice, we propose and justify a Habermasian approach as one useful means of achieving what can be described as dialogic consensus. The Habermasian approach builds around, first, his discourse theory of morality as universalizable to all and, second, communicative action as a cooperative search for truth. It is a concrete way to ground the discourse which must be held in complex medical decision-making situations, in its actual reality. Considerations about the theoretical underpinnings of the application of dialogic consensus to clinical practice, and potential difficulties, are explored.

  19. Measuring Appeal in Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neben, Tillmann; Xiao, Bo Sophia; Lim, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Appeal refers to the positive emotional response to an aesthetic, beautiful, or in another way desirable stimulus. It is a recurring topic in information systems (IS) research, and is important for understanding many phenomena of user behavior and decision-making. While past IS research on appeal...

  20. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design and und...

  1. Human/computer control of undersea teleoperators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, T. B.; Verplank, W. L.; Brooks, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of supervisory controlled teleoperators for accomplishment of manipulation and sensory tasks in deep ocean environments is discussed. Teleoperators and supervisory control are defined, the current problems of human divers are reviewed, and some assertions are made about why supervisory control has potential use to replace and extend human diver capabilities. The relative roles of man and computer and the variables involved in man-computer interaction are next discussed. Finally, a detailed description of a supervisory controlled teleoperator system, SUPERMAN, is presented.

  2. The Embodied Attunement of Therapists and a Couple within Dialogical Psychotherapy: An Introduction to the Relational Mind Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikkula, Jaakko; Karvonen, Anu; Kykyri, Virpi-Liisa; Kaartinen, Jukka; Penttonen, Markku

    2015-12-01

    In dialogical practice, therapists seek to respond to the utterances of clients by including in their own response what the client said. No research so far exists on how, in dialogs, therapists and clients attune themselves to each other with their entire bodies. The research program The Relational Mind is the first to look at dialog in terms of both the outer and the inner dialogs of participants (clients and therapists), observed in parallel with autonomic nervous system (ANS) measurements. In the ANS, the response occurs immediately, even before conscious thought, making it possible to follow how participants in a multiactor dialog synchronize their reactions and attune themselves to each other. The couple therapy case presented in this article demonstrates how attunement is often not a simple "all at the same time" phenomenon, but rather a complex, dyadic or triadic phenomenon which changes over time. In the case presented, there was strong synchrony between one therapist and one client in terms of their arousal level throughout the therapy session. It was also observed that high stress could occur when someone else was talking about something related to the participant, or if that person mirrored the participant's words. Overall, it seems that in evaluating the rhythmic attunement between therapists and clients it is not enough to look at single variables; instead, integrated information from several channels is needed when one is seeking to make sense of the embodiment. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  3. Evidence Report: Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina; Ezer, Neta; Vos, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction (HCI) encompasses all the methods by which humans and computer-based systems communicate, share information, and accomplish tasks. When HCI is poorly designed, crews have difficulty entering, navigating, accessing, and understanding information. HCI has rarely been studied in an operational spaceflight context, and detailed performance data that would support evaluation of HCI have not been collected; thus, we draw much of our evidence from post-spaceflight crew comments, and from other safety-critical domains like ground-based power plants, and aviation. Additionally, there is a concern that any potential or real issues to date may have been masked by the fact that crews have near constant access to ground controllers, who monitor for errors, correct mistakes, and provide additional information needed to complete tasks. We do not know what types of HCI issues might arise without this "safety net". Exploration missions will test this concern, as crews may be operating autonomously due to communication delays and blackouts. Crew survival will be heavily dependent on available electronic information for just-in-time training, procedure execution, and vehicle or system maintenance; hence, the criticality of the Risk of Inadequate HCI. Future work must focus on identifying the most important contributing risk factors, evaluating their contribution to the overall risk, and developing appropriate mitigations. The Risk of Inadequate HCI includes eight core contributing factors based on the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS): (1) Requirements, policies, and design processes, (2) Information resources and support, (3) Allocation of attention, (4) Cognitive overload, (5) Environmentally induced perceptual changes, (6) Misperception and misinterpretation of displayed information, (7) Spatial disorientation, and (8) Displays and controls.

  4. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancău Dorina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for error decoding.

  5. Dialogical, Enquiry and Participatory Approaches to Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurford, Donna; Rowley, Chris

    2018-01-01

    to what is to be learnt, what is in the adult’s mind, and both contribute to and are involved in the learning process, although the project also found that such exchanges do not occur frequently and that freely chosen play activities often provided the best opportunities for adults to extend children’s......Dialogical enquiry and participatory approaches This chapter is concerned with approaches to leading children into active participation and enquiry, through involvement in their own learning, both at Key Stages 1 and 2. The terms ‘enquiry’, ‘learning’ and ‘active participation’ are closely related...... Years (REPEY) Project (Siraj-Blatchford et al. 2002). This project found that the most effective strategies and techniques for promoting learning in the early years involved adult–child interactions in which the adult responds to the child’s understanding of a subject or activity, the child responds...

  6. A Software for the Analysis of Scripted Dialogs Based on Surface Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Delisle

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Most information systems that deal with natural language texts do not tolerate much deviation from their idealized and simplified model of language. Spoken dialog is notoriously ungrammatical however. Because the MAREDI project focuses in particular on the automatic analysis of scripted dialogs, we needed to develop a robust capacity to analyze transcribed spoken language. This paper presents the main elements of our approach, which is based on exploiting surface markers as the best route to the semantics of the conversation modelled. We highlight the foundations of our particular conversational model and give an overview of the MAREDI system. The latter consists of three key modules, which are 1 a connectionist network to recognise speech acts, 2 a robust syntactic parser, and 3 a semantic analyzer. These three modules are fully implemented in Prolog and C++ and have been packaged into an integrated software.

  7. Human-Computer Interaction in a Smart House

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Leiming; Sun, Chunyan

    2012-01-01

    The quality attribute concerning usability is generally of significant importance to systems. The area of Human Computer Interaction, HCI, especially handles several usability aspects. This degree project emphasizes HCI in a context of, so called, Smart House. The report is divided into three main sections: theory, application, and measurement results. In the theory section we will present about the context of HCI and the content of HCI, such as HCI model and goals of HCI design. In the appli...

  8. Physiological measures as indices of moods during human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Patrick; Zimmermann, Philippe; Guttormsen-Schär, Sissel; Danuser, Brigitta

    2007-01-01

    Emotions are an important factor in human-computer interaction. One of the challenges in building emotionally intelligent systems is the automatic recognition of affective states. We are developing and evaluating a method for measuring user affect that incorporates psychological, behavioral, and physiological measures. During affective stimulation, breathing parameters, skin conductance level (SCL) and corrugator EMG activity correlate with self-reported levels of valence and arousal. Valence...

  9. Measuring Multimodal Synchrony for Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    England, D.; Reidsma, Dennis; Sheridan, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Crane, B.; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Ramseyer, Fabian

    Nonverbal synchrony is an important element in human-human interaction. It can also play various roles in human-computer interaction. This paper surveys some of these uses, and presents a quantitative method for measuring the level of nonverbal synchrony in an interaction.

  10. Measuring Multimodal Synchrony for Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Ramseyer, Fabian; Sourin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nonverbal synchrony is an important and natural element in human-human interaction. It can also play various roles in human-computer interaction. In particular this is the case in the interaction between humans and the virtual humans that inhabit our cyberworlds. Virtual humans need to adapt their

  11. Humans, computers and wizards human (simulated) computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Norman; McGlashan, Scott; Wooffitt, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Using data taken from a major European Union funded project on speech understanding, the SunDial project, this book considers current perspectives on human computer interaction and argues for the value of an approach taken from sociology which is based on conversation analysis.

  12. New Theoretical Approaches for Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    Presents a critique of recent theoretical developments in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) together with an overview of HCI practice. This chapter discusses why theoretically based approaches have had little impact on the practice of interaction design and suggests mechanisms to enable designers and researchers to better articulate…

  13. Formal modelling techniques in human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G.; de Haan, G.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; van Vliet, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is a theoretical contribution, elaborating the concept of models as used in Cognitive Ergonomics. A number of formal modelling techniques in human-computer interaction will be reviewed and discussed. The analysis focusses on different related concepts of formal modelling techniques in

  14. Human Computing and Machine Understanding of Human Behavior: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex; Nijholt, Antinus; Huang, Thomas; Quek, F.; Yang, Yie

    2006-01-01

    A widely accepted prediction is that computing will move to the background, weaving itself into the fabric of our everyday living spaces and projecting the human user into the foreground. If this prediction is to come true, then next generation computing, which we will call human computing, should

  15. The Human-Computer Interface for Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Debora

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the human-computer interface as it relates to information technology and retrieval. Principles of interface design are examined, including visual display features and help messages; information retrieval applications are described, including online searching, CD-ROM, online public access catalogs (OPACs), and full-text databases; and…

  16. Designers' models of the human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Breedin, Sarah D.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding design models of the human-computer interface (HCI) may produce two types of benefits. First, interface development often requires input from two different types of experts: human factors specialists and software developers. Given the differences in their backgrounds and roles, human factors specialists and software developers may have different cognitive models of the HCI. Yet, they have to communicate about the interface as part of the design process. If they have different models, their interactions are likely to involve a certain amount of miscommunication. Second, the design process in general is likely to be guided by designers' cognitive models of the HCI, as well as by their knowledge of the user, tasks, and system. Designers do not start with a blank slate; rather they begin with a general model of the object they are designing. The author's approach to a design model of the HCI was to have three groups make judgments of categorical similarity about the components of an interface: human factors specialists with HCI design experience, software developers with HCI design experience, and a baseline group of computer users with no experience in HCI design. The components of the user interface included both display components such as windows, text, and graphics, and user interaction concepts, such as command language, editing, and help. The judgments of the three groups were analyzed using hierarchical cluster analysis and Pathfinder. These methods indicated, respectively, how the groups categorized the concepts, and network representations of the concepts for each group. The Pathfinder analysis provides greater information about local, pairwise relations among concepts, whereas the cluster analysis shows global, categorical relations to a greater extent.

  17. Theoretical Views in Inter-religious Dialog in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Jafarian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available   It has almost passed one century from the emergence of the idea of the inter-religious dialog. The idea, being based on the assumption that no religion has the absolute truth, believes that there is the possibility of the dialog between all the existent religions in the social world. The dialog could make the coexistence and peace between the religions possible. The importance of this issue is increasingly growing and different ideas have been presented in the different religion departments worldwide. After the Iranian Islamic Revolution, a new image of Islam was offered to the world. An image whose true exposure made the use of the inter-religious dialog unavoidable. This also caused appearance of different views between the Muslim scholars. This article seeks to provide a presentation of three different approaches to the inter-religious dialog by exploring the works of three eminent scholars in the field; Mohaghegh Damad, Abolhassan Navab and Mohammad Masjed Jamei. These three approaches are:   · Inter-religious dialog as an interaction-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a necessity-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a backgroubd-oriented action    The necessity-oriented action is the approach taken by Mohaghegh Damad. He emphasizes on the acceptance of other religions. The active action referring to this acceptance is the foundation of this approach. This approach, accepting the developmental discourse in the meaning of inter-religious dialog, believes that this kind of dialog has been evolved from defensive and opposing to a new meaning. Hence, the inter-religious dialog in its new meaning possesses three conditions; the existence of common rights, emphasis on mutual respect and the effort for the two sides for religious exchange. This approach­ assumes that we must first establish a pattern from the current experiences of inter-religious dialogs in order to have an ideal cooperation and to fortify it

  18. Theoretical Views in Inter-religious Dialog in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Masjed Jamei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It has almost passed one century from the emergence of the idea of the inter-religious dialog. The idea, being based on the assumption that no religion has the absolute truth, believes that there is the possibility of the dialog between all the existent religions in the social world. The dialog could make the coexistence and peace between the religions possible. The importance of this issue is increasingly growing and different ideas have been presented in the different religion departments worldwide. After the Iranian Islamic Revolution, a new image of Islam was offered to the world. An image whose true exposure made the use of the inter-religious dialog unavoidable. This also caused appearance of different views between the Muslim scholars. This article seeks to provide a presentation of three different approaches to the inter-religious dialog by exploring the works of three eminent scholars in the field; Mohaghegh Damad, Abolhassan Navab and Mohammad Masjed Jamei. These three approaches are:   · Inter-religious dialog as an interaction-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a necessity-oriented action    · Inter-religious dialog as a backgroubd-oriented action    The necessity-oriented action is the approach taken by Mohaghegh Damad. He emphasizes on the acceptance of other religions. The active action referring to this acceptance is the foundation of this approach. This approach, accepting the developmental discourse in the meaning of inter-religious dialog, believes that this kind of dialog has been evolved from defensive and opposing to a new meaning. Hence, the inter-religious dialog in its new meaning possesses three conditions; the existence of common rights, emphasis on mutual respect and the effort for the two sides for religious exchange. This approach­ assumes that we must first establish a pattern from the current experiences of inter-religious dialogs in order to have an ideal cooperation and to fortify it. Then

  19. Dialogical Interdetermination in Psychological Phenomenology of Education: an Example of Teachers’ Professional Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Yanchuk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: a distinctive feature of modern psychological knowledge is an extreme degree of disintegration manifested in an infinite array of publications describing local fragments of the studied reality outside the context of integrity. Simultaneously, development of knowledge without its metatheoretical interpretation gives it a sporadic character and, consequently, restricts the optimal solutions. The author’s attempt to solve this urgent problem is presented in the framework of sociocultural-interdeterminist dialogical metatheory of integration of psychological knowledge. Methodological foundations with substantial characterisation of metatheory are described. A research objective is to present innovative and heuristic potential of the meta-approach demonstration illustrated through the teacher’s psychological anti-deforming model. Materials and Methods: the methodological basis of research is presented by the sociocultural interdeterminist dialogical approach to education phenomenology analysis which innovative potential is illustrated by the example of teacher’s personality deformation. System analysis, comparative method, systematisation and conceptualisation of scientific ideas, classification and typifications, research object and subject modeling were used during the study. Results: the foundations and innovative potential of the sociocultural-interdeterminist dialogical meta-approach to social phenomenology analysis are given a thorough account. The teacher’s personality professional deformation main criteria are given (authoritativeness, rigidity, self-perception non-criticality, role expansionism and pedagogical indifference, the personality deformation operational definition is formulated. The concept of psychological interdeterminants of professional deformation is introduced, the process of interdetermination of personality’s deformation phenomenon is revealed, that is: interdependence of per¬sonal, environmental

  20. Assessing dialogic communication through the Internet in Spanish museums

    OpenAIRE

    Capriotti, Paul; Pardo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Dialogic communication is being boosted by the strong development of the social web. The web 2.0 is generating significant changes in the manner that organizations engage in dialogue with their publics, opening the way towards the interactive communication. In this way, web 2.0 tools will foster the dialogic communication between museums and their publics. Through them, the relationship between museums and publics is changing towards more interactive and collaborative forms. ...

  1. Reflective Roleplaying in the Development of Dialogic Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted

    2017-01-01

    Whether an organization prospers depends importantly on the relationships among its participants, and central to the success of relationships is the process of dialogue. This article describes an action-based educational practice for enhancing dialogical and relational skills among members...... together with approximately 60 organizational members over a period of 18 months. Results suggest that this combination of practices enhanced dialogic, relational, and reflective skills among leaders and employees of the organization. Among the various results, particular attention is here paid...

  2. The Human-Computer Domain Relation in UX Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil

    This paper argues that the conceptualization of the human, the computer and the domain of use in competing lines of UX research have problematic similarities and superficial differences. The paper qualitatively analyses concepts and models in five research papers that together represent two...... domains, give little details about users, and treat human-computer interaction as perception. The conclusion gives similarities and differences between the approaches to UX. The implications for theory building are indicated....

  3. Choice of Human-Computer Interaction Mode in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Hondori, Hossein; Khademi, Maryam; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; Lopes, Cristina V; Cramer, Steven C

    2016-03-01

    Advances in technology are providing new forms of human-computer interaction. The current study examined one form of human-computer interaction, augmented reality (AR), whereby subjects train in the real-world workspace with virtual objects projected by the computer. Motor performances were compared with those obtained while subjects used a traditional human-computer interaction, that is, a personal computer (PC) with a mouse. Patients used goal-directed arm movements to play AR and PC versions of the Fruit Ninja video game. The 2 versions required the same arm movements to control the game but had different cognitive demands. With AR, the game was projected onto the desktop, where subjects viewed the game plus their arm movements simultaneously, in the same visual coordinate space. In the PC version, subjects used the same arm movements but viewed the game by looking up at a computer monitor. Among 18 patients with chronic hemiparesis after stroke, the AR game was associated with 21% higher game scores (P = .0001), 19% faster reaching times (P = .0001), and 15% less movement variability (P = .0068), as compared to the PC game. Correlations between game score and arm motor status were stronger with the AR version. Motor performances during the AR game were superior to those during the PC game. This result is due in part to the greater cognitive demands imposed by the PC game, a feature problematic for some patients but clinically useful for others. Mode of human-computer interface influences rehabilitation therapy demands and can be individualized for patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The dialogical dance: self, identity construction, positioning and embodiment in tango dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Luca

    2014-09-01

    Argentine tango is a complex phenomenon, involving music, dancing and lifestyle, today practiced by hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. This is already a good reason for psychology to make it an object of study. Besides, studying tango could also help to develop a dialogical way of theorizing and a dialogical methodology, taking into account both the genetic historical and eso-systemic dimensions and the individual experiencing. As any other product of human psyche, tango creates an universal and abstract representation of life starting from very situated and individual acts. Such institutionalized representation, which is at the same time epistemological, ethical and aesthetical, becomes a tradition -that is the framework distanced from the individual immediate experience- within which the meaning of the experiences to be make sense in return. To illustrate this epistemological and methodological stance, a history of the development of tango as dialogical social object first is sketched. Then, an ethnographic study about the Self actuation in a community of Italian tango dancers is presented. Results show how participants construct and actuate their identities in a dialogue between their I-positions inside and outside tango community.

  5. Linking Futures across Scales: a Dialog on Multiscale Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinette Biggs

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Scenario analysis is a useful tool for exploring key uncertainties that may shape the future of social-ecological systems. This paper explores the methods, costs, and benefits of developing and linking scenarios of social-ecological systems across multiple spatial scales. Drawing largely on experiences in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, we suggest that the desired degree of cross-scale linkage depends on the primary aim of the scenario exercise. Loosely linked multiscale scenarios appear more appropriate when the primary aim is to engage in exploratory dialog with stakeholders. Tightly coupled cross-scale scenarios seem to work best when the main objective is to further our understanding of cross-scale interactions or to assess trade-offs between scales. The main disadvantages of tightly coupled cross-scale scenarios are that their development requires substantial time and financial resources, and that they often suffer loss of credibility at one or more scales. The reasons for developing multiscale scenarios and the expectations associated with doing so therefore need to be carefully evaluated when choosing the desired degree of cross-scale linkage in a particular scenario exercise.

  6. Dialogic Learning: Basis for Education & Transformation in Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Marigo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to introduce the Nucleus of Investigation and Social and Educational Action (NIASE, which is an academic nucleus in Brazil whose practices are based on the concept of dialogic learning as well as on the communicative action theory by Jürgen Habermas and on the concept of dialogicity by Paulo Freire. Dialogic learning is the result of dialogue directed to the overcoming of social and educational challenges which can be achieved through seven articulated principles: egalitarian dialogue, cultural intelligence, transformation, instrumental dimension, creation of meaning, sympathy and equality of differences. NIASE, which was founded in Brazil in 2002 with the purpose of working with education, research and extension, has found in dialogic learning the support for the democratic organization of schooling and on schooling educational environments, whose participants decide on seeking learning qualification and the social respect from the involved groups. As a result of such actions, the concept of dialogic learning has made an impact on education and academic production in Brazil, therefore contributing to consolidate the social commitment and the dialogue between the scientific community and the broader context in which it is involved.

  7. Human-Computer Interaction and Sociological Insight: A Theoretical Examination and Experiment in Building Affinity in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Michael Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The juxtaposition of classic sociological theory and the, relatively, young discipline of human-computer interaction (HCI) serves as a powerful mechanism for both exploring the theoretical impacts of technology on human interactions as well as the application of technological systems to moderate interactions. It is the intent of this dissertation…

  8. Homo ludens in the loop playful human computation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The human mind is incredible. It solves problems with ease that will elude machines even for the next decades. This book explores what happens when humans and machines work together to solve problems machines cannot yet solve alone. It explains how machines and computers can work together and how humans can have fun helping to face some of the most challenging problems of artificial intelligence. In this book, you will find designs for games that are entertaining and yet able to collect data to train machines for complex tasks such as natural language processing or image understanding. You wil

  9. Operational characteristics optimization of human-computer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulquernain Mallick

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer operational parameters are having vital influence on the operators efficiency from readability viewpoint. Four parameters namely font, text/background color, viewing angle and viewing distance are analyzed. The text reading task, in the form of English text, was presented on the computer screen to the participating subjects and their performance, measured in terms of number of words read per minute (NWRPM, was recorded. For the purpose of optimization, the Taguchi method is used to find the optimal parameters to maximize operators’ efficiency for performing readability task. Two levels of each parameter have been considered in this study. An orthogonal array, the signal-to-noise (S/N ratio and the analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed to investigate the operators’ performance/efficiency. Results showed that Times Roman font, black text on white background, 40 degree viewing angle and 60 cm viewing distance, the subjects were quite comfortable, efficient and read maximum number of words per minute. Text/background color was dominant parameter with a percentage contribution of 76.18% towards the laid down objective followed by font type at 18.17%, viewing distance 7.04% and viewing angle 0.58%. Experimental results are provided to confirm the effectiveness of this approach.

  10. A DIALOGIC PERSPECTIVE ON ORAL TRADITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alejos García

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral tradition has a long history of research both in linguistics and anthropology, being the vast corpus of ethnic narrative one of its main achievements. This outstanding documentation of worldwide cultural verbal creations has to a certain degree already been published, other materials remain in archives or as part of unpublished texts, while much more is being gathered in contemporary research. Yet, a critique to this enormous academic effort may be that analysis and interpretation of data has been left behind, to favor the ethnographic and linguistic documentation and rescue of the vanishing oral heritage of endangered native cultures. This paper discusses such analytical shortcoming and advances a dialogic perspective based on Bakhtin’s theoretical framework, with particular interest in concepts derived from musical theory, such as voice, intonation, and polyphony. In fact, even though Bakhtin’s interests were centered on rather canonical written literature, and not on folklore and the aesthetic verbal creations of non Western cultures, his conceptual framework is based on oral phenomena in general, as his concept of voice clearly shows. Oral discourse and everyday language are placed as the foundation and primary source of written literature. Therefore, Bakhtinian concepts have an extraordinary potential for the study of oral discourse, in particular of tales, legends, myths, and other genres belonging to traditional narrative. In this paper I argue that linguistic anthropological research on oral tradition may greatly benefit from a Bakhtinian perspective, which offers novel conceptual tools for the understanding of ethnic narrative, and may also allow a critical review of previous theories and studies on the subject.

  11. Chaotic harmony a dialog about physics, complexity and life

    CERN Document Server

    Sanayei, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This fascinating book written by Ali Sanayei and Otto E. Rössler is not a classic scientific publication, but a vivid dialogue on science, philosophy and  the interdisciplinary intersections of science and technology with biographic elements. Chaotic Harmony: A Dialog about Physics, Complexity and Life represents a discussion between Otto Rössler and his colleague and student, focusing on the different areas of science and highlights their mutual relations. The book's concept of interdisciplinary dialogue is  unusual nowadays although it has a long tradition in science. It provides insight not only into interesting topics that are often closely linked, but also into the mind of a prominent scientist in the field of physics, chaos and complexity in general. It allows a deep look into the fascinating process of scientific development and discovery and provides a very interesting background of known and unknown facts in the areas of complex processes in physics, cosmology, biology, brains and systems in gen...

  12. Generalization from Single Cases and the Concept of Double Dialogicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2017-01-01

    The present paper addresses how the concept of double-dialogicality may contribute to our understanding of how to generalize from single cases. Various attempts have been made within qualitative social research to define how generalization is possible from single cases. One problem with generaliz......The present paper addresses how the concept of double-dialogicality may contribute to our understanding of how to generalize from single cases. Various attempts have been made within qualitative social research to define how generalization is possible from single cases. One problem...... in this. In social interactions, persons draw on culturally available resources without which communicative meaning would be impossible. Double dialogicality as introduced by Per Linell helps to understand this relation and allows for identifying the general in the unique....

  13. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Folmann Hempler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use.

  14. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempler, Nana Folmann; Ewers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training......Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani...... and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use....

  15. Generalization from Single Cases and the Concept of Double Dialogicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2017-01-01

    The present paper addresses how the concept of double-dialogicality may contribute to our understanding of how to generalize from single cases. Various attempts have been made within qualitative social research to define how generalization is possible from single cases. One problem...... with generalization in psychology is that any human activity and sense making is situated/occasioned and all psychological phenomenon are hence unique. However, they are not arbitrary but dialogically intertwined with socio-cultural traditions of sense making and acting. Discursive practices play a pivotal role...... in this. In social interactions, persons draw on culturally available resources without which communicative meaning would be impossible. Double dialogicality as introduced by Per Linell helps to understand this relation and allows for identifying the general in the unique....

  16. Assessment of a human computer interface prototyping environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1993-01-01

    A Human Computer Interface (HCI) prototyping environment with embedded evaluation capability has been successfully assessed which will be valuable in developing and refining HCI standards and evaluating program/project interface development, especially Space Station Freedom on-board displays for payload operations. The HCI prototyping environment is designed to include four components: (1) a HCI format development tool, (2) a test and evaluation simulator development tool, (3) a dynamic, interactive interface between the HCI prototype and simulator, and (4) an embedded evaluation capability to evaluate the adequacy of an HCI based on a user's performance.

  17. The DiaCog: A Prototype Tool for Visualizing Online Dialog Games' Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengin, Ilker; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes and explains the design of a prototype learning tool named the DiaCog. The DiaCog visualizes dialog interactions within an online dialog game by using dynamically created cognitive maps. As a purposefully designed tool for enhancing learning effectiveness the DiaCog might be applicable to dialogs at discussion boards within a…

  18. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  19. Developing Argumentation Strategies in Electronic Dialogs: Is Modeling Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayweg-Paus, Elisabeth; Macagno, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here examines how interacting with a more capable interlocutor influences use of argumentation strategies in electronic discourse. To address this question, 54 young adolescents participating in an intervention centered on electronic peer dialogs were randomly assigned to either an experimental or control condition. In both…

  20. Calling-in the Family: Dialogic Performances of Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Mark, Jr.; Herakova, Liliana; Bishop, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication, Introduction to Interpersonal Communication, Family Communication, Small Group Communication, Communication and Listening. Objectives: By this end of this activity, students will be able to identify and practice supportive and defensive communication; understand a dialogic approach to conflict; and…

  1. Dialogism in India's New National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    This article presents evidence from a linguistic analysis conducted on the National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education (NCFTE) 2009, and explores the dialogic characteristics of the document driving the current reform of teacher education. I address one orienting research question: in what ways and to what extent are the aims and…

  2. Morality, Culture and the Dialogic Self: Taking Cultural Pluralism Seriously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Helen; Abrahams, Salie

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores moral reasoning within the framework of contemporary cultural theory, in which moral functioning is action mediated by tools (such as socially available discourses) within a social and cultural context. This cultural model of a "dialogic moral self" challenges many of the assumptions inherent in the individualistic Kantian…

  3. Opposites in a dialogical self: Constructs as characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, H.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Bakhtin's (1973) polyphonic novel serves as a metaphor for a dialogical conception of the self. In line with this metaphor, it is argued that a narrative approach leads to a multivoiced conception of the self, in which the poles of a personal construct are related as opposing characters positioned

  4. Dialectics, Dialogics and Other Ways of Reading Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Matthew; Broda, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    In this response to Reis's and Zuss's responses to our meditation on the grotesque, we attempt to draw distinctions between positivist, empiricist, and realist (including grotesque realist) projects. We also, drawing on Bakhtin, consider the difference between dialogic and dialectic commentary.

  5. International Doctoral Students' Becoming: A Dialogic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linlin; Grant, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper takes up Bakhtin's dialogic perspective to explore the becoming of one Chinese international doctoral student's voices. We investigate how a single participant (from a wider study) assimilates the most transformative but "alien" voice of critical thinking in her supervision space by participating in dialogues with key speaking…

  6. Effects of dialogic peer and teacher guided discourse patterns on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the effects of dialogic, peer and teacher – guided discourse patterns on students' interest in biology. The study also determined the influence of the discourse patterns on male and female students' interest in biology. Three research questions and five null hypotheses, tested at 0.05 level of significance ...

  7. Reflective Roleplaying in the Development of Dialogic Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted

    2017-01-01

    together with approximately 60 organizational members over a period of 18 months. Results suggest that this combination of practices enhanced dialogic, relational, and reflective skills among leaders and employees of the organization. Among the various results, particular attention is here paid...

  8. Dialogic Pedagogy in Creative Practice: A Conversation in Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Carol; Kelen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys examples of dialogic pedagogy in creative practices in the areas of Visual Studies and Creative Writing at universities in Hong Kong and Macao. The authors describe their own participant-observer experience of evolving pedagogy for creative practice through on-site and remote interaction, with colleagues and with and between…

  9. Fostering organizational sustainability through dialogical interaction. The Learning Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.; Schwarzin, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to introduce and investigate dialogic interaction as a key element of achieving a transition towards sustainability in people, organizations and society as a whole. Furthermore “sustainability competence” as a potential outcome of such interaction is to be introduced,

  10. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  11. Towards a Dialogic Theory of How Children Learn to Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a dialogic theory of thinking and of learning to think that has implications for education. The theory is offered as a contrast to theories that are based on both Piaget and Vygotsky. The paper proceeds by unpacking and interweaving three key concepts: dialogue, thinking and learning in order to argue that learning to think can…

  12. Health Effects Profiles for Searching Selected Lockheed DIALOG Data Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Linda Lee

    This preliminary study attempted to determine the most effective search strategies for the topic "health effects" in relation to specific chemicals and/or pollutants--in this case, asbestos--for each of five selected Lockheed DIALOG data bases: BIOSIS Previews, Chemical Abstracts Condensates (Chemcon), NTIS, Enviroline, and Pollution…

  13. Dialogical Feminism: Other Women and the Challenge of Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Academic feminism is now largely concerned with abstract theory and a discourse which distances it from the lived reality of working class women. This paper explores, through the concept and approach of dialogical feminism, ways in which feminists in the academy can re-connect with 'other women' in working towards social transformation for all…

  14. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  15. Combining Natural Human-Computer Interaction and Wireless Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Gheorghe PENTIUC

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present how human-computer interaction can be improved by using wireless communication between devices. Devices that offer a natural user interaction, like the Microsoft Surface Table and tablet PCs, can work together to enhance the experience of an application. Users can use physical objects for a more natural way of handling the virtual world on one hand, and interact with other users wirelessly connected on the other. Physical objects, that interact with the surface table, have a tag attached to them, allowing us to identify them, and take the required action. The TCP/IP protocol was used to handle the wireless communication over the wireless network. A server and a client application were developed for the used devices. To get a wide range of targeted mobile devices, different frameworks for developing cross platform applications were analyzed.

  16. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-04-20

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  17. Human Computer Interaction in the ALMA Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, M.; Primet, R.; Pietriga, E.; Schwarz, J.

    2012-09-01

    The article describes the ALMA Operations Monitoring and Control (OMC) software and its next generation user interfaces, used by operators and astronomers to monitor and control the observing facility. These user interfaces bring state-of-the-art Human Computer Interaction (HCI) techniques to the ALMA Control Room: map visualisation, semantic zooming, navigation gestures, multiple coordinated views, and decrease of time-to-point. They enable users to stay in control of dozens of antennas, hundreds of devices, and thousands of baselines. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international radio-astronomy facility, is a partnership of North America, Europe and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. It is located at the Altiplano de Chajnantor and is being operated from the Operations Support Facilities (OSF) near San Pedro de Atacama.

  18. Developing a Framework for Intuitive Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Marita A; Rogers, Wendy A; Fisk, Arthur D

    2008-09-01

    Many technology marketing materials tout the intuitive nature of products, but current human-computer interaction (HCI) guidelines provide limited methods to help designers create this experience beyond making them easy to use. This paper proposes a definition for intuitive interaction with specific attributes to allow designers to create products that elicit the target experience. Review of relevant literatures provides empirical evidence for the suggested working definition of intuitive HCI: interactions between humans and high technology in lenient learning environments that allow the human to use a combination of prior experience and feedforward methods to achieve an individual's functional and abstract goals. Core concepts supporting this definition were compiled into an organizational framework that includes: seeking user goals, performing well-learned behavior, determining what to do next, metacognition, knowledge in the head, and knowledge in the world. This paper describes these concepts and proposes design approaches that could facilitate intuitive behavior and suggests areas for further research.

  19. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  20. A Human-Computer Collaborative Approach to Identifying Common Data Elements in Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhihui; Miotto, Riccardo; Weng, Chunhua

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify Common Data Elements (CDEs) in eligibility criteria of multiple clinical trials studying the same disease using a human-computer collaborative approach. Design A set of free-text eligibility criteria from clinical trials on two representative diseases, breast cancer and cardiovascular diseases, was sampled to identify disease-specific eligibility criteria CDEs. In this proposed approach, a semantic annotator is used to recognize Unified Medical Language Systems (UMLS) terms within the eligibility criteria text. The Apriori algorithm is applied to mine frequent disease-specific UMLS terms, which are then filtered by a list of preferred UMLS semantic types, grouped by similarity based on the Dice coefficient, and, finally, manually reviewed. Measurements Standard precision, recall, and F-score of the CDEs recommended by the proposed approach were measured with respect to manually identified CDEs. Results Average precision and recall of the recommended CDEs for the two diseases were 0.823 and 0.797, respectively, leading to an average F-score of 0.810. In addition, the machine-powered CDEs covered 80% of the cardiovascular CDEs published by The American Heart Association and assigned by human experts. Conclusion It is feasible and effort saving to use a human-computer collaborative approach to augment domain experts for identifying disease-specific CDEs from free-text clinical trial eligibility criteria. PMID:22846169

  1. Human-computer interaction requirements for abnormal situation management in industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soken, N.; Bullemer, P.; Ramanathan, P.; Reinhart, W. [Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Honeywell Technology Center

    1995-10-01

    Honeywell is leading a multiyear effort to identify the causes of and propose solutions for abnormal situations in industrial processes. The authors define abnormal situations as those that necessitate human intervention because the automated distributed control system (DCS) cannot maintain the plant in an appropriate operating state. These situations are clearly of concern in the process industry because of their impact on revenues, human safety, and the environment. Interactions between the DCS and operating personnel are critical to mitigating abnormal situations in chemical plants. With the collaboration of major petrochemical and oil refining industries, Honeywell conducted on-site evaluations of the operating environments of various types of processes. Through this effort they identified process, equipment, people, and work context factors that contribute to abnormal situations. This paper describes human-computer interaction solution requirements based on the on-site plant evaluations. The results are discussed in terms of improvements to human-computer interactions and user interfaces and enhancements to conventional computer-based DCSs.

  2. Facial Position and Expression-Based Human-Computer Interface for Persons With Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zhen-Peng; Hou, Junhui; Chau, Lap-Pui; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    2016-05-01

    A human-computer interface (namely Facial position and expression Mouse system, FM) for the persons with tetraplegia based on a monocular infrared depth camera is presented in this paper. The nose position along with the mouth status (close/open) is detected by the proposed algorithm to control and navigate the cursor as computer user input. The algorithm is based on an improved Randomized Decision Tree, which is capable of detecting the facial information efficiently and accurately. A more comfortable user experience is achieved by mapping the nose motion to the cursor motion via a nonlinear function. The infrared depth camera enables the system to be independent of illumination and color changes both from the background and on human face, which is a critical advantage over RGB camera-based options. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed system outperforms existing assistive technologies in terms of quantitative and qualitative assessments.

  3. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  4. The Past, Present and Future of Human Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Churchill, Elizabeth

    2018-01-16

    Human Computer Interaction (HCI) focuses on how people interact with, and are transformed by computation. Our current technology landscape is changing rapidly. Interactive applications, devices and services are increasingly becoming embedded into our environments. From our homes to the urban and rural spaces, we traverse everyday. We are increasingly able toヨoften required toヨmanage and configure multiple, interconnected devices and program their interactions. Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques are being used to create dynamic services that learn about us and others, that make conclusions about our intents and affiliations, and that mould our digital interactions based in predictions about our actions and needs, nudging us toward certain behaviors. Computation is also increasingly embedded into our bodies. Understanding human interactions in the everyday digital and physical context. During this lecture, Elizabeth Churchill -Director of User Experience at Google- will talk about how an emerging landscape invites us to revisit old methods and tactics for understanding how people interact with computers and computation, and how it challenges us to think about new methods and frameworks for understanding the future of human-centered computation.

  5. Dialogic leadership: strategies for application in the hospital environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert; Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Martini, Jussara Gue; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein; Trindade, Letícia de Lima

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the strategies used by nurses to support the insertion of dialogic leadership in the hospital environment. Qualitative study, case study type. Twenty five nurses working in three hospitals in the city of Florianopolis, in the state of Santa Catarina (Brazil) participated in the study. Data were collected from May to December 2010. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were performed, non-participant observation and dialogue workshops. Data analysis was performed through Minayo's operational proposal. The strategies mentioned by the study participants were: dialogue, humility, setting an example, resoluteness, meetings and teamwork. It was observed that one strategy completed the other, which contributed to the nurses' leadership. The acceptance of dialogic leadership strategies in hospitals helps nurses strengthen the care provided in their workplace.

  6. Facebook as a Dialogic Strategic Tool for European Local Governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo HARO-DE-ROSARIO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to analyze theextent to which local governments in the EU applydialogic strategies in their Facebook profi lesin order to establish and enhance relations withsociety, and then to examine the impact of certainfactors on the implementation of these dialogicstrategies. A descriptive analysis is madeof the implementation of the dialogic communicationtheory in relation to the use of Facebook,and this is followed by an explanatory analysisof factors leading local governments to apply dialogicprinciples. These analyses show that thesituation is open to improvement, because localgovernments are mostly unaware of the benefi tsoffered by the use of dialogic principles when establishingonline relationships with stakeholders,and greater awareness would enable them to enhancesuch relationships.

  7. Dialogical Principles for Qualitative Inquiry: A Nonfoundational Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlei Pozzebon PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaving the thesis proposal defense room, the PhD business student had an important assignment to accomplish before being authorized to set a date for defending her thesis: to better justify the validity of her qualitative inquiry framed by a critical interpretive standpoint. Knowing that the generation, analysis, and interpretation of empirical materials are processes always conducted within some understanding of what constitutes legitimate inquiry and valid knowledge, she drew inspiration from ethnographical, confessional, critical, and post-modern work to propose a set of dialogical principles for conducting and evaluating a nonfoundational type of research inquiry. This manuscript revisits this venture a number of years later, reflecting on what has changed and what is still missing. We argue that there is a space and an occasion in the research methods literature for proposing dialogical principles for nonfoundational research, principles that are particularly relevant for qualitative researchers struggling in business schools worldwide.

  8. Dialogic leadership: strategies for application in the hospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Coelho Amestoy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the strategies used by nurses to support the insertion of dialogic leadership in the hospital environment. Methodology. Qualitative study, case study type. Twenty five nurses working in three hospitals in the city of Florianopolis, in the state of Santa Catarina (Brazil participated in the study. Data were collected from May to December 2010. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were performed, non-participant observation and dialogue workshops. Data analysis was performed through Minayo's operational proposal. Results. The strategies mentioned by the study participants were: dialogue, humility, setting an example, resoluteness, meetings and teamwork. It was observed that one strategy completed the other, which contributed to the nurses' leadership. Conclusion. The acceptance of dialogic leadership strategies in hospitals helps nurses strengthen the care provided in their workplace.

  9. Learning Task Knowledge from Dialog and Web Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Perera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present KnoWDiaL, an approach for Learning and using task-relevant Knowledge from human-robot Dialog and access to the Web. KnoWDiaL assumes that there is an autonomous agent that performs tasks, as requested by humans through speech. The agent needs to “understand” the request, (i.e., to fully ground the task until it can proceed to plan for and execute it. KnoWDiaL contributes such understanding by using and updating a Knowledge Base, by dialoguing with the user, and by accessing the web. We believe that KnoWDiaL, as we present it, can be applied to general autonomous agents. However, we focus on our work with our autonomous collaborative robot, CoBot, which executes service tasks in a building, moving around and transporting objects between locations. Hence, the knowledge acquired and accessed consists of groundings of language to robot actions, and building locations, persons, and objects. KnoWDiaL handles the interpretation of voice commands, is robust regarding speech recognition errors, and is able to learn commands involving referring expressions in an open domain, (i.e., without requiring a lexicon. We present in detail the multiple components of KnoWDiaL, namely a frame-semantic parser, a probabilistic grounding model, a web-based predicate evaluator, a dialog manager, and the weighted predicate-based Knowledge Base. We illustrate the knowledge access and updates from the dialog and Web access, through detailed and complete examples. We further evaluate the correctness of the predicate instances learned into the Knowledge Base, and show the increase in dialog efficiency as a function of the number of interactions. We have extensively and successfully used KnoWDiaL in CoBot dialoguing and accessing the Web, and extract a few corresponding example sequences from captured videos.

  10. Two instructional designs for dialogic citizenship education: an effect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; ten Dam, Geert

    2009-09-01

    Despite the renewed interest in citizenship education, relatively little is known about effective ways to realize citizenship education in the classroom. In the literature on citizenship education, dialogue is considered to be a crucial element. However, there is very little, if any, empirical research into the different ways to stimulate dialogue. The main aim of this study is to arrive at an understanding of how citizenship education can be integrated in history classes. The focus is on the effect of a dialogic approach to citizenship education on students' ability to justify an opinion on moral issues. Four hundred and eighty-two students in the eighth grade of secondary education. Two curriculum units for dialogic citizenship education were developed and implemented. The two curriculum units differed in the balance between group work and whole-class teaching. Students' ability to justify an opinion was assessed by means of short essays written by students on a moral issue. The effectiveness of both curriculum units was compared with regular history classes. Students who participated in the lessons for dialogic citizenship education were able to justify their opinion better than students who participated in regular history lessons. The results further show a positive effect of the amount of group work involved. The results of this study indicate that a dialogic approach to citizenship education as an integral part of history classes helps students to form a more profound opinion about moral issues in the subject matter. In addition, group work seems to be a more effective method to implement dialogue in the classroom than whole-class teaching.

  11. Dialogic Cosmopolitanism and the New Wave of Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of a new cycle of protests in 2011 raises questions about the connection between social movements and about the possible existence of a cosmopolitan vision to combine the local and the global dimensions of the protests. This article presents a conceptualization of dialogic cosmopoli...... and transnational dynamics in spaces of convergence; and translatability, since the common ground (the unity) is translated into a multiplicity of practices....

  12. DIALOGISM IN THE DISCUSSION FORUMS IN ONLINE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Lúcia de Oliveira MARINHO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The digital genre, Discussion Forums, if constitutes as the main instrument of asynchronous communication and interaction of the Education in the distance online. Essentially a space of debates, in the education/learning modality, the Forum possess a pedagogical character, instrument that can promote of the collective and collaborative construction of the knowledge in Virtual Environments of Learning. The use of the dialogic language practiced by Educators and learners in Forums should, in thesis, to stimulate the debate, specifically the verbal interaction between these interlocutors. This article searched to analyze the verbal communication between educators and learners in Discussion Forums. When analyzing a Forum promoted in a course in the modality Blended Learning, on the basis of the Dialogism, theoretical boarding presented by Bakhtin (1995, 2011, and in studies of the EAD as Moore and Kearsley (2010 and Cabral and Cavalcante (2010, this work evidenced that, even integral of language, the Dialogism still is hidden in discourses in this genre, harming the interaction and collaborative construction of knowledge in modality.

  13. Dialog Antaragama melalui Media: Perspektif dan Keterbatasan Perdamaian Jurnalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hanitzsch

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Bentrokan suku dan konflik di antara orang Indonesia berasal dari konflik agama memerlukan dialog antaragama mendesak. Media, sebagai salah satu agen sistem sosial, diyakini bisa memfasilitasi orang-orang semacam dialog. Konsep yang diperkenalkan di sini yang cocok untuk tujuan tersebut adalah Perdamaian Jurnalistik. Menurut definisi, Perdamaian Jurnalisme adalah program atau kerangka liputan berita jurnalistik, yang berkontribusi pada proses pembuatan dan melindungi perdamaian masing-masing dengan penyelesaian damai atas konflik. Konsep Perdamaian Jurnalisme terlihat sangat cocok terutama untuk budaya Asia dan Islam di mana tujuan komunikasi adalah untuk menghasilkan harmoni sosial dan kebebasan (Hasnain, 1988. Namun, konsep ini juga memiliki keterbatasan. Keterbatasan Mereka berasal dari hubungan yang kompleks antara jurnalisme dan masyarakat, dan tantangan dari jurnalisme yang dilayani dengan baik untuk membangun realitas. Menurut penulis, ada lima solusi dapat dicapai untuk mempertahankan dialog antaragama berbuah memfasilitasi oleh Perdamaian Jurnalistik. Pertama, perbaikan pendidikan jurnalisme dan pelatihan lanjutan untuk wartawan. Kedua, mendalam-penelitian secara menyeluruh dan oleh para ahli untuk memberikan pandangan eksternal pada jurnalisme dan operasi yang dapat menyebabkan koreksi diri. Ketiga, pertumbuhan "Media jurnalisme". Keempat, dewan pers yang kuat untuk mengontrol pers. Kelima, dan mungkin yang paling penting, sistem hukum yang dapat diandalkan.

  14. Priorities of Dialogic Speech Teaching Methodology at Higher Non-Linguistic School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Asanavičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a number of relevant methodological issues. First of all, the author analyses psychological peculiarities of dialogic speech and states that the dialogue is the product of at least two persons. Therefore, in this view, dialogic speech, unlike monologic speech, happens impromptu and is not prepared in advance. Dialogic speech is mainly of situational character. The linguistic nature of dialogic speech, in the author’s opinion, lies in the process of exchanging replications, which are coherent in structural and functional character. The author classifies dialogue groups by the number of replications and communicative parameters. The basic goal of dialogic speech teaching is developing the abilities and skills which enable to exchange replications. The author distinguishes two basic stages of dialogic speech teaching: 1. Training of abilities to exchange replications during communicative exercises. 2. Development of skills by training the capability to perform exercises of creative nature during a group dialogue, conversation or debate.

  15. The Mechanics of Embodiment: A Dialog on Embodiment and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Barsalou, Lawrence W.; Cangelosi, Angelo; Fischer, Martin H.; McRae, Ken; Spivey, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Embodied theories are increasingly challenging traditional views of cognition by arguing that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences, and processed at this sensorimotor level, rather than being represented and processed abstractly in an amodal conceptual system. Given the established empirical foundation, and the relatively underspecified theories to date, many researchers are extremely interested in embodied cognition but are clamoring for more mechanistic implementations. What is needed at this stage is a push toward explicit computational models that implement sensorimotor grounding as intrinsic to cognitive processes. In this article, six authors from varying backgrounds and approaches address issues concerning the construction of embodied computational models, and illustrate what they view as the critical current and next steps toward mechanistic theories of embodiment. The first part has the form of a dialog between two fictional characters: Ernest, the “experimenter,” and Mary, the “computational modeler.” The dialog consists of an interactive sequence of questions, requests for clarification, challenges, and (tentative) answers, and touches the most important aspects of grounded theories that should inform computational modeling and, conversely, the impact that computational modeling could have on embodied theories. The second part of the article discusses the most important open challenges for embodied computational modeling. PMID:21713184

  16. Ecohealth and resilience thinking: a dialog from experiences in research and practice

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    Marta Berbés-Blázquez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resilience thinking and ecosystems approaches to health (EAH, or ecohealth, share roots in complexity science, although they have distinct foundations in ecology and population health, respectively. The current articulations of these two approaches are strongly converging, but each approach has its strengths. Resilience thinking has developed theoretical models to the study of social-ecological systems, whereas ecohealth has a vast repertoire of experience in dealing with complex health issues. With the two fields dovetailing, there is ripe opportunity to create a dialog centered on concepts that are more thoroughly developed in one field, which can then serve to advance the other. In this article, we first present an overview of the ecohealth and resilience thinking frameworks before opening a dialog centered on seven themes that have strong potential for cross-pollination between the two approaches: scale interactions, regime shifts, adaptive environmental management, social learning, participation, social and gender equity, and knowledge to action. We conclude with some future research suggestions for those interested in theoretical and practical applications at the intersection of environment and health. In particular, closer collaboration between these two fields can lead to addressing blind spots in the ecosystem services framework, complementary social-network analysis, the application of resilience heuristics to the understanding of health, and the development of a normative dimension in resilience thinking.

  17. Expansion of Parents' Undetermined Experience in Socioeducational Programs: Extending the Dialogical Self Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Dany

    2017-12-01

    The Dialogic Self Theory (DST-Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, 2017) is extended here in its dynamic aspects through focusing on the notions of indeterminacy, emptiness and movement. Linking with Husserl, I propose moving the dialogical self (DS) from a clear position in the "repertory of the Self" to an undetermined horizon. This makes it possible to introduce "holes" (emptiness) into the schematic representation of the "repertory of the Self". Yet Husserl's concept of horizon seems to focus too much on making the indeterminable determinate. To overcome this limit, I incorporate Bergson's concept of empty form into the DST. This enables conceptualising the extension and emergence of horizon. Extending Bergson's concept of organisation, it is possible to see how the expansion of the horizon in a movement of globalisation does not necessarily entail the disorganisation of the DS but rather to its further organisation. Extending the system of DS by Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, (2017), I open by suggesting that movements are both horizontal (between people) and vertical (between the person, the institutions and the norms) connectors. My conceptual propositions are illustrated by parents' and educators' discourses in two Canadian socio-educational programs.

  18. Dialogic Learning In Adults Education: Denunciations and announcements in order to overcome obstacles and seek human development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Franzi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the present article is on Youngsters and Adults Education (YAE/EJA under the perspective of dialogic learning and based on the communicative action theory by Habermas and the dialogicity theory by Freire. Such concepts point out that dialogue means praxis, which is fundamental for learning, the constitution of human development and democracy; they enable the criticism of the dominant YAE model which discriminates the adults based on prejudice against adult intelligence; they also provide tools to overcome such a model. Based on this perspective, the purpose of the article is to present YAE as a cultural educational system as opposed to a traditional scholastic one, which guarantees that its individuals are perceived as subjects with their rights: education, housing, feeding, job, etc. In order to achieve such a goal, the education in this teaching model should be based on the practical and communicative skills which the learners already possess so that they are given the right to make and remake themselves in the world. When the Education of youngsters and adults is approached under a critical and dialogic perspective, we recover its transforming function, its announcing function.

  19. The Human-Computer Interface and Information Literacy: Some Basics and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses human/computer interaction research, human/computer interface, and their relationships to information literacy. Highlights include communication models; cognitive perspectives; task analysis; theory of action; problem solving; instructional design considerations; and a suggestion that human/information interface may be a more appropriate…

  20. Explanation, argumentation and dialogic interactions in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Orlando G.

    2016-12-01

    As a responsive article to Miranda Rocksén's paper "The many roles of `explanation' in science education: a case study", this paper aims to emphasize the importance of the two central themes of her paper: dialogic approaches in science education and the role of explanations in science classrooms. I start discussing the concepts of dialogue and dialogism in science classrooms contexts. Dialogism is discussed as the basic tenet from which Rocksén developed her research design and methods. In turn, dialogues in science classrooms may be considered as a particular type of discourse that allows the students' culture, mostly based on everyday knowledge, and the science school culture, related to scientific knowledge and language to be interwoven. I argue that in school, science teachers are always committed to the resolution of differences according to a scientific position for the knowledge to be constructed. Thus, the institution of schooling constrains the ways in which dialogue can be conducted in the classrooms, as the scientific perspective will be always, beforehand, the reference for the conclusions to be reached. The second theme developed here, in dialogue with Rocksén, is about explanations in science classrooms. Based on Jean Paul Bronckart (Atividade de linguagem, textos e discursos: por um interacionismo sócio-discursivo, Educ, São Paulo, 1999), the differences and relationship between explanation and argumentation as communicative acts are re-discussed as well its practical consequences to science teaching. Finally, some epistemological questions are raised about the status of scientific explanations in relation to non-scientific ones.

  1. Building shared situational awareness in surgery through distributed dialog

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    Gillespie BM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Brigid M Gillespie,1 Karleen Gwinner,2 Nicole Fairweather,3 Wendy Chaboyer41NHMRC Research Centre for Clinical Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalised Patients (NCREN and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation (RCCCPI, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Queensland, 2Griffith Centre for Cultural Research, Griffith University, Queensland, 3Department of Anaesthesiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland, Australia, 4Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalized Patients (NCREN Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice INHMRC Centre of Research Innovation (RCCCPI, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University Queensland, AustraliaBackground: Failure to convey time-critical information to team members during surgery diminishes members' perception of the dynamic information relevant to their task, and compromises shared situational awareness. This research reports the dialog around clinical decisions made by team members in the time-pressured and high-risk context of surgery, and the impact of these communications on shared situational awareness.Methods: Fieldwork methods were used to capture the dynamic integration of individual and situational elements in surgery that provided the backdrop for clinical decisions. Nineteen semistructured interviews were performed with 24 participants from anesthesia, surgery, and nursing in the operating rooms of a large metropolitan hospital in Queensland, Australia. Thematic analysis was used.Results: The domain "coordinating decisions in surgery" was generated from textual data. Within this domain, three themes illustrated the dialog of clinical decisions, ie, synchronizing and strategizing actions, sharing local knowledge, and planning contingency decisions based on priority.Conclusion: Strategies used to convey decisions that enhanced shared situational awareness included the use of "self-talk", closed-loop communications, and

  2. Generating Culture-Specific Gestures for Virtual Agent Dialogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endrass, Birgit; Damian, Ionut; Huber, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Integrating culture into the behavioral model of virtual agents has come into focus lately. When investigating verbal aspects of behavior, nonverbal behaviors are desirably added automatically, driven by the speech-act. In this paper, we present a corpus driven approach of generating gestures...... in a culture-specific way that accompany agent dialogs. The frequency of gestures and gesture-types, the correlation of gesture-types and speech-acts as well as the expressivity of gestures have been analyzed in the two cultures of Germany and Japan and integrated into a demonstrator....

  3. Why Study People's Stories? The Dialogical Ethics of Narrative Analysis

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    Arthur W. Frank

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Narrative analysis is presented as continuous with personal storytelling in the work of remoralizing what Weber identified as disenchanted modernity. Critics of contemporary storytelling seem to misunderstand what kind of authenticity of self is expressed in stories. Against those whom Charles Taylor calls “knockers” of the idea of personal authenticity, this article affirms authenticity, but in terms that are dialogical: authenticity is created in the process of storytelling, it is not a precondition of the telling, and authenticity remains in process. This authenticity is shown to have an affinity with democratic politics, in contrast to the neo-liberal affinity of the knocker position.

  4. CNC LATHE MACHINE PRODUCING NC CODE BY USING DIALOG METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup TURGUT

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an NC code generation program utilising Dialog Method was developed for turning centres. Initially, CNC lathes turning methods and tool path development techniques were reviewed briefly. By using geometric definition methods, tool path was generated and CNC part program was developed for FANUC control unit. The developed program made CNC part program generation process easy. The program was developed using BASIC 6.0 programming language while the material and cutting tool database were and supported with the help of ACCESS 7.0.

  5. Dialog on a country path: the qualitative research journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Jeanne M; Cangelosi, Pamela R; Dinkins, Christine S

    2014-03-01

    There is little information in the literature describing how students learn qualitative research. This article describes an approach to learning that is based on the pedagogical approach of Dinkins' Socratic-Hermeneutic Shared Inquiry. This approach integrates shared dialog as an essential aspect of learning. The qualitative pedagogy described in this article focused on three questions: What is knowing in qualitative research? How do we come to know qualitative research? What can we do with qualitative research? Students learned the basics of qualitative research within a context that fostered interpretive inquiry. In this way, the course framework mirrored the combination of interviewing, storytelling, and journeying toward understanding that constitute qualitative research. © 2013.

  6. DIALOG: Fostering Early Career Development Across the Aquatic Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Susan Weiler, PhD

    2004-11-14

    A total of 447 dissertation abstracts were received for the DIALOG V Program, with 146 individuals applying for the DIALOG V Symposium; 47 were invited and 45 have accepted. This represents a significant increase compared to the DIALOG IV Program in which 221 abstracts were registered and 124 applied for the symposium. The importance of the dissertation registration service is indicated by the increasing number of individuals who take time to register their dissertation even when they are not interested in applying to the symposium. The number of visits to the webpage has also increased significantly over the years. This also reflects graduate interest in being part of the on-line Dissertation Registry and receiving the weekly electronic DIALOG Newsletter. See http://aslo.org/phd.html for details. The DIALOG symposium reaches approximately 40 new PI's at a pivotal point in their research careers. Based on their comments, the symposium changes the way participants think, communicate, and approach their research. The science community and the general population will benefit from the perspectives these new PI's bring back to their home institutions and share with their students and colleagues. This group should act as a catalyst to move the entire field in exciting new, interdisciplinary directions. To reach more graduates, plans are underway to establish the symposium on an annual basis. By facilitating the development of close collegial ties, symposium participants come away with a network of colleagues from around the globe with interests in aquatic science research and education. Past participants are collaborating on research proposals, and all have noted that participation has enabled them to develop a more interdisciplinary view of their field, influencing the way they interpret, communicate, and approacli their research. The dissertation registry provides a unique introduction to the work of this most recent generation of aquatic scientists. Each

  7. Developing a Material-Dialogic Approach to Pedagogy to Guide Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, Lindsay; Wegerif, Rupert

    2018-01-01

    Dialogic pedagogy is being promoted in science teacher education but the literature on dialogic pedagogy tends to focus on explicit voices, and so runs the risk of overlooking the important role that material objects often play in science education. In this paper we use the findings of a teacher survey and classroom case study to argue that there…

  8. The Self Between Cacophony and Monologue: A Conceptualization and Empirical Examination of Dialogical Complexity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Miroslav; Kovářová, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2017), s. 270-294 ISSN 1072-0537 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : dialogical complexity * dialogical self theory * cognitive complexity * integrative complexity * personal position repertoire Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.476, year: 2016

  9. Greening the Campus: A Theoretical Extension of the Dialogic Communication Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Serena; Takahashi, Bruno; Lertpratchya, Alisa P.; Cunningham, Carie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the strategic organization-public dialogic communication practices of universities in the USA. The authors used the dialogic model of communication to explore the extent to which higher education sustainability leaders (SL) at the top 25 USA sustainable engage in relational communication strategies.…

  10. The Relationship between Academic Discipline and Dialogic Behavior in Open University Course Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, Paul; Caspi, Avner; Antonovsky, Avishai; Blau, Ina; Mansur, Asmahan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between disciplinary difference (exact and natural sciences versus humanities) and the dialogic behavior that occurred in Open University course forums. Dialogic behavior was measured in terms of students' and instructors' active participation in the forum (posting a message) as well as…

  11. Dialogic or Dialectic? The Significance of Ontological Assumptions in Research on Educational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between ontological assumptions and studies of educational dialogue through a focus on Bakhtin's "dialogic". The term dialogic is frequently appropriated to a modernist framework of assumptions, in particular the neo-Vygotskian or sociocultural tradition. However, Vygotsky's theory of education is dialectic,…

  12. Impacts of Dialogical Storybook Reading on Young Children's Reading Attitudes and Vocabulary Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaman, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed the impact of parents' dialogical storybook reading on their children's receptive vocabulary and reading attitudes. Forty parents and their preschoolers participated in the study. Parents were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group received dialogical storybook reading training.…

  13. An assessment of the dialogic potential of bank websites as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of the dialogic potential of bank websites as a strategic management tool in Ghana. ... are of the view that Ghanaian banks should consider upgrading their websites by improving the dialogic loop content to promote interactivity with their publics in order to build a good brand and stay competitive. Key words: ...

  14. A Mission Possible: Towards a Shared Dialogic Space for Professional Learning in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Margaret; Su, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed the concept of dialogic space to elaborate our view of the importance of creating future academic practice together in relationship with others in a higher education context. We see scope and potential for the dialogic space as a forum for "interthinking" to engage the voices of stakeholders in…

  15. The Effect of Dialogic Reading on Early Literacy Outcomes for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamparo, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of dialogic reading techniques in adult-child book reading has been effective in improving early literacy skills in children with language delays and those from at-risk populations. There is, however, limited research that examines the potential utility of dialogic reading strategies for children with disabilities such as Autism…

  16. University Intervention into Community Issues as Dialogic Public Relations: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jamie M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines a study of the wastewater collection and treatment issues of Little Rock and North Little Rock, Arkansas by University of Arkansas at Little Rock personnel and how it constitutes dialogic public relations. The paper defines dialogic public relations using Kent and Taylor's work and then uses their criteria to describe how this…

  17. The Effectiveness of Dialogic Reading in Increasing English Language Learning Preschool Children's Expressive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of dialogic reading in increasing the literacy interactions between English language learning parents (ELL) and their preschool aged children and children's expressive language development were studied. Twenty-one ELL parents of preschool aged children received dialogic reading training every other week for a ten-week period.…

  18. Quality of human-computer interaction--results of a national usability survey of hospital-IT in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Bettina B; Majeed, Raphael W; Bürkle, Thomas; Kuhn, Klaus; Sax, Ulrich; Seggewies, Christof; Vosseler, Cornelia; Röhrig, Rainer

    2011-11-09

    Due to the increasing functionality of medical information systems, it is hard to imagine day to day work in hospitals without IT support. Therefore, the design of dialogues between humans and information systems is one of the most important issues to be addressed in health care. This survey presents an analysis of the current quality level of human-computer interaction of healthcare-IT in German hospitals, focused on the users' point of view. To evaluate the usability of clinical-IT according to the design principles of EN ISO 9241-10 the IsoMetrics Inventory, an assessment tool, was used. The focus of this paper has been put on suitability for task, training effort and conformity with user expectations, differentiated by information systems. Effectiveness has been evaluated with the focus on interoperability and functionality of different IT systems. 4521 persons from 371 hospitals visited the start page of the study, while 1003 persons from 158 hospitals completed the questionnaire. The results show relevant variations between different information systems. Specialised information systems with defined functionality received better assessments than clinical information systems in general. This could be attributed to the improved customisation of these specialised systems for specific working environments. The results can be used as reference data for evaluation and benchmarking of human computer engineering in clinical health IT context for future studies.

  19. Narrative and dialogical reflexivity: an approach between writing and inner speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Encarnação Motta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of dialogical reflexivity indicators in compositions (written texts and established possible links between those indicators and narrative structures. A group of 23 children, between eight and ten years old, wrote two compositions on the themes "Tell your story" and "How do I talk to myself?". The results suggest that the dialogicality of reflective processes is involved in the writing expression: whereas. The first theme of compositions presented dialogues between the characters (dialogical structure, the second one presented self-talk (direct description of reflective action. In conclusion, it is discussed the relationship between dialogical reflexivity indicators in written texts and the role of the author's reflective process about what he/she writes as the basis for dialogicality.

  20. Speech language therapy practice in a bilingual dialogical clinic: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Beatriz Zaki Porcelli; Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi, Giselle; Tonocchi, Rita; Berberian, Ana Paula

    this study aims to discuss the use of Brazilian sign language as the first language for a deaf individual going to a bilingual dialogic clinic from dialogic activities. This is a longitudinal study, including one deaf individual, called N, interacting with his family and speech therapists. During the therapeutic process developed inside the bilingual dialogical clinic, N participated in interactive contexts and could constitute himself as author of his sign language texts. In addition, he started to act dialogically and use verbal and nonverbal signs. Through interactive and dialogical situations developed inside the speech language therapy clinic, this deaf participant got control of his sign language, and started to get interest in and control of the Portuguese language, especially in the written form.

  1. Design of a compact low-power human-computer interaction equipment for hand motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianwei; Jin, Wenguang

    2017-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) raises demand of convenience, endurance, responsiveness and naturalness. This paper describes a design of a compact wearable low-power HCI equipment applied to gesture recognition. System combines multi-mode sense signals: the vision sense signal and the motion sense signal, and the equipment is equipped with the depth camera and the motion sensor. The dimension (40 mm × 30 mm) and structure is compact and portable after tight integration. System is built on a module layered framework, which contributes to real-time collection (60 fps), process and transmission via synchronous confusion with asynchronous concurrent collection and wireless Blue 4.0 transmission. To minimize equipment's energy consumption, system makes use of low-power components, managing peripheral state dynamically, switching into idle mode intelligently, pulse-width modulation (PWM) of the NIR LEDs of the depth camera and algorithm optimization by the motion sensor. To test this equipment's function and performance, a gesture recognition algorithm is applied to system. As the result presents, general energy consumption could be as low as 0.5 W.

  2. Socratic Dialogs and Clicker use in an Upper-Division Mechanics Course

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, H Vincent; Carr, Lincoln D

    2015-01-01

    The general problem of effectively using interactive engagement in non-introductory physics courses remains open. We present a three-year study comparing different approaches to lecturing in an intermediate mechanics course at the Colorado School of Mines. In the first year, the lectures were fairly traditional. In the second year the lectures were modified to include Socratic dialogs between the instructor and students. In the third year, the instructor used a personal response system and Peer Instruction-like pedagogy. All other course materials were nearly identical to an established traditional lecture course. We present results from a new instructor-constructed conceptual survey, exams, and course evaluations. We observe little change in student exam performance as lecture techniques varied, though students consistently stated clickers were "the best part of the course" from which they "learned the most." Indeed, when using clickers in this course, students were considerably more likely to become engaged...

  3. Dialogical art as a challenge for competitive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahoslav Rozbořil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary society is raising important questions related to issues such as social construction or interpretation of reality, the role of culture and the meaning of art. Modernity replaces the determination of social standing with a compulsive and obligatory self-determination which holds for all periods and all sectors of the modern era, as described by Baumann (2001. This paper focuses on the analysis of problems related to contemporary art and its social meaning. The main focus is on projects which encourage their participants to question fixed identities, stereotypical images through a cumulative process of exchange and dialogue. The use of the community concept revolves around the complex forms of identification that exist between individuals and larger collective entities which encourage people to break down their defensive isolation and fear of others (Kester, 2004. The link between the society, history and culture is analyzed in the context of relational aesthetics (Bourriaud, 2002. The theoretical concept of dialogical art is illustrated by dialogical art projects and activist or community-based art practice, namely WochenKlausur projects. As a response to sociological problems of postmodern society, this could be a challenge for competitive environment, which often tends to position marginalized groups into disadvantaged situations.

  4. Real Time Eye Tracking and Hand Tracking Using Regular Video Cameras for Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Expo (ICME 2010), July 2010, Singapore. (15% acceptance rate)  Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer...Computing, Dec. 2009. Las Vegas, NV  Shaun Canavan and Lijun Yin, Dynamic face appearance modeling and sight direction estimation based on local...Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer interaction based on two orthogonal views”, IEEE/IAPR

  5. From Human-Computer Interaction to Human-Robot Social Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Toumi, Tarek; Abdelmadjid ZIDANI

    2014-01-01

    Human-Robot Social Interaction became one of active research fields in which researchers from different areas propose solutions and directives leading robots to improve their interactions with humans. In this paper we propose to introduce works in both human robot interaction and human computer interaction and to make a bridge between them, i.e. to integrate emotions and capabilities concepts of the robot in human computer model to become adequate for human robot interaction and discuss chall...

  6. User participation in the development of the human/computer interface for control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Richard; Quick-Campbell, Marlene; Creegan, James; Dutilly, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Technological advances coupled with the requirements to reduce operations staffing costs led to the demand for efficient, technologically-sophisticated mission operations control centers. The control center under development for the earth observing system (EOS) is considered. The users are involved in the development of a control center in order to ensure that it is cost-efficient and flexible. A number of measures were implemented in the EOS program in order to encourage user involvement in the area of human-computer interface development. The following user participation exercises carried out in relation to the system analysis and design are described: the shadow participation of the programmers during a day of operations; the flight operations personnel interviews; and the analysis of the flight operations team tasks. The user participation in the interface prototype development, the prototype evaluation, and the system implementation are reported on. The involvement of the users early in the development process enables the requirements to be better understood and the cost to be reduced.

  7. Human-computer interaction in distributed supervisory control tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of activities concerned with the development and applications of the Operator Function Model (OFM) is presented. The OFM is a mathematical tool to represent operator interaction with predominantly automated space ground control systems. The design and assessment of an intelligent operator aid (OFMspert and Ally) is particularly discussed. The application of OFM to represent the task knowledge in the design of intelligent tutoring systems, designated OFMTutor and ITSSO (Intelligent Tutoring System for Satellite Operators), is also described. Viewgraphs from symposia presentations are compiled along with papers addressing the intent inferencing capabilities of OFMspert, the OFMTutor system, and an overview of intelligent tutoring systems and the implications for complex dynamic systems.

  8. APPLYING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of UIMS (User Interface Management System), a system using a variety of artificial intelligence techniques to build knowledge-based user interfaces combining functionality and information from a variety of computer systems that maintain, test, and configure customer telephone...

  9. OLS Client and OLS Dialog: Open Source Tools to Annotate Public Omics Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Ternent, Tobias; Koch, Maximilian; Barsnes, Harald; Vrousgou, Olga; Jupp, Simon; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The availability of user-friendly software to annotate biological datasets and experimental details is becoming essential in data management practices, both in local storage systems and in public databases. The Ontology Lookup Service (OLS, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ols) is a popular centralized service to query, browse and navigate biomedical ontologies and controlled vocabularies. Recently, the OLS framework has been completely redeveloped (version 3.0), including enhancements in the data model, like the added support for Web Ontology Language based ontologies, among many other improvements. However, the new OLS is not backwards compatible and new software tools are needed to enable access to this widely used framework now that the previous version is no longer available. We here present the OLS Client as a free, open-source Java library to retrieve information from the new version of the OLS. It enables rapid tool creation by providing a robust, pluggable programming interface and common data model to programmatically access the OLS. The library has already been integrated and is routinely used by several bioinformatics resources and related data annotation tools. Secondly, we also introduce an updated version of the OLS Dialog (version 2.0), a Java graphical user interface that can be easily plugged into Java desktop applications to access the OLS. The software and related documentation are freely available at https://github.com/PRIDE-Utilities/ols-client and https://github.com/PRIDE-Toolsuite/ols-dialog. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Impact of familiarity on information complexity in human-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakaev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative measure of information complexity remains very much desirable in HCI field, since it may aid in optimization of user interfaces, especially in human-computer systems for controlling complex objects. Our paper is dedicated to exploration of subjective (subject-depended aspect of the complexity, conceptualized as information familiarity. Although research of familiarity in human cognition and behaviour is done in several fields, the accepted models in HCI, such as Human Processor or Hick-Hyman’s law do not generally consider this issue. In our experimental study the subjects performed search and selection of digits and letters, whose familiarity was conceptualized as frequency of occurrence in numbers and texts. The analysis showed significant effect of information familiarity on selection time and throughput in regression models, although the R2 values were somehow low. Still, we hope that our results might aid in quantification of information complexity and its further application for optimizing interaction in human-machine systems.

  11. Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Valerdi Luz María

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tridimensional representations stimulate cognitive processes that are the core and foundation of human-computer interaction (HCI. Those cognitive processes take place while a user navigates and explores a virtual environment (VE and are mainly related to spatial memory storage, attention, and perception. VEs have many distinctive features (e.g., involvement, immersion, and presence that can significantly improve HCI in highly demanding and interactive systems such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI. BCI is as a nonmuscular communication channel that attempts to reestablish the interaction between an individual and his/her environment. Although BCI research started in the sixties, this technology is not efficient or reliable yet for everyone at any time. Over the past few years, researchers have argued that main BCI flaws could be associated with HCI issues. The evidence presented thus far shows that VEs can (1 set out working environmental conditions, (2 maximize the efficiency of BCI control panels, (3 implement navigation systems based not only on user intentions but also on user emotions, and (4 regulate user mental state to increase the differentiation between control and noncontrol modalities.

  12. Integrated multimodal human-computer interface and augmented reality for interactive display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Marius S.; Sundareswaran, Venkataraman; Chen, S.; Behringer, Reinhold; Tam, Clement K.; Chan, M.; Bangayan, Phil T.; McGee, Joshua H.

    2000-08-01

    We describe new systems for improved integrated multimodal human-computer interaction and augmented reality for a diverse array of applications, including future advanced cockpits, tactical operations centers, and others. We have developed an integrated display system featuring: speech recognition of multiple concurrent users equipped with both standard air- coupled microphones and novel throat-coupled sensors (developed at Army Research Labs for increased noise immunity); lip reading for improving speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments, three-dimensional spatialized audio for improved display of warnings, alerts, and other information; wireless, coordinated handheld-PC control of a large display; real-time display of data and inferences from wireless integrated networked sensors with on-board signal processing and discrimination; gesture control with disambiguated point-and-speak capability; head- and eye- tracking coupled with speech recognition for 'look-and-speak' interaction; and integrated tetherless augmented reality on a wearable computer. The various interaction modalities (speech recognition, 3D audio, eyetracking, etc.) are implemented a 'modality servers' in an Internet-based client-server architecture. Each modality server encapsulates and exposes commercial and research software packages, presenting a socket network interface that is abstracted to a high-level interface, minimizing both vendor dependencies and required changes on the client side as the server's technology improves.

  13. A practical efficient human computer interface based on saccadic eye movements for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Sima; Mahnam, Amin

    2016-03-01

    Human computer interfaces (HCI) provide new channels of communication for people with severe motor disabilities to state their needs, and control their environment. Some HCI systems are based on eye movements detected from the electrooculogram. In this study, a wearable HCI, which implements a novel adaptive algorithm for detection of saccadic eye movements in eight directions, was developed, considering the limitations that people with disabilities have. The adaptive algorithm eliminated the need for calibration of the system for different users and in different environments. A two-stage typing environment and a simple game for training people with disabilities to work with the system were also developed. Performance of the system was evaluated in experiments with the typing environment performed by six participants without disabilities. The average accuracy of the system in detecting eye movements and blinking was 82.9% at first tries with an average typing rate of 4.5cpm. However an experienced user could achieve 96% accuracy and 7.2cpm typing rate. Moreover, the functionality of the system for people with movement disabilities was evaluated by performing experiments with the game environment. Six people with tetraplegia and significant levels of speech impairment played with the computer game several times. The average success rate in performing the necessary eye movements was 61.5%, which increased significantly with practice up to 83% for one participant. The developed system is 2.6×4.5cm in size and weighs only 15g, assuring high level of comfort for the users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. VACTIV: A graphical dialog based program for an automatic processing of line and band spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlokazov, V. B.

    2013-05-01

    The program VACTIV-Visual ACTIV-has been developed for an automatic analysis of spectrum-like distributions, in particular gamma-ray spectra or alpha-spectra and is a standard graphical dialog based Windows XX application, driven by a menu, mouse and keyboard. On the one hand, it was a conversion of an existing Fortran program ACTIV [1] to the DELPHI language; on the other hand, it is a transformation of the sequential syntax of Fortran programming to a new object-oriented style, based on the organization of event interactions. New features implemented in the algorithms of both the versions consisted in the following as peak model both an analytical function and a graphical curve could be used; the peak search algorithm was able to recognize not only Gauss peaks but also peaks with an irregular form; both narrow peaks (2-4 channels) and broad ones (50-100 channels); the regularization technique in the fitting guaranteed a stable solution in the most complicated cases of strongly overlapping or weak peaks. The graphical dialog interface of VACTIV is much more convenient than the batch mode of ACTIV. [1] V.B. Zlokazov, Computer Physics Communications, 28 (1982) 27-37. NEW VERSION PROGRAM SUMMARYProgram Title: VACTIV Catalogue identifier: ABAC_v2_0 Licensing provisions: no Programming language: DELPHI 5-7 Pascal. Computer: IBM PC series. Operating system: Windows XX. RAM: 1 MB Keywords: Nuclear physics, spectrum decomposition, least squares analysis, graphical dialog, object-oriented programming. Classification: 17.6. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ABAC_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 28 (1982) 27 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes. Nature of problem: Program VACTIV is intended for precise analysis of arbitrary spectrum-like distributions, e.g. gamma-ray and X-ray spectra and allows the user to carry out the full cycle of automatic processing of such spectra, i.e. calibration, automatic peak search

  15. Nonviolent communication: a dialogical retrieval of the ethic of authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marcianna

    2012-11-01

    Charles Taylor called for a retrieval of the ethic of authenticity that has been distorted in modern notions of autonomy and self-fulfillment. Via exchanges with others who matter to us, he proposed that human identities develop through the use of rich language draped in shared horizons of significance. The fostering of these dialogical ties beyond purely instrumental purposes, along with the recognition of the human dignity in all, may avert the fallen ideal of authenticity. Nonviolent communication affords the skillful dialogue with others cradled in a shared sense of significance and supports the development of a meaningful identity-one that is formed through the realization of what exists beyond the self. The purpose of this article is to argue that nonviolent communication facilitates the retrieval of the ethic of authenticity. Narratives from nursing students' journals on the use of nonviolent communication skills will be used to support the argument.

  16. Addressing Culture in the EFL Classroom: A Dialogic Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aldemar Álvarez Valencia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Language teaching has gone from a linguistic centered approach towards a lingo-cultural experience in which learning a language goes hand in hand with the understanding of not only the target culture, but the learner's own culture. This paper attempts to describe and reflect upon a collaborative and dialogical experience carried out between two teachers of the Languages Program of Universidad de la Salle, in Bogotá. The bilateral enrichment of such a pedagogical experience helped the teachers to improve their language teaching contexts and prompted the construction of a theoretical proposal to enhance intercultural awareness. It also opened the way for the development of critical intercultural competence in fl (foreign language learners.

  17. Democratic Dialogic Education For and From Authorial Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this multi-topic interview, Professor Eugene Matusov from the School of Education at the University of Delaware discusses the desirability and necessity for a psychological and educational shift from knowledge, ability, and skill to dialogically and a democratically understood notion of authorial agency. In this discussion, Professor Matusov tells about his own transition from his interest in Vygotsky to Bakhtin, discusses conceptual and ethical tensions among these scholars, and how his pedagogical practice informs his educational research. Professor Matusov provides a somewhat optimistic view on the transition of our society from knowledge-based to agency-based and discusses the role of education in this transformation. The interview was audio recorded and transcribed following closely the discussion. We tried to preserve both orality and the Russian and Serbian accents of the participants without sacrificing the readability of the text.

  18. DIALOG DAN TOLERANSI (SEBUAH ALTERNATIF DAKWAH DI TENGAH PLURALITAS AGAMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farichatul Maftuchah

    2017-01-01

      Pluralitas agama berpotensi melahirkan benturan, konflik, kekerasan dan sikap anarkhis terhadap pemeluk agama lain. Hal ini dikarenakan setiap ajaran agama mempunyai aspek eksklusif berupa truth claim yaitu satu pengakuan bahwa agama yang dianutnya adalah yang paling benar, konsekuensinya adalah agama yang dipeluk oleh orang yang berbeda adalah salah. Pluralisme tidak hanya dipahami hanya dengan mengakui kemajemukan saja, namun yang dimaksud adalah keterlibatan aktif terhadap realitas kemajemukan tersebut. Untuk menumbuhkan kedamaian di era pluralitas ini alternatif yang bisa dilaksanakan adalah membangun toleransi dengan dialog. Bagi seorang pluralis dalam berinteraksi dengan aneka ragam agama tidak hanya dituntut untuk membuka diri, belajar dan menghormati mitra dialognya, tetapi tetap harus commit terhadap agama yang dianutnya, karena dengan demikian relativisme agama dapat dihindari.

  19. Addressing Culture in the efl Classroom: A Dialogic Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Valencia José Aldemar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Language teaching has gone from a linguistic centered approach towards a lingo-cultural experience in which learning a language goes hand in hand with the understanding of not only the target culture, but the learner’s own culture. This paper attempts to describe and reflect upon a collaborative and dialogical experience carried out between two teachers of the Languages Program of Universidad de la Salle, in Bogotá. The bilateral enrichment of such a pedagogical experience helped the teachers to improve their language teaching contexts and prompted the construction of a theoretical proposal to enhance intercultural awareness. It also opened the way for the development of critical intercultural competence in fl (foreign language learners. Key words: Interculturality, critical intercultural awareness, critical intercultural competence, dialogical process La enseñanza de lengua ha pasado de un enfoque centrado en lo lingüístico hacia uno linguocultural, en el que el aprendizaje de una lengua va de la mano del entendimiento no sólo de la cultura objetivo, sino también de la propia cultura. Este artículo intenta describir y reflexionar alrededor de una experiencia colaborativa y dialógica que se realizó entre dos profesores del Programa de Lenguas de la Universidad de La Salle, en Bogotá. El enriquecimiento recíproco de esta experiencia pedagógica, permitió mejorar los contextos de enseñanza y la construcción de una propuesta teórica para promover la conciencia intercultural. También abrió las puertas para desarrollar competencia crítica intercultural en estudiantes de inglés como lengua extranjera. Palabras clave: Interculturalidad, conciencia crítica intercultural, competencia crítica intercultural, proceso dialógico

  20. "Spoilsport" in Drama in Education vs. Dialogic Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marjanovic-Shane

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I compare and contrast two educational paradigms that both attempt to overcome alienation often experienced by students in the conventional education. These two educational paradigms are embodied in different educational practices: First, Drama in Education in its widest definition, is based on the Vygotskian views that human cognitive, semantic (meaning-making, and social-emotional development happens in or through play and/or imagination, thus within the imagined worlds. Second, Critical Ontological Dialogic Pedagogy, is based in the Bakhtin inspired approach to critical dialogue among the “consciousnesses of equal rights” (Bakhtin, 1999, where education is assumed to be a practice of examination of the world, the others and the self. I reveal implicit and explicit conceptual similarities and differences between these two educational paradigms regarding their understanding the nature of learning; social values that they promote; the group dynamics, social relationships and the position of learners’ subjectivity. I aim to uncover the role and legitimacy of the learners’ disagreement with the positions of others, their dissensus with the educational events and settings, and the relationships of power within the social organization of educational communities in these two diverse educational approaches. I explore the legitimacy of dissensus in these two educational approaches regarding both the participants’ critical examination of the curriculum, and in regard to promoting the participants’ agency and its transformations. In spite of important similarities between the educational practices arranged by these two paradigms, the analysis of their differences points to the paradigmatically opposing views on human development, learning and education. Although both Drama in Education and Dialogic Pedagogy claim to deeply, fully and ontologically engage the learners in the process of education, they do it for different purposes

  1. Meaning Emergence in the Ecology of Dialogical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasmundi, S. B.; Steffensen, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    as a linguistic (symbolic) or a cognitive (representational) phenomenon external to an agent/user, but as emergent in coordinated interaction, we zoom in on how the practitioners recalibrate the organism-environmentsystem by shift ing between a multi-agentive mode and an individual mode. We use Cognitive Event......This article is an empirically based theoretical contribution to the investigation of meaningmaking in the ecology of human interaction and interactivity. It presents an ecological perspective on meaning-making that pivots on how agents pick up information directly in their organism...

  2. Digitale Arbeitsteilung: Amazon Mechanical Turks sozial konstruierte Designmuster und die Steuerung von Human-Computation-Arbeit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ellmer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In diesem Artikel wird Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT, derzeit eines der größten Online-Verteilungssysteme für Human-Computation-Arbeit, aus einer Social-Construction-of-Technology (SCOT-Perspektive kritisch analysiert. Unter Berücksichtigung der klassischen Labor-Process-Theorie wird gezeigt, dass AMTs Infrastruktur, durchwachsen und geformt von Diskursen zu digitaler Arbeit, beträchtliche Macht- und Informationsasymmetrien zugunsten von ArbeitgeberInnen (RequesterInnen determiniert und einen spezifischen Modus digitaler Arbeitsteilung ermöglicht. Dessen Effekte (Deskilling, Preissetzung, Effizienzsteigerung werden durch den crowdsourcing-basierten Zugriff auf hoch fragmentierte ArbeiterInnen (TurkerInnen verstärkt. Die SCOT-Perspektive zeigt die soziale Konstruktion digitaler Arbeitsteilung und Hierarchien in unterschiedlichen Einflussqualitäten auf die Ausgestaltung der Infrastruktur sowie den Arbeitsprozess. Sie hängt von Kapazitäten einzelner Akteure ab, ihre Bedeutungen und Interpretationen in Technologien zu implementieren. Die Browserextension Turkopticon schwächt diese Hierarchien ab, indem sie ein Requester-Rating-System direkt in das Interface von AMT einbettet.

  3. The experience of agency in human-computer interactions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limerick, Hannah; Coyle, David; Moore, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of agency is the experience of controlling both one’s body and the external environment. Although the sense of agency has been studied extensively, there is a paucity of studies in applied “real-life” situations. One applied domain that seems highly relevant is human-computer-interaction (HCI), as an increasing number of our everyday agentive interactions involve technology. Indeed, HCI has long recognized the feeling of control as a key factor in how people experience interactions with technology. The aim of this review is to summarize and examine the possible links between sense of agency and understanding control in HCI. We explore the overlap between HCI and sense of agency for computer input modalities and system feedback, computer assistance, and joint actions between humans and computers. An overarching consideration is how agency research can inform HCI and vice versa. Finally, we discuss the potential ethical implications of personal responsibility in an ever-increasing society of technology users and intelligent machine interfaces. PMID:25191256

  4. Human-Centered Software Engineering: Software Engineering Architectures, Patterns, and Sodels for Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffah, Ahmed; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Desmarais, Michel C.

    The Computer-Human Interaction and Software Engineering (CHISE) series of edited volumes originated from a number of workshops and discussions over the latest research and developments in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Software Engineering (SE) integration, convergence and cross-pollination. A first volume in this series (CHISE Volume I - Human-Centered Software Engineering: Integrating Usability in the Development Lifecycle) aims at bridging the gap between the field of SE and HCI, and addresses specifically the concerns of integrating usability and user-centered systems design methods and tools into the software development lifecycle and practices. This has been done by defining techniques, tools and practices that can fit into the entire software engineering lifecycle as well as by defining ways of addressing the knowledge and skills needed, and the attitudes and basic values that a user-centered development methodology requires. The first volume has been edited as Vol. 8 in the Springer HCI Series (Seffah, Gulliksen and Desmarais, 2005).

  5. Selection of suitable hand gestures for reliable myoelectric human computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Claudia F; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2015-04-09

    Myoelectric controlled prosthetic hand requires machine based identification of hand gestures using surface electromyogram (sEMG) recorded from the forearm muscles. This study has observed that a sub-set of the hand gestures have to be selected for an accurate automated hand gesture recognition, and reports a method to select these gestures to maximize the sensitivity and specificity. Experiments were conducted where sEMG was recorded from the muscles of the forearm while subjects performed hand gestures and then was classified off-line. The performances of ten gestures were ranked using the proposed Positive-Negative Performance Measurement Index (PNM), generated by a series of confusion matrices. When using all the ten gestures, the sensitivity and specificity was 80.0% and 97.8%. After ranking the gestures using the PNM, six gestures were selected and these gave sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% (96.5% and 99.3%); Hand open, Hand close, Little finger flexion, Ring finger flexion, Middle finger flexion and Thumb flexion. This work has shown that reliable myoelectric based human computer interface systems require careful selection of the gestures that have to be recognized and without such selection, the reliability is poor.

  6. Visualization of hierarchically structured information for human-computer interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Suh Hyun; Lee, J. K.; Choi, I. K.; Kye, S. C.; Lee, N. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-11-01

    Visualization techniques can be used to support operator's information navigation tasks on the system especially consisting of an enormous volume of information, such as operating information display system and computerized operating procedure system in advanced control room of nuclear power plants. By offering an easy understanding environment of hierarchically structured information, these techniques can reduce the operator's supplementary navigation task load. As a result of that, operators can pay more attention on the primary tasks and ultimately improve the cognitive task performance. In this report, an interface was designed and implemented using hyperbolic visualization technique, which is expected to be applied as a means of optimizing operator's information navigation tasks. 15 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs. (Author)

  7. Human/Computer Transaction Tasks: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Maddoz. Mt. ?., Burnette, J. T., ard Gutu’ann, J. C. Pont comparison for 5 x 7 dot matrix charaetars, OUS0 ESIM 1977, 19, 89-94. Two newly designed fon...constructpi with a matrix of 5 x 7 dots and wera presentaid with a computor- qenearat display. The results wetre analyzqd parametrically in terms of total...of thq software configuration being implemente4 to support the system. The next phase of work will focus on the system implemsantation of the rawly

  8. Questioning Mechanisms during Tutoring, Conversation, and Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    34cross-age" tutoring, which is one of the common types of tutoring in school systems. The tutors had never tutored in the area of research methods before...Segal Dr. Robert J. Seidel Dept. Psicologia Basica OERI US Army Research Institute Univ. Barcelona 555 New Jersey Ave., NW 5001 Eisenhower Ave. 08028

  9. Design of an efficient framework for fast prototyping of customized human-computer interfaces and virtual environments for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avola, Danilo; Spezialetti, Matteo; Placidi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation is often required after stroke, surgery, or degenerative diseases. It has to be specific for each patient and can be easily calibrated if assisted by human-computer interfaces and virtual reality. Recognition and tracking of different human body landmarks represent the basic features for the design of the next generation of human-computer interfaces. The most advanced systems for capturing human gestures are focused on vision-based techniques which, on the one hand, may require compromises from real-time and spatial precision and, on the other hand, ensure natural interaction experience. The integration of vision-based interfaces with thematic virtual environments encourages the development of novel applications and services regarding rehabilitation activities. The algorithmic processes involved during gesture recognition activity, as well as the characteristics of the virtual environments, can be developed with different levels of accuracy. This paper describes the architectural aspects of a framework supporting real-time vision-based gesture recognition and virtual environments for fast prototyping of customized exercises for rehabilitation purposes. The goal is to provide the therapist with a tool for fast implementation and modification of specific rehabilitation exercises for specific patients, during functional recovery. Pilot examples of designed applications and preliminary system evaluation are reported and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New Human-Computer Interface Concepts for Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeffrey A.; Hoxie, Mary Sue; Gillen, Dave; Parkinson, Christopher; Breed, Julie; Nickens, Stephanie; Baitinger, Mick

    2000-01-01

    The current climate of budget cuts has forced the space mission operations community to reconsider how it does business. Gone are the days of building one-of-kind control centers with teams of controllers working in shifts 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Increasingly, automation is used to significantly reduce staffing needs. In some cases, missions are moving towards lights-out operations where the ground system is run semi-autonomously. On-call operators are brought in only to resolve anomalies. Some operations concepts also call for smaller operations teams to manage an entire family of spacecraft. In the not too distant future, a skeleton crew of full-time general knowledge operators will oversee the operations of large constellations of small spacecraft, while geographically distributed specialists will be assigned to emergency response teams based on their expertise. As the operations paradigms change, so too must the tools to support the mission operations team's tasks. Tools need to be built not only to automate routine tasks, but also to communicate varying types of information to the part-time, generalist, or on-call operators and specialists more effectively. Thus, the proper design of a system's user-system interface (USI) becomes even more importance than before. Also, because the users will be accessing these systems from various locations (e.g., control center, home, on the road) via different devices with varying display capabilities (e.g., workstations, home PCs, PDAS, pagers) over connections with various bandwidths (e.g., dial-up 56k, wireless 9.6k), the same software must have different USIs to support the different types of users, their equipment, and their environments. In other words, the software must now adapt to the needs of the users! This paper will focus on the needs and the challenges of designing USIs for mission operations. After providing a general discussion of these challenges, the paper will focus on the current efforts of

  11. Dialogic reading of a novel for children: effects on text comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Pfeiffer Flores

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have shown positive effects of dialogic reading of picture books (reading aloud interspersed with prompts and feedback for verbalizations by the listener on the vocabulary and verbal expression of small children. This study assessed the effect of dialogic reading on the comprehension of a children’s novel by three children aged 7-8 years, using a single-subject reversal design. In Condition A, the text was read without intervention. In Condition B, reading was interspersed with dialogic interventions based on narrative functions. Comprehension was superior in all measures in Condition B for the two participants who underwent the B-A-B design, however, not for the participant who underwent the A-B-A design. We discuss possible interactions of dialogic reading with characteristics of text genre and the need for systematic replications with more sessions and reversals of conditions.

  12. Contributions of Paulo Freire to understanding the dialogic leadership exercise of nurses in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Oliveira, Anelise Freitas Lins de; Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Santos, Bianca Pozza Dos; Bao, Ana Cristina Pretto

    2017-04-04

    To know the understanding of nurses regarding the exercise of dialogic leadership in the hospital setting, and the challenges of leadership. Qualitative and exploratory-descriptive study Thirty-five nurses of a mid-sized hospital in the city of Pelotas/RS participated in this study. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, subsequently analysed using the operative proposal of Minayo. The results led to the following categories: exercise of dialogic leadership and challenges in the exercise of dialogic leadership. Dialogic leadership is understood as being the nurses' ability to coordinate and organise the nursing team in horizontally-oriented relationships guided by dialogue. Regarding the challenges, the nurses stressed the lack of professional experience, and relationships of hierarchy and power. Leadership based on dialogue can facilitate the management of care, of the nursing team, and of health services.

  13. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith

    2013-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction 2011 (IHCI 2011) was held at Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic from August 29 - August 31, 2011. This conference was third in the series, following IHCI 2009 and IHCI 2010 held in January at IIIT Allahabad, India. Human computer interaction is a fast growing research area and an attractive subject of interest for both academia and industry. There are many interesting and challenging topics that need to be researched and discussed. This book aims to provide excellent opportunities for the dissemination of interesting new research and discussion about presented topics. It can be useful for researchers working on various aspects of human computer interaction. Topics covered in this book include user interface and interaction, theoretical background and applications of HCI and also data mining and knowledge discovery as a support of HCI applications.

  14. Product Design Improvement Using Human-Computer Interaction Method Based on Modal Analysis

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    Liu Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of product design improvement method was proposed, which was mainly based on modal analysis using human-computer interactive way. And it was used in design improvement of an aerospace assembly to verify the effectiveness. The method made full use of the advantages of human and computer in product design and the work was mainly focused on modal analysis by computer and structure modification by human-computer interaction method. The final design got a better solution than the initial design as the results showed that the base frequency increased by 34.7% from 43.2Hz to 58.2Hz after design improvement and the vibration feature improved a lot. Also the experimental results were close to the simulation results with the relative error was 2.5%. The human-computer method can save cost and time and can provide a reference for other design of new products at the same time.

  15. Dialogue on ‘Dialogic Education’: Has Rupert gone over to ‘the Dark Side’?

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene Matusov; Rupert Wegerif

    2014-01-01

    This email dialogue that we record and report here between Eugene Matusov and Rupert Wegerif, exemplifies Internet mediated dialogic education. When Eugene emailed Rupert with his initial (mis)understanding of Rupert's position about dialogic pedagogy Rupert felt really motivated to reply. Rupert was not simply motivated to refute Eugene and assert his correctness, although Rupert is sure such elements enter into every dialogue, but also to explore and to try to resolve the issues ignited by ...

  16. Producing or reproducing reasoning? Socratic dialog is very effective, but only for a few.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Andrea Paula; Pedroncini, Olivia; Sigman, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    Successful communication between a teacher and a student is at the core of pedagogy. A well known example of a pedagogical dialog is 'Meno', a socratic lesson of geometry in which a student learns (or 'discovers') how to double the area of a given square 'in essence, a demonstration of Pythagoras' theorem. In previous studies we found that after engaging in the dialog participants can be divided in two kinds: those who can only apply a rule to solve the problem presented in the dialog and those who can go beyond and generalize that knowledge to solve any square problems. Here we study the effectiveness of this socratic dialog in an experimental and a control high-school classrooms, and we explore the boundaries of what is learnt by testing subjects with a set of 9 problems of varying degrees of difficulty. We found that half of the adolescents did not learn anything from the dialog. The other half not only learned to solve the problem, but could abstract something more: the geometric notion that the diagonal can be used to solve diverse area problems. Conceptual knowledge is critical for achievement in geometry, and it is not clear whether geometric concepts emerge spontaneously on the basis of universal experience with space, or reflect intrinsic properties of the human mind. We show that, for half of the learners, an exampled-based Socratic dialog in lecture form can give rise to formal geometric knowledge that can be applied to new, different problems.

  17. Human-computer interaction handbook fundamentals, evolving technologies and emerging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This second edition of The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook provides an updated, comprehensive overview of the most important research in the field, including insights that are directly applicable throughout the process of developing effective interactive information technologies. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base, as well as visionary perspectives and developments that fundamentally transform the way in which researchers and practitioners view the discipline. As the seminal volume of HCI research and practice, The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook feature

  18. Eye tracking using artificial neural networks for human computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, E; Aboši, V; Tomori, Z

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing project that has the aim to develop a low cost application to replace a computer mouse for people with physical impairment. The application is based on an eye tracking algorithm and assumes that the camera and the head position are fixed. Color tracking and template matching methods are used for pupil detection. Calibration is provided by neural networks as well as by parametric interpolation methods. Neural networks use back-propagation for learning and bipolar sigmoid function is chosen as the activation function. The user's eye is scanned with a simple web camera with backlight compensation which is attached to a head fixation device. Neural networks significantly outperform parametric interpolation techniques: 1) the calibration procedure is faster as they require less calibration marks and 2) cursor control is more precise. The system in its current stage of development is able to distinguish regions at least on the level of desktop icons. The main limitation of the proposed method is the lack of head-pose invariance and its relative sensitivity to illumination (especially to incidental pupil reflections).

  19. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  20. BAKUNIN'S SON, A DIALOGIC NOVEL BY SERGIO ATZENI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masina Depperu (Universidade de Lisboa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bakunin’s Son, a short novel by Sergio Atzeni, is the perfect embodiment of Bakhtin’s theory of the dialogic novel. The author sets his stories and characters - mostly humble outcast defeated people - in his own homeland, Sardinia. The accurately planned structure as an interview to thirty-two people reflects a multifarious reality with its complex rules and mentality expressed through different points of view, languages and ideologies. The protagonist’s story may result contradictory according to the different opinions of people who met him. Also the choice of a hybrid language contributes to create a highly connoted cultural context. In Bakunin’s Son, in fact, the Italian and the Sardinian overlap in a manner that cannot be distinguished or graphically marked, since form and meaning are fused together.Key words: dialogic novel, hybrid language.O filho de Bakunin, um romance polifónico de Sergio AtzeniO romance breve de Sergio Atzeni, O filho de Bakunin, è a perfeita exemplificação da teoria bachtininana do romance polifónico. O autor insere as histórias e as persona gens, geralmente abatidas, pessoas humildes e marginalizadas, na sua terra natal, a Sardenha. A história è estruturada na forma de entrevista a trinta e duas persona gens que com os seus pontos de vista criam una realidade multi-facetada e subjectiva. A vida de Tullio Saba, o protagonista, está narrada às vezes em modo contraditório e, por isso, os factos podem ser divergentes nas opiniões de quem esteve mais ou menos em contacto directo com ele. O uso característico de um instrumento linguístico híbrido, a meio caminho entre o italiano e o sardo, conota não somente o léxico mas também a estruturação inteira do discurso que atinge o efeito final pretendido pelo autor de descrever uma diversa ealidade antropológico-cultural.Palavras chave: romance polifónico, instrumento linguístico híbrido

  1. Implementasi Model Pembelajaran Argumentasi Dialogis dalam Pembelajaran Fisika untuk Meningkatkan Kemampuan Argumentasi Ilmiah Siswa SMA

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    Muslim Muslim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Low ability of scientific arguments related to the students' learning process in the physics classroom that has not habituate scientific argumentation ability. This study aimed to examine the effect of the implementation of arguments dialogical learning model to increase students' ability of scientific argumentation. Argumentation dialogical learning model consists of five phases of learning, namely stages: (1 identification of the problem; (2 group argument discussion; (3 classroom argument discussion; (4 class mediation; and (5 the integration of knowledge. Each stage involves students learning activities directly in order to develop the ability of scientific argumentation. The pre-experimental method with the one group pretest and posttest design used in this research. The essay ability of the scientific arguments test and observation sheet used as a research instruments. Subjects in this study were students of 10th grade in one of the state senior high schools in Bandung, which is determined by random cluster sampling technique. The results show there is an increase in the ability of the student to the acquisition of scientific arguments with medium category after argument dialogical learning model implemented and it was concluded that the implementation of arguments dialogical learning model increased the students’ ability of scientific argumentation. Keywords: argument dialogic learning model, scientific argumentation ability Abstrak Rendahnya kemampuan argumentasi ilmiah siswa terkait proses pembelajaran fisika di kelas yang belum melatihkan kemampuan argumentasi ilmiah. Penelitian ini bertujuan melihat pengaruh implementasi model pembelajaran argumentasi dialogis terhadap kemampuan argumentasi ilmiah siswa. Model pembelajaran argumentasi dialogis terdiri dari lima tahap pembelajaran, yaitu: (1 identifikasi masalah; (2 diskusi argumentasi kelompok; (3 diskusi argumentasi kelas; (4 mediasi kelas; dan (5 integrasi pengetahuan

  2. The forms of dialogical interaction between politics and art in the context of worldview paradigm of the New time rationalism

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    Y. Y. Laniuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the forms of dialogical interaction between politics and art in the context of the worldview paradigm of the Modern time. The category of mind is defined as the backbone element of the paradigm of rationalism of the New time along with its basic features. It is being argued that in ontological sense the concept of mind is identical to necessary, substantial laws under the surface of sensory available phenomena; in epistemological sense the mind correlates with analytical and synthetic method of cognition, and in the worldview sense it is equal to the organizing principle of World-order. Main features of the embodiment of the New time rationalism in political theories are outlined, including the interpretation of the concepts of natural condition of mankind and social contract as the necessary implications of the application of epistemological mind to sociopolitical reality. The specificity of the rationalistic anthropology is disclosed, along with the understanding of an individual as part of social system. The main principles of the aesthetics of rationalism are defined and the classicist style as aesthetical correlate of rationalism is characterized. Main features of the classicist aesthetics are postulated: normativeness, geometrism, consistency, etc. On this basis the principles of dialogical interaction between politics and art in the worldview paradigm of rationalism are established, including: 1. the equality of these spheres in their relationship to mind; 2. their rationalistic formal and substantial normativity; 3. correlation in the context of rationalistic anthropology.

  3. Implications of Artificial Intelligence Research for Human-Computer Interaction in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belajthy, Ernest

    Noting that many language arts teachers have rejected tutorial software because of its inability to interact effectively with students, this paper explores implications of artificial intelligence research for human/computer interaction in reading instruction. Limitations of "exact match" curriculum designs in contemporary attempts to provide…

  4. The Human-Computer Interaction of Cross-Cultural Gaming Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Joyram; Norcio, Anthony F.; Van Der Veer, Jacob J.; Andre, Charles F.; Miller, Zachary; Regelsberger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the cultural dimensions of the human-computer interaction that underlies gaming strategies. The article is a desktop study of existing literature and is organized into five sections. The first examines the cultural aspects of knowledge processing. The social constructs technology interaction is discussed. Following this, the…

  5. A Project-Based Learning Setting to Human-Computer Interaction for Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Cornelia; Geisler, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of fundamentals of human-computer interaction resp. usability engineering is getting more and more important in technical domains. However this interdisciplinary field of work and corresponding degree programs are not broadly known. Therefore at the Hochschule Ruhr West, University of Applied Sciences, a program was developed to give…

  6. Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction Design Education: Teaching Affordance Design for Emerging Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Anthony; Matei, Sorin Adam

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of human-computer interaction design (HCID) over the last 20 years suggests that there is a growing need for educational scholars to consider new and more applicable theoretical models of interactive product design. The authors suggest that such paradigms would call for an approach that would equip HCID students with a better…

  7. Integrating HCI into IDT: Charting the Human Computer Interaction Competencies Necessary for Instructional Media Production Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Abbie; Sugar, William

    2004-01-01

    A report on the efforts made to describe the range of human-computer interaction skills necessary to complete a program of study in Instructional Design Technology. Educators responsible for instructional media production courses have not yet articulated which among the wide range of possible interactions students must master for instructional…

  8. Implementations of the CC'01 Human-Computer Interaction Guidelines Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaris, Bill; Wainer, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E.; Stalvey, RoxAnn H.; Shannon, Christine; Leventhal, Laura; Barnes, Julie; Wright, John; Schafer, J. Ben; Sanders, Dean

    2007-01-01

    In today's technology-laden society human-computer interaction (HCI) is an important knowledge area for computer scientists and software engineers. This paper surveys existing approaches to incorporate HCI into computer science (CS) and such related issues as the perceived gap between the interests of the HCI community and the needs of CS…

  9. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in Educational Environments: Implications of Understanding Computers as Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews literature in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) as it applies to educational environments. Topics include the origin of HCI; human factors; usability; computer interface design; goals, operations, methods, and selection (GOMS) models; command language versus direct manipulation; hypertext; visual perception; interface…

  10. Competence of People with Intellectual Disabilities on Using Human-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex W. K.; Chan, Chetwyn C. H.; Li-Tsang, Cecilia W. P.; Lam, Chow S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the task processes which hinder people with intellectual disabilities (ID) when using the human-computer interface. This involved testing performance on specific computer tasks and conducting detailed analyses of the task demands imposed on the participants. The interface used by Internet Explorer (IE) was standardized into 16…

  11. Speech repairs, intonational boundaries and discourse markers: Modeling speakers' utterances in spoken dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeman, Peter Anthony

    Interactive spoken dialog provides many new challenges for natural language understanding systems. One of the most critical challenges is simply determining the speaker's intended utterances: both segmenting a speaker's turn into utterances and determining the intended words in each utterance. Even assuming perfect word recognition, the latter problem is complicated by the occurrence of speech repairs, which occur where the speaker goes back and changes (or repeats) something she just said. The words that are replaced or repeated are no longer part of the intended utterance, and so need to be identified. The two problems of segmenting the turn into utterances and resolving speech repairs are strongly intertwined with a third problem: identifying discourse markers. Lexical items that can function as discourse markers, such as 'well' and 'okay,' are ambiguous as to whether they are introducing an utterance unit, signaling a speech repair, or are simply part of the context of an utterance, as in 'that's okay.' Spoken dialog systems need to address these three issues together and early on in the processing stream. In fact, just as these three issues are closely intertwined with each other, they are also intertwined with identifying the syntactic role or part-of-speech (POS) of each word and the speech recognition problem of predicting the next word given the previous words. In this thesis, we present a statistical language model for resolving these issues. Rather than finding the best word interpretation for an acoustic signal, we redefine the speech recognition problem to so that it also identifies the POS tags, discourse markers, speech repairs and intonational phrase endings (a major cue in determining utterance units). Adding these extra elements to the speech recognition problem actually allows it to better predict the words involved, since we are able to make use of the predictions of boundary tones, discourse markers and speech repairs to better account for what

  12. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Kohrs

    Full Text Available The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system's trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays.

  13. Language acquisition: hesitations in the question/answer dialogic pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Lourenço; Villega, Cristyane de Camargo Sampaio

    2015-01-01

    (1) To verify the existence (or not) of hesitation marks in the beginning of utterances in children's discourse; and (2) to determine to what extent the presence/absence of these marks could be explained by retrievable facts in the production conditions of their discourses. Interview situations with four children aged 5-6 years attending Kindergarten level II in a public preschool at the time of the data collection were analyzed. The interviews were recorded on audio and video, inside a soundproof booth, with high fidelity equipment. Afterwards, the recordings were transcribed by six transcribers that were specially trained for this task. Transcription rules that prioritized the analyses of hesitations were used. For the analysis of retrievable facts in the production conditions of children's discourse, the dialogic pair question-answer was adopted. A correlation between presence/absence of hesitation in the beginning of utterances in children and type of question (open/closed) made by the collocutor was observed. When the question was closed ended, the utterances were preferably initiated without hesitation marks, and when the question was open ended, the utterances were preferably initiated with hesitation marks. The presence/absence of hesitation marks in the beginning of utterances in children was found to be dependent on the production conditions of their discourses.

  14. Aspek Dialogis al-Qur'an dalam Perspektif Pendidikan

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    Mahmud Arif

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Some of the thinkers who emerged in the history of thought of Muslims complained of the low response of the Qur’an toward empirical reality and the needs ofcommunity. They were sure that it was because of the tradition of study of the Qur’an that Muslims developed until now is less dialogical approach in addressing the reality, and that the interpretation of studies so far is more dominated by the patterns offiqh, kalam, and mysticism, and only a little to do with the pattern of education. Yet the Qur’an actually views human as the object of education in a long process with the ultimate objective of happiness of the world and the hereafter. This process involves human in an intensive dialogue and it takes time. This paper offers a selection of verses of the Qur’an and then analyses it with a historical approach that the results will be the philosophical basis andfundamental principles of human education efforts to achieve perfect being. This paper concludes that the gradual way of revelation of the Qur’an shows that this holy book presents as a “book of education” that accompanies everyday life of man. Thus the study of the meaning of the verses of the Qur’an with a multidisciplinary approach is a must as a form of attempt to optimize the intake of ”divine nutrition” to human health in living his life.

  15. Human Computation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  16. Dialogism and Carnival in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse: A Bakhtinian Reading

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    Hamed Faizi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism in a novel promises the creation of a domain of interactive context for different voices which results in a polyphonic discourse. Instead of trying to suppress each other, the voices of the novel interact upon the other voices in a way that none of them tries to silent the other ones, and each one has the opportunity to express itself. In Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, although some voices attempt to be more dominant, all are allowed to be heard and interact with the other ones. In this way Mrs. Ramsay acts like a link that helps to create a dialogic discourse by respecting the voices of all the other participants. Consequently a carnivalesque narrative discourse is established through which the voices that yield to be dominant, which is mainly Mr. Ramsay’s voice, could not be established as a hierarchical position and even it loses its authoritative position as the other characters attend the dialogue in the context of the novel. The present article will take it to track the policies of dialogism and carnival in Woolf’s novel and to search the production of meaning via the emergence and development of these policies. The activity in it of dialogism is the cause of unfinalizability which is the vital feature of dialogism that allows the permanent operation of dialogue upon the course of time and prevents the establishment of hierarchical positions of power. The article will also take to extrapolate the different phases in the creation of this sense of dialogism in the novel and especially highlighting the role of Mrs. Ramsay in the fabrication of such a sense. Keywords: Bakhtin, Woolf, To the Light House, Dialogism, Carnivalesque, Unfinalizability

  17. Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99 in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text chat communications, manipulation of procedureschecklists, cataloguingannotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit andor other EVA systems.

  18. A dual-mode human computer interface combining speech and tongue motion for people with severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xueliang; Park, Hangue; Kim, Jeonghee; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-11-01

    We are presenting a new wireless and wearable human computer interface called the dual-mode Tongue Drive System (dTDS), which is designed to allow people with severe disabilities to use computers more effectively with increased speed, flexibility, usability, and independence through their tongue motion and speech. The dTDS detects users' tongue motion using a magnetic tracer and an array of magnetic sensors embedded in a compact and ergonomic wireless headset. It also captures the users' voice wirelessly using a small microphone embedded in the same headset. Preliminary evaluation results based on 14 able-bodied subjects and three individuals with high level spinal cord injuries at level C3-C5 indicated that the dTDS headset, combined with a commercially available speech recognition (SR) software, can provide end users with significantly higher performance than either unimodal forms based on the tongue motion or speech alone, particularly in completing tasks that require both pointing and text entry.

  19. CROSS-CULTURAL DIALOG AS A PEDAGOGICAL INSTRUMENT OF MULTICULTURAL AWARENESS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Kozina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The  pa per em phasizes the  pros pects of cross-cultural dialog as a means of  poly-cultural education, and demonstrates the ex perience of culture dialog referring to a foreign language university course. Analyzing the existing definitions and s pecificities of cross-cultural dialog, the author regards it as a communicative context of culture clashes, as well as the mechanism of mutual understanding and enrichment in cultural and semantic s pheres. Consequently, the cross-cultural dialogue and its further reflection hel p to develo p active life attitude and readiness for  professional activity in a situation of multicultural diversity; on the other hand, it develo ps students’ ethnic identity, em pathy, and ability to re present the native culture. The theoretical  part of the research  presents a three-stage formation model of the cross-culture dialog aimed at develo ping a multicultural  personality; the  practical  part describes a seminar on the cross-culture dialog with students s pecializing in the Theory and Methods of English Language Teaching at Tumen State University. The  pa per is addressed to methodologists and foreign language teaches both  practicing and  pros pective.

  20. Challenging Transmission Modes of Teaching in Science Classrooms: Enhancing Learner-Centredness through Dialogicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Ramnarain, Umesh; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing reform towards more inquiry-based teaching in school curriculum policy in South Africa. Reform towards more inquiry-based approaches is already integrated in pre-service teacher education programmes. As inquiry-based approaches have been gaining momentum worldwide, there is an increasing concern that dialogic interaction in classroom communication is being neglected. This is especially within teacher-orchestrated classroom interactions that should foster greater learner centredness and thus authentic scientific inquiry. In learner-centred teaching approaches, student contributions should be explicitly taken into account as part of classroom interactions in science. Learner-centred approaches provide the rationale for improved interaction, especially when student contributions should be considered within teacher-orchestrated communications. The aim of this study is to bring forth indicators that are connected to different forms of interactions and complement the dialogic-authoritative categorization through in-depth analysis of two lesson transcript examples. Even though over-authoritative and even transmission modes of communication seemed to prevail in South African classrooms, it is through finding building blocks for dialogicity this status can be challenged towards more learner-centred interaction. The explicitness of dialogicity and fundamentally contrasting differences between examples of dialogic and authoritative approaches are presented through the in-depth analysis of classroom interactions of two case episodes. Implications for teaching and teacher education are discussed.

  1. Tolerance as dialogical universals: philosophical aspects of cultural area enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Troitska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Non­violence world forming requires the polycultural world dialogueness which becomes the necessary tool of interaction subjects’ relationship harmonization. On the basis of research result analysis the author reveals the significant possibilities of tolerance in modern intercultural interaction and emphasizes its potential for dialogue. By analysis logics it is proposed to transfer tolerance into the area of dialogical universals which consist of general definitions, ideas in the philosophical meaning and also have life­oriented sense for a man. In the article dialogue and tolerance are considered as natural features of a man and tolerance meaning is explicated in cultural universals, and praxeological area of spiritual­practical perception and re­construction of the world. The article aim realization with the help of the phenomenological approach, the theoretical re­construction and the analytics concerning tolerance make possible the search of useful constructs of its more efficient implementation in scientific­educational and social­cultural area as in the modern philosophy universals are often considered as universals of culture. As the basis of the world comprehension, as the conceptual foundation of its remaking by a human or its adaption to him they are formed implicitly in the personality’s cultural­educational area and they become, on the one hand, an orientation basis in choosing the life strategies and a certain tool of reality phenomena perception and, on the other hand, an intellectual combination of images into the integral picture of the universe.

  2. Dialogical Grammar: Varieties of Dialogue in Wittgenstein’s Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Lemberger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dialogical character of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations has received scant attention in the literature, given the work’s status in his total oeuvre, and is dismissed as a marginal as compared to the other differences between the Tractatus and the Investigations. The main lines of interpretation that have been proposed see dialogue as a rhetorical technique intended to present erroneous positions and then refute them, as an exemplification of what can be expressed in language (McGinn 1997; Rhees 1998, or as a reflection of Wittgenstein’s informal teaching method (Malcolm 2001; Savickey et al. 1990. The present article adopts the perspective that Wittgenstein’s use of dialogue makes it possible to track the various modes of language-acts, consonant with his directions to examine the daily use of language (Wittgenstein 2009, §116 and esp. §132, “when language is, as it were, idling.” In his later inquiries, Wittgenstein frequently considers the nature of mental states, accompanied by an attempt to characterize the differences between them while at the same time dealing with the cases in which it is difficult to distinguish them. In this process he made a variety of uses of dialogue, each of which embodies a different aspect of language action.  Subsequently I will demonstrate that these different uses are not haphazard. A scrutiny of the nature of the dialogue can help us understand the nature of the activity carried out of the state of consciousness. Finally, I propose a distinction among three main types of dialogue: technical, conversational, and reflexive.

  3. Creating Common Ground: Activities of the Soil Health Dialog Workgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Moebius-Clune, Bianca; Hatfield, Jerry; Buckner, William; Conklin, Neil; McMahon, Sean; Haney, Richard; Muller, Paul; Martin, Larkin; Shaw, Richard; Eyrich, Ted; Martens, Klaas; Archuleta, Ray; Thompson, Mary

    2014-05-01

    The concept of Soil Health has come to forefront as a soil management concept for soil scientists, agronomists, producers, land-use planners, and environmental advocates. Although many see this simply as a way to increase organic matter in the soil it is much more than that and has implications to a broader management decisions. A diverse group of stake holders ranging from scientists to consultants, conventional to organic farmers, governmental to NGOs met to start a dialog about soil health with an overarching goal to adopt practices that will improve soil health across a wide area and for a wide variety of land uses. The group recognized the critical need for using soil health as a cornerstone of sustainable soil management. The group also realized that a consistent and coherent message about soil health needed to be developed that would be inclusive to all stake holders. Furthermore the group recognized that if soil health is to be promoted we all need to know and agree on how to measure it and interpret the results. The first outcome from the meeting was the creation of several teams comprised of individuals with the diverse interests as list above. The first was tasked to review and develop a definition of soil health. The first group, after much debate, decided on the adoption of the USDA-NRCS definition of Soil Health as the most effective way to begin. This definition was presented as a press release from the Farm Foundation in early December 2013 in conjunction with World Soil Day. The second group was tasked to review, develop or recommend standard measurement techniques to assess soil health. The methods group is in the process of reviewing methods and hopes to have a preliminary list out for broader review by mid-year. This presentation reviews current progress and asks for input from the Soil Science community at large.

  4. A study of lip movements during spontaneous dialog and its application to voice activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodoyer, David; Rivet, Bertrand; Girin, Laurent; Savariaux, Christophe; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Jutten, Christian

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a quantitative and comprehensive study of the lip movements of a given speaker in different speech/nonspeech contexts, with a particular focus on silences (i.e., when no sound is produced by the speaker). The aim is to characterize the relationship between "lip activity" and "speech activity" and then to use visual speech information as a voice activity detector (VAD). To this aim, an original audiovisual corpus was recorded with two speakers involved in a face-to-face spontaneous dialog, although being in separate rooms. Each speaker communicated with the other using a microphone, a camera, a screen, and headphones. This system was used to capture separate audio stimuli for each speaker and to synchronously monitor the speaker's lip movements. A comprehensive analysis was carried out on the lip shapes and lip movements in either silence or nonsilence (i.e., speech+nonspeech audible events). A single visual parameter, defined to characterize the lip movements, was shown to be efficient for the detection of silence sections. This results in a visual VAD that can be used in any kind of environment noise, including intricate and highly nonstationary noises, e.g., multiple and/or moving noise sources or competing speech signals.

  5. Dialogical inquiry as an instrument of the reconciliation of conflict in the hands of Christian leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Hugo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The apartheid system caused deep rifts in South African society, and even following the dawn of democracy, society in South Africa continues to struggle with violence and conflict, ethnic differences, mass action and poverty. Christian leaders have an important part to play in conflict resolution. Conflict management in organisations incorporates negotiation as a means of conflict resolution. A number of approaches to conflict resolution contribute to this approach; these include forcing, avoiding, accommodating, compromising and collaborating. Christian leaders, however, favour reconciliation as a means of resolving conflict. A Christian approach to conflict resolution needs to take cognisance of the existential aspect of conflict. Examples of such approaches are those of Dreyer, who speaks of reconciliation as a dilemma for forgiveness, and Kistner, who explores the way in which the use of narratives rather than reallife stories in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission reduced the severity of trauma. The social construction of trauma in “Mamelodi” by Brigid Hess, which presents a shift from forgiveness to a journey taken along with the perpetrators, and the belief of Desmond Tutu in the healing brought about by the ubuntu philosophy, are evaluated here as being detrimental to reconciliation. Based on the examples cited, an approach to conflict resolution entailing a clear integration of the biblical approach to reconciliation and dialogical inquiry (DI is proposed as an appropriate intervention approach for Christian leaders. The present contribution is offered from within the discipline of Practical Theology, with a focus on Pastoral Counseling.

  6. THE PRINCIPLE OF CROSS-CULTURAL DIALOGUE IN TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE DIALOGICAL SPEECH ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolova Tatyana Petrovna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the necessity of taking into account such social and pedagogical principle as the principle of cross-cultural dialogue when teaching a foreign language, in particular when teaching foreign language dialogical speech activity. The purpose of the work is to study this social and pedagogical principle from the communicative point of view, based on the last researches in the field of linguistics, pedagogic and techniques of teaching foreign languages. Today the concept of culture is considered by the majority of scientists not only as the product of a certain group of people or as the system of signs reflecting the world, but also as the standard way of thinking and acting, as information, a set of knowledge, ideas apprehended and realized by people. We consider culture through a prism of the language, and the language as the main means of reflection and expression of culture when interrelating a foreign language training and the corresponding culture, and also when studying the native culture at foreign language classes. Thus, it is necessary to pay due attention to the problem of teaching both culture and foreign languages in the era of globalization as it is one of the leading social and pedagogical purposes of the higher education.

  7. AFFECTIVE AND EMOTIONAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION: Game-Based and Innovative Learning Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Askim GULUMBAY, Anadolu University, TURKEY

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This book was edited by, Maja Pivec, an educator at the University of Applied Sciences, and published by IOS Pres in 2006. The learning process can be seen as an emotional and personal experience that is addictive and leads learners to proactive behavior. New research methods in this field are related to affective and emotional approaches to computersupported learning and human-computer interactions.Bringing together scientists and research aspects from psychology, educational sciences, cognitive sciences, various aspects of communication and human computer interaction, interface design andcomputer science on one hand and educators and game industry on the other, this should open gates to evolutionary changes of the learning industry. The major topics discussed are emotions, motivation, games and game-experience.

  8. The dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience: what does philosophy of mind say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheniaux, Elie; Lyra, Carlos Eduardo de Sousa

    2014-12-01

    To briefly review how the main monist and dualist currents of philosophy of mind approach the mind-body problem and to describe their association with arguments for and against a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. The literature was reviewed for studies in the fields of psychology, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind. Some currents are incompatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neurosciences: interactionism and psychophysical parallelism, because they do not account for current knowledge about the brain; epiphenomenalism, which claims that the mind is a mere byproduct of the brain; and analytical behaviorism, eliminative materialism, reductive materialism and functionalism, because they ignore subjective experiences. In contrast, emergentism claims that mental states are dependent on brain states, but have properties that go beyond the field of neurobiology. Only emergentism is compatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

  9. The dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience: what does philosophy of mind say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Cheniaux

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To briefly review how the main monist and dualist currents of philosophy of mind approach the mind-body problem and to describe their association with arguments for and against a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.Methods: The literature was reviewed for studies in the fields of psychology, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind.Results: Some currents are incompatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neurosciences: interactionism and psychophysical parallelism, because they do not account for current knowledge about the brain; epiphenomenalism, which claims that the mind is a mere byproduct of the brain; and analytical behaviorism, eliminative materialism, reductive materialism and functionalism, because they ignore subjective experiences. In contrast, emergentism claims that mental states are dependent on brain states, but have properties that go beyond the field of neurobiology.Conclusions: Only emergentism is compatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

  10. The Teaching and the Learning Brain: A Cortical Hemodynamic Marker of Teacher-Student Interactions in the Socratic Dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holper, Lisa; Goldin, Andrea P.; Shalom, Diego E.; Battro, Antonio M.; Wolf, Martin; Sigman, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to step into two-person (teacher-student) educational neuroscience. We describe a physiological marker of cortical hemodynamic correlates involved in teacher-student interactions during performance of a classical teaching model, the Socratic dialog. We recorded prefrontal brain activity during dialog execution simultaneously in…

  11. Effects of Adapted Dialogic Reading on Oral Language and Vocabulary Knowledge of Latino Preschoolers at Risk for English Language Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Vivian I.; Lo, Ya-Yu; Godfrey-Hurrell, Kristi; Swart, Katie; Baker, Doris Luft

    2015-01-01

    In this single-case design study, we examined the effects of an adapted dialogic reading intervention on the oral language and vocabulary skills of four Latino preschool children who were at risk for English language delays. We used adapted dialogic reading strategies in English and two literacy games that included a rapid naming activity and…

  12. Constancy and Variability: Dialogic Literacy Events as Sites for Improvisation in Two 3rd-Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Michelle E.; Santori, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This multisite study investigates dialogic literacy events that revolved around narrative and informational texts in two 3rd-grade classrooms. The authors offer a metaphor of musical improvisation to contemplate dialogic literacy events as part of the repertoire of teaching and learning experiences. In literacy learning, where there is much…

  13. South African sign language human-computer interface in the context of the national accessibility portal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivrin, GJ

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available will be built by adapting and building on existing technologies. The potential breakthrough is to find the underlying grammar of SASL which has never been standardised. The research is conducted at different levels: • Sign Language Processing: Study... the computational aspects of sign language grammar production with a combination of linguistics rules [1], animation scripts generation [2,3] and prosody [4]. • Human Computer Interaction: Research alternative ways of capturing sign language users’ queries...

  14. An overview of a decade of journal publications about Culture and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)

    OpenAIRE

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Roese, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we analyze the concept of human-computer interaction in cultural and national contexts. Building and extending upon the framework for understanding research in usability and culture by Honold [3], we give an overview of publications in culture and HCI between 1998 and 2008, with a narrow focus on high-level journal publications only. The purpose is to review current practice in how cultural HCI issues are studied, and to analyse problems with the measure...

  15. Computer Aided Design in Digital Human Modeling for Human Computer Interaction in Ergonomic Assessment: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Suman Mukhopadhyay , Sanjib Kumar Das and Tania Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Research in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) hasbeen enormously successful in the area of computeraidedergonomics or human-centric designs. Perfectfit for people has always been a target for productdesign. Designers traditionally used anthropometricdimensions for 3D product design which created a lotof fitting problems when dealing with thecomplexities of the human body shapes. Computeraided design (CAD), also known as Computer aideddesign and drafting (CADD) is the computertechnology used fo...

  16. Review of the Use of Electroencephalography as an Evaluation Method for Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Jeremy; Mühl, C.; Lotte, Fabien; Hachet, Martin

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Evaluating human-computer interaction is essential as a broadening population uses machines, sometimes in sensitive contexts. However, traditional evaluation methods may fail to combine real-time measures, an "objective" approach and data contextualization. In this review we look at how adding neuroimaging techniques can respond to such needs. We focus on electroencephalography (EEG), as it could be handled effectively during a dedicated evaluation phase. We identify w...

  17. Service Design for Developing Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction for Smart Tvs

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Ming Wang; Cheih-Ju Huang

    2015-01-01

    A Smart TV integrates Internet and Web features into a TV, as well convergence between computer and TV and can utilize as a computer. Smart TV devices facilitate the curation of content by combining Internet-based information with content from TV providers. Many techniques, such as those that focus on speech, gestures, and eye movement, have been used to develop various human computer interfaces for Smart TVs. However, as suggested by several researchers, user scenarios and user experiences s...

  18. The Study on Human-Computer Interaction Design Based on the Users’ Subconscious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyuan

    2017-09-01

    Human-computer interaction is human-centered. An excellent interaction design should focus on the study of user experience, which greatly comes from the consistence between design and human behavioral habit. However, users’ behavioral habits often result from subconsciousness. Therefore, it is smart to utilize users’ subconscious behavior to achieve design's intention and maximize the value of products’ functions, which gradually becomes a new trend in this field.

  19. "Socratic Circles are a Luxury": Exploring the Conceptualization of a Dialogic Tool in Three Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelin, Michelle Renee

    Research has shown that dialogic instruction promotes learning in students. Secondary science has traditionally been taught from an authoritative stance, reinforced in recent years by testing policies requiring coverage. Socratic Circles are a framework for student-led dialogic discourse, which have been successfully used in English language arts and social studies classrooms. The purpose of this research was to explore the implementation process of Socratic Circles in secondary science classes where they have been perceived to be more difficult. Focusing on two physical science classes and one chemistry class, this study described the nature and characteristics of Socratic Circles, teachers' dispositions toward dialogic instruction, the nature and characteristics of student discussion, and student motivation. Socratic Circles were found to be a dialogic support that influenced classroom climate, social skills, content connections, and student participation. Teachers experienced conflict between using traditional test driven scripted teaching, and exploring innovation through dialogic instruction. Students experienced opportunities for peer interaction, participation, and deeper discussions in a framework designed to improve dialogic skills. Students in two of the classrooms showed evidence of motivation for engaging in peer-led discussion, and students in one class did not. The class that did not show evidence of motivation had not been given the same scaffolding as the other two classes. Two physical science teachers and one chemistry teacher found that Socratic Circles required more scaffolding than was indicated by their peers in other disciplines such as English and social studies. The teachers felt that student's general lack of background knowledge for any given topic in physical science or chemistry necessitated the building of a knowledge platform before work on a discussion could begin. All three of the teachers indicated that Socratic Circles were a

  20. ON CODE REFACTORING OF THE DIALOG SUBSYSTEM OF CDSS PLATFORM FOR THE OPEN-SOURCE MIS OPENMRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semenets

    2016-08-01

    The open-source MIS OpenMRS developer tools and software API are reviewed. The results of code refactoring of the dialog subsystem of the CDSS platform which is made as module for the open-source MIS OpenMRS are presented. The structure of information model of database of the CDSS dialog subsystem was updated according with MIS OpenMRS requirements. The Model-View-Controller (MVC based approach to the CDSS dialog subsystem architecture was re-implemented with Java programming language using Spring and Hibernate frameworks. The MIS OpenMRS Encounter portlet form for the CDSS dialog subsystem integration is developed as an extension. The administrative module of the CDSS platform is recreated. The data exchanging formats and methods for interaction of OpenMRS CDSS dialog subsystem module and DecisionTree GAE service are re-implemented with help of AJAX technology via jQuery library

  1. A paradigmatic disagreement in "Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy" by Eugene Matusov and Kiyotaka Miyazaki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marjanovic-Shane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available I read with a great pleasure the heated dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy between Eugene Matusov and Kiyotaka Miyazaki. It provided me with one of those rare occasions where I could both witness, and also join, the workings of two minds as they struggled with and against each other to construct, de-construct, and reconstruct their visions of dialogic pedagogical approaches to education. As I was reading, I had a lot of questions and remarks. I try to summarize them here – while many are still left on the margins of the original manuscript.

  2. Multicultural adolescents between tradition and postmodernity: Dialogical Self Theory and the paradox of localization and globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijl, Toon

    2012-01-01

    This chapter builds on Dialogical Self Theory to investigate the identity development of adolescents growing up in multicultural societies. Their cultural identity is not only compounded by the rapid cultural changes associated with globalization, but also by the paradoxical revival of cultural traditions which the large-scale compression of time and space has incited at local levels of society. Dialogical Self Theory, which is based on the metaphor of the self as a "society of mind," helps to understand the dilemmas of tradition and postmodernity, of localization and globalization, within the self of individual youngsters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  3. Name Me – ein Porträt als Dialog anhand des Namensystems der Kelabit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Böck

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Beitrag betrifft die künstlerische Arbeit Name Me, die im Rahmen von Porträt als Dialog, der Erforschung von Formen der individuellen Repräsentation, entstand. Porträt als Dialog provoziert in unterschiedlichen Konstellationen einen Darstellungsdialog, um zur Erweiterung der Kunstform Porträt beizutragen. Name Me richtet den Blick auf die Benennung und Namensänderung der Kelabit, einer indigenen Bevölkerungsgruppe im Hochland Zentral-Borneos. Vorgestellt wird deren Namensystem und das (ehemals praktizierte ihrer Nachbarn, der Penan.

  4. Die hermeneutische Erfahrung zwischen Weltoffenheit und Dialog (The hermeneutical experience between world-openness and dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dottori

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows on the basis of hermeneutical theories by Gadamer and Heidegger – enriched through philosophies of Aristotle and Hegel – the role of practical wisdom (phronesis and of dialectical knowledge in the establishing a peaceful order of the future world und future global society. The concept of the dialectical knowledge is connected with dialogical notion of truth and with such virtues as readiness and openness for such a dialog that puts our main assumptions and presuppositions into question and through that changes our whole life. It is the essence of so-called hermeneutical experience.

  5. Toppling Teacher Domination of Primary Classroom Talk through Dialogic Literary Gatherings in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Linda; García-Carrión, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    Dialogic Literary Gatherings (DLGs), first implemented by Ramon Flecha, have proved to be a "successful educational action" (SEA) for inclusion, social cohesion and raising children's attainment in several European and Latin American countries. This article reports their implementation in England and their consistent and dramatic…

  6. Preschool Children's Use of Thematic Vocabulary during Dialogic Reading and Activity-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Naomi L.; Coogle, Christan Grygas; Storie, Sloan

    2016-01-01

    An adapted alternating treatments design was used to compare the expressive use of thematic vocabulary by three preschool children with developmental delays during Dialogic Reading, a shared book reading intervention, and Activity-Based Intervention, a naturalistic play-based teaching method. The design was replicated across two early childhood…

  7. Effective Coviewing: Preschoolers' Learning from Video after a Dialogic Questioning Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Gabrielle A.; O'Doherty, Katherine; Troseth, Georgene L.

    2013-01-01

    Young preschoolers rapidly acquire new information from social partners but do not learn efficiently from people on video. We trained parents to use Whitehurst's "dialogic reading" questioning techniques while watching educational television with their children. Eighty-one parents coviewed storybook videos with their 3-year-old children…

  8. A Modified Dialogic Reading Intervention for Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Veronica P.; Schwartz, Ilene S.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of a modified dialogic reading intervention on levels of verbal participation and vocabulary growth in nine preschool children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using single-case design methodology. Baseline book reading resulted in consistently low levels of verbal participation followed by an immediate increase in verbal…

  9. Dialog als literarische Strategie: zum Sammelband ‚Inszenierte Gespräche‘

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Gröne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Hausmann und Marita Liebermann, Hrsg., Inszenierte Gespräche: zum Dialog als Gattung und Argumentationsmodus in der Romania vom Mittelalter bis zur Aufklärung, Internationale Forschungen zur Allgemeinen und Vergleichenden Literaturwissenschaft 173 (Berlin: Weidler, 2014, 273 S.

  10. The Dartmouth Dialog: the First Steps of Informal Soviet-American Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Moskovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with little known episodes of the informal Soviet-American Dartmouth dialog during the period of the Cold War. The potential of this channel of information exchange and its role in the Cuban missile crisis and in the signing of Limited Test Ban Treaty on August 5, 1963 are analyzed.

  11. Two secondary teachers’ understanding and classroom practice of dialogic teaching: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Pol, Janneke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840645; Brindley, Sue; Higham, Rupert John Edward

    2017-01-01

    Dialogic Teaching (DT) is effective in fostering student learning; yet, it is hard to implement. Little research focused on secondary teachers’ learning of DT and on the link between teachers’ understanding and practices, although these two are usually strongly intertwined. Using a wide range of

  12. How Children Talk Together to Make Meaning from Texts: A Dialogic Perspective on Reading Comprehension Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    This study considers reading comprehension as a dialogic transaction of making meaning from text. The concept of text and reading is taken to include the visual and multimodal as well as written forms. Case studies of children discussing texts are analysed to explore how children engage in inter-mental and intra-mental processes of reading,…

  13. Nurturing Cultures of Peace with Dialogic Approaches to Language and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shelley; Grant, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that violence in society can be reflected in the microcosm of the classroom, primarily taking the form of a range of bullying behaviours, and that TESOL educators can play a role in addressing conflict by connecting individuals and communities through a dialogic approach to TESOL. The article goes on to describe the nature of…

  14. Dialogism and Carnival in Virginia Woolf's "To the Lighthouse": A Bakhtinian Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizi, Hamed; Taghizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism in a novel promises the creation of a domain of interactive context for different voices which results in a polyphonic discourse. Instead of trying to suppress each other, the voices of the novel interact upon the other voices in a way that none of them tries to silent the other ones, and each one has the opportunity to…

  15. [The concept of "dialogical self" and its' application for psychotherapy and especially for family therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janusz, Bernadetta; Józefik, Barbara; de Barbaro, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The authors show how to use the concept of a "dialogical self' to conduct therapy, supervision and qualitative research of the process of psychotherapy. They pay special attention to usefulness of the presented concept and to investigate what happens to a therapist during a family meeting, i.e., the so called "inner conversation of the therapist".

  16. [The concept of the "dialogical self' in psychotherapy--theoretical assumptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefik, Barbara; Janusz, Bernadetta; de Barbaro, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The authors present Michaił Bachtin's and Hubert Herman's concept of "dialogical self" which was used by family therapists to create a new conceptual tool of understanding the family therapy process. The paper shows Peter Rober's and his co-workers works that use this concept in order to understand phenomena occurring during therapeutic meeting.

  17. Using Dialogic Reading to Enhance Emergent Literacy Skills of Young Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huennekens, Mary Ellen; Xu, Yaoying

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an early reading intervention on preschool-age dual language learners' (DLL) early literacy skills. Instruction in phonological awareness and alphabet knowledge was embedded in interactive reading strategies, also known as dialogic reading. A single subject multiple baseline across subjects design was applied to…

  18. Multicultural Adolescents between Tradition and Postmodernity: Dialogical Self Theory and the Paradox of Localization and Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijl, Toon

    2012-01-01

    This chapter builds on Dialogical Self Theory to investigate the identity development of adolescents growing up in multicultural societies. Their cultural identity is not only compounded by the rapid cultural changes associated with globalization, but also by the paradoxical revival of cultural traditions which the large-scale compression of…

  19. The dialogical construction of the Muslim self: a reading of the life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theoretical framework of this study relies upon Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of dialogical discourse and approaches identity formation as a process of ... The paper concludes by assessing al-Ghazālī's impact upon Muslim society, emphasising his influence upon an entire generation of Islamist scholars and activists and ...

  20. Bakhtinian Dialogic and Vygotskian Dialectic: Compatabilities and Contradictions in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth Jayne

    2014-01-01

    This article explores two central notions of "dialectics" and "dialogics" based on the work of Vygotsky (drawing on philosophers such as Hegel, Spinoza, Engels and Marx) and Bakhtin (drawing on members of the Bakhtin Circle and writers such as Dostoevsky and Rabelais) respectively, as well their varying interanimations within…

  1. Beyond Member-Checking: A Dialogic Approach to the Research Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Lou

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a dialogic qualitative interview design for a narrative study of six international UK university students' motivation for learning English. Based on the work of Mikhail Bakhtin, this design was developed in order to address the limitations of member-checking [Lincoln, Y. S., and E. G. Guba. 1985. "Naturalistic…

  2. The Dialogization of Genres in Teaching Narrative: Theorizing Hybrid Genres in Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwik, Mary M.

    2004-01-01

    Mary M. Juzwik draws on a grounded study to propose a hybrid theory of classroom genres that builds on Bauman's conceptualization of the "dialogization of genres." This perspective foregrounds Bakhtin's earlier and more literary work, while backgrounding Bakhtin's later, more social scientific perspectives on genre. In particular, Juzwik…

  3. Psychodiagnostic Properties of the Piotr Oles´ "Internal Dialogical Activity Scale"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astretsov, D. A.; Leontiev, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the concept of internal dialogue and how it is understood in various schools of psychological research, including both Russia and abroad. The authors briefly investigate how the concept was understood by Mikhail Bakhtin, Lev Vygotsky, G.M. Kuchinskii, and Hubert Hermans. The "Internal Dialogical Activity Scale"…

  4. "In the Neighborhood of": Dialogic Uncertainties and the Rise of New Subject Positions in Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Joy

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes that resonances exist between the curriculum vision advanced by the Panel for Education for Sustainable Development (1998) and key Bakhtinian motifs, such as dialogism, polyphony, and heteroglossia. The Panel's support for postmodern perspectives, however, makes the conjunction with Bakhtin problematic, due to anxieties that…

  5. Narratives as Zones of Dialogic Constructions: A Bakhtinian Approach to Data in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanova, Gergana

    2013-01-01

    Narratives have become increasingly important in the field of applied linguistics, as recent publications have illustrated, yet narrative analysis could still be considered undertheorized. This article outlines a specific, dialogical approach to the narrative analysis of data in qualitative research. Building on Bakhtin's notion of dialogue,…

  6. “They came there as workers”: Voice, dialogicality and identity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Van Leeuwen's (2008) socio-semantic categories for the representation of social actors, as well as Bakhtin's (1981) notions of 'dialogicality' and 'voice', are incorporated as key methodological tools. A critical analysis of the texts reveals that although the strikes were symbolic acts against a repressive economic and social ...

  7. Science Language "Wanted Alive": Through the Dialectical/Dialogical Lens of Vygotsky and the Bakhtin Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, science educators increasingly have become interested in the role of language in the learning of science and have drawn on the work of Bakhtin, among others, for understanding the dialogical nature of knowledge in a sociocultural framework. However, the nature of language and its relation to thinking have not…

  8. Creating a Dialogic Environment for Transformative Science Teaching Practices: Towards an Inclusive Education for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G.; Sandoval-Ríos, Marisol; Torres-Frías, José; López-Suero, Carolina; Lozano Garza, Adrián; Dessens Félix, Maribel; González Maitland, Marcelino; Ibanez, Jorge G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design and application of a teacher training strategy to promote the inclusive education of students with disabilities in the science classroom, through the creation of adult learning environments grounded on the principles of dialogic learning. Participants of the workshop proposal consisted of a group of twelve teachers…

  9. Multimedia Listening Comprehension: Metacognitive Instruction or Metacognitive Instruction through Dialogic Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgian, Hossein; Alamdari, Ebrahim Fakhri

    2018-01-01

    This study is an attempt to investigate the effect of metacognitive instruction through dialogic interaction in a joint activity on advanced Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' multimedia listening and their metacognitive awareness in listening comprehension. The data were collected through (N = 180) male and female Iranian…

  10. Dialogic Spaces: A Critical Policy Development Perspective of Educational Leadership Qualifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Déirdre; Kelly, Darron; Allard, Carson

    2017-01-01

    The critical exploration of policy development processes employed to construct leadership qualifications is the focus of this inquiry. This exploration is made through specific application of the necessary conditions of Habermasian "practical discourse" to current dialogic procedures used to develop policies for principal, supervisory…

  11. Transforming EFL Classroom Practices and Promoting Students' Empowerment: Collaborative Learning from a Dialogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras León, Janeth Juliana; Chapetón Castro, Claudia Marcela

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of implementing collaborative learning from a social and dialogical perspective on seventh graders' interaction in an English as a foreign language classroom at a public school in Bogotá, Colombia. Thirty students participated in this action research where field notes, questionnaires, semi-structured interviews,…

  12. Number Words in "Her" Language, Dialogism and Identity-Work: The Case of Little Mariah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronaki, Anna; Mountzouri, Georgia; Zaharaki, Maria; Planas, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Based on an ethnographic study, we explore the potential of experimenting with multiple languages for number words as part of young children's mathematical activity. Data from a preschool classroom activity on "number words in 'other' languages" exemplify a complex process of discursive identity-work and dialogism amongst children,…

  13. Shifting the primary focus: Assessing the case for dialogic education in secondary classrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higham, R.J.E.; Brindley, S.; van de Pol, J.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840645

    2014-01-01

    Dialogic theories and practices in education have grown over the last decade; in the United Kingdom, however, most research in the field has been carried out in primary schools. Six leading academic researchers in the field are interviewed to explore the reasons for this primary bias to date, and

  14. Shifting the Primary Focus: Assessing the Case for Dialogic Education in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Rupert John Edward; Brindley, Sue; Van de Pol, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    Dialogic theories and practices in education have grown over the last decade; in the United Kingdom, however, most research in the field has been carried out in primary schools. Six leading academic researchers in the field are interviewed to explore the reasons for this primary bias to date, and their perceptions of both the difficulties and the…

  15. A Cognitive Approach to the Event Structures of Wh-dialogic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the second, and wh-dialogues with non-syntactic cooperation between speakers are the least found, demonstrating the interaction of linguistic structure, cognitive process and interpersonal communication, meanwhile revealing certain features of the pragmatic use of English wh-dialogic constructions in conversations.

  16. Going "Meta": Using a Metadiscoursal Approach to Develop Secondary Students' Dialogic Talk in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a year-long research study: four teachers of English, their Year 8 (13-14 year old) classes (110 students) in urban, secondary schools and a university teacher educator investigated the contexts for students to develop dialogic, exploratory talk in small groups. Assuming a Vygotskyan perspective, the study adapted a pedagogic…

  17. A Written, Reflective and Dialogic Strategy for Assessment Feedback That Can Enhance Student/Teacher Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Gail; Nash, Gregory; Oprescu, Florin; Liebergreen, Marama; Turley, Janet; Bond, Richard; Dayton, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    In response to the shortcomings of current assessment feedback practice, this paper presents the results of a study designed to examine students' and teachers' experience of engaging in a written, reflective and dialogic feedback (WRDF) strategy. The strategy was designed to enhance the learning experience of students undertaking a large…

  18. Dialogical Positions as a Method of Understanding Identity Trajectories in a Collaborative Blended University Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligorio, M. Beatrice; Loperfido, Fedela Feldia; Sansone, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Recent learning sciences literature proposes to conceive learning as changes in the learner's identity trajectory. In this paper, we use the analysis of dialogical positioning as a method to track down and understand shifts in identity trajectories. The Bakhtinian concepts of "polyphony" and "chronotopes" are considered as…

  19. The Role of Beliefs in Lexical Alignment: Evidence from Dialogs with Humans and Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Holly P.; Pickering, Martin J.; Pearson, Jamie; McLean, Janet F.; Brown, Ash

    2011-01-01

    Five experiments examined the extent to which speakers' alignment (i.e., convergence) on words in dialog is mediated by beliefs about their interlocutor. To do this, we told participants that they were interacting with another person or a computer in a task in which they alternated between selecting pictures that matched their "partner's"…

  20. "Don't[strikethrough] Talk with Strangers" Engaging Student Artists in Dialogic Artmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a brief description of the culminating participatory arts and dialogue event, "Don't[strikethrough] Talk With Strangers," the author then backtracks to describe the rationale and process for a new community engaged arts course centred on dialogic artmaking. The course was designed for undergraduate and youth artists with…

  1. Beyond Ethnic Tidbits: Toward a Critical and Dialogical Model in Multicultural Social Justice Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This praxis article outlines the value of using a critical and dialogical model (CDM) to teach multicultural social justice education to preservice teachers. Based on practitioner research, the article draws on the author's own teaching experiences to highlight how key features of CDM can be used to help pre-service teachers move beyond thinking…

  2. Dialogic and Hortatory Features in the Writing of Chinese Candidates for the IELTS Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    Research conducted in the context of the IELTS Research Program indicates that there are recurrent features in the writing under test conditions of candidates from Chinese language backgrounds, particularly in terms of interpersonal tenor. These include a high level of interpersonal reference, combined with a heavily dialogic and hortatory style.…

  3. Dialogical Spaces to Reconceptualize Parent Support in the Social Investment State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroeck, Michel; Boonaert, Tom; Van der Mespel, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The study from which this article derives investigated some dominant assumptions of parent support policies and programmes, and suggests new possibilities for the conceptualization of the relations between parents and such policies, inspired by the possibilities of dialogical spaces and "relational citizenship". Parent support programmes…

  4. Resistance to Racial/Ethnic Dialog in Graduate Preparation Programs: Implications for Developing Multicultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget Turner; Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand how individuals experienced multicultural courses in graduate preparation programs. The researchers conducted focus groups with 37 current and former graduate students in student affairs. Participants reported resistance to multicultural dialog, both in their direct experiences and through their perceptions of…

  5. Mental Health Consultation: An Untapped Tool for Facilitating Volatile Intercultural Diversity Group Dialogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    marbley, aretha faye; Stevens, Hal; Taylor, Colette M.; Ritter, Rachelle Berg; Robinson, Petra A.; McGaha, Valerie; Bonner, Fred A., II; Li, Jiaqi

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for leadership skills when facilitating communication and engendering acceptance and respect among people from culturally different backgrounds, opposing viewpoints, and vastly different experiences. Thus, when facilitating intercultural group dialogs, varying institutions, agencies, and businesses need culturally competent…

  6. Modeling Classroom Discourse: Do Models That Predict Dialogic Instruction Properties Generalize across Populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Borhan; Olney, Andrew M.; Kelly, Sean; Nystrand, Martin; D'Mello, Sidney; Blanchard, Nathan; Graesser, Art

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the effective use of dialogic instruction has a positive impact on student achievement. In this study, we investigate whether linguistic features used to classify properties of classroom discourse generalize across different subpopulations. Results showed that the machine learned models perform equally well when…

  7. SuperPrikker: Rekvisitter til at åbne dialog om sociale medier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foverskov, Maria; Brandt, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Sociale medier giver mange muligheder for at danne og fastholde sociale netværk. Men hvordan indledes en dialog omkring mulighederne med teknologi og sociale medier, når for eksempel mobiltelefoner eller Facebook af mange seniorer bliver opfattet som forbeholdt børnebørnenes generation? Vi...

  8. Multicultural adolescents between tradition and postmodernity: Dialogical Self Theory and the paradox of localization and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    This chapter builds on Dialogical Self Theory to investigate the identity development of adolescents growing up in multicultural societies. Their cultural identity is not only compounded by the rapid cultural changes associated with globalization, but also by the paradoxical revival of cultural

  9. Multicultural adolescents between tradition and postmodernity: Dialogical self theory and the paradox of localization and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    This chapter builds on Dialogical Self Theory to investigate the identity development of adolescents growing up in multicultural societies. Their cultural identity is not only compounded by the rapid cultural changes associated with globalization, but also by the paradoxical revival of cultural

  10. From Constructivism to Dialogism in the Classroom. Theory and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Roseli Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the move from learning theories from the industrial society to learning theories from and for dialogic societies. While in the past intrapsychological elements, such as mental schemata of prior knowledge, were the key to explain learning, today's theories point to interaction and dialogue as the main means for achieving deep…

  11. Teacher Education in Schools as Learning Communities: Transforming High-Poverty Schools through Dialogic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carrion, Rocio; Gomez, Aitor; Molina, Silvia; Ionescu, Vladia

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' professional development in Schools as Learning Communities may become a key process for the sustainability and transferability of this model worldwide. Learning Communities (LC) is a community-based project that aims to transform schools through dialogic learning and involves research-grounded schools that implement Successful…

  12. Discussion in Religious Education: Developing Dialogic for Community Cohesion and/or Spiritual Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    In the UK and across Europe, rising concern about religion has impacted on religious education (RE), with a new emphasis being placed on dialogue for developing community cohesion. In this article it is suggested that the new emphasis on dialogue for community cohesion in RE also presents an opportunity to improve dialogic pedagogy for spiritual…

  13. Dialogic Reading in Early Childhood Settings: A Summary of the Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towson, Jacqueline A.; Fettig, Angel; Fleury, Veronica P.; Abarca, Diana L.

    2017-01-01

    Dialogic reading (DR) is an evidence-based practice for young children who are typically developing and at risk for developmental delays, with encouraging evidence for children with disabilities. The purpose of this review was to comprehensively evaluate the evidence base of DR across early childhood settings, with specific attention to fidelity…

  14. Dialogismo, lenguas extranjeras e identidad cultural (Dialogism, Foreign Languages, and Cultural Identity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    Foreign Language education will play an important role in the broadening and globalization of higher education for the 21st century. Where else will educators find the tools to "dialog" with--to engage--the "other" as part of the enriching process that accompanies cultural exchange, cultural broadening? This paper sheds light on these issues, and…

  15. An Investigation of the Additive Benefits of Parent Dialogic Reading Techniques in Older Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switalski, Sarah O'Neill

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the additive benefit of parent dialogic reading techniques in older, high-risk preschool children using multiple baseline design across participants, a single subject research design, as was as well as pre-test and post-test measures. Five preschoolers age-eligible to begin kindergarten the following school year participated.…

  16. Interactive whiteboards as artefacts to support dialogic learning spaces in primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Nes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interactive whiteboard (IWB is a technical digital medium for multiple forms of interaction - technical, physical and conceptual. It is a point of departure for this article that the IWB has the potential to support learning, given that the teacher has a dialogic teaching style. Our research is embedded in a social constructive learning philosophy implying that interaction between learners as well as learners and teacher will lead to increased insights for everyone. Dialogue is seen as a characteristic of education, but not all learner talks are dialogic; there are different types of pupil conversations - competitive, cumulative or exploratory. It is in particular the exploratory talk that has the ability to increase learning through interthinking and thus create a dialogic learning space. The article reports findings from a study of 7 primary school teachers and their use of the interactive board. The main findings are that they do not use the full potential that the IWB gives to support collaborative learning. We discuss what teachers need in order to develop their practices to exploit the potential of the IWB for creating a supportive dialogic learning space.

  17. Technology Integration: Exploring Interactive Whiteboards as Dialogic Spaces in the Foundation Phase Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Chamelle R.; Chigona, A.; Adendorff, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Among its many affordances, the interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a digital space for children's dialogic engagement in the Foundation Phase classroom remains largely under-exploited. This paper emanates from a study which was undertaken in an attempt to understand how teachers acquire knowledge of emerging technologies and how this shapes their…

  18. Revisiting the Authoritative-Dialogic Tension in Inquiry-Based Elementary Science Teacher Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Booven, Christopher D.

    2015-05-01

    Building on the 'questioning-based discourse analytical' framework developed by Singapore-based science educator and discourse analyst, Christine Chin, this study investigated the extent to which fifth-grade science teachers' use of questions with either an authoritative or dialogic orientation differentially restricted or expanded the quality and complexity of student responses in the USA. The author analyzed approximately 10 hours of classroom discourse from elementary science classrooms organized around inquiry-based science curricula and texts. Teacher questions and feedback were classified according to their dialogic orientation and contextually inferred structural purpose, while student understanding was operationalized as a dynamic interaction between cognitive process, syntacto-semantic complexity, and science knowledge type. The results of this study closely mirror Chin's and other scholars' findings that the fixed nature of authoritatively oriented questioning can dramatically limit students' opportunities to demonstrate higher order scientific understanding, while dialogically oriented questions, by contrast, often grant students the discursive space to demonstrate a greater breadth and depth of both canonical and self-generated knowledge. However, certain teacher questioning sequences occupying the 'middle ground' between maximal authoritativeness and dialogicity revealed patterns of meaningful, if isolated, instances of higher order thinking. Implications for classroom practice are discussed along with recommendations for future research.

  19. Discussing stories: on how a dialogic reading intervention improves kindergartners' oral narrative construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Rosemary; Sénéchal, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Oral narrative skills are assumed to develop through parent-child interactive routines. One such routine is shared reading. A causal link between shared reading and narrative knowledge, however, has not been clearly established. The current research tested whether an 8-week shared reading intervention enhanced the fictional narrative skills of children entering formal education. Dialogic reading, a shared reading activity that involves elaborative questioning techniques, was used to engage children in oral interaction during reading and to emphasize elements of story knowledge. Participants were 40 English-speaking 5- and 6-year-olds who were assigned to either the dialogic reading group or an alternative treatment group. Analysis of covariance results found that the dialogic reading children's posttest narratives were significantly better on structure and context measures than those for the alternative treatment children, but results differed for produced or retold narratives. The dialogic reading children also showed expressive vocabulary gains. Overall, this study concretely determined that aspects of fictional narrative construction knowledge can be learned from interactive book reading. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Design of dialogic eLearning-to-learn: metalearning as pedagogical methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2008-01-01

    networked e Learning based on Learning-to-Learn (L2L), it makes a plea for L2L in a dialogic global learning context, offering a vision of global democratic citizens able to engage in critical dialogue with fellow learners. http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?action=record&rec_id=17675&prev...

  1. Dialogue on ‘Dialogic Education’: Has Rupert gone over to ‘the Dark Side’?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This email dialogue that we record and report here between Eugene Matusov and Rupert Wegerif, exemplifies Internet mediated dialogic education. When Eugene emailed Rupert with his initial (misunderstanding of Rupert's position about dialogic pedagogy Rupert felt really motivated to reply. Rupert was not simply motivated to refute Eugene and assert his correctness, although Rupert is sure such elements enter into every dialogue, but also to explore and to try to resolve the issues ignited by the talk in New Zealand. Through this extended dialogue Rupert's and Eugene's positions become more nuanced and focussed. Rupert brings out his concern with the long-term and collective nature of some dialogues claiming that the – "dialogue of humanity that education serves is bigger than the interests of particular students and particular teachers.…" – and so he argues that it is often reasonable to induct students into the dialogue so far so that they can participate fully. On the other hand, Eugene's view of dialogue seems more focussed on personal responsibility, particular individual desires, interests and positions, individual agency and answering the final ethical "damned questions" without an alibi-in-being.  Rupert claims that dialogic education is education FOR dialogue and Eugene claims that dialogic education is education AS dialogue. Both believe in education THROUGH dialogue but education through dialogue is not in itself dialogic education. For Rupert dialogic education can include ‘scaffolding’ for full participation in dialogue as long as dialogue is the aim. For Eugene dialogic education has to be a genuine dialogue and this means that a curriculum goal cannot be specified in advance because learning in a dialogue is always emergent and unpredictable. Our dialogue-disagreement is a relational and discursive experiment to develop a new genre of academic critical dialogue. The dialogue itself called to us and motivated us and flowed

  2. Real-time non-invasive eyetracking and gaze-point determination for human-computer interaction and biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Ashit; Morookian, John-Michael; Monacos, S.; Lam, R.; Lebaw, C.; Bond, A.

    2004-01-01

    Eyetracking is one of the latest technologies that has shown potential in several areas including human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological problems in individuals.

  3. Engageability: a new sub-principle of the learnability principle in human-computer interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Chimbo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The learnability principle relates to improving the usability of software, as well as users’ performance and productivity. A gap has been identified as the current definition of the principle does not distinguish between users of different ages. To determine the extent of the gap, this article compares the ways in which two user groups, adults and children, learn how to use an unfamiliar software application. In doing this, we bring together the research areas of human-computer interaction (HCI, adult and child learning, learning theories and strategies, usability evaluation and interaction design. A literature survey conducted on learnability and learning processes considered the meaning of learnability of software applications across generations. In an empirical investigation, users aged from 9 to 12 and from 35 to 50 were observed in a usability laboratory while learning to use educational software applications. Insights that emerged from data analysis showed different tactics and approaches that children and adults use when learning unfamiliar software. Eye tracking data was also recorded. Findings indicated that subtle re- interpretation of the learnability principle and its associated sub-principles was required. An additional sub-principle, namely engageability was proposed to incorporate aspects of learnability that are not covered by the existing sub-principles. Our re-interpretation of the learnability principle and the resulting design recommendations should help designers to fulfill the varying needs of different-aged users, and improve the learnability of their designs. Keywords: Child computer interaction, Design principles, Eye tracking, Generational differences, human-computer interaction, Learning theories, Learnability, Engageability, Software applications, Uasability Disciplines: Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Studies, Computer science, Observational Studies

  4. Proceedings of the 5th Danish Human-Computer Interaction Research Symposium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Nielsen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Copenhagen Business School is happy to host the 5th Danish Human Computer Interaction Research Symposium. The aim of the symposium is to stimulate interaction between researchers from academia and industry through oral presentations and a keynote presentation. We received 17 paper contributions...... ORGANISATIONS Olav W. Bertelsen & Pär-Ola Zander PROCESS MANAGEMENT TOOLS IN HIGHER EDUCATION E-LEARNING - A NEWRESEARCH AREA Karin Tweddell Levinsen FROM HANDICRAFT SCHOOL TO DESIGN UNIVERSITY Eva Brandt THE USE PROJECT: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN USABILITY EVALUATIONAND SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Als, B., Frøkjær, E...

  5. Human-Computer Interaction Handbook Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jacko, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    The third edition of a groundbreaking reference, The Human--Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications raises the bar for handbooks in this field. It is the largest, most complete compilation of HCI theories, principles, advances, case studies, and more that exist within a single volume. The book captures the current and emerging sub-disciplines within HCI related to research, development, and practice that continue to advance at an astonishing rate. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base as well as visionary perspe

  6. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  7. Advancements in remote physiological measurement and applications in human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuff, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Physiological signals are important for tracking health and emotional states. Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is a set of techniques for remotely recovering cardio-pulmonary signals from video of the human body. Advances in iPPG methods over the past decade combined with the ubiquity of digital cameras presents the possibility for many new, lowcost applications of physiological monitoring. This talk will highlight methods for recovering physiological signals, work characterizing the impact of video parameters and hardware on these measurements, and applications of this technology in human-computer interfaces.

  8. Human-computer interfaces applied to numerical solution of the Plateau problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Soares Bandeira, Ivana; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a code in Matlab to solve the Problem of Plateau numerically, and the code will include human-computer interface. The Problem of Plateau has applications in areas of knowledge like, for instance, Computer Graphics. The solution method will be the same one of the Surface Evolver, but the difference will be a complete graphical interface with the user. This will enable us to implement other kinds of interface like ocular mouse, voice, touch, etc. To date, Evolver does not include any graphical interface, which restricts its use by the scientific community. Specially, its use is practically impossible for most of the Physically Challenged People.

  9. Bilingual dialogic book-reading intervention for preschoolers with slow expressive vocabulary development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybina, Irina; Eriks-Brophy, Alice

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a dialogic book-reading intervention for 22-41-month-old bilingual preschool children with expressive vocabulary delays. The intervention was provided in English and Spanish concurrently to an experimental group of six children, while six other children were in a delayed treatment control group. Thirty 15-min sessions using dialogic book-reading strategies were provided in each language in the children's homes, in English by the primary investigator and in Spanish by the children's mothers, who were trained in the techniques of dialogic book-reading. Results showed that the children in the intervention group learned significantly more target words in each language following the intervention than the children in the control group. The children in the intervention group were also able to produce the acquired words at the time of a follow-up test 6 weeks after the end of the intervention. The gains in the overall vocabulary of the two groups of children did not differ significantly. The children's mothers expressed satisfaction with the program, and confirmed the benefits of dialogic book-reading for their children's learning of target words. The current paper describes a unique bilingual vocabulary intervention program for preschool children. Readers will gain an appreciation for the rationale for this intervention, and an insight in the implementation of dialogic book-reading. The main goal of the article is to provide the readers with the evaluation of the feasibility of this intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A dialog with a puzzled profile: Poetry of an old pedological discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkin, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Defining and classifying are fundamental needs in the everyday life of humans. Among quite a few relevant examples in pedology, stands the question of whether soils and some types of sediments should or can be distinct. This issue is as old as soil science itself and is possibly very much related to the never ending debate regarding "the definition of soil". As is the case in many fields, the necessity of humans to create and keep a uniform common language might collide with different cultural and/or scientific perspectives. Such is the case with the wide variety of soil classifications found throughout the world. One can easily note this diversity when reading publications that address two similar regolith profiles from different locations round the globe. In some cases it would be impossible to correlate two comparable profiles when using different classification systems. This contradictory situation is one of the most challenging topics in pedology. This whole background gave the inspiration for the following poem, titled "A dialog with a puzzled profile": Are you a soil or a sediment? Ask the oak, see if he knows. Ask him whether these are peds Or maybe a bedrock under his toes. And if you're a soil, what are you? It depends on the viewpoint, you see: Some define me with Soil Taxonomy, While others with WRB. For Hutton and Lyell I'm a weathered rock, Yet Hilgard and Dokuchaev dispute. If you ask me, well I'm a 'pedosediment', I couldn't care less for the suit. If it helps you I'll be whatever it takes,
Making sure that no one will lose. I know it depends very much on the platform Where experts are setting the rules.

  11. Online Dialogue Measurement Index – A Measurement of the Dialogic Orientation of Organizations in the Online Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romenti, Stefania; Valentini, Chiara; Murtarelli, Grazia

    dialogic communications create conflicts or bad reputations. Organizations require public relations professionals to measure the results of their communication activities including their dialogic efforts. Yet, dialogic communication measurements are scarce and often incomplete. The purpose of this study...... is to develop an Online Dialogue Measurement Index to measure online dialogue orientation. Dialogue orientation is the direction that dialogue can take based on organizational aims for promoting dialogue, the setting where dialogue takes place and the underlying conversational processes. The index is based...... and discusses the contribution of this index for theory and practice....

  12. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  13. Effects of muscle fatigue on the usability of a myoelectric human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszap, Alexander G; Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-10-01

    Electromyography-based human-computer interface development is an active field of research. However, knowledge on the effects of muscle fatigue for specific devices is limited. We have developed a novel myoelectric human-computer interface in which subjects continuously navigate a cursor to targets by manipulating a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Two-dimensional control is achieved through simultaneous adjustments of power in two frequency bands through a series of dynamic low-level muscle contractions. Here, we investigate the potential effects of muscle fatigue during the use of our interface. In the first session, eight subjects completed 300 cursor-to-target trials without breaks; four using a wrist muscle and four using a head muscle. The wrist subjects returned for a second session in which a static fatiguing exercise took place at regular intervals in-between cursor-to-target trials. In the first session we observed no declines in performance as a function of use, even after the long period of use. In the second session, we observed clear changes in cursor trajectories, paired with a target-specific decrease in hit rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dialogical Exposure with Traumatically Bereaved Bosnian Women: Findings from a Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagl, Maria; Powell, Steve; Rosner, Rita; Butollo, Willi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, we compared the relative efficacy of dialogical exposure group treatment using Gestalt empty-chair method with a supportive group in the treatment of symptoms stemming from traumatic loss in a post-war society. One-hundred and nineteen women whose husbands were either killed or registered as missing during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina were quasi-randomized to seven sessions of group treatment with dialogical exposure or to an active control condition. Both interventions resulted in significant improvement from baseline to post-treatment for both kinds of loss, in terms of post-traumatic symptoms, general mental health and grief reactions, with the exception of depression and traumatic grief in the control condition. Regarding mean effect sizes (Cohen's d), pre-treatment to post-treatment improvements were moderate (d = 0.56) for the dialogical exposure group and small (d = 0.34) for the supportive group. Treatment gains were maintained at least until the 1-year follow-up. In controlled comparisons, dialogical exposure was superior concerning traumatic grief (Cohen's d = 0.37) and post-traumatic avoidance (d = 0.73) at post-treatment. Results show that short-term dialogical exposure group treatment was moderately effective in treating traumatically bereaved women. Research attests to high levels of symptoms among post-war civil populations, in particular, when a loved one was killed, which can lead not only to trauma reactions but also to severe separation distress. Grieving the loss of a loved one is hampered if the death remains unconfirmed. Unconfirmed loss could be conceptualized as unfinished business in terms of Gestalt therapy, which offers empty-chair dialogue for resolving unfinished business and grief. Dialogical exposure therapy (DET) supports the client in gaining awareness of and expressing his or her inner dialogues concerning the traumatic event, using Gestalt empty-chair method. Short-term DET was effective in

  15. Approaching Reading from the Perspective of the Ministry of Education and the Dialogic Pedagogy “Enlazando Mundos”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Del Pino-Sepúlveda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to characterize the curriculum, the didactics and the assessment promoted by the Ministry of Education of Chili, and the dialogic pedagogy “Enlazando Mundos” (Bridging Worlds. This is a qualitative study based on the dialogic-Kishu Kimkelay Ta Che research approach, with a design of two case studies derived from documentary sources. The procedure to collect and construct knowledge is the interpretation of the dialogic speech; as a data analysis, it focuses on pedagogical definitions from the perspective of transformative, excluding and conservative dimensions, in order to compare-interpret and reflect on educational inputs in relation to reading in a course of language and communication. As a result, it is observed the incongruity from the State in communicative curriculum design and its operational proposal, and in the regionalized construction the dialogic pedagogy “Enlazando Mundos” (Bridging Worlds is carrying out.

  16. A Review and Reappraisal of Adaptive Human-Computer Interfaces in Complex Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report was...concentrating. ABI was used to operate two brain-actuated devices: a virtual keyboard and a mobile robot (emulating a motorized wheelchair ). The brain

  17. Designing for Performance: A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach to Modifying an AWACS Human Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Subjective Workload Dominance TD Tabular Display WD Weapons Director V TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION...relationships among concepts. Originally devised as an instructional and evaluation tool for use in academic settings (e.g., Gowin & Novak, 1984...Co QP w in 0 m t’d, 0 U)u a >.w = M M-.0 m ’ V U) M 4)4) 1 .> L- M- tn w- m 40Ct ý 4- M FE E t: cn c CS in in - C = cc :6 L) 04)m > 4,i Tn U, LWwtn Em

  18. A Single Camera Motion Capture System for Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryuzo; Stenger, Björn

    This paper presents a method for markerless human motion capture using a single camera. It uses tree-based filtering to efficiently propagate a probability distribution over poses of a 3D body model. The pose vectors and associated shapes are arranged in a tree, which is constructed by hierarchical pairwise clustering, in order to efficiently evaluate the likelihood in each frame. Anew likelihood function based on silhouette matching is proposed that improves the pose estimation of thinner body parts, i. e. the limbs. The dynamic model takes self-occlusion into account by increasing the variance of occluded body-parts, thus allowing for recovery when the body part reappears. We present two applications of our method that work in real-time on a Cell Broadband Engine™: a computer game and a virtual clothing application.

  19. Designing Dialogic E-Learning in Pharmacy Professionalism Using Calibrated Feedback Loops (CFLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Roff

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The feedback analytics of online software including Articulate and Bristol Online Surveys can be used to facilitate dialogic learning in a community of practice such as Pharmacy and, thereby, promote reflective learning by the creation of formative calibrated feedback loops. Based on work with medical, dental, nursing, osteopathic, and social work students, trainees, and registrants, the paper shows how an online learning community can be created along the continuum from undergraduate to registrant to develop authentic dialogic e-learning around standards of Professionalism. The Dundee PolyProfessionalism inventories and Situational Judgement Scenarios (SJSs can be customised for Pharmacy Professionalism learning to support evidence-based curriculum design along benchmarked learning curves and to profile Professionalism learning in individuals and cohorts.

  20. It is not just about you: A dialogic approach to forgiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda S. Brown

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available How do I forgive thee? Let me count the ways. For the most part, scholars started examining the phenomenon of forgiveness about a decade ago, and are divided in their approaches-forgiveness as an individual response, or an interpersonal process; further, there is limited investigation to how people can forgive (Waldron & Kelley, 2005, 2008. This article, conceptually informed by Martin Buber's dialogic theory, orients forgiveness as an interpersonal process which shifts the focus of attention for both the forgiver and forgiven; and maintains that the potential for making strides towards relationship repair is predicated on the willingness of both people to be open to dialogging, and being authentic and honest in their communications.

  1. The Relationship between Academic Discipline and Dialogic Behavior in Open University Course Forums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gorsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between disciplinary difference (exact and natural sciences versus humanities and the dialogic behavior that occurred in Open University course forums. Dialogic behavior was measured in terms of students’ and instructors’ active participation in the forum (posting a message as well as amounts and proportions of “teaching presence,” “cognitive presence,” and “social presence.” We found that active participation in the science forums was much higher than in the humanities forums. We also found a ratio among the three presences that was constant across different academic disciplines,as well as across different group sizes and course types.

  2. Dialogic reading and morphology training in Chinese children: effects on language and literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Cheung, Him; Chow, Celia Sze-Lok

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of parent-child shared book reading and metalinguistic training on the language and literacy skills of 148 kindergartners in Hong Kong. Children were pretested on Chinese character recognition, vocabulary, morphological awareness, and reading interest and then assigned randomly to 1 of 4 conditions: the dialogic reading with morphology training (DR + MT), dialogic reading (DR), typical reading, or control condition. After a 12-week intervention period, the DR intervention yielded greater gains in vocabulary, and the DR + MT intervention yielded greater improvement in character recognition and morphological awareness. Both interventions enhanced children's reading interest. Results confirm that different home literacy approaches influence children's oral and written language skills differently: Shared book reading promotes language development, whereas parents' explicit metalinguistic training within a shared book reading context better prepares children for learning to read. Copyright (c) 2008 APA.

  3. Effect of age on human-computer-interface control via neck electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Gabrielle L; Stepp, Cara E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on visuomotor tracking using submental and anterior neck surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess feasibility of computer control via neck musculature, which allows people with little remaining motor function to interact with computers. Thirty-two healthy adults participated: sixteen younger adults aged 18 - 29 years and sixteen older adults aged 69 - 85 years. Participants modulated sEMG to achieve targets presented at different amplitudes using real-time visual feedback. Root-mean-squared (RMS) error was used to quantify tracking performance. RMS error was increased for older adults relative to younger adults. Older adults demonstrated more RMS error than younger adults as a function of increasing target amplitude. The differential effects of age found on static tracking performance in anterior neck musculature suggest more difficult translation of human-computer-interfaces controlled using anterior neck musculature for static tasks to older populations.

  4. An Overview of a Decade of Journal Publications about Culture and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Roese, Kerstin

    In this paper, we analyze the concept of human-computer interaction in cultural and national contexts. Building and extending upon the framework for understanding research in usability and culture by Honold [3], we give an overview of publications in culture and HCI between 1998 and 2008, with a narrow focus on high-level journal publications only. The purpose is to review current practice in how cultural HCI issues are studied, and to analyse problems with the measures and interpretation of this studies. We find that Hofstede's cultural dimensions has been the dominating model of culture, participants have been picked because they could speak English, and most studies have been large scale quantitative studies. In order to balance this situation, we recommend that more researchers and practitioners do qualitative, empirical work studies.

  5. TRANSITIONING BEYOND UNDERGRADUATE HOSPITALITY EDUCATION; A DIALOGIC ANALYSIS OF FINAL YEAR HOSPITALITY STUDENTS’ NARRATIVES OF EMPLOYABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Employability has become a key consideration for graduates, and society. Increasingly the trajectory of individuals at age 18 involves the completion of an undergraduate level degree qualification. This thesis presents a sociologically grounded study into the dialogic construction of employability in final year hospitality students and recent hospitality graduates. Drawing on a nationwide sample of UK based hospitality graduates, as they transition beyond undergraduate level higher educati...

  6. Context- and prosody-driven ERP markers for dialog focus perception in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannekamp, Ann; van der Meer, Elke; Toepel, Ulrike

    2011-10-01

    The development of language proficiency extends late into childhood and includes not only producing or comprehending sounds, words and sentences, but likewise larger utterances spanning beyond sentence borders like dialogs. Dialogs consist of information units whose value constantly varies within a verbal exchange. While information is focused when introduced for the first time or corrected in order to alter the knowledge state of communication partners, the same information turns into shared knowledge during the further course of a verbal exchange. In many languages, prosodic means are used by speakers to highlight the informational value of information foci. Our study investigated the developmental pattern of event-related potentials (ERPs) in three age groups (12, 8 and 5 years) when perceiving two information focus types (news and corrections) embedded in short question-answer dialogs. The information foci contained in the answer sentences were either adequately marked by prosodic means or not. In so doing, we questioned to what extent children depend on prosodic means to recognize information foci or whether contextual means as provided by dialog questions are sufficient to guide focus processing.Only 12-year-olds yield prosody-independent ERPs when encountering new and corrective information foci, resembling previous findings in adults. Focus processing in the 8-year-olds relied upon prosodic highlighting, and differing ERP responses as a function of focus type were observed. In the 5-year-olds, merely prosody-driven ERP responses were apparent, but no distinctive ERP indicating information focus recognition. Our findings reveal substantial alterations in information focus perception throughout childhood that are likely related to long-lasting maturational changes during brain development.

  7. The Problem of Dialogical Personality in the Context of Modern Psychotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhelyabin A.V.,

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on variations in understanding of personality in psychology and on the absence of the very category of personality in the modern Russian psychological practice. It aims to clarify the category of personality in the context of modern psychotechnical approach taking into account the key criteria of psychotechnicity, for instance, dialogicality. An assumption about the general pattern of overcoming all critical situations, including those of impossibility of emotional experienc...

  8. MENUJU DIALOG ISLAM – KRISTEN: PERJUMPAAN GEREJA ORTODOKS SYRIA DENGAN ISLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenul Arifin

    2012-05-01

    Konflik antara Kristen dengan Islam tampil dalam sejarah agama. Karena memiliki sumber asal yang sama, kedua agama selalu terlibat dalam kontak ke­kerasan. Tulisan ini mencoba untuk mengkaji secara mendalam geraja orthodoks Syria dan ditemukan akan adanya akar yang sama dengan Islam. Ditemukan pula adanya paralelisasi dalam aspek teologinya, khususnya pe­laksana­an kewajiban agama. Data yang didapatkan menunjukkan arti penting dalam pengembangan dialog antara Islam dengan Kristen

  9. Dialogic Cosmopolitanism and the New Wave of Movements: From Local Rupture to Global Openness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of a new cycle of protests in 2011 raises questions about the connection between social movements and about the possible existence of a cosmopolitan vision to combine the local and the global dimensions of the protests. This article presents a conceptualization of dialogic cosmopoli...... and transnational dynamics in spaces of convergence; and translatability, since the common ground (the unity) is translated into a multiplicity of practices....

  10. Artistic signs contribution to the sustentability of the dialogic discourse strategy of authority in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Henrique Moura da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study originated from a discourse approach identified as dialogic of authority and originally developed to raise students’ different understandings as well as to establish a process of consensual negotiation between students and teacher, in order to converge the students’ thoughts with scientific knowledge. Within this discourse proposal, however, the literature has emphasized the difficulty for the educator to maintain the dialogic discourse, thus unbalancing the desired discourse dynamics, by reverting it, predominantly and habitually, to an authoritarian discourse. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to propose a connection of the artistic signs potentiality in allowing interpretation possibilities by the aesthetics function they carry, during an educational process based on the dialogic discourse of authority in the classroom, through denotation and connotation, involving the theme “environmental protection”. So, based on the objective of this study to investigate the use of these signs within this context, by establishing an alternation between the discursive genres mentioned, the results indicate discourse tensions with fruitful cognitive interactions among the students, through their active participation in the joint construction of the referred knowledge.

  11. Argumentation and Explanation in Conceptual Change: Indications From Protocol Analyses of Peer-to-Peer Dialog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asterhan, Christa S C; Schwarz, Baruch B

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we attempt to identify which peer collaboration characteristics may be accountable for conceptual change through interaction. We focus on different socio-cognitive aspects of the peer dialog and relate these with learning gains on the dyadic as well as the individual level. The scientific topic that was used for this study concerns natural selection, a topic for which students' intuitive conceptions have been shown to be particularly robust. Learning tasks were designed according to the socio-cognitive conflict instructional paradigm. After receiving a short instructional intervention on natural selection, paired students were asked to collaboratively construct explanations for certain evolutionary phenomena while engaging in dialectical argumentation. Two quantitative coding schemes were developed, each with a different granularity. The first assessed discrete dialog moves that pertained to dialectical argumentation and to consensual explanation development. The second scheme characterized the dialog as a whole on a number of socio-cognitive dimensions. Results from analyses on the dyadic as well as the individual level revealed that the engagement in dialectical argumentation predicted conceptual learning gains, whereas consensual explanation development did not. These findings open up new venues for research on the mechanisms of learning in and from peer collaboration. Copyright © 2009, Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Can prosody aid the automatic classification of dialog acts in conversational speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, E; Bates, R; Stolcke, A; Taylor, P; Jurafsky, D; Ries, K; Coccaro, N; Martin, R; Meteer, M; van Ess-Dykema, C

    1998-01-01

    Identifying whether an utterance is a statement, question, greeting, and so forth is integral to effective automatic understanding of natural dialog. Little is known, however, about how such dialog acts (DAs) can be automatically classified in truly natural conversation. This study asks whether current approaches, which use mainly word information, could be improved by adding prosodic information. The study is based on more than 1000 conversations from the Switchboard corpus. DAs were hand-annotated, and prosodic features (duration, pause, F0, energy, and speaking rate) were automatically extracted for each DA. In training, decision trees based on these features were inferred; trees were then applied to unseen test data to evaluate performance. Performance was evaluated for prosody models alone, and after combining the prosody models with word information--either from true words or from the output of an automatic speech recognizer. For an overall classification task, as well as three subtasks, prosody made significant contributions to classification. Feature-specific analyses further revealed that although canonical features (such as F0 for questions) were important, less obvious features could compensate if canonical features were removed. Finally, in each task, integrating the prosodic model with a DA-specific statistical language model improved performance over that of the language model alone, especially for the case of recognized words. Results suggest that DAs are redundantly marked in natural conversation, and that a variety of automatically extractable prosodic features could aid dialog processing in speech applications.

  13. Nursing students’ experience in a health education group: a dialogic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Lopes da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a theoretical reflection on the experience of nursing students in a group of health education, in Campinas-SP, having as theoretical and methodological referential the Dialogical Model. Data Synthesis: This was an experience report, conductedin a Health Center of Southwest Health District, located in Campinas-SP, in the period from August to December 2009. This group was divided into 04 subgroups of on average 60 users each, being held diagnostic evaluation, identification of issues to be worked with users and planning and execution of group dynamics. The methodology developed in the educational activities was based on the theoretical Dialogical Model of Health Education. By means of group dynamics three changes were promoted in the way in which health education isthought and conducted: i from a biologicist focus to the multidimensional apprehension of the individual; ii through sharing, we learn: the principle of bidirectionality; iii to know, not to know or do we know? The principle of symmetry. Conclusions: The viability and operability of the Dialogic Model for health education interventions is demonstrated.

  14. Struggles of being and becoming: a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of Sami elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, Bodil Hansen; Hamran, Torunn; Normann, Hans Ketil

    2013-08-01

    The Sami are an indigenous people living in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Historically, national states have made strong efforts to assimilate the Sami people into the majority populations, and the Sami have experienced stigmatization and discrimination. However, after World War II, there has been a revitalization process among the Sami that was pioneered by the Sami Movement and gradually adopted in broader spheres of Norwegian society. The lifespans of the current cohort of elderly Sami unfold throughout a historical period in which contrasting public narratives about the Sami have dominated. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between elderly Sami's individual life stories and contrasting public narratives about the Sami. Nineteen elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed. This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of four elderly Sami. The article illuminates how individual life stories are framed and shaped by public narratives and how identifying is an ongoing process also in late life. A dialogical relationship between individual life stories and public narratives implies that individual stories have the capacity to shape and revise dominant public narratives. To do so, the number of stories that are allowed to act must be increased. A commitment in dialogic narrative research on minority elderly is to make available individual stories from the margins of the public narratives to reduce narrative silences and to prevent the reproduction of established "truths". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Teaching Literature Written in English in Undergraduate Language Teacher Education Programs: A Dialogic-Pragmatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orison Marden Bandeira de Melo Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to be part of the ongoing discussion on the teaching of literature written in English (LWE in literature classes in undergraduate language programs. In order to do that, it shows the challenges posed by the Letras DCN (National Curriculum Guidelines for the undergraduate Language Teacher Education programs as well as the reality literature teachers face due to the reduced number of hours of literature classes assigned in course curricula and to students' limited knowledge of English. Based on the dialogical concept of language and on the possibility of cooperation between scientific trends, we present a cooperative work between DDA (Dialogical Discourse Analysis and Pragmatics, showing how consonant and dissonant they are. Besides, we present part of the analysis of Alice Walker's short story Her Sweet Jerome done by students, which, in this context of teaching LWE to students with limited knowledge of English, pointed to the possibility of Pragmatics being the first step towards a dialogical analysis of literary texts.

  16. [Participative action research; self-care education for the mature adult, a dialogic and empowered process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Gomez, Sheila; Medina Moya, José Luis; Mendoza Pérez de Mendiguren, Beatriz; Ugarte Arena, Ana Isabel; Martínez de Albéniz Arriaran, Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    Explore and transform dialogic-reflexive learning processes oriented to self-care, capacitation, empowerment and health promotion for "mature-adult" collective. Participative action research on a qualitative and sociocritic approach. Data generation methods are SITE: Field work focuses on the development of the educational program "Care is in your hands" that takes place in two villages (Primary Care. Comarca Araba). Through a theoretical sampling involved people who are in a "mature-adult" life stage and three nurses with extensive experience in development health education programs. Participant observation where health education sessions are recorded in video and group reflection on action. To triangulate the data, have been made in-depth interviews with 4 participants. Carried out a content and discourse analysis. Participant and nurses' Previous Frameworks, and these last ones' discourses as well, reveal a current technical rationality (unidirectional, informative,.) yet in practice that perpetuates the role of passive recipient of care. Educational keys constructed from a viewpoint of Dialogic Learning emerge as elements that facilitate overcoming these previous frames limitations. Finally, Reflective Learning launched, has provided advance in professional knowledge and improve health education. Dialogical learning emerges as key to the training and empowerment, where we have seen how practical-reflexive, and not technical, rationality is meanly useful confronting ambiguous and complex situations of self-care practice and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Using a Dialogical Approach to Examine Peer Feedback During Chemistry Investigative Task Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan Joo Seng, Mark; Hill, Mary

    2014-10-01

    Peer feedback is an inherent feature of classroom collaborative learning. Students invariably turn to their peers for feedback when carrying out an investigative task, and this feedback is usually implicit, unstructured and may positively or negatively influence students' learning when they work on a task. This study explored the characteristics of verbal peer feedback during a collaborative investigative chemistry task involving New Zealand Year 13 students. During the planning stage of the students' investigation, the discussions of five pairs of students were recorded and then transcribed. Analysis of transcribed verbal data focused on interactions that involved peer feedback along two dimensions, interactive/non-interactive and dialogic/authoritative (Mortimer and Scott, 2003). The findings indicated that although students adopted a predominantly interactive/authoritative communicative approach, with peer feedback as confirmation or evaluation, they are also capable of a more interactive/dialogic exchange, characterised by elaborative peer feedback. We discuss how this dialogic perspective on peer feedback provides an alternative approach to the analysis and study of student-student interactions during science investigations. The findings should be interpreted in light of the limitations in terms of sample size, grouping and specificity of the coding scheme. Implications for teacher practice are discussed in relation to facilitating peer feedback discourse in the science classroom.

  18. Learning to modulate the partial powers of a single sEMG power spectrum through a novel human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Lyons, Kenneth R; Nemchuk, Anna; Muroff, Shira D; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-06-01

    New human-computer interfaces that use bioelectrical signals as input are allowing study of the flexibility of the human neuromuscular system. We have developed a myoelectric human-computer interface which enables users to navigate a cursor to targets through manipulations of partial powers within a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Users obtain two-dimensional control through simultaneous adjustments of powers in two frequency bands within the sEMG spectrum, creating power profiles corresponding to cursor positions. It is unlikely that these types of bioelectrical manipulations are required during routine muscle contractions. Here, we formally establish the neuromuscular ability to voluntarily modulate single-site sEMG power profiles in a group of naïve subjects under restricted and controlled conditions using a wrist muscle. All subjects used the same pre-selected frequency bands for control and underwent the same training, allowing a description of the average learning progress throughout eight sessions. We show that subjects steadily increased target hit rates from 48% to 71% and exhibited greater control of the cursor's trajectories following practice. Our results point towards an adaptable neuromuscular skill, which may allow humans to utilize single muscle sites as limited general-purpose signal generators. Ultimately, the goal is to translate this neuromuscular ability to practical interfaces for the disabled by using a spared muscle to control external machines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Decision Support System for Academic Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Donald K.; Leivano, Rodrigo J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of a decision support system to operate on a database for academic scheduling. Discusses the scheduling environment, database subsystem, dialog subsystem, modeling subsystem, and output formats. (JM)

  20. Linking Futures across Scales: a Dialog on Multiscale Scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biggs, R.; Raudsepp-Hearne, C.; Atkinson-Palombo, C.; Bohensky, E.; Boyd, E.; Cundill, G.; Fox, H.; Ingram, S.; Kok, K.; Spehar, S.; Tengö, M.; Timmer, D.; Zurek, M.

    2007-01-01

    Scenario analysis is a useful tool for exploring key uncertainties that may shape the future of social-ecological systems. This paper explores the methods, costs, and benefits of developing and linking scenarios of social-ecological systems across multiple spatial scales. Drawing largely on

  1. A dialogical exploration of the grey zone of health and illness: medical science, anthropology, and Plato on alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a phenomenological hermeneutic orientation to explicate and explore the notion of the grey zone of health and illness and seeks to develop the concept through an examination of the case of alcohol consumption. The grey zone is an interpretive area referring to the irremediable zone of ambiguity that haunts even the most apparently resolute discourse. This idea points to an ontological indeterminacy, in the face of which decisions have to be made with regard to the health of a person (e.g., an alcoholic), a system (e.g., the health system), or a society. The fundamental character of this notion will be developed in relation to the discourse on health and the limitations of different disciplinary practices. The case of alcohol consumption will be used to tease out the grey zone embedded in the different kinds of knowledge made available through the disciplinary traditions of medical science, with its emphasis on somatic well-being, and anthropology, with its focus on communal well-being. This tension or grey zone embedded in different knowledge outcomes will be shown to have a discursive parallel with the dialogue between the Athenian, the Spartan, and the Cretan in Plato's Laws. Making use of the dialogical approach as described by Gadamer, the Athenian's particular resolution of the tension will be explored as a case study to demonstrate the necessarily particular analysis involved in a grey zone resolution.

  2. End-user programming of a social robot by dialog

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Gorostiza Luengo, Javier; Salichs Sánchez-Caballero, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by social robots is how to provide intuitive, natural and enjoyable usability for the end-user. In our ordinary environment, social robots could be important tools for education and entertainment (edutainment) in a variety of ways. This paper presents a Natural Programming System (NPS) that is geared to non-expert users. The main goal of such a system is to provide an enjoyable interactive platform for the users to build different programs within their social ...

  3. The mind-writing pupil : A human-computer interface based on decoding of covert attention through pupillometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Melmi, Jean Baptiste; Van Der Linden, Lotje; Van Der Stigchel, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29880977X

    2016-01-01

    We present a new human-computer interface that is based on decoding of attention through pupillometry. Our method builds on the recent finding that covert visual attention affects the pupillary light response: Your pupil constricts when you covertly (without looking at it) attend to a bright,

  4. "Don't" Do This--Pitfalls in Using Anti-Patterns in Teaching Human-Computer Interaction Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, Paula; Renaud, Karen; van Biljon, Judy

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the use of design patterns and anti-patterns in teaching human-computer interaction principles. Patterns are increasingly popular and are seen as an efficient knowledge transfer mechanism in many fields, including software development in the field of software engineering, and more recently in the field of human-computer…

  5. Telepresence: A "Real" Component in a Model to Make Human-Computer Interface Factors Meaningful in the Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selverian, Melissa E. Markaridian; Lombard, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A thorough review of the research relating to Human-Computer Interface (HCI) form and content factors in the education, communication and computer science disciplines reveals strong associations of meaningful perceptual "illusions" with enhanced learning and satisfaction in the evolving classroom. Specifically, associations emerge…

  6. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Jason J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's colorectal cancer (CRC screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  7. A User-Developed 3-D Hand Gesture Set for Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anna; Wachs, Juan P; Park, Kunwoo; Rempel, David

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a lexicon for 3-D hand gestures for common human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks by considering usability and effort ratings. Recent technologies create an opportunity for developing a free-form 3-D hand gesture lexicon for HCI. Subjects (N = 30) with prior experience using 2-D gestures on touch screens performed 3-D gestures of their choice for 34 common HCI tasks and rated their gestures on preference, match, ease, and effort. Videos of the 1,300 generated gestures were analyzed for gesture popularity, order, and response times. Gesture hand postures were rated by the authors on biomechanical risk and fatigue. A final task gesture set is proposed based primarily on subjective ratings and hand posture risk. The different dimensions used for evaluating task gestures were not highly correlated and, therefore, measured different properties of the task-gesture match. A method is proposed for generating a user-developed 3-D gesture lexicon for common HCIs that involves subjective ratings and a posture risk rating for minimizing arm and hand fatigue. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  8. How should Fitts' Law be applied to human-computer interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, D. J.; Holden, K.; Adam, S.; Rudisill, M.; Magee, L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper challenges the notion that any Fitts' Law model can be applied generally to human-computer interaction, and proposes instead that applying Fitts' Law requires knowledge of the users' sequence of movements, direction of movement, and typical movement amplitudes as well as target sizes. Two experiments examined a text selection task with sequences of controlled movements (point-click and point-drag). For the point-click sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the diagonal across the text object in the direction of pointing (rather than the horizontal extent of the text object) as the target size provided the best fit for the pointing time data, whereas for the point-drag sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the vertical size of the text object as the target size gave the best fit. Dragging times were fitted well by Fitts' Law models that used either the vertical or horizontal size of the terminal character in the text object. Additional results of note were that pointing in the point-click sequence was consistently faster than in the point-drag sequence, and that pointing in either sequence was consistently faster than dragging. The discussion centres around the need to define task characteristics before applying Fitts' Law to an interface design or analysis, analyses of pointing and of dragging, and implications for interface design.

  9. Use of Human Computer Models to Influence the Design of International Space Station Propulsion Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, George S.; Hall, Meridith L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall design for the International Space Station (ISS) Propulsion (Prop) Module consists of two bell shapes connected by a long tube having a shirt sleeve environment. The tube is to be used by the flight crew to transfer equipment and supplies from the Shuttle to ISS. Due to a desire to use existing space qualified hardware, the tube internal diameter was initially set at 38 inches, while the human engineering specification, NASA-STD-3000, required 50". Human computer modeling using the MannequinPro application was used to help make the case to enlarge the passageway to meet the specification. 3D CAD models of Prop Module were created with 38 inches, 45 inches and 50 inches passageways and human figures in the neutral body posture as well as a fetal posture were inserted into the model and systematically exercised. Results showed that only the 50 inches tube would accommodate a mid tube turn around by a large crew member, 95th percentile American males, by stature.

  10. Eye center localization and gaze gesture recognition for human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Smith, Melvyn L; Smith, Lyndon N; Farooq, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces an unsupervised modular approach for accurate and real-time eye center localization in images and videos, thus allowing a coarse-to-fine, global-to-regional scheme. The trajectories of eye centers in consecutive frames, i.e., gaze gestures, are further analyzed, recognized, and employed to boost the human-computer interaction (HCI) experience. This modular approach makes use of isophote and gradient features to estimate the eye center locations. A selective oriented gradient filter has been specifically designed to remove strong gradients from eyebrows, eye corners, and shadows, which sabotage most eye center localization methods. A real-world implementation utilizing these algorithms has been designed in the form of an interactive advertising billboard to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method for HCI. The eye center localization algorithm has been compared with 10 other algorithms on the BioID database and six other algorithms on the GI4E database. It outperforms all the other algorithms in comparison in terms of localization accuracy. Further tests on the extended Yale Face Database b and self-collected data have proved this algorithm to be robust against moderate head poses and poor illumination conditions. The interactive advertising billboard has manifested outstanding usability and effectiveness in our tests and shows great potential for benefiting a wide range of real-world HCI applications.

  11. Using minimal human-computer interfaces for studying the interactive development of social awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    According to the enactive approach to cognitive science, perception is essentially a skillful engagement with the world. Learning how to engage via a human-computer interface (HCI) can therefore be taken as an instance of developing a new mode of experiencing. Similarly, social perception is theorized to be primarily constituted by skillful engagement between people, which implies that it is possible to investigate the origins and development of social awareness using multi-user HCIs. We analyzed the trial-by-trial objective and subjective changes in sociality that took place during a perceptual crossing experiment in which embodied interaction between pairs of adults was mediated over a minimalist haptic HCI. Since that study required participants to implicitly relearn how to mutually engage so as to perceive each other's presence, we hypothesized that there would be indications that the initial developmental stages of social awareness were recapitulated. Preliminary results reveal that, despite the lack of explicit feedback about task performance, there was a trend for the clarity of social awareness to increase over time. We discuss the methodological challenges involved in evaluating whether this trend was characterized by distinct developmental stages of objective behavior and subjective experience.

  12. Using minimal human-computer interfaces for studying the interactive development of social awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eFroese

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the enactive approach to cognitive science, perception is essentially a skillful engagement with the world. Learning how to engage via a human-computer interface (HCI can therefore be taken as an instance of developing a new mode of experiencing. Similarly, social perception is theorized to be primarily constituted by skillful engagement between people, which implies that it is possible to investigate the origins and development of social awareness using multi-user HCIs. We analyzed the trial-by-trial objective and subjective changes in sociality that took place during a perceptual crossing experiment in which embodied interaction between pairs of adults was mediated over a minimalist haptic HCI. Since that study required participants to implicitly relearn how to mutually engage so as to perceive each other’s presence, we hypothesized that there would be indications that the initial developmental stages of social awareness were recapitulated. Preliminary results reveal that, despite the lack of explicit feedback about task performance, there was a trend for the clarity of social awareness to increase over time. We discuss the methodological challenges involved in evaluating whether this trend was characterized by distinct developmental stages of objective behavior and subjective experience.

  13. Appearance-based human gesture recognition using multimodal features for human computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dan; Gao, Hua; Ekenel, Hazim Kemal; Ohya, Jun

    2011-03-01

    The use of gesture as a natural interface plays an utmost important role for achieving intelligent Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Human gestures include different components of visual actions such as motion of hands, facial expression, and torso, to convey meaning. So far, in the field of gesture recognition, most previous works have focused on the manual component of gestures. In this paper, we present an appearance-based multimodal gesture recognition framework, which combines the different groups of features such as facial expression features and hand motion features which are extracted from image frames captured by a single web camera. We refer 12 classes of human gestures with facial expression including neutral, negative and positive meanings from American Sign Languages (ASL). We combine the features in two levels by employing two fusion strategies. At the feature level, an early feature combination can be performed by concatenating and weighting different feature groups, and LDA is used to choose the most discriminative elements by projecting the feature on a discriminative expression space. The second strategy is applied on decision level. Weighted decisions from single modalities are fused in a later stage. A condensation-based algorithm is adopted for classification. We collected a data set with three to seven recording sessions and conducted experiments with the combination techniques. Experimental results showed that facial analysis improve hand gesture recognition, decision level fusion performs better than feature level fusion.

  14. Using minimal human-computer interfaces for studying the interactive development of social awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    According to the enactive approach to cognitive science, perception is essentially a skillful engagement with the world. Learning how to engage via a human-computer interface (HCI) can therefore be taken as an instance of developing a new mode of experiencing. Similarly, social perception is theorized to be primarily constituted by skillful engagement between people, which implies that it is possible to investigate the origins and development of social awareness using multi-user HCIs. We analyzed the trial-by-trial objective and subjective changes in sociality that took place during a perceptual crossing experiment in which embodied interaction between pairs of adults was mediated over a minimalist haptic HCI. Since that study required participants to implicitly relearn how to mutually engage so as to perceive each other's presence, we hypothesized that there would be indications that the initial developmental stages of social awareness were recapitulated. Preliminary results reveal that, despite the lack of explicit feedback about task performance, there was a trend for the clarity of social awareness to increase over time. We discuss the methodological challenges involved in evaluating whether this trend was characterized by distinct developmental stages of objective behavior and subjective experience. PMID:25309490

  15. Dialogic Pedagogy for Social Justice: A Critical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    A crucial component of any education, dialogue is viewed by many social justice educators as their primary means towards rectifying social inequalities. Yet the extent to which the particular educational practices they recommend meet the needs or interests of their students who face systemic disadvantage remains unclear. This essay examines claims…

  16. The chatting gathering as a methodological strategy in in-service learning: moving along dialogical dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Alonso

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on an experience of in-service training carried out by a group of educators in literacy. The novelty of the undertaking lies in the methodological proposal analysed: using “chatting gatherings” as a methodological strategy, which supports critical reflection and the construction of knowledge, both in in-service training of professionals and in basic adult education. This experience reveals the nature of learning achieved through dialogical educational processes. Further, it allows us to observe the impact that they may have on the improvement of the professionals’ educational practices.

  17. Empowering Teachers and their Practices of Inclusion through Digital Dialogic Negotiation of Meaning in Learning Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, Hanne; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    by digital dialogic negotiation of meaning in learning communities of practice (CoPs). The study is a continuation of an earlier study on establishing a digital dialogic architecture to fostering shared understanding and sustainable competence development in teacher practices of inclusion. A theoretical......The purpose of this paper is to develop and further refine a digital dialogic concept for the establishment of an including educational practice for teachers. The concept is inherently based on the view of teachers as co-researchers and with a view on inclusion as an endeavour best supported...... framework was developed. Through collaborative knowledge building and an Educational Design Research (EDR) method this study reports on a collaborative attempt to improve inclusive teaching/learning in ways that install ownership, reflection, and awareness of eLearning-to-Learn (eL2L). In the current study...

  18. Resistance to Dialogic Discourse in SSI Teaching: The Effects of an Argumentation-Based Workshop, Teaching Practicum, and Induction on a Preservice Science Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Demiral, Umit; Kartal, Tezcan

    2017-01-01

    Teaching socioscientific issues (SSI) necessitates dialogic discourse activities. However, a majority of science teachers prefer monologic discourse in SSI contexts. In addition, some of these teachers are resistant to change (from monologic to dialogic discourse) despite certain professional development attempts. The purpose of the present…

  19. Reflections on a Dialogic Pedagogy Inspired by the Writings of Bakhtin: An Account of the Experience of Two Professors Working Together in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Anselmo; von Duyke, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The practice of a dialogic pedagogy inspired by the writings of Bakhtin is increasingly popular in different parts of the world. This article is an account produced in the spirit of such pedagogy. Two professors (one from Brazil, the other from the United States), both members of an international dialogic pedagogy study group, write together to…

  20. Metaphors for the Nature of Human-Computer Interaction in an Empowering Environment: Interaction Style Influences the Manner of Human Accomplishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Herman G.; Hartson, H. Rex

    1992-01-01

    Describes human-computer interface needs for empowering environments in computer usage in which the machine handles the routine mechanics of problem solving while the user concentrates on its higher order meanings. A closed-loop model of interaction is described, interface as illusion is discussed, and metaphors for human-computer interaction are…

  1. Dialogs on the Yucca Mountain controversy. Special report No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambeau, C.B.; Szymanski, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The recent, 1992, report prepared by the Panel on Coupled Hydrologic/Tectonic/Hydrothermal Systems at Yucca Mountain for the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, entitled Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise? has generated critical reviews by Somerville et al. (1992) and by Archambeau (1992). These reviews were submitted as reports to the Nuclear Waste Project Office, State of Nevada by Technology and Resource Assessment Corporation under Contract No. 92/94.0004. A copy of the review report by C. B. Archambeau was also sent to Dr. Frank Press, President of the National Academy of Sciences, along with a cover letter from Dr. Archambeau expressing his concerns with the NRC report and his suggestion that the Academy President consider a re-evaluation of the issues covered by the NRC report. Dr. Press responded in a letter to Dr. Archambeau in February of this year which stated that, based on his staff recommendations and a review report by Dr. J. F. Evernden of the United States Geological Survey, he declined to initiate any further investigations and that, in his view, the NRC report was a valid scientific evaluation which was corroborated by Evernden`s report. He also enclosed, with his letter, a copy of the report he received from his staff. In March of this year Dr. Archambeau replied to the letter and NRC staff report sent by Dr. Press with a detailed point-by-point rebuttal of the NRC staff report to Press. Also, in March, a critical review of Dr. Evernden`s report by M. Somerville was submitted to the Nuclear Waste Project Office of the State of Nevada and this report, along with the earlier review of the NRC report by Somerville et al., was included as attachments to the letter sent to Dr. Press.

  2. MAPPING CHILDREN’S POLITICS: SPATIAL STORIES, DIALOGIC RELATIONS AND POLITICAL FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Sarah; Mitchell, Katharyne

    2015-01-01

    This article confronts a persistent challenge in research on children’s geographies and politics: the difficulty of recognizing forms of political agency and practice that by definition fall outside of existing political theory. Children are effectively “always already” positioned outside most of the structures and ideals of modernist democratic theory, such as the public sphere and abstracted notions of communicative action or “rational” speech. Recent emphases on embodied tactics of everyday life have offered important ways to recognize children’s political agency and practice. However, we argue here that a focus on spatial practices and critical knowledge alone cannot capture the full range of children’s politics, and show how representational and dialogic practices remain a critical element of their politics in everyday life. Drawing on de Certeau’s notion of spatial stories, and Bakhtin’s concept of dialogic relations, we argue that children’s representations and dialogues comprise a significant space of their political agency and formation, in which they can make and negotiate social meanings, subjectivities, and relationships. We develop these arguments with evidence from an after-school activity programme we conducted with 10–13 year olds in Seattle, Washington, in which participants explored, mapped, wrote and spoke about the spaces and experiences of their everyday lives. Within these practices, children negotiate autonomy and self-determination, and forward ideas, representations, and expressions of agreement or disagreement that are critical to their formation as political actors. PMID:25642017

  3. Oscillatory Brain Responses Reflect Anticipation during Comprehension of Speech Acts in Spoken Dialog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa S. Gisladottir

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Everyday conversation requires listeners to quickly recognize verbal actions, so-called speech acts, from the underspecified linguistic code and prepare a relevant response within the tight time constraints of turn-taking. The goal of this study was to determine the time-course of speech act recognition by investigating oscillatory EEG activity during comprehension of spoken dialog. Participants listened to short, spoken dialogs with target utterances that delivered three distinct speech acts (Answers, Declinations, Pre-offers. The targets were identical across conditions at lexico-syntactic and phonetic/prosodic levels but differed in the pragmatic interpretation of the speech act performed. Speech act comprehension was associated with reduced power in the alpha/beta bands just prior to Declination speech acts, relative to Answers and Pre-offers. In addition, we observed reduced power in the theta band during the beginning of Declinations, relative to Answers. Based on the role of alpha and beta desynchronization in anticipatory processes, the results are taken to indicate that anticipation plays a role in speech act recognition. Anticipation of speech acts could be critical for efficient turn-taking, allowing interactants to quickly recognize speech acts and respond within the tight time frame characteristic of conversation. The results show that anticipatory processes can be triggered by the characteristics of the interaction, including the speech act type.

  4. OLS Dialog: An open-source front end to the Ontology Lookup Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidhammer Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the growing amount of biomedical data available in public databases it has become increasingly important to annotate data in a consistent way in order to allow easy access to this rich source of information. Annotating the data using controlled vocabulary terms and ontologies makes it much easier to compare and analyze data from different sources. However, finding the correct controlled vocabulary terms can sometimes be a difficult task for the end user annotating these data. Results In order to facilitate the location of the correct term in the correct controlled vocabulary or ontology, the Ontology Lookup Service was created. However, using the Ontology Lookup Service as a web service is not always feasible, especially for researchers without bioinformatics support. We have therefore created a Java front end to the Ontology Lookup Service, called the OLS Dialog, which can be plugged into any application requiring the annotation of data using controlled vocabulary terms, making it possible to find and use controlled vocabulary terms without requiring any additional knowledge about web services or ontology formats. Conclusions As a user-friendly open source front end to the Ontology Lookup Service, the OLS Dialog makes it straightforward to include controlled vocabulary support in third-party tools, which ultimately makes the data even more valuable to the biomedical community.

  5. Imaginative Experience: A Narrative-Dialogic Ethnography of the Community Who Adores Its Idol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Ardianto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Managing customer loyalty becomes an important activity in marketing management. One of the reasons is that loyal consumers tend to make good financial performances to producer. Unfortunately, gaining a loyal customer is not a trivial activity since there are gaps to understand consumer experience comprehensively. To fulfill the gaps, this article explores imaginative experience of the community who adores its idol in the light of cultural perspective. The members of the community who adores its idol experience the imaginative experience. The author argues that those phenomena are cultural perspective, because they are meaningful to the members. Through narrative-dialogic ethnography, the author builds the concept of imaginative experience that through the imaginative media, the members do narrative-dialogic between “the realm of areal” and “the realm of afotik” then activate the imaginative relations in “the realm of aktinik”. Every member constructs its imaginative relations into imaginative constructions formed in a personal story. Managing imaginative experience could benefit the company. It can be the “Imaginative Experience Management” (IEM that accommodates imaginative consumers’ experiences with the company’s products deeply and sustainably through managing the story of its consumers’ imaginative experiences. It can also be linked to the customer loyalty programs. In this matter, IEM should be integrated with brand management.

  6. Voices of dialogue and directivity in family therapy with refugees: evolving ideas about dialogical refugee care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haene, Lucia; Rober, Peter; Adriaenssens, Peter; Verschueren, Karine

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we reflect on our evolving ideas regarding a dialogical approach to refugee care. Broadening the predominant phased trauma care model and its engaging of directive expertise in symptom reduction, meaning making, and rebuilding connectedness, these developing dialogical notions involve the negotiation of silencing and disclosure, meaning and absurdity, hope and hopelessness in a therapeutic dialogue that accepts its encounter of cultural and social difference. In locating therapeutic practice within these divergent approaches, we argue an orientation on collaborative dialogue may operate together with notions from the phased trauma care model as heuristic background in engaging a polyphonic understanding of coping with individual and family sequelae of forced displacement. This locating of therapeutic practice, as informed by each perspective, invites us to remain present to fragments of therapeutic positioning that resonate power imbalance or appropriation in a therapeutic encounter imbued with a social context that silences refugees' suffering. In a clinical case analysis, we further explore these relational complexities of negotiating directive expertise and collaborative dialogue in the therapeutic encounter with refugee clients. © FPI, Inc.

  7. Three approaches in the research field of ethnomodeling: emic (local, etic (global, and dialogical (glocal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Orey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of both emic (local and etic (global knowledge is an alternative goal for the implementation of ethnomodeling research. Emic knowledge is essential for an intuitive and empathic understanding of mathematical ideas, procedures, and practices developed by the members of distinct cultural groups. It is essential for conducting effective ethnographic fieldwork. Furthermore, emic knowledge is a valuable source of inspiration for etic hypotheses. Etic knowledge is essential for cross-cultural comparisons, which are based on the components of ethnology. In this regard, such comparisons demand standard units and categories to facilitate communication. Dialogical (glocal is a third approach for ethnomodeling research that makes use of both emic and etic knowledge traditions through processes of dialogue and interaction. Ethnomodeling is defined as the study of mathematical phenomena within a culture because it is a social construct and is culturally bound. Finally, the objective of this article is to show how we have come to use a combination of emic, etic and dialogical (glocal approaches in our work in the area of ethnomodeling, which contributes to the acquisition of a more complete understanding of mathematical practices developed by the members of distinct cultural groups.

  8. Three approaches in the research field of ethnomodeling: emic (local, etic (global, and dialogical (glocal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Orey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of both emic (local and etic (global knowledge is an alternative goal for the implementation of ethnomodeling research. Emic knowledge is essential for an intuitive and empathic understanding of mathematical ideas, procedures, and practices developed by the members of distinct cultural groups. It is essential for conducting effective ethnographic fieldwork. Furthermore, emic knowledge is a valuable source of inspiration for etic hypotheses. Etic knowledge is essential for cross-cultural comparisons, which are based on the components of ethnology. In this regard, such comparisons demand standard units and categories to facilitate communication. Dialogical (glocal is a third approach for ethnomodeling research that makes use of both emic and etic knowledge traditions through processes of dialogue and interaction. Ethnomodeling is defined as the study of mathematical phenomena within a culture because it is a social construct and is culturally bound. Finally, the objective of this article is to show how we have come to use a combination of emic, etic and dialogical (glocal approaches in our work in the area of ethnomodeling, which contributes to the acquisition of a more complete understanding of mathematical practices developed by the members of distinct cultural groups.

  9. A Conceptual Architecture for Adaptive Human-Computer Interface of a PT Operation Platform Based on Context-Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a conceptual architecture for adaptive human-computer interface of a PT operation platform based on context-awareness. This architecture will form the basis of design for such an interface. This paper describes components, key technologies, and working principles of the architecture. The critical contents covered context information modeling, processing, relationship establishing between contexts and interface design knowledge by use of adaptive knowledge reasoning, and visualization implementing of adaptive interface with the aid of interface tools technology.

  10. Towards a Conceptual Framework and an Empirical Methodology in Research on Artistic Human-Computer and Human-Robot Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, Uwe; Kim, Jin Hyun

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a new approach to the scientific study of the musical mind, cognitive musicology has to be complemented by research on human-computer and human-robot interaction. Within the computational approach to mind, interactionism or embodied cognitive science using robots for modeling cognitive and behavioral processes provides an adequate framework for modeling internal processes underlying artistic and aesthetic experiences. The computational framework provided by cognitive scien...

  11. Functional Grammar Analysis in Support of Dialogic Instruction with Text: Scaffolding Purposeful, Cumulative Dialogue with English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhofer, Rachel Rennie; Schleppegrell, Mary

    2016-01-01

    For children learning English as an additional language, dialogic teaching supports both learning content and learning language. Engaging language learners in dialogue offers special challenges, however. This article describes an instructional approach that focused on engendering purposeful and cumulative talk, supported by metalanguage from…

  12. Dialogic Multicultural Education Theory and Praxis: Dialogue and the Problems of Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermine Abd Elkader

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this theoretical article is to highlight the role that dialogic pedagogy can play in critical multicultural education for pre-service teachers. The article starts by discussing the problematic that critical multicultural education poses in a democratic society that claims freedom of speech and freedom of expression as a basic tenet of democracy. Through investigating research findings in the field of critical multicultural education in higher education, the author argues that many of the educational approaches-including the ones that claim dialogue to be their main instructional tool- could be described as undemocratic, and thus have done more harm than good for the multicultural objectives. On the other hand, the author argues that dialogic pedagogy could be a better approach for critical multicultural education as it promises many opportunities for learning that do not violate the students’ rights of freedom of expression and freedom of association. Throughout this paper, the author tries to clarify the difference between dialogic pedagogy and other conceptualizations of dialogue in critical multicultural education arguing for the better suitability of dialogic pedagogy for providing a safer learning environment that encompasses differing and at times conflicting voices.

  13. Discourse, Justification, and Education: Jürgen Habermas on Moral Epistemology and Dialogical Conditions of Moral Justification and Rightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okshevsky, Walter C.

    2016-01-01

    In this essay Walter Okshevsky addresses the question of whether a certain form of dialogically derived agreement can function as an epistemic (universal and necessary) criterion of moral judgment and ground of moral authority. Okshevsky examines arguments for and against in the literature of educational philosophy and develops Jürgen Habermas's…

  14. Dialogic Multicultural Education Theory and Praxis: Dialogue and the Problems of Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkader, Nermine Abd

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this theoretical article is to highlight the role that dialogic pedagogy can play in critical multicultural education for pre-service teachers. The article starts by discussing the problematic that critical multicultural education poses in a democratic society that claims freedom of speech and freedom of expression as a basic tenet…

  15. Dialogic e-Learning2learn: Creating Global Digital Networks and Educational Knowledge Building Architectures across Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to address the challenge and potential of online higher and continuing education, of fostering and promoting, in a global perspective across time and space, democratic values working for a better world. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a generalized dialogic learning architecture of networked…

  16. Social Networking Sites and Cyberdemocracy: A New Model of Dialogic Interactivity and Political Moblization in the Case of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Heasun

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to test whether dialogic interactions via SNSs can help revive political participation and help citizens to become involved in real-world politics. In a Tocquevillian sense, this study assumes a positive relationship between virtual associational life and political participation and therefore argues that SNSs…

  17. On the Relevancy of Using Vygotsky's Theoretical Framework to Legitimize Dialogic Teaching/Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a response to the growing acceptance that dialogic teaching/learning focusing on the role of intersubjectivity in developing knowledge and reasoning, particularly when this intersubjectivity is mediated and maintained by means of language is an appropriate reaction to the weaknesses of direct instruction within the Vygotskian…

  18. Dialogic Considerations of Confrontation as a Counseling Activity: An Examination of Allen Ivey's Use of Confronting as a Microskill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Zeman, Don

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine confrontation as a communication skill practiced and described by counselor educator Allen Ivey. Seeing confrontation as a dialogic activity completed interactionally, they use conversation analysis to examine 2 passages where Ivey used confrontation in his teaching tapes. Their microanalyses highlight some important and…

  19. Promoting Teacher and School Development through Co-Enquiry: Developing Interactive Whiteboard Use in a "Dialogic Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Paul; Hennessy, Sara; Mercer, Neil

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the work of a teacher-researcher collaborative group in the UK, who explored the idea of 'a dialogic approach' to classroom interaction and examined its relationship to use of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) in orchestrating classroom talk. We focus on how the co-inquiry process within this group led to the articulation of…

  20. The Influence of Parents' Backgrounds, Beliefs about English Learning, and a Dialogic Reading Program on Thai Kindergarteners' English Lexical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchprasert, Anongnad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated parents' backgrounds and their beliefs about English language learning, and compared the receptive English vocabulary development of three to six year-old-Thai children before and after participating in a parent-child reading program with the dialogic reading (DR) method. Fifty-four single parents of 54 children voluntarily…