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Sample records for human xeroderma pigmentosum

  1. Xeroderma pigmentosum

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    Lehmann Alan R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is defined by extreme sensitivity to sunlight, resulting in sunburn, pigment changes in the skin and a greatly elevated incidence of skin cancers. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder and has been found in all continents and racial groups. Estimated incidences vary from 1 in 20, 000 in Japan to 1 in 250, 000 in the USA, and approximately 2.3 per million live births in Western Europe. The first features are either extreme sensitivity to sunlight, triggering severe sunburn, or, in patients who do not show this sun-sensitivity, abnormal lentiginosis (freckle-like pigmentation due to increased numbers of melanocytes on sun-exposed areas. This is followed by areas of increased or decreased pigmentation, skin aging and multiple skin cancers, if the individuals are not protected from sunlight. A minority of patients show progressive neurological abnormalities. There are eight XP complementation groups, corresponding to eight genes, which, if defective, can result in XP. The products of these genes are involved in the repair of ultraviolet (UV-induced damage in DNA. Seven of the gene products (XPA through G are required to remove UV damage from the DNA. The eighth (XPV or DNA polymerase η is required to replicate DNA containing unrepaired damage. There is wide variability in clinical features both between and within XP groups. Diagnosis is made clinically by the presence, from birth, of an acute and prolonged sunburn response at all exposed sites, unusually early lentiginosis in sun-exposed areas or onset of skin cancers at a young age. The clinical diagnosis is confirmed by cellular tests for defective DNA repair. These features distinguish XP from other photodermatoses such as solar urticaria and polymorphic light eruption, Cockayne Syndrome (no pigmentation changes, different repair defect and other lentiginoses such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Leopard syndrome and Carney complex (pigmentation not sun

  2. Xeroderma pigmentosum. Case presentation.

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    Damaris Díaz Leonard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Twelve years old patient (YGS, female, white, of rural origin; with history of facial and truncal bullae since the age of eight months when exposed to the sun light. It was first diagnosed as solar dermatitis. At the age of 6 it was assessed as xeroderma pigmentosum. This diagnosis was confirmed at the age of 10 by the histopathology department and reassessed by the National Reference Centre. For the infrequency of this disease, a bibliographic revision was carried out to make a report for this case presentation.

  3. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum; Cancer cutane et xeroderma pigmentosum

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    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Sallemi, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Turki, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2007-11-15

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  4. Genetics Home Reference: xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of skin exposed to the sun. Some affected individuals also have problems involving the nervous system. The signs of xeroderma pigmentosum usually appear in infancy or early childhood. Many affected children develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. The ...

  5. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: the xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Matsutani; F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A. Hagemeier

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The

  6. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

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    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  7. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  8. Transient correction of excision repair defects in fibroblasts of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups by microinjection of crude human cell extract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Vermeulen (Wim); P. Osseweijer; A.J.R. de Jonge; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractCrude extracts from human cells were microinjected into the cytoplasm of cultured fibroblasts from 9 excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups. The level of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured to determine the effect of the extract on the re

  9. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome cells

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    Ayaki, Hitoshi; Hara, Ryujiro; Ikenaga, Mituo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center

    1996-06-01

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of {sup 3}H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes. (author)

  10. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: The xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23

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    Spek, P.J. van der; Smit, E.M.E.; Beverloo, H.B. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The previously cloned XPC gene is involved in the common XP complementation group C, which is defective in excision repair of nontranscribed sequences in the genome. The XPC protein was found to be complexed with the product of HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae NER gene RAD23. Here we present the chromosomal localization by in situ hybridization using haptenized probes of all three genes. The HHR23A gene was assigned to chromosome 19p13.2. Interestingly, the HHR23B and XPC genes, the product of which forms a tight complex, were found to colocalize on band 3p25.1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the HHR23B and XPC genes possibly share a MluI restriction fragment of about 625 kb. Potential involvement of the HHR23 genes in human genetic disorders is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

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    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  12. Recurrent conjunctival atypical fibroxanthoma in Pigmentosum Xeroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà-Ibáñez, M; Barreiro-González, A; Barranco González, H; Aviñó Martínez, J; Évole-Buselli, M; Harto-Castaño, M Á

    2017-08-23

    A 7 year-old boy with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and who presents a recurrent conjunctival atypical fibroxanthoma after two surgeries. This is the third procedure and the patient is treated with a surgical excision of the tumour and cryotherapy at the surgical bed. Due to the risk of recurrence, topical Mitomycin C 0,02% was added at post-operative care achieving a good clinical outcome. Surgical exeresis with cryotherapy and topical Mitomycin C is an effective treatment for a case of an atypical fibroxanthoma with a high potential for recurrence and invasion. An ophthalmologic follow-up is required for these patients, as well as general paediatric care and support aids. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

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    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  14. A RARE CASE REPORT OF XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM WITH STRONG FAMILIAL ASSOCIATION

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    Basavaraj R

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP was first described in 1874 by Hebra and Kaposi. In 1882, Kaposi coined the term xeroderma pigmentosum for the condition, referring to its characteristic dry, pigmented skin. Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare disorder transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by photosensitivity, pigmentary changes, premature skin aging, and malignant tumor development

  15. Effects of microinjected photoreactivating enzyme on thymine dimer removal and DNA repair synthesis in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

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    Roza, L.; Vermeulen, W.; Bergen Henegouwen, J.B.; Eker, A.P.; Jaspers, N.G.; Lohman, P.H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H. (TNO Medical Biological Laboratory, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    1990-03-15

    UV-induced thymine dimers (10 J/m2 of UV-C) were assayed in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts with a monoclonal antibody against these dimers and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. In repair-proficient cells dimer-specific immunofluorescence gradually decreased with time, reaching about 25% of the initial fluorescence after 27 h. Rapid disappearance of dimers was observed in cells which had been microinjected with yeast photoreactivating enzyme prior to UV irradiation. This photoreactivation (PHR) was light dependent and (virtually) complete within 15 min of PHR illumination. In general, PHR of dimers strongly reduces UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). However, when PHR was applied immediately after UV irradiation, UDS remained unchanged initially; the decrease set in only after 30 min. When PHR was performed 2 h after UV exposure, UDS dropped without delay. An explanation for this difference is preferential removal of some type(s) of nondimer lesions, which is responsible for the PHR-resistant UDS immediately following UV irradiation. After the rapid removal of these photoproducts, the bulk of UDS is due to dimer repair. From the rapid effect of dimer removal by PHR on UDS it can be deduced that the excision of dimers up to the repair synthesis step takes considerably less than 30 min. Also in XP fibroblasts of various complementation groups the effect of PHR was investigated. The immunochemical dimer assay showed rapid PHR-dependent removal comparable to that in normal cells. However, the decrease of (residual) UDS due to PHR was absent (in XP-D) or much delayed (in XP-A and -E) compared to normal cells. This supports the idea that in these XP cells preferential repair of nondimer lesions does occur, but at a much lower rate.

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

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    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  17. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A correcting protein from Calf Thymus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.M. Eker (André); W. Vermeulen (Wim); N. Miura; K. Tanaka (Kiyoji); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA proteinous factor was purified from calf thymus and HeLa cells, which specifically corrects the excision repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A) cells. Recovery of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis after microinjection of XP-A cells was used as a quanti

  18. Xeroderma pigmentosum group F caused by a defect in a structure-specific DNA repair endonuclease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Sijbers (Anneke); W.L. de Laat (Wouter); R.A. Ariza (Rafael); M. Biggerstaff (Maureen); Y-F. Wei; J.G. Moggs (Jonathan); K.C. Carter (Kenneth); B.K. Shell (Brenda); E. Evans (Elizabeth); M.C. de Jong (Mariska); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); J.D. de Rooij (Johan); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R.D. Wood (Richard)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair, which is defective in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), involves incision of a DNA strand on each side of a lesion. We isolated a human gene homologous to yeast Rad1 and found that it corrects the repair defects of XP group F as well as rodent groups 4 and 11. Causa

  19. RAD25(SSL2), a yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Park (Robert); S.N. Guzder; M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); I. Jaspers-Dekker (Iris); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Prakash; L. Prakash

    1992-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Ho

  20. Regulation of global genome nucleotide excision repair by SIRT1 through xeroderma pigmentosum C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Mei; Shea, Christopher R.; Guo, Xiumei; Li, Xiaoling; Soltani, Keyoumars; Han, Weinong; He, Yu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Disruption of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway by mutations can cause xeroderma pigmentosum, a syndrome predisposing affected individuals to development of skin cancer. The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein is essential for initiating global genome NER by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Here we show that inhibition of the deacetylase and longevity factor SIRT1 impairs global genome NER through suppressing the transcription of XPC in a SIRT1 deacetylase-dependent manner. SIRT1 enhances XPC expression by reducing AKT-dependent nuclear localization of the transcription repressor of XPC. Finally, we show that SIRT1 levels are significantly reduced in human skin tumors from Caucasian patients, a population at highest risk. These findings suggest that SIRT1 acts as a tumor suppressor through its role in DNA repair. PMID:21149730

  1. Cloning and characterization of the Drosophila homolog of the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B correcting gene, ERCC3.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); C. Vreeken; S.A.M. Bol (Sandra); N.C. Cheng (Ngan Ching); I. Jaspers-Dekker (Iris); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J.C.J. Eeken; G. Weeda (Geert); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractPreviously the human nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC3 was shown to be responsible for a rare combination of the autosomal recessive DNA repair disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group B) and Cockayne's syndrome (complementation group C). The human and mouse ERCC3 prote

  2. Characterization of the mouse homolog of the XPBC/ERCC-3 gene implicated in xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne's Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); L. Ma (Libin); R.C.A. van Ham; D. Bootsma (Dirk); A.J. van der Eb; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe human XPBC/ERCC-3 DNA repair gene specifically corrects the repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B and rodent repair mutant cell lines of group 3. The gene encodes a presumed DNA- and chromatin-binding helicase involved in early steps of the excision

  3. RAD25 (SSL2), the yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability

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    Park, E.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (United States)); Guzder, S.N.; Prakash, S. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Koken, M.H.M.; Jaspers-Dekker, I.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Homologs of human excision repair genes ERCC1, XPDC/ERCC2, and XPAC have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since no homolog of human XPBC/ERCC3 existed among the known yeast genes, we cloned the yeast homolog by using XPBC cDNA as a hybridization probe. The yeast homolog, RAD25 (SSL2), encodes a protein of 843 amino acids (M[sub r] 95,356). The RAD25 (SSL2)- and XPCX-encoded proteins share 55% identical and 72% conserved amino acid residues, and the two proteins resemble one another in containing the conserved DNA helicase sequence motifs. A nonsense mutation at codon 799 that deletes the 45 C-terminal amino acid residues in RAD25 (SSL2) confers UV sensitivity. This mutation shows epistasis with genes in the excision repair group, whereas a synergistic increase in UN sensitivity occurs when it is combined with mutations in genes in other DNA repair pathways, indicating that RAD25 (SSL2) functions in excision repair but not in other repair pathways. We also show that RAD25 (SSL2) is an essential gene. A mutation of the Lys[sup 392] residue to arginine in the conserved Walker type A nucleotide-binding motif is lethal, suggesting an essential role of the putative RAD 25 (SSL2) ATPase/DNA helicase activity in viability. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Eyelid reconstruction in a child with xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Cañal, B; Monts Cambero, N E; Carrión Campo, R; Saldaña Garrido, J D

    2016-09-01

    Seven-year-old male patient, affected by xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) who was referred to ophthalmology due to the presence of numerous tumours in his left eye that affected the eyelids and conjunctiva. He had a tumour in his lower eyelid that affected the free edge, creating a secondary ectropion, and several lesions with a melanocytic appearance in conjunctiva. A resection of the eyelid tumour and the conjunctival lesions were performed by placing a skin graft and amniotic membrane, respectively, as covering. XP patients have high probability of developing eye tumours. A thorough ophthalmic examination is necessary to establish an early diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: Man Deprived of His Right to Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareddy, Subhash; Reddy, Jithendra; Babu, Subhas; Balan, Preethi

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder characterized by photo hypersensitivity of sun exposed tissues and subsequent several-fold increased risk for malignant changes resulting from impaired ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Estimated incidences vary from 1 in 20,000 in Japan to 1 in 250,000 in the USA, and approximately 2.3 per million live births in Western Europe. Diagnosis is made clinically by the presence of unusual sunburns or lentiginosis or onset of cancers at an early age. It is confirmed by cellular tests for defective DNA repair. Although there is no cure for XP as of now, skin problems can be ameliorated with the use of sunscreens, sun avoidance methods, and recurrent tumor excisions. Oral isotretinoin and topical application of 5-fluorouracil to treat actinic keratoses are other therapeutic options. T4N5 and photolyase liposomal lotions are innovations in the therapy of XP. Genetic counselling implicating the effect of consanguineous marriages should be considered in the management of XP patients. PMID:24459435

  6. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G associated with Cockayne syndrome

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    Vermeulen, W.; Jaspers, N.G.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Belgium)); Jaeken, J. (Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium))

    1993-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are two rare inherited disorders with a clinical and cellular hypersensitivity to the UV component of the sunlight spectrum. Although the two traits are generally considered as clinically and genetically distinct entities, on the biochemical level a defect in the nucleotide excision-repair (NER) pathway is involved in both. Classical CS patients are primarily deficient in the preferential repair of DNA damage in actively transcribed genes, whereas in most XP patients the genetic defect affects both [open quotes]preferential[close quotes] and [open quotes]overall[close quotes] NER modalities. Here the authors report a genetic study of two unrelated, severely affected patients with the clinical characteristics of CS but with a biochemical defect typical of XP. By complementation analysis, using somatic cell fusion and nuclear microinjection of cloned repair genes, they assign these two patients to XP complementation group G, which previously was not associated with CS. This observation extends the earlier identification of two patients with a rare combined XP/CS phenotype within XP complementation groups B and D, respectively. It indicates that some mutations in at least three of the seven genes known to be involved in XP also can result in a picture of partial or even full-blown CS. It is concluded that the syndromes XP and CS are biochemically closely related and may be part of a broader clinical disease spectrum. The authors suggest, as a possible molecular mechanism underlying this relation, that the XPGC repair gene has an additional vital function, as shown for some other NER genes. 33 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Squamous Cell Carcinoma in African Children with Xeroderma Pigmentosum: Three Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou Kaloga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease. This disease predisposes patients to early-onset skin cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we report 3 pediatric cases, including 2 deaths. Observation: The subjects included 2 boys and 1 girl with skin type VI. All subjects were from consanguineous marriages, and the average age was 7.6 years. The patients all had ulcerative budding tumor lesions in the cephalic region, and the mean disease duration was 18 months. In all 3 cases, the diagnosis of xeroderma pigmentosum was made before the poikilodermal appearance of sun-exposed areas and photophobia. Neurological-type mental retardation was noted in 1 case. Histology confirmed squamous cell carcinoma in all 3 cases. The evolutions were marked by the death of 2 children (cases 1 and 3. In one case, the outcome was favorable following cancer excision and subsequent chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. Conclusion: Squamous cell carcinoma is a serious complication related to xeroderma pigmentosum in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prevention is based on the early diagnosis of xeroderma pigmentosum, black skin photoprotection, screening and early treatment of lesions, and genetic counseling.

  8. Correction of xeroderma pigmentosum repair defect by basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Vuuren (Hanneke); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L. Ma (Libin); G. Weeda (Geert); E. Appeldoorn (Esther); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A.J. van der Eb; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Humbert; L. Schaeffer; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractERCC3 was initially identified as a gene correcting the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XP-B). The recent finding that its gene product is identical to the p89 subunit of basal transcription factor BTF2(TFIIH), opened the possibil

  9. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Fassihi (H.); M. Sethi (M.); H. Fawcett (Heather); J. Wing (Jonathan); N. Chandler (Natalie); S. Mohammed (Shehla); E. Craythorne (Emma); A.M.S. Morley (Ana M.S.); R. Lim (Rongxuan); S. Turner (Sally); T. Henshaw (Tanya); I. Garrood (Isabel); P. Giunti (Paola); T. Hedderly (Tammy); A. Abiona (Adesoji); H. Naik (Harsha); G. Harrop (Gemma); D. McGibbon (D.); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); E. Botta (Elena); T. Nardo (Tiziana); M. Stefanini (Miria); A.R. Young (Antony R.); R. Sarkany (R.); A.R. Lehmann (Alan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight

  10. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Fassihi (H.); M. Sethi (M.); H. Fawcett (Heather); J. Wing (Jonathan); N. Chandler (Natalie); S. Mohammed (Shehla); E. Craythorne (Emma); A.M.S. Morley (Ana M.S.); R. Lim (Rongxuan); S. Turner (Sally); T. Henshaw (Tanya); I. Garrood (Isabel); P. Giunti (Paola); T. Hedderly (Tammy); A. Abiona (Adesoji); H. Naik (Harsha); G. Harrop (Gemma); D. McGibbon (D.); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); E. Botta (Elena); T. Nardo (Tiziana); M. Stefanini (Miria); A.R. Young (Antony R.); R. Sarkany (R.); A.R. Lehmann (Alan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight com

  11. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein loads as a separate factor onto DNA lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Rademakers (Suzanne); M. Volker (Marcel); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); A.L. Nigg (Alex); M.J. Mone; A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a centr

  12. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  13. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  14. Rapid diagnosis of sensitivity to ultraviolet light in fibroblasts from dermatologic disorders, with particular reference to xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Thomas, G.H.

    1988-04-01

    A rapid and simple method for determining the sensitivity of human fibroblasts to ultraviolet light is described. As an alternative to the colony formation assay, this method can be used for the rapid diagnosis of ultraviolet light sensitivity in fibroblasts from photosensitive disorders. The method is based on growth of small numbers of cells in 1-cm wells of culture trays for 4 or more days after irradiation and determination of cell survival by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine. D37 values (the dose at which 37% of the control level of incorporation remains) obtained from this procedure showed the same relative sensitivity of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts as was obtained by colony formation. Untransformed and SV40-transformed fibroblasts, which have different growth rates and different responses to high cell densities, gave different D37 values by this assay in culture trays as compared with colony formation. Comparison of relative sensitivities to irradiation should therefore be made only between cell types with similar growth characteristics. The similar sensitivity of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells to mitomycin C was also determined by this culture tray method. By increasing cell density at the beginning of the experiments, a greater capacity of group C compared with group D fibroblasts for recovery from potentially lethal damage was also detected.

  15. Hereditary orotic aciduria, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum probed by herpes simplex virus: /sup 125/I-iododeoxycytidine incorporation as an assay for viral growth. [Human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, J.; Hafner, J.; Boorstein, R.; Pardee, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    /sup 125/I-Iododeoxycytidine (/sup 125/IdC) incorporation into acid-insoluble material was a sensitive, rapid, and quantitative assay for the growth of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in human fibroblasts. Cellular utilization of the isotope was 10 to 25% of the incorporation by infected cells and could be 80% inhibited by tetrahydrouridine (THU). Viral utilization was inhibited by acycloguanosine, thioguanine (TG), and cytosine arabinoside. Isotope was incorporated equally well by growing or quiescent infected cells. HSV-1 was used to probe the metabolic capabilities of three mutant human fibroblast strains. /sup 125/IdC incorporation quantitatively measured the ability of the virus to grow in these cells. Viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to TG in normal fibroblasts but showed a 8- to 10-fold greater resistance to TG in fibroblasts derived from patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LN). Similarly, the growth of ultraviolet irradiated HSV-1 in normal fibroblasts was 5-fold greater than in fibroblasts derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In fibroblasts derived from patients with hereditary orotic aciduria, viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to adenosine (AD) at concentrations which were slightly stimulatory in normal fibroblasts. This was a 2-fold difference in AD sensitivity, which the radioassay reliably and quantitatively documented. HSV-1 infected cells could be individually identified by their incorporated /sup 125/IdC; such cells had blackened nuclei in autoradiograms prepared 12 hr after infection. Normal cells infected in the presence of TG had many fewer labeled nuclei than LN cells similarly infected in the presence of the drug. (JMT)

  16. Radiation therapy for a rare association of maxillary neoplasm in xeroderma pigmentosum: Is it really contraindicated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Samdariya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic malignancies are common in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP patients; they can develop maxillary sinus cancers on rare occasions. Despite their extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light, the patients of XP can be treated with standard doses of ionizing radiation for the treatment of cancers. The examples of use of radiotherapy as a treatment modality for maxillary neoplasms in patients of XP are rare. This report highlights a rare association of maxillary carcinoma in a patient of XP who received the tumoricidal doses of therapeutic X-rays with acceptable toxicities.

  17. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi M Mulimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we are reporting a 9-year-old child with XP scheduled for excision of basal cell carcinoma under general anaesthesia.

  18. Cockayne syndrome-xeroderma pigmentosum complex with demyelination: A rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Rani Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, such as mental retardation, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS demyelination and calcifications. We present a rare patient whose genome probably harbored a specific combination of mutations producing a rare double syndrome of XP-CS, with facial phenotype of CS, and CNS demyelination.

  19. Microinjection of Escherichia coli UvrA, B, C and D proteins into fibroblasts of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A and C does not result in restoration of UV-induced DNA synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; A.P. Barbeiro; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured human fibroblasts of repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A and C was assayed after injection of identical activities of either Uvr excinuclease (UvrA, B, C and D) from Escherichia coli or endonuclease V

  20. Targeted gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum cells using meganuclease and TALEN™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Dupuy

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C is a rare human syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a dramatic predisposition to skin neoplasms. XP-C cells are deficient in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway, a complex process involved in the recognition and removal of DNA lesions. Several XPC mutations have been described, including a founder mutation in North African patients involving the deletion of a TG dinucleotide (ΔTG located in the middle of exon 9. This deletion leads to the expression of an inactive truncated XPC protein, normally involved in the first step of NER. New approaches used for gene correction are based on the ability of engineered nucleases such as Meganucleases, Zinc-Finger nucleases or TALE nucleases to accurately generate a double strand break at a specific locus and promote correction by homologous recombination through the insertion of an exogenous DNA repair matrix. Here, we describe the targeted correction of the ΔTG mutation in XP-C cells using engineered meganuclease and TALEN™. The methylated status of the XPC locus, known to inhibit both of these nuclease activities, led us to adapt our experimental design to optimize their in vivo efficacies. We show that demethylating treatment as well as the use of TALEN™ insensitive to CpG methylation enable successful correction of the ΔTG mutation. Such genetic correction leads to re-expression of the full-length XPC protein and to the recovery of NER capacity, attested by UV-C resistance of the corrected cells. Overall, we demonstrate that nuclease-based targeted approaches offer reliable and efficient strategies for gene correction.

  1. Targeted gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum cells using meganuclease and TALEN™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Valton, Julien; Leduc, Sophie; Armier, Jacques; Galetto, Roman; Gouble, Agnès; Lebuhotel, Céline; Stary, Anne; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe; Sarasin, Alain; Daboussi, Fayza

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare human syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a dramatic predisposition to skin neoplasms. XP-C cells are deficient in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, a complex process involved in the recognition and removal of DNA lesions. Several XPC mutations have been described, including a founder mutation in North African patients involving the deletion of a TG dinucleotide (ΔTG) located in the middle of exon 9. This deletion leads to the expression of an inactive truncated XPC protein, normally involved in the first step of NER. New approaches used for gene correction are based on the ability of engineered nucleases such as Meganucleases, Zinc-Finger nucleases or TALE nucleases to accurately generate a double strand break at a specific locus and promote correction by homologous recombination through the insertion of an exogenous DNA repair matrix. Here, we describe the targeted correction of the ΔTG mutation in XP-C cells using engineered meganuclease and TALEN™. The methylated status of the XPC locus, known to inhibit both of these nuclease activities, led us to adapt our experimental design to optimize their in vivo efficacies. We show that demethylating treatment as well as the use of TALEN™ insensitive to CpG methylation enable successful correction of the ΔTG mutation. Such genetic correction leads to re-expression of the full-length XPC protein and to the recovery of NER capacity, attested by UV-C resistance of the corrected cells. Overall, we demonstrate that nuclease-based targeted approaches offer reliable and efficient strategies for gene correction.

  2. Repairing DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum: T4N5 lotion and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Sarwar; Brownell, Isaac

    2008-04-01

    Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have defective DNA repair and are at a high risk for cutaneous malignancies. Standard treatments for XP are limited in scope and effectiveness. Understanding the molecular etiology of XP has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including enzyme and gene therapies. One new topical treatment utilizing bacteriophage T4 endonuclease 5 (T4N5) in a liposomal lotion is currently in clinical trials and has received a Fast Track designation from the FDA. Gene therapy for XP, while making leaps in preclinical studies, has been slower to develop due to tactical hurdles, but seems to have much potential for future treatment. If these treatments prove effective in lowering the risk of cancer in patients with XP, they may also be found useful in reducing skin cancers in other at-risk patient populations.

  3. Anestesia em paciente com Xeroderma Pigmentoso: relato de caso Anestesia en paciente con Xeroderma Pigmentoso: relato de caso Anesthesia in patient with Xeroderma Pigmentosum: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rogério Degrandi Oliveira

    2003-02-01

    ómica recesiva rara, caracterizada por el desenvolvimiento prematuro de neoplasias debido a la extrema sensibilidad a la radiación ultravioleta. Estas manifestaciones ocurren por falla en el mecanismo de excisión y reparo del DNA. Si comparados a individuos normales, estos pacientes presentan riesgo 1000 veces mayor de desenvolver neoplasias en áreas expuestas al sol. El objetivo de este relato es presentar la conducta anestésica en una paciente portadora de Xeroderma Pigmentoso sometida a cirugía oftalmológica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo femenino, 7 años, portadora de Xeroderma Pigmentoso con comprometimiento facial extenso, admitida para exéresis de lesión papilar en el ojo derecho. Fue prescrito midazolam (10 mg por vía oral, como medicación pré-anestésica. La monitorización inicial consistió de cardioscópio, oxímetro de pulso, estetoscopio precordial y presión arterial no invasiva. Fue realizada pré-oxigenación con oxígeno a 100% por 3 minutos e inducción inhalatoria bajo máscara con oxígeno a 100% y sevoflurano en concentraciones crecientes hasta 7%. Después de acceso venoso periférico con catéter 22G, fueron inyectados propofol (50 mg y succinilcolina (20 mg y realizada intubación traqueal con tubo 5,5 mm sin balonete. Un guía de metal fue utilizado para facilitar la introducción del tubo traqueal. La manutención de la anestesia fue hecha con sevoflurano a 3,5% y oxígeno a 100%, con sistema de Bain. La niña fue extubada en la sala cirúrgica y encaminada a la sala de recuperación pós-anestésica en buenas condiciones. CONCLUSIONES: Las alteraciones faciales y orofaríngeas decurrentes de esta enfermedad determinaron dificultades en la adaptación de la máscara facial e intubación traqueal. La educación constante del paciente y de sus familiares constituye el objetivo más importante en el manoseo de esta enfermedad.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Xeroderma Pigmentosum is a rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by the

  4. El xeroderma pigmentoso en su fase de proliferación cutánea tumoral The xeroderma pigmentosum in its phase of tumoral cutaneous proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Melardo Taño Espinosa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El xeroderma pigmentoso es una enfermedad dermatológica rara, autosómica recesiva, y su etiología está relacionada con el déficit congénito de una endonucleasa que impide la reparación de ADN de las células de la piel que mutan por la incidencia de los rayos ultravioletas. La enfermedad transcurre por 3 etapas clínicas evolutivas y morfológicas. Si no están totalmente protegidos de la luz solar, los enfermos sufren un envejecimiento acelerado de la piel, y desarrollan inevitablemente lesiones oculares y dérmicas que pueden conducir a múltiples lesiones cancerosas. No existe actualmente ningún tratamiento curativo. El diagnóstico precoz y la protección frente a la radiación ultravioleta son los factores imprescindibles en el tratamiento de los pacientes afectados. Se describe la evolución clínica de una niña de 10 años con xeroderma pigmentoso, la cual presenta una fase muy avanzada de la enfermedad, con importante crecimiento de carcinomas cutáneos. El objetivo de la presente publicación es presentar un caso clínico poco frecuente de xeroderma pigmentoso, y al mismo tiempo, realizar una revisión bibliográfica con el fin de orientar el diagnóstico precoz y el tratamiento oportuno en este tipo de casos.The xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare dermatologic disease, autosomal recessive and its etiology is related to the congenital deficit of an endonuclease inactivating the DNA of the cutaneous cells muting by the incidence of ultraviolet rays. The disease passes by three clinical, evolutionary and morphological stages. If the patients are not appropriately protected of the sunlight, they suffer an accelerated aging of the skin and inevitably develop ocular and dermal lesions that may to lead to multiple cancerous lesions. Nowadays, there is not a curative treatment. The early diagnosis and the protection the ultraviolet rays are the essential factors in the treatment of the involved patients. Authors describe the clinical

  5. DNA excision-repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum prevents removal of a class of oxygen free radical-induced base lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, M S; Jones, C J; Wood, R D; Lindahl, T

    1993-07-01

    Plasmid DNA was gamma-irradiated or treated with H2O2 in the presence of Cu2+ to generate oxygen free radical-induced lesions. Open circular DNA molecules were removed by ethidium bromide/CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The closed circular DNA fraction was treated with the Escherichia coli reagent enzymes endonuclease III (Nth protein) and Fpg protein. This treatment converted DNA molecules containing the major base lesions pyrimidine hydrates and 8-hydroxyguanine to a nicked form. Remaining closed circular DNA containing other oxygen radical-induced base lesions was used as a substrate for nucleotide excision-repair in a cell-free system. Extracts from normal human cells, but not extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum cells, catalyzed repair synthesis in this DNA. The repair defect in the latter extracts could be specifically corrected by in vitro complementation. The data suggest that accumulation of endogenous oxidative damage in cellular DNA from xeroderma pigmentosum patients contributes to the increased frequency of internal cancers and the neural degeneration occurring in serious cases of the syndrome.

  6. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

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    Apurva Barve

    Full Text Available Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  7. TFIIH subunit alterations causing xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy specifically disturb several steps during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amita; Compe, Emanuel; Le May, Nicolas; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and GTF2H5 (p8 or TTD-A) subunits of the transcription and DNA-repair factor TFIIH lead to three autosomal-recessive disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP associated with Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). Although these diseases were originally associated with defects in DNA repair, transcription deficiencies might be also implicated. By using retinoic acid receptor beta isoform 2 (RARB2) as a model in several cells bearing mutations in genes encoding TFIIH subunits, we observed that (1) the recruitment of the TFIIH complex was altered at the activated RARB2 promoter, (2) TFIIH participated in the recruitment of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors during transcription in a manner different from that observed during NER, and (3) the different TFIIH variants disturbed transcription by having distinct consequences on post-translational modifications of histones, DNA-break induction, DNA demethylation, and gene-loop formation. The transition from heterochromatin to euchromatin was disrupted depending on the variant, illustrating the fact that TFIIH, by contributing to NER factor recruitment, orchestrates chromatin remodeling. The subtle transcriptional differences found between various TFIIH variants thus participate in the phenotypic variability observed among XP, XP/CS, and TTD individuals.

  8. Dynamic two-stage mechanism of versatile DNA damage recognition by xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Flurina C.; Camenisch, Ulrike; Fei, Jia; Kaczmarek, Nina; Mathieu, Nadine [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zuerich-Vetsuisse, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Naegeli, Hanspeter, E-mail: naegelih@vetpharm.uzh.ch [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zuerich-Vetsuisse, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-03-01

    The recognition and subsequent repair of DNA damage are essential reactions for the maintenance of genome stability. A key general sensor of DNA lesions is xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein, which recognizes a wide variety of helix-distorting DNA adducts arising from ultraviolet (UV) radiation, genotoxic chemicals and reactive metabolic byproducts. By detecting damaged DNA sites, this unique molecular sensor initiates the global genome repair (GGR) pathway, which allows for the removal of all the aforementioned lesions by a limited repertoire of excision factors. A faulty GGR activity causes the accumulation of DNA adducts leading to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, neurological degeneration and other traits of premature aging. Recent findings indicate that XPC protein achieves its extraordinary substrate versatility by an entirely indirect readout strategy implemented in two clearly discernible stages. First, the XPC subunit uses a dynamic sensor interface to monitor the double helix for the presence of non-hydrogen-bonded bases. This initial screening generates a transient nucleoprotein intermediate that subsequently matures into the ultimate recognition complex by trapping undamaged nucleotides in the abnormally oscillating native strand, in a way that no direct contacts are made between XPC protein and the offending lesion itself. It remains to be elucidated how accessory factors like Rad23B, centrin-2 or the UV-damaged DNA-binding complex contribute to this dynamic two-stage quality control process.

  9. Pellagra-like condition is xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome complex and niacin confers clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, H; Salih, M A; Hamad, M H A; Hassan, H H; Salih, S B M; Mohamed, K A; Mukhtar, M M; Karrar, Z A; Ansari, S; Ibrahim, N; Alkuraya, F S

    2015-01-01

    An extremely rare pellagra-like condition has been described, which was partially responsive to niacin and associated with a multisystem involvement. The condition was proposed to represent a novel autosomal recessive entity but the underlying mutation remained unknown for almost three decades. The objective of this study was to identify the causal mutation in the pellagra-like condition and investigate the mechanism by which niacin confers clinical benefit. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing were used to identify the causal mutation, and comet assay on patient fibroblasts before and after niacin treatment to assess its effect on DNA damage. We identified a single disease locus that harbors a novel mutation in ERCC5, thus confirming that the condition is in fact xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) complex. Importantly, we also show that the previously described dermatological response to niacin is consistent with a dramatic protective effect against ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in patient fibroblasts conferred by niacin treatment. Our findings show the power of exome sequencing in reassigning previously described novel clinical entities, and suggest a mechanism for the dermatological response to niacin in patients with XP/CS complex. This raises interesting possibilities about the potential therapeutic use of niacin in XP.

  10. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Miyata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  11. Genetic Correction of Stem Cells in the Treatment of Inherited Diseases and Focus on Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  12. Development of effective skin cancer treatment and prevention in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W Clark; Lambert, Muriel W

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively transmitted genetic disease characterized by increasingly marked dyspigmentation and xerosis (dryness) of sun-exposed tissues, especially skin. Skin cancers characteristically develop in sun-exposed sites at very much earlier ages than in the general population; these are often multiple and hundreds or even thousands may develop. Eight complementation groups have been identified. Seven groups, XP-A…G, are associated with defective genes encoding proteins involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway that recognizes and excises mutagenic changes induced in DNA by sunlight; the eighth group, XP-V, is associated with defective translesion synthesis (TLS) bypassing such alterations. The dyspigmentation, xerosis and eventually carcinogenesis in XP patients appear to be due to their cells' failure to respond properly to these mutagenic DNA alterations, leading to mutations in skin cells. A subset of cases, especially those in some complementation groups, may develop neurological degeneration, which may be severe. However, in most XP patients, in the past the multiple skin cancers have led to death at an early age due to either metastases or sepsis. Using either topical 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod, we have developed a protocol that effectively prevents most skin cancer development in XP patients. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Malfunction of nuclease ERCC1-XPF results in diverse clinical manifestations and causes Cockayne syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Kazuya; Nakazawa, Yuka; Pilz, Daniela T; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sasaki, Kensaku; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan F; Lewin, Susan O; Carr, Lucinda; Li, Tao-Sheng; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Utani, Atsushi; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Greenblatt, Danielle; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; McGibbon, David; Sarkany, Robert; Fassihi, Hiva; Takahashi, Yoshito; Nagayama, Yuji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Lehmann, Alan R; Ogi, Tomoo

    2013-05-02

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a genetic disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and photodermatosis resulting from the lack of transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, which is responsible for the removal of photodamage from actively transcribed genes. To date, all identified causative mutations for CS have been in the two known CS-associated genes, ERCC8 (CSA) and ERCC6 (CSB). For the rare combined xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS phenotype, all identified mutations are in three of the XP-associated genes, ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and ERCC5 (XPG). In a previous report, we identified several CS cases who did not have mutations in any of these genes. In this paper, we describe three CS individuals deficient in ERCC1 or ERCC4 (XPF). Remarkably, one of these individuals with XP complementation group F (XP-F) had clinical features of three different DNA-repair disorders--CS, XP, and Fanconi anemia (FA). Our results, together with those from Bogliolo et al., who describe XPF alterations resulting in FA alone, indicate a multifunctional role for XPF. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Basaloid squamous carcinoma of skin associated with xeroderma pigmentosum in an 8-year-old child: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashnin Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with hypersensitivity to ultraviolet (UV light, due to defects in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA repair. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with XP are at increased risk of developing cutaneous malignancy and are commonly associated with squamous carcinoma. We report an extremely rare case of 8-year-old child with XP along with basaloidsquamous carcinoma of skin; and review of literature related to it.

  15. Xeroderma Pigmentosum-Trichothiodystrophy overlap patient with novel XPD/ERCC2 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralund, Henrik H.; Ousager, Lilian; Jaspers, Nicolaas G.; Raams, Anja; Pedersen, Erling B.; Gade, Else; Bygum, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP), Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) and Cockayne Syndrome (CS) are rare, recessive disorders caused by mutational defects in the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) pathway and/or disruption of basic cellular DNA transcription. To date, a multitude of mutations in the XPD/ERCC2 gene have been described, many of which give rise to NER- and DNA transcription related diseases, which share certain diagnostic features and few overlap patients have been described. Despite increasing understanding of the roles of XPD/ERCC2 in mammalian cells, there is still weak predictability of somatic outcome from many of these mutations. We demonstrate a patient, believed to represent an overlap between XP and TTD/CS. In addition to other organ dysfunctions, the young man presented with Photosensitivity, Ichthyosis, Brittle hair, Impaired physical and mental development, Decreased fertility and Short stature (PIBIDS) suggestive of TTD, but lacking the almost patognomonic “tiger tail” banding of the hair under polarized light. Additionally, he developed basal cell carcinoma aged 28, as well as adult onset kidney failure, features normally not associated with TTD but rather XP/CS. His freckled appearance also suggested XP, but fibroblast cultures only demonstrated x2 UV-sensitivity with expected NER and TFIIH-activity decrease. Genetic sequencing of the XPD/ERCC2 gene established the patient as heterozygote compound with a novel, N-terminal Y18H mutation and a known C-terminal (TTD) mutation, A725P. The possible interplay between gene products and the patient phenotype is discussed. PMID:25002996

  16. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M. S.; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R.; Sarkany, Robert P. E.; Lehmann, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  17. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlanti, Eleonora [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Zijno, Andrea; D’Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sanchez, Massimo [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, Paola [Department of Technology and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Falchi, Mario [National AIDS Center, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Dogliotti, Eugenia, E-mail: dogliotti@iss.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Increased levels and different types of intracellular radical species as well as an altered glutathione redox state characterize XP-A human cells when compared to normal. • A more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels are associated with alteration of mitochondrial morphology and response to mitochondrial toxicants when XPA is defective. • XP-A human cells show increased spontaneous micronuclei frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O{sub 2−}· and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a

  18. A 3' --> 5' XPB helicase defect in repair/transcription factor TFIIH of xeroderma pigmentosum group B affects both DNA repair and transcription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Hwang; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); T. Seroz; H. van Vuuren; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractXPB is a subunit of the basal transcription factor TFIIH, which is also involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and potentially in cell cycle regulation. A frameshift mutation in the 3'-end of the XPB gene is responsible for a concurrence of two disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  19. Homozygous R788W point mutation in the XPF gene of a patient with Xeroderma pigmentosum and late-onset neurologic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbers, AM; Vader, PCV; Snoek, JW; Raams, A; Jaspers, NGJ; Kleijer, WJ

    1998-01-01

    The second Caucasian xeroderma pigmentosum patient (XP42RO) belonging to complementation group F (XP-F) is described, Mild ocular photophobia was present from childhood, and acute skin reactions occurred upon exposure to sunlight. Basal and squamous cell carcinomas developed after his twenty-seventh

  20. Microinjection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease restores UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.R. de Jonge; W. Vermeulen (Wim); W. Keijzer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured cells of excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A through I was assayed after injection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease using glass microneedles. In all complementation groups a restoration of

  1. Establishment and characterization of melanoma cell line from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient: activation of N-ras at a potential pyrimidine dimer site.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Keijzer; M.P. Mulder; J.C.M. Langeveld; E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); J.L. Bos; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractPatients suffering from the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) display an extreme sensitivity of their skin to sun (UV) exposure and predisposition to skin cancer due to deficiencies in the excision DNA repair pathway. Here we describe the establishment and characterization of t

  2. Enzyme therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum: safety and efficacy testing of T4N5 liposome lotion containing a prokaryotic DNA repair enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarosh, D; Klein, J; Kibitel, J; Alas, L; O'Connor, A; Cummings, B; Grob, D; Gerstein, D; Gilchrest, B A; Ichihashi, M; Ogoshi, M; Ueda, M; Fernandez, V; Chadwick, C; Potten, C S; Proby, C M; Young, A R; Hawk, J L

    1996-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic disease in which patients are defective in DNA repair and are extremely sensitive to solar UV radiation exposure. A new treatment approach was tested in these patients, in which a prokaryotic DNA repair enzyme specific for UV-induced DNA damage was delivered into the skin by means of topically applied liposomes to supplement the deficient activity. Acute and chronic safety testing in both mice and humans showed neither adverse reactions nor significant changes in serum chemistry or in skin histology. The skin of XP patients treated with the DNA repair liposomes had fewer cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers in DNA and showed less erythema than did control sites. The results encourage further clinical testing of this new enzyme therapy approach.

  3. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Perspective from the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Rongxuan; Sethi, Mieran; Morley, Ana M S

    2017-05-26

    To document the ocular manifestations of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), presenting via the United Kingdom (UK) XP service, and to analyze the correlations between XP genotype and ophthalmic phenotype. Prospective observational case series. Eighty-nine patients seen by the UK Nationally Commissioned XP Service, from April 2010 to December 2014, with a genetically confirmed diagnosis of XP. Patients underwent a full ophthalmic examination at each visit. Clinical features from both eyes were recorded on a standard proforma. The most recent assessments were analyzed. A 2-tailed Fisher exact test was used to assess for differences in ocular features between patients in XP subgroups with impaired transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) (category 1: XP-A, B, D, F, and G) and preserved TC-NER (category 2: XP-C, E, and V). Lid and periocular abnormalities, ocular surface pathologies, neuro-ophthalmologic abnormalities, lens and retinal abnormalities, and visual acuity (VA). Ninety-three percent of XP patients in our cohort had ocular involvement, with 65% describing photophobia. The most common abnormalities were in the periocular skin and ocular surface, including interpalpebral conjunctival melanosis (44%) and conjunctival injection (43%). Eleven percent of patients had required treatment for periocular cancers and 2% for ocular surface cancers. The most common neuro-ophthalmologic finding was minimal pupillary reaction to light (25%). Patients in category 2 had significantly more ocular surface abnormalities than patients in category 1, including a greater proportion of conjunctival injection (P = 0.003), conjunctival corkscrew vessels (P surface signs related to XP, before any formal diagnosis of XP was made. A large proportion of XP patients have ocular involvement. Regular examination by an ophthalmologist is essential, especially in screening for eyelid and ocular surface tumors. The ocular phenotype-genotype segregation within XP patients suggests

  4. Contribution of DNA Repair Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Genotypes to Colorectal Cancer Risk in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Yueh, Te-Cheng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Ji, Hong-Xue; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Wang, Shou-Cheng; Lai, Yi-Liang; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsieh, Ming-Hao; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Hung, Yi-Wen; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Bau, Da-Tian

    2016-04-01

    It has been previously proposed that genetic variations on DNA repair genes confer susceptibility to cancer and the DNA repair gene Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D (XPD) is thought to play the role of a helicase during excision repair and transcription. We investigated three genotypes of XPD, at promoter -114 (rs3810366), Asp312Asn (rs1799793) and Lys751Gln (rs13181), regarding their association with colorectal cancer susceptibility in a Taiwanese population. In total, 362 patients with colorectal cancer and 362 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and their XPD genotypes' association with colorectal cancer risk was investigated. The genotypes of XPD Asp312Asn (p=0.2493), Lys751Gln (p=0.7547) and promoter -114 (p=0.8702), were not associated with susceptibility for colorectal cancer. The Chi-square test revealed that the variant alleles of XPD Asp312Asn, Lys751Gln and promoter -114 was not associated with susceptibility for colorectal cancer either [p=0.1330, 0.3888 and 0.8740; odds ratio (OR)=1.20, 0.83 and 0.98; 95% confidence interval (95%CI)=0.95-1.52, 0.54-1.27 and 0.80-1.21, respectively]. The risk of A/G and A/A genotypes have no association with cancer risk among non-alcohol drinkers (OR=1.24, 95%, CI=0.90-1.72, p=0.2103) or alcohol drinkers (OR=1.51, 95% CI=0.64-3.55, p=0.4648). There exists no obvious contribution of XPD genotypes to tumor size (p=0.3531), location (p=0.3006) and lymph node metastasis (p=0.1061). Asp312Asn, Lys751Gln and promoter -114 of the XPD gene were not found to be adequate predictive markers for colorectal cancer risk in Taiwan. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Vismodegib Therapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma in an 8-Year-Old Chinese Boy with Xeroderma Pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Douglas; Laitinen, Marko A; Myers, David J; Landsteiner, Pamela B

    2017-03-01

    Vismodegib is an oral inhibitor of the Hedgehog signaling pathway and has been used to treat basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in adults. This article reports clearance of a nodular BCC of the nasal tip in an 8-year-old boy with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). BCC can pose therapeutic challenges when located in areas that are not amenable to traditional therapies such as Mohs micrographic surgery or topical agents. Vismodegib was used at a dose of 150 mg/day to treat the boy's BCC. After 4 months of therapy, we achieved complete clinical clearance. During 21 months of follow-up, the patient's nose remained clinically clear of tumor. Vismodegib was successfully used to treat a child with XP and nodular BCC. Our goal in using vismodegib was tumor regression while avoiding cosmetic and functional disfigurement. Vismodegib was effective in clinically clearing the tumor, and the patient has shown no signs of recurrence. Further studies are warranted.

  6. The rem Mutations in the ATP-Binding Groove of the Rad3/XPD Helicase Lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome-Like Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelone, Beth A.; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease. PMID:25500814

  7. Anestesia em paciente com Xeroderma Pigmentoso: relato de caso Anestesia en paciente con Xeroderma Pigmentoso: relato de caso Anesthesia in patient with Xeroderma Pigmentosum: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Rogério Degrandi Oliveira; Luciana Elias; Ana Cláudia de Melo Barros; Diogo Brüggemann da Conceição

    2003-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O Xeroderma Pigmentoso é uma doença autossômica recessiva rara, caracterizada pelo desenvolvimento prematuro de neoplasias devido à extrema sensibilidade à radiação ultravioleta. Estas manifestações ocorrem por falha no mecanismo de excisão e reparo do DNA. Se comparados a indivíduos normais, estes pacientes apresentam risco 1000 vezes maior de desenvolver neoplasias em áreas expostas ao sol. O objetivo deste relato é apresentar a conduta anestésica em uma paciente ...

  8. Molecular and cellular analysis of the DNA repair defect in a patient in Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D who has the clinical features of Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broughton, B.C.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A.; Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F.; Lehmann, A.R. [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Vermeulen, W.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (United Kingdom); Botta, E.; Stefanini, M. [Istituto di Genetica, Pavia (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are quite distinct genetic disorders that are associated with defects in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. A few patients have been described previously with the clinical features of both disorders. In this paper we describe an individual in this category who has unusual cellular responses to UV light. We show that his cultured fibroblasts and lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to irradiation with UV-C, despite a level of nucleotide excision repair that is 30%-40% that of normal cells. The deficiency is assigned to the XP-D complementation group, and we have identified two causative mutations in the XPD gene: a gly{yields}arg change at amino acid 675 in the allele inherited from the patient`s mother and a -1 frameshift at amino acid 669 in the allele inherited from his father. These mutations are in the C-terminal 20% of the 760-amino-acid XPD protein, in a region where we have recently identified several mutations in patients with trichothiodystrophy. 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test; Phenotypage de la reparation de l'ADN de lignees Xeroderma pigmentosum, par un test in vitro multiparametrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-15

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  10. Xeroderma Pigmentosum with Severe Neurological Manifestations/De Sanctis–Cacchione Syndrome and a Novel XPC Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Uribe-Bojanini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several genetic disorders caused by defective nucleotide excision repair that affect the skin and the nervous system have been described, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP, De Sanctis–Cacchione syndrome (DSC, Cockayne syndrome, and Trichothiodystrophy. Cutaneous photosensitivity with an increased risk of skin malignancy is a common feature of these disorders, but clinical manifestations commonly overlap these syndromes. Several genes have been found to be altered in these pathologies, but we lack more genotype-phenotype correlations in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Very few cases of DSC syndrome have been reported in the literature. We present a case of a 12-year-old Colombian male, with multiple skin lesions in sun-exposed areas from the age of 3 months and a history of 15 skin cancers. He also displayed severe neurologic abnormalities (intellectual disability, ataxia, altered speech, and hyperreflexia, short stature, and microcephaly, which are features associated with DSC. Genetic testing revealed a novel germline mutation in the XP-C gene (c.547A>T. This is the first case of an XP-C mutation causing De Sanctis–Cacchione syndrome. Multigene panel testing is becoming more widely available and accessible in the clinical setting and will help rapidly unveil the molecular etiology of these rare genetic disorders.

  11. Conformational effects of a common codon 751 polymorphism on the C-terminal domain of the xeroderma pigmentosum D protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Regina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD protein is a DNA helicase involved in the repair of DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR. The C-terminal domain of XPD has been implicated in interactions with other components of the TFIIH complex, and it is also the site of a common genetic polymorphism in XPD at amino acid residue 751 (Lys->Gln. Some evidence suggests that this polymorphism may alter DNA repair capacity and increase cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects could be attributable to conformational changes in XPD induced by the polymorphism. Materials and Methods: Molecular dynamics techniques were used to predict the structure of the wild-type and polymorphic forms of the C-terminal domain of XPD and differences in structure produced by the polymorphic substitution were determined. Results: The results indicate that, although the general configuration of both proteins is similar, the substitution produces a significant conformational change immediately N-terminal to the site of the polymorphism. Conclusion: These results provide support for the hypothesis that this polymorphism in XPD could affect DNA repair capability, and hence cancer risk, by altering the structure of the C-terminal domain.

  12. The Cerebro-Morphological Fingerprint of a Progeroid Syndrome: White Matter Changes Correlate with Neurological Symptoms in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassubek, Jan; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Pinkhardt, Elmar H.; Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Ludolph, Albert C.; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes), in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy (1H MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, 1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. Conclusions The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients. PMID:22363517

  13. The cerebro-morphological fingerprint of a progeroid syndrome: white matter changes correlate with neurological symptoms in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kassubek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes, in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy ((1H MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, (1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. CONCLUSIONS: The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients.

  14. A Founder Large Deletion Mutation in Xeroderma Pigmentosum-Variant Form in Tunisia: Implication for Molecular Diagnosis and Therapy

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    Mariem Ben Rekaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum Variant (XP-V form is characterized by a late onset of skin symptoms. Our aim is the clinical and genetic investigations of XP-V Tunisian patients in order to develop a simple tool for early diagnosis. We investigated 16 suspected XP patients belonging to ten consanguineous families. Analysis of the POLH gene was performed by linkage analysis, long range PCR, and sequencing. Genetic analysis showed linkage to the POLH gene with a founder haplotype in all affected patients. Long range PCR of exon 9 to exon 11 showed a 3926 bp deletion compared to control individuals. Sequence analysis demonstrates that this deletion has occurred between two Alu-Sq2 repetitive sequences in the same orientation, respectively, in introns 9 and 10. We suggest that this mutation POLH NG_009252.1: g.36847_40771del3925 is caused by an equal crossover event that occurred between two homologous chromosomes at meiosis. These results allowed us to develop a simple test based on a simple PCR in order to screen suspected XP-V patients. In Tunisia, the prevalence of XP-V group seems to be underestimated and clinical diagnosis is usually later. Cascade screening of this founder mutation by PCR in regions with high frequency of XP provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of XP-V in Tunisia and North Africa.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum group D 751 polymorphism as a predictive factor in resected gastric cancer treated with chemo-radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RN Zárate R; F Arias; E Bandres; E Cubedo; R Malumbres; J García-Foncillas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the potential association of xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) codon 751 variant with outcome after chemo-radiotherapy in patients with resected gastric cancer.METHODS: We used PCR-RFLP to evaluate the genetic XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms in 44 patients with stage Ⅲ (48%) and Ⅳ (20%) gastric cancer treated with surgery following radiation therapy plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin based chemotherapy.RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed that 75% (12 of 16) of relapse patients showed Lys/Lys genotype more frequently (P = 0.042). The Lys polymorphism was an independent predictor of high-risk relapse-free survival from Cox analysis (HR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.07-8.78, P =0.036) and Kaplan-Meir test (P = 0.027, log-rank test).CONCLUSION: XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism may be an important marker in the prediction of clinical outcome to chemo-radiotherapy in resected gastric cancer patients.

  16. Xeroderma Pigmentosum with Severe Neurological Manifestations/De Sanctis–Cacchione Syndrome and a Novel XPC Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Quiceno, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Several genetic disorders caused by defective nucleotide excision repair that affect the skin and the nervous system have been described, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP), De Sanctis–Cacchione syndrome (DSC), Cockayne syndrome, and Trichothiodystrophy. Cutaneous photosensitivity with an increased risk of skin malignancy is a common feature of these disorders, but clinical manifestations commonly overlap these syndromes. Several genes have been found to be altered in these pathologies, but we lack more genotype-phenotype correlations in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Very few cases of DSC syndrome have been reported in the literature. We present a case of a 12-year-old Colombian male, with multiple skin lesions in sun-exposed areas from the age of 3 months and a history of 15 skin cancers. He also displayed severe neurologic abnormalities (intellectual disability, ataxia, altered speech, and hyperreflexia), short stature, and microcephaly, which are features associated with DSC. Genetic testing revealed a novel germline mutation in the XP-C gene (c.547A>T). This is the first case of an XP-C mutation causing De Sanctis–Cacchione syndrome. Multigene panel testing is becoming more widely available and accessible in the clinical setting and will help rapidly unveil the molecular etiology of these rare genetic disorders. PMID:28255305

  17. Irradiation with ultraviolet light and gamma-rays increases the level of DNA topoisomerase II in nuclei of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielmann, H W; Popanda, O

    1998-02-01

    DNA topoisomerase II was monitored with the monoclonal antibody Ki-S1 in human fibroblasts after irradiation of cells with 254-nm UV light and -rays from a 137Cs source. DNA topoisomerase II was localized immunohistochemically as bright fluorescent dots in the karyoplasm. Investigated fibroblasts originated from normal human donors and a xeroderma pigmentosum patient (XP12BE). All cell lines showed a time and dose-dependent increase in DNA topoisomerase II abundance after irradiation. The increase may reflect enhanced accessibility of the enzyme, enhanced gene expression or enhanced stabilization of mRNA or protein molecules. The effect was detectable as early as 1 h after irradiation at doses 3 J/m2 or 3 Gy. It passed through a maximum and decreased within 18 h (UV light) or 6 h ( -rays). Except for the duration of the response, no principal differences were seen between the effects caused by UV light and those elicited by -rays. The increase in enzyme levels might be part of the well-known DNA damage responses which operate in cell-protective or DNA-reparative pathways or may reflect initiation of apoptosis. DNA topoisomerase I was detected with a commercially available polyclonal antibody raised against human DNA topoisomerase I. In unirradiated cells, DNA topoisomerase I was found to be mainly concentrated in nucleoli. Irradiation with -rays changed the staining pattern in that it caused a multitude of DNA topoisomerase I-rich centers to occur which may reflect sites of transcription of radiation-inducible genes.

  18. A criocirurgia como tratamento alternativo do xerodema pigmentoso = The criosurgery as alternative treatment of xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A criocirurgia consiste em tratar lesões patológicas da pele e mucosas pelo congelamento intenso da área afetada. Sua indicação deve obedecer a critérios de avaliação, como o aspecto macroscópico da lesão, tamanho, tipo histológico, localização e idade do paciente, sendo indicado para o tratamento das lesões provenientes do Xeroderma Pigmentoso (XP. O objetivo do presente estudo é instituir a experiência dos autores quanto ao uso da criocirurgia no tratamento de 12 pacientes com lesões em pele e mucosa da região da cabeça e pescoço associadas ao XP, em um período de 25 anos, discutindo suas aplicações e aspectos de sucesso e insucesso. Durante o período de abril de 1977 a abril de 2002 (25 anos, foram tratados pela criocirurgia, no Centro de Oncologia (CEON do Hospital Universitário Oswaldo Cruz (HUOC – Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE, Departamento de Cabeça e Pescoço – Hospital de Câncer de Pernambuco e na clínica privada de um dos autores, 1900 (mil e novecentos casos de pacientes portadores de lesões benignas e malignas da pele e mucosa na região de cabeça e pescoço, dos quais 12 pacientes (0,7% eram portadores de XP. Do total da amostra, 66,6% eram do sexo masculino e todos os casos ocorreram na 1ª e 2ª décadas de vida. A criocirurgia constitui-se um excelente método alternativo de tratamento para as lesões de pele e mucosa decorrentes do XP, sempre que indicada de maneira criteriosa

  19. Different removal of ultraviolet photoproducts in genetically related xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Eveno; F. Bourre; X. Quilliet; O. Chevalier-Lagente (Odile); L. Roza (Len); A.P.M. Eker (André); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); O. Nikaido; M. Stefanini (Miria); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.E. Cleaver; A. Sarasin; M. Mezzina

    1995-01-01

    textabstractTo understand the heterogeneity in genetic predisposition to skin cancer in different nucleotide excision repair-deficient human syndromes, we studied repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and of pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone (6-4PP) photoproducts in cells from trichothiodystrophy (

  20. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in xeroderma pigmentosum cells after microinjection of yeast photoreactivating enzyme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); A.P.M. Eker (André); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractPhotoreactivating enzyme (PRE) from yeast causes a light-dependent reduction of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) when injected into the cytoplasm of repair-proficieint human fibroblasts (Zwetsloot et al., 1985). This result indicates that the exogenous PRE monomerizers UV-induc

  1. Understanding Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... afternoon hours— a time of day when your shadow is much longer than your height. When XP ... such as zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, sun-blocking makeup, or sun- screens. Sunscreens with a sun protec- ...

  2. The Promoting Effects of Xeroderma Pigmentosum D Gene on Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelia Cells%人剪切修复基因着色性干皮病基因D对人脐静脉内皮细胞的促凋亡作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张南; 李菊香; 丁浩; 洪葵; 吴清华; 程晓曙

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate pro-apoptosis effects of xeroderma pigmentosum D( XPD) gene on human umbilical vein endothelia cells ( HUVEC). Methods Recombinant plasmid pEGFP-N2/XPD and vacant vector plasmid pEGFP-N2 were transient transfected into HUVEC by lipoaome 2000 method,with the same genetic background and algebra HUVEC as blank controls. The experiments were divided into three groups; control group, pEGFP-N2 group and pEGFP-N2/XPD group. The expression of green fluorescent protein was observed through fluorescence microscopy; the cell apop-losis rate was examined by flow cylometry; through RT-PCR and Western Blot, the expression levels of XPD,Bcl-2 and Bax and wt-p53 were detected jthe cell growth was detected by MTT. Results Green fluorescences were observed in the cells transfected with pEGFP-N2/XPD or pEGFP-N2, indicating that the plasmids were transfected successfully. Flow cy-tometry results showed that overexpression of XPD increased the apoptosic rate of HUVEC (P < 0.05 or P < 0. 01). RT-PCR results and Western Blot results showed that the transfection of pEGFP-N2/XPD increased the expression of XPD,Bax and wt-p53 (P < 0. 05), decreased the expression of Bcl-2 (P < 0.05); MTT results showed thai the transfection of pEG-FP-N2/XPD inhibited the cell growth( P <0. 05). Conclusions XPD gene can promote HUVEC apoptosis. Therefore , down-regulaling the expression of XPD gene is likely to be potential molecular target for treatment of atherosclerosis.%目的 探讨人剪切修复基因着色性干皮病基因D(XPD)对人脐静脉内皮细胞(HUVEC)的促凋亡作用.方法 用脂质体转染法瞬时转染HUVEC,转染重组质粒pEGFP-N2/XPD和空载质粒pEGFP-N2,并用未转染的与重组质粒pEGFP-N2/XPD和空载质粒pEGFP-N2具有相同遗传背景和代数的HUVEC作为空白对照.实验分为3组;正常对照组、pEGFP-N2组和pEGFP-N2/XPD组.用荧光显微镜观察绿色荧光蛋白报告基因表达情况,用流式细胞仪检测细

  3. Evidence that in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, which lack DNA polymerase eta, DNA polymerase iota causes the very high frequency and unique spectrum of UV-induced mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Woodgate, Roger; McManus, Terrence P; Mead, Samantha; McCormick, J Justin; Maher, Veronica M

    2007-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients have normal DNA excision repair, yet are predisposed to develop sunlight-induced cancer. They exhibit a 25-fold higher than normal frequency of UV-induced mutations and very unusual kinds (spectrum), mainly transversions. The primary defect in XPV cells is the lack of functional DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase that readily inserts adenine nucleotides opposite photoproducts involving thymine. The high frequency and striking difference in kinds of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells strongly suggest that, in the absence of Pol eta, an abnormally error-prone polymerase substitutes. In vitro replication studies of Pol iota show that it replicates past 5'T-T3' and 5'T-U3' cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, incorporating G or T nucleotides opposite the 3' nucleotide. To test the hypothesis that Pol iota causes the high frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells, we identified an unlimited lifespan XPV cell line expressing two forms of Pol iota, whose frequency of UV-induced mutations is twice that of XPV cells expressing one form. We eliminated expression of one form and compared the parental cells and derivatives for the frequency and kinds of UV-induced mutations. All exhibited similar sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of UV((254 nm)), and the kinds of mutations induced were identical, but the frequency of mutations induced in the derivatives was reduced to UV-induced mutations, and ultimately their malignant transformation.

  4. XPC branch-point sequence mutations disrupt U2 snRNP binding, resulting in abnormal pre-mRNA splicing in xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sikandar G; Yamanegi, Koji; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Boyle, Jennifer; Imoto, Kyoko; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Baker, Carl C; Gozukara, Engin; Metin, Ahmet; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in two branch-point sequences (BPS) in intron 3 of the XPC DNA repair gene affect pre-mRNA splicing in association with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) with many skin cancers (XP101TMA) or no skin cancer (XP72TMA), respectively. To investigate the mechanism of these abnormalities we now report that transfection of minigenes with these mutations revealed abnormal XPC pre-mRNA splicing that mimicked pre-mRNA splicing in the patients' cells. DNA oligonucleotide-directed RNase H digestion demonstrated that mutations in these BPS disrupt U2 snRNP-BPS interaction. XP101TMA cells had no detectable XPC protein but XP72TMA had 29% of normal levels. A small amount of XPC protein was detected at sites of localized ultraviolet (UV)-damaged DNA in XP72TMA cells which then recruited other nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins. In contrast, XP101TMA cells had no detectable recruitment of XPC or other NER proteins. Post-UV survival and photoproduct assays revealed greater reduction in DNA repair in XP101TMA cells than in XP72TMA. Thus mutations in XPC BPS resulted in disruption of U2 snRNP-BPS interaction leading to abnormal pre-mRNA splicing and reduced XPC protein. At the cellular level these changes were associated with features of reduced DNA repair including diminished NER protein recruitment, reduced post-UV survival and impaired photoproduct removal.

  5. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  6. Checkpoint Kinase ATR Promotes Nucleotide Excision Repair of UV-induced DNA Damage via Physical Interaction with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Steven M.; Li, Zhengke; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Brosey, Chris; Serrano, Moises A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Musich, Phillip R.; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, eukaryotic cells activate a series of DNA damage-dependent pathways that serve to arrest cell cycle progression and remove DNA damage. Coordination of cell cycle arrest and damage repair is critical for maintenance of genomic stability. However, this process is still poorly understood. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the ATR-dependent cell cycle checkpoint are the major pathways responsible for repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Here we show that ATR physically interacts with the NER factor Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). Using a mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting method, we found that ATR interacts with a helix-turn-helix motif in the minimal DNA-binding domain of XPA where an ATR phosphorylation site (serine 196) is located. XPA-deficient cells complemented with XPA containing a point mutation of S196A displayed a reduced repair efficiency of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers as compared with cells complemented with wild-type XPA, although no effect was observed for repair of (6-4) photoproducts. This suggests that the ATR-dependent phosphorylation of XPA may promote NER repair of persistent DNA damage. In addition, a K188A point mutation of XPA that disrupts the ATR-XPA interaction inhibits the nuclear import of XPA after UV irradiation and, thus, significantly reduced DNA repair efficiency. By contrast, the S196A mutation has no effect on XPA nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that the ATR-XPA interaction mediated by the helix-turn-helix motif of XPA plays an important role in DNA-damage responses to promote cell survival and genomic stability after UV irradiation. PMID:19586908

  7. A YAC contig spanning the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Fanconi anaemia group C, and xeroderma pigmentosum group A loci on chromosome 9q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.J.; Reis, A. [Freie Universtiaet, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin syndrome) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized primarily by multiple basal cell carcinomas, epithelium-lined jaw cysts, and palmar and plantar pits, as well as various other features. Loss of heterozygosity studies and linkage analysis have mapped the NBCCS gene to chromosome 9q and suggested that it is a tumor suppressor. The apparent sensitivity of NBCCS patients to UV and X-irradiation raises the possibility of hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents or defective DNA repair being etiological in the disorder. The recent mapping of the Fanconi anaemia group C (FACC) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementing group A (XPAC) genes to the same region on 9q has led us to begin the molecular dissection of the 9q22-q31 region. PCR analysis of the presence or absence of 10 microsatellite markers and exons 3 and 4 of the XPAC and FACC genes, respectively, allowed us to order 12 YACs into an overlapping contig and to order the markers as follows: D9S151/D9S12P1-D9S12P2-D9S197-D9S196-D9S280-FACC-D9S287/XPAC-D9S180-D9S6-D9S176. Sizing of the YACs has provided an initial estimate of the size of the NBCCS candidate region between D9S12 and D9S180 to be less than 1.65 Mb. 45 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Whole-exome sequencing of fibroblast and its iPS cell lines derived from a patient diagnosed with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Okamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells from a patient with a DNA repair-deficiency disorder are anticipated to bear a large number of somatic mutations. Because such mutations occur independently in each cell, there is a high degree of mosaicism in patients' tissues. While major mutations that have been expanded in many cognate cells are readily detected by sequencing, minor ones are overlaid with a large depth of non-mutated alleles and are not detected. However, cell cloning enables us to observe such cryptic mutations as well as major mutations. In the present study, we focused on a fibroblastic cell line that is derived from a patient diagnosed with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, which is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. By making a list of somatic mutations, we can expect to see a characteristic pattern of mutations caused by the hereditary disorder. We cloned a cell by generating an iPS cell line and performed a whole-exome sequencing analysis of the progenitor and its iPS cell lines. Unexpectedly, we failed to find causal mutations in the XP-related genes, but we identified many other mutations including homozygous deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, we found that the long arm of chromosome 9 formed uniparental disomy in the iPS cell line, which was also confirmed by a structural mutation analysis using a SNP array. Type and number of somatic mutations were different from those observed in XP patients. Taken together, we conclude that the patient might be affected by a different type of the disorder and that some of the mutations that we identified here may be responsible for exhibiting the phenotype. Sequencing and SNP-array data have been submitted to SRA and GEO under accession numbers SRP059858 and GSE55520, respectively.

  9. Remarkable induction of UV-signature mutations at the 3'-cytosine of dipyrimidine sites except at 5'-TCG-3' in the UVB-exposed skin epidermis of xeroderma pigmentosum variant model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Chang, Yumin; Yokoi, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2014-10-01

    The human POLH gene is responsible for the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V), a genetic disease highly susceptible to cancer on sun-exposed skin areas, and encodes DNA polymerase η (polη), which is specialized for translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) of UV-induced DNA photolesions. We constructed polη-deficient mice transgenic with lacZ mutational reporter genes to study the effect of Polh null mutation (Polh(-/-)) on mutagenesis in the skin after UVB irradiation. UVB induced lacZ mutations with remarkably higher frequency in the Polh(-/-) epidermis and dermis than in the wild-type (Polh(+/+)) and heterozygote. DNA sequences of a hundred lacZ mutants isolated from the epidermis of four UVB-exposed Polh(-/-) mice were determined and compared with mutant sequences from irradiated Polh(+)(/)(+) mice. The spectra of the mutations in the two genotypes were both highly UV-specific and dominated by C→T transitions at dipyrimidines, namely UV-signature mutations. However, sequence preferences of the occurrence of UV-signature mutations were quite different between the two genotypes: the mutations occurred at a higher frequency preferentially at the 5'-TCG-3' sequence context than at the other dipyrimidine contexts in the Polh(+/+) epidermis, whereas the mutations were induced remarkably and exclusively at the 3'-cytosine of almost all dipyrimidine contexts with no preference for 5'-TCG-3' in the Polh(-/-) epidermis. In addition, in Polh(-/-) mice, a small but remarkable fraction of G→T transversions was also observed exclusively at the 3'-cytosine of dipyrimidine sites, strongly suggesting that these transversions resulted not from oxidative damage but from UV photolesions. These results would reflect the characteristics of the error-prone TLS functioning in the bypass of UV photolesions in the absence of polη, which would be mediated by mechanisms based on the two-step model of TLS. On the other hand, the deamination model would explain well the mutation

  10. Immunochemical determination of an initial step in thymine dimer excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum variant fibroblasts and biopsy material from the normal population and patients with basal cell carcinoma and melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M.; Mueller, H.B.; Boyle, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody specific for u.v.-induced thymine-thymine dimers in single-stranded DNA has been used in an enzyme immunoassay to investigate the loss of antigenicity associated with repair of this lesion in the first 2 h following 10 J/m/sup 2/ 254 nm radiation. Variances of +/- 10% for the method and +/- 6.5% for individuals were established using primary cultures of biopsies from healthy individuals. No differences in the rate of loss of antigenicity was observed between 20 normal lymphocyte samples and 10 normal skin biopsies. Of three xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant cell lines tested, GM3617 could not be distinguished from normal cells but GM1227 and GM3053 showed lower rates of loss than any of the healthy samples. When the group mean values were compared there was no significant difference between normals and biopsies from sun-shielded skin areas from 16 basal cell carcinomas but similar material from 10 melanoma patients showed a significantly reduced (P = 0.001) rate of loss of antigenicity. Since the rate of loss of antigenicity in normal and XP variant cells reflected their relative abilities to perform unscheduled DNA synthesis, our results suggest that some melanoma patients may also have a minor deficiency in an early stage of excision repair.

  11. Preventive Long-Term Effects of a Topical Film-Forming Medical Device with Ultra-High UV Protection Filters and DNA Repair Enzyme in Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Retrospective Study of Eight Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Giustini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is common in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP due to a DNA repair mechanisms genetic defect. Ultraviolet (UV exposure is the main cause of increased incidence of actinic keratosis (AK, basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC observed in XP subjects. Photoprotection is therefore a mandatory strategy in order to reduce skin damage. A topical DNA repair enzyme has been shown to slow down the development of skin lesions in XP. However, there are no data regarding the effects of photoprotection combined with DNA repair strategies in this clinical setting. A film-forming medical device containing the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and very high-protection UV filters (Eryfotona AK-NMSC, Ery is currently available. We report retrospective data regarding the use of Ery in 8 patients (5 women, 3 men with a diagnosis of XP treated for at least 12 consecutive months, comparing the rate of new skin lesions (AK, BCC and SCC during active treatment with Ery and during 12 months just before the use of the product. New AK, BCC and SCC mean lesion numbers during the 1-year Ery treatment were 5, 3 and 0, respectively in comparison with 14, 6.8 and 3 lesions, respectively during the 1-year pre-treatment period. Ery use was associated with a 65% reduction in appearance of new AK lesions and with 56 and 100% reductions in the incidence of new BCC and SCC lesions, respectively. These data suggest that topical use of photoprotection and DNA repair enzyme could help lower skin cancer lesions in XP. Control prospective trials are advisable in this clinical setting.

  12. UV-stimulation of DNA-mediated transformation of human cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractIrradiation of dominant marker DNA with UV light (150 to 1,000 J/m2) was found to stimulate the transformation of human cells by this marker from two- to more than fourfold. This phenomenon is also displayed by xeroderma pigmentosum cells (complementation groups A and F), which are defic

  13. Affinity purification of human DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH using epitope-tagged xeroderma pigmentosum B protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); F. Coin (Frédéric); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a high molecular weight complex with a remarkable dual function in nucleotide excision repair and initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription. Mutations in the largest subunits, the XPB and XPD helicases, are associated with three inherited disorders: xeroder

  14. XPC and human homologs of RAD23: intracellular localization and relationship to other nucleotide excision repair complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A.P.M. Eker (André); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); C.E. Visser (Cécile); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Masutani (Chikahide); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe xeroderma pigmentosum syndrome complementation group C (XP-C) is due to a defect in the global genome repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The XPC protein is complexed with HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the yeast NER protein, RAD23 (Masutani at al. (1994)

  15. Impact of xeroderma pigmentosum group D gene polymorphism on the risk of pros-tate cancer:a Meta-analysis%人类着色性干皮病基因D基因多态性与前列腺癌易感性的 Met a分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴枫; 祝黎洁; 糜远源

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) gene polymorphism on the sus‐ceptibility of prostate cancer (PCa) .Methods All eligible studies in databases including Pubmed ,Embase ,WanFang ,CNKI and VIP were searched and data were collected .The association between XPD gene polymorphismand and risk of PCa was e‐valuated with odds ratio ( OR ) and 95% confidence intervals ( CI ) .Statistical analysis was performed with STATA 10 .0 . Results A total of 9 independent case‐control studies with 3 165 PCa patients and 3 539 healthy controls for XPD Gln751Lys SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and 2 555 cases and 3 182 controls for Asn312Asp SNP were collected .No significant as‐sociation was found between XPD Gln751Lys SNP and PCa risk .On the other hand ,in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity , associations were observed in Asian (eg .Asn vs .Asp:OR=1 .34 ,95% CI=1 .16-1 .55) and African (eg .Asn vs .Asp:OR=1 .31 ,95% CI=1 .01-1 .70) populations with Asn 312Asp SNP .Conclusion Our investigations demonstrate that XPD Asn 312Asp SNP ,instead of Gln751Lys SNP ,might increase PCa risk in Asians and Africans .%目的:评价人类着色性干皮病基因D Asn312Asp和Gln751Lys多态性位点对于前列腺癌患病风险的影响。方法检索2004年至2014年间在PubMed、Embase、万方、中国知网、维普等数据库中所有相关文献,提取其中数据进行统计学分析。以比值比和95%可信区间评价该位点与前列腺癌易感性的关系。分析软件使用STATA10.0。结果最终筛选出9项研究,分别有3165例前列腺癌患者和3539例对照人群涉及Gln751Lys基因多态性,2555例及3182例对照涉及Asn312Asp基因多态性。总体上,未发现XPD Gln751Lys基因多态性与前列腺癌易感性相关。另一方面,在种族亚组中发现Asn312Asp多态性能增加亚洲(如:Asn vs .Asp:OR=1.54,95% CI=1.24~1.91)及非洲人群(如:Asn vs

  16. Nasal prosthesis for a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Rajtilak, G.; Rajasekar, V.; Kumar, Muthu

    2013-01-01

    Acquired facial defects caused by extirpation of neoplasms, congenital malformations or traumatic injury results in a huge functional, cosmetic and psychological handicap in those patients. These defects can be restored by facial prosthesis using different materials and retention methods to achieve a lifelike appearance and function. This clinical report describes a treatment schedule using silicone nasal prosthesis, which is mechanically retained for a patient who has undergone a partial rhinectomy due to basal cell carcinoma of the nose. The prosthesis was made to restore the esthetic appearance of patient with a mechanically retained design using a spectacle glass frame without any prosthetic adhesives so that the patient is more comfortable and confident to resume daily activities. PMID:23956602

  17. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. (Universitaet, Mainz (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  18. A Human XPC Protein Interactome—A Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Lubin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER is responsible for identifying and removing bulky adducts from non-transcribed DNA that result from damaging agents such as UV radiation and cisplatin. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC is one of the essential damage recognition proteins of the GG-NER pathway and its dysfunction results in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, a disorder involving photosensitivity and a predisposition to cancer. To better understand the identification of DNA damage by XPC in the context of chromatin and the role of XPC in the pathogenesis of XP, we characterized the interactome of XPC using a high throughput yeast two-hybrid screening. Our screening showed 49 novel interactors of XPC involved in DNA repair and replication, proteolysis and post-translational modifications, transcription regulation, signal transduction, and metabolism. Importantly, we validated the XPC-OTUD4 interaction by co-IP and provided evidence that OTUD4 knockdown in human cells indeed affects the levels of ubiquitinated XPC, supporting a hypothesis that the OTUD4 deubiquitinase is involved in XPC recycling by cleaving the ubiquitin moiety. This high-throughput characterization of the XPC interactome provides a resource for future exploration and suggests that XPC may have many uncharacterized cellular functions.

  19. Expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein predicts cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tan-Chen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Cho, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chiang, I-Ping; Ho, Shu-Peng

    2011-05-01

    DNA repair has been suggested to be a major cause of spontaneous drug resistance in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADC). Among the DNA repair-related proteins, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be essential for repairing cisplatin-induced interstrand cross-linkage. However, the role of other DNA repair-related proteins in drug resistance has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis to identify the DNA repair-related genes associated with cisplatin resistance. We focused on the association of XPC protein expression, which plays a pivotal role in the earliest response to global genomic repair, with the survival of LADC patients. Using suppression subtractive hybridization and a microarray analysis to identify drug resistance-associated DNA repair-related genes, we found that the mRNA levels of ERCC1, MSH-3, MSH-6 and XPC were significantly increased in LADC patients. Since the results of ERCC1 mRNA expression corresponded well with those in previous reports, in this study we focused on the clinical correlation between XPC expression and patient survival. The level of XPC protein was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses. We detected the XPC protein in 46 (43%) of 107 pathological LADC samples. XPC protein expression correlated with tumor stage, cigarette smoking and poor survival. In the in vitro experiments with LADC cell lines, increased XPC expression was associated with elevated drug resistance, and silencing of XPC expression reduced cisplatin resistance. Our results suggest that XPC expression predicts drug resistance in LADC.

  20. Xeroderma Pigmentosum-Trichothiodystrophy overlap patient with novel XPD/ERCC2 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kralund, Henrik H; Ousager, Lilian; Jaspers, Nicolaas G

    2013-01-01

    outcome from many of these mutations. We demonstrate a patient, believed to represent an overlap between XP and TTD/CS. In addition to other organ dysfunctions, the young man presented with Photosensitivity, Ichthyosis, Brittle hair, Impaired physical and mental development, Decreased fertility and Short...

  1. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  2. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  3. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio- skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A. Raams (Anja); M.C. Silengo; N. Wijgers (Nils); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); A.R. Robinson (Andria Rasile); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two

  4. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio- skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A. Raams (Anja); M.C. Silengo; N. Wijgers (Nils); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); A.R. Robinson (Andria Rasile); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two proge

  5. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  6. Trichothiodystrophy, a human DNA repair disorder with heterogeneity in the cellular response to ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Arlett, C.F.; Broughton, B.C.; Harcourt, S.A.; Steingrimsdottir, H.; Stefanini, M.; Malcolm, A.; Taylor, R.; Natarajan, A.T.; Green, S.

    1988-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and physical retardation. Some patients are photosensitive. A previous study by Stefanini et al. showed that cells from four photosensitive patients with TTD had a molecular defect in DNA repair, which was not complemented by cells from xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D. In a detailed molecular and cellular study of the effects of UV light on cells cultured from three further TTD patients who did not exhibit photosensitivity we have found an array of different responses. In cells from the first patient, survival, excision repair, and DNA and RNA synthesis following UV irradiation were all normal, whereas in cells from the second patient all these responses were similar to those of excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (group D) cells. With the third patient, cell survival measured by colony-forming ability was normal following UV irradiation, even though repair synthesis was only 50% of normal and RNA synthesis was severely reduced. The excision-repair defect in these cells was not complemented by other TTD cell strains. These cellular characteristics of patient 3 have not been described previously for any other cell line. The normal survival may be attributed to the finding that the deficiency in excision-repair is confined to early times after irradiation. Our results pose a number of questions about the relationship between the molecular defect in DNA repair and the clinical symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum and TTD.

  7. Survey of radiosensitivity in a variety of human cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlett, C.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1980-03-01

    Gamma-ray sensitivity for cell killing was assayed in 54 human cell strains, including some derived from individuals suffering from certain hereditary diseases. The overall range of Do values in this study was 38 to 180 rads, indicating a considerable range of variability in humans. The normal sensitivity was described by a range of Do values of 97 to 180 rads. All ten ataxia telangiectasia cell strains tested proved radiosensitive and gave a mean Do value of 57 +- 15 (S.E.) rads, and these represent the most radiosensitive human skin fibroblasts currently available. Representative cell strains from familial retinoblastoma, Fanconi's anemia, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria occupied positions of intermediate sensitivity, as did one of two ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes. Six xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains together with two Cockayne's syndrome cell strains (all known to be sensitive to ultraviolet light) fell into the normal range, indicating an absence of cross-sensitivity between ultraviolet light and gamma-irradiation.

  8. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  9. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  10. Architecture of the Human and Yeast General Transcription and DNA Repair Factor TFIIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-09-03

    TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved "topological regions" that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Apigenin prevents ultraviolet-B radiation induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers formation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, S Mary; Shanthakumari, D; Agilan, B; Radhiga, T; Kanimozhi, G; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation leads to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). We investigated the protective effect of apigenin against UVB-induced CPDs formation in human dermal fibroblasts cells (HDFa). For this purpose, HDFa cells were treated with apigenin (15μM) prior to UVB irradiation (20mJ/cm(2)); DNA damage and subsequent molecular end points were observed. Exposure to UVB radiation increased significant CPDs formation in HDFa cells and the frequencies of CPDs were reduced by treatment with apigenin (15μM). UVB-induced CPDs downregulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C, B, G and F (XPC, XPB, XPG and XPF), transcription factor II human (TFIIH) and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) in HDFa cells. Conversely, apigenin treatment restored UVB-induced loss of NER proteins in HDFa cells, which indicates its preventive effect against CPDs formation. Besides, single low dose UVB-exposure induced nuclear fragmentation, apoptotic frequency and apoptotic proteins expression (Bax and Caspase-3) have been prevented by the apigenin pretreatment. Furthermore, apigenin exhibits strong UV absorbance property and showed 10.08 SPF value. Thus, apigenin can protect skin cells against UVB-induced CPDs formation probably through its sunscreen effect. Hence, apigenin can be considered as an effective protective agent against UV induced skin damages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of the Specific Interactors of the Human Lariat RNA Debranching Enzyme 1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Masaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step for gene expression. We have been analyzing post-splicing intron turnover steps in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report protein interaction between human Debranching enzyme 1 (hDbr1 and several factors found in the Intron Large (IL complex, which is an intermediate complex of the intron degradation pathway. The hDbr1 protein specifically interacts with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementeation group A (XPA-binding protein 2 (Xab2. We also attempted to identify specific interactors of hDbr1. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis identified a novel protein as one of the specific interactors of hDbr1. This protein is well conserved among many species and shows the highest similarity to yeast Drn1, so it is designated as human Dbr1 associated ribonuclease 1 (hDrn1. hDrn1 directly interacts with hDbr1 through protein–protein interaction. Furthermore, hDrn1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, as hDbr1 protein does. These findings suggest that hDrn1 has roles in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which are highly likely to involve hDbr1.

  13. Human ribosomal protein S3 interacts with DNA base excision repair proteins hAPE/Ref-1 and hOGG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vijay; Wang, Mu; Deutsch, Walter A

    2004-11-09

    The human ribosomal protein S3 (hS3) possesses associated activities that suggest alternative roles beyond its participation in protein translation. For example, it is capable of cleaving apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) DNA via a beta-elimination reaction, an activity that is missing in partially purified extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum group-D fibroblasts. In a recent study, we showed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that hS3 also has a very high apparent binding affinity for 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and AP sites in DNA. Using the same SPR technology, it is shown here that hS3 positively interacts with the human base excision repair (BER) enzymes N-glycosylase/AP lyase OGG1 and APE/Ref-1. Using a DNA substrate that allows for the detection of 8-oxoG repair, we also show that hOGG1 N-glycosylase activity becomes increasingly more robust in the presence of hS3. Human S3 was found to co-immunoprecipitate with both hOGG1 and APE/Ref-1, indicating that these proteins physically interact with one another. These results raise the possibility that hS3 not only functions as a ribosomal protein but, in addition, may influence repair activities at sites of DNA damage.

  14. The DNA-binding box of human SPARTAN contributes to the targeting of Polη to DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Agnes; Hegedus, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Haracska, Lajos; Burkovics, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate repair of UV-induced DNA damage results in human diseases such as Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is associated with an extremely high risk of skin cancer. A variant form of XP is caused by the absence of Polη, which is normally able to bypass UV-induced DNA lesions in an error-free manner. However, Polη is highly error prone when replicating undamaged DNA and, thus, the regulation of the proper targeting of Polη is crucial for the prevention of mutagenesis and UV-induced cancer formation. Spartan is a novel regulator of the damage tolerance pathway, and its association with Ub-PCNA has a role in Polη targeting; however, our knowledge about its function is only rudimentary. Here, we describe a new biochemical property of purified human SPARTAN by showing that it is a DNA-binding protein. Using a DNA binding mutant, we provide in vivo evidence that DNA binding by SPARTAN regulates the targeting of Polη to damage sites after UV exposure, and this function contributes highly to its DNA-damage tolerance function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA excision-repair defect of xeroderma pigmentosum prevents removal of a class of oxygen free radical-induced base lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, M S; C. J. Jones; Wood, R D; Lindahl, T

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid DNA was gamma-irradiated or treated with H2O2 in the presence of Cu2+ to generate oxygen free radical-induced lesions. Open circular DNA molecules were removed by ethidium bromide/CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The closed circular DNA fraction was treated with the Escherichia coli reagent enzymes endonuclease III (Nth protein) and Fpg protein. This treatment converted DNA molecules containing the major base lesions pyrimidine hydrates and 8-hydroxyguanine to a nicked form. Rema...

  16. FF483-484 motif of human Polη mediates its interaction with the POLD2 subunit of Polδ and contributes to DNA damage tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeck, Nadège; Janel-Bintz, Régine; Wagner, Jérome; Tissier, Agnès; Fuchs, Robert P; Burkovics, Peter; Haracska, Lajos; Despras, Emmanuelle; Bichara, Marc; Chatton, Bruno; Cordonnier, Agnès M

    2015-02-27

    Switching between replicative and translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases are crucial events for the completion of genomic DNA synthesis when the replication machinery encounters lesions in the DNA template. In eukaryotes, the translesional DNA polymerase η (Polη) plays a central role for accurate bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, the predominant DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation. Polη deficiency is responsible for a variant form of the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) syndrome, characterized by a predisposition to skin cancer. Here, we show that the FF483-484 amino acids in the human Polη (designated F1 motif) are necessary for the interaction of this TLS polymerase with POLD2, the B subunit of the replicative DNA polymerase δ, both in vitro and in vivo. Mutating this motif impairs Polη function in the bypass of both an N-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct and a TT-CPD lesion in cellular extracts. By complementing XPV cells with different forms of Polη, we show that the F1 motif contributes to the progression of DNA synthesis and to the cell survival after UV irradiation. We propose that the integrity of the F1 motif of Polη, necessary for the Polη/POLD2 interaction, is required for the establishment of an efficient TLS complex.

  17. FF483–484 motif of human Polη mediates its interaction with the POLD2 subunit of Polδ and contributes to DNA damage tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeck, Nadège; Janel-Bintz, Régine; Wagner, Jérome; Tissier, Agnès; Fuchs, Robert P.; Burkovics, Peter; Haracska, Lajos; Despras, Emmanuelle; Bichara, Marc; Chatton, Bruno; Cordonnier, Agnès M.

    2015-01-01

    Switching between replicative and translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases are crucial events for the completion of genomic DNA synthesis when the replication machinery encounters lesions in the DNA template. In eukaryotes, the translesional DNA polymerase η (Polη) plays a central role for accurate bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, the predominant DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation. Polη deficiency is responsible for a variant form of the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) syndrome, characterized by a predisposition to skin cancer. Here, we show that the FF483–484 amino acids in the human Polη (designated F1 motif) are necessary for the interaction of this TLS polymerase with POLD2, the B subunit of the replicative DNA polymerase δ, both in vitro and in vivo. Mutating this motif impairs Polη function in the bypass of both an N-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct and a TT-CPD lesion in cellular extracts. By complementing XPV cells with different forms of Polη, we show that the F1 motif contributes to the progression of DNA synthesis and to the cell survival after UV irradiation. We propose that the integrity of the F1 motif of Polη, necessary for the Polη/POLD2 interaction, is required for the establishment of an efficient TLS complex. PMID:25662213

  18. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  19. Yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG, plays a key role in the regulation of the cell cycle and actin dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Sun Kang

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the human XPG gene cause Cockayne syndrome (CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP. Transcription defects have been suggested as the fundamental cause of CS; however, defining CS as a transcription syndrome is inconclusive. In particular, the function of XPG in transcription has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of RAD2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart of XPG, in cell cycle regulation and efficient actin assembly following ultraviolet irradiation. RAD2 C-terminal deletion, which resembles the XPG mutation found in XPG/CS cells, caused cell growth arrest, the cell cycle stalling, a defective α-factor response, shortened lifespan, cell polarity defect, and misregulated actin-dynamics after DNA damage. Overexpression of the C-terminal 65 amino acids of Rad2p was sufficient to induce hyper-cell polarization. In addition, RAD2 genetically interacts with TPM1 during cell polarization. These results provide insights into the role of RAD2 in post-UV irradiation cell cycle regulation and actin assembly, which may be an underlying cause of XPG/CS.

  20. Pretreatment of Ferulic Acid Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Ultraviolet A Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ki Bbeum; Bae, Seunghee; Choi, Byung Gon; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 90%~99% of ultraviolet A (UVA) ray reaches the Earth's surface. The deeply penetrating UVA rays induce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which results in oxidative stress such as photoproducts, senescence, and cell death. Thus, UVA is considered a primary factor that promotes skin aging. Objective Researchers investigated whether pretreatment with ferulic acid protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) against UVA-induced cell damages. Methods HDF proliferation was analyzed using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. Cell cycle distribution and intracellular ROS levels were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. Senescence was evaluated using a senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, while Gadd45α promoter activity was analyzed through a luciferase assay. The expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), catalase (CAT), xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and C, matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3, as well as p21 and p16 were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Inhibition of proliferation and cell cycle arrest were detected in cells that were irradiated with UVA only. Pretreatment with ferulic acid significantly increased the proliferation and cell cycle progression in HDFs. Moreover, ferulic acid pretreatment produced antioxidant effects such as reduced DCF intensity, and affected SOD1 and CAT mRNA expression. These effects were also demonstrated in the analysis of cell senescence, promoter activity, expression of senescent markers, and DNA repair. Conclusion These results demonstrate that ferulic acid exerts protective effects on UVA-induced cell damages via anti-oxidant and stress-inducible cellular mechanisms in HDFs. PMID:27904274

  1. CK2 phosphorylation of human centrins 1 and 2 regulates their binding to the DNA repair protein XPC, the centrosomal protein Sfi1 and the phototransduction protein transducin β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dora; Assairi, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are calcium-binding proteins that can interact with several cellular targets (Sfi1, XPC, Sac3 and transducin β) through the same hydrophobic triad. However, two different orientations of the centrin-binding motif have been observed: W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8) for XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein) and the opposite orientation L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1) for Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein 1), Sac3 and transducin β. Centrins are also phosphorylated by several protein kinases, among which is CK2. The purpose of this study was to determine the binding mechanism of human centrins to three targets (transducin β, Sfi1 and XPC), and the effects of in vitro phosphorylation by CK2 of centrins 1 and 2 with regard to this binding mechanism. We identified the centrin-binding motif at the COOH extremity of transducin β. Human centrin 1 binds to transducin β only in the presence of calcium with a binding constant lower than the binding constant observed for Sfi1 and for XPC. The affinity constants of centrin 1 were 0.10 10(6) M(-1), 249 10(6) M(-1) and 52.5 10(6) M(-1) for Trd, R17-Sfi1 and P17-XPC respectively. CK2 phosphorylates human centrin 1 at residue T138 and human centrin 2 at residues T138 and S158. Consequently CK2 phosphorylation abolished the binding of centrin 1 to transducin β and reduced the binding to Sfi1 and XPC. CK2 phosphorylation of centrin 2 at T138 and S158 abolished the binding to Sfi1 as assessed using a C-HsCen2 T138D-S158D phosphomimetic form of centrin 2.

  2. CK2 phosphorylation of human centrins 1 and 2 regulates their binding to the DNA repair protein XPC, the centrosomal protein Sfi1 and the phototransduction protein transducin β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dora; Assairi, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are calcium-binding proteins that can interact with several cellular targets (Sfi1, XPC, Sac3 and transducin β) through the same hydrophobic triad. However, two different orientations of the centrin-binding motif have been observed: W1xxL4xxxL8 for XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein) and the opposite orientation L8xxxL4xxW1 for Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein 1), Sac3 and transducin β. Centrins are also phosphorylated by several protein kinases, among which is CK2. The purpose of this study was to determine the binding mechanism of human centrins to three targets (transducin β, Sfi1 and XPC), and the effects of in vitro phosphorylation by CK2 of centrins 1 and 2 with regard to this binding mechanism. We identified the centrin-binding motif at the COOH extremity of transducin β. Human centrin 1 binds to transducin β only in the presence of calcium with a binding constant lower than the binding constant observed for Sfi1 and for XPC. The affinity constants of centrin 1 were 0.10 106 M−1, 249 106 M−1 and 52.5 106 M−1 for Trd, R17-Sfi1 and P17-XPC respectively. CK2 phosphorylates human centrin 1 at residue T138 and human centrin 2 at residues T138 and S158. Consequently CK2 phosphorylation abolished the binding of centrin 1 to transducin β and reduced the binding to Sfi1 and XPC. CK2 phosphorylation of centrin 2 at T138 and S158 abolished the binding to Sfi1 as assessed using a C-HsCen2 T138D-S158D phosphomimetic form of centrin 2. PMID:24918055

  3. CK2 phosphorylation of human centrins 1 and 2 regulates their binding to the DNA repair protein XPC, the centrosomal protein Sfi1 and the phototransduction protein transducin β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Grecu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrins are calcium-binding proteins that can interact with several cellular targets (Sfi1, XPC, Sac3 and transducin β through the same hydrophobic triad. However, two different orientations of the centrin-binding motif have been observed: W1xxL4xxxL8 for XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein and the opposite orientation L8xxxL4xxW1 for Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein 1, Sac3 and transducin β. Centrins are also phosphorylated by several protein kinases, among which is CK2. The purpose of this study was to determine the binding mechanism of human centrins to three targets (transducin β, Sfi1 and XPC, and the effects of in vitro phosphorylation by CK2 of centrins 1 and 2 with regard to this binding mechanism. We identified the centrin-binding motif at the COOH extremity of transducin β. Human centrin 1 binds to transducin β only in the presence of calcium with a binding constant lower than the binding constant observed for Sfi1 and for XPC. The affinity constants of centrin 1 were 0.10 106 M−1, 249 106 M−1 and 52.5 106 M−1 for Trd, R17-Sfi1 and P17-XPC respectively. CK2 phosphorylates human centrin 1 at residue T138 and human centrin 2 at residues T138 and S158. Consequently CK2 phosphorylation abolished the binding of centrin 1 to transducin β and reduced the binding to Sfi1 and XPC. CK2 phosphorylation of centrin 2 at T138 and S158 abolished the binding to Sfi1 as assessed using a C-HsCen2 T138D-S158D phosphomimetic form of centrin 2.

  4. Interaction of hHR23 with S5a. The ubiquitin-like domain of hHR23 mediates interaction with S5a subunit of 26 S proteasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Hiyama; M. Yokoi; C. Masutani; K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); T. Maekawa; K. Tanaka (Kiyoji); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1999-01-01

    textabstracthHR23B is one of two human homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene product RAD23 and a component of a protein complex that specifically complements the NER defect of xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) cell extracts in vitro. Alth

  5. The XPB subunit of repair/transcription factor TFIIH directly interacts with SUG1, a subunit of the 26S proteasome and putative transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); M. Rossignol; R.A. Fraser; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L. Ma (Libin); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the basal transcription initiation/DNA repair factor TFIIH are responsible for three human disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The non-repair features of CS and TTD are thought to be due to a partial inactivation of th

  6. A Mouse Model for Trichothiodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is a versatile DNA repair mechanism that safeguards the genome from many types of DNA damages. The importance ofNER is highlighted by three inherited human disorders with defective NER: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodys

  7. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  8. From bacteria to humans: lessons learned from a reductionist's view of ultraviolet light-induced DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, J E

    2001-01-01

    What follows is a personal remembrance of how Dr. Richard Setlow influenced me as a young postdoctoral fellow at Oak Ridge National laboratory between 1963 and 1966. The narrative tries to place my "maturation" as a young, inexperienced scientist in the context of the cultural upheaval caused by the Vietnam war, of a Northerner facing a "culture-shock" living in the South and in a revolution in molecular and radiation biology taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory at that time. The unique historic juxtaposition of Dr. Setlow's contribution of the discovery of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in bacterial DNA, being potentially the molecular lesion responsible for cell killing and mutagenesis, occurring as I was at Oak Ridge, and the wonderful working relationship I had with William Carrier, his technician, led to our discovery with James Regan that normal human cells repaired these lesion from their DNA. Amazingly, because of Dr. Setlow's challenge to me about my thoughts of the implications of his findings in bacteria, the chance visit to Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Dr. James Cleaver and my background as a human geneticist provided me the extraordinary opportunity to carry out a collaboration to test if human cancer prone syndromes might be deficient in the repair of these UV-induced DNA lesions. With our finding that the direct demonstration of a lack of repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in cells from the skin cancer prone syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, opened up a new paradigm for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis of both radiation and chemical carcinogenesis. From this investigator's vantage point in the history of the understanding of carcinogenesis, which has led us to the present point of "oncogenes" and "tumor suppressor genes", the old adage by Newton, "I only saw further because I stood on the shoulder of giants", is so applicable here. Dr. Setlow's shoulders were indeed among those of all of us that have made

  9. Gclust Server: 112838 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM COMPLEMENTATION GROUP B 1); ATP-dependent helicase 1 1.00e+00 14.29 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.... (ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG OF XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM COMPLEMENTATION GROUP B 1); ATP-dependent helicase Number of

  10. Gclust Server: 112883 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM COMPLEMENTATION GROUP B 2); ATP-dependent helicase 1 1.00e+00 14.29 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.... (ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG OF XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM COMPLEMENTATION GROUP B 2); ATP-dependent helicase Number of

  11. The human POLH gene is not mutated, and is expressed in a cohort of patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, Annabelle M

    2007-04-01

    Skin cancer, the most common cancer in the general population, is strongly associated with exposure to the ultraviolet component of sunlight. To investigate the relationship between DNA damage processing and skin tumour development, we determined the POLH status of a cohort of skin cancer patients. The human POLH gene encodes DNA polymerase eta (poleta), which normally carries out accurate translesion synthesis past the major UV-induced photoproduct, the dithymine cyclobutane dimer. In the absence of active poleta in xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients, mutations accumulate at sites of UV-induced DNA damage, providing the initiating step in skin carcinogenesis. Forty patients diagnosed with skin cancer were genotyped for polymorphisms in the POLH protein-coding sequence, using glycosylase-mediated polymorphism detection (GMPD) and direct DNA sequencing of POLH PCR products derived from white blood cell genomic DNA. All individuals carried the wild-type POLH sequence. No POLH mutations were identified in genomic DNA from skin tumours derived from 15 of these patients. As determined by RT-PCR, POLH mRNA was expressed in all normal and skin tumour tissue examined. Poleta protein was also detectable by Western blotting, in two matched normal and skin tumour extracts. An alternatively spliced form of POLH mRNA, lacking exon 2, was more readily detected in skin tissue than in white blood cells from the same patient. Real-time PCR was used to quantify POLH expression in matched normal and skin tumour-derived mRNA from a series of patients diagnosed with either basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Compared to matched normal skin tissue from the same patient, 1 of 7 SCC, and 4 of 10 BCC tumours examined showed at least a 2-fold reduction in POLH expression, while 1 of 7 SCC, and 3 of 10 BCC tumours showed at least a 2-fold increase in POLH expression. Differences in gene expression, rather than sequence changes may be the main mechanism by which POLH status varies

  12. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); G. Weeda (Geert); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T. van Oostrum; R.B. Beems (Rudolf); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the sam

  13. Photomedicine: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-hur, E.; Rosenthal, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes the idiopathic photodermatoses; xeroderma pigmentosum, beta-carotene therapy for erythropoietic protoporphyria and other photosensitivity diseases; photochemotherapy of psoriasis using the furocoumrains; photochemotherapy of various skin disorders; photodynamic therapy of cancer; and photoimmunotherapy.

  14. Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Cornea in a Child with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causes marked alterations in the skin leading to keratosis, telangiectasia ... Keywords: Squamous cell carcinoma, surgical excision, Xeroderma Pigmentosum. How to cite this .... Typically, the first stage makes its appearance after the age of 6 ...

  15. Uso tópico do inteferon alfa-2b para neoplasia escamosa da superficie ocular em um caso de paciente com xeroderma pigmentoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Queiroz Cardoso Pinto

    Full Text Available Resumo Relato de um caso clínico de Xeroderma Pigmentoso com carcinoma espinocelular de conjuntiva bilateral que apresentou regressão importante das dimensões tumorais com o uso de Interferon alfa-2b tópico. Relato de caso: Paciente feminina com Xeroderma Pigmentoso em estágio avançado, com ausência de pele sadia, tendo sido submetida a cerca de 60 exéreses de lesões de pele malignas. A paciente compareceu com tumoração conjuntival em ambos os olhos, correspondendo a carcinoma espinocelular de conjuntiva e neoplasia intraepitelial de conjuntiva em olho esquerdo. Devido as dificuldades cirúrgicas, alta taxa de recidiva e elevada probabilidade de formação de simbléfaro foi-se iniciado terapêutica com Interferon alfa-2beta 1.000.000 unidades tópico, obtendo-se bons resultados com importante regressão do tamanho da lesão e resolução dos sintomas. Conclusão: O uso tópico de interferon alfa-2beta em neoplasia escamosa de conjuntiva, mostrou-se uma boa opção terapêutica em situações de elevado risco cirúrgico e de complicações pós operatórias.

  16. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  17. A rapid non-radioactive technique for measurement of repair synthesis in primary human fibroblasts by incorporation of ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Niimi, Atsuko; Fawcett, Heather; Lehmann, Alan; Yamashita, Shunichi; Ogi, Tomoo

    2009-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Afflicted patients show extreme sun-sensitivity and skin cancer predisposition. XP is in most cases associated with deficient nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is the process responsible for removing photolesions from DNA. Measuring NER activity by nucleotide incorporation into repair patches, termed 'unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS)', is one of the most commonly used assays for XP-diagnosis and NER research. We have established a rapid and accurate procedure for measuring UDS by replacement of thymidine with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). EdU incorporated into repair patches can be directly conjugated to fluorescent azide derivatives, thereby obviating the need for either radiolabeled thymidine or denaturation and antibody detection of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We demonstrate that the EdU incorporation assay is compatible with conventional techniques such as immunofluorescent staining and labeling of cells with micro-latex beads. Importantly, we can complete the entire UDS assay within half a day from preparation of the assay coverslips; this technique may prove useful as a method for XP diagnosis.

  18. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  19. Impact of the Circadian Clock on UV-Induced DNA Damage Response and Photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakup, Panshak; Gaddameedhi, Shobhan

    2017-01-01

    The skin is in constant exposure to various external environmental stressors, including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Various wavelengths of UV light are absorbed by the DNA and other molecules in the skin to cause DNA damage and induce oxidative stress. The exposure to excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation and/or accumulation of damage over time can lead to photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the sole mechanism for removing UV photoproduct damage from DNA, and genetic disruption of this repair pathway leads to the photosensitive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Interestingly, recent work has shown that NER is controlled by the circadian clock, the body's natural time-keeping mechanism, through regulation of the rate-limiting repair factor xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). Studies have shown reduced UV-induced skin cancer after UV exposure in the evening compared to the morning, which corresponds with times of high and low repair capacities, respectively. However, most studies of the circadian clock-NER connection have utilized murine models, and it is therefore important to translate these findings to humans to improve skin cancer prevention and chronotherapy.

  20. 过氧化氢诱导的人正常和早老细胞中DNA损伤及其修复研究%The Study of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced DNA Damage and Recovery in Normal Aging and Premature Aging Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    所起凤; 杜文婷; 杨鸣鸣; 范雪娇; 刘戟

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究人早老细胞和正常衰老细胞在氧化应激条件下的DNA损伤和修复.方法 采用免疫荧光技术和彗星电泳技术,分别检测3组不同群体倍增数(PD)的人正常二倍体成纤维细胞BJ(青年组第14代,成年组第30代,衰老组第45代)和2组不同PD的人赫-吉二氏综合征(HGPS)细胞(青年组第8代,衰老组第17代)的DNA基础损伤程度.研究过氧化氢诱导造成以上细胞组DNA损伤及去除致损因素正常培养后的修复水平,采用免疫荧光和彗星电泳技术检测细胞在沉默DNA损伤修复蛋白着色性干皮病蛋白A(XPA)表达前后的修复能力.结果 BJ细胞衰老组DNA损伤程度较高,与成年组相比,对DNA损伤诱导因子更加敏感(P<0.05);成年组与青年组相比,对损伤诱导因子也更敏感(P<0.05).HGPS细胞青年组的DNA基础损伤程度即已达到衰老BJ细胞类似或更高水平,且与BJ细胞具有一致的DNA损伤年龄变化趋势.经siRNA沉默XPA表达后可部分恢复HGPS细胞的修复能力,对BJ细胞则没有影响.随年龄增长无论正常还是早老细胞,DNA损伤程度增加,修复效率降低.结论 XPA功能异常抑制了HGPS细胞的损伤修复.%Objective To study the DNA damage and recovery induced by hydrogen peroxide in normal aging and premature aging human cells. Methods The immunofluorescent assay and comet assay were used to estimate basal DNA damage in normal aging BJ cells and premature aging Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) cells, which were divided into three and two distinct population doubling (PD) number groups (BJ 14· 30, 45 and HGPS 8, 17) respectively. The DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide of these cell populations, as well as their repair activity, was also studied. Finally, the recovery capability before and after the xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA ) knocked down in these groups was measured. Results Our results indicated that the normal BJ cells of older PD number

  1. Functional deficiency of fibroblasts heterozygous for Bloom syndrome as specific manifestation of the primary defect.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartram, C.R.; Rüdiger, H W; Schmidt-Preuss, U; Passarge, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect on the rate of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts by cocultivation with Fanconi anemia and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and with Bloom syndrome heterozygotes was studied. Cells of Fanconi anemia and xeroderma origin reduced the rate of SCEs in Bloom cells by about 45%-50%, just as control cells do. In contrast, heterozygous Bloom cells reduced the rate of SCEs by only 16%-28%. In absolute figures, Fanconi cells reduced the mean rate of SCE in Bloom...

  2. Structural and Functional Studies on Nucleotide Excision Repair From Recognition to Incision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Kisker

    2001-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct genetic information is crucial for all living organisms because mutations are the primary cause of hereditary diseases, as well as cancer and may also be involved in aging. The importance of genomic integrity is underscored by the fact that 80 to 90% of all human cancers are ultimately due to DNA damage. Among the different repair mechanisms that have evolved to protect the genome, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a universal pathway found in all organisms. NER removes a wide variety of bulky DNA adducts including the carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV radiation, benzo(a)pyrene-guanine adducts caused by smoking and the guanine-cisplatin adducts induced by chemotherapy. The importance of this repair mechanism is reflected by three severe inherited diseases in humans, which are due to defects in NER: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome and trichothiodystrophy.

  3. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  5. Proteins of nucleotide and base excision repair pathways interact in mitochondria to protect from loss of subcutaneous fat, a hallmark of aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Kamenisch (York); M.I. Fousteri (Maria); J. Knoch (Jennifer); A.K. Von Thaler (Anna Katherina); B. Fehrenbacher (Birgit); H. Kato (Hiroki); T. Becker (Tim); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); R. Kuiper (Ruud); M. Majora (Marc); M. Schaller (Martin); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. van Steeg (Harry); M. Röcken (Martin); D. Rapaport (Doron); J. Krutmann (Jean); L.H.F. Mullenders (Leon); M. Berneburg (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDefects in the DNA repair mechanism nucleotide excision repair (NER) may lead to tumors in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or to premature aging with loss of subcutaneous fat in Cockayne syndrome (CS). Mutations of mitochondrial (mt)DNA play a role in aging, but a link between the

  6. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: a potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousaf, S.; Khan, M.I.; Micheal, S.; Akhtar, F.; Ali, S.H.; Riaz, M.; Ali, M.; Lall, P.; Waheed, N.K.; Hollander, A.I. den; Ahmed, A.; Qamar, R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) an

  7. Rare Malignancies in Eastern India, Socio-Economic Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Surendra Senapati; Diptirani Samanta; Saumyaranjan Mishra; Chaitali Bose

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of cancer is multifactorial. Various factors, including physical carcinogens, chemicals and viral carcinogens affect patients with known predisposing factors who subsequently develop malignancies. Here is a retrospective study of 18 patients who developed rare malignancies in clinical situations like xeroderma pigmentosum, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, hereditary multiple exostosis, second malignancies due to radiotherapy and chronic irritation. The predisposing factors ...

  8. The ERCC2/DNA repair protein is associated with the class II BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; V. Moncollin; R. Roy (Richard); A. Staub; M. Mezzina; A. Sarasin; G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractERCC2 is involved in the DNA repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D and was found to copurify with the RNA polymerase II (B) transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH that possesses a bidirectional helicase activity. Antibodies directed towards the 89 kDa (ERCC3) or the p62 subunit of

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of 16 XP-C patients from Germany : environmental factors predominately contribute to phenotype variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Annika; Hofmann, Lars; Gratchev, Alexei; Laspe, Petra; Schubert, Steffen; Schuerer, Anke; Ohlenbusch, Andreas; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Hallermann, Christian; Reichrath, Joerg; Schoen, Michael P.; Emmert, Steffen

    Patients belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group C comprise one-third of all XP patients. Only four major reports compiled larger groups of XP-C patients from southern Europe (12 pts), North America (16 pts) and Africa (14 and 56 pts) as well as their genetic background (46 XPC

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK060447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060447 001-011-F08 AY163769.1 Homo sapiens excision repair cross-complementing ro...dent repair deficiency, complementation group 3 (xeroderma pigmentosum group B complementing) (ERCC3) gene, complete cds.|PRI PRI 1e-155 +1 ...

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK060447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060447 001-011-F08 BC008820.2 Homo sapiens excision repair cross-complementing ro...dent repair deficiency, complementation group 3 (xeroderma pigmentosum group B complementing), mRNA (cDNA clone MGC:10371 IMAGE:3958781), complete cds.|PRI PRI 1e-155 +1 ...

  12. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by

  13. Erythropoietic defect associated with reduced cell proliferation in mice lacking the 26S proteasome shuttling factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bergink (Steven); A.F. Theil (Arjan); W. Toussaint (Wendy); I.M. de Cuyper (Iris); D.I. Kulu (Divine); T. Clapes (Thomas); R. van der Linden (Reinier); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); E.P. Mul (Eric); F.P. van Alphen (Floris); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); T. van Gent (Teus); A. Maas (Alex); C. Robin (Catherine); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.R. Mitchell (James); L. Gutiérrez (Laura)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely

  14. Erythropoietic Defect Associated with Reduced Cell Proliferation in Mice Lacking the 26S Proteasome Shuttling Factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Theil, Arjan F.; Toussaint, Wendy; De Cuyper, Iris M.; Kulu, Divine I.; Clapes, Thomas; van der Linden, Reinier; Demmers, Jeroen A.; Mul, Eric P.; van Alphen, Floris P.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; van Gent, Teus; Maas, Alex; Robin, Catherine; Philipsen, Sjaak; Vermeulen, Wim; Mitchell, James R.; Gutierrez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Rad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely due to the r

  15. Protein: FBA4 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion factor complex helicase XPB subunit Basic transcription factor 2 89 kDa subunit, DNA excision repair prot...ein ERCC-3, DNA repair protein complementing XP-B cells, TFIIH basal transcription factor complex 89 kDa s...ubunit, Xeroderma pigmentosum group B-complementing protein 9606 Homo sapiens P19447 2071 2071 P19447 ...

  16. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder Trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the same XPD gene. XPD en

  17. Cytological evidence for DNA chain elongation after UV irradiation in the S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, D F; Nath, J

    1981-04-01

    Human cells irradiated with UV light synthesize lower molecular weight DNA than unirradiated cells. This reduction in molecular weight is greater in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells than in normal cells. The molecular weight of DNA is further reduced by the addition of caffeine to XP cells. By several hours after irradiation, DNA fragments are barely detectable. Cells from excision-proficient and excision-deficient XP patients were studied autoradiographically to produce cytological evidence of DNA chain elongation. Replicate cultures with and without caffeine were synchronized and irradiated with UV light during the S phase. Caffeine was removed in G2, and the cells were labeled with 3H-thymidine. Results showed significantly increased labeling during G2 of excision-deficient XP cells. Labeling was dependent on the time of irradiation and presence of caffeine. The XP variant cells had no increase in labeling for any irradiation time.

  18. Enhanced DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers changes the biological response to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarosh, Daniel B

    2002-11-30

    The goal of DNA repair enzyme therapy is the same as that for gene therapy: to rescue a defective proteome/genome by introducing a substitute protein/DNA. The danger of inadequate DNA repair is highlighted in the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum. These patients are hypersensitive to sunlight and develop multiple cutaneous neoplasms very early in life. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V was shown over 25 years ago to be capable of reversing the defective repair in xeroderma pigmentosum cells. This enzyme, packaged in an engineered delivery vehicle, has been shown to traverse the stratum corneum, reach the nuclei of living cells of the skin, and enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). In such a system, changes in DNA repair, mutagenesis, and cell signaling can be studied without manipulation of the genome.

  19. Homozygous Wildtype of XPD K751Q Polymorphism Is Associated with Increased Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Malaysian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Munn-Sann Lye; Shaneeta Visuvanathan; Pei-Pei Chong; Yoke-Yeow Yap; Chin-Chye Lim; Eng-Zhuan Ban

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) gene encodes a DNA helicase, an important component in transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) complex. XPD helicase plays a pivotal role in unwinding DNA at the damaged region during nucleotide excision repair (NER) mechanism. Dysfunctional XPD helicase protein from polymorphic diversity may contribute to increased risk of developing cancers. This study aims to determine the association between XPD K751Q polymorphism (rs13181) and risk of nasopharyngeal carci...

  20. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  1. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  2. Carcinogenesis of basal cell carcinomas: genetics and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, J P

    2002-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common type of cancer in humans. Like squamous cell carcinomas, they are also believed to be ultraviolet (UV)-induced, but several data suggest that some differences might exist in the mechanisms of their UV induction. The originating cells may arise from interfollicular basal cells, hair follicles or sebaceous glands, thus from a deeper zone than the SCC ones, which probably means exposure to different doses or wavelengths of UV. The p53 gene and the patched gene (PTCH) are major targets of UV for BCC induction. Mutations in p53 are present in about 56% of human BCC, even small early lesions. The "UV signature" is observed in 65% of them. Mutations in the PTCH play also a major role in BCC development, being responsible for hereditary BCCs in Gorlin's syndrome, sporadic BCC, and BCCs isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum, although with a lower incidence of "UV signature". Smoothened-activating mutations and PTCH2 mutations are also involved in BCC formation. Transgenic mice overexpressing Smoothened or Sonic hedgehog in the skin spontaneously produce skin lesions resembling human BCCs, but contrary to findings in the hairless albino mouse and with SCC, no data on experimental UV induction of BCCs are available.

  3. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L.; Dashner, Erica J.; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye

    2015-01-01

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  4. 2016 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Circadian Rhythm and UV-Induced Skin Damage: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Linna; Suggs, Amanda; Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Tarrillion, Madeline; Selph, Jacqueline; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma

    2016-09-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes many detrimental effects through mechanisms related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. Excessive oxidative stress can cause apoptosis and cellular dysfunction of epidermal cells leading to cellular senescence and connective tissue degradation. Direct and indirect damage to DNA predisposes the skin to cancer formation. Chronic UV exposure also leads to skin aging manifested as wrinkling, loss of skin tone, and decreased resilience. Fortunately, human skin has several natural mechanisms for combating UV-induced damage. The mechanisms operate on a diurnal rhythm, a cycle that repeats approximately every 24 hours. It is known that the circadian rhythm is involved in many skin physiologic processes, including water regulation and epidermal stem cell function. This study evaluated whether UV damage and the skin's natural mechanisms of inflammation and repair are also affected by circadian rhythm. We looked at UV-induced erythema on seven human subjects irradiated with simulated solar radiation in the morning (at 08:00 h) versus in the afternoon (at 16:00 h). Our data suggest that the same dose of UV radiation induces significantly more inflammation in the morning than in the afternoon. Changes in protein expression relevant to DNA damage, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from skin biopsies correlated with our clinical results. Both XPA and CPD levels were higher after the morning UV exposure compared with the afternoon exposure. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1124-1130.

  5. Enhancement of DNA repair capacity of mammalian cells by carcinogen treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protic, M.; Roilides, E.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

    1988-07-01

    To determine whether DNA excision repair is enhanced in mammalian cells in response to DNA damage, as it is in bacteria as part of the SOS response, we used an expression vector-host cell reactivation assay to measure cellular DNA repair capacity. When UV-damaged chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) vector DNA was introduced into monkey cells (CV-1), the level of CAT activity was inversely related to the UV fluence due to inhibition of CAT gene expression by UV photoproducts. When CV-1 cells were treated with either UV radiation or mitomycin C, 24-48 h before transfection, CAT expression from the UV-irradiated plasmid was increased. This increase also occurred in a line of normal human cells, but not in repair-deficient human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We confirmed that this increase in CAT expression was due to repair, and not to production of damage-free templates by recombination; the frequency of generation of supF+ recombinants after transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 vectors carrying different point mutations in the supF gene did not significantly increase in carcinogen-treated CV-1 cells. From these results we conclude that carcinogen treatment enhances the excision-repair capacity of normal mammalian cells.

  6. Analysis of Drosophila p8 and p52 mutants reveals distinct roles for the maintenance of TFIIH stability and male germ cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Becerra, Grisel; Juárez, Mandy; Valadez-Graham, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is activated by factors that interact within complex machinery to initiate transcription. An important component of this machinery is the DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH. Mutations in TFIIH result in three human syndromes: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Transcription and DNA repair defects have been linked to some clinical features of these syndromes. However, how mutations in TFIIH affect specific developmental programmes, allowing organisms to develop with particular phenotypes, is not well understood. Here, we show that mutations in the p52 and p8 subunits of TFIIH have a moderate effect on the gene expression programme in the Drosophila testis, causing germ cell differentiation arrest in meiosis, but no Polycomb enrichment at the promoter of the affected differentiation genes, supporting recent data that disagree with the current Polycomb-mediated repression model for regulating gene expression in the testis. Moreover, we found that TFIIH stability is not compromised in p8 subunit-depleted testes that show transcriptional defects, highlighting the role of p8 in transcription. Therefore, this study reveals how defects in TFIIH affect a specific cell differentiation programme and contributes to understanding the specific syndrome manifestations in TFIIH-afflicted patients.

  7. Nucleotide excision repair is associated with the replisome and its efficiency depends on a direct interaction between XPA and PCNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Gilljam

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is an essential protein for DNA replication, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, chromatin remodeling, and epigenetics. Many proteins interact with PCNA through the PCNA interacting peptide (PIP-box or the newly identified AlkB homolog 2 PCNA interacting motif (APIM. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA protein, with a central but somewhat elusive role in nucleotide excision repair (NER, contains the APIM sequence suggesting an interaction with PCNA. With an in vivo based approach, using modern techniques in live human cells, we show that APIM in XPA is a functional PCNA interacting motif and that efficient NER of UV lesions is dependent on an intact APIM sequence in XPA. We show that XPA(-/- cells complemented with XPA containing a mutated APIM sequence have increased UV sensitivity, reduced repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4 photoproducts, and are consequently more arrested in S phase as compared to XPA(-/- cells complemented with wild type XPA. Notably, XPA colocalizes with PCNA in replication foci and is loaded on newly synthesized DNA in undamaged cells. In addition, the TFIIH subunit XPD, as well as XPF are loaded on DNA together with XPA, and XPC and XPG colocalize with PCNA in replication foci. Altogether, our results suggest a presence of the NER complex in the vicinity of the replisome and a novel role of NER in post-replicative repair.

  8. DNA polymerase eta participates in the mutagenic bypass of adducts induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alden C Klarer

    Full Text Available Y-family DNA-polymerases have larger active sites that can accommodate bulky DNA adducts allowing them to bypass these lesions during replication. One member, polymerase eta (pol eta, is specialized for the bypass of UV-induced thymidine-thymidine dimers, correctly inserting two adenines. Loss of pol eta function is the molecular basis for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP variant where the accumulation of mutations results in a dramatic increase in UV-induced skin cancers. Less is known about the role of pol eta in the bypass of other DNA adducts. A commonly encountered DNA adduct is that caused by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental chemical benzo[a]pyrene. Here, treatment of pol eta-deficient fibroblasts from humans and mice with BPDE resulted in a significant decrease in Hprt gene mutations. These studies in mammalian cells support a number of in vitro reports that purified pol eta has error-prone activity on plasmids with site-directed BPDE adducts. Sequencing the Hprt gene from this work shows that the majority of mutations are G>T transversions. These data suggest that pol eta has error-prone activity when bypassing BPDE-adducts. Understanding the basis of environmental carcinogen-derived mutations may enable prevention strategies to reduce such mutations with the intent to reduce the number of environmentally relevant cancers.

  9. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  10. DNA repair diseases: what do they tell us about cancer and aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos FM Menck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of DNA repair defects in human syndromes, initially in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP but later in many others, led to striking observations on the association of molecular defects and patients' clinical phenotypes. For example, patients with syndromes resulting from defective nucleotide excision repair (NER or translesion synthesis (TLS present high levels of skin cancer in areas exposed to sunlight. However, some defects in NER also lead to more severe symptoms, such as developmental and neurological impairment and signs of premature aging. Skin cancer in XP patients is clearly associated with increased mutagenesis and genomic instability, reflecting the defective repair of DNA lesions. By analogy, more severe symptoms observed in NER-defective patients have also been associated with defective repair, likely involving cell death after transcription blockage of damaged templates. Endogenously induced DNA lesions, particularly through oxidative stress, have been identified as responsible for these severe pathologies. However, this association is not that clear and alternative explanations have been proposed. Despite high levels of exposure to intense sunlight, patients from tropical countries receive little attention or care, which likely also reflects the lack of understanding of how DNA damage causes cancer and premature aging.

  11. Cyclosporin A, but not everolimus, inhibits DNA repair mediated by calcineurin: implications for tumorigenesis under immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Kai-Martin; Kuschal, Christiane; Oetjen, Elke; Mori, Toshio; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Laspe, Petra; Boeckmann, Lars; Schön, Michael P; Emmert, Steffen

    2011-03-01

    Unlike other immunosuppressive drugs including everolimus, cyclosporin A causes a dramatic increase of UV-induced skin cancer, a feature that is reminiscent of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), where defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage results in cutaneous carcinogenesis. The molecular basis of the clinically important differential activities of cyclosporin A and everolimus is still unclear. We measured post-UV cell survival of cyclosporin A- and everolimus-treated human fibroblasts and lymphoblasts using a cell proliferation assay (MTT). The cellular NER capacity was assessed by host cell reactivation. Using an ELISA and specific antibodies, cyclobutane pyrimidine and pyrimidine-6,4-pyrimidone photoproduct removal from the cellular genome was measured. The effect of calcineurin on NER was investigated using a calcineurin A expression vector and specific RNAi. Cyclosporin A led to a dose dependent decrease in post-UV cell survival, inhibited NER and blocked photoproduct removal. In contrast, none of these effects where seen in everolimus-treated cells. Overexpression of calcineurin A resulted in increased NER and complemented the Cyclosporin A-induced reduction of NER. Downregulation of calcineurin using RNAi inhibited NER comparable to cyclosporin A-treatment. We conclude that cyclosporin A, but not everolimus, leads to an increased skin cancer risk via a calcineurin signalling-dependent impairment of NER. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Deficiency of the Caenorhabditis elegans DNA polymerase eta homologue increases sensitivity to UV radiation during germ-line development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkumo, Tsuyoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Eki, Toshihiko; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Defects in the human XPV/POLH gene result in the variant form of the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V). The gene encodes DNA polymerase eta (Poleta), which catalyzes translesion synthesis (TLS) past UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and other lesions. To further understand the roles of Poleta in multicellular organisms, we analyzed phenotypes caused by suppression of Caenorhabditis elegans POLH (Ce-POLH) by RNA interference (RNAi). F1 and F2 progeny from worms treated by Ce-POLH-specific RNAi grew normally, but F1 eggs laid by worms treated by RNAi against Ce-POLD, which encodes Poldelta did not hatch. These results suggest that Poldelta but not Poleta is essential for C. elegans embryogenesis. Poleta-targeted embryos UV-irradiated after egg laying were only moderately sensitive. In contrast, Poleta-targeted embryos UV-irradiated prior to egg laying exhibited severe sensitivity, indicating that Poleta contributes significantly to damage tolerance in C. elegans in early embryogenesis but only modestly at later stages. As early embryogenesis is characterized by high levels of DNA replication, Poleta may confer UV resistance in C. elegans, perhaps by catalyzing TLS in early embryogenesis.

  13. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  14. The DNA Damage-Binding Protein XPC Is a Frequent Target for Inactivation in Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    de Feraudy, Sebastien; Ridd, Katie; Richards, Lauren M.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Revet, Ingrid; Oh, Dennis; Feeney, Luzviminda; Cleaver, James E.

    2010-01-01

    XPC, the main damage-recognition protein responsible for nucleotide excision repair of UVB damage to DNA, is lost or mutated in xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C), a rare inherited disease characterized by high incidence and early onset of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. The high incidence of skin cancers in XP-C patients suggests that loss of expression of XPC protein might also provide a selective advantage for initiation and progression of similar cancers in non XP-C patients in ...

  15. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by a reduced ability to properly remove UV-induced DNA damage. The evidence for a DNA repair defect in AT cells is not as strong as in the case of XP (see section 2.2.5 of this thesis). Different XP p...

  16. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2013-01-01

    )-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response....... nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV...

  17. The E144 residue of Scherffelia dubia centrin discriminates between the DNA repair protein XPC and the centrosomal protein Sfi1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Grecu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrins are members of the EF-hand family of calcium-binding proteins, which are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Centrins bind to several cellular targets, through a hydrophobic triad. However, the W1xxL4xxxL8 triad in XPC (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C protein is found in the reverse orientation, as in the L8xxxL4xxW1 triad in Sfi1 (Suppressor of Fermentation-Induced loss of stress resistance protein 1. As shown by previous NMR studies of human centrin 2 in complex with XPC or Sfi1, the E148 residue of human centrin 2 is in contact with XPC but is pushed away from the triad of Sfi1. We corroborated these findings using site-directed mutagenesis to generate mutations in Scherffelia dubia centrin (SdCen and by using isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the binding affinity of these mutants to XPC and Sfi1. We mutated the F109 residue, which is the main residue involved in target binding regardless of triad orientation, and the E144 residue, which was thought to be involved only in XPC binding. The F109L mutation reduced the binding of SdCen to XPC and Sfi1 and the negative effect was greater upon temperature increase. By contrast, the E144A mutation reduced the binding to XPC but had no effect on Sfi1 binding. The F109L-E144A mutation enhanced the negative effect of the two single mutations on XPC binding. Sfi1 proteins from Ostreococcus lucimarinus and Ostreococcus tauri, which belong to the same clade as S. dubia, were also investigated. A comparative analysis shows that the triad residues are more conserved than those in human Sfi1.

  18. The E144 residue of Scherffelia dubia centrin discriminates between the DNA repair protein XPC and the centrosomal protein Sfi1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dora; Blouquit, Yves; Assairi, Liliane

    2013-01-01

    Centrins are members of the EF-hand family of calcium-binding proteins, which are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Centrins bind to several cellular targets, through a hydrophobic triad. However, the W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8) triad in XPC (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C protein) is found in the reverse orientation, as in the L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1) triad in Sfi1 (Suppressor of Fermentation-Induced loss of stress resistance protein 1). As shown by previous NMR studies of human centrin 2 in complex with XPC or Sfi1, the E148 residue of human centrin 2 is in contact with XPC but is pushed away from the triad of Sfi1. We corroborated these findings using site-directed mutagenesis to generate mutations in Scherffelia dubia centrin (SdCen) and by using isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the binding affinity of these mutants to XPC and Sfi1. We mutated the F109 residue, which is the main residue involved in target binding regardless of triad orientation, and the E144 residue, which was thought to be involved only in XPC binding. The F109L mutation reduced the binding of SdCen to XPC and Sfi1 and the negative effect was greater upon temperature increase. By contrast, the E144A mutation reduced the binding to XPC but had no effect on Sfi1 binding. The F109L-E144A mutation enhanced the negative effect of the two single mutations on XPC binding. Sfi1 proteins from Ostreococcus lucimarinus and Ostreococcus tauri, which belong to the same clade as S. dubia, were also investigated. A comparative analysis shows that the triad residues are more conserved than those in human Sfi1.

  19. The E144 residue of Scherffelia dubia centrin discriminates between the DNA repair protein XPC and the centrosomal protein Sfi1☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dora; Blouquit, Yves; Assairi, Liliane

    2013-01-01

    Centrins are members of the EF-hand family of calcium-binding proteins, which are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Centrins bind to several cellular targets, through a hydrophobic triad. However, the W1xxL4xxxL8 triad in XPC (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C protein) is found in the reverse orientation, as in the L8xxxL4xxW1 triad in Sfi1 (Suppressor of Fermentation-Induced loss of stress resistance protein 1). As shown by previous NMR studies of human centrin 2 in complex with XPC or Sfi1, the E148 residue of human centrin 2 is in contact with XPC but is pushed away from the triad of Sfi1. We corroborated these findings using site-directed mutagenesis to generate mutations in Scherffelia dubia centrin (SdCen) and by using isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the binding affinity of these mutants to XPC and Sfi1. We mutated the F109 residue, which is the main residue involved in target binding regardless of triad orientation, and the E144 residue, which was thought to be involved only in XPC binding. The F109L mutation reduced the binding of SdCen to XPC and Sfi1 and the negative effect was greater upon temperature increase. By contrast, the E144A mutation reduced the binding to XPC but had no effect on Sfi1 binding. The F109L-E144A mutation enhanced the negative effect of the two single mutations on XPC binding. Sfi1 proteins from Ostreococcus lucimarinus and Ostreococcus tauri, which belong to the same clade as S. dubia, were also investigated. A comparative analysis shows that the triad residues are more conserved than those in human Sfi1. PMID:24371720

  20. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  1. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  2. Human See, Human Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  3. The XPD subunit of TFIIH is required for transcription-associated but not DNA double-strand break-induced recombination in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Linda; Cassel, Tobias; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Mutations in the XPD gene can give rise to three phenotypically distinct disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) or combined XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS) (XP/CS). The role of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group D protein (XPD) in nucleotide excision repair explains the increased risk of skin cancer in XP patients but not all the clinical phenotypes found in XP/CS or TTD patients. Here, we describe that the XPD-defective UV5 cell line is impaired in transcription-associated recombination (TAR), which can be reverted by the introduction of the wild-type XPD gene expressed from a vector. UV5 cells are defective in TAR, despite having intact transcription and homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Interestingly, we find reduced spontaneous HR in XPD-defective cells, suggesting that transcription underlies a portion of spontaneous HR events. We also report that transcription-coupled repair (TCR)-defective cells, mutated in the Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) protein, have a defect in TAR, but not in DSB-induced HR. However, the TAR defect may be associated with a general transcription defect in CSB-deficient cells. In conclusion, we show a novel role for the XPD protein in TAR, linking TAR with TCR.

  4. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  5. Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein promotes cell survival and nucleotide excision repair through maintaining glutathione homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weinong; Ming, Mei; Zhao, Rui; Pi, Jingbo; Wu, Chunli; He, Yu-Ying

    2012-05-25

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Its major environmental risk factor is UVB radiation in sunlight. In response to UVB damage, epidermal keratinocytes activate a specific repair pathway, i.e. nucleotide excision repair, to remove UVB-induced DNA lesions. However, the regulation of UVB response is not fully understood. Here we show that the long isoform of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1, also called NFE2L1), a cytoprotective transcription factor critical for the expression of multiple antioxidant response element-dependent genes, plays an important role in the response of keratinocytes to UVB. Nrf1 loss sensitized keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bik through reducing glutathione levels. Knocking down Bik reduced UVB-induced apoptosis in Nrf1-inhibited cells. In UVB-irradiated surviving cells, however, disruption of Nrf1 impaired nucleotide excision repair through suppressing the transcription of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC), a factor essential for initiating the global genome nucleotide excision repair by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Nrf1 enhanced XPC expression by increasing glutathione availability but was independent of the transcription repressor of XPC. Adding XPC or glutathione restored the DNA repair capacity in Nrf1-inhibited cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Nrf1 levels are significantly reduced by UVB radiation in mouse skin and are lower in human skin tumors than in normal skin. These results indicate a novel role of Nrf1 in UVB-induced DNA damage repair and suggest Nrf1 as a tumor suppressor in the skin.

  6. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes (APEX1, XPD, XRCC1 and XRCC3 and Risk of Preeclampsia in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Sandoval-Carrillo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Variations in genes involved in DNA repair systems have been proposed as risk factors for the development of preeclampsia (PE. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association of Human apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP endonuclease (APEX1 Asp148Glu (rs1130409, Xeroderma Pigmentosum group D (XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181, X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC Arg399Gln (rs25487 and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3 Thr241Met (rs861539 polymorphisms with PE in a Mexican population. Samples of 202 cases and 350 controls were genotyped using RTPCR. Association analyses based on a χ2 test and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the odds ratio (OR and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI for each polymorphism. The allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed statistical significant differences between preeclamptic and normal women (p = 0.036. Although neither of the polymorphisms proved to be a risk factor for the disease, the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed a tendency of association (OR: 1.74, 95% CI = 0.96–3.14 and a significant trend (p for trend = 0.048. A subgroup analyses revealed differences in the allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism between women with mild preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia (p = 0.035. In conclusion, our results reveal no association between XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC Arg399Gln and XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphisms and the risk of PE in a Mexican mestizo population; however, the results in the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism suggest the need for future studies using a larger sample size.

  7. A comprehensive strategy to discover inhibitors of the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase κ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinrin Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Human DNA polymerase kappa (pol κ is a translesion synthesis (TLS polymerase that catalyzes TLS past various minor groove lesions including N(2-dG linked acrolein- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived adducts, as well as N(2-dG DNA-DNA interstrand cross-links introduced by the chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C. It also processes ultraviolet light-induced DNA lesions. Since pol κ TLS activity can reduce the cellular toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and since gliomas overexpress pol κ, small molecule library screens targeting pol κ were conducted to initiate the first step in the development of new adjunct cancer therapeutics. A high-throughput, fluorescence-based DNA strand displacement assay was utilized to screen ∼16,000 bioactive compounds, and the 60 top hits were validated by primer extension assays using non-damaged DNAs. Candesartan cilexetil, manoalide, and MK-886 were selected as proof-of-principle compounds and further characterized for their specificity toward pol κ by primer extension assays using DNAs containing a site-specific acrolein-derived, ring-opened reduced form of γ-HOPdG. Furthermore, candesartan cilexetil could enhance ultraviolet light-induced cytotoxicity in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, suggesting its inhibitory effect against intracellular pol κ. In summary, this investigation represents the first high-throughput screening designed to identify inhibitors of pol κ, with the characterization of biochemical and biologically relevant endpoints as a consequence of pol κ inhibition. These approaches lay the foundation for the future discovery of compounds that can be applied to combination chemotherapy.

  8. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  9. MUS81 is associated with cell proliferation and cisplatin sensitivity in serous ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Suhong; Zheng, Hui [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wen, Xuemei [Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiajun; Wang, Yanchun; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Lu, Renquan, E-mail: lurenquan@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    The dysfunction of DNA damage repair (DDR) pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and drug-resistance in cancer. MUS81 is a member of the conserved xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) family protein of endonucleases, which is important to the DDR pathway. However, the role of MUS81 in the development of ovarian cancer remains uncertain. To explore the expression of MUS81 and its association to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 43 biopsies of SOC patients were detected by qRT-PCR, and 29 specimens were further performed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Here, we observed that MUS81 was over-expressed in SOC tissues at both transcript and protein levels, and the expression level of MUS81 protein in ovarian cancer cell lines was also higher than that in human normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line (HOSEpiC). We also found that down-regulation of MUS81 expression in ovarian cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation ability, and influenced cell cycle progression. Moreover, inhibition of MUS81 expression induced cellular senescence and enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin. Down-regulation of MUS81 expression could suppress the growth and development of SOC. These results indicate that MUS81 might play important roles in the progression of SOC and influence the antitumor effect of cisplatin. - Highlights: • MUS81 was overexpression in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). • Meanwhile down-regulation of inhibited cell proliferation and influenced cell cycle progression. • Inhibition of MUS81 induced cell cellular senescence and enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin. • Down-regulation of MUS81 expression could suppress the growth and development of SOC.

  10. UV-induced mutations in epidermal cells of mice defective in DNA polymerase η and/or ι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Rie; Yokoi, Masayuki; Ohkumo, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Yasutaka; Dotsu, Kantaro; Kura, Shinobu; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) is a human rare inherited recessive disease, predisposed to sunlight-induced skin cancer, which is caused by deficiency in DNA polymerase η (Polη). Polη catalyzes accurate translesion synthesis (TLS) past pyrimidine dimers, the most prominent UV-induced lesions. DNA polymerase ι (Polι) is a paralog of Polη that has been suggested to participate in TLS past UV-induced lesions, but its function in vivo remains uncertain. We have previously reported that Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice showed increased susceptibility to UV-induced carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated UV-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in the epidermal cells of Polη- and/or Polι-deficient mice. While Polη-deficient mice showed significantly higher UV-induced mutation frequencies than wild-type mice, Polι deficiency did not influence the frequencies in the presence of Polη. Interestingly, the frequencies in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were statistically lower than those in Polη-deficient mice, although they were still higher than those of wild-type mice. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the UV-induced mutations in Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites. An increase in UV-induced mutations at both G:C and A:T pairs associated with Polη deficiency suggests that Polη contributes to accurate TLS past both thymine- and cytosine-containing dimers in vivo. A significant decrease in G:C to A:T transition in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice when compared with Polη-deficient mice suggests that Polι is involved in error-prone TLS past cytosine-containing dimers when Polη is inactivated.

  11. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  12. Determination of the relationship between basal cell carcinoma and human papilloma virus, based on immunohistochemistry staining method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtari M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common skin cancer among Caucasians, and in most cases, occurs in the sun-exposed areas. In recent years, in addition to many other etiologies such as exposure to UV radiation, and occasionally xeroderma pigmentosa, burns, tattoos, and pox scars, human papillomavirus (HPV is also considered to have an etiologic role. Different studies were conducted with varied results in this regard. Aims: We evaluate this plausible relationship between HPV and BCC by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC staining method. Methods: This is an analytic cross-sectional study in which 160 samples were selected randomly consisting of 80 BCC lesions and 80 safe margins. Sampling was done among paraffin-embedded blocks in pathology ward of Kashani and Alzahra hospitals, Isfahan-Iran, from 2004-2007. A section of each block was IHC stained for HPV immunoreactivity (DAKO, Denmark. This was followed by microscopic evaluation in terms of being positive or negative. Results: Fifty seven point five percent of the samples belonged to men and the others to women. In 10%, HPV marker was positive, both in lesion and margin. In 83.8% neither the lesions nor the margins were immunoreactive for HPV. Only in 5 cases (6.3% the lesion was positive and the margin was negative for this marker. There was no case of immunoreactivity for HPV marker in margins, while it was negative in lesions. Our study results followed by McNemar analysis did not show a significant relationship between BCC incidence and HPV existence. This was consistent in both genders ( P > 0.05, power > 90%. Conclusion: In this study we did not find a significant relationship between BCC and HPV, but based on review of articles it appears that large multicentric studies are to be conducted in this regard.

  13. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards an

  14. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  15. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation ...... often mentioned post-human condition....

  16. Human microbiomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendhran, J.; P. Gunasekaran

    2010-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has driven the study of human biology in a significant way and enabled the genome-wide study to elucidate the molecular basis of complex human diseases. Recently, the role of microbiota on human physiology and health has received much attention. The influence of gut microbiome (the collective genomes of the gut microbiota) in obesity has been demonstrated, which may pave the way for new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies such as bacteriotherapy. The sig...

  17. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  18. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  19. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    the humanities for decades, starting with research fields such as humanities computing or computational linguistics in the 1950s, and later new media studies and internet studies. The historical development of digital humanities has been characterized by a focus on three successive, but co-existing types......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  20. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  1. Human Rights and Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Possenti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be two different versions of human rights in Western tradition: say Rationalistic and Christian; the former adopted in revolutionary France, the latter highly developed in Renaissance Spain. Current relativistic criticisms attempt to deny the universality of human rights alleging that this theory has been created in Western countries or it has no strong justification, and therefore cannot have universal approach; but this objection can be dismissed with an alternative justification of human rights.

  2. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  3. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  4. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  5. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    , and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become...

  6. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  7. Teaching humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  8. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  9. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary societies, the humanities are under constant pressure and have to justify their existence. In the ongoing debates, Humboldt’s ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’ are often used to justify the unique function of the humanities of ensuring free research and contributing to a vital...... philosophy. Contrary to Humboldt’s idea that the non-practical is the most practical in the long run, philosophical pragmatism recommends to the humanities to situate knowledge in practices and apply knowledge to practices....

  10. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  11. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . The first section of this chapter outlines the complete cause-effect pathway, from emissions of toxic substances to intake by the population up to damages in terms of human health effects. Section 2 outlines the framework for assessing human toxicity in LCIA. Section 3 discusses the contributing substances......This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... – demonstrates the importance to account for both outdoor and indoor exposure, including consumer products. Analysing the variations in intake fraction (the fraction of the emitted or applied chemical that is taken in by the consumer and the general population), effect factor and characterisation factor across...

  12. Human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.; Kasparek, L.; Novicky, O.; Querner, E.P.; Fendeková, M.; Kupczyk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human activities can cause drought, which was not previously reported (man-induced hydrological drought). Groundwater abstractions for domestic and industrial use are a well-known example of such an environmental change

  13. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  14. Human expunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  15. Human babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Gołąb, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes described so far, only some were diagnosed in infected humans, mostly B. microti, B. divergens and B. venatorum (Babesia sp. EU1). Infection in humans is often asymptomatic or mild but is of a particular risk for asplenic individuals, those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiencies, and elderly. Infections transmitted with blood and blood products raise concerns in hemotherapy. Epidemiological situation of babesiosis varies around the world. In Europe, no increase in the number of cases was reported, but in the USA its prevalence is increasing and extension of endemic areas is observed. The aim of this publication is to describe the problems connected with the current epidemiological situation, diagnosis and treatment of human babesiosis with regard to clinical status of patients.

  16. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP. If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER. The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP proteins (XPA to XPG and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2. In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity.

  17. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  18. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab Shafek Atta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner’s, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A.

  19. Genetic illnesses of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordania Velázquez Avila

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At present, many genetic diseases, from 85 to 90 %, are considered rare diseases, since they affect a small number of individuals. The poor knowledge about them makes it difficult to diagnose them; they are chronic, incapacitating, with few therapeutic options diseases and often makes the patients’ adequate social integration impossible. The genodermatosis are part of the group of rare, uncommon and difficult to diagnose skin diseases; they are a frequent cause of stigmatization of those people who suffer from them. They may include: ichthyosis, epidermolysis bullosa, mastocytosis, neurofibromatosis, ectodermal dysplasia, palmoplantar keratoderma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, pityriasis rubra pylaris, xeroderma pigmentosum, epiloia, Darier's disease, and vascular tumors, among others. It is necessary to increase knowledge about them in the field of medical sciences, allowing a better treatment for patients and improve their quality of life, as well as contribute to their prevention.

  20. Automated Image Processing for the Analysis of DNA Repair Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Riess, Thorsten; Tomas, Martin; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Merhof, Dorit

    2011-01-01

    The efficient repair of cellular DNA is essential for the maintenance and inheritance of genomic information. In order to cope with the high frequency of spontaneous and induced DNA damage, a multitude of repair mechanisms have evolved. These are enabled by a wide range of protein factors specifically recognizing different types of lesions and finally restoring the normal DNA sequence. This work focuses on the repair factor XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C), which identifies bulky DNA lesions and initiates their removal via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The binding of XPC to damaged DNA can be visualized in living cells by following the accumulation of a fluorescent XPC fusion at lesions induced by laser microirradiation in a fluorescence microscope. In this work, an automated image processing pipeline is presented which allows to identify and quantify the accumulation reaction without any user interaction. The image processing pipeline comprises a preprocessing stage where the ima...

  1. The Children of the Night need your help

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The “Children of the Night” is a colloquial name given to children suffering from Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a genetic disorder that causes extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. When affected individuals are exposed to the sun, their skin undergoes alterations that can quickly develop into cancer. Special equipment has been developed to protect them from UV exposure but it is uncomfortable and very expensive. The association THE Port has a project to help the children afflicted by the disorder and their families and is looking for experts who can contribute.   Visiting the Synchrocyclotron. Their homes are kept in darkness and they leave them only at nighttime. During the day they can’t go anywhere without a special suit that protects their skin and eyes from the sun’s rays. Mutant genes in their DNA impair their bodies’ capacity to repair and accurately replicate DNA damaged by UV light. This deficiency causes cancers to develo...

  2. Photoprotection by topical DNA repair enzymes: molecular correlates of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarosh, D B; O'Connor, A; Alas, L; Potten, C; Wolf, P

    1999-02-01

    A new approach to photoprotection is to repair DNA damage after UV exposure. This can be accomplished by delivery of a DNA repair enzyme with specificity to UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers into skin by means of specially engineered liposomes. Treatment of DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients or skin cancer patients with T4N5 liposome lotion containing such DNA repair liposomes increases the removal of DNA damage in the first few hours after treatment. In these studies, a DNA repair effect was observed in some patients treated with heat-inactivated enzyme. Unexpectedly, it was discovered that the heat-inactivated T4 endonuclease V enzyme refolds and recovers enzymatic activity. These studies demonstrate that measurements of molecular changes induced by biological drugs are useful adjuvants to clinical studies.

  3. Photomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Rosenthal, I.

    1987-01-01

    Volume I of this book contains: Basics of Photochemistry; Molecular and Cellular Photobiology; Acute Cutaneous Effects of Light; The Homology of UV-Mediated Cutaneous Carcinogenic and Aging Processes; Effects of Sunlight on the Eye; Photoimmunology; Photosensitivity to Drugs; and Porphyrias. Volume II contains: The Idiopathic Photodermatoses; Xeroderma Pigmentosum; Beta-Carotene Therapy for Erythropoietic Protoporphyria and Other Photosensitivity Diseases; Photochemotherapy of Psoriasis Using the Furocoumrains; Photochemotherapy of Various Skin Disorders; Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer; and Photoimmunotherapy. Volume III of this book contains: The Phthalocyanines: Sensitizers with Potential for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer; Lasers in Surgery and Medicine; Lasers in Opthalmology; The Carbon Dioxide Laser in Orthopedic Surgery. Diagnostic Uses of Light; Sources and Measurements of Optical Radiation for Medical Applications; and Safety Measures in Optical Radiation Treatment.

  4. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  5. Human energy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the midst of big-oil record profits and growing debate on global warming, the Chevron Corporation launched its “Human Energy” public relations campaign. In television commercials and print advertisements, Chevron portrays itself as a compassionate entity striving to solve the planet’s energy crisis. Yet, the first term in this corporate oxymoron misleadingly reframes the significance of the second, suggesting that the corporation has a renewed focus. In depicting Chevron as a green/human o...

  6. Human Echolocation

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Santani

    2013-01-01

    The use of active natural echolocation as a mobility aid for blind humans has received increased scientific and popular attention in recent years (Engber, 2006; Kreiser, 2006; NPR, 2011), in part due to a focus on several blind individuals who have developed remarkable expertise. However, perhaps surprisingly, the history of empirical human echolocation research is not much younger than the era of echolocation research (cf. Griffin, 1958). Nevertheless, compared to its bat and cetacean count...

  7. Human ehrlichiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Milomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized disease. It is a tick-borne disease caused by several bacterial species of the genhus Erlichia. These are small gram-negative pleomorphic cocci, that are obligatory intracellular bacteria. Tick Ixodes is the principle vector in Europe, and Amblyomma americanum in the United States. Bacterial organisms replicate in a tick, and are transmited from infected cells in a vector to the blood cells of animals or humans. Human ehrlichiosis is a name for a group of diseases caused by different species of Ehrlichia. One of them is the disease named human monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and the other is a human granulocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilia. Case report. We reported a 23-year-old patient admitted for the clinical treatment with the symptoms of high febrility (above 40 °C, headache, vomiting, general weakness and exhaustion, but without data on a tick bite. The patient was treated with trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole for a week when Ehrlichia chaffeensis was confirmed by the immunofluoroscence test, and the therapy contimed with doxacyclin. Conclusion. Human ehrlichiosis is also present in our country, so this disease should be considered everyday, especially in infectology practice.

  8. Chemopreventive effects of diverse dietary phytochemicals against DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis via the induction of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective antioxidant, detoxification, and DNA repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, K; Thiyagarajan, P; Rathna Nandhini, J; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, S

    2013-08-01

    Identifying agents that activate nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), a key regulator of various cytoprotective antioxidant, and detoxifying enzymes has evolved as a promising strategy for cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of dietary supplementation of structurally diverse phytochemicals- astaxanthin, blueberry, chlorophyllin, ellagic acid, and theaphenon-E on Nrf2 signaling, and xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model. We observed that these phytochemicals induce nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 while downregulating its negative regulator, Keap-1. This was associated with reduced expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, the cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the activation of DMBA, and the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine coupled with upregulation of the phase II detoxification enzymes glutathione S-transferases and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, these dietary phytochemicals also enhanced the DNA repair enzymes 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD), xeroderma pigmentosum G (XPG), and x-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1). Our data provide substantial evidence that the dietary phytochemicals inhibit the development of HBP carcinomas through the activation of Nrf2/Keap-1 signaling and by upregulating cytoprotective enzymes. The extent of the chemopreventive effects of the phytochemicals was in the order: chlorophyllin > blueberry > ellagic acid > astaxanthin > theaphenon-E. Thus these dietary phytochemicals that function as potent activators of Nrf2 and its orchestrated response are novel candidates for cancer chemoprevention.

  9. [Human influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2006-10-01

    Human influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, contributing to approximately one million deaths every year. In Germany, each year between 5.000 and 20.000 individuals die from severe influenza infections. In several countries, the morbidity and mortality of influenza is greatly underestimated. This is reflected by general low immunization rates. The emergence of avian influenza against the background of the scenario of a human influenza pandemic has revived public interest in the disease. According to the World Health Organisation, it is only the question on the beginning of a new influenza pandemic. The virus type of the new pandemic is still uncertain and it is also unclear, if a pandemic spread of the virus may be prevented by consistent controlling of avian influenza.

  10. [Humanized childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2005-06-01

    Childbirth is a major event in a family. The expectant parent's perception of the childbirth experience influences his or her development as a parent. Making childbirth a positive and satisfying experience for women is the responsibility of health care providers. Women want to have physical and emotional privacy during labor and delivery, and to experience both in a friendly, comfortable environment. For women expected to undergo normal deliveries, humanized childbirth is one accessible approach. This article explores the definition and evolution of humanized childbirth and the care practice that it involves. It also explores birth plans and birth experiences, and the improvements necessary to routine labor practices to enable women to participate in decision making about their childbirth experiences. The author emphasizes that when health-care providers recognize the value of humanized childbirth and make changes accordingly, the dignity of women's childbirth experiences will be enhanced.

  11. Beyond Humanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer to the leading question of this paper, namely: ‘what does it mean to go beyond humanisms?’ The conclusion exposes briefly an ethics of hospitality and care from an angeletic perspective.

  12. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  13. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  14. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  15. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  16. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  17. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  18. Ultraviolet damage, DNA repair and vitamin D in nonmelanoma skin cancer and in malignant melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg; Rass, Knuth

    2014-01-01

    Skin exposure with UV radiation (UV) is the main cause of skin cancer development. Epidemiological data indicate that excessive or cumulative UV exposure takes place years and decades before the resulting malignancies arise. The most important defense mechanisms that protect human skin against UV radiation involve melanin synthesis and active repair mechanisms. DNA is the major target of direct or indirect UV-induced cellular damage. Low pigmentation capacity in white Caucasians and rare congenital defects in DNA repair are mainly responsible for protection failures. The important function of nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) to protect against skin cancer becomes obvious by the rare genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum, in which diverse NER genes are mutated. In animal models, it has been demonstrated that UVB is more effective to induce skin cancer than UVA. UV-induced DNA photoproducts are able to cause specific mutations (UV-signature) in susceptible genes for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In SCC development, UV-signature mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most common event, as precancerous lesions reveal -80% and SCCs > 90% UV-specific p53 mutations. Mutations in Hedgehog pathway related genes, especially PTCH1, are well known to represent the most significant pathogenic event in BCC. However, specific UV-induced mutations can be found only in -50% of sporadic BCCs. Thus, cumulative UVB radiation cannot be considered to represent the only etiologic risk factor for BCC development. During the last decades, experimental animal models, including genetically engineered mice, the Xiphophorus hybrid fish, the South American oppossum and human skin xenografts, have further elucidated the important role of the DNA repair system in the multi-step process of UV-induced melanomagenesis. An increasing body of evidence now indicates that nucleotide excision repair is not the only DNA repair pathway that is involved in UV

  19. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  20. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  1. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  2. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  3. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  4. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  5. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  6. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  7. Cockayne Syndrome in Adults: Review With Clinical and Pathologic Study of a New Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Isabelle; Weidenheim, Karen; Lindenbaum, Yelena; Rosenbaum, Pearl; Merchant, Saumil N.; Krishna, Sindu; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2009-01-01

    premature aging, but why patients with mutations in xeroderma pigmentosum genes present with the Cockayne syndrome phenotype is still not known. PMID:17092472

  8. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  9. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    steroid concentrations cause alterations in endometrial development, affecting oocyte viability in assisted reproductive technology. Furthermore, it has been proposed that elevated progesterone levels have a negative effect on the reproductive outcome of COS. This may arise from an asynchrony between...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  10. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  11. On key lesions and all that: a tribute to Paul Lohman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijg, Jan

    2002-02-20

    This paper is a tribute to Paul Lohman at the occasion of his retirement from the position of Professor in the Medical Faculty at the Leiden University in The Netherlands and as Director of its Department of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis. Paul's contributions to the science of genetic toxicology are discussed in the context of more recent insights as to how mammalian cells process DNA damage, and how this may lead to cancer and, possibly, aging. Starting with his work on the characterization of UV-induced DNA repair in cultured cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients and the development of methodology for monitoring the removal of UV-induced lesions in human cells, the concept of the key lesion is introduced. Among the myriad of DNA lesions that can be induced in DNA as a consequence of exposure to a range of natural or synthetic mutagens, key lesions are the ones responsible for subsequent adverse effects, for example, because they give rise to mutation. The development of methods using immunofluorescence microscopy to detect and identify such key lesions and quantitate them at the single cell level, is one of the highlights of Paul's career. Based on the perceived need to evaluate mutational end points in vivo in relation to specific lesions identified by his immunofluorescence methods, Paul subsequently made crucial contributions to the development of the first transgenic mouse model to measure mutations in chromosomally integrated reporter genes. In parallel to his experimental work, Paul greatly contributed to genetic toxicology at the theoretical level by his work on the development and evaluation of methods for assessment or prediction of risks of exposure to environmental mutagens. Finally, Paul has served the discipline of genetic toxicology in a more administrative role in various ways, both locally as one of the founders of the Medical Genetics Center South-West Netherlands and internationally by playing a prominent role in organizations

  12. Effect of XPA expression on the chemotherapy sensitivity of A549/DDP cells%着色性干皮病A基因表达对A549/DDP化疗敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 吴金香; 魏玉平; 郝俊青; 黄山英; 董亮

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨沉默着色性干皮病A(XPA)基因表达在非小细胞肺癌耐药细胞株顺铂化疗敏感性的影响.方法:采用免疫组化法、实时定量PCR(qPCR)及Western blot方法检测非小细胞肺癌患者肿瘤组织中XPA的表达情况.应用qPCR及Western blot方法检测A549/DDP细胞经XPA-shRNA转染后XPA-mRNA及其蛋白表达.通过MTT法检测沉默XPA基因后A549/DDP细胞凋亡情况及其对顺铂的敏感性.结果:肺癌组织XPA表达水平明显高于癌旁组织;沉默XPA基因能够促进A549/DDP细胞凋亡,并能提高A549/DDP对顺铂的药物敏感性.结论:沉默XPA基因表达能够逆转肺癌A549/DDP细胞对顺铂的耐药性.%AIM; To investigate the influence on platinum-based chemotherapy sensitivity by silencing xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) drug resistance cell lines (A549/ DDP). METHODS; We detected the expression of XPA in lung normal and tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting. We silenced XPA expression in A549/DDP cells by XPA-shRNA transfection, and detected the expression of XPA by qPCR and Western blotting. The cell sensitivity to cisplatin and the apoptosis of A549/DDP cells transfected with XPA-shRNA were determined by MTT assay. RESULTS: The expression of XPA was higher in NSCLC tissues than that in normal lung tissues. Silencing XPA gene increased the apoptosis and sensitivity of A549/DDP cells to cisplatin. CONCLUSION: Silencing XPA gene can partly reverse the cisplatin resistance in human cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cell line A549/DDP.

  13. Mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 nuclease contributes to reduced DNA repair in XP-F patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwaar Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is caused by defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway. NER removes helix-distorting DNA lesions, such as UV-induced photodimers, from the genome. Patients suffering from XP exhibit exquisite sun sensitivity, high incidence of skin cancer, and in some cases neurodegeneration. The severity of XP varies tremendously depending upon which NER gene is mutated and how severely the mutation affects DNA repair capacity. XPF-ERCC1 is a structure-specific endonuclease essential for incising the damaged strand of DNA in NER. Missense mutations in XPF can result not only in XP, but also XPF-ERCC1 (XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging. In an attempt to determine how mutations in XPF can lead to such diverse symptoms, the effects of a progeria-causing mutation (XPF(R153P were compared to an XP-causing mutation (XPF(R799W in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant XPF harboring either mutation was purified in a complex with ERCC1 and tested for its ability to incise a stem-loop structure in vitro. Both mutant complexes nicked the substrate indicating that neither mutation obviates catalytic activity of the nuclease. Surprisingly, differential immunostaining and fractionation of cells from an XFE progeroid patient revealed that XPF-ERCC1 is abundant in the cytoplasm. This was confirmed by fluorescent detection of XPF(R153P-YFP expressed in Xpf mutant cells. In addition, microinjection of XPF(R153P-ERCC1 into the nucleus of XPF-deficient human cells restored nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Intriguingly, in all XPF mutant cell lines examined, XPF-ERCC1 was detected in the cytoplasm of a fraction of cells. This demonstrates that at least part of the DNA repair defect and symptoms associated with mutations in XPF are due to mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 into the cytoplasm of cells, likely due to protein misfolding. Analysis of these patient cells therefore reveals a novel mechanism to potentially

  14. Impact of age-associated cyclopurine lesions on DNA repair helicases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Khan

    Full Text Available 8,5' cyclopurine deoxynucleosides (cPu are locally distorting DNA base lesions corrected by nucleotide excision repair (NER and proposed to play a role in neurodegeneration prevalent in genetically defined Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP patients. In the current study, purified recombinant helicases from different classifications based on sequence homology were examined for their ability to unwind partial duplex DNA substrates harboring a single site-specific cPu adduct. Superfamily (SF 2 RecQ helicases (RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RecQ were inhibited by cPu in the helicase translocating strand, whereas helicases from SF1 (UvrD and SF4 (DnaB tolerated cPu in either strand. SF2 Fe-S helicases (FANCJ, DDX11 (ChlR1, DinG, XPD displayed marked differences in their ability to unwind the cPu DNA substrates. Archaeal Thermoplasma acidophilum XPD (taXPD, homologue to the human XPD helicase involved in NER DNA damage verification, was impeded by cPu in the non-translocating strand, while FANCJ was uniquely inhibited by the cPu in the translocating strand. Sequestration experiments demonstrated that FANCJ became trapped by the translocating strand cPu whereas RECQ1 was not, suggesting the two SF2 helicases interact with the cPu lesion by distinct mechanisms despite strand-specific inhibition for both. Using a protein trap to simulate single-turnover conditions, the rate of FANCJ or RECQ1 helicase activity was reduced 10-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, by cPu in the translocating strand. In contrast, single-turnover rates of DNA unwinding by DDX11 and UvrD helicases were only modestly affected by the cPu lesion in the translocating strand. The marked difference in effect of the translocating strand cPu on rate of DNA unwinding between DDX11 and FANCJ helicase suggests the two Fe-S cluster helicases unwind damaged DNA by distinct mechanisms. The apparent complexity of helicase encounters with an unusual form of oxidative damage is likely to have important consequences in

  15. Human Toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Selek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human toxocariasis is an parasitic infection caused by the ingestion of larvae of dog nematode Toxocara canis and less frequently of cat nematode T.cati. Toxocara eggs, shed to environment by infected dogs' and cats' droppings, become infective by embryonation. Humans, particularly children, can be infected by accidentally ingesting embryonated Toxocara eggs. Larvae hatch in the small intestine, penetrate the intestinal wall and migrate to other parts of body via the bloodstream. It is generally a benign, asymptomatic, and self-limiting disease, although migrating larvae can cause damage to tissues and organs, especially brain involvement can cause severe morbidity. The two main clinical presentations of toxocariasis are visceral larva migrans (VLM (a systemic disease caused by larval migration through major organs and ocular larva migrans (OLM (a disease limited to the eyes and optic nerves. There are also two less-severe syndromes which have recently been described, one mainly in children (covert toxocariasis and the other mainly in adults (common toxocariasis. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical signs/symptoms, epidemiological background of the patient and the use of immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot. On the other hand definitive diagnosis is much more challenging, since it requires the demonstration of larvae via biopsy or autopsy. Most cases of toxocariasis clear up without any treatment. VLM is primarily treated with antihelmintic drugs, such as; albendazole or mebendazole. Treatment of OLM is more difficult and usually consists of measures to prevent progressive damage to the eye like steroids. Laser photocoagulation and cryoretinopexy may also be used to treat severe cases. Since eradicating T.canis infection is difficult due to the complexity of its life cycle, prevention of toxocariasis is always preferred. Toxocara eggs have a strong protective layer which makes the eggs able to survive in the environment for months or

  16. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  17. [Human papillomaviruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  18. Human Development Report 1991: Financing Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    United Nations Development Programme, UNDP

    1991-01-01

    Lack of political commitment rather than financial resources is often the real barrier to human development. This is the main conclusion of Human Development Report 1991 - the second in a series of annual reports on the subject.

  19. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  20. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  1. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  2. Scalability of human models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodarius, C.; Rooij, L. van; Lange, R. de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to create a scalable human occupant model that allows adaptation of human models with respect to size, weight and several mechanical parameters. Therefore, for the first time two scalable facet human models were developed in MADYMO. First, a scalable human male was

  3. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  4. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  5. From Human Past to Human Future

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic an...

  6. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  7. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLETON, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  8. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth.

  9. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  10. Human assisted robotic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  11. Human Use Index (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  12. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  13. Human Use Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  14. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  15. Human Services Offices

    Data.gov (United States)

    Fairfax County, Virginia — This data contains point features representing the human services offices within Fairfax County.“HS_Region” is the office for each human services region, “DFS_Area”...

  16. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  17. The Growing Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  18. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  19. Monogenic human obesity syndromes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    .... This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  20. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    The article puts forward an aesthetic and psychoanalytic analysis of Titian's painting, The Flaying of Marsyas, arguing that the painting is a reflection on the human subject as a being constituted by skin and by a core of non-humanity. The analysis is partly an answer to Melanie Hart's (2007......) article 'Visualizing the mind: Looking at Titian's Flaying of Marsyas', addressing features of the painting not commented on by Hart, and supplementing Hart's (Kleinian) theoretical frame by involving Didier Anzieu's 'skin ego', Slavoj Zizek's concept of the 'non-human', Giorgio Agamben's term...

  1. Human productivity program definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  2. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  3. Human nature and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations.

  4. Human Document Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.; Abelmann, L.; Manz, A.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    “The Human Document Project” is a project which tries to answer all of the questions related to preserving information about the human race for tens of generations of humans to come or maybe even for a future intelligence which can emerge in the coming thousands of years. This document mainly focuss

  5. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  6. Has human evolution stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2010-07-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  7. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...

  8. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  9. Monogenic human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  10. From Human Past to Human Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic and neural detriments and pathologies. Uniformitarian reasoning based on ontogenic homology suggests that the cognitive abilities of hominins are consistently underrated in the unstable orthodoxies of Pleistocene archaeology. A scientifically guided review establishes developmental trajectories defining recent changes in the human genome and its expressions, which then form the basis of attempts to extrapolate from them into the future. It is suggested that continuing and perhaps accelerating unfavorable genetic changes to the human species, rather than existential threats such as massive disasters, pandemics, or astrophysical events, may become the ultimate peril of humanity.

  11. Humanity at the Edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.; Gjødsbøl, Iben M.; Dam, Mie S.

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of anthropology and the social sciences lies a notion of human existence according to which humans and animals share the basic need for food, but only humans have the capacity for morality. Based on fieldwork in a pig laboratory, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a dementia ...... human and animal value and agency with approaches that focus on human experience and virtue ethics, we argue that ‘the human’ at stake in the moral laboratory of feeding precarious lives puts ‘the human’ in anthropology at disposal for moral experimentation....

  12. Jordan Adjusted Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Human Development Index (HDI) and Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) In 1990, the United Nations Development Programme designed a Human Development Index composed of life expectancy at birth, level of education and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. In 2011, the UNDP ranked Jordan 95th out of 187 countries with a human development index of 0.698, up from 0.591 in 1990, making it the leading medium-range country for human development (fig. VIII.1). In 2010, the inequality adj...

  13. Human Beings And Water

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The writer of this paper on this writing is talking about the human beings and water. Water is one of the very fundamentally things that human beings need to keep their lives. Human beings sometimes do not realise that the water is very important for them because they actually cannot live their lives without the present of water. Human beings can keep their lives without rice, but cannot without water. For instances the use of water for human beings are domestic use, cooking, washing, bathing...

  14. Human rights and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  15. Human Milk Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  16. Human Capital and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of sustainability needs to consider the role of all forms of capital—natural, biological, social, technological, financial, cultural—and the complex ways in which they interact. All forms of capital derive their value, utility and application from human mental awareness, creativity and social innovation. This makes human capital, including social capital, the central determinant of resource productivity and sustainability. Humanity has entered the Anthropocene Epoch in which human changes have become the predominant factor in evolution. Humanity is itself evolving from animal physicality to social vitality to mental individuality. This transition has profound bearing on human productive capabilities, adaptability, creativity and values, the organization of economy, public policy, social awareness and life styles that determine sustainability. This article examines the linkages between population, economic development, employment, education, health, social equity, cultural values, energy intensity and sustainability in the context of evolving human consciousness. It concludes that development of human capital is the critical determinant of long-term sustainability and that efforts to accelerate the evolution of human consciousness and emergence of mentally self-conscious individuals will be the most effective approach for ensuring a sustainable future. Education is the primary lever. Human choice matters.

  17. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  18. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  19. Chimeras and human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  20. Human Performance in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  1. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  2. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research......Todays expanding digital landscape constitutes an important research object as well as the research environment for the Humanities at the beginning of the 21st century. Taking this state of affairs as a starting point this inaugural lecture presents a vision for how the digital affects...

  3. Advancing Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2012-2015) was initiated after the successful conclusion of the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-2010).The Chinese government in late July published an assessment report on the implementation of the plan,elaborating on the full implementation of China's first-ever national program on human rights development,which was drafted in April 2009.

  4. Human hemoglobin genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  5. Modern Human Capital Management

    OpenAIRE

    Feldberger, Madita

    2008-01-01

    Title: Modern Human Capital Management Seminar date: 30th of May 2008 Course: Master thesis in Business Administration, 15 ECTS Authors: Madita Feldberger Supervisor: Lars Svensson Keywords: Human capital, SWOT Analysis, Strategic Map, Balanced Scorecard Research Problem: Despite of the success of Human Capital Management (HCM) in research it did not arrive yet in the HR departments of many companies. Numerous firms even have problems to set their strategic goals with focus on HR. The HR Bala...

  6. Potential risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma due to nucleotide excision repair XPA and XPC gene variants and their interaction among themselves and with environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Rumaisa; Bhat, Gulzar Ahmad; Lone, Mohd Maqbool; Masood, Akbar; Dar, Nazir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    The association of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene polymorphisms with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is inconclusive. The aim of the current study was to assess the association of repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) (rs-1800975) and xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) (rs-2228000) polymorphisms with ESCC risk as well as modifying effects of environmental factors. The genotyping was done in 450 confirmed ESCC cases and equal number of individually matched controls by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing methods. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the genotypic associations and interactions. A high ESCC risk was found in subjects who carried the homozygous minor allele of XPA (odds ratio (OR) = 3.57; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.76-7.23), and the risk was higher when analysis was limited to participants who were ever smokers (OR = 4.22; 95 % CI = 2.01-8.88), lived in adobe houses (OR = 8.42; 95 % CI = 3.74-18.95), consumed large volumes of salt tea (OR = 7.42; 95 % CI = 3.30-16.69), or had a positive family history of cancer (FHC) (OR = 9.47; 95 % CI = 4.67-19.20). In case of XPC, a homozygous minor allele also showed strong association with ESCC risk (OR = 4.43; 95 % CI = 2.41-8.16). We again observed a very strong effect of the above environmental factors in elevating the risk of ESCC. Further, the variant genotypes of both genes in combination showed an increased risk towards ESCC (OR = 7.01; 95 % CI = 3.14-15.64) and such association was synergistically significant. Salt tea consumption showed an interaction with genotypes of XPA and XPC. However, an interaction with FHC was significant in the case of XPA genotype only. XPA and XPC genotypes are associated with an increased risk of ESCC, and such association was reasonably modulated by different exposures.

  7. Robotics for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  8. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  9. Human Performance Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Biochemistry:Improvements in energy metabolism, muscular strength and endurance capacity have a basis in biochemical and molecular adaptations within the human body....

  10. Extraterritorial Human Rights Obligations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amsinck Boie, Hans Nikolaj; Torp, Kristian

    adequately be addressed without including the approach to the problem taken in practice; Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. The book therefore draws upon the concept of CSR and the approaches developed here and discusses whether states may utilize the CSR-based concept of human rights due diligence...... to fulfil their possible obligations to protect against human rights violations by corporations.......The book addresses the issue of corporate respect for human rights by examining if and how states are obligated to ensure that corporations originating from their jurisdiction respect human rights when they operate abroad. The existence of such a duty is much debated by academics at national...

  11. The psychology of humanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  12. The Human Toolmaker

    OpenAIRE

    Kassuba, Tanja; Kastner, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Do you enjoy building airplanes, cars, houses, or robots with Lego blocks? Humans are the only animal species that can create complicated constructions from simple Lego blocks – our Lego building ability is “human-specific,” since it is only found in human beings. What would our closest relatives, apes or monkeys, do with a box of Lego blocks? They would probably chew on them, and lose interest when they find out that they are not edible! Why are humans the only Lego builders in the animal ki...

  13. Photography after the Human

    OpenAIRE

    Zylinska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    How can we visualise and subsequently reimagine the abstraction that is the extinction of human species while there is still time? The article addresses this question by considering the existence of images – and, in particular, light-induced mechanical images known as photographs – after the human. The “after the human” designation does not just refer to the material disappearance of the human in some kind of distant future, but also to the present imagining of the disappearance of the human ...

  14. Refractoriness in human atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Jespersen, Thomas; Christ, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    drugs. Cardiomyocyte excitability depends on availability of sodium channels, which involves both time- and voltage-dependent recovery from inactivation. This study therefore aims to characterise how sodium channel inactivation affects refractoriness in human atria. METHODS AND RESULTS: Steady......-state activation and inactivation parameters of sodium channels measured in vitro in isolated human atrial cardiomyocytes were used to parameterise a mathematical human atrial cell model. Action potential data were acquired from human atrial trabeculae of patients in either sinus rhythm or chronic atrial...... in pharmacological management of chronic atrial fibrillation....

  15. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research...

  16. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  17. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century

  18. Introduction to human factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  19. Human Capital and Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Alders

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the relation between human capital and retirement when the age of retirement is endogenous. This relation is examined in a life-cycle earnings model. An employee works full time until retirement. The worker accumulates human capital by training- on-the-job and by

  20. Cohabitation: Humans & Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodington, W.

    2012-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Cohabitation of humans and agriculture can be used to improve building climate, human health and the state of the world. It affects building design and requires new building components. This manual explains w

  1. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  2. Human Resource Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An interview is reported which discussed the implications for the hiring, recruiting, screening and development of employees in the light of human resource accounting, here defined as the identification, accumulation and dissemination of information about human resources in dollar terms. (SA)

  3. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.…

  4. The Human Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    with fundamental human values like intuition, vision and sensing; all the qualities the technology, the industrialisation and rationalisation, or in short modernity, has been criticized for having taken away from human existence. What technology has taken away now comes back through new technology as an aid...

  5. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  6. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  7. Human Rights Guaranteed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Report says China’s human rights plan successfully implemented According to a detailed assessment report published by China’s State Council Information Office (SCIO),all the measures outlined in the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-10) had been successfully put into place by the end of 2010.

  8. Defects in Human Nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄靓

    2008-01-01

    By tracing the defects of society back to the defects of human nature, humanity's essence is proved to be inherent evil. Man's natural tendency to do evil remain harnessed through the controls and conventions imposed by civilization, however, when rules or civilization are weakened, man' s dark side is unleashed.

  9. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  10. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues its first white paper on human resources The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September 10, highlighting the country’s policies to cope with employment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents.

  11. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a Colo

  12. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  13. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    Passive humans (sitting or standing) might well be present on flooring-systems, footbridges or other structures that carry humans. An active croud of people might generate structural vibrations, and these might be problematic. The passive crowd of people, however, will interact with the structural...

  14. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  15. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  16. Human Resource Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Centering on strategic objective of reform and development,CIAE formulated its objectives in human resource construction for the 13th Five-year Plan period,and achieved new apparent progress in human resource construction in 2015.1 Implementation of"LONGMA Project"

  17. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  18. Human Rights Improving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues a white paper on its human rights,highlighting freedom of speech on the Interne The Chinese Government released a white paper on its human rights in 2009 on September 26,highlighting the role of Internet freedom and the country’s efforts in safeguarding citizens’legitimate civil and political rights.

  19. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century lib

  20. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... a shared interdisciplinary research and educational collaboration. As a creative research initiative it focuses on change and innovative thinking. The innovativeness is a result of the strongly interdisciplinary perspective which is at the heart of Designing Human Technologies. Designing Human Technologies...

  1. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...... der mellem Human Relations (Hawthorne-eksperimenter ne) og Neo-Human Relations (behovsteorierne), men i denne fremstilling bruges Human Relations som en samlebetegnelse for begge disse – noget forskellige – forskningstraditioner. De har i dag opnået stor udbredelse og er praktisk talt obligatorisk...

  2. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vigeant

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely mode of transmission in this case.

  3. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    OpenAIRE

    Patrice Vigeant; Jack Mendelson; Miller, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely ...

  4. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  5. Human Power Empirically Explored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-18

    Harvesting energy from the users' muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are convenient and can be environmentally and economically beneficial. This work provides insight into the knowledge required to design human-powered energy systems in consumer products from a scientific perspective. It shows the developments of human-powered products from the first introduction of the BayGen Freeplay radio in 1995 till current products and provides an overview and analysis of 211 human-powered products currently on the market. Although human power is generally perceived as beneficial for the environment, this thesis shows that achieving environmental benefit is only feasible when the environmental impact of additional materials in the energy conversion system is well balanced with the energy demands of the products functionality. User testing with existing products showed a preference for speeds in the range of 70 to 190 rpm for crank lengths from 32 to 95 mm. The muscular input power varied from 5 to 21 W. The analysis of twenty graduation projects from the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering in the field of human-powered products, offers an interesting set of additional practice based design recommendations. The knowledge based approach of human power is very powerful to support the design of human-powered products. There is substantial potential for improvements in the domains energy conversion, ergonomics and environment. This makes that human power, when applied properly, is environmentally and economically competitive over a wider range of applications than thought previously.

  6. Human pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  7. Enhancing human capacities

    CERN Document Server

    Savulescu, Julian; Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing Human Capacities is the first to review the very latest scientific developments in human enhancement. It is unique in its examination of the ethical and policy implications of these technologies from a broad range of perspectives. Presents a rich range of perspectives on enhancement from world leading ethicists and scientists from Europe and North America The most comprehensive volume yet on the science and ethics of human enhancement Unique in providing a detailed overview of current and expected scientific advances in this area Discusses both general conceptual and ethical issues

  8. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  10. Human dignity and bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By opening the field of bioethics followed a new wave of intense debate on the theological, philosophical and legal significance of the concept of human dignity . Exactly ten years ago (December 2003 American bioethicist Ruth Maclin has proposed to divest ourselves of the concept of human dignity because it is vague, useless and redundant and that, without any loss, we can replace it by the ethical principle of personal autonomy. Her article was followed by harsh reactions and opposite views. What is this term in so broad, almost inflationary and opposite use is not a reason to deprive him, but, on the contrary, it shows how important it is and that it should be determined at least outline. As universal values and general concept, the human dignity has no pre-defined and narrow, precise meaning. It is more an evaluation horizon, the guiding principle and regulatory ideas that must constantly define and codify by many guaranted human rights and fundamental freedoms. As generic notion of each reasonable law, it is their foundation and a common denominator, legitimising basis of natural but also of positive law. As intrinsic and static value which means the humaneness, the humanity it is absolute, inherent to every human being without distinction and conditioning, as a unique and unrepeatable creation. In this meaning, the dignity is the obligation and limitation of the state, society and each of us. As an ethical and dynamic category, it is not given to us, but it is assign to us, and it is not in us, but always before us, as a guide of our actions in accordance with virtues, to treat ourselves, each other and the nature in a human way. The century in which we live is named the century of molecular biology and genetic engineering because of the enormous potential but also risks to human dignity. Because of that human dignity has become a central principle in all international documents relating to the human genome, genetics and bioethics, adopted

  11. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  12. Human Capital Tracking Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — AVS is now required to collect, track, and report on data from the following Flight, Business and Workforce Plan. The Human Resource Management’s Performance Target...

  13. Human Research Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strategically, the HRP conducts research and technology development that: 1) enables the development or modification of Agency-level human health and performance...

  14. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to the Centers ... and how to prevent it. How to Prevent HPV: There are 3 types of HPV vaccine: Cervarix , ...

  15. Human Reliability Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  16. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  17. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  18. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  19. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  20. Human Resource Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  1. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  2. CHINESE OF HUMANITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Humanism Education in Language Class,Innovative model university English teaching,Analysis on Information Literacy of College English Teachers Based On Net Environment,Cultural Differences between E-C Idioms and Teaching of English Idioms

  3. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  4. Will Technology Humanize Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    The author considers the question of whether technology will cause humanization or dehumanization in the schools. He concludes that we can not stop tecchnology; we can only give it direction and purpose. (Author/MS)

  5. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September I0, highlighting the coun-try's policies to cope with employ-ment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents."

  6. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence ... stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also known as research or therapeutic cloning), ...

  7. Science and Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Science and humanism are separated so completely as to bring about the creation of two cultures quite distinct from each other within contemporary civilization. Pragmatic, rational attitudes are needed on both sides to bring them together. (DF)

  8. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  9. [Demography and human ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology

  10. Human Resources Accounting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 21 st century will be the epoch of knowled ge economy. Knowledge economy is to develop economy on the basis of knowledge will surely become the major resources of economy development. Therefore, human resources accounting which provides such information as the ebb and follow of hu man resources investment, the size of the human resources employment, will bec ome the main stream of accounting the time of knowledge economy. To face China 's reality, to develop economy, and to flourish enterprise...

  11. Human motricity and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sérgio Vieira e Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available If human motricity science intends to study motor conduct (or actions in which the human being pursues transcendence (or surmounting, it inevitably relates to the large realm of health. What are the aspects it evinces? Transdisciplinarity, solidarity among the various knowledge types (including poetical, complexity, (where the physical is integrated but surmounted and the firm belief that to be healthy is to have in ourselves, alive and working, the capacity for surmounting anything.

  12. Human Happiness Is Sensuous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕静

    2003-01-01

    All human happiness is biological happiness. That is strictly scientific. At the risk of being misunderstood. I must make it clearer: all human happiness is sensuous happiness. The spiritualists will misunderstand me. I am sure; the spiritualists and materialists must forever misunderstand each other, because they don’t talk the same language, or mean by the same word different things. Are we, too, in this problem

  13. Evolution and human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  14. Meeting human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  15. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  16. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  17. A WORLD BEYOND HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Abram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial project to investigate the relationship between magic and traditional medicine as practiced by shamans in Southern rural Asia, the focus of attention gradually shifted to an awareness of the negotiation traditional medicine people or shamans exert between the human community and the larger community of beings. This attentiveness to a more-than-human world does not occur at a supernatural domain above nature or inside her personal self but is the result of the shaman’s special ability to project her consciousness horizontally to other forms of sensibility with which human existence is interwoven. The ecological function of the shaman is to maintain a constant balance between what is taken and what is given from the human community to the larger community. The spirits of indigenous cultures are not defined in opposition to materiality but are essentially those modes of intelligence or awareness that do not possess a human form. By exploring different landscapes, and the sensibility living in them, a new sensitivity is awoken that allows for communication with those intelligences. However, the drowning of these other voices in Western culture, which reduces otherness to an object, creates an uneasiness that is hardly perceived except as an inability to interact with anything more-than-human and its dire consequences in the form of “civilization’s” destructive behavior.

  18. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  19. Human Milk Fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  20. Human Factors Review Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  1. Philosophical foundations of human rights

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    What makes something a human right? What is the relationship between the moral foundations of human rights and human rights law? What are the difficulties of appealing to human rights? This book offers the first comprehensive survey of current thinking on the philosophical foundations of human rights. Divided into four parts, this book focusses firstly on the moral grounds of human rights, for example in our dignity, agency, interests or needs. 'Secondly, it looks at the implications that different moral perspectives on human rights bear for human rights law and politics. Thirdly, it discusses specific and topical human rights including freedom of expression and religion, security, health and more controversial rights such as a human right to subsistence. The final part discusses nuanced critical and reformative views on human rights from feminist, Kantian and relativist perspectives among others. The essays represent new and canonical research by leading scholars in the field. Each part is comprised of a set...

  2. Why Geo-Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  3. [Human ehrlichiosis. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraga-Alvarado, C

    1994-12-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized tick-borne disease. Since 1935 Ehrlichia canis has been known as a cause of illness in dogs and other canine species, and for a few years it was related with human disease. In 1990, Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated from a man suspected of having ehrlichiosis. Partial sequencing of the rRNAS from the human isolate and E. canis, indicated that they are 98.7% related. More recently (May 1994) an "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis" have been reported in USA. PCR amplification and sequence of 16S rDNA, showed that the human isolate was virtually identical to those reported for E. phagocytophila y E. equi, organisms that cause ehrlichiosis in rumiant and in horses. Most patients shows fever, headache, malaise, nausea or vomiting, anorexia and in a minority of cases rash is present. Some of them have complications such as pulmonary infiltrates, gastrointestinal problems, renal dysfunction or failure, hepatoesplenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, DIC and some times death. Leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzyme values have been common findings. Tetracycline and cloramphenicol have been using in adults and children as especific theraphy.

  4. The human serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Psychogios

    Full Text Available Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca.

  5. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  6. NOOSPHERE HUMAN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novozhilova Elena Olegovna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author dwells upon typical features of noosphere human communities, assessing prospects and hazards of genetic engineering, namely of recombinant DNA technology. Background: Socio-historical ecology ushers in a new approach to studying society in its relation to nature. This interrelation is regarded as a series of socio-ecological transformations ending up in certain types of socio-ecological systems being formed. One of such historical types is represented by a noosphere human community [1]. Results: A number of characteristic features of this kind of community have been outlined, namely: its existence and functioning on global scale, major role of information in making up social wealth, creation of living matter. Conclusion: The noosphere human community is currently the latest stage in the sequence of historical types of socio-ecological systems. Widespread use of information and genetic technology may enable noosphere people to create in future a totally man-made world superseding evolutionary biosphere.

  7. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    , men også arbejdssociologien, arbejdspsykologien og human resource development. Den første retning udsprang af de såkaldte Hawthorne-eksperimenter og psykologen Elton Mayos bearbejdelse af resultaterne derfra. Den anden er en løsere gruppering bestående af navne som Abraham Maslow og Frederick Herzberg......Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...

  8. [Human pulmonary trichomonoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboucher, Christophe; Caby, Stéphanie; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Pierce, Raymond; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2007-05-01

    Colonization of human lungs by various Trichomonas species is a frequent occurrence, but is unknown to most physicians. At this site of infection, the parasite develops into an amoeboid form that renders it unrecognizable. For this reason it has been overlooked until recently. Morphological identification is not feasible under these conditions and molecular tools provide the only means of identification. The species involved are not restricted to Trichomonas tenax, a saprophyte of the mouth that is usually cited in the rare cases of pleuropulmonary trichomoniasis reported in the literature. The recent discovery of species previously unknown in humans raises further questions, including the zoonotic potential of these microorganisms and the existence of species of animal origin that have adapted to humans. Anaerobiosis in poorly ventilated alveolar lumen, rather than immunodepression, seems to be the factor that promotes proliferation of this parasite. The diagnosis of trichomoniasis and its treatment by specific drugs will make it possible to evaluate the pathogenicity of these parasites.

  9. Scientists and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  10. Helicopter human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  11. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  12. Reflections on humanizing biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2008-01-01

    Although biomedicine is responsible for the "miracles" of modern medicine, paradoxically it has also led to a quality-of-care crisis in which many patients feel disenfranchised from the health-care industry. To address this crisis, several medical commentators make an appeal for humanizing biomedicine, which has led to shifts in the philosophical boundaries of medical knowledge and practice. In this paper, the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical boundaries of biomedicine and its humanized versions are investigated and compared to one another. Biomedicine is founded on a metaphysical position of mechanistic monism, an epistemology of objective knowing, and an ethic of emotionally detached concern. In humanizing modern medicine, these boundaries are often shifted to a metaphysical position of dualism/holism, an epistemology of subject knowing, and an ethic of empathic care. In a concluding section, the question is discussed whether these shifts in the philosophical boundaries are adequate to resolve the quality-of-care crisis.

  13. HUMAN MISSION OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Miovska Spaseva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the complex role and great responsibility of the education today in development of the moral strength and human values of the children and youth. At the beginning of the article the author reconsiders the pedagogical ideas of Maria Montessori and her concept of education for peace as an instrument for reconstruction of the society and for improvement of the human living. Than the analysis of the moral values in the contemporary society is made and several issues and dilemmas are discussed referring the value disorientation of the youth and the importance of the models of adult’s moral behavior in their search for personal identity. On the basis of this analysis, the human dimension of the education is elaborated enhancing the need for its understanding as support of development, which is based on several crucial elements: love, freedom and spirit of community.

  14. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...... challenging in organizations involved in change processes such as Continuous Improvement (CI), as the technical skills traditionally valued are no longer adequate. These companies are faced with the question: “What competencies should our employees possess in order to contribute to our success, given...... the change processes in which we are engaged?” Without a clear picture of the types of competencies required to implement CI, it is impossible for companies to make informed decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, and training of their workforce. The objective of this paper is therefore to define...

  15. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... and technologies relating to performances and experiences, urban design, climate adaptation, etc. The research takes a process-oriented and participatory approach and involves interaction between different user interests and designs. It is based on empirical, typical case- and action research-oriented studies...

  16. Abortion and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus.

  17. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  18. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  19. [Human rights and procreation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  20. Monogenic obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Until relatively recently, the small number of identifiable inherited human diseases associated with marked obesity were complex, pleiotropic developmental disorders, the molecular basis for which were entirely obscure. The molecular basis for many of these complex syndromes, such as Bardet Beidl syndrome, has been revealed, providing novel insights into processes essential for human hypothalamic function and energy balance. In addition to these discoveries, which were the fruits of positional cloning, the molecular constituents of the signaling pathways responsible for the control of mammalian energy homeostasis have been identified, largely through the study of natural or artificial mutations in mice. We discuss the increasing number of human disorders that result from genetic disruption of the leptin-melanocortin pathways that have been identified. Practical implications of these findings for genetic counseling, prognostication, and even therapy have already emerged.

  1. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  2. Social cognition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Frith, Uta

    2007-01-01

    We review a diversity of studies of human social interaction and highlight the importance of social signals. We also discuss recent findings from social cognitive neuroscience that explore the brain basis of the capacity for processing social signals. These signals enable us to learn about...... the world from others, to learn about other people, and to create a shared social world. Social signals can be processed automatically by the receiver and may be unconsciously emitted by the sender. These signals are non-verbal and are responsible for social learning in the first year of life. Social...... signals can also be processed consciously and this allows automatic processing to be modulated and overruled. Evidence for this higher-level social processing is abundant from about 18 months of age in humans, while evidence is sparse for non-human animals. We suggest that deliberate social signalling...

  3. Human Security Agendas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan Hunter

    2012-01-01

    Ⅰ.IntroductionThe need for governments and international organisations to gain a better understanding of "security" is ever more urgent.For example in the conflict in Libya in early 2011,many security dilemmas were visible:the protection of Libyan civilians,the security of the regime,whether and how the UN or NATO should intervene,whether Europe would be threatened with a massive refugee flow,how to protect or evacuate foreign citizens (including Chinese),how to secure food and medical supplies in the midst of armed conflict.Such events may be termed "complex emergencies" which often raise legal, military and humanitarian issues simultaneously.International law and practice do not provide clear guidelines on such situations,and responses can be random,contingent on a variety of factors.Traditional concepts of security,for example protection of national borders,are certainly still relevant and legally enforceable,but more sophisticated concepts are needed to respond to security dilemmas in today's globalised world.Human security as a concept was first developed within the UN system in the 1990s,and set out,for example,in Human Security Now [1] The first section of this paper tracks the development of Human Security discourse,and also examines the broadening of the "security"concept in recent years.The second section reports on institutions with a specific interest in Human Security,for example within the UN system and in universities.The third section acknowledges some critiques of the Human Security paradigm.The last section reports on new directions that may enrich the Human Security agenda.

  4. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    The need for experimental models is obvious. In animal models it is possible to study vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, c-fos expression etc. However, the pathophysiology of migraine remains unsolved, why results from animal studies not directly can be related to the migraine attack......, which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...

  5. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  6. On human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spijk, Piet

    2015-05-01

    If it is true that health is a priority objective of medicine, then medical practice can only be successful if the meaning of the term "health" is known. Various attempts have been made over the years to define health. This paper proposes a new definition. In addition to current health concepts, it also takes into account the distinction between specifically human (great) health and health as the absence of disease and illness-i.e. small health. The feeling of leading a life that makes sense plays a key role in determining specifically human great health.

  7. Handbook of human computation

    CERN Document Server

    Michelucci, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses the emerging area of human computation, The chapters, written by leading international researchers, explore existing and future opportunities to combine the respective strengths of both humans and machines in order to create powerful problem-solving capabilities. The book bridges scientific communities, capturing and integrating the unique perspective and achievements of each. It coalesces contributions from industry and across related disciplines in order to motivate, define, and anticipate the future of this exciting new frontier in science and cultural evolution. Reade

  8. When computers were human

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, David Alan

    2013-01-01

    Before Palm Pilots and iPods, PCs and laptops, the term ""computer"" referred to the people who did scientific calculations by hand. These workers were neither calculating geniuses nor idiot savants but knowledgeable people who, in other circumstances, might have become scientists in their own right. When Computers Were Human represents the first in-depth account of this little-known, 200-year epoch in the history of science and technology. Beginning with the story of his own grandmother, who was trained as a human computer, David Alan Grier provides a poignant introduction to the wider wo

  9. We Are Human Beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  10. Biodemography of human ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W

    2010-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems...... to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival...... - and healthy survival - to even greater ages....

  11. Understanding digital humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, D

    2012-01-01

    The application of new computational techniques and visualisation technologies in the Arts and Humanities are resulting in fresh approaches and methodologies for the study of new and traditional corpora. This 'computational turn' takes the methods and techniques from computer science to create innovative means of close and distant reading. This book discusses the implications and applications of 'Digital Humanities' and the questions raised when using algorithmic techniques. Key researchers in the field provide a comprehensive introduction to important debates surrounding issues such as th

  12. Artificial human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  13. Post-human Viewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2013-01-01

    to become part of a global cultural flow, thus calling into question the physical connection between viewer and image. This article analyses what happens to that connection when not only the image but also the physical body is mediated and challenged in post-human relations, and examines the ensuing ethical...... implications. The author takes photojournalism and, in particular, mobile phone footage as a starting point for an exploration of the (post-human) body as evidence and sign of authenticity in the modern age of digital communications and journalism....

  14. Ayahuasca and human destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2005-06-01

    In this essay, the author shares his personal reflections gleaned from a lifetime of research with ayahuasca, and speculates on the societal, political, planetary, and evolutionary implications of humanity's aeons-old symbiosis with this shamanic plant. The thesis is developed that at this critical historical juncture, ayahuasca has developed a strategy to broadcast its message to a wider world--a reflection of the urgent need to avert global ecological catastrophe. While ayahuasca has much to teach us, the critical question is, will humanity hear it, and heed it, in time?

  15. Human Factors Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  16. Pragmatic Challenges to Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2007-01-01

    Pragmatism offers a platform for posing relevant questions. This article uses a pragmatic point of departure to question a natural law conception of human rights and to take a closer look at three pressing human rights problems: The human rights situation in states with little or no state capacity......; the revision and adaptation of human rights law; and the not straightforward relationship betweemn human rights and democracy....

  17. Human automation integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, M.; Cosenzo, K.; Galster, s.; Hollnagel, E.; Miller, C.; Parasuraman, R.; Reising, J.; Taylor, R.; Breda, L. van

    2007-01-01

    Many versions of future concept of operations (CONOPS) rely heavily on UMVs. The pressure to take the human out of immediate control of these vehicles is being driven by several factors. These factors include a reduction in cost for the production and maintenance of the vehicle, operational viabilit

  18. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then ...

  19. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID framework, and a sample of 54 HWID related papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009–2014. We group the papers into six topical group...

  20. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  1. Predictors of human rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  2. Humanizing science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, James F.

    2004-09-01

    This paper argues that the diverse curriculum reform agendas associated with science education are strongly and critically associated with the educational characteristics of the humanities. The article begins with a survey of interpretations of the distinctive contribution which the humanities make to educational purposes. From this survey four general characteristics of the humanities are identified: an appeal to an autonomous self with the right and capacity to make independent judgements and interpretations; indeterminacy in the subject matter of these judgements and interpretations; a focus on meaning, in the context of human responses, actions, and relationships, and especially on the ethical, aesthetic, and purposive; and finally, the possibility of commonality in standards of judgement and interpretation, under conditions of indeterminacy. Inquiry and science technology and society (STS) orientated curriculum development agendas within science education are explored in the light of this analysis. It is argued that the four characteristics identified are central to the educational purposes of these and other less prominent modes of curriculum development in science, though not unproblematically so. In the light of this discussion the prognosis and challenges for science curriculum development are explored.

  3. Learning to Be Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  4. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  5. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  6. Parasites and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  7. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  8. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  9. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360

  10. Visible Human Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library of Medicine thanks the men and the women who will their body to science, thereby enabling medical research and development. Further Information General Information A description of The Visible Human Project ® image data and how to obtain it (includes license ...

  11. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  12. Computational human body models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Computational human body models are widely used for automotive crashsafety research and design and as such have significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic injuries and fatalities. Currently crash simulations are mainly performed using models based on crash-dummies. However crash dummies dif

  13. Human Power Empirically Explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Harvesting energy from the users’ muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are conven

  14. Narratology beyond the Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay uses Lauren Groff’s 2011 short story “Above and Below” to explore aspects of a narratology beyond the human, considering how ideas developed by scholars of narrative bear on questions about the nature and scope of human-animal relationships in the larger biosphere. Bringing Groff’s text into dialogue with the concept of “self-narratives” as developed by Kenneth J. Gergen and Mary M. Gergen, anthropological research on the ontologies projected by the members of different cultures, and ideas from literary narratology, I discuss how the structure and narration of Groff’s story reveal a fault line between two competing ontologies in the culture of modernity, one parsimonious and the other prolific when it comes to allocating possibilities for selfhood across species lines. More generally, in addition to illuminating how a given self-narrative locates the human agent in a transspecies constellation of selves, a narratology beyond the human can assist with the construction of new, more sustainable individual and collective self-narratives that situate the self within wider webs of creatural life.

  15. Communicating Humanism Nonverbally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillison, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the importance of nonverbal communication by counselors in expressing humanistic feeling. Notes that facial expression (i.e., smiling) provides immediate feedback to the observer; use of space (i.e., close proximity) communicates warmth and humaneness; and tone of voice can complement spoken words and give them more meaning. (WAS)

  16. Cultivating human nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology claims to offer a unified perspective on human nature and culture, which can serve to further the integration of psychology and the social sciences. I describe four approaches to evolutionary psychology, and note increasing attention to the agency of the individual in constru

  17. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  18. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  19. Lessons in Human Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Joanne Lozar

    2003-01-01

    Explores the importance of relationship literacy--the ability to create good relationships with others--in the next economy and offers perspectives on how business education instructors can help students develop and improve their human relations skills for business success. (Author/JOW)

  20. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of

  1. Human health and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The high quality of most groundwaters, consequent upon the self-purification capacity of subsurface strata, has long been a key factor in human health and wellbeing. More than 50% of the world’s population now rely on groundwater for their supply of drinking water – and in most circumstances a prope...

  2. Humanizing the Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Norman K., Ed.; Saylor, J. Galen, Ed.

    These papers, presented during ASCD-sponsored conference, confront educators with issues in and alternatives for making secondary schools a more humanizing experience for students. The contributors and their articles are: Norman K. Hamilton, "Alternatives in Secondary Education"; Thornton B. Monez and Norman L. Bussiere, "The High School in Human…

  3. Humanism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  4. Assessment of human exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebret, E. [RIVM-National Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    This article describes some of the features of the assessment of human exposure to environmental pollutants in epidemiological studies. Since exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiology studies typically involve professionals from various backgrounds, interpretation of a concepts like `exposure` may vary. A brief descriptions is therefore given by way of introduction

  5. Hauntings of Human Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The central conflicts of Stephen King’s horror novel The Shining are rooted in human nature and reflect evolutionarily recurrent adaptive problems—the problem of balancing conflicting evolved motives, such as motives for selfish status striving versus motives for affiliative nurturing behavior...

  6. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  7. Computational human body models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Computational human body models are widely used for automotive crashsafety research and design and as such have significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic injuries and fatalities. Currently crash simulations are mainly performed using models based on crash-dummies. However crash dummies

  8. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  9. Designers of Human Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  10. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  11. Haptocorrin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Anne Louise; Nexo, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2007-01-01

    knowledge concerning its function and its distribution in adult and foetal life is limited. In this study, we present data on the tissue expression of haptocorrin and on the relation between analogues on haptocorrin and vitamin B(12) status in humans. Methods: Polyclonal antibodies towards haptocorrin were...

  12. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  13. Humanism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  14. Animal and Human Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks…

  15. Conceptualizations of Human Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Rudolf H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents six major methods by which characteristics of environments have been related to indexes of human functioning: (1) ecological dimensions; (2) behavior settings; (3) dimensions of organizational structure; and, (4) dimensions identifying the collective personal and/or behavioral characteristics of the milieu inhabitants; and two others.…

  16. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  17. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  18. Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selenium is an essential element for human health and it is toxic at high concentrations. Selenium is a constituent component of selenoproteins that have enzymatic and structural roles in human biochemistry. Selenium is a best antioxidant and catalyst for production of thyroid hormone. This element has the key role in the immune function; prevention of AIDS progression and the deactivity of toxins. Furthermore, selenium is essential for sperm motility and can reduce abortions. Selenium deficiency was also associated with adverse mood states. The findings regarding cardiovascular disease risk related to selenium deficiency is unclear, though other conditions such as vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and selenium deficiency can cause this disease too. Moreover, consuming of 60 mg of selenium per day may be associated with reduction of cancer risk. In this study, a review of studies has been performed on the biochemical function of selenium toxicity, and its effects on human health. Furthermore, certain identified cancers associated with selenium have been discussed to absorb more attention to the status of this element and also as a guide for further studies. Selenium plays the dual character (useful and harmful in human health, and then it is necessary to determine the concentration of this element in body fluids and tissues. An appropriate method for routine measurement of selenium in clinical laboratories is electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS with very low detection limit and good precision.

  19. Towards International Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Julian

    1971-01-01

    The basic task before the educational profession today is to study and understand the evolutionary-humanist revolution, to follow up its educational implications; and to enable as many as possible of the world's growing minds to be illuminated by its new vision of human destiny. (Author/JB)

  20. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  1. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of hu

  2. Disability and Human Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff McNair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview of models of disability growing out of the field of disability studies and leading to a call for interventions going beyond a simply medical model approach. A brief discussion of human supports/services is provided such that readers engaged in the development of services/supports can base them on best principles.

  3. Human herpesviruses and MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in MS pathogenesis; the human herpesviruses (HHV) are likely candidates for such factors. HHV share a number of properties: they are almost ubiquitous, they are highly prevalent worldwide, they all cause latent infections...

  4. Children Are Human Beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, James H. S.

    2017-01-01

    The basic assumption underlying this article is that the really significant changes in human history are those that occur, not in the mechanical gadgets which men use nor in the institutionalized arrangements by which they live, but in their attitudes and in the values which they accept. The revolutions of the past that have had the greatest…

  5. Ubiquitous Human Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zittrain, Jonathan L.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a thumb tack and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This short essay explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring.

  6. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  7. Human-Centered Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, O.; Kosara, R.; Urquiza, J.; Wassink, I.; Kerren, A.; Ebert, A.; Meyer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Humans have remarkable perceptual capabilities. These capabilities are heavily underestimated in current visualizations. Often, this is due to the lack of an in-depth user study to set the requirements for optimal visualizations. The designer does not understand what kind of information should be vi

  8. Human Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  9. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-04-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP.

  10. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  11. A tour in sign language

    CERN Multimedia

    François Briard

    2016-01-01

    In early May, CERN welcomed a group of deaf children for a tour of Microcosm and a Fun with Physics demonstration.   On 4 May, around ten children from the Centre pour enfants sourds de Montbrillant (Montbrillant Centre for Deaf Children), a public school funded by the Office médico-pédagogique du canton de Genève, took a guided tour of the Microcosm exhibition and were treated to a Fun with Physics demonstration. The tour guides’ explanations were interpreted into sign language in real time by a professional interpreter who accompanied the children, and the pace and content were adapted to maximise the interaction with the children. This visit demonstrates CERN’s commitment to remaining as widely accessible as possible. To this end, most of CERN’s visit sites offer reduced-mobility access. In the past few months, CERN has also welcomed children suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum (a genetic disorder causing extreme sensiti...

  12. Rare Malignancies in Eastern India, Socio-Economic Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Surendranath; Samanta, Diptirani; Mishra, Saumyaranjan; Bose, Chaitali

    2016-06-28

    The etiology of cancer is multifactorial. Various factors, including physical carcinogens, chemicals and viral carcinogens affect patients with known predisposing factors who subsequently develop malignancies. Here is a retrospective study of 18 patients who developed rare malignancies in clinical situations like xeroderma pigmentosum, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, hereditary multiple exostosis, second malignancies due to radiotherapy and chronic irritation. The predisposing factors like chronic infection in leprosy, filariasis, poverty and ignorance leading to the chronicity of the lesion, lack of available health care facilities and socio-cultural background, i.e. consanguinity marriage in some community are responsible for the development of these rare malignancies. They were treated at A.H Regional Cancer Centre, Cuttack, Odisha, which is located at Eastern part of India for various malignancies, between January 1989 and January 2008. Malignancies that developed in patients with the above predisposing factors are being reported here due to their rarity and to highlight the impact of socio cultural background in developing these malignancies. Patients with above clinical situations should be kept under close observation for early detection of malignancy so their chances of survival can be improved. In addition, those oncogenic stimuli that initiated or propagated the malignancies, due to socio-economic factors, should be addressed promptly to prevent their eventual development.

  13. Rare malignancies in Eastern India, socio-economic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Senapati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of cancer is multifactorial. Various factors, including physical carcinogens, chemicals and viral carcinogens affect patients with known predisposing factors who subsequently develop malignancies. Here is a retrospective study of 18 patients who developed rare malignancies in clinical situations like xeroderma pigmentosum, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, hereditary multiple exostosis, second malignancies due to radiotherapy and chronic irritation. The predisposing factors like chronic infection in leprosy, filariasis, poverty and ignorance leading to the chronicity of the lesion, lack of available health care facilities and socio-cultural background, i.e. consanguinity marriage in some community are responsible for the development of these rare malignancies. They were treated at A.H Regional Cancer Centre, Cuttack, Odisha, which is located at Eastern part of India for various malignancies, between January 1989 and January 2008. Malignancies that developed in patients with the above predisposing factors are being reported here due to their rarity and to highlight the impact of socio cultural background in developing these malignancies. Patients with above clinical situations should be kept under close observation for early detection of malignancy so their chances of survival can be improved. In addition, those oncogenic stimuli that initiated or propagated the malignancies, due to socio-economic factors, should be addressed promptly to prevent their eventual development.

  14. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

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    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  15. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

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    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  16. Attenuated XPC expression is not associated with impaired DNA repair in bladder cancer.

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    Kishan A T Naipal

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has a high incidence with significant morbidity and mortality. Attenuated expression of the DNA damage response protein Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC has been described in bladder cancer. XPC plays an essential role as the main initiator and damage-detector in global genome nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced lesions, bulky DNA adducts and intrastrand crosslinks, such as those made by the chemotherapeutic agent Cisplatin. Hence, XPC protein might be an informative biomarker to guide personalized therapy strategies in a subset of bladder cancer cases. Therefore, we measured the XPC protein expression level and functional NER activity of 36 bladder tumors in a standardized manner. We optimized conditions for dissociation and in vitro culture of primary bladder cancer cells and confirmed attenuated XPC expression in approximately 40% of the tumors. However, NER activity was similar to co-cultured wild type cells in all but one of 36 bladder tumors. We conclude, that (i functional NER deficiency is a relatively rare phenomenon in bladder cancer and (ii XPC protein levels are not useful as biomarker for NER activity in these tumors.

  17. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe231, Leu231 lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation. PMID:26085086

  18. A bright weekend: THE Port develops a better solution for the “Children of the Night”

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    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    THE Port Hackathon took place at CERN and Geneva’s Campus Biotech from 2 to 4 October. Among the various prototypes presented at the final event was a novel solution for the special mask that children suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum have to wear to reduce their risk of getting skin cancer. The whole initiative was triggered by an article published in one of the summer issues of the Bulletin.   Developing and testing the mask prototype at THE Port Hackathon, 2015. (Images: Andrey Loginov, Pierre Freyermuth, Antonio Bellotta/ THE Port)   “The improvements are really substantial and have made the president of the French Children of the Night Association really happy!” says Andy Butterworth from the team that worked on developing a prototype for a new mask during THE Port Hackathon. In his “normal” professional life, Andy is a radio-frequency expert working in the Beams department. During the hackathon, he worked with colleagues from CE...

  19. Functional and mechanistic studies of XPC DNA-repair complex as transcriptional coactivator in embryonic stem cells.

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    Cattoglio, Claudia; Zhang, Elisa T; Grubisic, Ivan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Fong, Yick W; Tjian, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic stem cell (ESC) state is transcriptionally controlled by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG with cofactors, chromatin regulators, noncoding RNAs, and other effectors of signaling pathways. Uncovering components of these regulatory circuits and their interplay provides the knowledge base to deploy ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. We recently identified the DNA-repair complex xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC)-RAD23B-CETN2 as a stem cell coactivator (SCC) required for OCT4/SOX2 transcriptional activation. Here we investigate the role of SCC genome-wide in murine ESCs by mapping regions bound by RAD23B and analyzing transcriptional profiles of SCC-depleted ESCs. We establish OCT4 and SOX2 as the primary transcription factors recruiting SCC to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes and identify the XPC subunit as essential for interaction with the two proteins. The present study reveals new mechanistic and functional aspects of SCC transcriptional activity, and thus underscores the diversified functions of this regulatory complex.

  20. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2016-04-07

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5' to 3' helicase with an essential iron-sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD.

  1. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J. Carlos; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5′ to 3′ helicase with an essential iron–sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD. PMID:26896802

  2. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Young Patients

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    Uğur Horoz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common type of skin cancer and has a direct relationship with chronic sun exposure. Other risk factors include fair skin and eyes, freckling, family history, genetic disorders, immunosuppression, ionizing radiation, arsenic, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. BCC usually progresses slowly. Lesions are usually seen over sun-exposed areas, which are most commonly on the face and neck. Local invasion may occur, but it rarely metastasizes. The incidence of BCC peaks in the seventh decade of life. BCC is an uncommon lesion during childhood, youth, and pregnancy. It has rarely been reported during childhood. BCC seen during childhood can be inherited with diseases such as xeroderma pigmentosum, albinism, Bazex syndrome, and basal cell nevus syndrome or after high-dose radiotherapy. In this study, we present the cases of a 14-year-old girl with BCC on the right popliteal region and a 23-year-old pregnant woman with BCC on the nasal tip. Both patients underwent total excision, and there were neither recurrence nor any complication during the follow-up

  3. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Departamento de Morfologia

    2015-10-15

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T{sub 4} endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T{sub 4} endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T{sub 4} endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. (author)

  4. Homozygous Wildtype of XPD K751Q Polymorphism Is Associated with Increased Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Malaysian Population.

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    Munn-Sann Lye

    Full Text Available The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD gene encodes a DNA helicase, an important component in transcription factor IIH (TFIIH complex. XPD helicase plays a pivotal role in unwinding DNA at the damaged region during nucleotide excision repair (NER mechanism. Dysfunctional XPD helicase protein from polymorphic diversity may contribute to increased risk of developing cancers. This study aims to determine the association between XPD K751Q polymorphism (rs13181 and risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in the Malaysian population. In this hospital-based matched case-control study, 356 controls were matched by age, gender and ethnicity to 356 cases. RFLP-PCR was used to genotype the XPD K751Q polymorphism. A significant association was observed between XPD K751Q polymorphism and the risk of NPC using conditional logistic regression. Subjects with homozygous Lys/Lys (wildtype genotype have 1.58 times higher odds of developing NPC compared to subjects with recessive combination of heterozygous Lys/Gln and homozygous Gln/Gln genotypes (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.05-2.38 p = 0.028 adjusted for cigarette smoking, alcohol and salted fish consumption. Our data suggests that Lys/Lys (wildtype of XPD K751Q contributes to increased risk of NPC in the Malaysian population.

  5. DNA-damage accumulation and replicative arrest in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Phillip R.; Zou, Yue

    2013-01-01

    A common feature of progeria syndromes is a premature aging phenotype and an enhanced accumulation of DNA damage arising from a compromised repair system. HGPS (Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome) is a severe form of progeria in which patients accumulate progerin, a mutant lamin A protein derived from a splicing variant of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). Progerin causes chromatin perturbations which result in the formation of DSBs (double-strand breaks) and abnormal DDR (DNA-damage response). In the present article, we review recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how progerin may disrupt DDR pathways in HGPS cells. We propose that progerin accumulation results in disruption of functions of some replication and repair factors, causing the mislocalization of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein to the replication forks, replication fork stalling and, subsequently, DNA DSBs. The binding of XPA to the stalled forks excludes normal binding by repair proteins, leading to DSB accumulation, which activates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) checkpoints, and arresting cell-cycle progression. PMID:22103522

  6. The structure of the TFIIH p34 subunit reveals a von Willebrand factor A like fold.

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    Dominik R Schmitt

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II dependent transcription and nucleotide excision repair are mediated by a multifaceted interplay of subunits within the general transcription factor II H (TFIIH. A better understanding of the molecular structure of TFIIH is the key to unravel the mechanism of action of this versatile protein complex within these vital cellular processes. The importance of this complex becomes further evident in the context of severe diseases like xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome and trichothiodystrophy, that arise from single point mutations in TFIIH subunits. Here we describe the structure of the p34 subunit of the TFIIH complex from the eukaryotic thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum. The structure revealed that p34 contains a von Willebrand Factor A (vWA like domain, a fold which is generally known to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Within TFIIH p34 strongly interacts with p44, a positive regulator of the helicase XPD. Putative protein-protein interfaces are analyzed and possible binding sites for the p34-p44 interaction suggested.

  7. DNA-damage accumulation and replicative arrest in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2011-12-01

    A common feature of progeria syndromes is a premature aging phenotype and an enhanced accumulation of DNA damage arising from a compromised repair system. HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) is a severe form of progeria in which patients accumulate progerin, a mutant lamin A protein derived from a splicing variant of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). Progerin causes chromatin perturbations which result in the formation of DSBs (double-strand breaks) and abnormal DDR (DNA-damage response). In the present article, we review recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how progerin may disrupt DDR pathways in HGPS cells. We propose that progerin accumulation results in disruption of functions of some replication and repair factors, causing the mislocalization of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein to the replication forks, replication fork stalling and, subsequently, DNA DSBs. The binding of XPA to the stalled forks excludes normal binding by repair proteins, leading to DSB accumulation, which activates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) checkpoints, and arresting cell-cycle progression.

  8. Dermoscopy of Pigmented Actinic Keratosis of the Face: A Study of 232 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelati, A; Baybay, H; Moscarella, E; Argenziano, G; Gallouj, S; Mernissi, F Z

    2017-07-11

    The diagnosis of pigmented actinic keratosis (PAK) is often challenging because of overlapping features with lentigo maligna. To investigate dermoscopic patterns of PAK according to their different evolutionary stages, and to correlate the pattern with clinical characteristics of the patients. Descriptive and analytical study of 232 PAK. Dermoscopic patterns were divided into two categories: the follicule surroundings' abnormalities (FSA) and follicular keratosis' abnormalities (FKA). FSA and FKA dermoscopic patterns were related to male gender, except for star-like appearance, double white clods and dermoscopic horn (p≤0.04). Rhomboidal, annular granular pattern, gray halo, white circle and double clods were dermoscopic pattern significantly related to xeroderma pigmentosum's type of skin. Based on the evolutionary stages of PAK, the jelly sign was significantly related to thin patches of PAK. Central crusts and scales were related to thick plaques and the star-like appearance to hypertrophic PAK. The presence of 2 or more dermoscopic signs in both FSA and FKA was noticed in 99.1% of lesions. The dermoscopic diagnosis of PAK vary according to the evolutionary stages of the disease, this will increase the diagnosis accuracy, with therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The DNA damage-binding protein XPC is a frequent target for inactivation in squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Feraudy, Sebastien; Ridd, Katie; Richards, Lauren M; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Revet, Ingrid; Oh, Dennis; Feeney, Luzviminda; Cleaver, James E

    2010-08-01

    XPC, the main damage-recognition protein responsible for nucleotide excision repair of UVB damage to DNA, is lost or mutated in xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C), a rare inherited disease characterized by high incidence and early onset of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. The high incidence of skin cancers in XP-C patients suggests that loss of expression of XPC protein might also provide a selective advantage for initiation and progression of similar cancers in non XP-C patients in the general population. To test whether XPC is selectively lost in squamous cell carcinomas from non XP-C patients, we examined XPC expression by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray with 244 tissue cores, including in situ and invasive squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), keratoacanthoma (KA), and normal skin samples from both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients. We found that XPC expression was lost in 49% of invasive squamous cell carcinomas from immunocompetent patients and 59% from immunosuppressed patients. Loss of expression was correlated with deletions of chromosomal 3p and mutations in the XPC gene. The XPC gene is consequently inactivated or lost in almost half of squamous cell carcinomas from non XP-C patients. Loss or mutation of XPC may be an early event during skin carcinogenesis that provides a selective advantage for initiation and progression of squamous cell carcinomas in non XP-C patients.

  10. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

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    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  11. Further Evidence of Mutational Heterogeneity of the XPC Gene in Tunisian Families: A Spectrum of Private and Ethnic Specific Mutations

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    Mariem Ben Rekaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive autosomal cancer prone disease, characterized by UV hypersensitivity and early appearance of cutaneous and ocular malignancies. We investigated four unrelated patients suspected to be XP-C. To confirm linkage to XPC gene, genotyping and direct sequencing of XPC gene were performed. Pathogenic effect of novel mutations was confirmed by reverse Transciptase PCR. Mutation screening revealed the presence of two novel mutations g.18246G>A and g.18810G>T in the XPC gene (NG_011763.1. The first is present in one patient XP50NEF, but the second is present in three unrelated patients (XP16KEB, XP28SFA, and XP45GB. These 3 patients are from three different cities of Southern Tunisia and bear the same haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. Reverse Transciptase PCR revealed the absence of the XPC mRNA. In Tunisia, as observed in an other severe genodermatosis, the mutational spectrum of XP-C group seems to be homogeneous with some clusters of heterogeneity that should be taken into account to improve molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  12. Dermoscopy for the pediatric dermatologist, part ii: dermoscopy of genetic syndromes with cutaneous manifestations and pediatric vascular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliasos, Elena C; Kerner, Miryam; Jaimes, Natalia; Zalaudek, Iris; Malvehy, Josep; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Hinter, Helmut; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Braun, Ralph P; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2013-01-01

    Genetic syndromes including basal cell nevus syndrome (BSNS), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) predispose the individual to skin cancer. Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) often develop in patients with BCNS and XP. One of the aims of surveillance examination in these patients is to detect BCC while the tumors are still small and easy to manage. Dermoscopy, by allowing the visualization of arborizing vessels, ovoid nests, nonaggregated blue-gray globules, and spoke-wheel and leaf-like structures, can facilitate in the early detection of BCC. Patients with XP are also at risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Dermoscopy can assist in the early detection of these cancers by allowing the observer to visualize focal glomerular vessels, which is a common feature seen in SCC. This feature can also assist in detecting SCC developing in other syndromes such as EV and epidermolysis bullosa (EB). In addition to helping in the detection of BCC and SCC, dermoscopy can also help detect melanoma in individuals with XP and evaluate nevi developing in those with EB. This review will discuss how dermoscopy can be used in the management of patients with BSNS, XP, EV, and EB and will discuss the dermoscopic findings of vascular lesions, including pyogenic granuloma, hemangioma, port-wine stain, and lymphangioma circumscriptum.

  13. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J.; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G.; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A.; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R.; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP. PMID:26996949

  14. Association of XPC Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer: Evidence from 3,936 Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan-Feng; Tao, Jin-Hui; Ye, Qian-Ling; Pan, Hai-Feng; Pan, Fa-Ming; Su, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Polymorphisms of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) are thought to have significant effects on prostate cancer (PCa) risk. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of XPC gene polymorphisms on PCa risk by using a meta-analysis. Methods: Data were collected from the following electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Elsevier Science Direct, Cochrane Library, and CNKI, with the last report up to April 30, 2013. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the association. Results: A total of five separate case–control studies (1966 cases and 1970 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis was performed for the rs2228001 and PAT+/−polymorphisms. We did not detect a significant association between rs2228001 polymorphism and PCa (p>0.05). Similar results were found in stratification analyses by ethnicity and tumor stage. We detected a significant association of PAT+/−polymorphism with PCa (p0.05). Conclusion: These analyses suggest that XPC gene PAT+/−polymorphism, but not rs2228001, likely contributes to susceptibility to PCa. PMID:24093803

  15. Association of XPC Gene Polymorphisms with Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Southern Chinese Population: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

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    Rui-Xi Hua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC is a key component of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway. Dysfunctional XPC protein may impair NER-mediated DNA repair capacity and further lead to genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Two common nonsynonymous polymorphisms in the XPC gene, Lys939Gln (rs2228001 A > C and Ala499Val (rs2228000 C > T, have been investigated in various types of cancer. We genotyped these two polymorphisms in 1141 cases with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer (CRC and 1173 healthy controls to explore their causative association with CRC susceptibility. Overall, no association was observed between these two variants and the risk of CRC. Our meta-analysis also confirmed a lack of overall association. Stratified analyses were performed by age, gender, smoking status, pack-year, drinking status, tumor sites, and Duke’s stages. We found that XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased CRC risk in subjects at 57 years of age or younger (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.004–1.86, p = 0.047 and non-drinkers (adjusted OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.10–2.12, p = 0.011. Our results indicated that XPC Lys939Gln may be a low-penetrance CRC susceptibility polymorphism. Our findings warrant further validation.

  16. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm-2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  17. Reflections on the brainstem dysfunction in neurologically disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the neurological basis of brainstem-related symptoms in disabled children. Synaptic interactions of respiratory and swallowing centers, which are briefly reviewed in this study, highlight the significance of the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) in the stereotyped motor events. Coordination mechanisms between these two central pattern generators are also studied with a focus on the inhibitory action of decrementing expiratory neurons that terminate the inspiratory activity and become activated during swallowing. Dorsal brainstem lesions in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) affect the area including NTS, and result in symptoms of apneusis, facial nerve paresis, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, and laryngeal stridor. Leigh syndrome patients with similar distributions of medullary lesions show increased sighs, post-sigh apnea, hiccups, and vomiting in addition to the symptoms of HIE, suggesting pathologically augmented vagal reflex pathways. The present article also discusses the pathophysiology of laryngeal dystonia in xeroderma pigmentosum group A, self-mutilation in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and sudden unexpected death in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Close observation and logical assessment of brainstem dysfunction symptoms should be encouraged in order to achieve better understanding and management of these symptoms in disabled children.

  18. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  19. Exopolysaccharides Isolated from Milk Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Prevent Ultraviolet-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morifuji, Masashi; Kitade, Masami; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Ichihashi, Masamitsu

    2017-01-13

    We studied the mechanism by which fermented milk ameliorates UV-B-induced skin damage and determined the active components in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria by evaluating erythema formation, dryness, epidermal proliferation, DNA damage and cytokine mRNA levels in hairless mice exposed to acute UV-B irradiation. Nine week-old hairless mice were given fermented milk (1.3 g/kg BW/day) or exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrate (70 mg/kg BW/day) orally for ten days. Seven days after fermented milk or EPS administration began, the dorsal skin of the mice was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm²). Ingestion of either fermented milk or EPS significantly attenuated UV-B-induced erythema formation, dryness and epidermal proliferation in mouse skin. Both fermented milk and EPS were associated with a significant decrease in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and upregulated mRNA levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA), which is involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, administration of either fermented milk or EPS significantly suppressed increases in the ratio of interleukin (IL)-10/IL-12a and IL-10/interferon-gamma mRNA levels. Together, these results indicate that EPS isolated from milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria enhanced DNA repair mechanisms and modulated skin immunity to protect skin against UV damage.

  20. Homozygous Wildtype of XPD K751Q Polymorphism Is Associated with Increased Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Malaysian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, Munn-Sann; Visuvanathan, Shaneeta; Chong, Pei-Pei; Yap, Yoke-Yeow; Lim, Chin-Chye; Ban, Eng-Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) gene encodes a DNA helicase, an important component in transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) complex. XPD helicase plays a pivotal role in unwinding DNA at the damaged region during nucleotide excision repair (NER) mechanism. Dysfunctional XPD helicase protein from polymorphic diversity may contribute to increased risk of developing cancers. This study aims to determine the association between XPD K751Q polymorphism (rs13181) and risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the Malaysian population. In this hospital-based matched case-control study, 356 controls were matched by age, gender and ethnicity to 356 cases. RFLP-PCR was used to genotype the XPD K751Q polymorphism. A significant association was observed between XPD K751Q polymorphism and the risk of NPC using conditional logistic regression. Subjects with homozygous Lys/Lys (wildtype) genotype have 1.58 times higher odds of developing NPC compared to subjects with recessive combination of heterozygous Lys/Gln and homozygous Gln/Gln genotypes (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.05-2.38 p = 0.028) adjusted for cigarette smoking, alcohol and salted fish consumption. Our data suggests that Lys/Lys (wildtype) of XPD K751Q contributes to increased risk of NPC in the Malaysian population.